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Sample records for dry plant formations

  1. Effects of plant polyphenols and a-tocopherol on lipid oxidation, microbiological characteristics, and biogenic amines formation in dry-cured bacons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of plant polyphenols (tea polyphenol, grape seed extract, and gingerol) and a-tocopherol on physicochemical parameters, microbiological counts, and biogenic amines were determined in dry-cured bacons at the end of ripening. Results showed that plant polyphenols and a-tocopherol significantly...

  2. Reflectance characteristics of dry plant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvidge, Christopher D.

    1987-01-01

    Chlorophyll and water obscure the absorption features of all other leaf constituents in the spectra of green leaves. The predominant near-IR and thermal IR spectral features of dry plant materials originate from lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose. These compounds account for 80 to 98 percent of the dry weight in most plant materials.

  3. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  4. Running dry at the power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, B.

    2007-07-01

    In the future, competition for water will require electricity generators in the United States to address conservation of fresh water. There are a number of avenues to consider. One is to use dry-cooling and dry-scrubbing technologies. Another is to find innovative ways to recycle water within the power plant itself. A third is to find and use alternative sources of water, including wastewater supplies from municipalities, agricultural runoff, blackish groundwater, or seawater. Dry technologies are usually more capital intensive and typically exact a penalty in terms of plant performance, which in turn raises the cost of power generation. On the other hand, if the cost of water increases in response to greater demand, the cost differences between dry and wet technologies will be reduced. EPRI has a substantial R & D programme evaluating new water-conserving power plant technologies, improving dry and hybrid cooling technologies, reducing water losses in cooling towers, using degraded water sources and developing resource assessment and management decision support tools. 5 refs., 10 figs.

  5. "Dry-column" chromatography of plant pigments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Lehwalt, M. F.; Oyama, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    Separation of plant pigments which can be accomplished on thin-layer silica plates with mixture of petroleum ether, halocarbon, acetone, and polar solvent can be readily translated into dry-column technique that yields reproducible chromatograms after elution in fashion of liquid chromatography with fluorimeter as detector. Best solvent system was found to be mixture of petroleum ether, dichloromethane, acetone, and ethyl acetate.

  6. Pattern formation in drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, D.; Sobac, B.; Loquet, B.; Sampol, J.

    2011-01-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood exhibits coupled physical mechanisms, such as Marangoni flow, evaporation and wettability. The final stage of a whole blood drop evaporation reveals regular patterns with a good reproducibility for a healthy person. Other experiments on anaemic and hyperlipidemic people were performed, and different patterns were revealed. The flow motion inside the blood drop is observed and analyzed with the use of a digital camera: the influence of the red blood cells (RBCs) motion is revealed at the drop periphery as well as its consequences on the final stage of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of the dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of haematology. The blood drop evaporation process is evidenced to be driven only by Marangoni flow. The same axisymetric pattern formation is observed, and can be forecast for different blood drop diameters. The evaporation mass flux can be predicted with a good agreement, assuming only the knowledge of the colloids mass concentration.

  7. Drying without senescence in resurrection plants

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Cara A.; Gaff, Donald F.; Neale, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Research into extreme drought tolerance in resurrection plants using species such as Craterostigma plantagineum, C. wilmsii, Xerophyta humilis, Tortula ruralis, and Sporobolus stapfianus has provided some insight into the desiccation tolerance mechanisms utilized by these plants to allow them to persist under extremely adverse environmental conditions. Some of the mechanisms used to ensure cellular preservation during severe dehydration appear to be peculiar to resurrection plants. Apart from the ability to preserve vital cellular components during drying and rehydration, such mechanisms include the ability to down-regulate growth-related metabolism rapidly in response to changes in water availability, and the ability to inhibit dehydration-induced senescence programs enabling reconstitution of photosynthetic capacity quickly following a rainfall event. Extensive research on the molecular mechanism of leaf senescence in non-resurrection plants has revealed a multi-layered regulatory network operates to control programed cell death pathways. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that resurrection plants employ to avoid undergoing drought-related senescence during the desiccation process. To survive desiccation, dehydration in the perennial resurrection grass S. stapfianus must proceed slowly over a period of 7 days or more. Leaves detached from the plant before 60% relative water content (RWC) is attained are desiccation-sensitive indicating that desiccation tolerance is conferred in vegetative tissue of S. stapfianus when the leaf RWC has declined to 60%. Whilst some older leaves remaining attached to the plant during dehydration will senesce, suggesting dehydration-induced senescence may be influenced by leaf age or the rate of dehydration in individual leaves, the majority of leaves do not senesce. Rather these leaves dehydrate to air-dryness and revive fully following rehydration. Hence it seems likely that there are genes expressed in

  8. Elapsed time for crack formation during drying.

    PubMed

    Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, F; Pauchard, L

    2014-05-01

    The drying of colloidal films usually leads to mechanical instabilities that affect the uniformity of the final deposit. The resulting patterns are the signature of the mechanical stress, and reveal the way the system consolidates. We report experimental results on the crack patterns induced by the drying of sessile drops of concentrated dispersions. Crack patterns exhibit a well-defined spatial order, and a regular temporal periodicity. In addition, the onset of cracking occurs after a well-defined elapsed time that depends on the mechanical properties of the gel, and on the drying kinetics. The estimation of the time elapsed before cracks form is related to the elastic properties of the material. This is supported by quantitative measurements using indentation testing and by a simple scaling law derived from poro-elastic theory. PMID:24853634

  9. Formation of Shear Bands in Drying Colloidal Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Kiatkirakajorn, Pree-Cha; Goehring, Lucas

    2015-08-21

    In directionally dried colloidal dispersions regular bands can appear behind the drying front, inclined at ±45° to the drying line. Although these features have been noted to share visual similarities with shear bands in metal, no physical mechanism for their formation has ever been suggested, until very recently. Here, through microscopy of silica and polystyrene dispersions, dried in Hele-Shaw cells, we demonstrate that the bands are indeed associated with local shear strains. We further show how the bands form, that they scale with the thickness of the drying layer, and that they are eliminated by the addition of salt to the drying dispersions. Finally, we reveal the origins of these bands in the compressive forces associated with drying, and show how they affect the optical properties (birefringence) of colloidal films and coatings. PMID:26340215

  10. Formation of Shear Bands in Drying Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkirakajorn, Pree-Cha; Goehring, Lucas

    2015-08-01

    In directionally dried colloidal dispersions regular bands can appear behind the drying front, inclined at ±45 ° to the drying line. Although these features have been noted to share visual similarities with shear bands in metal, no physical mechanism for their formation has ever been suggested, until very recently. Here, through microscopy of silica and polystyrene dispersions, dried in Hele-Shaw cells, we demonstrate that the bands are indeed associated with local shear strains. We further show how the bands form, that they scale with the thickness of the drying layer, and that they are eliminated by the addition of salt to the drying dispersions. Finally, we reveal the origins of these bands in the compressive forces associated with drying, and show how they affect the optical properties (birefringence) of colloidal films and coatings.

  11. 9. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF POWER PLANT BUILDING LOOKING NORTHEAST. DRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE OF POWER PLANT BUILDING LOOKING NORTHEAST. DRY CANAL BED IN FOREGROUND. - Potomac Power Plant, On West Virginia Shore of Potomac River, about 1 mile upriver from confluence with Shenandoah River, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, WV

  12. 6. VIEW OF POWER PLANT BUILDING LOOKING NORTHWEST. DRY CANAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF POWER PLANT BUILDING LOOKING NORTHWEST. DRY CANAL BED TO THE LEFT. - Potomac Power Plant, On West Virginia Shore of Potomac River, about 1 mile upriver from confluence with Shenandoah River, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, WV

  13. Effects of plant polyphenols and a-tocopherol on lipid oxidation, residual nitrites, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines formation during ripening and storage of dry-cured bacon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of plant polyphenols (green tea polyphenols (GTP) and grape seed extract (GSE) and a-tocopherol on physicochemical parameters, lipid oxidation, residual nitrite, microbiological counts, biogenic amines, and N-nitrosamines were determined in bacons during dry-curing and storage. Results show ...

  14. Geothermal energy savings for a New Zealand alfalfa drying plant

    SciTech Connect

    van de Wydeven, F.; Freeston, D.H.

    1980-12-01

    The existing alfalfa drying plant was analyzed to determine the efficiency and cost of energy use per unit of production. Further studies are reported of possibilities for energy savings both in the existing plant and in the future development which will incorporate a second dryer and treble the output. (MHR)

  15. Pattern Formation in Drying Drops of Polystyrene/Water nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    We study the pattern formation and the evaporation dynamics of drying drops of polystyrene/water based nanofluids with concentrations ranging from 0.01% to 6%. Cracks formation is evidenced to depend on the nanoparticles concentration. The dynamics of evaporation is recorded using an electronic balance with an accuracy of 10 μg. A top view recording enables to analyze the pattern formation in relation with the mass evolution. We determine several key parameters such as the time of evaporation, the wetting diameter, the final solid deposition diameter, the number and the spacing of the cracks. We evidence a ring formation above a critical concentration. We evidenced by change of the surrounding humidity in the range of 10 to 90% that this pattern remains constant. The pattern formation is influenced by the liquid phase evaporation dynamics but only depends on the concentration in nanoparticles. These results are of great interest regarding the formation of droplets in several areas such as inkjet printing, pharmacology...

  16. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Hierarchical Structure Formation of Nanoparticulate Spray-Dried Composite Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Sabrina; Garnweitner, Georg; Breinlinger, Thomas; Kraft, Torsten; Schilde, Carsten

    2015-11-24

    The design of hierarchically structured nano- and microparticles of different sizes, porosities, surface areas, compositions, and internal structures from nanoparticle building blocks is important for new or enhanced application properties of high-quality products in a variety of industries. Spray-drying processes are well-suited for the design of hierarchical structures of multicomponent products. This structure design using various nanoparticles as building blocks is one of the most important challenges for the future to create products with optimized or completely new properties. Furthermore, the transfer of designed nanomaterials to large-scale products with favorable handling and processing can be achieved. The resultant aggregate structure depends on the utilized nanoparticle building blocks as well as on a large number of process and formulation parameters. In this study, structure formation and segregation phenomena during the spray drying process were investigated to enable the synthesis of tailor-made nanostructures with defined properties. Moreover, a theoretical model of this segregation and structure formation in nanosuspensions is presented using a discrete element method simulation. PMID:26505280

  18. Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment of Plant Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conejo, Ricardo; Garcia-Viñas, Juan Ignacio; Gastón, Aitor; Barros, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Developing plant identification skills is an important part of the curriculum of any botany course in higher education. Frequent practice with dried and fresh plants is necessary to recognize the diversity of forms, states, and details that a species can present. We have developed a web-based assessment system for mobile devices that is able to pose appropriate questions according to the location of the student. A student's location can be obtained using the device position or by scanning a QR code attached to a dried plant sheet in a herbarium or to a fresh plant in an arboretum. The assessment questions are complemented with elaborated feedback that, according to the students' responses, provides indications of possible mistakes and correct answers. Three experiments were designed to measure the effectiveness of the formative assessment using dried and fresh plants. Three questionnaires were used to evaluate the system performance from the students' perspective. The results clearly indicate that formative assessment is objectively effective compared to traditional methods and that the students' attitudes towards the system were very positive.

  19. Formation kinetics of particulate films in directional drying of a colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Inasawa, S; Oshimi, Y; Kamiya, H

    2016-08-10

    We observed the kinetics of formation of colloidal films through directional drying with a pinned drying interface. The volume fraction of particles accumulated at the pinned drying interface increased in two stages: it rapidly increased in the initial stage of drying and then slowly increased. The final filling factor of the dried films decreased with increasing drying flux. We found a threshold drying flux for the formation of colloidal films below which uneven films are formed at the drying interface. This threshold flux is well explained by the competition between transport of particles by flow and transport by diffusion. We also found a minimum thickness for the formation of a packed layer of particles. The formation kinetics of a packed layer of particles due to drying was discussed. PMID:27471046

  20. 39. REDUCTION PLANT THIRD FLOOR The dried fish meal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. REDUCTION PLANT - THIRD FLOOR The dried fish meal was blown into the left side of the room (behind the cloth barrier). When the meal settled to the floor level, it was picked up by an Archimedes screw-shaft which carried it to the far end of the room, where it was blown through pipes (supported by a truss) across Cannery Row to the sacking and storage building. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  1. Dry matter and energy partitioning in plants under climatic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Bolhar-Nordenkampf, H.R.; Postl, W.F.; Meister, M.H.; Ledl, D.; Nemeth, K.; Ludlow, M.M.

    1996-12-31

    During ontogenesis plants distribute assimilates quite differently among their organs depending on the environmental conditions. In case of high sink capacity energetically cheap storing compounds such as carbohydrates and/or organic acids are formed, whereas during periods with low demand proteins and lipids may be accumulated. Besides ontogenesis, drought and increased CO{sub 2} are able to modify sink capacity and by this transients in the partitioning pattern of carbon are induced. Plants, well adapted to several dry seasons during the year are able to allocate carbon predominantly to below ground organs. During this period many leaves become senescent. In any case stems and remaining green leaves will loose dry matter and energy. With 80% of plants under investigation CO{sub 2} enrichment was shown to induce an enforced allocation of carbon to below ground organs. Roots and Rhizomes, beets and tubers act as a sink for the additionally fixed carbon. It was demonstrated that sink capacity is controlling photosynthetic activity. With respect to agricultural production, to ecosystems and to single plants, climatic change will modify productivity and plants distribution pattern as a consequence of quite different metabolic changes. These responses are depending on the effect of natural and anthropogenic stress factors on the use of enhanced CO{sub 2} and on the allocation of additionally formed assimilates.

  2. Thin layer convective air drying of wild edible plant (Allium roseum) leaves: experimental kinetics, modeling and quality.

    PubMed

    Ben Haj Said, Leila; Najjaa, Hanen; Farhat, Abdelhamid; Neffati, Mohamed; Bellagha, Sihem

    2015-06-01

    The present study deals with the valorization of an edible spontaneous plant of the Tunisian arid areas: Allium roseum. This plant is traditionally used for therapeutic and culinary uses. Thin-layer drying behavior of Allium roseum leaves was investigated at 40, 50 and 60 °C drying air temperatures and 1 and l.5 m/s air velocity, in a convective dryer. The increase in air temperature significantly affected the moisture loss and reduced the drying time while air velocity was an insignificant factor during drying of Allium roseum leaves. Five models selected from the literature were found to satisfactorily describe drying kinetics of Allium roseum leaves for all tested drying conditions. Drying data were analyzed to obtain moisture diffusivity values. During the falling rate-drying period, moisture transfer from Allium roseum leaves was described by applying the Fick's diffusion model. Moisture diffusivity varied from 2.55 × 10(-12) to 8.83 × 10(-12) m(2)/s and increased with air temperature. Activation energy during convective drying was calculated using an exponential expression based on Arrhenius equation and ranged between 46.80 and 52.68 kJ/mol. All sulfur compounds detected in the fresh leaves were detected in the dried leaves. Convective air drying preserved the sulfur compounds potential formation. PMID:26028758

  3. NAD + -dependent Formate Dehydrogenase from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A.A.; Savin, S.S.; Tishkov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase (FDH, EC 1.2.1.2) widely occurs in nature. FDH consists of two identical subunits and contains neither prosthetic groups nor metal ions. This type of FDH was found in different microorganisms (including pathogenic ones), such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. As opposed to microbiological FDHs functioning in cytoplasm, plant FDHs localize in mitochondria. Formate dehydrogenase activity was first discovered as early as in 1921 in plant; however, until the past decade FDHs from plants had been considerably less studied than the enzymes from microorganisms. This review summarizes the recent results on studying the physiological role, properties, structure, and protein engineering of plant formate dehydrogenases. PMID:22649703

  4. Relationship soil-water-plant after the dry season in dry Mediterranean areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, P.; Jiménez-Donaire, V.; Ruiz-Sinoga, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    Preliminary studies have determined the existence of a pluviometric gradient around Mediterranean system, which varies from 240 to 1 100 mm mean annual rainfall. This gradient has an incidence in the physical, chemical and hydrological properties in soils with the same litology. Empiric results conclude that humid eco-geomorphological systems are controlled by biotic processes, whereas in arid eco-geomorphological systems, are abiotic factors which have more importance in soil degradation processes. The study area of the present work is located in Málaga (Andalusia, Spain), in the southern part of the Natural Park "Sierra Tejeda, Almijara y Alhama". There, the mean annual temperature is around 18 °C and the mean rainfall is 650 mm. Predominant vegetation corresponds to the termomediterranean serie Smilaci Mauritanicae-Querceto Rotundifoliae Sigmetum, typical of basic soils. The aim of this study is to analyse the immediate hydrological response of the soil under different vegetation covers, through the analysis of certain properties, all this, under subhumid ombrotipe. A random choice of ten representative plants has been done. These plants, with different sizes, were located in the same Southern slope. The soil samples were taken right beside the plant log, and also within a distance of 0.4 to 1 metre from them, depending on the plant size. The sampling was carried out between the end of the dry season and the beginning of the wet one, after a 20% of the mean annual rainfall had rained. The physical, chemical and hydrological analyzes -both in the field and the laboratory- were: exchange-base, total carbon, cation exchange capacity, soil infiltration capacity, salt content, hydrophobia, organic matter, soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, wetting profile in bared soil, wetting profile under vegetation cover (shrubland), and p.H. Literature reveals that rainfall affects significantly the edafogenetic factors, regarding the pluviometric gradient level. In the

  5. Insights from plants: tunable nano-flows induced by drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Robin, Antoine; Szenicer, Alexandre; Stroock, Abraham

    2015-11-01

    Moving fluids through nanoscale confinements is a difficult process due to high friction with the walls. Pushing fluids to achieve significant (or even measurable) flows requires very large pressures, which can be inconvenient and costly. Inspired by plants, we used evaporation to generate controlled steady-state nano-flows in pores ~ 3 nm in diameter embedded in a silicon-based micro-platform. The capillary negative pressure that drives the flow, on the order of tens to hundreds of MPa in magnitude, develops spontaneously upon drying and can be externally tuned by changing the relative humidity (vapor saturation) outside of the sample. We show that the analysis of the dynamic drying response allows to get precise measurements of the behavior of highly confined liquids and could be used both as tool for the study of nanoscale fluid physics and as a method to handle liquids in a controlled way for lab-on-chip applications. We also discuss flow enhancement possibilities based on ideas from the vascular anatomy of plants.

  6. Formation of triploid plants via possible polyspermy.

    PubMed

    Toda, Erika; Okamoto, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Polyploidization is a common phenomenon in angiosperms, and polyploidy has played a major role in the long-term diversification and evolutionary success of plants. Triploid plants are considered as the intermediate stage in the formation of stable autotetraploid plants, and this pathway of tetraploid formation is known as the triploid bridge. As for the mechanism of triploid formation among diploid populations, fusion of an unreduced gamete with a reduced gamete is generally accepted. In addition, the possibility of polyspermy has been proposed for maize, wheat and some orchids, although it has been regarded as an uncommon mechanism of polyploid formation. One of the reasons why polyspermy is regarded as uncommon is because it is difficult to reproduce the polyspermy situation in zygotes and to analyze the developmental profiles of polyspermic zygotes. In the study, we produced polyspermic rice zygotes by electric fusion of an egg cell with two sperm cells and monitored their developmental profiles. The two sperm nuclei and the egg nucleus fused into a zygotic nucleus in the polyspermic zygote, and the triploid zygote divided into a two-celled embryo via mitotic division with a typical bipolar microtubule spindle. The two-celled proembryos developed and regenerated into triploid plants. These results suggest that polyspermic plant zygotes have the potential to form triploid embryos, and that polyspermy in angiosperms might be a pathway for the formation of triploid plants. PMID:27617495

  7. INVESTIGATION OF THE FORMATION OF A PORTLAND CEMENT PLANT DETACHED PLUME

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gaseous and particulate source emissions sampling program has been conducted at a Portland Cement production plant in Rapid City South Dakota. The study was conducted to determine the cause of the formation of an opaque detached plume from the plants' dry process kiln. The inst...

