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Sample records for dry biological fibrillar

  1. A design methodology for biologically inspired dry fibrillar adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksak, Burak

    Realization of the unique aspects of gecko adhesion and incorporating these aspects into a comprehensive design methodology is essential to enable fabrication of application oriented gecko-inspired dry fibrillar adhesives. To address the need for such a design methodology, we propose a fibrillar adhesion model that evaluates the effect of fiber dimensions and material on adhesive performance of fiber arrays. A fibrillar adhesion model is developed to predict the adhesive characteristics of an array of fibrillar structures, and quantify the effect of fiber length, radius, spacing, and material. Photolithography techniques were utilized to fabricate elastomer microfiber arrays. Fibers that are fabricated from stiff SU-8 photoresist are used to fabricate a flexible negative mold that facilitates fabrication of fiber arrays from various elastomers with high yield. The tips of the cylindrical fibers are modified to mushroom-like tip shapes. Adhesive strengths in excess of 100 kPa is obtained with mushroom tipped elastomer microfibers. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are utilized as enhanced friction materials by partially embedding inside soft polyurethanes. Friction coefficients up to 1 were repeatedly obtained from the resulting VACNF composite structures. A novel fabrication method is used to attach Poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) molecular brush-like structures on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These brushes are grown on unstructured PDMS and PDMS fibers with mushroom tips. Pull-off force is enhanced by up to 7 times with PBA brush grafted micro-fiber arrays over unstructured PDMS substrate. Adhesion model, initially developed for curved smooth surfaces, is extended to self-affine fractal surfaces to better reflect the adhesion performance of fiber arrays on natural surfaces. Developed adhesion model for fiber arrays is used in an optimization scheme which estimates optimal design parameters to obtain maximum adhesive strength on a given

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of the scaling of wet and dry biological fibrillar adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Peattie, A. M.; Full, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Fibrillar, or “hairy,” adhesives have evolved multiple times independently within arthropods and reptiles. These adhesives exhibit highly desirable properties for dynamic attachment, including orientation dependence, wear resistance, and self-cleaning. Our understanding of how these properties are related to their fibrillar structure is limited, although theoretical models from the literature have generated useful hypotheses. We survey the morphology of 81 species with fibrillar adhesives to test the hypothesis that packing density of contact elements should increase with body size, whereas the size of the contact elements should decrease. We test this hypothesis in a phylogenetic context to avoid treating historically related species as statistically independent data points. We find that fiber morphology is better predicted by evolutionary history and adhesive mechanism than by body size. As we attempt to identify which morphological parameters are most responsible for the performance of fibrillar adhesives, it will be important to take advantage of the natural variation in morphology and the potentially suboptimal outcomes it encompasses, rather than assuming evolution to be an inherently optimizing process. PMID:18000044

  3. Fibrillar Organic Phases And Their Roles In Rigid Biological Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Arey, Bruce W.; Park, John J.; Mayer, George

    2015-06-01

    This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites ("glass" sponge spicules), and thereby to clarify how those composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for the large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of such composites, extending to large deformations must consider such interpenetrating phases.

  4. Dry self-cleaning properties of hard and soft fibrillar structures.

    PubMed

    Gillies, Andrew G; Puthoff, Jonathan; Cohen, Michael J; Autumn, Kellar; Fearing, Ronald S

    2013-07-10

    Recently, gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives (GSAs) have been made using a variety of fabrication techniques and materials, with one made from a hard polymer having been reported to recover its shear adhesion after fouling by normal use, or "dry self-clean", a feature useful for applications in wall crawling robots, reusable adhesives, microfabrication and solar panel cleaning. This paper investigates the impact of two design parameters on the dry self-cleaning capability of GSAs by experimentally testing two GSAs after fouling with small (1 μm), medium (3-10 μm), and large (40-50 μm) particles. We found that a GSA made from a hard thermoplastic with nanoscopic fibers was able to recover 96-115% of its shear adhesion after fouling with small and large but not medium particles, while a GSA made from a soft polymer and microscopic fibers recovered 40-55% on medium and large particles, with SEM imaging revealing particles embedding within the polymer. An analysis of the contact strength between fibers, particles and substrates of various dimensions and elasticity reveals that dry self-cleaning will be more effective for GSAs fabricated with smaller fiber diameters and for GSAs fabricated from materials with smaller loss functions, such as hard thermoplastics. These results have important implications on the choice of materials and geometries used for GSAs when dry self-cleaning capability is a desired function in the material. PMID:23786527

  5. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Paris, O; Terrill, N J; Gupta, H S

    2016-01-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales. PMID:27211574

  6. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paris, O.; Terrill, N. J.; Gupta, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales.

  7. Uncovering three-dimensional gradients in fibrillar orientation in an impact-resistant biological armour

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Paris, O.; Terrill, N. J.; Gupta, H. S.

    2016-01-01

    The complex hierarchical structure in biological and synthetic fibrous nanocomposites entails considerable difficulties in the interpretation of the crystallographic texture from diffraction data. Here, we present a novel reconstruction method to obtain the 3D distribution of fibres in such systems. An analytical expression is derived for the diffraction intensity from fibres, explaining the azimuthal intensity distribution in terms of the angles of the three dimensional fibre orientation distributions. The telson of stomatopod (mantis shrimp) serves as an example of natural biological armour whose high impact resistance property is believed to arise from the hierarchical organization of alpha chitin nanofibrils into fibres and twisted plywood (Bouligand) structures at the sub-micron and micron scale. Synchrotron microfocus scanning X-ray diffraction data on stomatopod telson were used as a test case to map the 3D fibre orientation across the entire tissue section. The method is applicable to a range of biological and biomimetic structures with graded 3D fibre texture at the sub-micron and micron length scales. PMID:27211574

  8. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  9. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate. PMID:26167951

  10. Fibrillar peptide gels in biotechnology and biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Gasiorowski, Joshua Z.; Collier, Joel H.

    2012-01-01

    Peptides, peptidomimetics, and peptide derivatives that self-assemble into fibrillar gels have received increasing interest as synthetic extracellular matrices for applications in 3D cell culture and regenerative medicine. Recently, several of these fibrillizing molecules have been functionalized with bioactive components such as cell-binding ligands, degradable sequences, drug-eluting compounds, and chemical modifications for cross-linking, producing gels that can reliably display multiple factors simultaneously. This capacity for incorporating precise levels of many different biological and chemical factors is advantageous given the natural complexity of cell-matrix interactions that many current biomaterial strategies seek to mimic. In this review, recent efforts in the area of fibril-forming peptide materials are described, and advantages of biomaterials containing multiple modular elements are outlined. In addition, a few hurdles and open questions surrounding fibrillar peptide gels are discussed, including issues of the materials’ structural heterogeneity, challenges in fully characterizing the diversity of their self-assembled structures, and incomplete knowledge of how the materials are processed in vivo. PMID:20091870

  11. Probing the biology of dry biological systems to address the basis of seed longevity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drying cells reduces molecular mobility and slows chemical and physical reactions. As a result, dry biological systems deteriorate slowly. The time course of deterioration in a population of living cells often follows a sigmoidal pattern in which aging is occurring but no changes to viability are ...

  12. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  13. Biological Nitrogen Fixation In Tropical Dry Forests Of Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gei, M. G.; Powers, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Evidence suggests that tropical dry forests (TDF) are not nitrogen (N) deficient. This evidence includes: high losses of gaseous nitrogen during the rainy season, high ecosystem soil N stocks and high N concentrations in leaves and litterfall. Its been commonly hypothesized that biological nitrogen fixation is responsible for the high availability of N in tropical soils. However, the magnitude of this flux has rarely if ever been measured in tropical dry forests. Because of the high cost of fixing N and the ubiquity of N fixing legume trees in the TDF, at the individual tree level symbiotic fixation should be a strategy down-regulated by the plant. Our main goal was to determine the rates of and controls over symbiotic N fixation. We hypothesized that legume tree species employ a facultative strategy of nitrogen fixation and that this process responds to changes in light availability, soil moisture and nutrient supply. We tested this hypothesis both on naturally established trees in a forest and under controlled conditions in a shade house by estimating the quantities of N fixed annually using the 15N natural abundance method, counting nodules, and quantifying (field) or manipulating (shade house) the variation in important environmental variables (soil nutrients, soil moisture, and light). We found that in both in our shade house experiment and in the forest, nodulation varied among different legume species. For both settings, the 15N natural abundance approach successfully detected differences in nitrogen fixation among species. The legume species that we studied were able to regulate fixation depending on the environmental conditions. They showed to have different strategies of nitrogen fixation that follow a gradient of facultative to obligate fixation. Our data suggest that there exists a continuum of nitrogen fixation strategies among species. Any efforts to define tropical legume trees as a functional group need to incorporate this variation.

  14. Biologically-inspired synthetic dry adhesives for wall-climbing robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael P.

    Animals such as insects, spiders, and lizards are capable of clinging to and climbing on a variety of surfaces, from rough stone to smooth silicon. Hairy microscale arrays of structures on their feet conform to surface roughness to create millions of points of contact, creating a large overall contact area. Weak intermolecular forces (van der Waals forces) between each fiber tip and the surface sum to large overall forces due to the high number of contacts. In this work we present the fabrication, characterization, and demonstration of synthetic polyurethane fibrillar adhesives inspired by these animals. Angled polymer micro-fiber arrays are fabricated and characterized. A tip modification technique is presented which enables fabrication of fibers with flat mushroom shaped tips which greatly increase the adhesion of the fibers, up to 5N/cm 2 (normal direction), and with a magnitude within the range of geckos (10 N/cm2) in the shear direction on smooth surfaces. We present a fabrication technique to create fibers with angled flat mushroom-shaped tips which replicate the directional characteristics of geckos, gripping in one direction (within the range of gecko adhesion) and releasing easily in the other. Multilevel hierarchical structures with specialized tips for roughness adaptation are also presented. Fiber hierarchies from the millimeter scale to the sub-micron scale are demonstrated, including three-level fiber fabrication with specialized tips. Hierarchical structures demonstrate up to 5 times the adhesion of an unstructured sample, and requiring up to 10 times the detachment energy. Finally, an agile, wireless, palm-sized wall climbing robot which uses the synthetic fibrillar dry adhesives to climb is presented. Waalbot , named after the van der Waals forces it uses to climb, exploits the attachment and detachment characteristics of the developed dry adhesives, capabilities include climbing smooth surfaces such as glass in any orientation on any surface slope

  15. Dangling chain elastomers as repeatable fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Sitti, Metin; Cusick, Brian; Aksak, Burak; Nese, Alper; Lee, Hyung-il; Dong, Hongchen; Kowalewski, Tomasz; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    This work reports on repeatable adhesive materials prepared by controlled grafting of dangling hetero chains from polymer elastomers. The dangling chain elastomer system was prepared by grafting poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) chains from prefunctionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer networks using atom transfer radical polymerization. To study the effects of chain growth and network strain as they relate to network adhesion mechanics, various lengths of PBA chains with degree of polymerizations (DP) of 65, 281, 508, and 1200 were incorporated into the PDMS matrix. PBA chains with a DP value of 281 grafted from a flat PDMS substrate showed the highest (approximately 3.5-fold) enhancement of nano- and macroscale adhesion relative to a flat raw (ungrafted and not prefunctionalized) PDMS substrate. Moreover, to study the effect of PBA dangling chains on adhesion in fibrillar elastomer structures inspired by gecko foot hairs, a dip-transfer fabrication method was used to graft PBA chains with a DP value of 296 from the tip endings of mushroom-shaped PDMS micropillars. A PBA chain covered micropillar array showed macroscale adhesion enhancement up to approximately 7 times relative to the flat ungrafted prefunctionalized PDMS control substrate, showing additional nonoptimized approximately 2-fold adhesion enhancement due to fibrillar structuring and mushroom-shaped tip ending. These dangling hetero chains on elastomer micro-/nanofibrillar structures may provide a novel fabrication platform for multilength scale, repeatable, and high-strength fibrillar adhesives inspired by gecko foot hairs. PMID:20355863

  16. Contact shape controls adhesion of bioinspired fibrillar surfaces.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Aránzazu; Greiner, Christian; Arzt, Eduard

    2007-09-25

    Following a recent bioinspired paradigm, patterned surfaces can exhibit better adhesion than flat contacts. Previous studies have verified that finer contact structures give rise to higher adhesion forces. In this study, we report on the effect of the tip shape, which was varied systematically in fibrillar PDMS surfaces, produced by lithographic and soft-molding methods. For fiber radii between 2.5 and 25 microm, it is found that shape exerts a stronger effect on adhesion than size. The highest adhesion is measured for mushroom-like and spatular terminals, which attain adhesion values 30 times in excess of the flat controls and similar to a gecko toe. These results explain the shapes commonly found in biological systems, and help in the exploration of the parameter space for artificial attachment systems. PMID:17722937

  17. Dense fibrillar collagen is a master activator of invadopodia

    PubMed Central

    Artym, Vira V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor stroma is characterized by abnormal accumulation of dense fibrillar collagen, which promotes tumor progression and metastasis. However, the effect of desmoplastic collagen on cells has been unclear. Our recent findings demonstrate that dense fibrillar collagen activates a novel phosphosignaling mechanism for robust induction of invadopodia in tumor cells and normal fibroblasts. PMID:27314068

  18. New Method for Monitoring the Process of Freeze Drying of Biological Materials.

    PubMed

    Alkeev, Nikolay; Averin, Stanislav; von Gratowski, Svetlana

    2015-12-01

    A capacitive sensor was proposed and tested for the monitoring and control of a freeze drying process of a vaccine against the Newcastle disease of birds. The residual moisture of the vaccine was measured by the thermogravimetric method. The vaccine activity was determined by titration in chicken embryos. It was shown that, at the stages of freezing and primary drying, a capacitive sensor measured the fraction of unfrozen liquid phase in a material and allowed one to control the sublimation stage of drying in an optimal way. This prevented the foaming of the material and shortened the total drying time approximately twice. The control range at the sublimation stage of drying expanded up to -70°C. It was found at the final stage of drying that the signal of a capacitive sensor passed through a maximum value. We supposed that this maximum corresponds to the minimum of intramolecular mobility of biological macromolecules and hence to the optimal residual moisture of the material, which ensures long-term preservation of its activity. We also suppose that using the capacitive sensor at the final stage of drying allows one to more precisely detect the time when the residual moisture of dried material reaches the optimal value. PMID:26022547

  19. Some biological and physical factors in dry heat sterilization: a general review.

    PubMed

    Bruch, C W

    1964-01-01

    There is a surprising lack of quantitative data on sterilization by dry heat so that microbiologists have little knowledge of the role played by various biological and physical factors in this sterilizing process. A recent investigation by the author has shown that the aerobic mesophilic bacterial sporeformers, such as Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus coagulans, are the most resistant among several species of sporeforming bacteria to dry heat sterilization. The type of carrier on which the spores are exposed to dry heat markedly affects their thermal resistance. An analysis of four carriers showed that spores on sand or vermiculite are more difficult to destroy than spores on paper or glass. Spores under low vacuums are more susceptible to dry heat sterilization than spores in helium, which are more susceptible than spores in air. Spores trapped in solids have thermal resistance levels two or three times greater than those found for spores exposed to dry heat in air. Preliminary results on the combination of dry heat and ionizing radiation sterilization indicate no synergistic effects, i.e., the destruction obtained with each agent is additive. Another important variable that governs the interpretation of the effectiveness of dry heat sterilization tests is the recovery medium for heat-damaged spores. The kinetics of dry heat sterilization cannot be fully interpreted from the available data. Death follows a logarithmic pattern thereby implying a monomolecular reaction. The mechanism of death is thought to be due to an oxidative process. PMID:11883444

  20. Tunable Friction Behavior of Photochromic Fibrillar Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Gabriele; Ceseracciu, Luca; Oropesa-Nuñez, Reinier; Canale, Claudio; Salvatore, Princia; Fragouli, Despina; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2015-06-01

    Grasslike compliant micro/nano crystals made of diarylethene (DAE) photochromic molecules are spontaneously formed on elastomer films after dipping them in a solution containing the photochromic molecules. The frictional forces of such micro- and nanofibrillar surfaces are reversibly tuned upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and dark storage cycles. This behavior is attributed to the Young's modulus variation of the single fibrils due to the photoisomerization process of the DAE molecules, as measured by advanced atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. In fact, a significant yet reversible decrease of the stiffness of the outer part of the fibrils in response to the UV light irradiation is demonstrated. The modification of the molecular structure of the fibrils influences their mechanical properties and affects the frictional behavior of the overall fibrillar surfaces. These findings provide the possibility to develop a system that controllably and accurately generates both low and high friction forces. PMID:26017025

  1. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  2. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  3. Pontin is localized in nucleolar fibrillar centers

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Pontin is a multifunctional protein having roles in various cellular processes including regulation of gene expression. Here, we addressed Pontin intracellular localization using two different monoclonal antibodies directed against different Pontin epitopes. For the first time, Pontin was directly visualized in nucleoli where it co-localizes with Upstream Binding Factor and RNA polymerase I. Nucleolar localization of Pontin was confirmed by its detection in nucleolar extracts and by electron microscopy, which revealed Pontin accumulation specifically in the nucleolar fibrillar centers. Pontin localization in the nucleolus was dynamic and Pontin accumulated in large nucleolar dots mainly during S-phase. Pontin concentration in the large nucleolar dots correlated with reduced transcriptional activity of nucleoli. In addition, Pontin was found to associate with RNA polymerase I and to interact in a complex with c-Myc with rDNA sequences indicating that Pontin is involved in the c-Myc-dependent regulation of rRNA synthesis. PMID:18548265

  4. Hierarchical fibrillar scaffolds obtained by non-conventional layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Sara M; Silva, Tiago H; Reis, Rui L; Mano, João F

    2013-03-01

    A new application of layer-by-layer assembly is presented, able to create nano/micro fibrils or nanocoatings inside 3D scaffolds using non-fibrillar polyelectrolytes for tissue-engineering applications. This approach shows promise for developing advanced scaffolds with controlled nano/micro environments, and nature and architectures similar to the natural extracellular matrix, leading to improved biological performance. PMID:23184814

  5. Observation of the freeze-drying process of biological materials with a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Nei, T; Fujikawa, S

    1976-10-01

    Over the past few decades, numerous studies have been done on the freeze-drying of biological materials from a physical, chemical and biological point of view. Morphological observation of the freeze-drying process of specimens, however, has been tried by only a few investigators. In those studies, thin-layered aqueous specimens, which were sandwiched between two cover slips, were mostly observed with an optical microscope. For ultrastructural and stereoscopic observation, the scanning electron microscope has a great advantage, unlike that of the optical microscope. A specially designed cryo-scanning electron microscope, employed in the present study, made it possible to observe the freezing patterns of the specimens and also the sublimation process of ice in frozen specimens under vacuum. With this specially designed microscope, shrinkage of some specimens due to dehydration during the freeze-drying process was revealed and the extent of such shrinkage was quantitatively determined. PMID:1036327

  6. Light-assisted drying (LAD) of small volume biologics: a comparison of two IR light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Madison A.; Van Vorst, Matthew; Elliott, Gloria D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2016-03-01

    Protein therapeutics have been developed to treat diseases ranging from arthritis and psoriasis to cancer. A challenge in the development of protein-based drugs is maintaining the protein in the folded state during processing and storage. We are developing a novel processing method, light-assisted drying (LAD), to dehydrate proteins suspended in a sugar (trehalose) solution for storage at supra-zero temperatures. Our technique selectively heats the water in small volume samples using near-IR light to speed dehydration which prevents sugar crystallization that can damage embedded proteins. In this study, we compare the end moisture content (EMC) as a function of processing time of samples dried with two different light sources, Nd:YAG (1064 nm) and Thulium fiber (1850 nm) lasers. EMC is the ratio of water to dry weight in a sample and the lower the EMC the higher the possible storage temperature. LAD with the 1064 and 1850 nm lasers yielded 78% and 65% lower EMC, respectively, than standard air-drying. After 40 minutes of LAD with 1064 and 1850 nm sources, EMCs of 0.27+/-.27 and 0.15+/-.05 gH2O/gDryWeight were reached, which are near the desired value of 0.10 gH2O/gDryWeight that enables storage in a glassy state without refrigeration. LAD is a promising new technique for the preparation of biologics for anhydrous preservation.

  7. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimentalmore » and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.« less

  8. Friction Properties of Bio-mimetic Nano-fibrillar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Hua; Mi, Chun-Hui

    2009-10-01

    Nano-fibrillar arrays are fabricated using polystyrene materials. The average diameter of each fiber is about 300nm. Experiments show that such a fibrillar surface possesses a relatively hydrophobic feature with a water contact angle of 142°. Nanoscale friction properties are mainly focused on. It is found that the friction force of polystyrene nano-fibrillar surfaces is obviously enhanced in contrast to polystyrene smooth surfaces. The apparent coefficient of friction increases with the applied load, but is independent of the scanning speed. An interesting observation is that the friction force increases almost linearly with the real contact area, which abides by the fundamental Bowden-Tabor law of nano-scale friction.

  9. Looking beyond fibrillar features to scale gecko-like adhesion.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Michael D; Croll, Andrew B; King, Daniel R; Paret, Beth M; Irschick, Duncan J; Crosby, Alfred J

    2012-02-21

    Hand-sized gecko-inspired adhesives with reversible force capacities as high as 2950 N (29.5 N cm(-2) ) are designed without the use of fibrillar features through a simple scaling theory. The scaling theory describes both natural and synthetic gecko-inspired adhesives, over 14 orders of magnitude in adhesive force capacity, from nanoscopic to macroscopic length scales. PMID:22278804

  10. Detailed characterization of mechanical properties and molecular mobility within dry seed glasses: relevance to the physiology of dry biological systems.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Daniel; Walters, Christina

    2011-11-01

    Slow movement of molecules in glassy matrices controls the kinetics of chemical and physical reactions in dry seeds. Variation in physiological activity among seeds suggests that there are differences in mobility among seed glasses. Testing this hypothesis is difficult because few tools are available to measure molecular mobility within dry seeds. Here, motional properties within dry pea cotyledons were assessed using dynamic mechanical analysis. The technique detected several molecular relaxations between -80 and +80°C and gave a more detailed description of water content-temperature effects on molecular motion than previously understood from studies of glass formation in seeds at glass transition (Tg). Diffusive movement is delimited by the α relaxation, which appears to be analogous to Tg. β and γ relaxations were also detected at temperatures lower than α relaxations, clearly demonstrating intramolecular motion within the glassy matrix of the pea cotyledon. Glass transitions, or the mechanical counterpart α relaxation, appear to be less relevant to seed aging during dry storage than previously thought. On the other hand, β relaxation occurs at temperature and moisture conditions typically used for seed storage and has established importance for physical aging of synthetic polymer glasses. Our data show that the nature and extent of molecular motion varies considerably with moisture and temperature, and that the hydrated conditions used for accelerated aging experiments and ultra-dry conditions sometimes recommended for seed storage give greater molecular mobility than more standard seed storage practices. We believe characterization of molecular mobility is critical for evaluating how dry seeds respond to the environment and persist through time. PMID:21831210

  11. Detailed characterization of mechanical properties and molecular mobility within dry seed glasses: relevance to the physiology of dry biological systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular motion slows when seeds form a glassy matrix, conferring longevity during dry storage. However, seeds inevitably age and variation in aging rates suggests differences in mobility among seed glasses. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was used to distinguish elastic and viscous motion with...

  12. Biological damage induced by ionizing cosmic rays in dry Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Kranz, A R; Bork, U; Bucker, H; Reitz, G

    1990-01-01

    In September 1987 dry seeds containing embryos of the crucifer plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh, were flown in orbit for 13 days on the Kosmos 1887 satellite. The seeds were fixed on CNd detectors and stored in units of Biorack type I/O. One unit was exposed inside, another one outside the satellite. The temperature profile of the flown seeds inside the satellite was simulated on earth in an identical backup control sample (BC). An additional control (SC) was studied with the original seeds sample. By use of the CNd-detector, HZE-tracks were measured with a PC-assisted microscope. The biological damages were investigated by growing the seeds under controlled climatic conditions. The following biological endpoints of the cosmic radiation damage were studied: germination, radicle length, sublethality, morphological aberrations, flower development, tumorization, embryo lethality inside the siliques. The summarized damage (D) and the mutation frequencies of embyronic lethal genes were calculated. The following results were obtained: the damages increase significantly in orbit at all biological endpoints; germination and fiowerings especially, as well as embryo lethality of fruits and lethal mutation frequency, were maximum mostly for HZE-hit seeds. Additionally, an increase of damage was observed for the seeds of the outside-exposed Biorack in comparison to the inside ones, which was probably caused by less radiation shielding and free space vacuum. The significance of the results obtained is discussed with respect to stress and risk and, thus, the quality of the RBE-factors and heavy ionizing radiation all needed for the very definition of radiation protection standards in space. PMID:11537515

  13. Nanoscale helium ion microscopic analysis of collagen fibrillar changes following femtosecond laser dissection of human cornea.

    PubMed

    Riau, Andri K; Poh, Rebekah; Pickard, Daniel S; Park, Chris H J; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2014-08-01

    Over the last decade, femtosecond lasers have emerged as an important tool to perform accurate and fine dissections with minimal collateral damage in biological tissue. The most common surgical procedure in medicine utilizing femtosecond laser is LASIK. During the femtosecond laser dissection process, the corneal collagen fibers inevitably undergo biomechanical and thermal changes on a sub-micro- or even a nanoscale level, which can potentially lead to post-surgical complications. In this study, we utilized helium ion microscopy, complemented with transmission electron microscopy to examine the femtosecond laser-induced collagen fibrillar damage in ex vivo human corneas. We found that the biomechanical damage induced by laser etching, generation of tissue bridges, and expansion of cavitation bubble and its subsequent collapse, created distortion to the surrounding collagen lamellae. Femtosecond laser-induced thermal damage was characterized by collapsed collagen lamellae, loss of collagen banding, collagen coiling, and presence of spherical debris. Our findings have shown the ability of helium ion microscopy to provide high resolution images with unprecedented detail of nanoscale fibrillar morphological changes in order to assess a tissue damage, which could not be resolved by conventional scanning electron microscopy previously. This imaging technology has also given us a better understanding of the tissue-laser interactions in a nano-structural manner and their possible effects on post-operative wound recovery. PMID:25016655

  14. Molecular nanomechanics of nascent bone: fibrillar toughening by mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Markus J.

    2007-07-01

    Mineralized collagen fibrils are highly conserved nanostructural building blocks of bone. By a combination of molecular dynamics simulation and theoretical analysis it is shown that the characteristic nanostructure of mineralized collagen fibrils is vital for its high strength and its ability to sustain large deformation, as is relevant to the physiological role of bone, creating a strong and tough material. An analysis of the molecular mechanisms of protein and mineral phases under large deformation of mineralized collagen fibrils reveals a fibrillar toughening mechanism that leads to a manifold increase of energy dissipation compared to fibrils without mineral phase. This fibrillar toughening mechanism increases the resistance to fracture by forming large local yield regions around crack-like defects, a mechanism that protects the integrity of the entire structure by allowing for localized failure. As a consequence, mineralized collagen fibrils are able to tolerate microcracks of the order of several hundred micrometres in size without causing any macroscopic failure of the tissue, which may be essential to enable bone remodelling. The analysis proves that adding nanoscopic small platelets to collagen fibrils increases their Young's modulus and yield strength as well as their fracture strength. We find that mineralized collagen fibrils have a Young's modulus of 6.23 GPa (versus 4.59 GPa for the collagen fibril), yield at a tensile strain of 6.7% (versus 5% for the collagen fibril) and feature a fracture stress of 0.6 GPa (versus 0.3 GPa for the collagen fibril).