  8. Chromatin Ring Formation at Plant Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Veit; Ruban, Alevtina; Houben, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We observed the formation of chromatin ring structures at centromeres of somatic rye and Arabidopsis chromosomes. To test whether this behavior is present also in other plant species and tissues we analyzed Arabidopsis, rye, wheat, Aegilops and barley centromeres during cell divisions and in interphase nuclei by immunostaining and FISH. Furthermore, structured illumination microscopy (super-resolution) was applied to investigate the ultrastructure of centromere chromatin beyond the classical refraction limit of light. It became obvious, that a ring formation at centromeres may appear during mitosis, meiosis and in interphase nuclei in all species analyzed. However, varying centromere structures, as ring formations or globular organized chromatin fibers, were identified in different tissues of one and the same species. In addition, we found that a chromatin ring formation may also be caused by subtelomeric repeats in barley. Thus, we conclude that the formation of chromatin rings may appear in different plant species and tissues, but that it is not specific for centromere function. Based on our findings we established a model describing the ultrastructure of plant centromeres and discuss it in comparison to previous models proposed for animals and plants. PMID:26913037

  9. Formation of monodisperse mesoporous silica microparticles via spray-drying.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Kathryn; Wu, Winston Duo; Wu, Zhangxiong; Liu, Wenjie; Selomulya, Cordelia; Zhao, Dongyuan; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2014-03-15

    In this work, a protocol to synthesize monodisperse mesoporous silica microparticles via a unique microfluidic jet spray-drying route is reported for the first time. The microparticles demonstrated highly ordered hexagonal mesostructures with surface areas ranging from ~900 up to 1500 m(2)/g and pore volumes from ~0.6 to 0.8 cm(3)/g. The particle size could be easily controlled from ~50 to 100 μm from the same diameter nozzle via changing the initial solute content, or changing the drying temperature. The ratio of the surfactant (CTAB) and silica (TEOS), and the amount of water in the precursor were found to affect the degree of ordering of mesopores by promoting either the self-assembly of the surfactant-silica micelles or the condensation of the silica as two competing processes in evaporation induced self-assembly. The drying rate and the curvature of particles also affected the self-assembly of the mesostructure. The particle mesostructure is not influenced by the inlet drying temperature in the range of 92-160 °C, with even a relatively low temperature of 92 °C producing highly ordered mesoporous microparticles. The spray-drying derived mesoporous silica microparticles, while of larger sizes and more rapidly synthesized, showed a comparable performance with the conventional mesoporous silica MCM-41 in controlled release of a dye, Rhodamine B, indicating that these spray dried microparticles could be used for the immobilisation and controlled release of small molecules. PMID:24461839

  10. Spore formation in plants: sporocyteless and more.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Sundaresan, Venkatesan

    2015-01-01

    Plant reproduction is initiated by the specification of sporocytes that form haploid spores through meiosis. A new study in Arabidopsis published in Cell Research shows how the product of sporocyteless/nozzle, a key gene in this process, partners with co-repressors and transcription factors to promote spore formation, and draws interesting parallels with fungi. PMID:25512340

  11. Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling for Power Plants (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kutscher, C.; Buys, A.; Gladden, C.

    2006-02-01

    This presentation includes an overview of cooling options, an analysis of evaporative enhancement of air-cooled geothermal power plants, field measurements at a geothermal plant, a preliminary analysis of trough plant, and improvements to air-cooled condensers.

  12. Design of Peumus boldus tablets by direct compression using a novel dry plant extract.

    PubMed

    Palma, Santiago; Luján, Claudia; Llabot, Juan Manuel; Barboza, Gloria; Manzo, Ruben Hilario; Allemandi, Daniel Alberto

    2002-02-21

    A solid pharmaceutical dosage formulation using a novel dry plant extract of Peumus boldus MOL. (Monimiaceae) (Pb) is proposed. The botanical evaluation of plant material, through morphological and anatomical diagnosis, is presented. This evaluation permits to identify the herb to be used correctly. The analysis of the most extractive solvent mixture and the attainment of plant extract (fluid and dry) are reported. Several formulations (tablets) containing a novel dry plant extract of Pb and common excipients for direct compression are evaluated. The following formulation: dry plant extract of Pb (170 mg), Avicel PH101 (112 mg), Lactose CD (112) and magnesium stearate (6 mg), compressed at 1000 mPa, showed the best pharmaceutical performance. PMID:11897423

  13. Drying and Storage Methods Affect Cyfluthrin Concentrations in Exposed Plant Samples.

    PubMed

    Moore, M T; Kröger, R; Locke, M A

    2016-08-01

    Standard procedures do not exist for drying and storage of plant samples prior to chemical analyses. Since immediate analysis is not always possible, current research examined which plant drying and storage method yielded the highest cyfluthrin recovery rates compared to traditional mechanical freeze-drying methods. Fifteen mesocosms were planted with rice. Cyfluthrin (5 mg L(-1)) was amended into the water column of individual mesocosms. 48 h later, plant material in the water column was collected from each mesocosm. Control (mechanical freeze drying) recovery was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than all 14 combinations of drying and storage. Significant differences also existed between all 14 different combinations. Greatest cyfluthrin recoveries in non-control plants were from the freezer-greenhouse-freezer drying and storage method. Results offer evidence for the efficient plant drying and storage methods prior to cyfluthrin analysis. Future studies should perform comparable analyses on various pesticide classes to determine possible relationships. PMID:27225509

  14. Simulation of Latex Film Formation Using a Cell Model in Real Space: Vertical Drying.

    PubMed

    Gromer, A; Nassar, M; Thalmann, F; Hébraud, P; Holl, Y

    2015-10-13

    This paper presents a simulation tool applied to latex film formation by drying, a hybrid between a classical numerical resolution method using finite differences and cellular automata, and making use of object-oriented programming. It consists of dividing real space into cells and applying local physical laws to simulate the exchange of matter between neighboring cells. In a first step, the simulation was applied to the simple case of vertical drying of a latex containing only one population of monodisperse particles and water. Our results show how the distribution of latex particles evolves through the different drying stages due to a combination of diffusion, convection, and particle deformation. While repulsive interactions between the particles tend to favor homogeneous distributions in the first drying stage, concentration gradients that develop in opposite ways can be observed depending on the drying regime. The distributions, calculated in various cases, reproduce and extend several theoretical results and are in qualitative agreement with some experimental findings. PMID:26378376

  15. Valeriana officinalis Dry Plant Extract for Direct Compression: Preparation and Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Loreana; Ramírez-Rigo, María Veronica; Piña, Juliana; Palma, Santiago; Allemandi, Daniel; Bucalá, Verónica

    2012-01-01

    Valeriana officinalis L. (Valerianaceae) is one of the most widely used plants for the treatment of anxiety and insomnia. Usually dry plant extracts, including V. officinalis, are hygroscopic materials with poor physico-mechanical properties that can be directly compressed. A V. officinalis dry extract with moderate hygroscocity is suitable for direct compression, and was obtained by using a simple and economical technique. The V. officinalis fluid extract was oven-dried with colloidal silicon dioxide as a drying adjuvant. The addition of colloidal silicon dioxide resulted in a dry plant extract with good physico-mechanical properties for direct compression and lower hygroscopicity than the dry extract without the carrier. The dry plant extract glass transition temperature was considerably above room temperature (about 72 °C). The colloidal silicon dioxide also produced an antiplasticizing effect, improving the powder’s physical stability. The pharmaceutical performance of the prepared V. officinalis dry extract was studied through the design of tablets. The manufactured tablets showed good compactability, friability, hardness, and disintegration time. Those containing a disintegrant (Avicel PH 101) exhibited the best pharmaceutical performance, having the lowest disintegration time of around 40 seconds. PMID:23264947

  16. WET/DRY COOLING SYSTEMS FOR FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS: WATER CONSERVATION AND PLUME ABATEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of technical and economic feasibilities of wet/dry cooling towers for water conservation and vapor plume abatement. Results of cost optimizations of wet/dry cooling for 1000-MWe fossil-fueled power plants are presented. Five sites in the wester...

  17. Use of dried aquatic plant roots to adsorb heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, K.D.

    1996-12-31

    The removal of heavy metal ions by dried aquatic macrophytes was investigated. The ability of the biomass, Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth), Typha latifolia (cattail), Sparganium minimum (burr reed) and Menyanthes trifoliata to abstract lead and mercury ions is presented here, along with a conceptual filter design. This paper examines an alternative to both the traditional and recent systems designed for metal removal. It involves the use of dried aquatic macrophytes. There are numerous advantages for the use of dried macrophytes in the treatment of industrial wastewater. First, it is cost-effective. There are also funding opportunities through a variety of Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) programs. It is more environmentally conscious because a wetland, the harvesting pond, has been created. And, it creates public goodwill by providing a more appealing, less hardware-intensive, natural system.

  18. Rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles using dried medicinal plant of basil.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naheed; Sharma, Seema; Alam, Md K; Singh, V N; Shamsi, S F; Mehta, B R; Fatma, Anjum

    2010-11-01

    Plants respond to heavy metal stress by metal complexation process like production of phytochelations or by other metal chelating peptides. In this paper we report the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) from the room dried stem and root of Ocimum sanctum. The broth of the plant is used as a reducing agent for the synthesis of Ag nanoparticles at room temperature. The reaction process was simple and was monitored by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis). There was formation of highly stable silver nanoparticles in the solution. The morphology and crystalline phase of the NPs were determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra. Transmission Electron Microscopy studies showed that the silver nanoparticles obtained from roots and stem were of sizes 10+/-2 and 5+/-1.5 nm, respectively. The various phytochemicals present within the ocimum plant result in effective reduction of silver salts to nanoparticles but their chemical framework is also effective at wrapping around the nanoparticles to provide excellent robustness against agglomeration. PMID:20656463

  19. Simulating Plant Water Stress and Phenology in Seasonally Dry Tropical Forests: Plant Hydraulics and Trait-Driven Trade-Offs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Medvigy, D.; Powers, J. S.; Becknell, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonally dry tropical forests account for over 40% of the forested area in tropical and subtropical regions. Previous studies suggest that seasonal water stress is one main driver of phenology and related vegetation dynamics in seasonally dry tropical forests. Species that coexist in seasonally dry tropical forests have different plant traits, experience different degrees of plant water stress and show distinctive phenological patterns. However, the observed diversity in plant phenology and related vegetation dynamics is poorly represented in current dynamic vegetation models. In this study, we employ a new modeling approach to enhance our model skills in seasonally dry tropical forests. First, we implement a new plant hydraulic module under the framework of a state-of-the-art dynamic vegetation model, Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2). Second, we link plant water stress with several key coordinated plant traits. Unlike previous models, the updated ED2 does not prescribe leaf phenology (deciduous or evergreen) and plant water stress is not determined by empirical water stress factors or by soil moisture alone. Instead, the model tracks more mechanistic indicators of plant water stress like leaf water potential, accounts for different abilities to tolerate water stress among plant functional types and predicts dry season leaf deciduousness and related vegetation dynamics. The updated model is then tested with in-situ meteorological data and long-term ecological observations. We also perform numerical experiments to explore the possible biases of ignoring the observed diversity in seasonally dry tropical forests. We find that (i) variations of several key plant traits (specific leaf area, wood density, turgor loss point and rooting depth) can account for the observed distinctive phenological patterns as well as inter-annual variations in vegetation growth among species. (ii) Ignoring the trait-driven trade-offs and diversity in seasonality would introduce significant

  20. Laboratory bioassay for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on plant growth and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, K.S.; Liberta, A.E.

    1982-12-01

    A laboratory bioassay is described for assessing the effects of sludge supernatant on juvenile corn growth and the ability of vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi, indigenous to coal spoil, to form mycorrhizae. The bioassay demonstrated that application rates can be identified that have the potential to promote increased plant dry weight without suppressing the formation of VA mycorrhizae in a plant's root system.

  1. Reduction of primary freeze-drying time by electric field induced ice nucleus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Ansgar; Rau, Guenter; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2006-08-01

    The potential of a high electric field was utilized to induce ice nucleus formation in aqueous solutions. Using this technique it was possible to reduce the primary drying time during lyophilization. Samples of 10% (w/v) hydroxyethylstarch (HES) solution were frozen at a constant rate of -1 K/min, while nucleation was initiated at temperatures of -1.5, -4.5 and -8.5°C. In contrast, spontaneous nucleation was observed in a range between -11.5 and -17.1°C. Electrically induced nucleus formation has proved to be a reliable method to start crystallization at a desired temperature. Continuous measurement of the weight allowed to determine the drying rate and to detect at which time primary drying was completed. The drying time and the drying rate were found to be strongly dependent on the nucleation temperature during freezing. A relation between the nucleation temperature, the structure of the frozen samples and the drying times could be established.

  2. Influence of surface modification on structure formation and micromechanical properties of spray-dried silica aggregates.

    PubMed

    Zellmer, Sabrina; Lindenau, Maylin; Michel, Stephanie; Garnweitner, Georg; Schilde, Carsten

    2016-02-15

    Spray drying processes were utilized for the production of hierarchical materials with defined structures. The structure formation during the spray drying process and the micromechanical properties of the obtained aggregates depend on the particle-particle interactions, the primary particle size and morphology as well as the process parameters of the spray drying process. Hence, the effect of different primary particle systems prepared as stable dispersions with various surface modifications were investigated on the colloidal structure formation and the micromechanical properties of silica particles as model aggregates and compared to theoretical considerations. The obtained results show that the structure formation of aggregates during the spray drying process for stable suspensions is almost independent on the functional groups present at the particle surface. Further, the mechanical properties of these aggregates differ considerably with the content of the bound ligand. This allows the defined adjustment of the aggregate properties, such as the strength and surface properties, as well as the formation of defined hierarchical aggregate structures. PMID:26619128

  3. Pattern formation in vibrated beds of dry and wet granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan Lim, Eldin Wee

    2014-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method was coupled with a capillary liquid bridge force model for computational studies of pattern formation in vibrated granular beds containing dry or wet granular materials. Depending on the vibration conditions applied, hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was observed in the dry vibrated granular bed. In each of these cases, the same hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was also observed in the spatial distribution of the magnitudes of particle-particle collision forces prior to the formation of the corresponding actual pattern in physical distributions of the particles. This seemed to suggest that the pattern formation phenomenon of vibrated granular bed systems might be the result of a two-dimensional Newton's cradle effect. In the presence of a small amount of wetness, these patterns were no longer formed in the vibrated granular beds under the same corresponding set of vibration conditions. Despite the relatively much weaker capillary forces arising from the simulated liquid bridges between particles compared with particle-particle collision forces, the spatial distributions of these collision forces, physical distributions of particles, as well as time profiles of average collision forces were altered significantly in comparison with the corresponding distributions and profiles observed for the dry vibrated granular beds. This seemed to suggest the presence of a two-dimensional Stokes' cradle effect in these wet vibrated granular bed systems which disrupted the formation of patterns in the wet granular materials that would have been observed in their dry counterparts.

  4. Drying bacterial biosaline patterns capable of vital reanimation upon rehydration: novel hibernating biomineralogical life formations.

    PubMed

    Gómez Gómez, José María; Medina, Jesús; Hochberg, David; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Rull, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    Water is the fundamental molecule for life on Earth. Thus, the search for hibernating life-forms in waterless environments is an important research topic for astrobiology. To date, however, the organizational patterns containing microbial life in extremely dry places, such as the deserts of Earth, the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, or Mars analog regolith, have been poorly characterized. Here, we report on the formation of bacterial biosaline self-organized drying patterns formed over plastic surfaces. These emerge during the evaporation of sessile droplets of aqueous NaCl salt 0.15 M solutions containing Escherichia coli cells. In the present study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) analyses indicated that the bacterial cells and the NaCl in these biosaline formations are organized in a two-layered characteristic 3-D architectural morphology. A thin filmlike top layer formed by NaCl conjugated to, and intermingled with, "mineralized" bacterial cells covers a bottom layer constructed by the bulk of the nonmineralized bacterial cells; both layers have the same morphological pattern. In addition, optical microscopic time-lapsed movies show that the formation of these patterns is a kinetically fast process that requires the coupled interaction between the salt and the bacterial cells. Apparently, this mutual interaction drives the generative process of self-assembly that underlies the drying pattern formation. Most notably, the bacterial cells inside these drying self-assembled patterns enter into a quiescent suspended anhydrobiotic state resistant to complete desiccation and capable of vital reanimation upon rehydration. We propose that these E. coli biosaline drying patterns represent an excellent experimental model for understanding different aspects of anhydrobiosis phenomena in bacteria as well as for revealing the mechanisms of bacterially induced biomineralization, both highly relevant topics for the search of life in

  5. Technology-Enhanced Formative Assessment of Plant Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conejo, Ricardo; Garcia-Viñas, Juan Ignacio; Gastón, Aitor; Barros, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Developing plant identification skills is an important part of the curriculum of any botany course in higher education. Frequent practice with dried and fresh plants is necessary to recognize the diversity of forms, states, and details that a species can present. We have developed a web-based assessment system for mobile devices that is able to…

  6. Stepwise drying of medicinal plants as alternative to reduce time and energy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuervo-Andrade, S. P.; Hensel, O.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of drying medicinal plants is to extend the shelf life and conserving the fresh characteristics. This is achieved by reducing the water activity (aw) of the product to a value which will inhibit the growth and development of pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, significantly reducing enzyme activity and the rate at which undesirable chemical reactions occur. The technical drying process requires an enormous amount of thermal and electrical energy. An improvement in the quality of the product to be dried and at the same time a decrease in the drying cost and time are achieved through the utilization of a controlled conventional drying method, which is based on a good utilization of the renewable energy or looking for other alternatives which achieve lower processing times without sacrificing the final product quality. In this work the method of stepwise drying of medicinal plants is presented as an alternative to the conventional drying that uses a constant temperature during the whole process. The objective of stepwise drying is the decrease of drying time and reduction in energy consumption. In this process, apart from observing the effects on decreases the effective drying process time and energy, the influence of the different combinations of drying phases on several characteristics of the product are considered. The tests were carried out with Melissa officinalis L. variety citronella, sowed in greenhouse. For the stepwise drying process different combinations of initial and final temperature, 40/50°C, are evaluated, with different transition points associated to different moisture contents (20, 30, 40% and 50%) of the product during the process. Final quality of dried foods is another important issue in food drying. Drying process has effect in quality attributes drying products. This study was determining the color changes and essential oil loses by reference the measurement of the color and essential oil content of the fresh product was

  7. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Hugo Caram

    2006-03-01

    U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.

  8. Measuring dry plant residues in grasslands: A case study using AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Michael; Ustin, Susan L.

    1992-01-01

    Grasslands, savannah, and hardwood rangelands are critical ecosystems and sensitive to disturbance. Approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface are grasslands and represent 3 million ha. in California alone. Developing a methodology for estimating disturbance and the effects of cumulative impacts on grasslands and rangelands is needed to effectively monitor these ecosystems. Estimating the dry biomass residue remaining on rangelands at the end of the growing season provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of land management practices. The residual biomass is indicative of the grazing pressure and provides a measure of the system capacity for nutrient cycling since it represents the maximum organic matter available for decomposition, and finally, provides a measure of the erosion potential for the ecosystem. Remote sensing presents a possible method for measuring dry residue. However, current satellites have had limited application due to the coarse spatial scales (relative to the patch dynamics) and insensitivity of the spectral coverage to resolve dry plant material. Several hypotheses for measuring the biochemical constituents of dry plant material, particularly cellulose and lignin, using high spectral resolution sensors were proposed. The use of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometers (AVIRIS) to measure dry plant residues over an oak savannah on the eastern slopes of the Coast Range in central California was investigated and it was asked what spatial and spectral resolutions are needed to quantitatively measure dry plant biomass in this ecosystem.