  15. A Dry Membrane Protection Technique to Allow Surface Acoustic Wave Biosensor Measurements of Biological Model Membrane Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Reder-Christ, Katrin; Schmitz, Patrick; Bota, Marian; Gerber, Ursula; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Fuss, Christian; Enachescu, Marius; Bendas, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Model membrane approaches have attracted much attention in biomedical sciences to investigate and simulate biological processes. The application of model membrane systems for biosensor measurements is partly restricted by the fact that the integrity of membranes critically depends on the maintenance of an aqueous surrounding, while various biosensors require a preconditioning of dry sensors. This is for example true for the well-established surface acoustic wave (SAW) biosensor SAM®5 blue. Here, a simple drying procedure of sensor-supported model membranes is introduced using the protective disaccharide trehalose. Highly reproducible model membranes were prepared by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, transferred to SAW sensors and supplemented with a trehalose solution. Membrane rehydration after dry incorporation into the SAW device becomes immediately evident by phase changes. Reconstituted model membranes maintain their full functionality, as indicated by biotin/avidin binding experiments. Atomic force microscopy confirmed the morphological invariability of dried and rehydrated membranes. Approximating to more physiological recognition phenomena, the site-directed immobilization of the integrin VLA-4 into the reconstituted model membrane and subsequent VCAM-1 ligand binding with nanomolar affinity were illustrated. This simple drying procedure is a novel way to combine the model membrane generation by Langmuir-Blodgett technique with SAW biosensor measurements, which extends the applicability of SAM®5 blue in biomedical sciences. PMID:24064603

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Gecko-inspired Fibrillar Adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yongkwan

    Over the last decade, geckos' remarkable ability to stick to and climb surfaces found in nature has motivated a wide range of scientific interest in engineering gecko-mimetic surface for various adhesive and high friction applications. The high adhesion and friction of its pads have been attributed to a complex array of hairy structures, which maximize surface area for van der Waals interaction between the toes and the counter-surface. While advances in micro- and nanolithography technique have allowed fabrication of increasingly sophisticated gecko mimetic surfaces, it remains a challenge to produce an adhesive as robust as that of the natural gecko pads. In order to rationally design gecko adhesives, understanding the contact behavior of fibrillar interface is critical. The first chapter of the dissertation introduces gecko adhesion and its potential applications, followed by a brief survey of gecko-inspired adhesives. Challenges that limit the performance of the current adhesives are presented. In particular, it is pointed out that almost all testing of gecko adhesives have been on clean, smooth glass, which is ideal for adhesion due to high surface energy and low roughness. Surfaces in application are more difficult to stick to, so the understanding of failure modes in low energy and rough surfaces is important. The second chapter presents a fabrication method for thermoplastic gecko adhesive to be used for a detailed study of fibrillar interfaces. Low-density polyethylene nanofibers are replicated from a silicon nanowire array fabricated by colloidal lithography and metal-catalyzed chemical etching. This process yields a highly ordered array of nanofibers over a large area with control over fiber diameter, length, and number density. The high yield and consistency of the process make it ideal for a systematic study on factors that affect adhesion and friction of gecko adhesives. The following three chapters examine parameters that affect macroscale friction of

  17. [Determination of the biological activity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on a dry nutrient medium of Soviet manufacture].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, V M; Andreeva, Z M; Astanina, L N; Shiriaeva, V L; Gridneva, N I

    1981-06-01

    Possible use of the dry nutrient medium manufactured in the USSR for the assay of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity with the agar diffusion method was studied. The optimal conditions for the antibiotic activity assay on this medium were developed. The dry nutrient medium may be used for the activity assay of the aminoglycoside antibiotics, i. e. streptomycin sulfate, dihydrostreptomycin sulfate, neomycin sulfate, monomycin and gentamicin sulfate. PMID:7271256

  18. In vitro biological activity of resveratrol using a novel inhalable resveratrol spray-dried formulation.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Valentina; Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Haghi, Mehra; Young, Paul M; Scalia, Santo; Traini, Daniela

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to prepare inhalable resveratrol by spray drying for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Resveratrol, with a spherical morphology and particle diameter less than 5 μm, was successfully manufactured. Fine particle fraction (FPF) and mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of spray-dried resveratrol was 39.9 ± 1.1% and 3.7 ± 0.1 μm, respectively, when assessed with an Andersen cascade impactor (ACI) at 60 l/min. The cytotoxicity results of resveratrol on Calu-3 revealed that the cells could tolerate high concentration of resveratrol (up to 160 μM). In addition, in transport experiments using Snapwells, it was observed that more than 80% of the deposited dry powder was transported across the Calu-3 cells to the basal chamber within four hours. The expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from Calu-3 induced with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were significantly reduced after treatment with spray-dried resveratrol. The antioxidant assay (radical scavenging activity and nitric oxide production) showed spray-dried resveratrol to possess an equivalent antioxidant property as compared to vitamin C. Results presented in this investigation suggested that resveratrol could potentially be developed as a dry powder for inhalation for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases like COPD. PMID:26117190

  19. On-demand weighing of single dry biological particles over a 5-order-of-magnitude dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bin-Da; Icoz, Kutay; Huang, Wanfeng; Chang, Chun-Li; Savran, Cagri A

    2014-11-01

    We report a simple and highly versatile system to select and weigh individual dry biological particles. The system is composed of a microtweezer to pick and place individual particles and a cantilever-based resonator to weigh them. The system can weigh entities that vary from a red blood cell (~10(-11) g) to the eye-brain complex of an insect (~10(-6) g), covering a 5-order-of-magnitude mass range. Due to its versatility and ease of use, this weighing method is highly compatible with established laboratory practices. The system can provide complementary mass information for a wide variety of individual particles imaged using scanning electron microscopy and determine comparative weights of individual biological entities that are attached to microparticles as well as weigh fractions of individual biological entities that have been subjected to focused ion beam milling. PMID:25162712

  20. Nervous system in the fibrillar theory of Giorgio Baglivi.

    PubMed

    Zurak, N

    2000-01-01

    The drafts, epistles, headwords, and conceptual basis known as the fibrillar theory of Giorgio Baglivi, published in his book entitled De fibra motrice et morbosa, were analyzed in an attempt to re-evaluate Baglivi's contribution, generally considered quite modest, to the development of scientific thought on the nervous system functions. The analysis revealed Baglivi's identification of the reflex organization, vegetative nervous system function, and neural aspect of the vasomotor function to be surprisingly valuable. I believe that the lucidity and genuine contemporariness of Baglivi's standpoints arise the question of the historical precedence in the discovery of these functions (it is usually attributed to F.X. Bichat for vegetative nervous system, and to Claude Bernard for vasomotor nerves). In the light of these facts, the need of an expert revision of the history of discovering nervous system functions is suggested. PMID:11624709

  1. Adhesion hysteresis of a film-terminated fibrillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, ShunPing; He, LingHui; Wang, HuiJing

    2012-06-01

    Motivated by the recent biomimic design of microstructured adhesive surfaces, we study adhesion between a film-terminated fibrillar array and a rigid substrate. Using a two-dimensional model and ignoring the deformation of the fibers and the backing layer, we show that the adhesion behavior is dominated by a dimensionless parameter reflecting the global flexibility of the terminal film. In particular, if the parameter is larger than 0.4, the adhesion is reversible; otherwise one or more hysteresis loops will appear after an approach-retraction cycle, leading to significant increase in the specific separation work. The result is expected to help not only optimal design of the structure, but also other applications such as micro-manipulation in micromechanical systems.

  2. Elemental distribution and sample integrity comparison of freeze-dried and frozen-hydrated biological tissue samples with nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavpetič, P.; Vogel-Mikuš, K.; Jeromel, L.; Ogrinc Potočnik, N.; Pongrac, P.; Drobne, D.; Pipan Tkalec, Ž.; Novak, S.; Kos, M.; Koren, Š.; Regvar, M.; Pelicon, P.

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of biological samples in frozen-hydrated state with micro-PIXE technique at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) nuclear microprobe has matured to a point that enables us to measure and examine frozen tissue samples routinely as a standard research method. Cryotome-cut slice of frozen-hydrated biological sample is mounted between two thin foils and positioned on the sample holder. The temperature of the cold stage in the measuring chamber is kept below 130 K throughout the insertion of the samples and the proton beam exposure. Matrix composition of frozen-hydrated tissue is consisted mostly of ice. Sample deterioration during proton beam exposure is monitored during the experiment, as both Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) and Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) in on-off axis geometry are recorded together with the events in two PIXE detectors and backscattered ions from the chopper in a single list-mode file. The aim of this experiment was to determine differences and similarities between two kinds of biological sample preparation techniques for micro-PIXE analysis, namely freeze-drying and frozen-hydrated sample preparation in order to evaluate the improvements in the elemental localisation of the latter technique if any. In the presented work, a standard micro-PIXE configuration for tissue mapping at JSI was used with five detection systems operating in parallel, with proton beam cross section of 1.0 × 1.0 μm2 and a beam current of 100 pA. The comparison of the resulting elemental distributions measured at the biological tissue prepared in the frozen-hydrated and in the freeze-dried state revealed differences in elemental distribution of particular elements at the cellular level due to the morphology alteration in particular tissue compartments induced either by water removal in the lyophilisation process or by unsatisfactory preparation of samples for cutting and mounting during the shock-freezing phase of sample preparation.

  3. [Blood sampling using "dried blood spot": a clinical biology revolution underway?].

    PubMed

    Hirtz, Christophe; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Blood testing using the dried blood spot (DBS) is used since the 1960s in clinical analysis, mainly within the framework of the neonatal screening (Guthrie test). Since then numerous analytes such as nucleic acids, small molecules or lipids, were successfully measured on the DBS. While this pre-analytical method represents an interesting alternative to classic blood sampling, its use in routine is still limited. We review here the different clinical applications of the blood sampling on DBS and estimate its future place, supported by the new methods of analysis as the LC-MS mass spectrometry. PMID:25582720

  4. Innovative Manufacturing of Carbon Nanotube-Loaded Fibrillar Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. J. T.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Fakirov, S.

    The concept of microfibrillar composite (MFC) has been used to create a new type of polymer composites, in which the reinforcing microfibrils are loaded with carbon nanotubes (CNT). Polyamide 66 (PA66) has been melt blended with polypropylene in a twin screw extruder with and without CNT, and thereafter cold drawn to create a fibrillar state as well as to align the CNT in the PA66 microfibrils. The drawn bristles were compression moulded at 180°C to prepare MFC plates. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicate near perfect distribution of CNT in the reinforcing PA66 microfibrils. Although the fibrillated PA66 is able to improve the tensile stiffness and strength as expected from the MFC structure, the incorporation of CNT does not exhibit any further enhancing effect. It rather adversely affects the mechanical properties due to poor interface adhesion between the matrix and the reinforcing microfibrils with the presence of CNT, as demonstrated by SEM. However, the resulting highly aligned CNT within the MFC are expected to affect the physical and functional properties of these composites.

  5. Effect of biological treatment of the ceramic mass on the drying and firing of facing tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, V.V.; Sidorova, V.A.; Skripnik, V.P.; Solnyshkina, T.N.; Vainberg, S.N.; Vlasov, A.S.; Yashchenko, O.I.

    1985-12-01

    The authors studied the ceramic masses of the Minsk Building Materials Production complex (MZSM) and the Kishinev FinishingMaterials Plant (KZOM) having the following compositions: MZSM--48% Vesejovsk VGP clay, 22% nepheline concentrate, 17% quartz sand, 8% dolomite, 5% title scrap, and above 100% 3% bentonite, 0.1% soda ash, and 0.28% liquid glass; KZOM-48% Veselovsk VGP clay, 28% nepheline-syenite, 8% limestone filings (scrap), 16% title scrap, and, above 100%, 1% bentonite and 3% sodium tripolyphosphate. Improving the quality of ceramic tiles and reducing the mineral and fuel-energy consumption in their production are among the practical industrial problems. This paper discusses a method of solving them by improving the drying and firing processes of the products.

  6. RNA Profiling for the Identification of the Tissue Origin of Dried Stains in Forensic Biology.

    PubMed

    Hanson, E K; Ballantyne, J

    2010-07-01

    Examination of crime scene items for biological evidence typically begins with a preliminary screening for the presence of biological fluids in order to identify possible sources of DNA. Conventional biochemical and immunological assays employed for this screening require multiple tests to be performed in a serial manner, can consume a significant amount of valuable evidentiary material, and can require a significant amount of time and labor for completion. Moreover, the presence of several biological fluids, such as saliva, vaginal secretions, and menstrual blood, cannot be conclusively identified using current methods. Due to the disadvantages of conventional body fluid testing, some operational crime laboratories have chosen to bypass the body fluid identification process and proceed directly to DNA analysis. However, while reducing the time spent on each case, this "shortcut" could result in a failure to provide important probative information regarding the nature of the crime as well as result in increased cost to crime laboratories if unnecessary DNA testing is performed. In the past several years, a number of forensic researchers have attempted to develop molecular-based approaches to body fluid identification that would provide operational crime laboratories with significantly improved specificity. This has resulted in an increased interest in the use of RNA profiling strategies for the identification of forensically relevant biological fluids. This review provides an overview of studies carried out on the use of both messenger RNA and small (micro) RNA profiling. The results of these studies are encouraging and presage the routine identification the tissue source(s) of forensic evidence using molecular-based approaches. PMID:26242593

  7. Trans-cellular propagation of Tau aggregation by fibrillar species.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2012-06-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22461630

  8. Biological activity of a standardized freeze-dried platelet derivative to be used as cell culture medium supplement.

    PubMed

    Muraglia, Anita; Ottonello, Chiara; Spanò, Raffaele; Dozin, Beatrice; Strada, Paolo; Grandizio, Michele; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Serum of animal origin and in particular fetal bovine serum is the most commonly utilized cell culture medium additive for in vitro cell growth and differentiation. However, several major concerns have been raised by the scientific community regarding the use of animal sera for human cell-based culture applications. Among the possible alternatives to the animal serum, platelet-derived compounds have been proposed since more than 10 years. Nevertheless, the high degree of variability between the different platelet preparations, and the lack of standardized manufacturing and quality control procedures, made difficult to reach a consensus on the applicability of this novel cell culture medium supplement. In this study, we describe the preparation of a standardized platelet-rich plasma (PRP) derivative obtained starting from human-certified buffy coat samples with a defined platelet concentration and following protocols including also freeze-drying, gamma irradiation and biological activity testing prior the product release as cell culture medium additive. Biological activity testing of the different preparations was done by determining the capability of the different PRP preparations to sustain human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) clone formation and proliferation. Taking advantage of a developed MSC in vitro clonogenicity test, we also determined biological activity and stability of the freeze-dried gamma-sterilized PRP preparations after their storage for different times and at different temperatures. The PRP effects on cell proliferation were determined both on primary cell cultures established from different tissues and on a cell line. Results were compared with those obtained in "traditional" parallel control cultures performed in the presence of bovine serum [10% fetal calf serum (FCS)]. Compared to FCS, the PRP addition to the culture medium increased the MSC colony number and average size. In primary cell cultures and in cell line cultures, the PRP

  9. Influence of Disturbance on Soil Respiration in Biologically Crusted Soil during the Dry Season

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yu-qing; Wu, Bin; Zha, Tian-shan; Jia, Xin; Qin, Shu-gao; Shao, Chen-xi; Liu, Jia-bin; Lai, Zong-rui; Fa, Ke-yu

    2013-01-01

    Soil respiration (Rs) is a major pathway for carbon cycling and is a complex process involving abiotic and biotic factors. Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are a key biotic component of desert ecosystems worldwide. In desert ecosystems, soils are protected from surface disturbance by BSCs, but it is unknown whether Rs is affected by disturbance of this crust layer. We measured Rs in three types of disturbed and undisturbed crusted soils (algae, lichen, and moss), as well as bare land from April to August, 2010, in Mu Us desert, northwest China. Rs was similar among undisturbed soils but increased significantly in disturbed moss and algae crusted soils. The variation of Rs in undisturbed and disturbed soil was related to soil bulk density. Disturbance also led to changes in soil organic carbon and fine particles contents, including declines of 60–70% in surface soil C and N, relative to predisturbance values. Once BSCs were disturbed, Q10 increased. Our findings indicate that a loss of BSCs cover will lead to greater soil C loss through respiration. Given these results, understanding the disturbance sensitivity impact on Rs could be helpful to modify soil management practices which promote carbon sequestration. PMID:24453845

  10. The effect of model soil contamination with Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb on the biological properties of soils in the dry steppe and semidesert regions of southern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, S. I.; Spivakova, N. A.; Kazeev, K. Sh.

    2011-09-01

    Model soil contamination with Cr, Cu, Ni, and Pb in the dry steppes and semideserts of southern Russia has worsened the biological soil properties. With respect to the degree of deterioration of the biological properties, the soils can be arranged in the following sequence: dark chestnut soils > chestnut soils > light chestnut soils > brown semidesert soils > sandy brown semidesert soils. The sequence of metal oxides according to the adverse effect on the biological soil properties is as follows: CrO3 > CuO ≥ PbO ≥ NiO.

  11. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin; Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki; Akaike, Akinori; Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  12. Assembly and function of AsGlu2 fibrillar multimer of oat beta-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Su-Nam; Kim, Sang-Yeob; Choi, Sa-Ra; Kim, In-Soo

    2009-03-01

    Oat beta-glucosidase in plastid exists as a long fibrillar structure of AsGlu1 homomultimer (type I) and heteromultimer of AsGlu1 and AsGlu2 (type II). In spite of the high amino acid sequence homology of AsGlu1 and AsGlu2, AsGlu1 assembles into the fibrillar multimers but AsGlu2 forms a dimer when expressed in E. coli. A swapping analysis of AsGlu2 cDNA with AsGlu1 cDNA indicated that the C-terminal segment of AsGlu1 was critical for the fibrillar multimerization. A single substitution of glutamic acid-495 of AsGlu2 in the C-terminal region with lysine, an AsGlu1 counterpart amino acid for the glutamic acid-495, assembled the AsGlu2 into fibrillar homomultimers. The mutant AsGlu2 homomultimer was highly stable and had relatively faster electric mobility in native gel than the AsGlu1 homomultimer. Multimerization increased enzyme affinity to substrates. PMID:19100871

  13. Pathological tendons maintain sufficient aligned fibrillar structure on ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC).

    PubMed

    Docking, S I; Cook, J

    2016-06-01

    Structural disorganization in the tendon is associated with tendinopathy, with little research investigating whether disorganization overwhelms the overall structural integrity of the tendon. This study investigated the mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of aligned fibrillar structure as detected by ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) in the pathological and normal Achilles and patellar tendons. Ninety-one participants had their Achilles and/or patellar tendons scanned using UTC to capture a three-dimensional image of the tendon and allow a semi-quantification of the echopattern. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure (echo type I + II) and disorganized structure (echo type III + IV) was calculated based on UTC algorithms. Each tendon was classified as either pathological or normal based solely on gray-scale ultrasound. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.001) in the pathological tendon compared with the normal tendon, despite the pathological tendon containing greater amounts of disorganized structure (P ≤ 0.001). A significant relationship was observed between the mean CSA of disorganized structure and anteroposterior diameter of the Achilles (R(2)  = 0.587) and patellar (R(2)  = 0.559) tendons. This study is the first to show that pathological tendons have sufficient levels of aligned fibrillar structure. Pathological tendons may compensate for areas of disorganization by increasing in tendon thickness. PMID:26059532

  14. Fibrillar assembly and stability of collagen coating on titanium for improved osteoblast responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae-Won; Li, Long-Hao; Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Su-Hee; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2005-12-01

    Collagen, as a major constituent of human connective tissues, has been regarded as one of the most important biomaterials. As a coating moiety on Ti hard-tissue implants, the collagen has recently attracted a great deal of attention. This article reports the effects of fibrillar assembly and crosslinking of collagen on its chemical stability and the subsequent osteoblastic responses. The fibrillar self-assembly of collagen was carried out by incubating acid-dissolved collagen in an ionic-buffered medium at 37 degrees C. The degree of assembly was varied with the incubation time and monitored by the turbidity change. The differently assembled collagen was coated on the Ti and crosslinked with a carbodiimide derivative. The partially assembled collagen contained fibrils with varying diameters as well as nonfibrillar aggregates. On the other hand, the fully assembled collagen showed the complete formation of fibrils with uniform diameters of approximately 100-200 nm with periodic stain patterns within the fibrils, which are typical of native collagen fibers. Through this fibrillar assembly, the collagen coating had significantly improved chemical stability in both the saline and collagenase media. The subsequent crosslinking step also improved the stability of the collagen coating, particularly in the unassembled collagen. The fibrillar assembly and the crosslinking of collagen significantly influenced the osteoblastic cell responses. Without the assembly, the collagen layer on Ti adversely affected the cell attachment and proliferation. However, those cellular responses were improved significantly when the collagen was assembled to fibrils and the assembly degree was increased. After crosslinking the collagen coating, these cellular responses were significantly enhanced in the case of the unassembled collagen but were not altered much in the assembled collagen. Based on these observations, it is suggested that the fibrillar assembly and the crosslinking of collagen

  15. Cloning of an annelid fibrillar-collagen gene and phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate and invertebrate collagens.

    PubMed

    Sicot, F X; Exposito, J Y; Masselot, M; Garrone, R; Deutsch, J; Gaill, F

    1997-05-15

    Arenicola marina possesses cuticular and interstitial collagens, which are mostly synthesised by its epidermis. A cDNA library was constructed from the body wall. This annelid cDNA library was screened with a sea-urchin-collagen cDNA probe, and several overlapping clones were isolated. Nucleotide sequencing of these clones revealed an open reading frame of 2052 nucleotides. The translation product exhibits a triple helical domain of 138 Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats followed by a 269-residue-long C-terminal non-collagenous domain (C-propeptide). The triple helical domain exhibits an imperfection that has been previously described in a peptide produced by cyanogen bromide digestion (CNBr peptide) of A. marina interstitial collagen. This imperfection occurs at the same place in the interstitial collagen of the vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila. This identifies the clone as coding for the C-terminal part of a fibrillar collagen chain. It was called FAm1alpha, for fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina. The non-collagenous domain possesses a structure similar to carboxy-terminal propeptides of fibrillar pro-alpha chains. Only six conserved cysteine residues are observed in A. marina compared with seven or eight in all other known C-propeptides. This provides information on the importance of disulfide bonds in C-propeptide interactions and in the collagen-assembly process. Phylogenetic studies indicate that the fibrillar collagen 1alpha chain of A. marina is homologous to the R. pachyptila interstitial collagen and that the FAm1alpha gene evolved independently from the other alpha-chain genes. Complementary analyses indicate that the vertebrate fibrillar collagen family is composed of two monophyletic subgroups with a specific position of the collagen type-V chains. PMID:9210465

  16. Experimental microbial contamination and disinfection of dry (vapour) shipper dewars designed for short-term storage and transportation of cryopreserved germplasm and other biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Bielanski, A

    2005-04-15

    Cryopreservation, storage and transport of cryopreserved germplasm without the risk of disease transmission is of great concern to animal and human health authorities. Here we report on the efficacy of microbial decontamination of the liquid nitrogen (LN) dry (vapour) shippers used for short-term storage and transportation of germplasm and other biological specimens. Dry shippers containing either a hydrophobic or a non-hydrophobic LN absorbent were experimentally contaminated with high titers of cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococus aureus, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1). Biocidals with broad spectrum antimicrobial activity and gas vapours of formalin and ethylene oxide were used for disinfection of the dewars. Among the biocidals used, treatment with sodium hypochlorite solution, the quaternary ammonium-based disinfectants and peracetic acid were the most effective and useful for dry shippers with a hydrophobic LN absorbent. None of the bacterial or viral microorganisms were detected in samples of semen and embryos stored in dry shippers following their disinfection with these biocides. An application of some other disinfectants, due to their foaming properties or to the permeability of the absorbent hydrophobic membrane (HM) was not effective or may have caused irreversible damage to the LN absorbent. Gas sterilization by ethylene oxide in contrast to formalin was fully effective for both types of dry shippers. PMID:15823351

  17. Relative biological effectiveness of fission neutrons for producing micronuclei in the root-tip cells of onion seedlings after irradiation as dry seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyi; Endo, Satoru; Ishikawa, Masayori; Ikeda, Hideo; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-12-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of mixed neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted at a 252Cf source at the Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, compared with 60Co gamma-ray radiation was determined. The tissue-absorbed dose contribution of the accompanying gamma radiation was about 35.7% to the total tissue-absorbed dose from the 252Cf mixed radiation. The 252Cf mixed radiation and 60Co gamma rays produced approximate linear changes in the frequency of micronuclei induced in root-tip cells of Allium cepa L. onion seedlings after irradiation as dry dormant seeds with varying absorbed doses in onion seeds. Therefore, the RBE for radiation-induced micronuclei was calculated as the ratio of the slopes for the 252Cf mixed radiation and the 60Co gamma rays. The deduced RBE value of 252Cf mixed radiation to 60Co gamma rays to induce micronuclei in dry dormant onion seed cells was about 90.5 +/- 3.6 (+/- 1sigma); the RBE of neutrons from the 252Cf mixed radiation was about 150 +/- 6 (+/- 1sigma). Furthermore, the sensitivity ratio of the induction rate of micronuclei in dry dormant seeds to that in seedlings by neutrons from 252Cf mixed radiation was significantly different from that by 60Co gamma rays. From these results, we concluded that the repair efficiency of DNA damage induced by neutrons may be different from that by gamma rays. PMID:12674204

  18. Infrared nanospectroscopy characterization of oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates during amyloid formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, F. S.; Longo, G.; Faggiano, S.; Lipiec, E.; Pastore, A.; Dietler, G.

    2015-07-01

    Amyloids are insoluble protein fibrillar aggregates. The importance of characterizing their aggregation has steadily increased because of their link to human diseases and material science applications. In particular, misfolding and aggregation of the Josephin domain of ataxin-3 is implicated in spinocerebellar ataxia-3. Infrared nanospectroscopy, simultaneously exploiting atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, can characterize at the nanoscale the conformational rearrangements of proteins during their aggregation. Here we demonstrate that we can individually characterize the oligomeric and fibrillar species formed along the amyloid aggregation. We describe their secondary structure, monitoring at the nanoscale an α-to-β transition, and couple these studies with an independent measurement of the evolution of their intrinsic stiffness. These results suggest that the aggregation of Josephin proceeds from the monomer state to the formation of spheroidal intermediates with a native structure. Only successively, these intermediates evolve into misfolded aggregates and into the final fibrils.