  9. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

    2004-07-01

    This is the sixth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with a Powder River Basin coal to measure the effects of fluidization velocity and drying temperature on rate of drying in a batch drying process. Comparisons to computational results using the batch bed drying model show good agreement. Comparisons to drying results with North Dakota lignite at the same process conditions confirm the lignite dries slightly more rapidly than the PRB. Experiments were also carried out to determine the effects of inlet air humidity on drying rate. The specific humidity ranged from a value typical for air at temperatures near freezing to a value for 30 C air at 90 percent relative humidity. The experimental results show drying rate is strongly affected by inlet air humidity, with the rate decreasing with more humid inlet air. The temperature of the drying process also plays a strong role, with the negative impacts of high inlet moisture being less of a factor in a higher temperature drying process. Concepts for coal drying systems integrated into a power plant were developed. These make use of hot circulating cooling water from the condenser, steam extraction from the turbine cycle and thermal energy extracted from hot flue gas, in various combinations. Analyses are under way to calculate the effects of drying system design and process conditions on unit performance, emissions, and cooling tower makeup water.

  10. Jurassic "savannah" - Plant taphonomy and climate of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic, Western USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrish, Judith T.; Peterson, F.; Turner, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Morrison Formation contains six plant taphofacies: Wood, whole-leaf, leaf-mat, root, common carbonaceous debris, and rare carbonaceous debris. None of these taphofacies is common in the Morrison; particularly striking is the paucity of wood, even in more reducing environments. The flora of the Morrison Formation is distinct in the Kimmeridgian and Tithonian parts of the section. The plant taphofacies are consistent with a predominantly herbaceous vegetation. Evidence from the plant taphofacies, floras, and sedimentology of the Morrison is consistent with a warm, seasonal, semi-arid climate throughout, changing from dry semi-arid to humid semi-arid from the Kimmeridgian to the Tithonian parts of the formation. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Irrigation and Maize Cultivation Erode Plant Diversity Within Crops in Mediterranean Dry Cereal Agro-Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Fagúndez, Jaime; Olea, Pedro P; Tejedo, Pablo; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Gómez, David

    2016-07-01

    The intensification of agriculture has increased production at the cost of environment and biodiversity worldwide. To increase crop yield in dry cereal systems, vast farmland areas of high conservation value are being converted into irrigation, especially in Mediterranean countries. We analyze the effect of irrigation-driven changes on the farm biota by comparing species diversity, community composition, and species traits of arable plants within crop fields from two contrasting farming systems (dry and irrigated) in Spain. We sampled plant species within 80 fields of dry wheat, irrigated wheat, and maize (only cultivated under irrigation). Wheat crops held higher landscape and per field species richness, and beta diversity than maize. Within the same type of crop, irrigated wheat hosted lower plant diversity than dry wheat at both field and landscape scales. Floristic composition differed between crop types, with higher frequencies of perennials, cosmopolitan, exotic, wind-pollinated and C4 species in maize. Our results suggest that irrigation projects, that transform large areas of dry cereal agro-ecosystems into irrigated crop systems dominated by maize, erode plant diversity. An adequate planning on the type and proportion of crops used in the irrigated agro-ecosystems is needed in order to balance agriculture production and biodiversity conservation. PMID:26994604

  12. Irrigation and Maize Cultivation Erode Plant Diversity Within Crops in Mediterranean Dry Cereal Agro-Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagúndez, Jaime; Olea, Pedro P.; Tejedo, Pablo; Mateo-Tomás, Patricia; Gómez, David

    2016-07-01

    The intensification of agriculture has increased production at the cost of environment and biodiversity worldwide. To increase crop yield in dry cereal systems, vast farmland areas of high conservation value are being converted into irrigation, especially in Mediterranean countries. We analyze the effect of irrigation-driven changes on the farm biota by comparing species diversity, community composition, and species traits of arable plants within crop fields from two contrasting farming systems (dry and irrigated) in Spain. We sampled plant species within 80 fields of dry wheat, irrigated wheat, and maize (only cultivated under irrigation). Wheat crops held higher landscape and per field species richness, and beta diversity than maize. Within the same type of crop, irrigated wheat hosted lower plant diversity than dry wheat at both field and landscape scales. Floristic composition differed between crop types, with higher frequencies of perennials, cosmopolitan, exotic, wind-pollinated and C4 species in maize. Our results suggest that irrigation projects, that transform large areas of dry cereal agro-ecosystems into irrigated crop systems dominated by maize, erode plant diversity. An adequate planning on the type and proportion of crops used in the irrigated agro-ecosystems is needed in order to balance agriculture production and biodiversity conservation.

  13. Interfacial force-driven pattern formation during drying of Aβ (25-35) fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sett, Ayantika; Bag, Sudipta; Dasgupta, Swagata; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-08-01

    Pattern formation during evaporation of biofluids finds significant applications in the biomedical field for disease identification. Aβ (25-35) is the smallest peptide in the amyloid peptide family that retains the toxicity of a full length peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease and is chosen here as the model solute. Drying experiments on substrates of varying wettability exhibit unique drying patterns of Aβ (25-35) fibrils visualized through fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The unique pattern formations can be interpreted as manifestations of the changes in the self-pinning mechanism with changes in wettability, which in some cases resembles the well-known coffee ring effect. Additionally, the delicate balance between the drag and capillary forces has been perturbed by initiating controlled rates of evaporation and probing their effects on the fibril patterning. PMID:25964177

  14. Formation of naturally occurring pigments during the production of nitrite-free dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    De Maere, Hannelore; Fraeye, Ilse; De Mey, Eveline; Dewulf, Lore; Michiels, Chris; Paelinck, Hubert; Chollet, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the potential of producing red coloured dry fermented sausages without the addition of nitrite and/or nitrate. Therefore, the formation of zinc protoporphyrin IX (Zn(II)PPIX) as naturally occurring pigment, and the interrelated protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) and heme content were evaluated during nitrite-free dry fermented sausage production at different pH conditions. Zn(II)PPIX was only able to form in dry fermented sausages at pH conditions higher than approximately 4.9. Additionally, the presence of Zn(II)PPIX increased drastically at the later phase of the production process (up to day 177), confirming that in addition to pH, time is also a crucial factor for its formation. Similarly, PPIX also accumulated in the meat products at increased pH conditions and production times. In contrast, a breakdown of heme was observed. This breakdown was more gradual and independent of pH and showed no clear relationship with the formed amounts of Zn(II)PPIX and PPIX. A statistically significant relationship between Zn(II)PPIX formation and product redness was established. PMID:26686009

  15. Toward breeding new land-sea plant hybrid species irrigable with seawater for dry regions.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    A plant species growing in sea or coastal saltmarsh is greatly tolerant to high concentrations of salts, and a plant species growing in desert or dry regions is highly tolerant to drought. Breeding a new plant hybrid species from both species by means of cellular grafting, genome fusion or nuclear transfer would generate, at least in theory, a hybrid plant species that should be strongly tolerant to harsh aridity and salinity and would be potentially irrigable with seawater. Such prospective species can be used for example as a fodder, biofuel crop or stabilizer species to protect soil from wind erosion and sandy storms in dry regions. Breeding such species would change the surface of the world and help to solve major challenges of starvation, malnutrition and poverty. Here, I propose potential approaches that would be worthy of investigation toward this purpose. PMID:25806436

  16. Toward breeding new land-sea plant hybrid species irrigable with seawater for dry regions

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    A plant species growing in sea or coastal saltmarsh is greatly tolerant to high concentrations of salts, and a plant species growing in desert or dry regions is highly tolerant to drought. Breeding a new plant hybrid species from both species by means of cellular grafting, genome fusion or nuclear transfer would generate, at least in theory, a hybrid plant species that should be strongly tolerant to harsh aridity and salinity and would be potentially irrigable with seawater. Such prospective species can be used for example as a fodder, biofuel crop or stabilizer species to protect soil from wind erosion and sandy storms in dry regions. Breeding such species would change the surface of the world and help to solve major challenges of starvation, malnutrition and poverty. Here, I propose potential approaches that would be worthy of investigation toward this purpose. PMID:25806436

  17. The effect of AMF suppression on plant species composition in a nutrient-poor dry grassland.

    PubMed

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Rydlová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are expected to be one of the key drivers determining the diversity of natural plant communities, especially in nutrient-poor and dry habitats. Several previous studies have explored the importance of AMF for the composition of plant communities in various types of habitats. Surprisingly, studies of the role of AMF in nutrient-poor dry grassland communities dominated by less mycotrophic plant species are still relatively rare. We present the results of a 3-year study in which a plant community in a species-rich dry grassland was subjected to the fungicide carbendazim to suppress AMF colonization. We tested the effect of the fungicide on the following parameters: the plant species composition; the number of plant species; the cover of the rare, highly mycorrhiza-dependent species Aster amellus; the cover of the dominant, less mycorrhiza-dependent species Brachypodium pinnatum; and the cover of graminoids and perennial forbs. In addition, we examined the mycorrhizal inoculation potential of the soil. We found that the suppression of AMF with fungicide resulted in substantial changes in plant species composition and significant decrease in species richness, the cover of A. amellus and the cover of perennial forbs. In contrast the species increasing their cover after fungicide application were graminoids--the C3 grasses B. pinnatum and Bromus erectus and the sedge Carex flacca. These species appear to be less mycorrhiza dependent. Moreover, due to their clonal growth and efficient nutrient usage, they are, most likely, better competitors than perennial forbs under fungicide application. Our results thus suggest that AMF are an essential part of the soil communities supporting a high diversity of plant species in species-rich dry grasslands in nutrient-poor habitats. The AMF are especially important for the maintenance of the populations of perennial forbs, many of which are rare and endangered in the area. PMID:24265829

  18. The Effect of AMF Suppression on Plant Species Composition in a Nutrient-Poor Dry Grassland

    PubMed Central

    Dostálek, Tomáš; Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Rydlová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are expected to be one of the key drivers determining the diversity of natural plant communities, especially in nutrient-poor and dry habitats. Several previous studies have explored the importance of AMF for the composition of plant communities in various types of habitats. Surprisingly, studies of the role of AMF in nutrient-poor dry grassland communities dominated by less mycotrophic plant species are still relatively rare. We present the results of a 3-year study in which a plant community in a species-rich dry grassland was subjected to the fungicide carbendazim to suppress AMF colonization. We tested the effect of the fungicide on the following parameters: the plant species composition; the number of plant species; the cover of the rare, highly mycorrhiza-dependent species Aster amellus; the cover of the dominant, less mycorrhiza-dependent species Brachypodium pinnatum; and the cover of graminoids and perennial forbs. In addition, we examined the mycorrhizal inoculation potential of the soil. We found that the suppression of AMF with fungicide resulted in substantial changes in plant species composition and significant decrease in species richness, the cover of A. amellus and the cover of perennial forbs. In contrast the species increasing their cover after fungicide application were graminoids—the C3 grasses B. pinnatum and Bromus erectus and the sedge Carex flacca. These species appear to be less mycorrhiza dependent. Moreover, due to their clonal growth and efficient nutrient usage, they are, most likely, better competitors than perennial forbs under fungicide application. Our results thus suggest that AMF are an essential part of the soil communities supporting a high diversity of plant species in species-rich dry grasslands in nutrient-poor habitats. The AMF are especially important for the maintenance of the populations of perennial forbs, many of which are rare and endangered in the area. PMID:24265829

  19. Studies and research concerning BNFP: spent fuel dry storage studies at the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kenneth J.

    1980-09-01

    Conceptual designs are presented utilizing the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant for the dry interim storage of spent light water reactor fuel. Studies were conducted to determine feasible approaches to storing spent fuel by methods other than wet pool storage. Fuel that has had an opportunity to cool for several years, or more, after discharge from a reactor is especially adaptable to dry storage since its thermal load is greatly reduced compared to the thermal load immediately following discharge. A thermal analysis was performed to help in determining the feasibility of various spent fuel dry storage concepts. Methods to reject the heat from dry storage are briefly discussed, which include both active and passive cooling systems. The storage modes reviewed include above and below ground caisson-type storage facilities and numerous variations of vault, or hot cell-type, storage facilities.

  20. Plant Hormones: How They Affect Root Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhard, Diana Hereda

    This science study aid, produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, includes a series of plant rooting activities for secondary science classes. The material in the pamphlet is written for students and includes background information on plant hormones, a vocabulary list, and five learning activities. Objectives, needed materials, and…

  1. Drying and storage methods affect cyfluthrin concentrations in exposed plant samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Standard procedures exist for collection and chemical analyses of pyrethroid insecticides in environmental matrices. However, less detail is given for drying and potential storage methods of plant samples prior to analyses. Due to equipment and financial limitations, immediate sample analysis is n...

  2. Forage Production on Dry Rangelands of Binary Grass-Legume Mixtures at Four Plant Densities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forage production on Western US rangelands can be increased with the right combination of plants. Our objective was to demonstrate the relative forage production advantage of including a legume on dry rangelands. A falcata and rhizomatous alfalfa (medicago sativa L.), alti wildrye [Leymus andustus...

  3. ETHYLMERCURY: FORMATION IN PLANT TISSUES AND RELATION TO METHYLMERCURY FORMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seedlings of the common dwarf garden pea, Pisum sativum, cv. Little Marvel, exposed to elemental mercury vapor formed both methylmercury and ethylmercury in all parts of the plant. Concentrations of both organomercury compounds fluctuated considerably over a 48-hour exposure peri...

  4. Evaporation of multi-component mixtures and shell formation in spray dried droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, Pedro; Duarte, Íris; Porfirio, Tiago; Temtem, Márcio

    2015-11-01

    Drug particles where the active pharmaceutical ingredient (APIs) is dispersed in a polymer matrix forming an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) is a commonly used strategy to increase the solubility and dissolution rate of poorly water soluble APIs. However, the formation and stability of an amorphous solid dispersion depends on the polymer/API combination and process conditions to generate it. The focus of the present work is to further develop a numerical tool to predict the formation of ASDs by spray drying solutions of different polymer/API combinations. Specifically, the evaporation of a multi-component droplet is coupled with a diffusion law within the droplet that minimizes the Gibbs free energy of the polymer/API/solvents system, following the Flory-Huggins model. Prior to the shell formation, the evaporation of the solvents is modelled following the simplified approach proposed by Abramzon & Sirignano (1989) which accounts for the varying relative velocity between the droplet and the drying gas. After shell formation, the diffusion of the solvents across the porous shell starkly modifies the evaporative dynamics.

  5. Do vineyards in contrasting landscapes contribute to conserve plant species of dry calcareous grasslands?

    PubMed

    Nascimbene, Juri; Zottini, Michela; Ivan, Diego; Casagrande, Valentina; Marini, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    The increasing development of vineyards in Mediterranean areas worldwide is considered a major driver of conversion of several habitats of conservation concern, including calcareous dry grasslands that are targeted for biodiversity conservation by the European Union, according to Natura 2000 policies. Here, we aim at evaluating the potential of extensive vineyards located in contrasting landscapes (semi-natural vs crop-dominated) for providing suitable habitat conditions to plant species associated with dry grasslands. This study was carried out in one of the economically most important winemaking districts of Italy, characterized by a hilly landscape with steep slope vineyards. We compared plant communities of vineyards in contrasting landscapes with those of the remnants of dry grasslands. Our study demonstrates that landscape composition strongly affects local plant communities in vineyards, with a positive effect of semi-natural habitats bordering the cultivated areas. Our findings thus supply an additional tool for improving the effectiveness of viticultural landscapes for nature conservation. In particular, our results indicate that vineyards on steep slopes could provide moderate chance for the conservation of plant specialists inhabiting calcareous dry grasslands, depending on the landscape composition: vineyards embedded in semi-natural landscapes have more potential for conservation than those in crop-dominated landscapes. Our study also indicates that conservation efforts should aim at (a) decreasing the current management intensity that likely hampers the beneficial effects of semi-natural habitats in the surrounding landscape on local plant assemblages, and (b) strictly conserving the remnants of dry grasslands that are irreplaceable refugia for habitat specialists and species of conservation concern. PMID:26747988

  6. Reducing drying/preheat cycle time to increase pellet production at the BHP Whyalla Pellet Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Teo, C.S.; Reynolds, G.; Haines, B.

    1997-12-31

    The feasibility of changing the Whyalla Pellet Plant drying/preheat pattern to reduce the cycle time without causing extra spalling of the preheated balls was investigated using both plant and laboratory produced green balls in the BHP Research pot grate facility. It was found that the results were consistent for both plant and laboratory produced balls in that for the pellet production at 5,000t/d, spalling of the preheated balls was mainly caused by the remaining bound water in the balls. Removing the bound water resulted in a dramatic reduction in spalling. At the plant, the balls were dried at less than 350 C for less than 6 min, which was insufficient heat to drive off all the bound water. The balls then entered the preheat furnace at over 1,000 C. The bound water rapidly vaporized causing the balls to spall. Introducing a dehydration step would involve recouping air from the cooler at 600 C and directing this hot air to the hotter end of the drying furnace to remove most of the bound water. For increased pellet production at 5,800t/d, it was found that an extended dehydration (1/3 drying, 2/3 dehydration) step in the shorter drying/preheat cycle under a higher suction was necessary to have minimum spalling. Implementing this finding required mass and energy balance, a task undertaken by Robert Cnare of Davy John Brown, to allow recommendations to be made for an optimum configuration for plant modifications.