  19. Infrared nanospectroscopy characterization of oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates during amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, F. S.; Longo, G.; Faggiano, S.; Lipiec, E.; Pastore, A.; Dietler, G.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloids are insoluble protein fibrillar aggregates. The importance of characterizing their aggregation has steadily increased because of their link to human diseases and material science applications. In particular, misfolding and aggregation of the Josephin domain of ataxin-3 is implicated in spinocerebellar ataxia-3. Infrared nanospectroscopy, simultaneously exploiting atomic force microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, can characterize at the nanoscale the conformational rearrangements of proteins during their aggregation. Here we demonstrate that we can individually characterize the oligomeric and fibrillar species formed along the amyloid aggregation. We describe their secondary structure, monitoring at the nanoscale an α-to-β transition, and couple these studies with an independent measurement of the evolution of their intrinsic stiffness. These results suggest that the aggregation of Josephin proceeds from the monomer state to the formation of spheroidal intermediates with a native structure. Only successively, these intermediates evolve into misfolded aggregates and into the final fibrils. PMID:26215704

  20. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    PubMed

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives. PMID:25244526

  1. Biologically inspired polymer microfibers with spatulate tips as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok; Sitti, Metin

    2006-12-01

    Being inspired by gecko foot hairs, microfibers with flat spatulate tips are proposed as repeatable adhesives. They are fabricated by molding a master template fabricated using deep reactive ion etching and the notching effect. Fabricated polyurethane fiber arrays with 4.5μm fiber and 9μm tip diameter demonstrated macroscale adhesion pressures up to 18N/cm2 and overall work of adhesion up to 11J/m2 on a 6mm diameter glass hemisphere for a preload pressure of 12N/cm2. These results show around four times higher adhesion and five times higher overall work of adhesion as compared to the flat polyurethane surface.

  2. In vivo evidence for the fibrillar structures of Sup35 prions in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Pack, Chan-Gi; Kojidani, Tomoko; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Kinjo, Masataka; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hirata, Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Yeast prion [PSI+] is caused by aggregated structures of the Sup35 protein. Although Sup35 forms typical amyloid fibrils in vitro, there is no direct evidence for the fibrillar structures of Sup35 in vivo. We analyzed [PSI+] cells in which Sup35 fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) formed aggregates visible by fluorescence microscopy using thin-section electron microscopy (EM). Rapid-freeze EM combined with an immunogold-labeling technique as well as correlative light EM, which allows high-resolution imaging by EM of the same structure observed by light (fluorescence) microscopy, shows that the aggregates contain bundled fibrillar structures of Sup35-GFP. Additional biochemical and fluorescent correlation spectroscopy results suggest that the Sup35 oligomers diffused in the [PSI+] lysates adopt fibril-like shapes. Our findings demonstrate that [PSI+] cells contain Sup35 fibrillar structures closely related to those formed in vitro and provide insight into the molecular mechanism by which Sup35 aggregates are assembled and remodeled in [PSI+] cells. PMID:20643880

  3. Amyloid structure--one but not the same: the many levels of fibrillar polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jesper S; Andersen, Christian B; Otzen, Daniel E

    2010-11-01

    Many proteins and peptides can form amyloid-like structures both in vivo and in vitro. Although strikingly similar fibrillar structures can be observed across a variety of amino acid sequences, the fibrils formed often exhibit a stunning wealth of polymorphisms at the level of electron or atomic force microscopy. This appears to violate the Anfinsen principle seen for globular proteins, where each protein sequence codes for just one well-defined fold. To a large extent, polymorphism reflects variable packing of a single protofilament structure in the mature fibrils. However, we and others have recently demonstrated that polymorphism can also reflect real structural differences in the molecular packing of the polypeptide chains leading to several possible protofilament structures and diverse mature fibrillar structures. Glucagon has been a particularly useful model system for studying the fibrillogenesis mechanisms that lead to the formation of structural polymorphism, thanks to its single tryptophan residue and the availability of large quantities at pharmaceutical-grade quality. Combinations of structural investigations and seed extension experiments have revealed the reproducible formation of at least five different self-propagating fibril types from subtle variations in growth conditions. These reflect the underlying complexity of the peptide conformational landscape and provide a link to natively disordered proteins, where structure is dictated by context in the form of different binding partners. Here we review some of the latest advances in the study of glucagon fibrillar polymorphism and their implications for mechanisms of fibril formation in general. PMID:20977663

  4. Amphiphilic beads as depots for sustained drug release integrated into fibrillar scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Mihaila, Silvia M; Kulkarni, Ashish A; Patel, Alpesh; Di Luca, Andrea; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-08-10

    Native extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex fibrous structure loaded with bioactive cues that affects the surrounding cells. A promising strategy to mimicking native tissue architecture for tissue engineering applications is to engineer fibrous scaffolds using electrospinning. By loading appropriate bioactive cues within these fibrous scaffolds, various cellular functions such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation can be regulated. Here, we report on the encapsulation and sustained release of a model hydrophobic drug (dexamethasone (Dex)) within beaded fibrillar scaffold of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT), a polyether-ester multiblock copolymer to direct differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The amphiphilic beads act as depots for sustained drug release that is integrated into the fibrillar scaffolds. The entrapment of Dex within the beaded structure results in sustained release of the drug over the period of 28days. This is mainly attributed to the diffusion driven release of Dex from the amphiphilic electrospun scaffolds. In vitro results indicate that hMSCs cultured on Dex containing beaded fibrillar scaffolds exhibit an increase in osteogenic differentiation potential, as evidenced by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, compared to the direct infusion of Dex in the culture medium. The formation of a mineralized matrix is also significantly enhanced due to the controlled Dex release from the fibrous scaffolds. This approach can be used to engineer scaffolds with appropriate chemical cues to direct tissue regeneration. PMID:24794894

  5. Self-assembly of collagen fibers. Influence of fibrillar alignment and decorin on mechanical properties.

    PubMed Central

    Pins, G D; Christiansen, D L; Patel, R; Silver, F H

    1997-01-01

    Collagen is the primary structural element in extracellular matrices. In the form of fibers it acts to transmit forces, dissipate energy, and prevent premature mechanical failure in normal tissues. Deformation of collagen fibers involves molecular stretching and slippage, fibrillar slippage, and, ultimately, defibrillation. Our laboratory has developed a process for self-assembly of macroscopic collagen fibers that have structures and mechanical properties similar to rat tail tendon fibers. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of subfibrillar orientation and decorin incorporation on the mechanical properties of collagen fibers. Self-assembled collagen fibers were stretched 0-50% before cross-linking and then characterized by microscopy and mechanical testing. Results of these studies indicate that fibrillar orientation, packing, and ultimate tensile strength can be increased by stretching. In addition, it is shown that decorin incorporation increases ultimate tensile strength of uncross-linked fibers. Based on the observed results it is hypothesized that decorin facilitates fibrillar slippage during deformation and thereby improves the tensile properties of collagen fibers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9336212

  6. A Chemical Screening Approach Reveals that Indole Flourescence is Quenched by Pre-Fibrillar But Not Fibrillar Amyloid-β

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Ashley A.; Seh, Han Yiau; Gestwicki, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    Aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease. In vitro and in vivo, these aggregates are found in a variety of morphologies, including globular oligomers and linear fibrils, which possess distinct biological activities. However, known chemical probes, including the dyes thioflavin T and Congo Red, appear to lack selectivity for specific amyloid structures. To identify molecules that might differentiate between these architectures, we employed a fluorescence-based interaction assay to screen a collection of 68 known Aβ ligands against pre-formed oligomers and fibrils. In these studies, we found that the fluorescence of five indole-based compounds was selectively quenched (~15%) in the presence of oligomers, but remained unchanged after addition of fibrils. These results suggest that indoles might be complementary to existing chemical probes for studying amyloid formation in vitro. PMID:19640715

  7. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  8. Pre-fibrillar α-synuclein variants with impaired β-structure increase neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease models

    PubMed Central

    Karpinar, Damla Pinar; Balija, Madhu Babu Gajula; Kügler, Sebastian; Opazo, Felipe; Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Wender, Nora; Kim, Hai-Young; Taschenberger, Grit; Falkenburger, Björn H; Heise, Henrike; Kumar, Ashutosh; Riedel, Dietmar; Fichtner, Lars; Voigt, Aaron; Braus, Gerhard H; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Herzig, Alf; Baldus, Marc; Jäckle, Herbert; Eimer, Stefan; Schulz, Jörg B; Griesinger, Christian; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The relation of α-synuclein (αS) aggregation to Parkinson's disease (PD) has long been recognized, but the mechanism of toxicity, the pathogenic species and its molecular properties are yet to be identified. To obtain insight into the function different aggregated αS species have in neurotoxicity in vivo, we generated αS variants by a structure-based rational design. Biophysical analysis revealed that the αS mutants have a reduced fibrillization propensity, but form increased amounts of soluble oligomers. To assess their biological response in vivo, we studied the effects of the biophysically defined pre-fibrillar αS mutants after expression in tissue culture cells, in mammalian neurons and in PD model organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. The results show a striking correlation between αS aggregates with impaired β-structure, neuronal toxicity and behavioural defects, and they establish a tight link between the biophysical properties of multimeric αS species and their in vivo function. PMID:19745811

  9. Fibrillar polysaccharides in marine macromolecular organic matter as imaged by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, P.H.; Balnois, E.; Wilkinson, K.J.; Zhang, J.; Buffle, J.; Guo, L.

    1998-07-01

    A consensus is now emerging that the structure of organic macromolecules will determine their function in aquatic systems. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are highly complementary techniques for the study of natural colloids and can, when used together, reveal complementary information about the relative abundance and structures of aquatic macromolecules and colloids. In this study, colloid samples from the Gulf of Mexico and Middle Atlantic Bight of nominal sizes 1--200 nm were collected by cross-flow ultrafiltration, diafiltered, and freeze-dried. Rehydrated colloids were analyzed in parallel by AFM and TEM using standardized techniques. Results from estuarine, surface-, and deep-water samples show that an important fraction of colloidal organic matter (COM) consists of fibrillar material, which is rich in polysaccharides and fresher (i.e., has a younger radiocarbon age) than the bulk COM. This result is important because COM makes up 30--70% of oceanic and estuarine nominally dissolved organic matter. Other microparticles appear to be quasi-spherical, often attached to the fibrils like pearls. In the surface waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Middle Atlantic Bight, and Trinity River, fibrils with diameters of 1--3 nm and lengths of 100--2,000 nm were predominant. Although fibrils were also observed in samples from the benthic nepheloid layer in the Gulf of Mexico (1,600 m) and Middle Atlantic Bight (2,600 m), a much greater heterogeneity of colloid and macromolecule shapes and sizes was observed in these deeper waters.

  10. Fabrication of injectable, cellular, anisotropic collagen tissue equivalents with modular fibrillar densities.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Benedetto; Ghezzi, Chiara E; James-Bhasin, Mark; Nazhat, Showan N

    2015-01-01

    Technological improvements in collagen gel fabrication are highly desirable as they may enable significant advances in the formation of tissue-equivalent biomaterials for regenerative medicine, three-dimensional (3D) in vitro tissue models, and injectable scaffolds for cell and drug delivery applications. Thus, strategies to modulate collagen gel fibrillar density and organization in the mesostructure have been pursued to fabricate collagenous matrices with extracellular matrix-like features. Herein, we introduce a robust and simple method, namely gel aspiration-ejection (GAE), to engineer 3D, anisotropic, cell seeded, injectable dense collagen (I-DC) gels with controllable fibrillar densities, without the use of crosslinking. GAE allows for the hybridization of collagen gels with bioactive agents for increased functionality and supports highly aligned homogenous cell seeding, thus providing I-DC gels with distinct properties when compared to isotropic DC gels of random fibrillar orientation. The hybridization of I-DC with anionic fibroin derived polypeptides resulted in the nucleation of carbonated hydroxyapatite within the aligned nanofibrillar network upon exposure to simulated body fluid, yielding a 3D, anisotropic, mineralized collagen matrix. In addition, I-DC gels accelerated the osteoblastic differentiation of seeded murine mesenchymal stem cells (m-MSCs) when exposed to osteogenic supplements, which resulted in the cell-mediated, bulk mineralization of the osteoid-like gels. In addition, and upon exposure to neuronal transdifferentiation medium, I-DC gels supported and accelerated the differentiation of m-MSCs toward neuronal cells. In conclusion, collagen GAE presents interesting opportunities in a number of fields spanning tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to drug and cell delivery. PMID:25453949

  11. Label-free, sensitivity detection of fibrillar fibrin using gold nanoparticle-based chemiluminescence system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanfu; Liu, Jifeng; Liu, Ting; Li, Haibo; Xue, Qingwang; Li, Rui; Wang, Lei; Yue, Qiaoli; Wang, Shuhao

    2016-03-15

    A novel, label-free, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based chemiluminescence assay has been developed for the detection of fibrillar fibrin. The method relied on the interaction of fibrinogen (Fib) with AuNPs and the aggregated AuNPs induce a strong luminol-H2O2 chemiluminesecence (CL) signal. We prepared the 12-nm-diameter AuNPs which well dispersed in the solution. Fib was absorbed on the surface of AuNPs against the aggregation of AuNPs in 1.0M NaCl. Otherwise, Fib was catalyzed to form fibrillar fibrin in the presence of thrombin. The fibrin induced AuNPs aggregated in the presence of NaCl solution. The catalytic activity of aggregated AuNPs on the luminol-H2O2 CL reaction is greatly enhanced. This allows us to utilize the luminol-H2O2 CL system for quantitative analysis of thrombin, which was used to denote fibrosis degree of Fib. The assay showed a linear toward fibrillar fibrin concentration in the range of 2.7 × 10(-15)-2.7 × 10(-13)M with a correlation of 0.9920. The limit of detection for fibrin was experimentally determined to be 1 fM, based on a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of 3. Relative to conventional methods, this method offers the advantages of higher sensitivity and selectivity and lower cost, showing great potential for medical diagnosis. PMID:26397422

  12. Depth profiling of the elemental surface composition of the oral microorganism S. salivarius HB and fibrillar mutants by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, H C; Handley, P S; Busscher, H J

    1992-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) on microbial cell surfaces requires freeze-drying of cells, and as a result, the cell surface appendages flatten out on the cell surface and form a collapsed fibrillar mass. At present, it is unclear how the density, length and composition of these fibrils influence the elemental surface composition as probed by XPS. The sampling depth of XPS can be varied by changing the electron take-off angle. In this article, we made a depth profiling of the collapsed fibrillar mass of Streptococcus salivarius HB and fibril-deficient mutants by angle-dependent XPS. Methylamine tungstate negative staining and ruthenium red staining followed by sectioning revealed distinct classes of fibrils with various lengths on each of the strains. Interpretation of the angle dependence of the oxygen/carbon (O/C) and phosphorus/carbon (P/C) surface concentration ratios of these strains was difficult. However, the angle dependence of the nitrogen/carbon (N/C) surface concentration ratio could be fully interpreted: N/C did not vary with sampling depth on a bald strain, S. salivarius HBC12 and on S. salivarius HB7, a strain with a dense array of fibrils of uniform length. N/C decreased with sampling depth in case of a sparsely fibrillated strain, S. salivarius HBV51 and eventually reached the value observed for the bald strain, HBC12. A high N/C at small sampling depth was observed for S. salivarius HB with protruding, protein rich fibrils. We conclude that elemental depth profiling of microbial cell surfaces by XPS can be interpreted to coincide with structural and biochemical information on the cell surface as obtained by electron microscopy and can therefore be considered as a useful technique to study structural features of cell surfaces in combination with electron microscopy. PMID:1284785

  13. Chemical composition and biological value of spray dried porcine blood by-products and bone protein hydrolysate for young chickens.

    PubMed

    Jamroz, D; Wiliczkiewicz, A; Orda, J; Skorupińska, J; Słupczyńska, M; Kuryszko, J

    2011-10-01

    The chemical composition of spray dried porcine blood by-products is characterised by wide variation in crude protein contents. In spray dried porcine blood plasma (SDBP) it varied between 670-780 g/kg, in spray dried blood cells (SDBC) between 830-930 g/kg, and in bone protein hydrolysate (BPH) in a range of 740-780 g/kg. Compared with fish meal, these feeds are poor in Met and Lys. Moreover, in BPH deep deficits of Met, Cys, Thr and other amino acids were found. The experiment comprised 7 dietary treatments: SDBP, SDBC, and BPH, each at an inclusion rate of 20 or 40 g/kg diet, plus a control. The addition of 20 or 40 g/kg of the analysed meals into feeds for very young chickens (1-28 d post hatch) significantly decreased the body weight (BW) of birds. Only the treatments with 40 g/kg of SDBP and SDBC showed no significant difference in BW as compared with the control. There were no significant differences between treatments and type of meal for feed intake, haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations in blood. Addition of bone protein and blood cell meals to feed decreased the IgG concentration in blood and caused shortening of the femur and tibia bones. However, changes in the mineral composition of bones were not significantly affected by the type of meal used. The blood by-products, which are rich in microelements, improved retention of Ca and Cu only. In comparison to control chickens, significantly better accretion of these minerals was found in treatments containing 20 g/kg of SDBP or 40 g/kg of SDBC. Great variability in apparent ileal amino acid digestibility in chickens was determined. In this respect, some significant differences related to the type of meal fed were confirmed for Asp, Pro, Val, Tyr and His. In general, the apparent ileal digestibility of amino acids was about 2-3 percentage units better in chickens fed on diets containing the animal by products than in control birds. PMID:22029787

  14. Complex formation of blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) anthocyanins during freeze-drying and its influence on their biological activity.

    PubMed

    Correa-Betanzo, Julieta; Padmanabhan, Priya; Corredig, Milena; Subramanian, Jayasankar; Paliyath, Gopinadhan

    2015-03-25

    Biological activity of polyphenols is influenced by their uptake and is highly influenced by their interactions with the food matrix. This study evaluated the complex formation of blueberry polyphenols with fruit matrixes such as pectin and cellulose and their effect on the biological and antiproliferative properties of human colon cell lines HT-29 and CRL 1790. Free or complexed polyphenols were isolated by dialyzing aqueous or methanolic blueberry homogenates. Seven phenolic compounds and thirteen anthocyanins were identified in blueberry extracts. Blueberry extracts showed varying degrees of antioxidant and antiproliferative activities, as well as α-glucosidase activity. Fruit matrix containing cellulose and pectin, or purified polygalacturonic acid and cellulose, did not retain polyphenols and showed very low antioxidant or antiproliferative activities. These findings suggest that interactions between polyphenols and the food matrix may be more complex than a simple association and may play an important role in the bioefficacy of blueberry polyphenols. PMID:25727778

  15. Nitrogen compounds in wine during its biological aging by two flor film yeasts: An approach to accelerated biological aging of dry sherry-type wines.

    PubMed

    Mauricio, J C; Ortega, J M

    1997-01-20

    Urea, ammonium, and free amino acid contents were quantified in biological aging of a young wine under two flor film forming yeast strains, Saccharomyces cerevisiae race capensis and S. cerevisiae race bayanus, and compared. Cell viability in the film was different for the two yeast strains. Thus, capensis maintained a much greater number of viable cells per surface area than bayanus and hence used greater amount of nitrogen compounds. The main source of nitrogen for the yeasts during the biological aging process was L-proline. The two yeast strains also differed in the amounts of assimilable nitrogen they utilized, in their preferences for amino acid consumption, and kinetics. To accelerate the aging process, the effect of controlled monthly aeration of the wine aged with capensis strain was investigated. The results revealed that short aeration did not appreciably increase the overall consumption of assimilable nitrogen, but consumption of some nitrogen compounds was accelerated (particularly L-proline, L-tryptophan, L-glutamic acid, ammonium ion, L-lysine, and L-arginine); the use of L-ornithine was inhibited; and GABA, L-methionine, and urea were depletes. Probably the aeration increases the aroma compounds, thereby producing wines with improved sensory properties. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18633960

  16. Stochastic Formation of Fibrillar and Amorphous Superoxide Dismutase Oligomers Linked to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Abdolvahabi, Alireza; Shi, Yunhua; Chuprin, Aleksandra; Rasouli, Sanaz; Shaw, Bryan F

    2016-06-15

    Recent reports suggest that the nucleation and propagation of oligomeric superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) is effectively stochastic in vivo and in vitro. This perplexing kinetic variability-observed for other proteins and frequently attributed to experimental error-plagues attempts to discern how SOD1 mutations and post-translational modifications linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) affect SOD1 aggregation. This study used microplate fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering to measure rates of fibrillar and amorphous SOD1 aggregation at high iteration (ntotal = 1.2 × 10(3)). Rates of oligomerization were intrinsically irreproducible and populated continuous probability distributions. Modifying reaction conditions to mimic random and systematic experimental error could not account for kinetic outliers in standard assays, suggesting that stochasticity is not an experimental artifact, rather an intrinsic property of SOD1 oligomerization (presumably caused by competing pathways of oligomerization). Moreover, mean rates of fibrillar and amorphous nucleation were not uniformly increased by mutations that cause ALS; however, mutations did increase kinetic noise (variation) associated with nucleation and propagation. The stochastic aggregation of SOD1 provides a plausible statistical framework to rationalize how a pathogenic mutation can increase the probability of oligomer nucleation within a single cell, without increasing the mean rate of nucleation across an entire population of cells. PMID:26979728

  17. Capsules of the diatom Achnanthidium minutissimum arise from fibrillar precursors and foster attachment of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kroth, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Achnanthidium minutissimum is a benthic freshwater diatom that forms biofilms on submerged surfaces in aquatic environments. Within these biofilms, A. minutissimum cells produce extracellular structures which facilitate substrate adhesion, such as stalks and capsules. Both consist of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), but the microstructure and development stages of the capsules are so far unknown, despite a number of hypotheses about their function, including attachment and protection. We coupled scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to bright-field microscopy (BFM) and found that A. minutissimum capsules mostly possess an unstructured surface. However, capsule material that was mechanically stressed by being stretched between or around cells displayed fibrillar substructures. Fibrils were also found on the frustules of non-encapsulated cells, implicating that A. minutissimum capsules may develop from fibrillar precursors. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy revealed that the capsule material do not contain silicon, distinguishing it from the frustule material. We furthermore show that bacteria preferentially attach to capsules, instead of non-encapsulated A. minutissimum cells, which supports the idea that capsules mediate diatom-bacteria interactions. PMID:25834772

  18. Electrochemical immunosensors for effective evaluation of amyloid-beta modulators on oligomeric and fibrillar aggregation processes.

    PubMed

    Veloso, Anthony J; Chow, Ari M; Ganesh, Hashwin V S; Li, Nan; Dhar, Devjani; Wu, David C H; Mikhaylichenko, S; Brown, Ian R; Kerman, Kagan

    2014-05-20

    A novel electrochemical immunosensor fabricated from gold compact disc electrodes was designed for rapid evaluation of aggregation processes that lead to the formation of oligomeric and fibrillar states of amyloid-beta(1-42) (Aβ(1-42)) during Alzheimer's disease. Conformation-specific antibodies were immobilized on the surface of the gold electrode using a 3,3'-dithiobis (sulfosuccinimidyl) propionate (DTSSP) linker. Surface binding events were analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in which the formation of an antigen-antibody complex was quantified as a function of charge transfer resistance using a [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) redox probe. The effectiveness of novel sym-triazine-derived aggregation modulators (TAE-1, TAE-2) to reduce the population of toxic oligomers was evaluated. Aβ fibril formation was validated by thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, whereas oligomer formation was investigated by MALDI. Antigen detection by EIS was further supported by immuno dot blot assays for oligomeric and fibrillar components. Docking simulations of the aggregation modulators TAE-1 and TAE-2 with Aβ(1-42) fibrils performed using Autodock Vina suggest a mechanism for the improved aggregation inhibition observed for TAE-2. The results demonstrate the utility and convenience of impedance immunosensing as an analytical tool for rapid and comprehensive evaluation of effective Aβ aggregation modulating agents. PMID:24784791

  19. Dense fibrillar collagen is a potent inducer of invadopodia via a specific signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Swatkoski, Stephen; Matsumoto, Kazue; Campbell, Catherine B.; Petrie, Ryan J.; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Li, Xin; Mueller, Susette C.; Bugge, Thomas H.; Gucek, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) can regulate multiple cellular activities and the matrix itself in dynamic, bidirectional processes. One such process is local proteolytic modification of the ECM. Invadopodia of tumor cells are actin-rich proteolytic protrusions that locally degrade matrix molecules and mediate invasion. We report that a novel high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrix is a potent inducer of invadopodia, both in carcinoma cell lines and in primary human fibroblasts. In carcinoma cells, HDFC matrix induced formation of invadopodia via a specific integrin signaling pathway that did not require growth factors or even altered gene and protein expression. In contrast, phosphoproteomics identified major changes in a complex phosphosignaling network with kindlin2 serine phosphorylation as a key regulatory element. This kindlin2-dependent signal transduction network was required for efficient induction of invadopodia on dense fibrillar collagen and for local degradation of collagen. This novel phosphosignaling mechanism regulates cell surface invadopodia via kindlin2 for local proteolytic remodeling of the ECM. PMID:25646088

  20. Humidity-enhanced wet adhesion on insect-inspired fibrillar adhesive pads

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Longjian; Kovalev, Alexander; Eichler-Volf, Anna; Steinhart, Martin; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2015-01-01

    Many insect species reversibly adhere to surfaces by combining contact splitting (contact formation via fibrillar contact elements) and wet adhesion (supply of liquid secretion via pores in the insects’ feet). Here, we fabricate insect-inspired fibrillar pads for wet adhesion containing continuous pore systems through which liquid is supplied to the contact interfaces. Synergistic interaction of capillarity and humidity-induced pad softening increases the pull-off force and the work of adhesion by two orders of magnitude. This increase and the independence of pull-off force on the applied load are caused by the capillarity-supported formation of solid–solid contact between pad and the surface. Solid–solid contact dominates adhesion at high humidity and capillarity at low humidity. At low humidity, the work of adhesion strongly depends on the amount of liquid deposited on the surface and, therefore, on contact duration. These results may pave the way for the design of insect-inspired adhesive pads. PMID:25791574

  1. Bis-GMA/TEGDMA Dental Composites Reinforced with Electrospun Nylon 6 Nanocomposite Nanofibers Containing Highly Aligned Fibrillar Silicate Single Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ming; Gao, Yi; Liu, Yi; Liao, Yiliang; Xu, Riwei; Hedin, Nyle E.; Fong, Hao

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the reinforcement of electrospun nylon 6/fibrillar silicate nanocomposite nanofibers on Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental composites. The hypothesis was that the uniform distribution of nano-scaled and highly aligned fibrillar silicate single crystals into electrospun nylon 6 nanofibers would improve the mechanical properties of the resulting nanocomposite nanofibers, and would lead to the effective reinforcement of dental composites. The nylon 6/fibrillar silicate nanocomposite nanofibers were crystalline, structurally oriented and had an average diameter of approximately 250 nm. To relatively well distribute nanofibers in dental composites, the nanofiber containing composite powders with a particle structure similar to that in interpenetration networks were prepared first, and then used to make the dental composites. The results indicated that small mass fractions (1 % and 2 %) of nanofiber impregnation improved the mechanical properties substantially, while larger mass factions (4 % and 8 %) of nanofiber impregnation resulted in less desired mechanical properties. PMID:17940586

  2. Dried blood spot on-card derivatization: an alternative form of sample handling to overcome the instability of thiorphan in biological matrix.

    PubMed

    Mess, Jean-Nicholas; Taillon, Marie-Pierre; Côté, Cynthia; Garofolo, Fabio

    2012-12-01

    Thiorphan, the active metabolite of racecadotril, can undergo oxidation in biological matrices such as blood and plasma. In bioanalysis, a general approach for the stabilization of such a molecule is to derivatize the thiol group to a more stable thioether, often requiring complex handling procedures at the clinical site. In this research, the concept of dried blood spot (DBS) on-card derivatization was evaluated to stabilize thiorphan. DBS cards were in-house pre-treated with 2-bromo-3'-methoxyacetophenone and left to dry prior to blood spotting. Thiorphan was shown to be effectively derivatized to thiorphan-methoxyacetophenone once applied on the in-house pre-treated cards. Thiorphan-methoxyacetophenone was extracted by soaking a 6 mm DBS punch in methanol containing the internal standard (thiorphan-methoxyacetophenone-D₅). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters XBridge C₁₈ column with a gradient elution of 5 mM NH₄HCO₃ and methanol in 2.5 min and detection by ESI(+)/MS/MS. A linear (weighted 1/x²) relationship was obtained over a concentration range of 5.00-600.00 ng/mL. The assay met regulatory guidelines acceptance criteria for sensitivity, selectivity, precision and accuracy, matrix effect, recovery, dilution integrity and multiple stability evaluations. The DBS on-card derivatization has shown to be an easy and reliable alternative form of sample collection for the quantification of thiorphan. PMID:22511292

  3. A biologically active delivery material with dried-rehydrated vesicles containing the anti-inflammatory diclofenac for potential wound healing.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Helena; Silva, Raquel; Matamá, Teresa; Silva, Carla; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds usually remain in the inflammatory phase of the healing process during several months or even years. Hence, a continuous research has been resulting in the development of wound dressings with improved performance. Herein, we report a delivery system for cutaneous wound healing, consisting of a textile material (non-woven gauzes) covered with lipidic vesicles containing diclofenac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This study also aims to compare the entrapment efficiency data with previous works and confirm that this parameter and drug amount are not directly correlated. A method of dehydration-rehydration of the liposomes presenting different sizes and lamellarities was used to assess the best conditions to attain the highest drug entrapment efficiency. Optimum conditions for the NSAID release were achieved with high phospholipid concentrations and dried-rehydrated vesicles (DRVs) prepared from multilamellar liposomes (MLVs). A chemical activation of the gauzes was performed to enhance the vesicles attachment, also contributing to a higher drug amount in the surrounding media. In spite of the entrapment efficiency being lower comparatively with other values presented by us previously, the diclofenac concentration was considerably higher in this formulation. Entrapment efficiency is, therefore, not sufficient per se to define the real amount of drug contained in the formulation. The cytocompatibility assessment in human skin fibroblasts showed that DRVs from MLVs and DRVs from large unilamellar liposomes (LUVs) with less than 750 μM of egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC), containing diclofenac, were not cytotoxic after 72 h of contact, greatly implying potential for their application in the chronic wounds healing. PMID:26634871

  4. Uncovering the molecular machinery of the human spindle--an integration of wet and dry systems biology.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Ana M; Santamaria, Anna; Malik, Rainer; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Körner, Roman; Morilla, Ian; de Juan, David; Krallinger, Martin; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Hoffmann, Robert; Lees, Jonathan; Reid, Adam; Yeats, Corin; Wehner, Anja; Elowe, Sabine; Clegg, Andrew B; Brunak, Søren; Nigg, Erich A; Orengo, Christine; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A G

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is an essential molecular machine involved in cell division, whose composition has been studied extensively by detailed cellular biology, high-throughput proteomics, and RNA interference experiments. However, because of its dynamic organization and complex regulation it is difficult to obtain a complete description of its molecular composition. We have implemented an integrated computational approach to characterize novel human spindle components and have analysed in detail the individual candidates predicted to be spindle proteins, as well as the network of predicted relations connecting known and putative spindle proteins. The subsequent experimental validation of a number of predicted novel proteins confirmed not only their association with the spindle apparatus but also their role in mitosis. We found that 75% of our tested proteins are localizing to the spindle apparatus compared to a success rate of 35% when expert knowledge alone was used. We compare our results to the previously published MitoCheck study and see that our approach does validate some findings by this consortium. Further, we predict so-called "hidden spindle hub", proteins whose network of interactions is still poorly characterised by experimental means and which are thought to influence the functionality of the mitotic spindle on a large scale. Our analyses suggest that we are still far from knowing the complete repertoire of functionally important components of the human spindle network. Combining integrated bio-computational approaches and single gene experimental follow-ups could be key to exploring the still hidden regions of the human spindle system. PMID:22427808

  5. Effect of biological type of cattle on the incidence of the dark, firm, and dry condition in the longissimus muscle.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M; Wheeler, T L; Cundiff, L V; Dikeman, M E

    1994-02-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to characterize longissimus muscle color, texture, and firmness for beef carcasses of diverse biological types and to determine the genetic parameters of lean color, texture, and firmness. The carcasses (n = 3,641) used in this experiment were from steers produced by mating Angus, Brahman, Braunvieh, Charolais, Chianina, Galloway, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Jersey, Limousin, Longhorn, Maine Anjou, Nellore, Piedmontese, Pinzgauer, Red Poll, Sahiwal, Salers, Shorthorn, Simmental, South Devon, and Tarentaise sires to Hereford and Angus dams. Steers were fed a corn-corn silage diet from weaning until slaughter at 356 to 575 d of age. Steers were slaughtered at commercial packing plants and longissimus muscle color, texture, and firmness were scored by trained carcass evaluators. Sire line least squares means for lean color, texture, and firmness ranged approximately one unit on a 7-point scale. Chianina crosses had darker-colored lean than all breed groups except Tarentaise and Simmental crosses (P < .05). Moreover, a higher percentage (P < .05) of Chianina crosses than of all other breed groups had unacceptably dark-colored ("dark red" or darker) lean. Bos indicus sire lines were not different from Bos taurus sire lines in frequency of carcasses with unacceptably dark-colored lean. However, Bos indicus crosses were more likely to be scored "very light cherry-red." Lean color and texture were lowly heritable, whereas lean firmness was moderately heritable. Thus, this experiment demonstrated that there is genetic variation in the incidence of the DFD condition; however, genetic variation was small relative to environmental variation. PMID:8157518

  6. Uncovering the Molecular Machinery of the Human Spindle—An Integration of Wet and Dry Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Roman; Morilla, Ian; de Juan, David; Krallinger, Martin; Hansen, Daniel Aaen; Hoffmann, Robert; Lees, Jonathan; Reid, Adam; Yeats, Corin; Wehner, Anja; Elowe, Sabine; Clegg, Andrew B.; Brunak, Søren; Nigg, Erich A.; Orengo, Christine; Valencia, Alfonso; Ranea, Juan A. G.

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is an essential molecular machine involved in cell division, whose composition has been studied extensively by detailed cellular biology, high-throughput proteomics, and RNA interference experiments. However, because of its dynamic organization and complex regulation it is difficult to obtain a complete description of its molecular composition. We have implemented an integrated computational approach to characterize novel human spindle components and have analysed in detail the individual candidates predicted to be spindle proteins, as well as the network of predicted relations connecting known and putative spindle proteins. The subsequent experimental validation of a number of predicted novel proteins confirmed not only their association with the spindle apparatus but also their role in mitosis. We found that 75% of our tested proteins are localizing to the spindle apparatus compared to a success rate of 35% when expert knowledge alone was used. We compare our results to the previously published MitoCheck study and see that our approach does validate some findings by this consortium. Further, we predict so-called “hidden spindle hub”, proteins whose network of interactions is still poorly characterised by experimental means and which are thought to influence the functionality of the mitotic spindle on a large scale. Our analyses suggest that we are still far from knowing the complete repertoire of functionally important components of the human spindle network. Combining integrated bio-computational approaches and single gene experimental follow-ups could be key to exploring the still hidden regions of the human spindle system. PMID:22427808

  7. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  8. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  9. Protein Fibrillar Nanopolymers: Molecular-Level Insights into Their Structural, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils represent a generic class of mechanically strong and stable biomaterials with extremely advantageous properties. Although amyloids were initially associated only with severe neurological disorders, the role of these structures nowadays is shifting from health debilitating to highly beneficial both in biomedical and technological aspects. Intensive involvement of fibrillar assemblies into the wide range of pathogenic and functional processes strongly necessitate the molecular level characterization of the structural, physical and elastic features of protein nanofibrils. In the present contribution, we made an attempt to highlight the up-to-date progress in the understanding of amyloid properties from the polymer physics standpoint. The fundamental insights into protein fibril behavior are essential not only for development of therapeutic strategies to combat the protein misfolding disorders but also for rational and precise design of novel biodegradable protein-based nanopolymers.

  10. Thermal Transitions of Fibrillar Collagen Unveiled by Second-Harmonic Generation Microscopy of Corneal Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Matteini, Paolo; Cicchi, Riccardo; Ratto, Fulvio; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Rossi, Francesca; de Angelis, Marella; Pavone, Francesco S.; Pini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The thermal transitions of fibrillar collagen are investigated with second-harmonic generation polarization anisotropy microscopy. Second-harmonic generation images and polarization anisotropy profiles of corneal stroma heated in the 35–80°C range are analyzed by means of a theoretical model that is suitable to probe principal intramolecular and interfibrillar parameters of immediate physiological interest. Our results depict the tissue modification with temperature as the interplay of three destructuration stages at different hierarchical levels of collagen assembly including its tertiary structure and interfibrillar alignment, thus supporting and extending previous findings. This method holds the promise of a quantitative inspection of fundamental biophysical and biochemical processes and may find future applications in real-time and postsurgical functional imaging of collagen-rich tissues subjected to thermal treatments. PMID:22995490

  11. Self-assembling and auto-crosslinkable hyaluronic acid hydrogels with a fibrillar structure.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, F S; Pitarresi, G; Albanese, A; Calascibetta, F; Giammona, G

    2010-01-01

    A hyaluronic acid derivative bearing pendant L-benzoyl-cysteine portions (with a derivatization degree equal to 10 mol.%) was synthesized by linking N,N'-dibenzoyl-L-cystine to the polysaccharide and then reducing its disulfide bridge to thiol groups. The formation of pi-pi stacking interactions between the benzoyl moieties was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy as a function of polymer concentration and oxidation time. The efficiency of oxidation of thiol groups to disulfide bridges occurring in phosphate buffer pH 7.4, was determined by colorimetric assays. The hydrogel formed by means of oxidative crosslinking has shown the presence of fibrillar aggregates as detected by light and scanning electron microscopy. Human derm fibroblasts were encapsulated into hydrogel-forming solution, and their ability to proliferate was tested during 3 days of culture. PMID:19531387

  12. Molecular Structure of Amyloid Fibrils Controls the Relationship between Fibrillar Size and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jin; Savtchenko, Regina; Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the prevailing view, soluble oligomers or small fibrillar fragments are considered to be the most toxic species in prion diseases. To test this hypothesis, two conformationally different amyloid states were produced from the same highly pure recombinant full-length prion protein (rPrP). The cytotoxic potential of intact fibrils and fibrillar fragments generated by sonication from these two states was tested using cultured cells. Methodology/Principal Findings For one amyloid state, fibril fragmentation was found to enhance its cytotoxic potential, whereas for another amyloid state formed within the same amino acid sequence, the fragmented fibrils were found to be substantially less toxic than the intact fibrils. Consistent with the previous studies, the toxic effects were more pronounced for cell cultures expressing normal isoform of the prion protein (PrPC) at high levels confirming that cytotoxicity was in part PrPC-dependent. Silencing of PrPC expression by small hairpin RNAs designed to silence expression of human PrPC (shRNA-PrPC) deminished the deleterious effects of the two amyloid states to a different extent, suggesting that the role of PrPC-mediated and PrPC-independent mechanisms depends on the structure of the aggregates. Conclusions/Significance This work provides a direct illustration that the relationship between an amyloid's physical dimension and its toxic potential is not unidirectional but is controlled by the molecular structure of prion protein (PrP) molecules within aggregated states. Depending on the structure, a decrease in size of amyloid fibrils can either enhance or abolish their cytotoxic effect. Regardless of the molecular structure or size of PrP aggregates, silencing of PrPC expression can be exploited to reduce their deleterious effects. PMID:21625461

  13. Deciphering Structural Intermediates and Genotoxic Fibrillar Aggregates of Albumins: A Molecular Mechanism Underlying for Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Aabgeena; Amani, Samreen

    2013-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins is involved in some of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders. The importance of human serum albumin (HSA) stems from the fact that it is involved in bio-regulatory and transport phenomena. Here the effect of acetonitrile (ACN) on the conformational stability of HSA and by comparison, ovalbumin (OVA) has been evaluated in the presence and absence of NaCl. The results show the presence of significant amount of secondary structure in HSA at 70% ACN and in OVA at 50% ACN, as evident from far-UV Circular Dichroism (CD) and Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier transformed infra red spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Tryptophan and 8-Anilino-1-Naphthalene-Sulphonic acid (ANS) fluorescence indicate altered tryptophan environment and high ANS binding suggesting a compact “molten globule”-like conformation with enhanced exposure of hydrophobic surface area. However, in presence of NaCl no intermediate state was observed. Detection of aggregates in HSA and OVA was possible at 90% ACN. Aggregates possess extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and ATR-FTIR. These aggregates exhibit increase Thioflavin T (Th T) fluorescence with a red shift of Congo red (CR) absorption spectrum. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis confirmed the presence of fibrillar aggregates. Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay of these fibrillar aggregates showed the DNA damage resulting in cell necrosis confirming their genotoxic nature. Some proteins not related to any human disease form fibrils in vitro. In the present study ACN gives access to a model system to study the process of aggregation. PMID:23342075

  14. In situ localization of two fibrillar collagens in two compact connective tissues by immunoelectron microscopy after cryotechnical processing.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, G; Gaill, F; Zylberberg, L

    1997-01-01

    Two fibrillar collagens, the worm cuticular collagen and the vertebrate Type I fish scale collagen, both organized in a compact tissue, were localized by immunogold electron microscopy in resin sections after freeze-fixation and freeze-substitution. Identification of these two fibrillar collagens failed with the use of postembedding labelling after conventional electron microscopic processing. Positive labeling of the Type I collagen was observed in sections of fish scales freeze-fixed by either slam-freezing or high-pressure freezing, freeze-substituted in acetone with or without osmium tetroxide, and embedded in LR White. The worm cuticular collagen was detected in sections of cuticle that were freeze-fixed, freeze-substituted (necessarily with osmium tetroxide added to acetone), and embedded in either LR White or Epon. It was also detected in specimens pre-fixed by aldehydes before freeze-fixation. The Type I fish scale collagen appears to be more sensitive than the fibrillar cuticular collagen of worms to the procedures employed for postembedding immunoelectron microscopy. Our results have shown that freeze-fixation and freeze-substitution preserved the antigenicity of the fibrillar collagens organized in a compact three-dimensional network, whereas immunolabeling failed after conventional electron microscopic procedures. These cryostabilization techniques appear to be of value to improve the immunolocalization of collagens. PMID:9010476

  15. Conversion of non-fibrillar {beta}-sheet oligomers into amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptide aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Benseny-Cases, Nuria; Cocera, Mercedes; Cladera, Josep

    2007-10-05

    A{beta}(1-40) is one of the main components of the fibrils found in amyloid plaques, a hallmark of brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. It is known that prior to the formation of amyloid fibrils in which the peptide adopts a well-ordered intermolecular {beta}-sheet structure, peptide monomers associate forming low and high molecular weight oligomers. These oligomers have been previously described in electron microscopy, AFM, and exclusion chromatography studies. Their specific secondary structures however, have not yet been well established. A major problem when comparing aggregation and secondary structure determinations in concentration-dependent processes such as amyloid aggregation is the different concentration range required in each type of experiment. In the present study we used the dye Thioflavin T (ThT), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and electron microscopy in order to structurally characterize the different aggregated species which form during the A{beta}(1-40) fibril formation process. A unique sample containing 90 {mu}M peptide was used. The results show that oligomeric species which form during the lag phase of the aggregation kinetics are a mixture of unordered, helical, and intermolecular non-fibrillar {beta}-structures. The number of oligomers and the amount of non-fibrillar {beta}-structures grows throughout the lag phase and during the elongation phase these non-fibrillar {beta}-structures are transformed into fibrillar (amyloid) {beta}-structures, formed by association of high molecular weight intermediates.

  16. Characterization of a fibrillar collagen gene in sponges reveals the early evolutionary appearance of two collagen gene families.

    PubMed Central

    Exposito, J Y; Garrone, R

    1990-01-01

    We have characterized cDNA and genomic clones coding for a sponge collagen. The partial cDNA has an open reading frame encoding 547 amino acid residues. The conceptual translation product contains a probably incomplete triple-helical domain (307 amino acids) with one Gly-Xaa-Yaa-Zaa imperfection in the otherwise perfect Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats and a carboxyl propeptide (240 amino acids) that includes 7 cysteine residues. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicate that this sponge collagen is homologous to vertebrate and sea urchin fibrillar collagens. Partial characterization of the corresponding gene reveals an intron-exon organization clearly related to the fibrillar collagen gene family. The exons coding for the triple-helical domain are 54 base pairs (bp) or multiples thereof, except for a 57-bp exon containing the Gly-Xaa-Yaa-Zaa coding sequence and for two unusual exons of 126 and 18 bp, respectively. This latter 18-bp exon marks the end of the triple-helical domain, contrary to the other known fibrillar collagen genes that contain exons coding for the junction between the triple-helical domain and the carboxyl propeptide. Compared to other fibrillar collagen genes, the introns are remarkably small. Hybridization to blotted RNAs established that the gene transcript is 4.9 kilobases. Together with previous results that showed the existence of a nonfibrillar collagen in the same species, these data demonstrate that at least two collagen gene families are represented in the most primitive metazoa. PMID:2395869

  17. Role of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene in the formation of beta1-integrin fibrillar adhesions.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Barragán, Miguel A; Avila, Pilar; Alvarez-Tejado, Miguel; Gutiérrez, M Dolores; García-Pardo, Angeles; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Landázuri, Manuel O

    2002-05-15

    The von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene (VHL) is absent or inactivated in the VHLcancer syndrome and in most sporadic renal cancers. VHL is requiredfor the assembly of a proper extracellular fibronectin matrix, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. In this report, we demonstrate that 786-O renal cancer cells are unable to organize an adequate matrix even in the presence of an excess of exogenous fibronectin. Because the formation of integrin fibrillar adhesions plays a pivotal role in the organization of extracellular fibronectin, we next examined the expression and subcellular distribution of integrins in VHL- cells and their wild-type VHL stably transfected counterparts. The levels of beta1 and alphav integrins were increased in VHL- cells when compared with VHL+ transfectants. Early after plating, both VHL+ and VHL- cells were capable of assembling classic "patch-like" alphav focal contacts. As the culture advanced and cells became confluent, alphav integrins partly relocated to the intercellular junctions in VHL+ transfectants, which then developed large beta1 fibrillar-type adhesions and anchored firmly to the substrate. In contrast, confluent VHL- cells were unable to assemble beta1 fibrillar adhesions, and alphav focal contacts remained unchanged at all stages of the culture. Exogenous activation of beta1 integrins with either divalent cations or activating antibodies partly restored the capability of VHL- cells to assemble beta1 fibrillar adhesions and fibronectin fibers. Finally, pulse-chase studies of metabolically labeled 786-O cells revealed that the maturation of the common beta1-integrin chain was delayed in VHL- cells when compared with VHL+ cells. Our results show that VHL is an important regulator of integrins and is essential for the formation of beta1 fibrillar adhesions. These findings help to explain the abnormal extracellular matrix organization and increased motility of VHL- renal cancer cells. PMID:12019174

  18. Dry hair

    MedlinePlus

    ... or using harsh soaps or alcohols Excessive blow-drying Dry air Menkes kinky hair syndrome Malnutrition Underactive ... or twice a week Add conditioners Avoid blow drying and harsh styling products

  19. Dry hair

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of dry hair are: Anorexia nervosa Excessive hair washing, or using harsh soaps or alcohols Excessive blow-drying Dry air Menkes kinky hair syndrome Malnutrition Underactive parathyroid ( ...

  20. Fibrillar Oligomers Nucleate the Oligomerization of Monomeric Amyloid β but Do Not Seed Fibril Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jessica W.; Breydo, Leonid; Isas, J. Mario; Lee, Jerome; Kuznetsov, Yurii G.; Langen, Ralf; Glabe, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Soluble amyloid oligomers are potent neurotoxins that are involved in a wide range of human degenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. In Alzheimer disease, amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers bind to neuronal synapses, inhibit long term potentiation, and induce cell death. Recent evidence indicates that several immunologically distinct structural variants exist as follows: prefibrillar oligomers (PFOs), fibrillar oligomers (FOs), and annular protofibrils. Despite widespread interest, amyloid oligomers are poorly characterized in terms of structural differences and pathological significance. FOs are immunologically related to fibrils because they react with OC, a conformation-dependent, fibril-specific antibody and do not react with antibodies specific for other types of oligomers. However, fibrillar oligomers are much smaller than fibrils. FOs are soluble at 100,000 × g, rich in β-sheet structures, but yet bind weakly to thioflavin T. EPR spectroscopy indicates that FOs display significantly more spin-spin interaction at multiple labeled sites than PFOs and are more structurally similar to fibrils. Atomic force microscopy indicates that FOs are approximately one-half to one-third the height of mature fibrils. We found that Aβ FOs do not seed the formation of thioflavin T-positive fibrils from Aβ monomers but instead seed the formation of FOs from Aβ monomers that are positive for the OC anti-fibril antibody. These results indicate that the lattice of FOs is distinct from the fibril lattice even though the polypeptide chains are organized in an immunologically identical conformation. The FOs resulting from seeded reactions have the same dimensions and morphology as the initial seeds, suggesting that the seeds replicate by growing to a limiting size and then splitting, indicating that their lattice is less stable than fibrils. We suggest that FOs may represent small pieces of single fibril protofilament and that the addition of monomers to the ends of FOs is

  1. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, D. V. Shepherd, J. H.; Cameron, R. E.; Best, S. M.; Ghose, S.; Kew, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide), NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer) or water in any of the fibres.

  2. Contact compliance effects in the frictional response of bioinspired fibrillar adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piccardo, Marco; Chateauminois, Antoine; Fretigny, Christian; Pugno, Nicola M.; Sitti, Metin

    2013-01-01

    The shear failure and friction mechanisms of bioinspired adhesives consisting of elastomer arrays of microfibres terminated by mushroom-shaped tips are investigated in contact with a rigid lens. In order to reveal the interplay between the vertical and lateral loading directions, experiments are carried out using a custom friction set-up in which normal stiffness can be made either high or low when compared with the stiffness of the contact between the fibrillar adhesive and the lens. Using in situ contact imaging, the shear failure of the adhesive is found to involve two successive mechanisms: (i) cavitation and peeling at the contact interface between the mushroom-shaped fibre tip endings and the lens; and (ii) side re-adhesion of the fibre's stem to the lens. The extent of these mechanisms and their implications regarding static friction forces is found to depend on the crosstalk between the normal and lateral loading directions that can result in contact instabilities associated with fibre buckling. In addition, the effects of the viscoelastic behaviour of the polyurethane material on the rate dependence of the shear response of the adhesive are accounted for. PMID:23554349

  3. Deacetylation of TFEB promotes fibrillar Aβ degradation by upregulating lysosomal biogenesis in microglia.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jintao; Zheng, Liangjun; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinya; Zhang, Xuefei; Li, Zeyang; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Zhong; Huo, Wei; Zhao, Xuyang; Shang, Shujiang; Wang, Qingsong; Zhang, Chen; Ji, Jianguo

    2016-06-01

    Microglia play a pivotal role in clearance of Aβ by degrading them in lysosomes, countering amyloid plaque pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that lysosomal dysfunction leads to insufficient elimination of toxic protein aggregates. We tested whether enhancing lysosomal function with transcription factor EB (TFEB), an essential regulator modulating lysosomal pathways, would promote Aβ clearance in microglia. Here we show that microglial expression of TFEB facilitates fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) degradation and reduces deposited amyloid plaques, which are further enhanced by deacetylation of TFEB. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we firstly confirmed acetylation as a previously unreported modification of TFEB and found that SIRT1 directly interacted with and deacetylated TFEB at lysine residue 116. Subsequently, SIRT1 overexpression enhanced lysosomal function and fAβ degradation by upregulating transcriptional levels of TFEB downstream targets, which could be inhibited when TFEB was knocked down. Furthermore, overexpression of deacetylated TFEB at K116R mutant in microglia accelerated intracellular fAβ degradation by stimulating lysosomal biogenesis and greatly reduced the deposited amyloid plaques in the brain slices of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Our findings reveal that deacetylation of TFEB could regulate lysosomal biogenesis and fAβ degradation, making microglial activation of TFEB a possible strategy for attenuating amyloid plaque deposition in AD. PMID:27209302

  4. The fibrillar structure of the cemento-dentinal junction in different kinds of human teeth.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Domon, T; Takahashi, S; Islam, M N; Suzuki, R

    2001-10-01

    The cemento-dentinal junction was examined in human maxillary incisors, canines and premolars by scanning electron microscopy combined with NaOH maceration. The NaOH maceration was used to remove interfibrillar substances and to observe details of the fibrillar architecture. The teeth were half-sectioned longitudinally, demineralized and macerated for 3-4 days or for 10-14 days. In the 3-4 day-macerated specimens, longitudinal sections of the cemento-dentinal junction were examined. In the 10-14 day-macerated specimens, the cementum was detached and the inner cementum surface facing the cemento-dentinal junction was examined. Observations suggested that cemental fibrils intermingle with dentinal fibrils only in places at the cemento-dentinal junction in both acellular and cellular cementum. These structural features were consistent in all kinds of teeth investigated here. Using human molars, we have previously proposed that the adhesion of proteoglycans is a main factor for the cemento-dentinal attachment and that the fibril intermingling between dentin and cementum is an accessory or secondary factor. The present study suggests that this applies to other kinds of human teeth. PMID:11585119

  5. Second harmonic generation microscopy for quantitative analysis of collagen fibrillar structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyi; Nadiarynkh, Oleg; Plotnikov, Sergey; Campagnola, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has emerged as a powerful modality for imaging fibrillar collagen in a diverse range of tissues. Because of its underlying physical origin, it is highly sensitive to the collagen fibril/fiber structure, and, importantly, to changes that occur in diseases such as cancer, fibrosis and connective tissue disorders. We discuss how SHG can be used to obtain more structural information on the assembly of collagen in tissues than is possible by other microscopy techniques. We first provide an overview of the state of the art and the physical background of SHG microscopy, and then describe the optical modifications that need to be made to a laser-scanning microscope to enable the measurements. Crucial aspects for biomedical applications are the capabilities and limitations of the different experimental configurations. We estimate that the setup and calibration of the SHG instrument from its component parts will require 2–4 weeks, depending on the level of the user’s experience. PMID:22402635

  6. Integrin activation state determines selectivity for novel recognition sites in fibrillar collagens.

    PubMed

    Siljander, Pia R-M; Hamaia, Samir; Peachey, Anthony R; Slatter, David A; Smethurst, Peter A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Knight, C Graham; Farndale, Richard W

    2004-11-12

    Only three recognition motifs, GFOGER, GLOGER, and GASGER, all present in type I collagen, have been identified to date for collagen-binding integrins, such as alpha(2)beta(1). Sequence alignment was used to investigate the occurrence of related motifs in other human fibrillar collagens, and located a conserved array of novel GER motifs within their triple helical domains. We compared the integrin binding properties of synthetic triple helical peptides containing examples of such sequences (GLSGER, GMOGER, GAOGER, and GQRGER) or the previously identified motifs. Recombinant inserted (I) domains of integrin subunits alpha(1), alpha(2) and alpha(11) all bound poorly to all motifs other than GFOGER and GLOGER. Similarly, alpha(2)beta(1) -containing resting platelets adhered well only to GFOGER and GLOGER, while ADP-activated platelets, HT1080 cells and two active alpha(2)I domain mutants (E318W, locked open) bound all motifs well, indicating that affinity modulation determines the sequence selectivity of integrins. GxO/SGER peptides inhibited platelet adhesion to collagen monomers with order of potency F >/= L >/= M > A. These results establish GFOGER as a high affinity sequence, which can interact with the alpha(2)I domain in the absence of activation and suggest that integrin reactivity of collagens may be predicted from their GER content. PMID:15345717

  7. Second harmonic generation microscopy for quantitative analysis of collagen fibrillar structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiyi; Nadiarynkh, Oleg; Plotnikov, Sergey; Campagnola, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy has emerged as a powerful modality for imaging fibrillar collagen in a diverse range of tissues. Because of its underlying physical origin, it is highly sensitive to the collagen fibril/fiber structure, and, importantly, to changes that occur in diseases such as cancer, fibrosis and connective tissue disorders. We discuss how SHG can be used to obtain more structural information on the assembly of collagen in tissues than is possible by other microscopy techniques. We first provide an overview of the state of the art and the physical background of SHG microscopy, and then describe the optical modifications that need to be made to a laser-scanning microscope to enable the measurements. Crucial aspects for biomedical applications are the capabilities and limitations of the different experimental configurations. We estimate that the setup and calibration of the SHG instrument from its component parts will require 2-4 weeks, depending on the level of the user's experience. PMID:22402635

  8. Inverted formin 2 in focal adhesions promotes dorsal stress fiber and fibrillar adhesion formation to drive extracellular matrix assembly

    PubMed Central

    Skau, Colleen T.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments and integrin-based focal adhesions (FAs) form integrated systems that mediate dynamic cell interactions with their environment or other cells during migration, the immune response, and tissue morphogenesis. How adhesion-associated actin structures obtain their functional specificity is unclear. Here we show that the formin-family actin nucleator, inverted formin 2 (INF2), localizes specifically to FAs and dorsal stress fibers (SFs) in fibroblasts. High-resolution fluorescence microscopy and manipulation of INF2 levels in cells indicate that INF2 plays a critical role at the SF–FA junction by promoting actin polymerization via free barbed end generation and centripetal elongation of an FA-associated actin bundle to form dorsal SF. INF2 assembles into FAs during maturation rather than during their initial generation, and once there, acts to promote rapid FA elongation and maturation into tensin-containing fibrillar FAs in the cell center. We show that INF2 is required for fibroblasts to organize fibronectin into matrix fibers and ultimately 3D matrices. Collectively our results indicate an important role for the formin INF2 in specifying the function of fibrillar FAs through its ability to generate dorsal SFs. Thus, dorsal SFs and fibrillar FAs form a specific class of integrated adhesion-associated actin structure in fibroblasts that mediates generation and remodeling of ECM. PMID:25918420

  9. An integrated view on how the management of the dry period length of lactating cows could affect mammary biology and defence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dry period is necessary to facilitate cell turnover in the bovine mammary gland and to optimize milk production in the next lactation. An eight-week dry period has long been the golden standard of management for dairy cows. Genetic improvements and new management technologies have led to higher ...