  7. Formation of circular crack pattern in deposition self-assembled by drying nanoparticle suspension.

    PubMed

    Jing, Guangyin; Ma, Jun

    2012-05-31

    Curved cracks widely exist in nanoparticle (NP) deposition produced by drying colloidal suspension. Circular cracks, for example, initiate and propagate along a circular trajectory. One feasible theoretical explanation of a circular crack is the Xia-Hutchinson model, in which a preexisting track (flaw loop) in the film is necessary for initiating and propagating the crack on the circular path. Here, we report the first experimental evidence of dried deposition to support this model. Our results indicate that cracks along the circular trajectory can surprisingly "pass" across a 180 μm air gap. Moreover, two arc-path cracks originate in different areas and propagate to meet, forming a circular trajectory. These unexpected crack initiation and propagation indicate that the crack propagates alone the "preformed" track, experimentally confirming the hypothesis proposed by the Xia-Hutchinson model. The transition of the circular crack to a radial one indicates that the deposition microstructure is the dominant factor for the crack formation. PMID:22577983

  8. Sewage sludge drying process integration with a waste-to-energy power plant.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, A; Bonfiglioli, L; Pellegrini, M; Saccani, C

    2015-08-01

    Dewatered sewage sludge from Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is encountering increasing problems associated with its disposal. Several solutions have been proposed in the last years regarding energy and materials recovery from sewage sludge. Current technological solutions have relevant limits as dewatered sewage sludge is characterized by a high water content (70-75% by weight), even if mechanically treated. A Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) with good thermal characteristics in terms of Lower Heating Value (LHV) can be obtained if dewatered sludge is further processed, for example by a thermal drying stage. Sewage sludge thermal drying is not sustainable if the power is fed by primary energy sources, but can be appealing if waste heat, recovered from other processes, is used. A suitable integration can be realized between a WWTP and a waste-to-energy (WTE) power plant through the recovery of WTE waste heat as energy source for sewage sludge drying. In this paper, the properties of sewage sludge from three different WWTPs are studied. On the basis of the results obtained, a facility for the integration of sewage sludge drying within a WTE power plant is developed. Furthermore, energy and mass balances are set up in order to evaluate the benefits brought by the described integration. PMID:25959614

  9. Sludge-Drying Lagoons: a Potential Significant Methane Source in Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuting; Ye, Liu; van den Akker, Ben; Ganigué Pagès, Ramon; Musenze, Ronald S; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-02-01

    "Sludge-drying lagoons" are a preferred sludge treatment and drying method in tropical and subtropical areas due to the low construction and operational costs. However, this method may be a potential significant source of methane (CH4) because some of the organic matter would be microbially metabolized under anaerobic conditions in the lagoon. The quantification of CH4 emissions from lagoons is difficult due to the expected temporal and spatial variations over a lagoon maturing cycle of several years. Sporadic ebullition of CH4, which cannot be easily quantified by conventional methods such as floating hoods, is also expected. In this study, a novel method based on mass balances was developed to estimate the CH4 emissions and was applied to a full-scale sludge-drying lagoon over a three year operational cycle. The results revealed that processes in a sludge-drying lagoon would emit 6.5 kg CO2-e per megaliter of treated sewage. This would represent a quarter to two-thirds of the overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs). This work highlights the fact that sludge-drying lagoons are a significant source of CH4 that adds substantially to the overall GHG footprint of WWTPs despite being recognized as a cheap and energy-efficient means of drying sludge. PMID:26642353

  10. Pattern formation in miniature: the female gametophyte of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Alandete-Saez, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Plant reproduction involves gamete production by a haploid generation, the gametophyte. For flowering plants, a defining characteristic in the evolution from the 'naked-seed' plants, or gymnosperms, is a reduced female gametophyte, comprising just seven cells of four different types--a microcosm of pattern formation and gamete specification about which only little is known. However, several genes involved in the differentiation, fertilization and post-fertilization functions of the female gametophyte have been identified and, recently, the morphogenic activity of the plant hormone auxin has been found to mediate patterning and egg cell specification. This article reviews recent progress in understanding the pattern formation, maternal effects and evolution of this essential unit of plant reproduction. PMID:20040485

  11. Sun-drying diminishes the antioxidative potentials of leaves of Eugenia uniflora against formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances induced in homogenates of rat brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Kade, Ige Joseph; Ibukun, Emmanuel Oluwafemi; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira

    2008-08-01

    Extracts from leaves of Pitanga cherry (Eugenia uniflora) are considered to be effective against many diseases, and are therefore used in popular traditional medicines. In the present study, the antioxidative effect of sun-dried (PCS) and air-dried (PCA) ethanolic extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves were investigated. The antioxidant effects were tested by measuring the ability of both PCS and PCA to inhibit the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) induced by prooxidant agents such as iron (II) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in rat brain and liver tissues. The results showed that while PCA significantly (P<0.0001) inhibited the formation of TBARS in both liver and brain tissues homogenates, PCS did not. Further investigation reveals that the phenolic content of the PCS was significantly (P<0.0001) lower compared to PCA. Since phenolics in plants largely contributed to the antioxidative potency of plants, we conclude that air-drying should be employed in the preparation of extracts of Pitanga cherry leaves before it is administered empirically as a traditional medicament, and hence this study serves a public awareness to traditional medical practitioners. PMID:18539016

  12. Distribution of Cenozoic plant relicts in China explained by drought in dry season.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongjiang; Jacques, Frédéric M B; Su, Tao; Ferguson, David K; Tang, Hui; Chen, Wenyun; Zhou, Zhekun

    2015-01-01

    Cenozoic plant relicts are those groups that were once widespread in the Northern Hemisphere but are now restricted to some small isolated areas as a result of drastic climatic changes. They are good proxies to study how plants respond to climatic changes since their modern climatic requirements are known. Herein we look at the modern distribution of 65 palaeoendemic genera in China and compare it with the Chinese climatic pattern, in order to find a link between the plant distribution and climate. Central China and Taiwan Island are shown to be diversity centres of Cenozoic relict genera, consistent with the fact that these two regions have a shorter dry season with comparatively humid autumn and spring in China. Species distribution models indicate that the precipitation parameters are the most important variables to explain the distribution of relict genera. The Cenozoic wide-scale distribution of relict plants in the Northern Hemisphere is therefore considered to be linked to the widespread humid climate at that time, and the subsequent contraction of their distributional ranges was probably caused by the drying trend along with global cooling. PMID:26369980

  13. Distribution of Cenozoic plant relicts in China explained by drought in dry season

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongjiang; Jacques, Frédéric M. B.; Su, Tao; Ferguson, David K.; Tang, Hui; Chen, Wenyun; Zhou, Zhekun

    2015-01-01

    Cenozoic plant relicts are those groups that were once widespread in the Northern Hemisphere but are now restricted to some small isolated areas as a result of drastic climatic changes. They are good proxies to study how plants respond to climatic changes since their modern climatic requirements are known. Herein we look at the modern distribution of 65 palaeoendemic genera in China and compare it with the Chinese climatic pattern, in order to find a link between the plant distribution and climate. Central China and Taiwan Island are shown to be diversity centres of Cenozoic relict genera, consistent with the fact that these two regions have a shorter dry season with comparatively humid autumn and spring in China. Species distribution models indicate that the precipitation parameters are the most important variables to explain the distribution of relict genera. The Cenozoic wide-scale distribution of relict plants in the Northern Hemisphere is therefore considered to be linked to the widespread humid climate at that time, and the subsequent contraction of their distributional ranges was probably caused by the drying trend along with global cooling. PMID:26369980

  14. Select Generic Dry-Storage Pilot Plant Design for Safeguards and Security by Design (SSBD) per Used Fuel Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Demuth, Scott Francis; Sprinkle, James K.

    2015-05-26

    As preparation to the year-end deliverable (Provide SSBD Best Practices for Generic Dry-Storage Pilot Scale Plant) for the Work Package (FT-15LA040501–Safeguards and Security by Design for Extended Dry Storage), the initial step was to select a generic dry-storage pilot plant design for SSBD. To be consistent with other DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) activities, the Used Fuel Campaign was engaged for the selection of a design for this deliverable. For the work Package FT-15LA040501–“Safeguards and Security by Design for Extended Dry Storage”, SSBD will be initiated for the Generic Dry-Storage Pilot Scale Plant described by the layout of Reference 2. SSBD will consider aspects of the design that are impacted by domestic material control and accounting (MC&A), domestic security, and international safeguards.

  15. Understanding the Formation of Anisometric Supraparticles: A Mechanistic Look Inside Droplets Drying on a Superhydrophobic Surface.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Marcel; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Gradzielski, Michael

    2016-07-12

    Evaporating drops of nanoparticle suspensions on superhydrophobic surfaces can give anisotropic superaparticles. Previous studies implied the formation of a stiff shell that collapses, but the exact mechanism leading to anisotropy was unclear so far. Here we report on a new experiment using confocal laser scanning microscopy for a detailed characterization of particle formation from droplets of aqueous colloidal dispersions on superhydrophobic surfaces. In a customized setup, we investigated droplets of fumed silica suspensions using two different fluorescent dyes for independently marking silica and the water phase. Taking advantage of interfacial reflection, we locate the drop-air interface and extract normalized time-resolved intensity profiles for dyed silica throughout the drying process. Using comprehensive image analysis we observe and quantify shell-like interfacial particle accumulation arising from droplet evaporation. This leads to a buildup of a stiff fumed silica mantle of ∼20 μm thickness that causes deformation of the droplet throughout further shrinkage, consequently leading to the formation of solid anisometric fumed silica particles. PMID:27336463

  16. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy

    2005-10-01

    Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits

  17. Contribution of plant polymers to coal formation

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Profiles of five representative peats from the Florida Everglades and the Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia, have been examined by various analytical techniques. The emphasis of the work reported here will be the application of FT-IR spectroscopy to these peats to determine the presence and extent of alteration of the carbohydrate and lignin components of peat. The results of this study suggest that most peats contain ..cap alpha..-cellulose in appreciable amounts at the uppermost levels, but that little polysaccharide of any kind is identifiable at lower depths. Lignin, though probably chemically altered, becomes concentrated with increasing depth of burial. A computer program was used to fit the spectra of lignin and holocellulose to the spectra of peat. Where the fit was good an estimate of holocellulose and lignin components was made. Where the fit was not good chemical alteration of the plant polymers was inferred. Furthermore, the lignin-derived material is oxidized, so that various types of hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxylic acid groups are prominent components of the peat, to different extents in different peats. The fine-grained humic fractions show weak amide vibrations characteristic of proteinaceous material. Also, in some cores there is an increase with depth of the intensity of aliphatic C-H stretching modes, suggesting the presence of polymeric alkanes; the origin of these is still speculative. Measurements by both FT-IR and CP/MAS /sup 13/C NMR techniques for the amount of carbohydrate retained in peat were remarkably similar at the upper levels of the cores, though NMR showed a larger quantity, at the lower depths. The increase of alkanes with depth is also indicated by both techniques. In contrast to previous studies, some systematic changes in peat as a function of depth of burial were noted in this study.

  18. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudich, Yinon; Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven; Haspel, Carynelisa

    2014-05-01

    In cold high altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, ice partciles that are exposed to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. In this talk we will describe experiements that simulate the atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols. We find that aerosols with high organic content can form highly porous particles (HPA) with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogenous aerosol following ice subliation. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure follwoing ice sublimation. We find that the highly porous aerosol scatter solar light less efficiently than non-porous aerosol particles. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  19. Self-heating of dried industrial tannery wastewater sludge induced by pyrophoric iron sulfides formation.

    PubMed

    Bertani, R; Biasin, A; Canu, P; Della Zassa, M; Refosco, D; Simionato, F; Zerlottin, M

    2016-03-15

    Similarly to many powders of solids, dried sludge originated from tannery wastewater may result in a self-heating process, under given circumstances. In most cases, it causes a moderate heating (reaching 70-90°C), but larger, off-design residence times in the drier, in a suboxic atmosphere, extremely reactive solids can be produced. Tannery waste contains several chemicals that mostly end up in the wastewater treatment sludge. Unexpected and uncontrolled self heating could lead to a combustion and even to environmental problems. Elaborating on previous studies, with the addition of several analytical determinations, before and after the self-heating, we attempted to formulate a mechanism for the onset of heating. We demonstrated that the system Fe/S/O has been involved in the process. We proved that the formation of small quantities of pyrophoric iron sulfides is the key. They are converted to sulfated by reaction with water and oxygen with exothermic processes. The pyrite/pyrrhotite production depends on the sludge drying process. The oxidation of sulfides to oxides and sulfates through exothermic steps, reasonably catalyzed by metals in the sludge, occurs preferentially in a moist environment. The mechanism has been proved by reproducing in the laboratory prolonged heating under anoxic/suboxic atmosphere. PMID:26651067

  20. The Film Formation of Polymer Particles in Drying Thin Films of Aqueous Acrylic Latices.

    PubMed

    van Tent A; te Nijenhuis K

    2000-12-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the factors that contribute to the process of film formation of binder particles in drying aqueous dispersion coatings, based on acrylic polymers. It is known that concentrated latices of uniform size show iridescent, colored light patterns. These colors are caused by interparticle interference, and they are only present when the latex particles are ordered in a regular structure. The interparticle interference can be characterized by measuring the transmission as a function of wavelength of the incident light. It appeared that the changes of the interparticle interference of a drying latex film can be related to changes in the interparticle distance and displacement. It was also found that the interparticle distance becomes "negative" upon coalescence of the latex particles. This means that from this point on, the change in interparticle interference is directly related to the indentation or deformation of the latex particles. It became clear that the coalescence process differs from deformation mechanisms accepted in the literature. It seems that the deformation of the particles follows a biaxial mechanism. This means that the particles deform only in one direction, perpendicular to the film surface. Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:11097771

  1. The length of the dry season may be associated with leaf scleromorphism in cerrado plants.

    PubMed

    Souza, Marcelo C; Franco, Augusto C; Haridasan, Mundayatan; Rossatto, Davi R; de Araújo, Janaína F; Morellato, Leonor P C; Habermann, Gustavo

    2015-09-01

    Despite limitations of low fertility and high acidity of the soils, the cerrado flora is the richest amongst savannas. Many cerrado woody species show sclerophyllous leaves, which might be related to the availability of water and nutrients in the soil. To better understand the function and structure of cerrado vegetation within its own variations, we compared two cerrado communities: one in its core region in central Brazil (Brasília, DF) and the other on its southern periphery (Itirapina, SP). We contrasted the length of the dry season, soil fertility rates, leaf concentrations of N, P, K, Ca and Mg and the specific leaf area (SLA) between these communities. The dry season was shorter on the periphery, where the soil was more fertile although more acidic. Plants from the periphery showed higher SLA and higher leaf concentrations of N, P, Ca and Mg. We propose that the higher SLA of plants from the periphery is related to the shorter dry season, which allows better conditions for nutrient uptake. PMID:26221991

  2. Role of plant polyphenols in acrylamide formation and elimination.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanbing; Wang, Pengpu; Chen, Fang; Yuan, Yuan; Zhu, Yuchen; Yan, Haiyang; Hu, Xiaosong

    2015-11-01

    Acrylamide found in thermal-treated foods has led to an intensive and persistent research effort, since it is a neurotoxic, genotoxic and probable carcinogenic compound to humans. Plant polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in human diet. Several researches indicated that the polyphenols affected the acrylamide formation during heating. However, the controversial effects of the polyphenols on acrylamide formation were related to their structure, concentrations, and antioxidant capacity, as well as reaction condition. Polyphenols can inhibit acrylamide formation through trapping of carbonyl compounds and preventing against lipid oxidation, while some special polyphenols can enhance the acrylamide content by providing carbonyl groups, accelerating the conversion from 3-aminopropionamide (3-APA) to acrylamide and inhibiting acrylamide elimination. This review concludes the effects of polyphenols in the Maillard reaction and food systems conducted so far, aimed to give an overview on the role of plant polyphenols in acrylamide formation and elimination. PMID:25976790

  3. Skin formation in drying a film of soft matter solutions: Application of solute based Lagrangian scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Luo; Fanlong, Meng; Junying, Zhang; Masao, Doi

    2016-07-01

    When a film of soft matter solutions is being dried, a skin layer often forms at its surface, which is a gel-like elastic phase made of concentrated soft matter solutions. We study the dynamics of this process by using the solute based Lagrangian scheme which was proposed by us recently. In this scheme, the process of the gelation (i.e., the change from sol to gel) can be naturally incorporated in the diffusion equation. Effects of the elasticity of the skin phase, the evaporation rate of the solvents, and the initial concentration of the solutions are discussed. Moreover, the condition for the skin formation is provided. Project supported by the National Natural Science of China (Grant Nos. 21434001, 51561145002, and 11421110001).

  4. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES: VOLUME 2. PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a mini-pilot test program to investigate potential new sorbents and processes for dry SO2 removal. Initial tests showed that the 85 cu m/h pilot plant could be used successfully to evaluate both spray dryer and dry injection processes using traditional calciu...

  5. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES - VOLUME 2 - PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a mini-pilot test program to investigate potential new sorbents and processes for dry SO2 removal. Initial tests showed that the 85 cu m/h pilot plant could be used successfully to evaluate both spray dryer and dry injection processes using traditional calciu...

  6. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H.; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-01-01

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  7. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges. PMID:24297908

  8. Importance of Silicon and Mechanisms of Biosilica Formation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Siti Nor Akmar, Abdullah; Rafii, Mohd Y.; Tengoua, F. F.; Nurul Mayzaitul Azwa, Jamaludin; Shabanimofrad, M.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most prevalent macroelements, performing an essential function in healing plants in response to environmental stresses. The purpose of using Si is to induce resistance to distinct stresses, diseases, and pathogens. Additionally, Si can improve the condition of soils, which contain toxic levels of heavy metals along with other chemical elements. Silicon minimizes toxicity of Fe, Al, and Mn, increases the availability of P, and enhances drought along with salt tolerance in plants through the formation of silicified tissues in plants. However, the concentration of Si depends on the plants genotype and organisms. Hence, the physiological mechanisms and metabolic activities of plants may be affected by Si application. Peptides as well as amino acids can effectively create polysilicic species through interactions with different species of silicate inside solution. The carboxylic acid and the alcohol groups of serine and asparagine tend not to engage in any significant role in polysilicates formation, but the hydroxyl group side chain can be involved in the formation of hydrogen bond with Si(OH)4. The mechanisms and trend of Si absorption are different between plant species. Furthermore, the transportation of Si requires an energy mechanism; thus, low temperatures and metabolic repressors inhibit Si transportation. PMID:25685787

  9. Importance of silicon and mechanisms of biosilica formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Siti Nor Akmar, Abdullah; Rafii, Mohd Y; Azizi, Parisa; Tengoua, F F; Nurul Mayzaitul Azwa, Jamaludin; Shabanimofrad, M

    2015-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is one of the most prevalent macroelements, performing an essential function in healing plants in response to environmental stresses. The purpose of using Si is to induce resistance to distinct stresses, diseases, and pathogens. Additionally, Si can improve the condition of soils, which contain toxic levels of heavy metals along with other chemical elements. Silicon minimizes toxicity of Fe, Al, and Mn, increases the availability of P, and enhances drought along with salt tolerance in plants through the formation of silicified tissues in plants. However, the concentration of Si depends on the plants genotype and organisms. Hence, the physiological mechanisms and metabolic activities of plants may be affected by Si application. Peptides as well as amino acids can effectively create polysilicic species through interactions with different species of silicate inside solution. The carboxylic acid and the alcohol groups of serine and asparagine tend not to engage in any significant role in polysilicates formation, but the hydroxyl group side chain can be involved in the formation of hydrogen bond with Si(OH)4. The mechanisms and trend of Si absorption are different between plant species. Furthermore, the transportation of Si requires an energy mechanism; thus, low temperatures and metabolic repressors inhibit Si transportation. PMID:25685787

  10. Zeolite Formation and Weathering Processes in Dry Valleys of Antartica: Martian Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Socki, R. A.

    2004-01-01

    Terrestrial weathering processes in cold-desert climates such as the Dry Valleys of Antarctica may provide an excellent analog to chemical weathering and diagenesis of soils on Mars. Detailed studies of soil development and the chemical and mineralogical alterations occurring within soil columns in Wright Valley, Antarctica show incredible complexity in the upper meter of soil. Previous workers noted the ice-free Dry Valleys are the best terrestrial approximations to contemporary Mars. Images returned from the Pathfinder and Spirit landers show similarities to surfaces observed within the Dry Valleys. Similarities to Mars that exist in these valleys are: mean temperatures always below freezing (-20 C), no rainfall, sparse snowfall-rapidly removed by sublimation, desiccating winds, diurnal freeze-thaw cycles (even during daylight hours), low humidity, oxidative environment, relatively high solar radiation and low magnetic fields . The Dry Valley soils contain irregular distributions and low abundances of soil microorganisms that are somewhat unusual on Earth. Physical processes-such as sand abrasion-are dominant mechanisms of rock weathering in Antarctica. However, chemical weathering is also an important process even in such extreme climates. For example, ionic migration occurs even in frozen soils along liquid films on individual soil particles. It has also been shown that water with liquid-like properties is present in soils at temperatures on the order of approx.-80 C and it has been observed that the percentage of oxidized iron increases with increasing soil age and enrichments in oxidized iron occurs toward the surface. The presence of evaporates is evident and appear similar to "evaporite sites" within the Pathfinder and Spirit sites. Evaporites indicate ionic migration and chemical activity even in the permanently frozen zone. The presence of evaporates indicates that chemical weathering of rocks and possibly soils has been active. Authogenic zeolites have

  11. Impact of Hybrid Wet/Dry Cooling on Concentrating Solar Power Plant Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the sensitivity of Rankine cycle plant performance to dry cooling and hybrid (parallel) wet/dry cooling combinations with the traditional wet-cooled model as a baseline. Plants with a lower temperature thermal resource are more sensitive to fluctuations in cooling conditions, and so the lower temperature parabolic trough plant is analyzed to assess the maximum impact of alternative cooling configurations. While low water-use heat rejection designs are applicable to any technology that utilizes a Rankine steam cycle for power generation, they are of special interest to concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies that are located in arid regions with limited water availability. System performance is evaluated using hourly simulations over the course of a year at Daggett, CA. The scope of the analysis in this paper is limited to the power block and the heat rejection system, excluding the solar field and thermal storage. As such, water used in mirror washing, maintenance, etc., is not included. Thermal energy produced by the solar field is modeled using NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM).