  10. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  11. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  12. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    PubMed

    Neeves, Keith B; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Hansen, Ryan R; Lilly, Jessica J; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B; Irish, Andrew T; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T)), the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT)), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT) and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T) for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  13. Instantly switchable adhesion of bridged fibrillar adhesive via gecko-inspired detachment mechanism and its application to a transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Won-Gyu; Kim, Doogon; Suh, Kahp-Yang

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the climbing behaviour of gecko lizards. The adhesive shows strong normal attachment (~30 N cm-2) as well as easy and fast detachment within 0.5 s without involving complex dynamic mechanisms or specific stimulus-responsive materials. The fabrication of the bridged micropillars consists of replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micropillars, transfer of the PDMS precursor to the heads of the micropillars, and inverse placement on an inert Teflon-coated surface. Owing to the spontaneous interconnections of low viscosity PDMS precursor, bridged micropillars with a uniform capping nanomembrane (~800 nm thickness) are formed over a large area. Interestingly, macroscopic adhesion in the normal direction can be immediately switched between on and off states by changing the two detachment modes of pulling and peeling, respectively. To prove the potential of the fibrillar adhesive for practical use, an automated transportation system is demonstrated for lifting and releasing a mass of stacked glass slides over 1000 cycles of attachment and detachment.Inspired by the exceptional climbing ability of gecko lizards, artificial fibrillar adhesives have been extensively studied over the last decade both experimentally and theoretically. Therefore, a new leap towards practical uses beyond the academic horizon is timely and highly anticipated. To this end, we present a fibrillar adhesive in the form of bridged micropillars and its application to a transportation system with the detachment mechanism inspired by the

  14. Zinc-Amyloid Interactions on a Millisecond Time-Scale Stabilize Non-Fibrillar Alzheimer Related Species

    SciTech Connect

    Noy,D.; Solomonov, I.; Sinkevich, O.; Arad, A.; Kjaer, K.; Sagi, I.

    2008-01-01

    The role of zinc, an essential element for normal brain function, in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is poorly understood. On one hand, physiological and genetic evidence from transgenic mouse models supports its pathogenic role in promoting the deposition of the amyloid {beta}-protein (A{beta}) in senile plaques. On the other hand, levels of extracellular ('free') zinc in the brain, as inferred by the levels of zinc in cerebrospinal fluid, were found to be too low for inducing A{beta} aggregation. Remarkably, the release of transient high local concentrations of zinc during rapid synaptic events was reported. The role of such free zinc pulses in promoting A{beta} aggregation has never been established. Using a range of time-resolved structural and spectroscopic techniques, we found that zinc, when introduced in millisecond pulses of micromolar concentrations, immediately interacts with A{beta} 1-40 and promotes its aggregation. These interactions specifically stabilize non-fibrillar pathogenic related aggregate forms and prevent the formation of A{beta} fibrils (more benign species) presumably by interfering with the self-assembly process of A{beta}. These in vitro results strongly suggest a significant role for zinc pulses in A{beta} pathology. We further propose that by interfering with A{beta} self-assembly, which leads to insoluble, non-pathological fibrillar forms, zinc stabilizes transient, harmful amyloid forms. This report argues that zinc represents a class of molecular pathogens that effectively perturb the self-assembly of benign A{beta} fibrils, and stabilize harmful non-fibrillar forms.

  15. Salt drying: a low-cost, simple and efficient method for storing plants in the field and preserving biological repositories for DNA diversity research.

    PubMed

    Carrió, Elena; Rosselló, Josep A

    2014-03-01

    Although a variety of methods have been optimized for the collection and storage of plant specimens, most of these are not suited for field expeditions for a variety of logistic reasons. Drying specimens with silica gel in polyethylene bags is currently the standard for field-sampling methods that are suitable for subsequent DNA extraction. However, silica-gel repositories are not readily available in remote areas, and its use is not very cost-effective for the long-term storage of collections or in developing countries with limited research budgets. Salting is an ancient and traditional drying process that preserves food samples by dehydrating tissues and inhibiting water-dependent cellular metabolism. We compared salt and silica-gel drying methods with respect to dehydration rates overtime, DNA quality and polymerase chain reaction(PCR) success to assess whether dry salting can be used as an effective plant preservation method for DNA analysis. Specimens from eleven plant species covering a variety of leaf structures, leaf thicknesses and water contents were analysed. Experimental work indicated that (i) levels of dehydration in sodium chloride were usually comparable to those obtained when silica gel was used, (ii) no spoilage, fungal or bacterial growth was observed for any of the species with all drying treatments and (iii) good yields of quality genomic DNA suitable for PCR applications were obtained in the salt-drying treatments. The preservation of plant tissues in commercial table salt appears to be a satisfactory, and versatile method that may be suitable in remote areas where cryogenic resources and silica repositories are not available. PMID:24103361

  16. The new evidence of nucleolar ultrastructural dynamic change: fibrillar centre (FC) fusion in G1 phase and regeneration in S phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengcai; Ying, Chen; Shang, Guangbin; Jiao, Mingda; Hongfang, Zhang

    2013-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes ribosome production starts at the end of mitosis, increases during G1, is maximal in G2 (Sirri et al., 2000) and stops during prophase (Gébrane-Younès et al., 1997). But the mechanism of the change is still uncovered. Especially in the actively growing mammalian somatic cells usually contain one or several giant fibrillar centres (GFCs) with many tiny fibrillar centre (FCs) (Koberna et al., 2002; Raška et al., 2004; Casafont et al., 2007). The process how the giant fibrillar centre (GFC) and the many tiny fibrillar centres (FCs) were formed is unknown. The present results showed there were processes of FCs fusion in G1 phase and FCs regeneration in S phase respectively in the nucleoli of A 375 cells. A few FCs fused each other in late G1 phase when the process of nucleoli fusion was completed. In S phase, a lot of tiny FCs were regenerated from the periphery of GFC, separated and scattered into nucleolar matrix in late S phase and early G2 phase. The GFC was found to be coexisted with numerous tiny FCs in the nucleolus in G2 phase. The present study provided a new evidence of nucleolar dynamic change during interphase: fibrillar centre (FC) was not to be a stable state subunit of nucleolar compartment but a highly dynamic process that may be the bases of nucleolar morphological architecture organization and its function taking place. PMID:23602556

  17. Design of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong attachment and easy-removal properties: a numerical analysis of peel-zone.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Pesika, Noshir; Zeng, Hongbo; Wan, Jin; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Wen, Shizhu; Tian, Yu

    2012-10-01

    Despite successful fabrication of gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces with strong adhesion forces, how to achieve an easy-removal property becomes a major concern that may restrict the wide applications of these bio-inspired surfaces. Research on how geckos detach rapidly has inspired the design of novel adhesive surfaces with strong and reversible adhesion capabilities, which relies on further fundamental understanding of the peeling mechanisms. Recent studies showed that the peel-zone plays an important role in the peeling off of adhesive tapes or fibrillar surfaces. In this study, a numerical method was developed to evaluate peel-zone deformation and the resulting mechanical behaviour due to the deformations of fibrillar surfaces detaching from a smooth rigid substrate. The effect of the geometrical parameters of pillars and the stiffness of backing layer on the peel-zone and peel strength, and the strong attachment and easy-removal properties have been analysed to establish a design map for bio-inspired fibrillar surfaces, which shows that the optimized strong attachment and easy-removal properties can vary by over three orders of magnitude. The adhesion and peeling design map established provides new insights into the design and development of novel gecko-inspired fibrillar surfaces. PMID:22572030

  18. Dry socket

    MedlinePlus

    ... care for the dry socket at home: Take pain medicine and antibiotics as directed Apply a cold pack to the outside of your jaw Carefully rinse the dry socket as directed by your dentist If taking antibiotics, avoid smoking or using tobacco and alcohol

  19. Vitamin B12[c-lactone], a biologically inactive corrinoid compound, occurs in cultured and dried lion's mane mushroom (Hericium erinaceus) fruiting bodies.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fei; Bito, Tomohiro; Takenaka, Shigeo; Yabuta, Yukinori; Watanabe, Fumio

    2014-02-19

    This study determined the vitamin B12 content of the edible medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus, lion's mane mushroom fruiting body, using a microbiological assay based on Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC 7830. Trace levels (0.04-0.36 μg/100 g dry weight) of vitamin B12 were found in most of the dried mushroom samples, and two samples contained slightly higher levels (0.56 and 1.04 μg/100 g dry weight, respectively) of vitamin B12. We purified the corrinoid compounds from the extracts of dried lion's mane mushroom fruiting bodies using an immunoaffinity column and identified them as vitamin B12 or vitamin B12[c-lactone] (or both) based on LC/ESI-MS/MS chromatograms. This is the first report on an unnatural corrinoid, vitamin B12[c-lactone], occurring in foods. Vitamin B12[c-lactone] was simple to produce during incubation of authentic vitamin B12 and chloramine-T, an antimicrobial agent, at varying pH values (3.0-7.0) and was completely inactive in the vitamin B12-dependent bacteria that are generally used in vitamin B12 bioassays. PMID:24506286

  20. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of [alpha]- and PPII-helices

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2010-08-18

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the A{sub 3}VP{sub 1} fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 {angstrom}) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A{sub 3} repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended {alpha}-helix that intertwines with the P{sub 1} repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A{sub 3} and P{sub 1} helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length.

  1. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of α- and PPII-helices

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 Å) crystal structure of the A3VP1 fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 Å) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A3 repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended α-helix that intertwines with the P1 repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A3 and P1 helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length. PMID:20231452

  2. Endothelial cell culture on fibrillar collagen: model to study platelet adhesion and liposome targeting to intercellular collagen matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Chazov, E I; Alexeev, A V; Antonov, A S; Koteliansky, V E; Leytin, V L; Lyubimova, E V; Repin, V S; Sviridov, D D; Torchilin, V P; Smirnov, V N

    1981-01-01

    Human umbilical endothelial cells (ECs) were grown on fibrillar type I collagen in 16.4-mm multiwell tissue culture plates. Human platelets were added to the wells, and platelet adhesion to collagen was examined by scanning electron microscopy and radioisotopic technique in the absence of ECs and in preconfluent and confluent EC cultures. Single adherent platelets of different shapes as well as small aggregates were seen on collagen surface. Human plasma fibronectin added to the system stimulated platelet adhesion and their spreading on collagen. ECs had no effect on the percentage of platelets adherent to collagen-coated gaps in preconfluent culture but decreased the number of spread platelets. It is demonstrated that collagen-coated gaps can bind 14C-labeled liposome--antibody and 14-C-labeled liposome--fibronectin conjugates. ECs grown on fibrillar collagen are suggested as useful models for screening of antiplatelet drugs and for the study of drug targeting to the areas of vascular injury for prevention of thrombosis. Images PMID:6946497

  3. Evidence for distinct leptomeningeal cell-dependent paracrine and EGF-linked autocrine regulatory pathways for suppression of fibrillar collagens in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Heck, Nicolas; Garwood, Jeremy; Dobbertin, Alexandre; Calco, Valérie; Sirko, Swetlana; Mittmann, Thomas; Eysel, Ulf T; Faissner, Andreas

    2007-09-01

    A unique and unresolved property of the central nervous system is that its extracellular matrix lacks fibrillar elements. In the present report, we show that astrocytes secrete triple helices of fibrillar collagens type I, III and V in culture, while no astroglial collagen expression could be detected in vivo. We discovered two inhibitory mechanisms that could underlie this apparent discrepancy. Thus, we uncover a strong inhibitory effect of meningeal cells on astrocytic collagen expression in coculture assays. Furthermore, we present evidence that EGF-receptor activation downregulates collagen expression in astrocytes via an autocrine loop. These investigations provide a rational framework to explain why the brain is devoid of collagen fibers, which is a unique feature that characterizes the structure of the neural extracellular matrix. Moreover, fibrillar collagens were found transiently upregulated in a laser-induced cortical lesion, suggesting that these could contribute to the glial scar that inhibits axonal regeneration. PMID:17689979

  4. Effect of curcumin and Cu 2+/Zn 2+ ions on the fibrillar aggregates formed by the amyloid peptide and other peptides at the organic-aqueous interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghamitra, Nusrat J. M.; Varghese, Neenu; Rao, C. N. R.

    2010-08-01

    Characteristic features of a perilous neuro-degenerative disease such as the Alzhiemer's disease is fibrillar plaque formation by the amyloid (Aβ) peptide. We have modelled the formation and disintegration of fibrils by studying the aggregate structures formed by Aβ structural motif diphenylalanine as well as insulin and bovine serum albumin at the organic-aqueous interface. Even small concentrations of curcumin in the organic medium or Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ions in the aqueous medium are found to break down the fibrillar structures.

  5. Fibrillar structure and elasticity of hydrating collagen: a quantitative multiscale approach.

    PubMed

    Morin, Claire; Hellmich, Christian; Henits, Peter

    2013-01-21

    It is well known that hydration of collagenous tissues leads to their swelling, as well as to softening of their elastic behavior. However, it is much less clear which microstructural and micromechanical "rules" are involved in this process. Here, we develop a theoretical approach cast in analytical mathematical formulations, which is experimentally validated by a wealth of independent tests on collagenous tissues, such as X-ray diffraction, vacuum drying, mass measurements, and Brillouin light scattering. The overall emerging picture is the following: air-drying leaves water only in the gap zones between the triple-helical collagen molecules; upon re-hydration, the extrafibrillar space is established at volumes directly proportional to the hydration-induced swelling of the (micro) fibrils, until the maximum equatorial distance between the long collagen molecules is reached. Thereafter, the volume of the fibrils stays constant, and only the extrafibrillar volume continues to grow. At all these hydration stages, the elastic behavior is governed by the same, hydration-invariant mechanical interaction pattern of only two, interpenetrating mechanical phases: transversely isotropic molecular collagen and isotropic water (or empty pores in the vacuum-dried case). PMID:23032219

  6. century drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  7. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  8. [Biological contamination by micromycetes in dried Boletus edulis: research of aflatoxin B1, B2 G1, G2 and ochratoxin A].

    PubMed

    Lorini, C; Rossetti, F; Palazzoni, S; Comodo, N; Bonaccorsi, G

    2008-01-01

    Aim of this survey is to identify those filamentous fungi which parasite Boletus edulis and its group and check the potential presence of secondary metabolites, specifically aflatoxin B1, total aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, in order to assess the risk to consumers' health. Forty samples of dried Boletus edulis, collected by two food industries which distribute the product in many Italian regions, have been analysed. The sampling plan has been conducted from November 2005 to March 2006, collecting 50 g from each commercial category of dried Boletus edulis available in the factory at the time of sampling. All the samples have been tested by visual macroscopic and stereoscopic assays; for some samples--those referred to commercial category presumably at higher risk--we have performed cultural assays as well, typization of isolated micromycetes, extraction and quantification of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A. Mycotoxin detection has been made by HPLC, using the UNI EN 14123 and UNI EN 14132 standard methods, respectively applied to aflatoxins determination in peanuts, pistachios, figs and paprika and to ochratoxin A in barley and coffee. Non pathogenic micromycetes, common in food products, have been frequently observed in cultural assays, while Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger have been found in some samples. However the concentration of aflatoxins was always under the quantification limit. The survey confirm that, if the cold chain is kept throughout the process and the distribution, Boletus edulis and analogue mycetes are not a favourable substratum for the growth and the development of moulds. PMID:19238880

  9. Antimicrobial peptide (Cn-AMP2) from liquid endosperm of Cocos nucifera forms amyloid-like fibrillar structure.

    PubMed

    Gour, Shalini; Kaushik, Vibha; Kumar, Vijay; Bhat, Priyanka; Yadav, Subhash C; Yadav, Jay K

    2016-04-01

    Cn-AMP2 is an antimicrobial peptide derived from liquid endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera). It consists of 11 amino acid residues and predicted to have high propensity for β-sheet formation that disposes this peptide to be amyloidogenic. In the present study, we have examined the amyloidogenic propensities of Cn-AMP2 in silico and then tested the predictions under in vitro conditions. The in silico study revealed that the peptide possesses high amyloidogenic propensity comparable with Aβ. Upon solubilisation and agitation in aqueous buffer, Cn-AMP2 forms visible aggregates that display bathochromic shift in the Congo red absorbance spectra, strong increase in thioflavin T fluorescence and fibrillar morphology under transmission electron microscopy. All these properties are typical of an amyloid fibril derived from various proteins/peptides including Aβ. PMID:27028204

  10. Complete structural organization of the human {alpha}1(V) collagen gene (COL5A1): Divergence from the conserved organization of other characterized fibrillar collagen genes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahara, Kazuhiko; Hoffman, G.G.; Greenspan, D.S.

    1995-10-10

    Genes that encode the vertebrate fibrillar collagen types I-III have previously been shown to share a highly conserved intron/exon organization, thought to reflect common ancestry and evolutionary pressures at the protein level. We report here the complete intron/exon organization of COL5A1, the human gene that encodes the {alpha}1 chain of fibrillar collagen type V. The structure of COL5A1 is shown to be considerably diverged from the conserved structure of the genes for fibrillar collagen types I-III. COL5A1 has 66 exons, which is greater than the number of exons found in the genes for collagen types I-III. The increased number of exons is partly due to the increased size of the pro-{alpha}1(V) N-propeptide, relative to the sizes of the N-propeptides of the types I-III procollagen molecules. In addition, however, the increased number of exons is due to differences in the intron/exon organization of the triple-helix coding region of COL5A1 compared to the organization of the triple-helix coding regions of the genes for collagen types I-III. Of particular interest is the increase of 54 bp exons in this region of COL5A1, strongly supporting the proposal that the triple-helix coding regions of fibrillar collagen genes evolved from duplication of a 54 bp primordial genetic element. Moreover, comparison of the structure of COL5A1 to the highly conserved structure of the genes of collagen types I-III provides insights into the probable structure of the ancestral gene that gave rise to what appears to be two classes of vertebrate fibrillar collagen genes. 50 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Colorful drying.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-03-01

    Drying is one of the standard unit operations in the pharmaceutical industry and it is important to become aware of the circumstances that dominate during the process. The purpose of this study was to test microcapsulated thermochromic pigments as heat indicators in a fluid bed drying process. The indicator powders were manually granulated with alpha-lactose monohydrate resulting in three particle-size groups. Also, pellets were coated with the indicator powders. The granules and pellets were fluidized in fluid bed dryer to observe the progress of the heat flow in the material and to study the heat indicator properties of the indicator materials. A tristimulus colorimeter was used to measure CIELAB color values. Color indicator for heat detection can be utilized to test if the heat-sensitive API would go through physical changes during the pharmaceutical drying process. Both the prepared granules and pellets can be used as heat indicator in fluid bed drying process. The colored heat indicators give an opportunity to learn new aspects of the process at real time and could be exploded, for example, for scaling-up studies. PMID:20039220

  12. Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, called punctal cautery, is recommended to permanently close the drainage holes. The procedure helps keep the limited volume of tears on the eye for a longer period of time. In some patients with dry eye, supplements or dietary sources (such as tuna fish) of omega-3 fatty ...

  13. Evaluation of Biological and Enzymatic Activity of Soil in a Tropical Dry Forest: Desierto de la Tatacoa (Colombia) with Potential in Mars Terraforming and Other Similar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno Moreno, A. N.

    2009-12-01

    Desierto de la Tatacoa has been determined to be a tropical dry forest bioma, which is located at 3° 13" N 75° 13" W. It has a hot thermal floor with 440 msnm of altitude; it has a daily average of 28° C, and a maximum of 40° C, Its annual rainfall total can be upwards of 1250 mm. Its solar sheen has a daily average of 5.8 hours and its relative humidity is between 60% and 65%. Therefore, the life forms presents are very scant, and in certain places, almost void. It was realized a completely random sampling of soil from its surface down to 6 inches deep, of zones without vegetation and with soils highly loaded by oxides of iron in order to determine the number of microorganisms per gram and its subsequent identification. It was measured the soil basal respiration. Besides, it was determined enzymatic activity (catalase, dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease). Starting with the obtained results, it is developes an alternative towards the study of soil genesis in Mars in particular, and recommendations for same process in other planets. Although the information found in the experiments already realized in Martian soil they demonstrate that doesnt exist any enzymatic activity, the knowledge of the same topic in the soil is proposed as an alternative to problems like carbonic fixing of the dense Martian atmosphere of CO2, the degradation of inorganic compounds amongst other in order to prepare the substratum for later colonization by some life form.

  14. Horizontal ridge augmentation utilizing a composite graft of demineralized freeze-dried allograft, mineralized cortical cancellous chips, and a biologically degradable thermoplastic carrier combined with a resorbable membrane: a retrospective evaluation of 73 consecutively treated cases from private practices.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Nicholas; Holtzclaw, Danny; Mazor, Ziv; Rosen, Paul; Horowitz, Robert; Toffler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Ridge deficiency is an unfortunate obstacle in the field of implant dentistry. Many techniques are available to rebuild the deficient ridge. Some of these techniques are associated with significant morbidity and often require a second surgical site. With the advent of guided bone regeneration (GBR), one may now graft the deficient ridge with decreased morbidity and without a second surgical site. The purpose of this retrospective consecutive case series from 5 private practices is to report on the outcomes of a composite material of demineralized freeze-dried allograft, mineralized cortical cancellous chips, and a biologically degradable thermoplastic carrier (Regenaform RT) when combined with a resorbable membrane for GBR of lateral ridge defects in human patients. The specific aim was to quantify clinical results through direct measurement. Data were obtained from 73 consecutively treated lateral ridge augmentations performed on 67 partial and/or completely edentate patients. Clinical data (presurgical ridge width, ridge width at implant placement, and bone density at implant placement) were obtained retrospectively from 5 private practices via an exhaustive retrospective chart review, which was pooled and averaged for analysis. The average gain in horizontal ridge width was 3.5 mm (range, 3-6 mm). The density of the bone was noted to be type 2 to 3, with type 3 being the predominant finding. This retrospective case series from 5 clinical private practices suggests that the use of a composite material of demineralized freeze-dried allograft, mineralized cortical cancellous chips, and a biologically degradable thermoplastic carrier, when covered by a resorbable collagen membrane for GBR, is an effective means of horizontal ridge augmentation. PMID:20545553

  15. Drying Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    In searching for an improved method of removing water from polyester type resins without damaging the materials, Conair Inc. turned to the NASA Center at the University of Pittsburgh for assistance. Taking an organized, thorough look at existing technology before beginning research has helped many companies save significant time and money. They searched the NASA and other computerized files for microwave drying of thermoplastics. About 300 relevant citations were retrieved - eight of which were identified as directly applicable to the problem. Company estimates it saved a minimum of a full year in compiling research results assembled by the information center.