  12. Patterns of fine-scale plant species richness in dry grasslands across the eastern Balkan Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palpurina, Salza; Chytrý, Milan; Tzonev, Rossen; Danihelka, Jiří; Axmanová, Irena; Merunková, Kristina; Duchoň, Mário; Karakiev, Todor

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale plant species richness varies across habitats, climatic and biogeographic regions, but the large-scale context of this variation is insufficiently explored. The patterns at the borders between biomes harbouring rich but different floras are of special interest. Dry grasslands of the eastern Balkan Peninsula, situated in the Eurasian forest-steppe zone and developed under Mediterranean influence, are a specific case of such biome transition. However, there are no studies assessing the patterns of fine-scale species richness and their underlying factors across the eastern Balkans. To explore these patterns, we sampled dry and semi-dry grasslands (phytosociological class Festuco-Brometea) across Bulgaria and SE Romania. In total, 172 vegetation plots of 10 × 10 m2 were sampled, in which all vascular plant species were recorded, soil depth was measured, and soil samples were collected and analysed in a laboratory for pH and plant-available nutrients. Geographic coordinates were used to extract selected climatic variables. Regression trees and linear regressions were used to quantify the relationships between species richness and environmental variables. Climatic factors were identified as the main drivers of species richness: (1) Species richness was strongly positively correlated with the mean temperature of the coldest month: sub-Mediterranean areas of S and E Bulgaria, characterized by warmer winters, were more species-rich. (2) Outside the sub-Mediterranean areas, species richness strongly increased with annual precipitation, which was primarily controlled by altitude. (3) Bedrock type and soil pH also significantly affected dry grassland richness outside the sub-Mediterranean areas. These results suggest that fine-scale species richness of dry grasslands over large areas is driven by processes at the regional level, especially by the difference in the species pools of large regions, in our case the Continental and Mediterranean biogeographic regions

  13. Air-dense medium fluidized bed dry beneficiation of coal: Results of 50 MTPH demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qingru; Yang Yi; Liang Chuncheng; Tao Xiuxiang; Luo Zhenfu

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents the performance results of the 50 MTPH Coal Dry Beneficiation Demonstration Plant constructed in the Heilongjiang Province of northeastern China. The separating media used in this process consists of an air/dense medium (magnetite, or magnetic pearls, a remnant of coal combustion in power plants) fluidized bed controllable at specific gravities ranging from 1.3 to 2.0. That portion of the feedstock with a specific gravity less than the separating gravity floats to the top of the fluidized bed where it is recovered at one end of the vessel. That portion of the feedstock with a specific gravity higher than the separating gravity sinks and is discharged from the other end of the vessel. The process has separating efficiencies similar to a heavy media vessel or cyclone with the additional advantages of (1) can be utilized in an arid region containing insufficient water supply, (2) results in a dry product requiring no additional dewatering and coal slime treatment, and (3) as result of air flow will remove some surface moisture present in the feedstock. As a result of the magnetite used in the fluidized bed and the subsequent downstream recovery of this magnetite, the current demonstration plant utilizes a 6mm bottom size. The topsize of the feed is a function of the size of the system and the site specific ash liberation requirement. The Demonstration Plant commenced operation in September 1992. The mechanical processes of the system including coal feeding, sizing, gravity separation/beneficiation, and medium recovery, functioned as anticipated from the 10 MTPH pilot plant. Preliminary results with separating gravities in the range of 1.3--2.0 showed a probable error as low as 0.05 with magnetite losses of 0.5 kg/MT of feed.

  14. Hyperosmolar Stress Induces Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation: Implications for Dry Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tibrewal, Sapna; Ivanir, Yair; Sarkar, Joy; Nayeb-Hashemi, Neema; Bouchard, Charles S.; Kim, Eunjae; Jain, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if hyperosmolar stress can stimulate human neutrophils to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and to investigate potential strategies to reduce formation of NETs (NETosis) in a hyperosmolar environment. Methods. Neutrophils were isolated from peripheral venous blood of healthy subjects and incubated in iso-osmolar (280 mOsM) or hyperosmolar (420 mOsM) media for 4 hours. Neutrophil extracellular traps were quantified using a PicoGreen dye assay to measure extracellular DNA. Two known inhibitors of NETosis, staurosporine and anti-β2 integrin blocking antibody, and two proresolution formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) agonists, annexin/lipocortin-1 mimetic peptide and 15-epi-lipoxin A4, were evaluated as possible strategies to reduce hyperosmolarity-induced NETosis. Results. The amount of NETs induced by hyperosmolar medium (420 mOsM) increased linearly over time to 3.2 ± 0.3 times that induced by iso-osmolar medium at 4 hours (P < 0.05). NETosis increased exponentially with increasing osmolarity and was independent of the stimulus used to increase osmolarity. Upon neutrophil exposure to hyperosmolar stress, restoration of iso-osmolar conditions decreased NET formation by 52.7% ± 5% (P < 0.05) but did not completely abrogate it. Among the strategies tested to reduce NETosis in a hyperosmolar environment, annexin-1 peptide was the most efficacious. Conclusions. Hyperosmolarity induces formation of NETs by neutrophils. This NETosis mechanism may explain the presence of excessive NETs on the ocular surface of patients with dry eye disease. Because they reduce hyperosmolarity-induced NETosis, FPR2 agonists may have therapeutic potential in these patients. PMID:25406284

  15. An effective system to produce smoke solutions from dried plant tissue for seed germination studies1

    PubMed Central

    Coons, Janice; Coutant, Nancy; Lawrence, Barbara; Finn, Daniel; Finn, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: An efficient and inexpensive system was developed to produce smoke solutions from plant material to research the influence of water-soluble compounds from smoke on seed germination. • Methods and Results: Smoke solutions (300 mL per batch) were produced by burning small quantities (100–200 g) of dried plant material from a range of species in a bee smoker attached by a heater hose to a side-arm flask. The flask was attached to a vacuum water aspirator, to pull the smoke through the water. The entire apparatus was operated in a laboratory fume hood. • Conclusions: Compared with other smoke solution preparation systems, the system described is easy to assemble and operate, inexpensive to build, and effective at producing smoke solutions from desired species in a small indoor space. Quantitative measurements can be made when using this system, allowing for replication of the process. PMID:25202613

  16. Value Added Products from Hemicellulose Utilization in Dry Mill Ethanol Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Williamson, ICPB; John Magnuson, PNNL; David Reed, INL; Marco Baez, Dyadic; Marion Bradford, ICPB

    2007-03-30

    The Iowa Corn Promotion Board is the principal contracting entity for this grant funded by the US Department of Agriculture and managed by the US Department of Energy. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board subcontracted with New Jersey Institute of Technology, KiwiChem, Pacific Northwest National Lab and Idaho National Lab to conduct research for this project. KiwiChem conducted the economic engineering assessment of a dry-mill ethanol plant. New Jersey Institute of Technology conducted work on incorporating the organic acids into polymers. Pacific Northwest National Lab conducted work in hydrolysis of hemicellulose, fermentation and chemical catalysis of sugars to value-added chemicals. Idaho National Lab engineered an organism to ferment a specific organic acid. Dyadic, an enzme company, was a collaborator which provided in-kind support for the project. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board collaborated with the Ohio Corn Marketing Board and the Minnesota Corn Merchandising Council in providing cost share for the project. The purpose of this diverse collaboration was to integrate the hydrolysis, the conversion and the polymer applications into one project and increase the likelihood of success. This project had two primary goals: (1) to hydrolyze the hemicellulose fraction of the distillers grain (DG) coproduct coming from the dry-mill ethanol plants and (2) convert the sugars derived from the hemicellulose into value-added co-products via fermentation and chemical catalysis.

  17. Salinity and Alkaline pH of Irrigation Water Affect Marigold Plants: I. Growth and Shoot Dry Weight Partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marigold, is one of the most popular annual ornamental plants. Both the short-statured cultivars (Tagetes patula L.) and the taller cultivars (T. erecta L.) are used as container plants, in landscape and garden settings. Tagetes erecta varieties make excellent cut and dried flowers for the florist...

  18. Subtask 5.10 - Testing of an Advanced Dry Cooling Technology for Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Christopher; Pavlish, John

    2013-09-30

    The University of North Dakota’s Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing a market-focused dry cooling technology that is intended to address the key shortcomings of conventional dry cooling technologies: high capital cost and degraded cooling performance during daytime temperature peaks. The unique aspect of desiccant dry cooling (DDC) is the use of a hygroscopic working fluid—a liquid desiccant—as a heat-transfer medium between a power plant’s steam condenser and the atmosphere. This configuration enables a number of beneficial features for large-scale heat dissipation to the atmosphere, without the consumptive use of cooling water. The overall goal of this project was to accurately define the performance and cost characteristics of DDC to determine if further development of the concept is warranted. A balanced approach of modeling grounded in applied experimentation was pursued to substantiate DDC-modeling efforts and outline the potential for this technology to cool full-scale power plants. The resulting analysis shows that DDC can be a lower-cost dry cooling alternative to an air-cooled condenser (ACC) and can even be competitive with conventional wet recirculating cooling under certain circumstances. This project has also highlighted the key technological steps that must be taken in order to transfer DDC into the marketplace. To address these issues and to offer an extended demonstration of DDC technology, a next-stage project should include the opportunity for outdoor ambient testing of a small DDC cooling cell. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Wyoming State Legislature under an award made through the Wyoming Clean Coal Technologies Research Program.

  19. Color formation in nitrite-free dried hams as related to Zn-protoporphyrin IX and Zn-chelatase activity.

    PubMed

    Parolari, Giovanni; Benedini, Riccardo; Toscani, Tania

    2009-08-01

    The development of red pigment Zn-protoporphyrin IX (ZPP) in nitrite-free Parma hams was investigated in 5 leg muscles at several stages of processing and the activity of muscle Zn-chelatase was concurrently assayed for its potential role in ZPP formation. A steady increase of the pigment was observed throughout the manufacturing stages at mild temperatures while no development was observed during the prior cold resting phase. The enzyme was partly inactivated according to a muscle-dependent pattern, resulting in similar ZPP contents, hence color, in finished hams. It is concluded that enzyme-dependent synthesis of ZPP in nitrite-free dried hams contributes to color development, enabling muscles in dried hams to become more similar in redness than in green thighs. Therefore, checking raw meat for the enzyme content may be a means to control color formation in nitrite-free dry-cured meat derivatives. PMID:19723176

  20. The growth and survival of plants in urban green roofs in a dry climate.

    PubMed

    Razzaghmanesh, M; Beecham, S; Kazemi, F

    2014-04-01

    Green roofs as one of the components of water-sensitive urban design have become widely used in recent years. This paper describes performance monitoring of four prototype-scale experimental green roofs in a northern suburb of Adelaide, South Australia, undertaken over a 1-year period. Four species of indigenous Australian ground cover and grass species comprising Carpobrotus rossii, Lomandra longifolia 'Tanika,' Dianella caerula 'Breeze' and Myoporum parvifolium were planted in extensive and intensive green roof configurations using two different growing media. The first medium consisted of crushed brick, scoria, coir fibre and composted organics while the second comprised scoria, composted pine bark and hydro-cell flakes. Plant growth indices including vertical and horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot and root biomasses, water use efficiency and irrigation regimes were studied during a 12-month period. The results showed that the succulent species, C. rossii, can best tolerate the hot, dry summer conditions of South Australia, and this species showed a 100% survival rate and had the maximum horizontal growth rate, leaf succulence, shoot biomass and water use efficiency. All of the plants in the intensive green roofs with the crushed brick mix media survived during the term of this study. It was shown that stormwater can be used as a source of irrigation water for green roofs during 8 months of the year in Adelaide. However, supplementary irrigation is required for some of the plants over a full annual cycle. PMID:24468503

  1. [Determination of Trace Germanium in Plant Samples by Dry Ashing-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai-jie; Yu, Zhao-shui; Bai, Jin-feng; Li, Qing-xia; Liu, Ya-xuan; Bo, Wei; Zhang, Qin

    2015-04-01

    To reduce the limit of detection (LOD) and allow the accurate determination of Ge, a dry ashing method was performed to enrich the Ge in plant samples. A method for the determination.of trace Ge in plant samples by HG-AFS was established. Study of the effect of temperature on the ashing of plant samples showed that no volatile loss of Ge occurred even at 900 °C. Additional experiments indicated that a 4 h burning process at 600 °C would be sufficient to fully ash the plant samples. Various digestion methods (involving nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and sulfuric acid digestion methods) for ashed samples were investigated. High-temperature ashing with large sample weights was used, which could reduce the reagent doses and the method's LOD effectively and simultaneously, the precision of the method was improved. The method's LOD was 0.27 ng · g(-1), and the relative standard deviation was 3.99%-6.81%. Verified with national biological reference materials (grade I), the proposed method was accurate and reliable. PMID:26197600

  2. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1996-03-01

    This report uses the methodology and scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. The methodology calls for an initial screening phase in which the CCFP for each plant is calculated based on loads versus strength evaluations using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if the CCFP calculated in the screening phase is less than 0.01. This value is more stringent than the overall success criterion of 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 in the screening phase calculations, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  3. Hormonal interplay during adventitious root formation in flooded tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Vidoz, Maria Laura; Loreti, Elena; Mensuali, Anna; Alpi, Amedeo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2010-08-01

    Soil flooding, which results in a decline in the availability of oxygen to submerged organs, negatively affects the growth and productivity of most crops. Although tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is known for its sensitivity to waterlogging, its ability to produce adventitious roots (ARs) increases plant survival when the level of oxygen is decreased in the root zone. Ethylene entrapment by water may represent the first warning signal to the plant indicating waterlogging. We found that treatment with the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) and the auxin transport inhibitor 1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) resulted in a reduction of AR formation in waterlogged plants. We observed that ethylene, perceived by the Never Ripe receptor, stimulated auxin transport. In a process requiring the Diageotropica gene, auxin accumulation in the stem triggered additional ethylene synthesis, which further stimulated a flux of auxin towards to the flooded parts of the plant. Auxin accumulation in the base of the plant induces growth of pre-formed root initials. This response of tomato plants results in a new root system that is capable of replacing the original one when it has been damaged by submergence. PMID:20497380

  4. THE ROLE OF DRY MERGERS FOR THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruszkowski, M.; Springel, V. E-mail: volker@map-garching.mpg.de

    2009-05-10

    Using a resimulation technique, we perform high-resolution cosmological simulations of dry mergers in a massive (10{sup 15} M {sub sun}) galaxy cluster identified in the Millennium Run. Our initial conditions include well resolved compound galaxy models consisting of dark matter halos and stellar bulges that are used to replace the most massive cluster progenitor halos at redshift z = 3, allowing us to follow the subsequent dry merger processes that build up the cluster galaxies in a self-consistent cosmological setting. By construction, our galaxy models obey the stellar mass-size relation initially. Also, we study both galaxy models with adiabatically contracted and uncompressed halos. We demonstrate that the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) evolves away from the Kormendy relation as defined by the smaller mass galaxies (i.e., the relation bends). This is accompanied by a significantly faster dark matter mass growth within the half-light radius of the BCG compared to the increase in the stellar mass inside the same radius. As a result of the comparatively large number of mergers the BCG experiences, its total mass-to-light ratio becomes significantly higher than in typical elliptical galaxies. We also show that the mixing processes between dark matter and stars lead to a small but numerically robust tilt in the fundamental plane and that the BCG lies on the tilted plane. Our model is consistent with the observed steepening of the logarithmic mass-to-light gradient as a function of the stellar mass. As we have not included effects from gas dynamics or star formation, these trends are exclusively due to N-body and stellar dynamical effects. Surprisingly, we find only tentative weak distortion in the Faber-Jackson relation that depends on the aperture size, unlike expected based on studies of isolated merger simulations. This may be due to differences in the distribution of galaxy orbits, which is given in our approach directly by the cosmological context while it has

  5. Effect of different drying methods on concentrations of several phytochemicals in herbal preparation of 8 medicinal plants leaves.

    PubMed

    Mahanom, H; Azizah, A; Dzulkifly, M

    1999-12-01

    The effect of oven drying at 50ᵒC ± 1ᵒC for 9 hour, 70ᵒC ± 1ᵒC for 5 hour and freeze drying on retention of chlorophyll, riboflavin, niacin, ascorbic acid and carotenoids in herbal preparation consisting of 8 medicinal plants was evaluated. The medicinal plants selected were leaves of Apium graveolens (saderi), Averrhoa bilimbi (belimbing buluh), Centella asiatica (pegaga), Mentha arvensis (pudina), Psidium guajava (jambu batu), Sauropus androgynous (cekor manis), Solanum nigrum (terung meranti) and Polygonum minus (kesum ). Results revealed that both type and conditions of the drying treatments affected retention of all phytochemicals analysed. Herbal preparation developed using oven drying was found to have inferior phytochemicals content compared to that obtained by freeze dryer. Nevertheless, the herbal preparation developed using all treatments still retain appreciable amount of phytochemicals studied, especially carotenoids, ascorbic acid, niacin and riboflavin and thus have potential for commercial purposes. PMID:22692357

  6. β-Diversity of Functional Groups of Woody Plants in a Tropical Dry Forest in Yucatan

    PubMed Central

    López-Martínez, Jorge Omar; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía; Dupuy, Juan Manuel; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis; Meave, Jorge Arturo; Gallardo-Cruz, José Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Two main theories have attempted to explain variation in plant species composition (β-diversity). Niche theory proposes that most of the variation is related to environment (environmental filtering), whereas neutral theory posits that dispersal limitation is the main driver of β-diversity. In this study, we first explored how α- and β-diversity of plant functional groups defined by growth form (trees, shrubs and lianas, which represent different strategies of resource partitioning), and dispersal syndrome (autochory, anemochory and zoochory, which represent differences in dispersal limitation) vary with successional age and topographic position in a tropical dry forest. Second, we examined the effects of environmental, spatial, and spatially-structured environmental factors on β-diversity of functional groups; we used the spatial structure of sampling sites as a proxy for dispersal limitation, and elevation, soil properties and forest stand age as indicators of environmental filtering. We recorded 200 species and 22,245 individuals in 276 plots; 120 species were trees, 41 shrubs and 39 lianas. We found that β-diversity was highest for shrubs, intermediate for lianas and lowest for trees, and was slightly higher for zoochorous than for autochorous and anemochorous species. All three dispersal syndromes, trees and shrubs varied in composition among vegetation classes (successional age and topographic position), whilst lianas did not. β-diversity was influenced mostly by proxies of environmental filtering, except for shrubs, for which the influence of dispersal limitation was more important. Stand age and topography significantly influenced α-diversity across functional groups, but showed a low influence on β-diversity –possibly due to the counterbalancing effect of resprouting on plant distribution and composition. Our results show that considering different plant functional groups reveals important differences in both α- and β-diversity patterns and

  7. Peduncles elicit large-mammal endozoochory in a dry-fruited plant

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Youbing; Newman, Chris; Xie, Zongqiang; Macdonald, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants have evolved a variety of seed dispersal mechanisms to overcome lack of mobility. Many species embed seeds in fleshy pulp to elicit endozoochory, i.e. disseminating seed through the animal gut. In contrast to well-studied fleshy fruited plants, dry-fruited plants may exploit this dispersal mutualism by producing fleshy appendages as a nutritional reward to entice animals to swallow their diaspores, but this has been little studied. In this study, it is hypothesized that these accessory fruits represent co-adaptations facilitating the syndrome of mammalian endozoochorous dispersal. Methods Field observations (focal tree watches, faecal surveys and fruiting phenology) with experimental manipulations (examination of seed germination and feeding trials) were conducted over 2 years in a native population of the raisin tree, Hovenia dulcis, which produces enlarged, twisted brown peduncles with external black seeds, in central China. Key Results Birds were not observed to swallow seeds or carry infructescences away during 190 h of focal tree watches. However, H. dulcis seeds were detected in 247 faecal samples, representative of two herbivore and four carnivore mammalian species. Feeding trials revealed that peduncles attracted mammals to consume the entire infructescence, thereby facilitating effective seed dispersal. The germination rate of egested seeds proved higher than that of unconsumed seeds. It was also noted that this mutualism was most vulnerable in degraded forest. Conclusions Hovenia dulcis peduncle sets are confirmed to adapt primarily to mammalian endozoochory, a mutualistic association similar in function to fleshy pulp or foliage. This demonstrates that plant organ systems can be adapted to unique mutualisms that utilize animal dispersal agents. Such an ecological role has until now been attributed only to bird epizoochory. Future studies should consider more widely the putative role of peduncle sets and mammalian endozoochory

  8. Rice Chalky Ring Formation Caused by Temporal Reduction in Starch Biosynthesis during Osmotic Adjustment under Foehn-Induced Dry Wind

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hiroshi; Masumoto-Kubo, Chisato; Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Tsutsumi, Koichi; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Morita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Foehn-like extreme hot and dry wind conditions (34°C, >2.5 kPa vapor pressure deficit, and 7 m s−1) strongly affect grain quality in rice (Oryza sativa L.). This is a current concern because of the increasing frequency and intensity of combined heat and water-deficit stress under climate change. Foehn-induced dry wind conditions during the grain-filling stage increase ring-shaped chalkiness as a result of spatiotemporal reduction in starch accumulation in the endosperm, but kernel growth is sometimes maintained by osmotic adjustment. Here, we assess the effects of dry wind on chalky ring formation in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Our results showed that hot and dry wind conditions that lasted for >24 h dramatically increased chalky ring formation. Hot and dry wind conditions temporarily reduced panicle water potential to –0.65 MPa; however, kernel growth was maintained by osmotic adjustment at control levels with increased transport of assimilate to the growing kernels. Dynamic tracer analysis with a nano-electrospray-ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometer and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that starch degradation was negligible in the short-term treatment. Overall expression of starch synthesis-related genes was found to be down-regulated at moderately low water potential. Because the events observed at low water potential preceded the packing of starch granules in cells, we concluded that reduced rates of starch biosynthesis play a central role in the events of cellular metabolism that are altered at osmotic adjustment, which leads to chalky ring formation under short-term hot and dry wind conditions. PMID:25330305

  9. Rice chalky ring formation caused by temporal reduction in starch biosynthesis during osmotic adjustment under foehn-induced dry wind.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hiroshi; Masumoto-Kubo, Chisato; Gholipour, Yousef; Nonami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Fukuyo; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Tsutsumi, Koichi; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Morita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Foehn-like extreme hot and dry wind conditions (34°C, >2.5 kPa vapor pressure deficit, and 7 m s(-1)) strongly affect grain quality in rice (Oryza sativa L.). This is a current concern because of the increasing frequency and intensity of combined heat and water-deficit stress under climate change. Foehn-induced dry wind conditions during the grain-filling stage increase ring-shaped chalkiness as a result of spatiotemporal reduction in starch accumulation in the endosperm, but kernel growth is sometimes maintained by osmotic adjustment. Here, we assess the effects of dry wind on chalky ring formation in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Our results showed that hot and dry wind conditions that lasted for >24 h dramatically increased chalky ring formation. Hot and dry wind conditions temporarily reduced panicle water potential to -0.65 MPa; however, kernel growth was maintained by osmotic adjustment at control levels with increased transport of assimilate to the growing kernels. Dynamic tracer analysis with a nano-electrospray-ionization Orbitrap mass spectrometer and quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that starch degradation was negligible in the short-term treatment. Overall expression of starch synthesis-related genes was found to be down-regulated at moderately low water potential. Because the events observed at low water potential preceded the packing of starch granules in cells, we concluded that reduced rates of starch biosynthesis play a central role in the events of cellular metabolism that are altered at osmotic adjustment, which leads to chalky ring formation under short-term hot and dry wind conditions. PMID:25330305

  10. Basis for assessing the movement of spent nuclear fuels from wet to dry storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.; Gilbert, E.R.; Johnson, A.B.; Lund, A.L.; Pednekar, S.P.; Windes, W.E.

    1994-12-01

    An assessment of the possible material interactions arising from the movement of previously wet stored spent nuclear fuel (SNF) into long-term dry interim storage has been conducted for selected fuels in the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Three main classes of fuels are addressed: aluminum (Al) clad, stainless steel (SS) clad, and unclad Uranium-Zirconium Hydride (UZrHx) fuel types. Degradation issues for the cladding, fuel matrix material, and storage canister in both wet and dry storage environments are assessed. Possible conditioning techniques to stabilize the fuel and optimum dry environment conditions during storage are also addressed.

  11. Enzyme Production by Industrially Relevant Fungi Cultured on Coproduct From Corn Dry Grind Ethanol Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ximenes, Eduardo A.; Dien, Bruce S.; Ladisch, Michael R.; Mosier, Nathan; Cotta, Michael A.; Li, Xin-Liang

    Distillers dried grain with solubles (DDGS) is the major coproduct produced at a dry grind ethanol facility. Currently, it is sold primarily as a ruminant animal feed. DDGS is low cost and relatively high in protein and fiber contents. In this study, DDGS was investigated as carbon source for extracellular hydrolytic enzyme production. Two filamentous fungi, noted for their high cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzyme titers, were grown on DDGS: Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 and Aspergillus niger NRRL 2001. DDGS was either used as delivered from the plant (untreated) or after being pretreated with hot water. Both microorganisms secreted a broad range of enzymes when grown on DDGS. Higher xylanase titers were obtained when cultured on hot water DDGS compared with growth on untreated DDGS. Maximum xylanase titers were produced in 4 d for A. niger and 8 d for T. reesei in shake flask cultures. Larger amounts of enzymes were produced in bioreactors (5L) either equipped with Rushton (for T. reesei) or updraft marine impellers (A. niger). Initial production titers were lower for bioreactor than for flask cultures, especially for T. reesei cultures. Improvement of enzyme titers were obtained using fed-batch feeding schemes.

  12. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

    2005-04-01

    This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

  13. PCDD/F enviromental impact from municipal solid waste bio-drying plant.

    PubMed

    Rada, E C; Ragazzi, M; Zardi, D; Laiti, L; Ferrari, A

    2011-06-01

    The present work indentifies some environmental and health impacts of a municipal solid waste bio-drying plant taking into account the PCDD/F release into the atmosphere, its concentration at ground level and its deposition. Four scenarios are presented for the process air treatment and management: biofilter or regenerative thermal oxidation treatment, at two different heights. A Gaussian dispersion model, AERMOD, was used in order to model the dispersion and deposition of the PCDD/F emissions into the atmosphere. Considerations on health risk, from different exposure pathways are presented using an original approach. The case of biofilter at ground level resulted the most critical, depending on the low dispersion of the pollutants. Suggestions on technical solutions for the optimization of the impact are presented. PMID:21550632

  14. The effect of freezing and drying on leaching of DOM from above ground vascular plant material from the Alaskan Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosh, M. S.; McClelland, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of the seasonal dynamics of fluvial dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations and fluxes in Arctic catchments has increased substantially during recent years, especially during the spring, which historically has been an under-sampled time period. While a number of studies have observed peaks in both DOM concentrations and fluxes during the spring snowmelt, our knowledge of the mechanisms that control these observations are still lacking. During the initial snowmelt period, frozen ground and the snow matrix act to constrain melt-water to the soil surface. We hypothesize that restriction of flow during this time facilitates leaching of DOM from senescent above ground vegetation and detritus contributing to the high DOM concentrations observed during the spring melt. This study focuses on the effect of freezing and drying on the leaching of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen (DOC and DON) from above ground vascular plant material. Specifically, we examined the treatment effects of freezing, drying, and freeze-drying on three genera of common Alaskan Arctic vascular plants; Eriophorum (spp.), Carex (spp.), and Salix (spp.). Frozen and freeze-dried plant material released more DOC over the experimental 96 hour leaching period compared to plant material that was only dried. Qualitatively, these patterns were similar among the different plant types, while quantitatively Salix leached more DOC than either Eriophorum or Carex in all treatments. Similar patterns were also seen for DON between the different treatments and among the different plant types. Compositionally, DOM that was leached from frozen and freeze-dried material had higher C:N ratios than material that was only dried. Comparatively, DOM leached from Salix had much higher C:N ratios than either Eriophorum or Carex. During the first 24 hours of leaching, C:N ratios tended to increase followed by a subsequent leveling or decrease, suggesting that the composition of leached DOM varied

  15. Adaptive Speckle Imaging Interferometry: a new technique for the analysis of microstructure dynamics, drying processes and coating formation.

    PubMed

    Brunel, L; Brun, A; Snabre, P; Cipelletti, L

    2007-11-12

    We describe an extension of multi-speckle diffusing wave spectroscopy adapted to follow the non-stationary microscopic dynamics in drying films and coatings in a very reactive way and with a high dynamic range. We call this technique "Adaptive Speckle Imaging Interferometry". We introduce an efficient tool, the inter-image distance, to evaluate the speckle dynamics, and the concept of "speckle rate" (SR, in Hz) to quantify this dynamics. The adaptive algorithm plots a simple kinetics, the time evolution of the SR, providing a non-invasive characterization of drying phenomena. A new commercial instrument, called HORUS(R), based on ASII and specialized in the analysis of film formation and drying processes is presented. PMID:19550809

  16. Ftsz Ring Formation at the Chloroplast Division Site in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Vitha, Stanislav; McAndrew, Rosemary S.; Osteryoung, Katherine W.

    2001-01-01

    Among the events that accompanied the evolution of chloroplasts from their endosymbiotic ancestors was the host cell recruitment of the prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ to function in chloroplast division. FtsZ, a structural homologue of tubulin, mediates cell division in bacteria by assembling into a ring at the midcell division site. In higher plants, two nuclear-encoded forms of FtsZ, FtsZ1 and FtsZ2, play essential and functionally distinct roles in chloroplast division, but whether this involves ring formation at the division site has not been determined previously. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana, we demonstrate here that FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 localize to coaligned rings at the chloroplast midpoint. Antibodies specific for recognition of FtsZ1 or FtsZ2 proteins in Arabidopsis also recognize related polypeptides and detect midplastid rings in pea and tobacco, suggesting that midplastid ring formation by FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 is universal among flowering plants. Perturbation in the level of either protein in transgenic plants is accompanied by plastid division defects and assembly of FtsZ1 and FtsZ2 into filaments and filament networks not observed in wild-type, suggesting that previously described FtsZ-containing cytoskeletal-like networks in chloroplasts may be artifacts of FtsZ overexpression. PMID:11285278

  17. Biomass and diversity of dry alpine plant communities along altitudinal gradients in the Himalayas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Namgail, T.; Rawat, G.S.; Mishra, C.; van Wieren, S.E.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2012-01-01

    A non-linear relationship between phytodiversity and altitude has widely been reported, but the relationship between phytomass and altitude remains little understood. We examined the phytomass and diversity of vascular plants along altitudinal gradients on the dry alpine rangelands of Ladakh, western Himalaya. We used generalized linear and generalized additive models to assess the relationship between these vegetation parameters and altitude. We found a hump-shaped relationship between aboveground phytomass and altitude. We suspect that this is engendered by low rainfall and trampling/excessive grazing at lower slopes by domestic livestock, and low temperature and low nutrient levels at higher slopes. We also found a unimodal relationship between plant species-richness and altitude at a single mountain as well as at the scale of entire Ladakh. The species-richness at the single mountain peaked between 5,000 and 5,200 m, while it peaked between 3,500 and 4,000 m at entire Ladakh level. Perhaps biotic factors such as grazing and precipitation are, respectively, important in generating this pattern at the single mountain and entire Ladakh. ?? 2011 The Author(s).

  18. Optimisation potential for a SBR plant based upon integrated modelling for dry and wet weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Rönner-Holm, S G E; Kaufmann Alves, I; Steinmetz, H; Holm, N C

    2009-01-01

    Integrated dynamic simulation analysis of a full-scale municipal sequential batch reactor (SBR) wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was performed using the KOSMO pollution load simulation model for the combined sewer system (CSS) and the ASM3 + EAWAG-BioP model for the WWTP. Various optimising strategies for dry and storm weather conditions were developed to raise the purification and hydraulic performance and to reduce operation costs based on simulation studies with the calibrated WWTP model. The implementation of some strategies on the plant led to lower effluent values and an average annual saving of 49,000 euro including sewage tax, which is 22% of the total running costs. Dynamic simulation analysis of CSS for an increased WWTP influent over a period of one year showed high potentials for reducing combined sewer overflow (CSO) volume by 18-27% and CSO loads for COD by 22%, NH(4)-N and P(total) by 33%. In addition, the SBR WWTP could easily handle much higher influents without exceeding the monitoring values. During the integrated simulation of representative storm events, the total emission load for COD dropped to 90%, the sewer system emitted 47% less, whereas the pollution load in the WWTP effluent increased to only 14% with 2% higher running costs. PMID:19844042

  19. A Role for Shoot Protein in Shoot–Root Dry Matter Allocation in Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    ANDREWS, M.; RAVEN, J. A.; LEA, P. J.; SPRENT, J. I.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims It is stated in many recent publications that nitrate (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{NO}}_{3}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}) acts as a signal to regulate dry matter partitioning between the shoot and root of higher plants. Here we challenge this hypothesis and present evidence for the viewpoint that \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{NO}}_{3}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and other environmental effects on the shoot : root dry weight ratio (S:R) of higher plants are often related mechanistically to changes in shoot protein concentration. • Methods The literature on environmental effects on S:R is reviewed, focusing on relationships between S:R, growth and leaf \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{NO}}_{3}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and protein concentrations. A series of experiments carried out to test the proposal that S:R is dependent on shoot protein concentration is highlighted and new data are presented for tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). • Key Results/Evidence Results from the literature and new data for tobacco show that S:R and leaf \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage

  20. The Formation and Function of Plant Cuticles1

    PubMed Central

    Yeats, Trevor H.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant cuticle is an extracellular hydrophobic layer that covers the aerial epidermis of all land plants, providing protection against desiccation and external environmental stresses. The past decade has seen considerable progress in assembling models for the biosynthesis of its two major components, the polymer cutin and cuticular waxes. Most recently, two breakthroughs in the long-sought molecular bases of alkane formation and polyester synthesis have allowed construction of nearly complete biosynthetic pathways for both waxes and cutin. Concurrently, a complex regulatory network controlling the synthesis of the cuticle is emerging. It has also become clear that the physiological role of the cuticle extends well beyond its primary function as a transpiration barrier, playing important roles in processes ranging from development to interaction with microbes. Here, we review recent progress in the biochemistry and molecular biology of cuticle synthesis and function and highlight some of the major questions that will drive future research in this field. PMID:23893170

  1. Plant development in space: Observations on root formation and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. G.; Kann, R. P.; Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1990-01-01

    Root growth in space is discussed and observations on root production from plants flown as part of the Chromex project that were defined as to their origin, stage of development and physiological status, are presented. Roots were generated from fully differentiated, aseptically maintained individuals of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae) under spaceflight conditions. Results are compared for tissue culture generated plantlets and comparably sized seedling clone individuals, both of which had their roots trimmed on Earth before they were loaded into NASA's plant growth unit and subjected to a 5 day shuttle flight (STS-29). Asepsis was maintained throughout the experiment. Overall root production was 40 to 50 percent greater under spaceflight conditions than during ground control tests. However, root formation slowed down towards the end of the flight. This decrease in new roots did not occur in the ground controls that sought to simulate flight except for microgravity.

  2. Transcriptional Switches Direct Plant Organ Formation and Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A.; Van Norman, Jaimie M.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2013-01-01

    Development of multicellular organisms requires specification of diverse cell types. In plants, development is continuous and because plant cells are surrounded by rigid cell walls, cell division and specification of daughter cell fate must be carefully orchestrated. During embryonic and postembryonic plant development, the specification of cell types is determined both by positional cues and cell lineage. The establishment of distinct transcriptional domains is a fundamental mechanism for determining different cell fates. In this review, we focus on four examples from recent literature of switches operating in cell fate decisions that are regulated by transcriptional mechanisms. First, we highlight a transcriptional mechanism involving a mobile transcription factor in formation of the two ground tissue cell types in roots. Specification of vascular cell types is then discussed, including new details about xylem cell-type specification via a mobile microRNA. Next, transcriptional regulation of two key embryonic developmental events is considered: establishment of apical–basal polarity in the single-celled zygote and specification of distinct root and shoot stem cell populations in the plant embryo. Finally, a dynamic transcriptional mechanism for lateral organ positioning that integrates spatial and temporal information into a repeating pattern is summarized. PMID:22305165

  3. Dioxin formation and control in a gasification-melting plant.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Katsuya; Miyata, Haruo

    2015-10-01

    We investigated dioxin formation and removal in a commercial thermal waste treatment plant employing a gasification and melting process that has become widespread in the last decade in Japan. The aim was to clarify the possibility of dioxin formation in a process operation at high temperatures and the applicability of catalytic decomposition of dioxins. Also, the possible use of dioxin surrogate compounds for plant monitoring was further evaluated. The main test parameter was the influence of changes in the amount and type of municipal solid waste (MSW) supplied to the thermal waste treatment plant which from day to day operation is a relevant parameter also from commercial perspective. Here especially, the plastic content on dioxin release was assessed. The following conclusions were reached: (1) disturbance of combustion by adding plastic waste above the capability of the system resulted in a considerable increase in dioxin content of the flue gas at the inlet of the bag house and (2) bag filter equipment incorporating a catalytic filter effectively reduced the gaseous dioxin content below the standard of 0.1 ng toxic equivalency (TEQ)/m(3) N, by decomposition and partly adsorption, as was revealed by total dioxin mass balance and an increased levels in the fly ash. Also, the possible use of organohalogen compounds as dioxin surrogate compounds for plant monitoring was further evaluated. The levels of these surrogates did not exceed values corresponding to 0.1 ng TEQ/m(3) N dioxins established from former tests. This further substantiated that surrogate measurement therefore can well reflect dioxin levels. PMID:24894757

  4. Zeolites replacing plant fossils in the Denver formation, Lakewood, Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Verbeek, E.R.; Grout, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Well-developed crystals of heulandite and stilbite, within fossil wood, occur in sedimentary rocks in Lakewood, Jefferson County. The rocks belong to the Denver formation, a locally fossiliferous deposit of fluvial claystone, siltstone, sandstone and conglomerate, containing some volcanic mudflows (andesitic) of late Cretaceous to Palaeocene age. Altered volcanic glass released Na and Ca into the ground-water and subsequently zeolites were crystallized in the open spaces between grains and within fossil plant structures. Minor pyrite, quartz (jasper), calcite and apatite also occur as replacements of fossil wood. Similar zeolite occurrences in other areas are reviewed.-R.S.M.

  5. Evaluation of Plant Introductions and Dry-Fleshed Sweetpotato Genotypes for Resistance to Soil Insect Pests, 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two insect-susceptible, orange-fleshed check cultivars (‘Beauregard’ and ‘SC1149 19’), three insect-resistant check cultivars (‘Regal’, ‘Ruddy’ and ‘Sumor’), 21 dry-flesh genotypes from the USVL sweetpotato breeding program, and 12 other varieties and plant introductions (PI) obtained from the Natio...