  16. Nanoscale Visualization of a Fibrillar Array in the Cell Wall of Filamentous Cyanobacteria and Its Implications for Gliding Motility▿

    PubMed Central

    Read, Nicholas; Connell, Simon; Adams, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria are motile by gliding, which requires attachment to a surface. There are two main theories to explain the mechanism of gliding. According to the first, the filament is pushed forward by small waves that pass along the cell surface. In the second, gliding is powered by the extrusion of slime through pores surrounding each cell septum. We have previously shown that the cell walls of several motile cyanobacteria possess an array of parallel fibrils between the peptidoglycan and the outer membrane and have speculated that the function of this array may be to generate surface waves to power gliding. Here, we report on a study of the cell surface topography of two morphologically different filamentous cyanobacteria, using field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). FEGSEM and AFM images of Oscillatoria sp. strain A2 confirmed the presence of an array of fibrils, visible as parallel corrugations on the cell surface. These corrugations were also visualized by AFM scanning of fully hydrated filaments under liquid; this has not been achieved before for filamentous bacteria. FEGSEM images of Nostoc punctiforme revealed a highly convoluted, not parallel, fibrillar array. We conclude that an array of parallel fibrils, beneath the outer membrane of Oscillatoria, may function in the generation of thrust in gliding motility. The array of convoluted fibrils in N. punctiforme may have an alternative function, perhaps connected with the increase in outer membrane surface area resulting from the presence of the fibrils. PMID:17693519

  17. Soft sheets of fibrillar bone from a fossil of the supraorbital horn of the dinosaur Triceratops horridus.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Mark Hollis; Anderson, Kevin Lee

    2013-07-01

    Soft fibrillar bone tissues were obtained from a supraorbital horn of Triceratops horridus collected at the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, USA. Soft material was present in pre and post-decalcified bone. Horn material yielded numerous small sheets of lamellar bone matrix. This matrix possessed visible microstructures consistent with lamellar bone osteocytes. Some sheets of soft tissue had multiple layers of intact tissues with osteocyte-like structures featuring filipodial-like interconnections and secondary branching. Both oblate and stellate types of osteocyte-like cells were present in sheets of soft tissues and exhibited organelle-like microstructures. SEM analysis yielded osteocyte-like cells featuring filipodial extensions of 18-20μm in length. Filipodial extensions were delicate and showed no evidence of any permineralization or crystallization artifact and therefore were interpreted to be soft. This is the first report of sheets of soft tissues from Triceratops horn bearing layers of osteocytes, and extends the range and type of dinosaur specimens known to contain non-fossilized material in bone matrix. PMID:23414624

  18. Phosphorylation Interferes with Maturation of Amyloid-β Fibrillar Structure in the N Terminus.

    PubMed

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-07-29

    Neurodegeneration is characterized by the ubiquitous presence of modifications in protein deposits. Despite their potential significance in the initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, the effects of posttranslational modifications on the molecular properties of protein aggregates are largely unknown. Here, we study the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and investigate how phosphorylation at serine 8 affects the structure of Aβ aggregates. Serine 8 is shown to be located in a region of high conformational flexibility in monomeric Aβ, which upon phosphorylation undergoes changes in local conformational dynamics. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange NMR and fluorescence quenching techniques, we demonstrate that Aβ phosphorylation at serine 8 causes structural changes in the N-terminal region of Aβ aggregates in favor of less compact conformations. Structural changes induced by serine 8 phosphorylation can provide a mechanistic link between phosphorylation and other biological events that involve the N-terminal region of Aβ aggregates. Our data therefore support an important role of posttranslational modifications in the structural polymorphism of amyloid aggregates and their modulatory effect on neurodegeneration. PMID:27252381

  19. Amyloid-β(1-42) Fibrillar Precursors are Optimal for Inducing Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production in the THP-1 Human Monocytic Cell Line†

    PubMed Central

    Ajit, Deepa; Udan, Maria L. D.; Paranjape, Geeta; Nichols, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological studies have determined that fibrillar forms of amyloid-beta protein (Aβ) comprise the characteristic neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These studies have also revealed significant inflammatory markers such as activated microglia and cytokines surrounding the plaques. Although the plaques are a hallmark of AD, they are only part of an array of Aβ aggregate morphologies observed in vivo. Interestingly, not all of these Aβ deposits provoke an inflammatory response. Since structural polymorphism is a prominent feature of Aβ aggregation both in vitro and in vivo, we sought to clarify what Aβ morphology or aggregation species induces the strongest proinflammatory response using human THP-1 monocytes as a model system. An aliquot of freshly-reconstituted Aβ(1-42) in sterile water (100 μM, pH 3.6) did not effectively stimulate the cells at a final Aβ concentration of 15 μM. However, quiescent incubation of the peptide at 4°C for 48-96 h greatly increased its ability to induce tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) production, which surprisingly declined upon further aggregation. Imaging of the Aβ(1-42) aggregation solutions with atomic force microscopy indicated that best cellular response coincided with the appearance of fibrillar structures yet conditions that accelerated or increased Aβ(1-42) fibril formation such as peptide concentration, temperature, or reconstitution in NaOH/PBS at pH 7.4, diminished its ability to stimulate the cells. Finally, depletion of the Aβ(1-42) solution with an antibody that recognizes fibrillar oligomers dramatically reduced the ability to induce TNFα production and size-exclusion separation of the Aβ(1-42) solution provided further characterization of an aggregated species with proinflammatory activity. The findings suggested that an intermediate stage Aβ(1-42) fibrillar precursor is optimal for inducing a proinflammatory response in THP-1 monocytes. PMID:19694428

  20. Characterization of the Six Zebrafish Clade B Fibrillar Procollagen Genes, with Evidence for Evolutionarily Conserved Alternative Splicing within the pro-α1(V) C-propeptide

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Guy G.; Branam, Amanda M.; Huang, Guorui; Pelegri, Francisco; Cole, William G.; Wenstrup, Richard M.; Greenspan, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Genes for tetrapod fibrillar procollagen chains can be divided into two clades, A and B, based on sequence homologies and differences in protein domain and gene structures. Although the major fibrillar collagen types I–III comprise only clade A chains, the minor fibrillar collagen types V and XI comprise both clade A chains and the clade B chains pro-α1(V), pro-α3(V), pro-α1(XI) and pro-α2(XI), in which defects can underlie various genetic connective tissue disorders. Here we characterize the clade B procollagen chains of zebrafish. We demonstrate that in contrast to the four tetrapod clade B chains, zebrafish have six clade B chains, designated here as pro-α1(V), proα3(V)a and b, pro-α1(XI)a and b, and pro-α2(XI), based on synteny, sequence homologies, and features of protein domain and gene structures. Spatiotemporal expression patterns are described, as are conserved and non-conserved features that provide insights into the function and evolution of the clade B chain types. Such features include differential alternative splicing of NH2-terminal globular sequences and the first case of a non-triple helical imperfection in the COL1 domain of a clade B, or clade A, fibrillar procollagen chain. Evidence is also provided for previously unknown and evolutionarily conserved alternative splicing within the pro-α1(V) C-propeptide, which may affect selectivity of collagen type V/XI chain associations in species ranging from zebrafish to human. Data presented herein provide insights into the nature of clade B procollagen chains and should facilitate their study in the zebrafish model system. PMID:20102740

  1. Dry Mouth or Xerostomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Xerostomia Request Permissions Print to PDF Dry Mouth or Xerostomia Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... a dry mouth. Signs and symptoms of dry mouth The signs and symptoms of dry mouth include ...

  2. Brain propagation of transduced α-synuclein involves non-fibrillar protein species and is enhanced in α-synuclein null mice.

    PubMed

    Helwig, Michael; Klinkenberg, Michael; Rusconi, Raffaella; Musgrove, Ruth E; Majbour, Nour K; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation and neuron-to-neuron transmission are attributes of α-synuclein relevant to its pathogenetic role in human synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. Intraparenchymal injections of fibrillar α-synuclein trigger widespread propagation of amyloidogenic protein species via mechanisms that require expression of endogenous α-synuclein and, possibly, its structural corruption by misfolded conformers acting as pathological seeds. Here we describe another paradigm of long-distance brain diffusion of α-synuclein that involves inter-neuronal transfer of monomeric and/or oligomeric species and is independent of recruitment of the endogenous protein. Targeted expression of human α-synuclein was induced in the mouse medulla oblongata through an injection of viral vectors into the vagus nerve. Enhanced levels of intra-neuronal α-synuclein were sufficient to initiate its caudo-rostral diffusion that likely involved at least one synaptic transfer and progressively reached specific brain regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphae and amygdala in the pons, midbrain and forebrain. Transfer of human α-synuclein was compared in two separate lines of α-synuclein-deficient mice versus their respective wild-type controls and, interestingly, lack of endogenous α-synuclein expression did not counteract diffusion but actually resulted in a more pronounced and advanced propagation of exogenous α-synuclein. Self-interaction of adjacent molecules of human α-synuclein was detected in both wild-type and mutant mice. In the former, interaction of human α-synuclein with mouse α-synuclein was also observed and might have contributed to differences in protein transmission. In wild-type and α-synuclein-deficient mice, accumulation of human α-synuclein within recipient axons in the pons, midbrain and forebrain caused morphological evidence of neuritic pathology. Tissue sections from the medulla oblongata and pons were stained with different antibodies recognizing

  3. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures. PMID:27043221

  4. Micro-environmental control of cell migration – myosin IIA is required for efficient migration in fibrillar environments through control of cell adhesion dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Kutys, Matthew L.; Conti, Mary Anne; Matsumoto, Kazue; Adelstein, Robert S.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that organization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) into aligned fibrils or fibril-like ECM topographies promotes rapid migration in fibroblasts. However, the mechanisms of cell migration that are altered by these changes in micro-environmental topography remain unknown. Here, using 1D fibrillar migration as a model system for oriented fibrillar 3D matrices, we find that fibroblast leading-edge dynamics are enhanced by 1D fibrillar micropatterns and demonstrate a dependence on the spatial positioning of cell adhesions. Although 1D, 2D and 3D matrix adhesions have similar assembly kinetics, both 1D and 3D adhesions are stabilized for prolonged periods, whereas both paxillin and vinculin show slower turnover rates in 1D adhesions. Moreover, actin in 1D adhesions undergoes slower retrograde flow than the actin that is present in 2D lamellipodia. These data suggest an increase in mechanical coupling between adhesions and protrusive machinery. Experimental reduction of contractility resulted in the loss of 1D adhesion structure and stability, with scattered small and unstable adhesions, and an uncoupling of adhesion protein-integrin stability. Genetic ablation of myosin IIA (MIIA) or myosin IIB (MIIB) isoforms revealed that MIIA is required for efficient migration in restricted environments as well as adhesion maturation, whereas MIIB helps to stabilize adhesions beneath the cell body. These data suggest that restricted cell environments, such as 1D patterns, require cellular contraction through MIIA to enhance adhesion stability and coupling to integrins behind the leading edge. This increase in mechanical coupling allows for greater leading-edge protrusion and rapid cell migration. PMID:22328520

  5. Structural properties of fibrillar proteins isolated from the cell surface and cytoplasm of Streptococcus salivarius (K+) cells and nonadhesive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; van der Mei, H C; Liem, R S

    1986-01-01

    Most Streptococcus salivarius (K+) cells contain two protein antigens with different adhesive functions. The subcellular distribution and some structural properties of purified proteins were studied. Antigen B (AgB), a protein involved in interbacterial coaggregation with gram-negative bacteria, was present in the cell wall fraction only of the wild-type strain and was absent from the cells of a nonadhesive mutant. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in host-associated adhesive functions, was predominantly associated with the cell wall of the wild-type strain (AgCw), but accumulated in high amounts in the cytoplasmic fraction (AgCin) of mutants lacking the wall-associated form. AgB, AgCw, and AgCin had molecular weights of 380,000, 250,000 to 320,000, and 488,000, respectively, upon gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions. In the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and beta-mercaptoethanol the molecular weights were only slightly lower, suggesting that the free, isolated molecules exist as monomers under native conditions. AgCin readily stained with periodate-Schiff reagent, indicating a significant content of carbohydrate, similar to AgCw. Circular dichroism spectra showed that about 45% of the amino acids of AgCw were involved in alpha-helical coiled structures. AgB had a significantly lower proportion of ordered coiled structure. Electron microscopic observations of low-angle-shadowed preparations of purified antigens showed that they were flexible, thin rods with thickened or globular ends. Measurements corrected for shadow thickness showed lengths of 184 nm (AgB), 112 nm (AgCin), and 87 nm (AgCw). Treatment of AgCw with protease destroyed the fibrillar core, but seemed not to affect the globular ends. Comparison of the results with the localization of the antigens in wild-type and specific mutant strains suggested that each antigen molecule may represent a single, characteristic surface fibril with a specific adhesive capacity. Images PMID

  6. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1989-05-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during manufacture of paper and similar web products. Impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip where one of the rolls is heated to a very high temperature. Steam generated by contact with the hot roll expands and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is much lower than that required for conventional evaporative drying. Tests have been completed that elucidate the unique displacement mechanism of water removal in the impulse drying process. A pilot roll press has been designed, installed and used to examine impulse drying under conditions that simulate commercial press conditions. The results of this earlier work have been reported in three previous reports. During this report period October, 1987 to September, 1988, the pilot press was equipped with a second impulse drying roll to facilitate studies of surface uniformity in impulse dried paper. Studies have also been completed which examine the origins of sheet delamination that has been been encountered during impulse drying of certain heavyweight paper grades, and which investigate approaches to prevent delamination in these grades. Finally, an experimental plan has been formalized to examine impulse drying of lightweight grades which are candidates for early commercialization. 7 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Characterization of beta-lactoglobulin fibrillar assembly using atomic force microscopy, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and in situ fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oboroceanu, Daniela; Wang, Lizhe; Brodkorb, André; Magner, Edmond; Auty, Mark A E

    2010-03-24

    The aggregation process of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) from 0 min to 20 h was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and in situ attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Fibril assembly was monitored in real time using AFM up to 20 h. From 0 to 85 min, beta-lg monomers deformed and expanded with some aggregation. After 85 min, fibrillar structures were formed, exceeding 10 mum in length. Fibrillar structures were confirmed by STEM. Secondary structural changes occurring during fibril formation were monitored by ATR-FTIR at 80 degrees C and indicated a decrease in alpha-helix content and an increase in beta-sheet content. SDS-PAGE indicated that fibrils were composed of polypeptides and not intact monomers. In this study, beta-lg and whey protein isolate (WPI)-derived fibrils, including some double helices, in water were observed by AFM under ambient conditions and in their native aqueous environment. PMID:20187607

  8. Collagen metabolism and basement membrane formation in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells: Induction of assembly on fibrillar type I collagen substrata

    SciTech Connect

    David, G.; van der Schueren, B.; van den Berghe, H. ); Nusgens, B.; Van Cauwenberge, D.; Lapiere, C. )

    1987-06-01

    Collagen metabolism was compared in cultures of mouse mammary epithelial cells maintained on plastic or fibrillar type I collagen gel substrata. The accumulation of dialysable and non-dialysable ({sup 3}H)hydroxyproline and the identification of the collagens produced suggest no difference between substrata in the allover rates of collagen synthesis and degradation. The proportion of the ({sup 3}H)collagen which accumulates in the monolayers of cultures on collagen, however, markedly exceeds that of cultures on plastic. Cultures on collagen deposit a sheet-like layer of extracellular matrix materials on the surface of the collagen fibers. Transformed cells on collagen produce and accumulate more ({sup 3}H)collage, yet are less effective in basement membrane formation than normal cells, indicting that the accumulation of collagen alone and the effect of interstitial collagen thereupon do not suffice. Thus, exogenous fibrillar collagen appears to enhance, but is not sufficient for proper assembly of collagenous basement membrane components near the basal epithelial cell surface.

  9. The small heat-shock protein αB-crystallin uses different mechanisms of chaperone action to prevent the amorphous versus fibrillar aggregation of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Melissa; Ecroyd, Heath

    2012-12-15

    Stress conditions can destabilize proteins, promoting them to unfold and adopt intermediately folded states. Partially folded protein intermediates are unstable and prone to aggregation down off-folding pathways leading to the formation of either amorphous or amyloid fibril aggregates. The sHsp (small heat-shock protein) αB-crystallin acts as a molecular chaperone to prevent both amorphous and fibrillar protein aggregation; however, the precise molecular mechanisms behind its chaperone action are incompletely understood. To investigate whether the chaperone activity of αB-crystallin is dependent upon the form of aggregation (amorphous compared with fibrillar), bovine α-lactalbumin was developed as a model target protein that could be induced to aggregate down either off-folding pathway using comparable buffer conditions. Thus when α-lactalbumin was reduced it aggregated amorphously, whereas a reduced and carboxymethylated form aggregated to form amyloid fibrils. Using this model, αB-crystallin was shown to be a more efficient chaperone against amorphously aggregating α-lactalbumin than when it aggregated to form fibrils. Moreover, αB-crystallin forms high molecular mass complexes with α-lactalbumin to prevent its amorphous aggregation, but prevents fibril formation via weak transient interactions. Thus, the conformational stability of the protein intermediate, which is a precursor to aggregation, plays a critical role in modulating the chaperone mechanism of αB-crystallin. PMID:23005341

  10. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Redeker, Virginie; Fritz, Nicolas; Pieri, Laura; Almeida, Leandro G.; Spolidoro, Maria; Liebmann, Thomas; Bousset, Luc; Renner, Marianne; Léna, Clément; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD). This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively) (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397[1]). α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively). For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD002256 to PRIDE: PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/PXD002256 to 10.6019/PXD002263. PMID:26958642

  11. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Redeker, Virginie; Fritz, Nicolas; Pieri, Laura; Almeida, Leandro G; Spolidoro, Maria; Liebmann, Thomas; Bousset, Luc; Renner, Marianne; Léna, Clément; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD). This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively) (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397[1]). α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively). For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD002256 to PRIDE: PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/PXD002256 to 10.6019/PXD002263. PMID:26958642

  12. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  13. Comparison of frozen and freeze-dried particulate bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Malinin, Theodore; Temple, H Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Freeze-dried and frozen particulate bone allografts are used interchangeably on the assumption that the biologic behavior of these grafts is similar. Dissimilarities in biologic behavior and differences in the rate and extent of bone incorporation of freeze-dried and frozen particulate grafts were demonstrated in a comparative study using a non-human primate model. Freeze-dried particulate allografts induced new bone formation and healing of the osseous defects much faster than the frozen allografts. PMID:17658506

  14. Effects of contact cap dimension on dry adhesion of bioinspired mushroom-shaped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Shao, Jinyou; Ding, Yucheng; Li, Xiangming; Tian, Hongmiao; Hu, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Dry adhesion observed in small creatures, such as spiders, insects, and geckos, has many great advantages such as repeatability and strong adhesiveness. In order to mimic these unique performances, fibrillar surface with a mushroom shaped end has drawn lots of attentions because of its advantage in efficiently enhancing adhesion compared with other sphere or simple flat ends. Here, in order to study the effects of contact cap dimension on adhesion strength, patterned surfaces of mushroom-shaped micropillars with differing cap diameters are fabricated based on the conventional photolithography and molding. The normal adhesion strength of these dry adhesives with varying cap diameters is measured with home-built equipment. The strength increases with the rise of cap diameter, and interestingly it becomes strongest when the mushroom caps join together.

  15. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Chemotherapy - dry mouth; Radiation therapy - dry mouth; Transplant - dry mouth; Transplantation - dry mouth ... Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you may have include: Mouth sores Thick ...

  16. Biological and biophysics aspects of metformin-induced effects: cortex mitochondrial dysfunction and promotion of toxic amyloid pre-fibrillar aggregates.

    PubMed

    Picone, Pasquale; Vilasi, Silvia; Librizzi, Fabio; Contardi, Marco; Nuzzo, Domenico; Caruana, Luca; Baldassano, Sara; Amato, Antonella; Mulè, Flavia; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Giacomazza, Daniela; Di Carlo, Marta

    2016-08-01

    The onset of Alzheimer disease (AD) is influenced by several risk factors comprising diabetes. Within this context, antidiabetic drugs, including metformin, are investigated for their effect on AD. We report that in the C57B6/J mice, metformin is delivered to the brain where activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), its molecular target. This drug affects the levels of β-secretase (BACE1) and β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), promoting processing and aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ), mainly in the cortex region. Moreover, metformin induces mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death by affecting the level and conformation of Translocase of the Outer Membrane 40 (TOM40), voltage-dependent anion-selective channels 1 (VDAC1) and hexokinase I (HKI), proteins involved in mitochondrial transport of molecules, including Aβ. By using biophysical techniques we found that metformin is able to directly interact with Aβ influencing its aggregation kinetics and features. These findings indicate that metformin induces different adverse effects, leading to an overall increase of the risk of AD onset. PMID:27509335

  17. Adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers on soft surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eugene; Sitti, Metin

    2009-06-16

    Polymer microfiber arrays with mushroom-shaped tips are shown to adhere well to a soft, smooth substrate. An existing model describing the effect of backing layer thickness is also shown to be applicable to the adhesion of fibrillar arrays on soft surfaces. Simulations showed that adhesion can be enhanced by increasing the compliance of the microfibers in addition to maximizing single-fiber adhesion. This model can be used to guide the development of optimized microfiber adhesives for use on soft surfaces such as biological tissues or textiles. PMID:19449817

  18. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin, which may bleed if severe. Chapped or cracked lips. When dry skin cracks, germs can get ... cause the skin to become dry, raw, and cracked. Swimming : Some pools have high levels of chlorine, ...

  19. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gum Disease TMJ Disorders Oral Cancer Dry Mouth Burning Mouth Tooth Decay See All Oral Complications of Systemic ... mouth trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting, or speaking a burning feeling in the mouth a dry feeling in the throat cracked lips ...

  20. Dry eye syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of dry eyes include: Dry environment or workplace (wind, air conditioning) Sun exposure Smoking or second-hand ... NOT smoke and avoid second-hand smoke, direct wind, and air conditioning. Use a humidifier, especially in ...

  1. Self-assembly of well-defined polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymer on fibrillar clays via ultrasonic-assisted surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Tingmei; Su, Zhixing

    2006-06-01

    Well-defined polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymers were grafted from the fibrillar clay, attapulgite, by a four-step self-assembly process: (i) the gamma-aminopropyltriethoxyl silane was self-assembled onto the surfaces of the attapulgite; (ii) the surface amino groups were amidated with bromoacetylbromide; (iii) the bromo-acetamide modified attapulgite was used as macro-initiator for the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene with the catalyst of the complex of 1,10-phenanthroline and Cu(I)Br; (iv) the polystyrene grafted attapulgite was then used as macroinitiator for the polymerization of acrylamide. The two steps of the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerizations were all conducted under ultrasonic irradiation at room temperature. The product, polyacrylamide-polystyrene copolymers grafted attapulgite, had been characterized with elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:17025071

  2. Identical oligomeric and fibrillar structures captured from the brains of R6/2 and knock-in mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Kirupa; Lane, Amin; Legleiter, Justin; Warley, Alice; Woodman, Ben; Finkbeiner, Steve; Paganetti, Paolo; Muchowski, Paul J; Wilson, Stuart; Bates, Gillian P

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized neuropathologically by the presence of neuropil aggregates and nuclear inclusions. However, the profile of aggregate structures that are present in the brains of HD patients or of HD mouse models and the relative contribution of specific aggregate structures to disease pathogenesis is unknown. We have used the Seprion ligand to develop a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based method for quantifying aggregated polyglutamine in tissues from HD mouse models. We used a combination of electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to investigate the aggregate structures isolated by the ligand. We found that the oligomeric, proto-fibrillar and fibrillar aggregates extracted from the brains of R6/2 and HdhQ150 knock-in mice were remarkably similar. Using AFM, we determined that the nanometre globular oligomers isolated from the brains of both mouse models have dimensions identical to those generated from recombinant huntingtin exon 1 proteins. Finally, antibodies that detect exon 1 Htt epitopes differentially recognize the ligand-captured material on SDS-PAGE gels. The Seprion-ligand ELISA provides an assay with good statistical power for use in preclinical pharmacodynamic therapeutic trials or to assess the effects of the genetic manipulation of potential therapeutic targets on aggregate load. This, together with the ability to identify a spectrum of aggregate species in HD mouse tissues, will contribute to our understanding of how these structures relate to the pathogenesis of HD and whether their formation can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. PMID:19825844

  3. Dry Eye and Designer Ophthalmics

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, Gordon W.; Olsakovsky, Leslie A.; Conway, Brian P.; McKown, Robert L.; Kitagawa, Kazuko; Nichols, Jason J.

    2009-01-01

    EST, proteomic, and antibody capture assays are revealing a level of tear film protein complexity far greater than previously appreciated. A systems biology approach will be needed to fully appreciate function as tear protein doses fluctuate in time through different conditions. Although consensus is growing on what fully constitutes the human tear proteome, questions remain about the source and significance of the ∼256 tear proteins designated as ‘intracellular’. Many of these may derive from normal cellular turnover and could therefore be informative. A further >183 are designated as ‘extracellular’. Surprisingly, only 4 – 5% of these appear to be dysregulated in the three forms of dry eye preliminarily examined to date. Some differ and a couple overlap, suggesting that disease-specific signatures could be identified. Future dry eye treatment might include recombinant tear protein rescue as a personalized ophthalmic approach to ocular surface disease. PMID:18677231

  4. Scaling Reversible Adhesion in Synthetic and Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Michael; Irschick, Duncan; Crosby, Alfred

    2013-03-01

    High capacity, easy release polymer adhesives, as demonstrated by a gecko's toe, present unique opportunities for synthetic design. However, without a framework that connects biological and synthetic adhesives from basic nanoscopic features to macroscopic systems, synthetic mimics have failed to perform favorably at large length scales. Starting from an energy balance, we develop a scaling approach to understand unstable interfacial fracture over multiple length scales. The simple theory reveals that reversibly adhesive polymers do not rely upon fibrillar features but require contradicting attributes: maximum compliance normal to the substrate and minimum compliance in the loading direction. We use this counterintuitive criterion to create reversible, easy release adhesives at macroscopic sizes (100 cm2) with unprecedented force capacities on the order of 3000 N. Importantly, we achieve this without fibrillar features, supporting our predictions and emphasizing the importance of subsurface anatomy in biological adhesive systems. Our theory describes adhesive force capacity as a function of material properties and geometry and is supported by over 1000 experiments, spanning both synthetic and biological adhesives, with agreement over 14 orders of magnitude in adhesive force.

  5. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  6. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1990-09-01

    Impulse drying is an innovative process for drying paper that holds great promise for reducing the energy consumed during the manufacture of paper and similar web products. Impulse drying occurs when a wet paper web passes through a press nip in which one of the rolls is heated to a high temperature. A steam layer adjacent to the heated surface grows and displaces water from the sheet in a very efficient manner. The energy required for water removal is very much less than that required for conventional evaporative drying. Hence, it has been projected that wide commercialization of impulse drying would result in at least a 10% industry-wide energy saving. This report covers work completed between October, 1988 and September, 1989. During this period, pilot press trails demonstrated that newsprint as well as linerboard experience delamination. Hence, the major focus of the research was the resolution of the delamination problem. In order to document potential process improvements, measurement methods were developed to quantify sheet delamination. Using these methods, low thermal diffusivity ceramic roll surfaces were shown to extend the range of impulse drying operating conditions while avoiding sheet delamination. As compared to steel surfaces, ceramics were found to provide significantly higher water volume without inducing sheet delamination. 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  8. Dephosphorization when using DRI

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-21

    The increase in high quality steel production in electric arc furnaces (EAFs) requires the use of scrap substitute materials, such as Direct Reduced Iron (DRI) and Hot Briquetted Iron (HBI). Although DRI and HBI products have lower copper and nickel contents than most scrap materials, they can contain up to ten times more phosphorus. This project, led by Carnegie Mellon University’s Center for Iron and Steelmaking Research, improves the understanding of how phosphorus behaves when DRI and HBI melt.

  9. McMurdo Dry Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the few areas of Antarctica not covered by thousands of meters of ice, the McMurdo Dry Valleys stand out in this satellite image. For a few weeks each summer temperatures are warm enough to melt glacial ice, creating streams that feed freshwater lakes that lie at the bottom of the valleys. Beneath a cap of ice these lakes remains unfrozen year-round, supporting colonies of bacteria and phytoplankton. Over the past 14 years, however, summers have been colder than usual, and the lakes are becoming more and more frozen. If the trend continues, the biological communities they support may go into hibernation. Most of Antarctica has cooled along with the Dry Valleys, in contrast to much of the rest of the Earth, which has warmed over the past 100 years. No one knows if the trend is related to global climate, or just a quirk in the weather. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) instrument on December 18, 1999. For more information, visit: National Public Radio's Mixed Signals from Antarctica Declassified Satellite Imagery of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Image by Robert Simmon, based on data provided by the NASA GSFC Oceans and Ice Branch and the Landsat 7 Science Team

  10. Role of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor and fibronectin in the interaction of platelets in flowing blood with monomeric and fibrillar human collagen types I and III.

    PubMed

    Houdijk, W P; Sakariassen, K S; Nievelstein, P F; Sixma, J J

    1985-02-01

    I and III is dependent on both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin. FVIII-VWF is only required at relatively high shear rates; fibronectin also at relatively low shear rates. Their complementary role in platelet adhesion suggests separate binding sites for FVIII-VWF and fibronectin on collagen. Platelet deposition on performed fibrils of collagen types I and III was also studied. Initial adhesion expressed as percentage surface coverage was similar to that found with monomeric collagen, but thrombus formation was much enhanced. Adhesion on fibrillar collagen at 800 s(-1) was impaired in VWD-plasma and fibronectin-free plasma, and was restored by addition of purified fibronectin to fibronectin-free plasma. When perfusions were performed with HAS, only addition of FVIII-VWF was required for optimal adhesion to fibrillar collagen; addition of fibronectin had no effect. These data are in contrast to the studies with monomeric collagens described above, in which the addition of both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin was required. These data are also in contrast to the observation that in plasma both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin are required for optimal adhesion to fibrillar collagen. PMID:3919060

  11. Role of factor VIII-von Willebrand factor and fibronectin in the interaction of platelets in flowing blood with monomeric and fibrillar human collagen types I and III.