  6. Freeze-Drying of Mononuclear Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Followed by Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Natan, Dity; Nagler, Arnon; Arav, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background We recently showed that freeze-dried cells stored for 3 years at room temperature can direct embryonic development following cloning. However, viability, as evaluated by membrane integrity of the cells after freeze-drying, was very low; and it was mainly the DNA integrity that was preserved. In the present study, we improved the cells' viability and functionality after freeze-drying. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized the conditions of directional freezing, i.e. interface velocity and cell concentration, and we added the antioxidant EGCG to the freezing solution. The study was performed on mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. After freeze-drying, we tested the viability, number of CD34+-presenting cells and ability of the rehydrated hematopoietic stem cells to differentiate into different blood cells in culture. The viability of the MNCs after freeze-drying and rehydration with pure water was 88%–91%. The total number of CD34+-presenting cells and the number of colonies did not change significantly when evaluated before freezing, after freeze-thawing, and after freeze-drying (5.4×104±4.7, 3.49×104±6 and 6.31×104±12.27 cells, respectively, and 31±25.15, 47±45.8 and 23.44±13.3 colonies, respectively). Conclusions This is the first report of nucleated cells which have been dried and then rehydrated with double-distilled water remaining viable, and of hematopoietic stem cells retaining their ability to differentiate into different blood cells. PMID:19381290

  7. Effects of past burning frequency on plant species structure and composition in dry dipterocarp forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanthongchai, Dr.; Bauhus, Prof.; Goldammer, Prof.

    2009-04-01

    Anthropogenic burning in dry dipterocarp forests (DDF) has become a common phenomenon throughout Thailand. It is feared that too frequent fires may affect vegetation structure and composition and thus impact on ecosystem productivity. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of prescribed fires on sites with different past burning regimes on vegetation structure and composition in the Huay Kha Khaeng Wildlife Sanctuary (HKK), Thailand. Fire frequency was determined from satellite images and ranged from frequent, infrequent, rare and unburned with fire occurrences of 7, 2, 1 and 0 out of the past 10 years, respectively. The pre-burn fuel loads, the overstorey and understorey vegetation structure and composition were determined to investigate the effects of the contrasting past burning regimes. The burning experiment was carried out, applying a three-strip head-fire burning technique. The vegetation structure and composition were sampled again one year after the fire to assess the fire impacts. Aboveground fine fuel loads increased with the length of fire-free interval. The woody plant structures of the frequently burned stand differed from those of the other less frequently burned stands. The species composition of the overstorey on the frequently burned site, in particular that of small sized trees (4.5-10 cm dbh), also differed significantly from that of the other sites. Whilst the ground vegetation including shrubs and herbs did not differ between the past burning regimes, frequent burning obviously promoted the proliferation of graminoid vegetation. There was no clear evidence showing that the prescribed fires affected the mortality of trees (dbh> 4.5 cm) on the sites of the different past burning regimes. The effects of prescribed burning on the understorey vegetation structures varied between the past burning regimes and the understorey vegetation type. Therefore, it is recommended that the DDF at HKK should be subjected to a prescribed fire frequency

  8. Resolution of the direct containment heating issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry containments or subatmospheric containments

    SciTech Connect

    Pilch, M.M.; Allen, M.D.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1996-02-01

    This report uses the scenarios described in NUREG/CR-6075 and NUREG/CR-6075, Supplement 1, to address the direct containment heating (DCH) issue for all Westinghouse plants with large dry or subatmospheric containments. DCH is considered resolved if the conditional containment failure probability (CCFP) is less than 0.1. Loads versus strength evaluations of the CCFP were performed for each plant using plant-specific information. The DCH issue is considered resolved for a plant if a screening phase results in a CCFP less than 0.01, which is more stringent than the overall success criterion. If the screening phase CCFP for a plant is greater than 0.01, then refined containment loads evaluations must be performed and/or the probability of high pressure at vessel breach must be analyzed. These analyses could be used separately or could be integrated together to recalculate the CCFP for an individual plant to reduce the CCFP to meet the overall success criterion of less than 0.1. The CCFPs for all of the Westinghouse plants with dry containments were less than 0.01 at the screening phase, and thus, the DCH issue is resolved for these plants based on containment loads alone. No additional analyses are required.

  9. [Effects of maize plant types on dry matter accumulation characteristics and yield of soybean in maize-soybean intercropping systems].

    PubMed

    Cui, Liang; Yang, Wen-yu; Huang, Ni; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Yan-ling; Wang, Xiao-hui; Liu, Yang; Yan, Shou

    2015-08-01

    In order to explore the effects of maize plant types on dry matter accumulation and yield of soybean, a field experiment was conducted in 2013, including three maize-soybean relay strip intercropping systems. The relay strip intercropping systems were designed as soybean (Gongxuan 1) intercropped with Denghai 605 (RI1), Chuandan 418 (RI2) or Yayu 13 ( RI3), and the monocultured soybean was used as control. The results demonstrated that the dry matter accumulation rates of intercropped soybean in RI2 and RI3 treatments were lower than in RI1 treatment, and the leaf, stem and pod dry matter accumulation of intercropped soybean in RI1 treatment was 17.6%, 16.5% and 13.7% higher than that in RI2 treatment, and 34.6%, 33.1% and 28.4% higher than that in RI3 treatment, respectively. The distribution proportion of leaf and stem of intercropped soybean was in the order of RI1 > RI2 > RI3. However, the trend of the distribution proportion of pod was opposite. Compared with RI2 and RI3, the dry matter translocation amount, translocation proportion, contribution proportion of soybean vegetative organs to pod of soybean were improved in RI, treatment, and the pod per plant, seeds per plant, seeds per pod, yield per plant and yield of soybean in RI, were higher than RI2 and RI3 by 6.8%, 11.5%, 4.4%, 15.9%, 15.6% and 14.3%, 22.2%, 6.7%, 33.4%, 36.8%, respectively. The results showed that the yield was positively related with the accumulation rate of dry matter, dry matter translocation, dry matter translocation ratio and the contribution of dry matter accumulation, and these indices were highest in RI treatment. The results indicated that the compact maize relay intercropped with soybean could effectively regulate the dry matter accumulation, translocation and distribution, and improve the yield of soybean. PMID:26685605

  10. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension

    PubMed Central

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Basavaraj, Madivala G.

    2016-01-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments. PMID:27477261

  11. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K.; Basavaraj, Madivala G.

    2016-08-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments.

  12. Effect of interfacial free energy on the formation of polymer microcapsules by emulsification/freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Yin, Weisi; Yates, M Z

    2008-02-01

    Hollow polymer microparticles with a single opening on the surface were formed by freeze-drying aqueous polymer colloids swollen with solvent. The results show that the particle morphology is due to phase separation in the polymer emulsion droplets upon freezing in liquid nitrogen, and that morphological changes are driven largely by lowering interfacial free energy. The effects of added surfactant, volume fraction of solvent, type of solvent, and processing conditions on the particle morphology were examined and compared to theoretical predictions. The dried hollow particles were resuspended in a dispersing media and exposed to a second swelling solvent to close the surface opening and form microcapsules. The interfacial free energy difference between the inside and outside surfaces is the driving force for closing the hole on the surface. The emulsification/freeze-drying technique can be used to encapsulate hydrophilic additives in the core of the microcapsules, demonstrating the potential of the technique in controlled-release applications. PMID:18173290

  13. Role of particle shape anisotropy on crack formation in drying of colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Dugyala, Venkateshwar Rao; Lama, Hisay; Satapathy, Dillip K; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2016-01-01

    Cracks in a colloidal film formed by evaporation induced drying can be controlled by changing drying conditions. We show, for the first time that the crack morphologies in colloidal films are dependent on shape of constituting particles apart from the microstructure and particle assembly. In order to investigate the particle shape effect on crack patterns, monodispered spherical and ellipsoidal particles are used in sessile drop experiments. On observing the dried sessile drop we found cracks along the radial direction for spherical particle dispersions and circular crack patterns for ellipsoidal particle dispersions. The change in crack pattern is a result of self assembly of shape anisotropic particles and their ordering. The ordering of particles dictate the crack direction and the cracks follow the path of least resistance to release the excess stress stored in the particle film. Ellipsoids having different aspect ratio (~3 to 7) are used and circular crack patterns are repeatedly observed in all experiments. PMID:27477261

  14. Plant growth with new fluorescent lamps : I. Fresh and dry weight yields of tomato seedlings.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A S; Dunn, S

    1966-06-01

    Tomato seedlings were grown under seven kinds of fluorescent lamps, including two that are commercially available, and five experimental lamps. Detailed descriptions and spectral emission curves for these lamps are presented.The 78/22 lamp, which emitted most of its energy above 500 mμ, more than ten percent above 700 mμ, and had a sharp peak output at 660 mμ, generally produced superior fresh and dry weight yields. This effect may be due primarily to the high peak of energy emitted at approximately 660 mμ, combined with a considerable emission in the far-red, which in turn may be related to the red ↔ far-red reversibility phenomeon.The Com I lamp, which lacked the sharp peak output at 660 mμ and emitted more energy in the blue than the 78/22 lamp, was generally second only to the latter in promoting plant growth. A high moisture content was found in plants under this lamp in some experiments.The IRIII lamp had the sharp peak output at 660 mμ but greater output in the blue than the 78/22 lamp. The 282 lamp output was similar to the 78/22 but lacked the high peak. Both of these lamps generally gave improved results over those produced by commercial Gro-Lux, Warm-white, and FLAT lamps. This was attributed to the greater percentage of red and far-red energy emission by the former two lamps. The yields with the FLAT lamp were consistently lowest of all. This has been attributed to the high percentage of emitted energy in the blue and green portions of the spectrum.Both length of the test period (13 days versus 26 days) and light intensity (550 μw/cm(2) versus 1100 μw/cm(2)) may be important factors in determining which composition of spectral energy emission produces the greatest yields. Under low intensity and short test period the Com I light produced highest fresh- and dry-weight yields, but under high intensity and longer growth period the 78/22 lamp gave greatest yields. This effect may be due to inhibition of leaf expansion by red light in the early

  15. Neural network implementation for a reversal procedure for water and dry matter estimation on plant leaves using selected LED wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Elian; Frangi, Jean-Pierre; de Rosny, Gilles

    2015-06-10

    An inversion method based on a neural network was used to estimate water and dry matter contents on plant leaves, from transmittance and reflectance measurements, using light emitting diodes (LEDs) at specific wavelengths in NIR and FIR. The preliminary results for the predicted water content by the neural network method showed a RMSE value of 0.0027 g/cm(2) and |σ| value of approximately 3.53%, computed on 127 plant leaf samples over 51 species. Dry matter estimation also was performed, which showed potential implementation after future improvements. We believe this inversion method could be implemented in a portable system based on any silicon platform with the capability to perform in situ measurements on plant tissue. PMID:26192847

  16. Impact of processing conditions on the kinetic of vitamin C degradation and 2-furoylmethyl amino acid formation in dried strawberries.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Soria, A Cristina; Olano, Agustín; Montilla, Antonia; Villamiel, Mar

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a study on the usefulness of the determination of vitamin C together with indicators of the initial steps of Maillard reaction (2-furoylmethyl amino acids, 2-FM-AA) during the convective drying of strawberries has been carried out for the first time, paying special attention to the kinetics of degradation and formation, respectively, of both parameters. Formation of 2-FM-AA of Lys, Arg and GABA and vitamin C loss increased with time and temperature following, respectively, a zero and first-order kinetics. As supported by its lower activation energy, 2-FM-GABA (55.9 kJ/mol) and 2-FM-Lys+2-FM-Arg (58.2 kJ/mol) were shown to be slightly more sensitive indicators than vitamin C (82.1 kJ/mol). The obtained results, together with a complementary study on the rehydration ability and sensorial attributes of samples, pointed out the suitability of the convective drying system to obtain dried strawberries of high nutritive quality and bioactivity and good consumer acceptance. PMID:24491716

  17. Accelerated thermokarst formation in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, J. S.; Fountain, A. G.; Dickson, J. L.; Head, J. W.; Okal, M. H.; Marchant, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Thermokarst is a land surface lowered and disrupted by melting ground ice. Thermokarst is a major consequence of climate change in the Arctic, but has been considered to be a minor process in Antarctica. Garwood Valley (78°S, 164°E) is a coastal valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys (MDV) of Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica and is a natural laboratory in which competing models of Antarctic thermokarst erosion can be tested. Garwood Valley is partially filled with a remnant of the Ross Sea Ice Sheet, a debris-covered ice mass that lodged in the valley during the Pleistocene. Rapid ablation of this buried ice mass via melting and block calving has recently been detected at a large retrogressive thaw feature referred to as the Garwood Valley ice cliff. Curiously, regional air temperatures in the MDV have been declining or stable on decadal timescales. Despite no increase in thawing degree days in Garwood Valley, biannual LiDAR scans show large-scale thermokarst backwasting occurring along the entire face of the ice cliff. Since ground-based data collection began in November 2010 to January, 2012, the ~400 m long ice cliff has backwasted ~1-3 m. Since airborne LiDAR data were first collected in 2001-2002 to January, 2012, backwasting along the ice cliff has ranged from 10-55 m, totaling 44,900 × 900 m3, or on average, 5,000 × 100 m3/year. From November 2010 to January 2011, 6,700 × 130 m3 of ice and capping sediment was removed from the Garwood Valley ice cliff; from January 2011 to January 2012, 11,300 × 230 m3 of material was removed. These melt and calving rates are comparable to the low end of retrogressive thaw slump erosion in Arctic and alpine environments, and suggest that some coastal MDV ground ice may no longer be stable under current climate conditions. Here, we combine this ground-based and airborne LiDAR data with with timelapse imaging and meteorological data to show that 1) thermokarst formation has accelerated in Garwood Valley; 2) the rate of

  18. Wet and Dry Atmospheric Depositions of Inorganic Nitrogen during Plant Growing Season in the Coastal Zone of Yellow River Delta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO42− and Na+ were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m−2, in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3−–N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4+–N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3−–N and NH4+–N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3−–N and NH4+–N in 0–10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD. PMID:24977238

  19. Stability and extractability of double-stranded RNA of pangola stunt and sugarcane Fiji disease viruses in dried plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Karan, M; Hicks, S; Harding, R M; Teakle, D S

    1991-06-01

    When leaves infected with pangola stunt virus (PaSV) were dried at 23, 37, 50, 70 or 105 degrees C, the dsRNA was stable and could be extracted after aerobic storage at room temperature for 1 month, although at 105 degrees C the amount obtained was reduced. The dsRNA was also recovered after leaves were freeze dried and stored in vacuo at room temperature for 6 months, or were dried and stored aerobically at room temperature for 10.5 months. dsRNA of sugarcane Fiji disease virus (FDV) was also stable when infected leaves were dried at 23, 37, 50 or 105 degrees C and stored aerobically for 3 months or for at least 6 months when infected leaves were dried at 70 degrees C. The unexpected high stability and extractability of both PaSV and FDV dsRNA when dried in leaves at low or high temperatures and stored at room temperature indicate that these, and probably other plant-infecting reoviruses, can be transported readily in desiccated host tissue between different countries for later extraction and comparison of their dsRNAs. PMID:1939508

  20. Wet and dry atmospheric depositions of inorganic nitrogen during plant growing season in the coastal zone of Yellow River Delta.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junbao; Ning, Kai; Li, Yunzhao; Du, Siyao; Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Guangmei; Gao, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The ecological problems caused by dry and wet deposition of atmospheric nitrogen have been widespread concern in the world. In this study, wet and dry atmospheric depositions were monitored in plant growing season in the coastal zone of the Yellow River Delta (YRD) using automatic sampling equipment. The results showed that SO4 (2-) and Na(+) were the predominant anion and cation, respectively, in both wet and dry atmospheric depositions. The total atmospheric nitrogen deposition was ~2264.24 mg m(-2), in which dry atmospheric nitrogen deposition was about 32.02%. The highest values of dry and wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition appeared in May and August, respectively. In the studied area, NO3 (-)-N was the main nitrogen form in dry deposition, while the predominant nitrogen in wet atmospheric deposition was NH4 (+)-N with ~56.51% of total wet atmospheric nitrogen deposition. The average monthly attribution rate of atmospheric deposition of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N was ~31.38% and ~20.50% for the contents of NO3 (-)-N and NH4 (+)-N in 0-10 cm soil layer, respectively, suggested that the atmospheric nitrogen was one of main sources for soil nitrogen in coastal zone of the YRD. PMID:24977238

  1. Caterpillar regurgitant induces pore formation in plant membranes.

    PubMed

    Lühring, Hinrich; Nguyen, Van Dy; Schmidt, Lilian; Röse, Ursula S R

    2007-11-27

    Formation of channel-like pores in a plant membrane was induced within seconds after application of an aqueous solution containing regurgitant of the insect larvae Spodoptera littoralis. Gated pore currents recorded on the tonoplast of the Charophyte Chara corallina displayed conductances up to several hundred pS. A voltage-dependent gating reaction supports the assumption that pore-forming molecules have amphipathic properties. Regurgitant samples separated into masses smaller or larger than 3kDa were evaluated by patch-clamp and mass spectroscopy. Fractions containing peptides larger than 3kDa constituted pores of large conductances, peptides smaller than 3kDa constituted pores of small conductances. Peptide-free eluates did not constitute conducting pores, indicating that pore-forming components in regurgitant are membrane-spanning oligopeptides. PMID:17967419

  2. Pyridine metabolism in tea plants: salvage, conjugate formation and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Ashihara, Hiroshi; Deng, Wei-Wei

    2012-11-01

    Pyridine compounds, including nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, are key metabolites of both the salvage pathway for NAD and the biosynthesis of related secondary compounds. We examined the in situ metabolic fate of [carbonyl-(14)C]nicotinamide, [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid and [carboxyl-(14)C]nicotinic acid riboside in tissue segments of tea (Camellia sinensis) plants, and determined the activity of enzymes involved in pyridine metabolism in protein extracts from young tea leaves. Exogenously supplied (14)C-labelled nicotinamide was readily converted to nicotinic acid, and some nicotinic acid was salvaged to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and then utilized for the synthesis of NAD and NADP. The nicotinic acid riboside salvage pathway discovered recently in mungbean cotyledons is also operative in tea leaves. Nicotinic acid was converted to nicotinic acid N-glucoside, but not to trigonelline (N-methylnicotinic acid), in any part of tea seedlings. Active catabolism of nicotinic acid was observed in tea leaves. The fate of [2-(14)C]nicotinic acid indicates that glutaric acid is a major catabolite of nicotinic acid; it was further metabolised, and carbon atoms were finally released as CO(2). The catabolic pathway observed in tea leaves appears to start with the nicotinic acid N-glucoside formation; this pathway differs from catabolic pathways observed in microorganisms. Profiles of pyridine metabolism in tea plants are discussed. PMID:22527843

  3. Cost benefits from applying advanced heat rejection concepts to a wet/dry-cooled binary geothermal plant

    SciTech Connect

    Faletti, D.W.

    1981-03-01

    Optimized ammonia heat rejection system designs were carried out for three water allocations equivalent to 9, 20, and 31% of that of a 100% wet-cooled plant. The Holt/Procon design of a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant for the Heber site was used as a design basis. The optimization process took into account the penalties for replacement power, gas turbine capital, and lost capacity due to increased heat rejection temperature, as well as added base plant capacity and fuel to provide fan and pump power to the heat rejection system. Descriptions of the three plant designs are presented. For comparison, a wet tower loop was costed out for a 100% wet-cooled plant using the parameters of the Holt/Procon design. Wet/dry cooling was found to increase the cost of electricity by 28% above that of a 100% wet-cooled plant for all three of the water allocations studied (9, 20, and 31%). The application selected for a preconceptual evaluation of the BCT (binary cooling tower) system was the use of agricultural waste water from the New River, located in California's Imperial Valley, to cool a 50-MWe binary geothermal plant. Technical and cost evaluations at the preconceptual level indicated that performance estimates provided by Tower Systems Incorporated (TSI) were reasonable and that TSI's tower cost, although 2 to 19% lower than PNL estimates, was also reasonable. Electrical cost comparisonswere made among the BCT system, a conventional 100% wet system, and a 9% wet/dry ammonia system, all using agricultural waste water with solar pond disposal. The BCT system cost the least, yielding a cost of electricity only 13% above that of a conventional wet system using high quality water and 14% less than either the conventional 100% wet or the 9% wet/dry ammonia system.