    PubMed Central

    Houdijk, W P; Sakariassen, K S; Nievelstein, P F; Sixma, J J

    1985-01-01

    I and III is dependent on both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin. FVIII-VWF is only required at relatively high shear rates; fibronectin also at relatively low shear rates. Their complementary role in platelet adhesion suggests separate binding sites for FVIII-VWF and fibronectin on collagen. Platelet deposition on performed fibrils of collagen types I and III was also studied. Initial adhesion expressed as percentage surface coverage was similar to that found with monomeric collagen, but thrombus formation was much enhanced. Adhesion on fibrillar collagen at 800 s(-1) was impaired in VWD-plasma and fibronectin-free plasma, and was restored by addition of purified fibronectin to fibronectin-free plasma. When perfusions were performed with HAS, only addition of FVIII-VWF was required for optimal adhesion to fibrillar collagen; addition of fibronectin had no effect. These data are in contrast to the studies with monomeric collagens described above, in which the addition of both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin was required. These data are also in contrast to the observation that in plasma both FVIII-VWF and fibronectin are required for optimal adhesion to fibrillar collagen. Images PMID:3919060

  12. Dry pressing technical ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, W.A. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Dry pressing of technical ceramics is a fundamental method of producing high-quality ceramic components. The goals of dry pressing technical ceramics are uniform compact size and green density, consistent part-to-part green density and defect-free compact. Dry pressing is the axial compaction of loosely granulated dry ceramic powders (< 3% free moisture) within a die/punch arrangement. The powder, under pressure, conforms to the specific shape of the punch faces and die. Powder compaction occurs within a rigid-walled die and usually between a top and bottom punch. Press configurations include anvil, rotary, multiple-punch and multiple-action.

  13. To Dry Or Not To Dry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaks, Audrey E.

    1977-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most frustrating problems which confront many teachers is lack of adequate drying space or facilities for prints, paintings and three-dimensional art activities. Suggests requirements necessary for an adequate storage unit and how to construct one. (Author/RK)

  14. Tuning of cellulose fibres' structure and surface topography: Influence of swelling and various drying procedures.

    PubMed

    Hribernik, Silvo; Stana Kleinschek, Karin; Rihm, Rainer; Ganster, Johannes; Fink, Hans-Peter; Sfiligoj Smole, Majda

    2016-09-01

    Presented study deals with the pre-treatment of cellulose fibres with the aim to activate their surface and to enlarge their pore system, leading to an enhancement of fibres' affinity for subsequent functionalization processes. Swelling of fibres in aqueous solutions of sodium hydroxide opens their fibrillar structure, while freezing and freeze-drying retain this enlargement of the pore system, in contrast with conventional air or elevated temperature drying. Effect of different pre-treatment procedures on fibres' supramolecular structure, enlargement of their pore system, surface topography, zeta potential and mechanical properties was investigated. Degree of enhancement of the pore system depends on the concentration of sodium hydroxide and type of freezing; higher alkali concentrations are more effective, but at the cost of extensive deterioration of mechanical properties. Swelling of fibres in lower concentrations of NaOH, in combination with freeze drying, offers an acceptable compromise between enhancement of the fibres' pore system, changes in surface potential and tensile properties of treated fibres. Design of a suitable regime of swelling and drying of cellulose fibres results in an effective procedure for controlled tuning of their surface topography in combination with an increase of the available internal surface area and pore volume. PMID:27185135

  15. Tray Drying of Solids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afacan, Artin; Masliyah, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    Describes a drying experiment useful in presenting the concept of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Background information, equipment requirements, experimental procedures, and results are provided. The reasonably good agreement in the calculated rate of drying and that observed experimentally makes students feel confident in applying…

  16. Indiana Corn Dry Mill

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-01

    The goal of this project is to perform engineering, project design, and permitting for the creation and commercial demonstration of a corn dry mill biorefinery that will produce fuel-grade ethanol, distillers dry grain for animal feed, and carbon dioxide for industrial use.

  17. Packaged kiln dried firewood

    SciTech Connect

    Cutrara, A.

    1986-07-01

    A process is described for kiln drying firewood consisting of essentially uniform lengths of split firewood pieces, the process comprising splitting essentially uniform lengths of green tree logs to form firewood pieces, placing the firewood pieces in open mesh bags to provide a plurality of bags of firewood, placing the plurality of bags of green firewood pieces in a kiln drying oven, kiln drying the pieces at temperatures in excess of 150/sup 0/F. by moving heated air over the pieces until the pieces have an overall moisture content ranging from 15% up to 30% by weight, operating the kiln at a temperature below a level which would render the structural characteristics of the bag useless and removing the kiln dried firewood pieces in the plurality of bags from the kiln drying oven.

  18. Dry imaging cameras

    PubMed Central

    Indrajit, IK; Alam, Aftab; Sahni, Hirdesh; Bhatia, Mukul; Sahu, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow. PMID:21799589

  19. Surface contact and design of fibrillar ‘friction pads’ in stick insects (Carausius morosus): mechanisms for large friction coefficients and negligible adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Labonte, David; Williams, John A.; Federle, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Many stick insects and mantophasmids possess tarsal ‘heel pads’ (euplantulae) covered by arrays of conical, micrometre-sized hairs (acanthae). These pads are used mainly under compression; they respond to load with increasing shear resistance, and show negligible adhesion. Reflected-light microscopy in stick insects (Carausius morosus) revealed that the contact area of ‘heel pads’ changes with normal load on three hierarchical levels. First, loading brought larger areas of the convex pads into contact. Second, loading increased the density of acanthae in contact. Third, higher loads changed the shape of individual hair contacts gradually from circular (tip contact) to elongated (side contact). The resulting increase in real contact area can explain the load dependence of friction, indicating a constant shear stress between acanthae and substrate. As the euplantula contact area is negligible for small loads (similar to hard materials), but increases sharply with load (resembling soft materials), these pads show high friction coefficients despite little adhesion. This property appears essential for the pads’ use in locomotion. Several morphological characteristics of hairy friction pads are in apparent contrast to hairy pads used for adhesion, highlighting key adaptations for both pad types. Our results are relevant for the design of fibrillar structures with high friction coefficients but small adhesion. PMID:24554580

  20. Pinocembrin Protects Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Fibrillar Amyloid-β1−40Injury by Suppressing the MAPK/NF-κB Inflammatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-ze; Song, Jun-ke; Sun, Jia-lin; Li, Yong-jie; Zhou, Si-bai; Du, Guan-hua

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in Alzheimer's disease (AD) may contribute to disease progression through Aβ-induced microvascular endothelial pathogenesis. Pinocembrin has been shown to have therapeutic effects in AD models. These effects correlate with preservation of microvascular function, but the effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged conditions is unclear. The present study focuses on the in vitro protective effect of pinocembrin on fibrillar Aβ1−40 (fAβ1−40) injured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs) and explores potential mechanisms. The results demonstrate that fAβ1−40-induced cytotoxicity in hBMECs can be rescued by pinocembrin treatment. Pinocembrin increases cell viability, reduces the release of LDH, and relieves nuclear condensation. The mechanisms of this reversal from Aβ may be associated with the inhibition of inflammatory response, involving inhibition of MAPK activation, downregulation of phosphor-IKK level, relief of IκBα degradation, blockage of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and reduction of the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Pinocembrin does not show obvious effects on regulating the redox imbalance after exposure to fAβ1−40. Together, the suppression of MAPK and the NF-κB signaling pathways play a significant role in the anti-inflammation of pinocembrin in hBMECs subjected to fAβ1−40. This may serve as a therapeutic agent for BMEC protection in Alzheimer's-related deficits. PMID:25157358

  1. Bayesian Extraction of Deep UV Resonance Raman Signature of Fibrillar Cross-β Sheet Core based on H-D Exchange Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashilov, V. A.; Lednev, I. K.

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. The application of conventional biophysical techniques including solution NMR and X-ray crystallography for structural characterization of fibrils is limited because they are neither crystalline nor soluble. The Bayesian approach was utilized for extracting the deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectrum of the lysozyme fibrillar β-sheet based on the hydrogen-deuterium exchange spectral data. The problem was shown to be unsolvable when using blind source separation or conventional chemometrics methods because of the 100% correlation of the concentration profiles of the species under study. Information about the mixing process was incorporated by forcing the columns of the concentration matrix to be proportional to the expected concentration profiles. The ill-conditioning of the matrix was removed by concatenating it to the diagonal matrix with entries corresponding to the known pure spectra (sources). Prior information about the spectral features and characteristic bands of the spectra was taken into account using the Bayesian signal dictionary approach. The extracted DUVRR spectrum of the cross-β sheet core exhibited sharp bands indicating the highly ordered structure. Well resolved sub-bands in Amide I and Amide III regions enabled us to assign the fibril core structure to anti-parallel β-sheet and estimate the amide group facial angle Ψ in the cross-β structure. The elaborated Bayesian approach was demonstrated to be applicable for studying correlated biochemical processes.

  2. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  3. 2. INTERIOR OF SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING WITH DRYING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. INTERIOR OF SAND DRAINING & DRYING BUILDING WITH DRYING BINS TO THE RIGHT, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Mill "C" Complex, Sand Draining & Drying Building, South of Dee Bennet Road, near Illinois River, Ottawa, La Salle County, IL

  4. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by medical conditions, such as atopic dermatitis and malnutrition. Dry skin develops due to a decrease in ... Diabetes Hypothyroidism Down syndrome Liver or kidney disease Malnutrition HIV/AIDS Lymphoma Signs and Symptoms The most ...

  5. Freeze drying method

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  6. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  7. Acoustoconvection Drying of Meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, A. A.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of moisture extraction from meat samples by the acoustoconvection and thermoconvection methods has been investigated. To describe the dynamics of moisture extraction from meat, we propose a simple relaxation model with a relaxation time of 8-10 min in satisfactorily describing experimental data on acoustoconvection drying of meat. For thermoconvection drying the relaxation time is thereby 30 and 45 min for the longitudinal and transverse positions of fibers, respectively.

  8. Biological Threats

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thunderstorms & Lightning Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may ...

  9. Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Type 19 Is Caused by Mutations in COL13A1, Encoding the Atypical Non-fibrillar Collagen Type XIII α1 Chain

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Clare V.; Cossins, Judith; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M.; Parry, David A.; Maxwell, Susan; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Riepsaame, Joey; Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Lake, Alice V.R.; Moran, Maria; Robb, Stephanie; Chow, Gabriel; Sewry, Caroline; Hopkins, Philip M.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Jayawant, Sandeep; Palace, Jacqueline; Johnson, Colin A.; Beeson, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) consists of a tripartite synapse with a presynaptic nerve terminal, Schwann cells that ensheathe the terminal bouton, and a highly specialized postsynaptic membrane. Synaptic structural integrity is crucial for efficient signal transmission. Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that result from impaired neuromuscular transmission, caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are involved in synaptic transmission and in forming and maintaining the structural integrity of NMJs. To identify further causes of CMSs, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in families without an identified mutation in known CMS-associated genes. In two families affected by a previously undefined CMS, we identified homozygous loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, which encodes the alpha chain of an atypical non-fibrillar collagen with a single transmembrane domain. COL13A1 localized to the human muscle motor endplate. Using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, modeling of the COL13A1 c.1171delG (p.Leu392Sfs∗71) frameshift mutation in the C2C12 cell line reduced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering during myotube differentiation. This highlights the crucial role of collagen XIII in the formation and maintenance of the NMJ. Our results therefore delineate a myasthenic disorder that is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, encoding a protein involved in organization of the NMJ, and emphasize the importance of appropriate symptomatic treatment for these individuals. PMID:26626625

  10. Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome Type 19 Is Caused by Mutations in COL13A1, Encoding the Atypical Non-fibrillar Collagen Type XIII α1 Chain.

    PubMed

    Logan, Clare V; Cossins, Judith; Rodríguez Cruz, Pedro M; Parry, David A; Maxwell, Susan; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Riepsaame, Joey; Abdelhamed, Zakia A; Lake, Alice V R; Moran, Maria; Robb, Stephanie; Chow, Gabriel; Sewry, Caroline; Hopkins, Philip M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Jayawant, Sandeep; Palace, Jacqueline; Johnson, Colin A; Beeson, David

    2015-12-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) consists of a tripartite synapse with a presynaptic nerve terminal, Schwann cells that ensheathe the terminal bouton, and a highly specialized postsynaptic membrane. Synaptic structural integrity is crucial for efficient signal transmission. Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that result from impaired neuromuscular transmission, caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins that are involved in synaptic transmission and in forming and maintaining the structural integrity of NMJs. To identify further causes of CMSs, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in families without an identified mutation in known CMS-associated genes. In two families affected by a previously undefined CMS, we identified homozygous loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, which encodes the alpha chain of an atypical non-fibrillar collagen with a single transmembrane domain. COL13A1 localized to the human muscle motor endplate. Using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, modeling of the COL13A1 c.1171delG (p.Leu392Sfs(∗)71) frameshift mutation in the C2C12 cell line reduced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering during myotube differentiation. This highlights the crucial role of collagen XIII in the formation and maintenance of the NMJ. Our results therefore delineate a myasthenic disorder that is caused by loss-of-function mutations in COL13A1, encoding a protein involved in organization of the NMJ, and emphasize the importance of appropriate symptomatic treatment for these individuals. PMID:26626625

  11. Fibrillar morphology of derivatives of poly(3-alkylthiophene)s by solvent vapor annealing: effects of conformational transition and conjugate length.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyang; Liu, Jiangang; Xu, Yaozhuo; Han, Yanchun

    2013-05-16

    A fibrillar morphology was obtained, compared to the featherless pristine films, via solvent annealing the films of a series of derivatives of poly(3-alkylthiophene)s (P3ATs): poly(3-dodecylthiophene) (P3DDT), poly(3,3'''-didodecyl-quaterthiophene) (PQT12), and poly(2,5-bis(3-dodecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (pBTTT12). Among the solvents used, including dichloromethane, chloroform, tetrahydrofuran, and carbon disulfide (CS2), CS2 was the best to induce fibril formation because its solubility parameter is closest to those of the P3AT derivatives. It was found that higher critical CS2 vapor pressures were needed to form crystal nuclei with increasing conjugation length and molecular weight of the P3AT derivatives; i.e., the critical vapor pressures for P3DDT 13.9k and PQT12 15.5k were 59.0% and 80.7%, respectively, and there were no nuclei of fibrils for pBTTT12 15.6k with the highest conjugation length, even at a CS2 vapor pressure of 98.3%. Meanwhile, at the highest vapor pressure, the fibril density decreased with increasing conjugation length and molecular weight of the P3AT derivatives. This is attributed to the rod-like conformation prevailing for polymers with larger conjugation length and higher molecular weight during solvent annealing, making the conformational transition toward coils more difficult and hindering diffusion of molecules. The results presented here are expected to be helpful for the design and processing of conjugated semiconductor polymers. PMID:23590386

  12. Advanced gecko-foot-mimetic dry adhesives based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2012-12-01

    Geckos can run freely on vertical walls and even ceilings. Recent studies have discovered that gecko's extraordinary climbing ability comes from a remarkable design of nature with nanoscale beta-keratin elastic hairs on their feet and toes, which collectively generate sufficiently strong van der Waals force to hold the animal onto an opposing surface while at the same time disengaging at will. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNT) arrays, resembling gecko's adhesive foot hairs with additional superior mechanical, chemical and electrical properties, have been demonstrated to be a promising candidate for advanced fibrillar dry adhesives. The VA-CNT arrays with tailor-made hierarchical structures can be patterned and/or transferred onto various flexible substrates, including responsive polymers. This, together with recent advances in nanofabrication techniques, could offer `smart' dry adhesives for various potential applications, even where traditional adhesives cannot be used. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing the material properties and adhesion performances is critical to the design and fabrication of gecko inspired CNT dry adhesives of practical significance. In this feature article, we present an overview of recent progress in both fundamental and applied frontiers for the development of CNT-based adhesives by summarizing important studies in this exciting field, including our own work.

  13. Dry Dock No. 3. View of head of Dry Dock ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry Dock No. 3. View of head of Dry Dock with stair to right of shot. View facing west - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Dry Dock No. 3, On northern shoreline of shipyard, west of Dry Dock Nos. 1 & 2, near the intersection of Avenue G and Sixth Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. Laser polarization fluorescence of the networks of optically anisotropic biological crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, Y. A.; Dubolazov, A. V.; Angelsky, A. P.; Sidor, M. I.; Bodnar, G. B.; Koval, G.; Zabolotna, N. I.; Smolarz, A.; Junisbekov, M. Sh.

    2013-01-01

    The present work is devoted to investigation of mechanisms of optical anisotropy of biological tissues polycrystalline networks and laser polarization fluorescence. The model of complex optical anisotropy, which takes into account both linear and circular birefringence, as well as linear and circular dichroism of fibrillar networks of histological sections of women reproductive sphere is proposed. The data of statistical, correlation and fractal processing of coordinate distributions of laser polarization fluorescence is provided. The technique of azimuthally invariant Mueller-matrix mapping of laser polarization fluorescence of protein networks in the tasks of differentiation of benign and malignant tumors of uterus wall is elaborated.

  15. Influence of the drying medium parameters on drying induced stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Musielak, G.

    2000-03-01

    A thermomechanical model of drying of capillary-porous materials whose material constants depend on moisture content and temperature is presented in the paper. The finite element method is used for the solution of two-dimensional problem of convective drying of a prismatic bar. The moisture distributions, temperature distributions, drying induced strains and stresses for various drying medium parameters are determined. The effect of these parameters on moisture distribution and in particular on drying induced stresses is discussed.

  16. Current Approach to Dry Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Valim, Valéria; Trevisani, Virginia Fernandes Moça; de Sousa, Jacqueline Martins; Vilela, Verônica Silva; Belfort, Rubens

    2015-12-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disease of the tears and ocular surface that causes tear film instability with potential damage to the ocular surface. The prevalence of dry eye in the world population ranges from 6 to 34 %. It is more common in those aged over 50, and affects mainly women. Since the introduction of the Schirmer's test in 1903, other tests have been developed to evaluate dry eye, such as biomicroscopy, the tear film breakup time (BUT), vital dyes (lissamine green and rose bengal), fluorescein, leaf fern test, corneal sensitivity test, conjunctiva impression cytology, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and tear osmolarity measurement. Although there is no gold standard, it is advisable to combine at least two tests. Strategies for treating DED have recently been modified and include patient education, tear substitute, corticosteroids, secretagogues, fatty acids, immunomodulators, occlusion of lacrimal puncta surgery and, tarsorrhaphy. Biological therapy and new topical immunomodulators such as tacrolimus, tofacitinib and IL-1 receptor inhibitor are being tested. In this review, the evaluation tests for dry eye are compared and the main studies on treatment are presented, with emphasis on studies in patients with Sjögren's syndrome. The authors propose an approach for the management of dry eye. PMID:25081064

  17. Magnetically responsive dry fluids.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Filipa L; Bustamante, Rodney; Millán, Angel; Palacio, Fernando; Trindade, Tito; Silva, Nuno J O

    2013-08-21

    Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid. PMID:23831769

  18. Dry anaerobic methane fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, W.J.; Dell'Orto, S.; Fanfoni, K.J.; Fast, S.; Jackson, D.; Kabrick, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of relatively dry organics directly to biogas increases the potential of using large amounts of organics such as mixtures of crop residues and animal manures on the farm, crop residues, and urban solid wastes. Besides the use of the dry fermentation process on farms and in centralized facilities, the possibility of using this concept as a residential energy generating system exists. Existing crop residues can be used to generate biogas without major water needs problems. Requirements for an efficient reaction include initial solid content less than 30%, an active methanogenic slurry addition of 40% dry weight (depending on the substrate), and a reaction period of 60-300 days, depending on the reactor temperatures. Further analyses are required to clarify the controlling parameters and the economic feasibility.

  19. Magnetically responsive dry fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Bustamante, Rodney; Millán, Angel; Palacio, Fernando; Trindade, Tito; Silva, Nuno J. O.

    2013-07-01

    Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid.Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01784b

  20. Properties of Spray Dried Food and Spray Drying Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katoh, Fumio

    The following conclusions are obtained, studying properties of spray dried food and drying characteristics. (a) Dried particles are similar to spray droplets in size distribution (y=2.5), and particle count distribution is arranged as (dn/dx = ae-bx). (b) The ratio of the particle diameters before and after drying is calculated with moisture before and after drying, and porosity is given as (εp = ww4). (c) The standard drying method is presented to evaluate accurately drying problems at a certain standard. (d) Equilibrium moisture at 20 up to 100°C are summarized in terms of adsorption potential. (e) It makes clear that calulation based on the theory of residence time and drying time represents well complex spray drying characteristics.

  1. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  2. Cooling of dried coal

    SciTech Connect

    Siddoway, M.A.

    1988-06-14

    This patent describes a process for noncombustibly drying particulate coal comprising: separating the coal into two wet coal streams; passing one wet coal system into a dryer to form a bed; heating air in a furnace; admitting the heated air to the dryer to fluidize the bed; withdrawing dryer exhaust gas; passing the exhaust gas through a cyclone and withdrawing coal fines from the cyclone; withdrawing a hot, dry coal stream from the dryer; blending the drier hot dry coal stream with the cyclone coal fines; withdrawing cyclone exhaust gas; wet scrubbing the cyclone exhaust gas to form a coal fines slurry and scrubber exhaust gas; passing the coal fines slurry to a sedimentation pool; blending the second wet coal stream with the drier hot dry coal stream and the cyclone coal fines; passing the latter blended stream to a cooler to form a bed; fluidizing the latter bed with ambient air; withdrawing cooler exhaust gas and passing the gas to a cyclone; passing exhaust gas from the latter cyclone to a baghouse and collecting coal fines therein; passing the latter coal fines to the furnace as fuel for heating the air; and withdrawing cooled coal from the cooler and blending the cooled coal with coal fines from the latter cyclone.

  3. Dry piston coal feeder

    DOEpatents

    Hathaway, Thomas J.; Bell, Jr., Harold S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a solids feeder for feeding dry coal to a pressurized gasifier at elevated temperatures substantially without losing gas from the gasifier by providing a lock having a double-acting piston that feeds the coals into the gasifier, traps the gas from escaping, and expels the trapped gas back into the gasifier.

  4. [Towards a structuring fibrillar ontology].

    PubMed

    Guimberteau, J-C

    2012-10-01

    Over previous decades and centuries, the difficulty encountered in the manner in which the tissue of our bodies is organised, and structured, is clearly explained by the impossibility of exploring it in detail. Since the creation of the microscope, the perception of the basic unity, which is the cell, has been essential in understanding the functioning of reproduction and of transmission, but has not been able to explain the notion of form; since the cells are not everywhere and are not distributed in an apparently balanced manner. The problems that remain are those of form and volume and also of connection. The concept of multifibrillar architecture, shaping the interfibrillar microvolumes in space, represents a solution to all these questions. The architectural structures revealed, made up of fibres, fibrils and microfibrils, from the mesoscopic to the microscopic level, provide the concept of a living form with structural rationalism that permits the association of psychochemical molecular biodynamics and quantum physics: the form can thus be described and interpreted, and a true structural ontology is elaborated from a basic functional unity, which is the microvacuole, the intra and interfibrillar volume of the fractal organisation, and the chaotic distribution. Naturally, new, less linear, less conclusive, and less specific concepts will be implied by this ontology, leading one to believe that the emergence of life takes place under submission to forces that the original form will have imposed and oriented the adaptive finality. PMID:22921289

  5. Infrared Drying Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Matthew R.

    In recent years, much research has been done to explore direct printing methods, such as screen and inkjet printing, as alternatives to the traditional lithographic process. The primary motivation is reduction of the material costs associated with producing common electronic devices. Much of this research has focused on developing inkjet or screen paste formulations that can be printed on a variety of substrates, and which have similar conductivity performance to the materials currently used in the manufacturing of circuit boards and other electronic devices. Very little research has been done to develop a process that would use direct printing methods to manufacture electronic devices in high volumes. This study focuses on developing and optimizing a drying process for conductive copper ink in a high volume manufacturing setting. Using an infrared (IR) dryer, it was determined that conductive copper prints could be dried in seconds or minutes as opposed to tens of minutes or hours that it would take with other drying devices, such as a vacuum oven. In addition, this study also identifies significant parameters that can affect the conductivity of IR dried prints. Using designed experiments and statistical analysis; the dryer parameters were optimized to produce the best conductivity performance for a specific ink formulation and substrate combination. It was determined that for an ethylene glycol, butanol, 1-methoxy 2- propanol ink formulation printed on Kapton, the optimal drying parameters consisted of a dryer height of 4 inches, a temperature setting between 190 - 200°C, and a dry time of 50-65 seconds depending on the printed film thickness as determined by the number of print passes. It is important to note that these parameters are optimized specifically for the ink formulation and substrate used in this study. There is still much research that needs to be done into optimizing the IR dryer for different ink substrate combinations, as well as developing a

  6. Dry etching of metallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollinger, D.

    1983-01-01

    The production dry etch processes are reviewed from the perspective of microelectronic fabrication applications. The major dry etch processes used in the fabrication of microelectronic devices can be divided into two categories - plasma processes in which samples are directly exposed to an electrical discharge, and ion beam processes in which samples are etched by a beam of ions extracted from a discharge. The plasma etch processes can be distinguished by the degree to which ion bombardment contributes to the etch process. This, in turn is related to capability for anisotropic etching. Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) and Ion Beam Etching are of most interest for etching of thin film metals. RIE is generally considered the best process for large volume, anisotropic aluminum etching.

  7. An unusually dry story.

    PubMed

    Rajagopala, Srinivas; Danigeti, Gurukiran; Subrahmanyan, Dharanipragada

    2015-09-01

    We present a middle-aged woman with a prior history of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorder who presented with an acute onset quadriparesis and respiratory failure. The evaluation revealed distal renal tubular acidosis with hypokalemia and medullary nephrocalcinosis. Weakness persisted despite potassium correction, and ongoing evaluation confirmed recurrent CNS and long-segment spinal cord demyelination with anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies. There was no history of dry eyes or dry mouth. Anti-Sjogren's syndrome A antigen antibodies were elevated, and there was reduced salivary flow on scintigraphy. Coexistent antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with inferior vena cava thrombosis was also found on evaluation. The index patient highlights several rare manifestations of primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) as the presenting features and highlights the differential diagnosis of the clinical syndromes in which pSS should be considered in the Intensive Care Unit. PMID:26430343

  8. An unusually dry story

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopala, Srinivas; Danigeti, Gurukiran; Subrahmanyan, Dharanipragada

    2015-01-01

    We present a middle-aged woman with a prior history of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorder who presented with an acute onset quadriparesis and respiratory failure. The evaluation revealed distal renal tubular acidosis with hypokalemia and medullary nephrocalcinosis. Weakness persisted despite potassium correction, and ongoing evaluation confirmed recurrent CNS and long-segment spinal cord demyelination with anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies. There was no history of dry eyes or dry mouth. Anti-Sjogren's syndrome A antigen antibodies were elevated, and there was reduced salivary flow on scintigraphy. Coexistent antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with inferior vena cava thrombosis was also found on evaluation. The index patient highlights several rare manifestations of primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) as the presenting features and highlights the differential diagnosis of the clinical syndromes in which pSS should be considered in the Intensive Care Unit. PMID:26430343

  9. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-05-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE?s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  10. Session: Hot Dry Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Duchane, David V.; Ponden, Raymond F.; Brown, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Hot Dry Rock - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''HDR Opportunities and Challenges Beyond the Long Term Flow Test'' by David V. Duchane; ''Start-Up Operations at the Fenton Hill HDR Pilot Plant'' by Raymond F. Ponden; and ''Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program'' by Donald W. Brown.

  11. Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dry dock no. 4. Service Building between dry docks 4 and 5. Floor plans (Navy Yard Public Works Office 1941). In files of Cushman & Wakefield, building 501. Philadelphia Naval Business Center. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Service Building, Dry Docks No. 4 & 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  12. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  13. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  14. Biological Technicians

    MedlinePlus

    ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ... Biological technicians typically need a bachelor’s degree in biology or a closely related field. It is important ...

  15. Simple Solutions for Dry Eye

    MedlinePlus

    ... are more concentrated in the tear film of dry eye patients. In hot weather, sleep with the windows shut and keep cool with air conditioning. • Dry eye patients often develop or aggravate allergies. An ...

  16. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause dry mouth. Symptoms you may have include: Mouth sores Thick and stringy saliva Cuts or cracks in ... air dry between brushings. If toothpaste makes your mouth sore, brush with a solution of 1 teaspoon of ...

  17. LASER METHODS IN BIOLOGY: Optical anisotropy of fibrous biological tissues: analysis of the influence of structural properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimnyakov, D. A.; Sinichkin, Yu P.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2007-08-01

    The results of theoretical analysis of the optical anisotropy of multiply scattering fibrillar biological tissues based on the model of an effective anisotropic medium are compared with the experimental in vivo birefringence data for the rat derma obtained earlier in spectral polarisation measurements of rat skin samples in the visible region. The disordered system of parallel dielectric cylinders embedded into an isotropic dielectric medium was considered as a model medium. Simulations were performed taking into account the influence of a partial mutual disordering of the bundles of collagen and elastin fibres in derma on birefringence in samples. The theoretical optical anisotropy averaged over the spectral interval 550-650 nm for the model medium with parameters corresponding to the structural parameters of derma is in good agreement with the results of spectral polarisation measurements of skin samples in the corresponding wavelength range.

  18. Non isothermal drying process optimisation - Drying of clay tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasić, M.; Radojević, Z.

    2015-11-01

    In our previous studies we have developed a model for determination of the variable effective diffusivity and identification of the exact transition points between possible drying mechanisms. The next goal was to develop a drying regime which could in advance characterize the real non isothermal process of drying clay tiles. In order to do this four isothermal experiments were recorded. Temperature and humidity were maintained at 350C / 75%; 450C / 70%; 450C / 60% and 500C / 60%; respectively in each experiment. All experimentally collected data were analyzed and the exact transition points between possible drying mechanisms were detected. Characteristic drying period (time) for each isothermal drying mechanism was also detected. The real, non-isothermal drying process was approximated by 5 segments. In each of these segments approximately isothermal drying condition were maintained. Temperature and humidity of the drying air, in the first four segments, was maintained on the same level as in recorded isothermal experiments while in the fifth segment, it were maintained at 700C / 40%. The duration of the first four segments were calculated from the diagrams Deff - t respectively for each experiment. The clay tile in experiment five was dried without cracking using the proposed non isothermal drying regime.

  19. Electrohydrodynamic Drying of Carrot Slices

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun; Song, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique. PMID:25874695

  20. Electrohydrodynamic drying of carrot slices.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changjiang; Lu, Jun; Song, Zhiqing

    2015-01-01

    Carrots have one of the highest levels of carotene, and they are rich in vitamins, fiber and minerals. However, since fresh carrots wilt rapidly after harvest under inappropriate storage conditions, drying has been used to improve their shelf life and retain nutritional quality. Therefore, to further investigate the potential of this method, carrot slices were dried in an EHD system in order to study the effect of different voltages on drying rate. As measures of quality, carotene content and rehydration ratio were, respectively, compared against the conventional oven drying regime. Carotene, the main component of the dried carrot, and rehydration characteristics of the dried product can both indicate quality by physical and chemical changes during the drying process. Mathematical modeling and simulation of drying curves were also performed, using root mean square error, reduced mean square of the deviation and modeling efficiency as the primary criteria to select the equation that best accounts for the variation in the drying curves of the dried samples. Theoretically, the Page model was best suited for describing the drying rate curve of carrot slices at 10kV to 30kV. Experimentally, the drying rate of carrots was notably greater in the EHD system when compared to control, and quality, as determined by carotene content and rehydration ratio, was also improved when compared to oven drying. Therefore, this work presents a facile and effective strategy for experimentally and theoretically determining the drying properties of carrots, and, as a result, it provides deeper insight into the industrial potential of the EHD drying technique. PMID:25874695

  1. Drum drying of fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Stemmelen, D.; Moyne, C.; Perre, R.; Lebois, P.

    1997-10-01

    A study of drying of textile fabrics on a drum heated by natural gas burner is presented. In the first stage of study, the distribution of the heat flux over the outer surface of the drum is calculated by an analytical method. In the second stage, this heat flux is entered in a numerical code able to simulate the heat and mass transfers in porous media. The simulation results validate the analytical model assumptions. Special attention is paid to the contact resistance between the drum and the fabric.

  2. Method of drying articles

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.

    1999-03-23

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: (a) Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and (b) contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores. 3 figs.

  3. Dry sand foam generator

    SciTech Connect

    Edgley, K.D.; Stromberg, J.L.

    1988-10-25

    A method of generating a foam containing particulate material for treating a subsurface earth formation penetrated by a well bore, the method comprising: (a) introducing a first stream of pressurized gas having dry particulate material entrained therein into a vessel, the particulate material flowing vertically downward into the vessel, at least in part due to the action of gravity; (b) introducing a second stream of liquid into the vessel; (c) varying the second stream into a self-impinging conical jet; (d) impinging the conical jet onto the first stream and thereby forming a foam containing particulate material; and (e) injecting such a foam into the well bore.

  4. Method of drying articles

    DOEpatents

    Janney, Mark A.; Kiggans, Jr., James O.

    1999-01-01

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: a. Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and b. contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores.

  5. Advances in drying: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    Mujumdar, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Topics covered in this volume include recent thoughts in modeling of drying phenomena, use of computers in rational design of drying particulates, recent advances in drying of wood, and heat/mass transfer phenomena in drying of solids. As the readers will no doubt notice, special effort is made to ensure the truly international nature of the contents of this serial publication. As existing knowledge on drying and dryers becomes more widely and readily accessible, it is expected that more and more dryers will be designed rationally rather than built solely with the benefit of empiricism.

  6. Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Yatish T.; Gardner, Todd H.

    2014-09-25

    Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

  7. Dry EEG Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Gordo, M. A.; Sanchez-Morillo, D.; Valle, F. Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) emerged in the second decade of the 20th century as a technique for recording the neurophysiological response. Since then, there has been little variation in the physical principles that sustain the signal acquisition probes, otherwise called electrodes. Currently, new advances in technology have brought new unexpected fields of applications apart from the clinical, for which new aspects such as usability and gel-free operation are first order priorities. Thanks to new advances in materials and integrated electronic systems technologies, a new generation of dry electrodes has been developed to fulfill the need. In this manuscript, we review current approaches to develop dry EEG electrodes for clinical and other applications, including information about measurement methods and evaluation reports. We conclude that, although a broad and non-homogeneous diversity of approaches has been evaluated without a consensus in procedures and methodology, their performances are not far from those obtained with wet electrodes, which are considered the gold standard, thus enabling the former to be a useful tool in a variety of novel applications. PMID:25046013

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies on low-temperature adsorption drying of fresh ginger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Xu, Wei; Ding, Jing; Zhao, Yi

    2006-03-01

    The working principle of low-temperature adsorption drying and the advantages of its application for biological materials drying were introduced in this paper. By using fresh ginger as the drying material, the effects of temperature and relative humidity on its drying characteristics were examined. The results show that the drying rate increases with the temperature increasing or the humidity decreasing. The drying time to the equilibrium is almost the same under different humidity conditions, but low equilibrium moisture content can be acquired under low humidity. The shrinkage characteristics of fresh ginger were also studied. The change of its surface appearance during the drying process was characterized by the new Charged Coupled Device (CCD) and the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) technique. A mathematical model of drying dynamics was set up according to the experiments.

  9. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  10. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  11. Characterization of In-Drum Drying Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kroselj, V.; Jankovic, M.; Skanata, D.; Medakovic, S.; Harapin, D.; Hertl, B.

    2006-07-01

    A few years ago Krsko NPP decided to introduce In-Drum Drying technology for treatment and conditioning of evaporator concentrates and spent ion resins. The main reason to employ this technology was the need for waste volume reduction and experience with vermiculite-cement solidification that proved inadequate for Krsko NPP. Use of In-Drum Drying technology was encouraged by good experience in the field at some German and Spanish NPP's. In the paper, solidification techniques in vermiculite-cement matrix and In-Drum Drying System are described briefly. The resulting waste forms (so called solidification and dryer products) and containers that are used for interim storage of these wastes are described as well. A comparison of the drying versus solidification technology is performed and advantages as well as disadvantages are underlined. Experience gained during seven years of system operation has shown that crying technology resulted in volume reduction by factor of 20 for evaporator concentrates, and by factor of 5 for spent ion resin. Special consideration is paid to the characterization of dryer products. For evaporator concentrates the resulting waste form is a solid salt block with up to 5% bound water. It is packaged in stainless steel drums (net volume of 200 l) with bolted lids and lifting rings. The fluidized spent ion resins (primary and blow-down) are sluiced into the spent resin drying tank. The resin is dewatered and dried by electrical jacket heaters. The resulting waste (i.e. fine granulates) is directly discharged into a shielded stainless steel drum with bolted lid and lifting rings. Characterization of both waste forms has been performed in accordance with recommendations given in Characterization of Radioactive Waste Forms and Packages issued by International Atomic Energy Agency, 1997. This means that radiological, chemical, physical, mechanical, biological and thermal properties of the waste form has been taken into consideration. In the paper

  12. Steam drying -- Modeling and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmerstedt, R.; Hager, J.

    1996-08-01

    The concept of steam drying originates from the mid of the last century. However, a broad industrial acceptance of the technique has so far not taken place. The paper deals with modelling the steam drying process and applications of steam drying within certain industrial sectors where the technique has been deemed to have special opportunities. In the modelling section the mass and heat transfer processes are described along with equilibrium, capillarity and sorption phenomena occurring in porous materials during the steam drying process. In addition existing models in the literature are presented. The applications discussed involve drying of fuels with high moisture contents, cattle feed exemplified by sugar beet pulp, lumber, paper pulp, paper and sludges. Steam drying is compared to flue gas drying of biofuels prior to combustion in a boiler. With reference to a current installation in Sweden, the exergy losses, as manifested by loss of co-generation capacity, are discussed. The energy saving potential when using steam drying of sugar beet pulp as compared to other possible plant configurations is demonstrated. Mechanical vapor recompression applied to steam drying is analyzed with reference to reported data from industrial plants. Finally, environmental advantages when using steam drying are presented.

  13. Dry aging of beef; Review.

    PubMed

    Dashdorj, Dashmaa; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Cho, Soohyun; Kim, Younghoon; Hwang, Inho

    2016-01-01

    The present review has mainly focused on the specific parameters including aging (aging days, temperature, relative humidity, and air flow), eating quality (flavor, tenderness and juiciness), microbiological quality and economic (shrinkage, retail yields and cost) involved beef dry aging process. Dry aging is the process where beef carcasses or primal cuts are hanged and aged for 28 to 55 d under controlling environment conditions in a refrigerated room with 0° to 4 °C and with relative humidity of 75 to 80 %. However there are various opinions on dry aging procedures and purveyors of such products are passionate about their programs. Recently, there has been an increased interest in dry aging process by a wider array of purveyors and retailers in the many countries. Dry aging process is very costly because of high aging shrinkage (6 to15 %), trims loss (3 to 24 %), risk of contamination and the requirement of highest grades meat with. The packaging in highly moisture-permeable bag may positively impact on safety, quality and shelf stability of dry aged beef. The key effect of dry aging is the concentration of the flavor that can only be described as "dry-aged beef". But the contribution of flavor compounds of proteolysis and lipolysis to the cooked dry aged beef flavor is not fully known. Also there are limited scientific studies of aging parameters on the quality and palatability of dry aged beef. PMID:27200180

  14. Phospholipid Motional Characteristics in a Dry Biological System 1

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, David A.; de Kruijff, B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of the proton-decoupled 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of fully hydrated Typha latifolia pollen revealed the presence of two main peaks: A broad asymmetrical component of a `bilayer' lineshape and a much narrower symmetrical component originating from phosphorus compounds undergoing rapid isotropic motion. From (a) 31P-NMR experiments on the hydrated total pollen phospholipids, (b) saturation transfer 31P-NMR experiments, and (c) the fraction of lipid phosphate in the pollen, it can be concluded that the great majority of the endogenous phospholipids are arranged in extended bilayers in which the lipid phosphates undergo fast (τc < 10−6 second) long axis rotation. This bilayer arrangement of phospholipids was observed in the pollen down to hydration levels of at least 10.9% moisture content. At the lowest level of pollen hydration examined (5.2%) the 31P-NMR spectrum had a solid state lineshape demonstrating that all the phosphorus-containing compounds (including the phospholipids) were virtually immobile. PMID:16662616

  15. AIR DRYING AND PRETREATMENT EFFECTS ON SOIL SULFATE SORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drying, freezing, and refrigeration are commonly employed to facilitate the handling and storage of soil samples on which chemical, biological and physical analyses are to be performed. hese laboratory protocol have the potential to alter soil chemical characteristics and may res...

  16. Nanoliposomal Dry Powder Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Gaurang; Chougule, Mahavir; Singh, Mandip; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2013-01-01

    Liposomal dry powder formulations (DPFs) have proven their superiority over conventional DPFs due to favorably improved pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of entrapped drugs, and thus, reduced local and systemic toxicities. Nanoliposomal DPFs (NLDPFs) provide stable, high aerosolization efficiency to deep lung, prolonged drug release, slow systemic dilution, and avoid macrophage uptake of encapsulated drug by carrier-based delivery of nano-range liposomes. This chapter describes methods of preparation of nanoliposomes (NLs) and NLDPFs, using various techniques, and their characterization with respect to size distribution, flow behavior, in vitro drug release profile, lung deposition, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity, and in vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Some examples have been detailed for better understanding of the methods of preparation and evaluation of NLDPFs by investigators. PMID:19903555

  17. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  18. [Biological weapons].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, K; Becker, S; Wulf, H; Densow, D

    2010-08-01

    Biological weapons are weapons of mass destruction that use pathogens (bacteria, viruses) or the toxins produced by them to target living organisms or to contaminate non-living substances. In the past, biological warfare has been repeatedly used. Anthrax, plague and smallpox are regarded as the most dangerous biological weapons by various institutions. Nowadays it seems quite unlikely that biological warfare will be employed in any military campaigns. However, the possibility remains that biological weapons may be used in acts of bioterrorism. In addition all diseases caused by biological weapons may also occur naturally or as a result of a laboratory accident. Risk assessment with regard to biological danger often proves to be difficult. In this context, an early identification of a potentially dangerous situation through experts is essential to limit the degree of damage. PMID:20717866

  19. Drying of a model soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, P.; Coussot, P.

    2010-09-01

    Drying experiments have been carried out with model soils made of different pastes filling granular packings. A detailed information concerning the time evolution of the water saturation distribution inside the sample was obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements. This study makes it possible to understand the physical origin of the drying characteristics of these materials. The drying curves exhibit a constant-rate period (CRP) and a falling-rate period (FRP) but the relative durations of these periods depend on the paste structure. With a kaolin suspension the CRP lasts down to very low water densities and is associated with a homogeneous drying of the paste throughout the sample. With a bentonite suspension the CRP is shorter and the drying in the FRP results from a complex process involving fractures progressing downward through the pasty matrix. With a gel the CRP period is even shorter and the drying in the FRP results from the progression of a dry front through the packing as a result of the shrinkage of the gel matrix. This provides an overview of the main possible processes at work when drying a soil as a function of its components along with some practical means for slowing down drying from soils.

  20. Drying of a model soil.

    PubMed

    Faure, P; Coussot, P

    2010-09-01

    Drying experiments have been carried out with model soils made of different pastes filling granular packings. A detailed information concerning the time evolution of the water saturation distribution inside the sample was obtained from magnetic resonance imaging measurements. This study makes it possible to understand the physical origin of the drying characteristics of these materials. The drying curves exhibit a constant-rate period (CRP) and a falling-rate period (FRP) but the relative durations of these periods depend on the paste structure. With a kaolin suspension the CRP lasts down to very low water densities and is associated with a homogeneous drying of the paste throughout the sample. With a bentonite suspension the CRP is shorter and the drying in the FRP results from a complex process involving fractures progressing downward through the pasty matrix. With a gel the CRP period is even shorter and the drying in the FRP results from the progression of a dry front through the packing as a result of the shrinkage of the gel matrix. This provides an overview of the main possible processes at work when drying a soil as a function of its components along with some practical means for slowing down drying from soils. PMID:21230167

  1. Convective drying of sludge cake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbo; Peng, Xiaofeng; Xue, Yuan; Lee, Duujong; Chu, Chingping

    2002-08-01

    This paper presented an experimental study on convective drying of waste water sludge collected from Beijing GaoBeiDian Sewage Treatment Plant, particularly on the correlation between the observed shrinkage dynamics of sludge cake and the drying curve. During the initial stage of drying the process resembles to that of a particulate bed, in which moisture diffuses and evaporates at the upper surface. Conventional drying theory assuming a diffusion-evaporating front interprets this period of drying. Consequently, owing to the very large shrinkage ratio of the dried cake, cracks emerges and propagates on and within the cake body, whence inducing evaporating channel that facilitates the water removal. This occurrence compensates the reduction of surface area for evaporation, whence extending the constant-rate period during the test. Afterwards, the cracks meet with each other and form isolated cake piles, while the subsequent drying occur mainly within these piles and the conventional theory fails. The transition between the drying on a plain cake layer and that on the isolated piles demonstrates the need to adopt distinct descriptions on these two regimes of drying for the sludge cake.

  2. Space Technology for Crop Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas came up with a new method of drying agricultural crops derived from vacuum chamber technology called MIVAC, a compression of microwave vacuum drying system. A distant cousin of the home microwave oven, MIVAC dries by means of electrically- generated microwaves introduced to a crop-containing vacuum chamber. Microwaves remove moisture quickly and the very low pressure atmosphere in the chamber permits effective drying at much lower than customary temperatures. Thus energy demand is doubly reduced by lower heat requirement and by the shorter time electric power is needed.

  3. Fibrillar Amyloid-β Accumulation Triggers an Inflammatory Mechanism Leading to Hyperphosphorylation of the Carboxyl-Terminal End of Tau Polypeptide in the Hippocampal Formation of the 3×Tg-AD Transgenic Mouse.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros-Torres, Miguel Ángel; Labra-Barrios, María Luisa; Díaz-Cintra, Sofía; Aguilar-Vázquez, Azucena Ruth; Moreno-Campuzano, Samadhi; Flores-Rodríguez, Paola; Luna-Herrera, Claudia; Mena, Raúl; Perry, George; Florán-Garduño, Benjamín; Luna-Muñoz, José; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2016-03-22

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative and irreversible disorder whose progressiveness is dependent on age. It is histopathologically characterized by the massive accumulation of insoluble forms of tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) asneurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques, respectively. Many studies have documented that these two polypeptides suffer several posttranslational modifications employing postmortem tissue sections from brains of patients with AD. In order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the posttranslational modifications of key players in this disease, including Aβ and tau, several transgenic mouse models have been developed. One of these models is the 3×Tg-AD transgenic mouse, carrying three transgenes encoding APPSWE, S1M146V, and TauP301L proteins. To further characterize this transgenicmouse, we determined the accumulation of fibrillar Aβ as a function of age in relation to the hyperphosphorylation patterns of TauP301L at both its N- and C-terminus in the hippocampal formation by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we searched for the expression of activated protein kinases and mediators of inflammation by western blot of wholeprotein extracts from hippocampal tissue sections since 3 to 28 months as well. Our results indicate that the presence of fibrillar Aβ deposits correlates with a significant activation of astrocytes and microglia in subiculum and CA1 regions of hippocampus. Accordingly, we also observed a significant increase in the expression of TNF-α associated to neuritic plaques and glial cells. Importantly, there is an overexpression of the stress activated protein kinases SAPK/JNK and Cdk-5 in pyramidal neurons, which might phosphorylate several residues at the C-terminus of TauP301L. Therefore, the accumulation of Aβ oligomers results in an inflammatory environment that upregulates kinases involved in hyperphosphorylation of TauP301L polypeptide. PMID:27031470

  4. Optical anisotropy of fibrous biological tissues: analysis of the influence of structural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zimnyakov, D A; Sinichkin, Yu P; Ushakova, O V

    2007-08-31

    The results of theoretical analysis of the optical anisotropy of multiply scattering fibrillar biological tissues based on the model of an effective anisotropic medium are compared with the experimental in vivo birefringence data for the rat derma obtained earlier in spectral polarisation measurements of rat skin samples in the visible region. The disordered system of parallel dielectric cylinders embedded into an isotropic dielectric medium was considered as a model medium. Simulations were performed taking into account the influence of a partial mutual disordering of the bundles of collagen and elastin fibres in derma on birefringence in samples. The theoretical optical anisotropy averaged over the spectral interval 550-650 nm for the model medium with parameters corresponding to the structural parameters of derma is in good agreement with the results of spectral polarisation measurements of skin samples in the corresponding wavelength range. (laser methods in biology)

  5. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  6. Forward Osmosis Brine Drying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Michael; Shaw, Hali; Hyde, Deirdre; Beeler, David; Parodi, Jurek

    2015-01-01

    The Forward Osmosis Brine Drying (FOBD) system is based on a technique called forward osmosis (FO). FO is a membrane-based process where the osmotic potential between brine and a salt solution is equalized by the movement of water from the brine to the salt solution. The FOBD system is composed of two main elements, the FO bag and the salt regeneration system. This paper discusses the results of testing of the FO bag to determine the maximum water recovery ratio that can be attained using this technology. Testing demonstrated that the FO bag is capable of achieving a maximum brine water recovery ratio of the brine of 95%. The equivalent system mass was calculated to be 95 kg for a feed similar to the concentrated brine generated on the International Space Station and 86 kg for an Exploration brine. The results have indicated that the FOBD can process all the brine for a one year mission for between 11% to 10% mass required to bring the water needed to make up for water lost in the brine if not recycled. The FOBD saves 685 kg and when treating the International Space Station brine and it saves 829 kg when treating the Exploration brine. It was also demonstrated that saturated salt solutions achieve a higher water recovery ratios than solids salts do and that lithium chloride achieved a higher water recovery ratio than sodium chloride.

  7. Dry sump crankcase

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, A.H.; Dichi, R.E.

    1987-06-23

    A dry sump type crankcase is described for an automotive type internal combustion engine having an intake manifold and a positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system for automatically and continuously ventilating the crankcase. The system includes an essentially atmospheric pressure fresh air inlet to the engine passing air through to the crankcase and a connection from the oil pan to the vacuum in the intake manifold establishing a constant flow of crankcase vapors. The oil pan has a baffle partitioning it into an inner oil collecting funnel-like crankcase cavity and an outer oil reservoir. The inner cavity has an opening at its lower-most point for communication of oil with the reservoir. The opening is of a controlled vertical height for creating a pressure differential across the baffle during operation of the engine. Means connects the inner cavity to the air inlet pressure side of the PCV System while connecting the reservoir to the vacuum side of the PCV system for establishing a constant pressure differential across the baffle sufficient to displace the oil against gravity and maintain the oil level in the crankcase during operation of the engine at the height of the opening in the baffle. Gravity causes the oil to seek a level higher than the opening upon shutdown of the engine and the consequential decay of vacuum in the intake manifold.

  8. Staying dry under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Paul; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Megaridis, Constantine; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Patankar, Neelesh

    2012-11-01

    Lotus leaves are known for their non-wetting properties due to the presence of surface texture. The superhydrophobic behavior arises because of the prevention of liquid water from entering the pores of the roughness. Present superhydrophobic materials rely on air trapped within the surface pores to avoid liquid permeation. This is typically unsustainable for immersed bodies due to dissolution of the air, especially under elevated pressures. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to demonstrate the non-wetting behavior of an immersed ten-nanometer pore. This is accomplished by establishing thermodynamically sustained vapor pockets of the surrounding liquid medium. Over 300,000 atoms were used to construct the nanopore geometry and simulate SPC/E water molecules. Ambient pressure was varied along two isotherms (300 K, and 500 K). This approach for vapor-stabilization could offer valuable guidance for maintaining surfaces dry even in a submerged state without relying on trapped air. The approach may be extended to control general phase behavior of water adjacent to textured surfaces. ISEN support is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Sessile nanofluid droplet drying.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Crivoi, Alexandru; Duan, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Nanofluid droplet evaporation has gained much audience nowadays due to its wide applications in painting, coating, surface patterning, particle deposition, etc. This paper reviews the drying progress and deposition formation from the evaporative sessile droplets with the suspended insoluble solutes, especially nanoparticles. The main content covers the evaporation fundamental, the particle self-assembly, and deposition patterns in sessile nanofluid droplet. Both experimental and theoretical studies are presented. The effects of the type, concentration and size of nanoparticles on the spreading and evaporative dynamics are elucidated at first, serving the basis for the understanding of particle motion and deposition process which are introduced afterward. Stressing on particle assembly and production of desirable residue patterns, we express abundant experimental interventions, various types of deposits, and the effects on nanoparticle deposition. The review ends with the introduction of theoretical investigations, including the Navier-Stokes equations in terms of solutions, the Diffusion Limited Aggregation approach, the Kinetic Monte Carlo method, and the Dynamical Density Functional Theory. Nanoparticles have shown great influences in spreading, evaporation rate, evaporation regime, fluid flow and pattern formation of sessile droplets. Under different experimental conditions, various deposition patterns can be formed. The existing theoretical approaches are able to predict fluid dynamics, particle motion and deposition patterns in the particular cases. On the basis of further understanding of the effects of fluid dynamics and particle motion, the desirable patterns can be obtained with appropriate experimental regulations. PMID:25578408

  10. Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H S.

    2006-06-01

    The biology revolution over the last 50 years has been driven by the ascendancy of molecular biology. This was enthusiastically embraced by most biologists because it took us into increasingly familiar territory. It took mysterious processes, such as the replication of genetic material and assigned them parts that could be readily understood by the human mind. When we think of ''molecular machines'' as being the underlying basis of life, we are using a paradigm derived from everyday experience. However, the price that we paid was a relentless drive towards reductionism and the attendant balkanization of biology. Now along comes ''systems biology'' that promises us a solution to the problem of ''knowing more and more about less and less''. Unlike molecular biology, systems biology appears to be taking us into unfamiliar intellectual territory, such as statistics, mathematics and computer modeling. Not surprisingly, systems biology has met with widespread skepticism and resistance. Why do we need systems biology anyway and how does this new area of research promise to change the face of biology in the next couple of decades?