  4. Water-Hydrogel Binding Affinity Modulates Freeze-Drying-Induced Micropore Architecture and Skeletal Myotube Formation.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Marshall, Nicholas; Clay, Nicholas; Chen, Jinrong; Mahmassani, Ziad; Boppart, Marni; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-08-10

    Freeze-dried hydrogels are increasingly used to create 3D interconnected micropores that facilitate biomolecular and cellular transports. However, freeze-drying is often plagued by variance in micropore architecture based on polymer choice. We hypothesized that water-polymer binding affinity plays a significant role in sizes and numbers of micropores formed through freeze-drying, influencing cell-derived tissue quality. Poly(ethylene glycol)diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels with alginate methacrylate (AM) were used due to AM's higher binding affinity for water than PEGDA. PEGDA-AM hydrogels with larger AM concentrations resulted in larger sizes and numbers of micropores than pure PEGDA hydrogels, attributed to the increased mass of water binding to the PEGDA-AM gel. Skeletal myoblasts loaded in microporous PEGDA-AM hydrogels were active to produce 3D muscle-like tissue, while those loaded in pure PEGDA gels were localized on the gel surface. We propose that this study will be broadly useful in designing and improving the performance of various microporous gels. PMID:26113238

  5. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Hugo Caram; Zheng Yao; Gu Feng

    2004-01-01

    This is the fourth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A description is given of the equipment, instrumentation and procedures being used for the fluidized bed drying experiments. Experimental data were obtained during this last quarter on the effects of particle size on drying rate for a North Dakota lignite. Other experiments looked at drying a PRB coal. The tests comparing drying rates with lignite particles of different diameters were carried out with particle top sizes from 2 to 9.5 mm and covered a range of air velocities. The results show that drying rate increased with air velocity, but that, within the accuracy of the data, the data for all four particle size distributions follow the same curve. This suggests the higher drying rates associated with the larger particles are due to higher air velocities and not to any inherently different drying rates due to particle size. The drying data with the PRB coal show qualitatively similar behavior to that observed with lignite. However, quantitative comparisons of the drying rate data obtained so far for the two coals show the PRB dried at rates which were 14 to 20 percent lower than the lignite, for comparable process conditions. The equilibrium relationship between relative humidity and coal moisture was refined using a correction for temperature. This reduced the scatter in the coal moisture versus relative humidity data and improved the predictions made with the first principle drying model.

  6. The Role of Edaphic Environment and Climate in Structuring Phylogenetic Pattern in Seasonally Dry Tropical Plant Communities

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Marcelo Freire; Silva, Igor Aurélio; de Araújo, Francisca Soares; Nic Lughadha, Eimear; Meagher, Thomas R.; Martins, Fernando Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Seasonally dry tropical plant formations (SDTF) are likely to exhibit phylogenetic clustering owing to niche conservatism driven by a strong environmental filter (water stress), but heterogeneous edaphic environments and life histories may result in heterogeneity in degree of phylogenetic clustering. We investigated phylogenetic patterns across ecological gradients related to water availability (edaphic environment and climate) in the Caatinga, a SDTF in Brazil. Caatinga is characterized by semiarid climate and three distinct edaphic environments – sedimentary, crystalline, and inselberg –representing a decreasing gradient in soil water availability. We used two measures of phylogenetic diversity: Net Relatedness Index based on the entire phylogeny among species present in a site, reflecting long-term diversification; and Nearest Taxon Index based on the tips of the phylogeny, reflecting more recent diversification. We also evaluated woody species in contrast to herbaceous species. The main climatic variable influencing phylogenetic pattern was precipitation in the driest quarter, particularly for herbaceous species, suggesting that environmental filtering related to minimal periods of precipitation is an important driver of Caatinga biodiversity, as one might expect for a SDTF. Woody species tended to show phylogenetic clustering whereas herbaceous species tended towards phylogenetic overdispersion. We also found phylogenetic clustering in two edaphic environments (sedimentary and crystalline) in contrast to phylogenetic overdispersion in the third (inselberg). We conclude that while niche conservatism is evident in phylogenetic clustering in the Caatinga, this is not a universal pattern likely due to heterogeneity in the degree of realized environmental filtering across edaphic environments. Thus, SDTF, in spite of a strong shared environmental filter, are potentially heterogeneous in phylogenetic structuring. Our results support the need for scientifically

  7. The role of edaphic environment and climate in structuring phylogenetic pattern in seasonally dry tropical plant communities.

    PubMed

    Moro, Marcelo Freire; Silva, Igor Aurélio; de Araújo, Francisca Soares; Nic Lughadha, Eimear; Meagher, Thomas R; Martins, Fernando Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Seasonally dry tropical plant formations (SDTF) are likely to exhibit phylogenetic clustering owing to niche conservatism driven by a strong environmental filter (water stress), but heterogeneous edaphic environments and life histories may result in heterogeneity in degree of phylogenetic clustering. We investigated phylogenetic patterns across ecological gradients related to water availability (edaphic environment and climate) in the Caatinga, a SDTF in Brazil. Caatinga is characterized by semiarid climate and three distinct edaphic environments - sedimentary, crystalline, and inselberg -representing a decreasing gradient in soil water availability. We used two measures of phylogenetic diversity: Net Relatedness Index based on the entire phylogeny among species present in a site, reflecting long-term diversification; and Nearest Taxon Index based on the tips of the phylogeny, reflecting more recent diversification. We also evaluated woody species in contrast to herbaceous species. The main climatic variable influencing phylogenetic pattern was precipitation in the driest quarter, particularly for herbaceous species, suggesting that environmental filtering related to minimal periods of precipitation is an important driver of Caatinga biodiversity, as one might expect for a SDTF. Woody species tended to show phylogenetic clustering whereas herbaceous species tended towards phylogenetic overdispersion. We also found phylogenetic clustering in two edaphic environments (sedimentary and crystalline) in contrast to phylogenetic overdispersion in the third (inselberg). We conclude that while niche conservatism is evident in phylogenetic clustering in the Caatinga, this is not a universal pattern likely due to heterogeneity in the degree of realized environmental filtering across edaphic environments. Thus, SDTF, in spite of a strong shared environmental filter, are potentially heterogeneous in phylogenetic structuring. Our results support the need for scientifically

  8. Diversity in plant hydraulic traits explains seasonal and inter-annual variations of vegetation dynamics in seasonally dry tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangtao; Medvigy, David; Powers, Jennifer S; Becknell, Justin M; Guan, Kaiyu

    2016-10-01

    We assessed whether diversity in plant hydraulic traits can explain the observed diversity in plant responses to water stress in seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs). The Ecosystem Demography model 2 (ED2) was updated with a trait-driven mechanistic plant hydraulic module, as well as novel drought-phenology and plant water stress schemes. Four plant functional types were parameterized on the basis of meta-analysis of plant hydraulic traits. Simulations from both the original and the updated ED2 were evaluated against 5 yr of field data from a Costa Rican SDTF site and remote-sensing data over Central America. The updated model generated realistic plant hydraulic dynamics, such as leaf water potential and stem sap flow. Compared with the original ED2, predictions from our novel trait-driven model matched better with observed growth, phenology and their variations among functional groups. Most notably, the original ED2 produced unrealistically small leaf area index (LAI) and underestimated cumulative leaf litter. Both of these biases were corrected by the updated model. The updated model was also better able to simulate spatial patterns of LAI dynamics in Central America. Plant hydraulic traits are intercorrelated in SDTFs. Mechanistic incorporation of plant hydraulic traits is necessary for the simulation of spatiotemporal patterns of vegetation dynamics in SDTFs in vegetation models. PMID:27189787

  9. Formation of type 4 resistant starch and maltodextrins from amylose and amylopectin upon dry heating: A model study.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Fernando M; Lopes, Edgar S; Moreira, Ana S P; Simões, Joana; Coimbra, Manuel A; Domingues, Rosário M

    2016-05-01

    Starch is one of the main components of human diet. During food processing, starch is submitted to high temperatures in the presence or absence of water. Thus, the main goal of this work was to identify structural modifications caused by dry heating in starch polysaccharides (amylose and amylopectin) and structurally related oligosaccharides, maltotetraose (M4) and glucosyl-maltotriose (GM3), simulating processing conditions. The structural modifications were evaluated by methylation analysis, electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) and anionic chromatography after in vitro enzymatic digestion. Dry heating promoted dehydration, depolymerization, as well as changes in Glc glycosidic linkage positions and anomeric configuration. In oligosaccharides, polymerization was also observed. All these changes resulted in a lower in vitro digestibility, suggesting that dry heating of starch polysaccharides and related oligosaccharides may be associated with the formation of type 4 resistant starch and maltodextrins, non-digestible carbohydrates that are responsible for beneficial effects in human intestinal tract. PMID:26877020

  10. Initial evaluation of dry storage issues for spent nuclear fuels in wet storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R J; Johnson, Jr, A B; Lund, A L; Gilbert, E R

    1996-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has evaluated the basis for moving selected spent nuclear fuels in the CPP-603 and CPP-666 storage pools at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant from wet to dry interim storage. This work is being conducted for the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company as part of the effort to determine appropriate conditioning and dry storage requirements for these fuels. These spent fuels are from 22 test reactors and include elements clad with aluminum or stainless steel and a wide variety of fuel materials: UAl{sub x}, UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermets, U-5% fissium, UMo, UZrH{sub x}, UErZrH, UO{sub 2}-stainless steel cermet, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-stainless steel cermet. The study also included declad uranium-zirconium hydride spent fuel stored in the CPP-603 storage pools. The current condition and potential failure mechanisms for these spent fuels were evaluated to determine the impact on conditioning and dry storage requirements. Initial recommendations for conditioning and dry storage requirements are made based on the potential degradation mechanisms and their impacts on moving the spent fuel from wet to dry storage. Areas needing further evaluation are identified.

  11. Development of a Dry Sorbent-based Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Thomas; Coleman, Luke; Anderson, Matthew; Gupta, Raghubir; Herr, Joshua; Kalluri, Ranjeeth; Pavani, Maruthi

    2009-12-31

    The objective of this research and development (R&D) project was to further the development of a solid sorbent-based CO2 capture process based on sodium carbonate (i.e. the Dry Carbonate Process) that is capable of capturing>90% of the CO2 as a nearly pure stream from coal-fired power plant flue gas with <35% increase in the cost of electrictiy (ICOE).

  12. Using the "Kalanchoe daigremontiana" Plant To Show the Effects of Photoperiodism on Plantlet Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity demonstrating the importance of photoperiod on plant development. Uses the plant devil's backbone for the experiment and studies the details of photoperiodic requirement for plantlet formation. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  13. Extraradical development and contribution to plant performance of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis exposed to complete or partial rootzone drying.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Elke; Schmid, Barbara; Römheld, Volker; George, Eckhard

    2009-11-01

    Sweet potato plants were grown with or without Glomus intraradices in split-root pots with adjacent root compartments containing a soil with a low availability of phosphate. One fungal tube, from which root growth was excluded, was inserted into each root compartment. During 4 weeks before harvest, the soil moisture level in either both or only one of the two root-compartments of each pot was decreased. Controls remained well watered. Low soil moisture generally had a negative effect on the amount of extraradical mycelium of G. intraradices extracted from the fungal tubes. Sporulation in the fungal tubes was much higher compared with the soil in the root compartment, but remained unaffected by the soil moisture regime. Concentrations of P in extraradical mycelium were much lower than usually found in plants and fungi, while P concentrations in associated mycorrhizal host plant tissues were in an optimum range. This suggests efficient transfer of P from the extraradical mycelium to the host plant. Despite the negative effect of a low soil moisture regime on extraradical G. intraradices development, the symbiosis indeed contributed significantly to P uptake of plants exposed to partial rootzone drying. The possibility that extraradical arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal development was limited by P availability under dry soil conditions is discussed. PMID:19499252

  14. Economic evaluation of four types of dry/wet cooling applied to the 5-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.

    1982-07-01

    A cost study is described which compared the economics of four dry/wet cooling systems to use at the existing Raft River Geothermal Plant. The results apply only at this site and should not be generalized without due consideration of the complete geothermal cycle. These systems are: the Binary Cooling Tower, evaporative condenser, Combin-aire, and a metal fin-tube dry cooling tower with deluge augmentation. The systems were evaluated using cooled, treated geothermal fluid instead of ground or surface water in the cooling loops. All comparisons were performed on the basis of a common plant site - the Raft River 5 MWe geothermal plant in Idaho. The Binary Cooling Tower and the Combin-aire cooling system were designed assuming the use of the isobutane/water surface condenser currently installed at the Raft River Plant. The other two systems had the isobutane ducted to the evaporative condensers. Capital credit was not given to the system employing the direct condensing process. The cost of the systems were estimated from designs provided by the vendors. The levelized energy cost range for each cooling system is listed below. The levelized energy cost reflects the incremental cost of the cooling system for the life of the plant. The estimates are presented in 1981 dollars.

  15. Formation of brown lines in paper: characterization of cellulose degradation at the wet-dry interface.

    PubMed

    Souguir, Zied; Dupont, Anne-Laurence; de la Rie, E René

    2008-09-01

    Brown lines were generated at the wet-dry interface on Whatman paper No. 1 by suspending the sheet vertically in deionized water. Formic acid and acetic acid were quantified in three areas of the paper defined by the wet-dry boundary (above, below, and at the tideline) using capillary zone electrophoresis with indirect UV detection. Their concentration increased upon accelerated aging of the paper and was highest in the tideline. The hydroperoxides have been quantified using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection based on the determination of triphenylphosphine oxide produced from the reaction with triphenylphosphine, and their highest concentration was found in the tideline as well. For the first time, it was shown that various types of hydroperoxides were present, water-soluble and non-water-soluble, most probably in part hydroperoxide functionalized cellulose. After accelerated aging, a significant increase in hydroperoxide concentration was found in all the paper areas. The molar masses of cellulose determined using size-exclusion chromatography with multiangle light scattering detection showed that, upon aging, cellulose degraded significantly more in the tideline area than in the other areas of the paper. The area below the tideline was more degraded than the area above. A kinetic study of the degradation of cellulose allowed determining the constants for glycosidic bond breaking in each of the areas of the paper. PMID:18715033

  16. Influence of management regime and harvest date on the forage quality of rangelands plants: the importance of dry matter content.

    PubMed

    Bumb, Iris; Garnier, Eric; Bastianelli, Denis; Richarte, Jean; Bonnal, Laurent; Kazakou, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their recognized ecological value, relatively little is known about the nutritional value of species-rich rangelands for herbivores. We investigated the sources of variation in dry matter digestibility (DMD), neutral detergent fibre content (NDF) and nitrogen concentration (NC) in plants from species-rich Mediterranean rangelands in southern France, and tested whether the dry matter content (DMC) was a good predictor of the forage quality of different plant parts. Sixteen plant species with contrasting growth forms (rosette, tussock, extensive and stemmed-herb) were studied, representative of two management regimes imposed in these rangelands: (i) fertilization and intensive grazing and (ii) non-fertilization and moderate grazing. Among the 16 plant species, four species were found in both treatments, allowing us to assess the intraspecific variability in forage quality and DMC across the treatments. The components of nutritional value (DMD, NDF and NC) as well as the DMC of leaves, stems and reproductive plant parts, were assessed at the beginning of the growing season and at peak standing biomass. All components of nutritional value and DMC were affected by species growth form: rosettes had higher DMD and NC than tussocks; the reverse being found for NDF and DMC. As the season progressed, DMD and NC of the different plant parts decreased while NDF and DMC increased for all species. DMC was negatively related to DMD and NC and positively to NDF, regardless of the source of variation (species, harvest date, management regime or plant part). Path analysis indicated that NDF was the main determinant of DMD. Better assessment of forage quality in species-rich systems requires consideration of their growth form composition. DMC of all plant parts, which is closely related to NDF, emerged as a good predictor and easily measured trait to estimate DMD in these species-rich systems. PMID:27339049

  17. Influence of management regime and harvest date on the forage quality of rangelands plants: the importance of dry matter content

    PubMed Central

    Bumb, Iris; Garnier, Eric; Bastianelli, Denis; Richarte, Jean; Bonnal, Laurent; Kazakou, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their recognized ecological value, relatively little is known about the nutritional value of species-rich rangelands for herbivores. We investigated the sources of variation in dry matter digestibility (DMD), neutral detergent fibre content (NDF) and nitrogen concentration (NC) in plants from species-rich Mediterranean rangelands in southern France, and tested whether the dry matter content (DMC) was a good predictor of the forage quality of different plant parts. Sixteen plant species with contrasting growth forms (rosette, tussock, extensive and stemmed-herb) were studied, representative of two management regimes imposed in these rangelands: (i) fertilization and intensive grazing and (ii) non-fertilization and moderate grazing. Among the 16 plant species, four species were found in both treatments, allowing us to assess the intraspecific variability in forage quality and DMC across the treatments. The components of nutritional value (DMD, NDF and NC) as well as the DMC of leaves, stems and reproductive plant parts, were assessed at the beginning of the growing season and at peak standing biomass. All components of nutritional value and DMC were affected by species growth form: rosettes had higher DMD and NC than tussocks; the reverse being found for NDF and DMC. As the season progressed, DMD and NC of the different plant parts decreased while NDF and DMC increased for all species. DMC was negatively related to DMD and NC and positively to NDF, regardless of the source of variation (species, harvest date, management regime or plant part). Path analysis indicated that NDF was the main determinant of DMD. Better assessment of forage quality in species-rich systems requires consideration of their growth form composition. DMC of all plant parts, which is closely related to NDF, emerged as a good predictor and easily measured trait to estimate DMD in these species-rich systems. PMID:27339049

  18. Recovery of aboveground plant biomass and productivity after fire in mesic and dry black spruce forests of interior Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mack, M.C.; Treseder, K.K.; Manies, K.L.; Harden, J.W.; Schuur, E.A.G.; Vogel, J.G.; Randerson, J.T.; Chapin, F. S., III

    2008-01-01

    Plant biomass accumulation and productivity are important determinants of ecosystem carbon (C) balance during post-fire succession. In boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) forests near Delta Junction, Alaska, we quantified aboveground plant biomass and net primary productivity (ANPP) for 4 years after a 1999 wildfire in a well-drained (dry) site, and also across a dry and a moderately well-drained (mesic) chronosequence of sites that varied in time since fire (2 to ???116 years). Four years after fire, total biomass at the 1999 burn site had increased exponentially to 160 ?? 21 g m-2 (mean ?? 1SE) and vascular ANPP had recovered to 138 ?? 32 g m-2 y -1, which was not different than that of a nearby unburned stand (160 ?? 48 g m-2 y-1) that had similar pre-fire stand structure and understory composition. Production in the young site was dominated by re-sprouting graminoids, whereas production in the unburned site was dominated by black spruce. On the dry and mesic chronosequences, total biomass pools, including overstory and understory vascular and non-vascular plants, and lichens, increased logarithmically (dry) or linearly (mesic) with increasing site age, reaching a maximum of 2469 ?? 180 (dry) and 4008 ?? 233 g m-2 (mesic) in mature stands. Biomass differences were primarily due to higher tree density in the mesic sites because mass per tree was similar between sites. ANPP of vascular and non-vascular plants increased linearly over time in the mesic chronosequence to 335 ?? 68 g m-2 y -1 in the mature site, but in the dry chronosequence it peaked at 410 ?? 43 g m-2 y-1 in a 15-year-old stand dominated by deciduous trees and shrubs. Key factors regulating biomass accumulation and production in these ecosystems appear to be the abundance and composition of re-sprouting species early in succession, the abundance of deciduous trees and shrubs in intermediate aged stands, and the density of black spruce across all stand ages. A better understanding of the controls

  19. PCB decomposition and formation in thermal treatment plant equipment.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yukari; Noma, Yukio; Yamamoto, Takashi; Mori, Yoshihito; Sakai, Shin-ichi

    2007-04-01

    In this study we investigated both the decomposition and unintentional formation of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners during combustion experiments of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) and automobile shredder residue (ASR) at several stages in thermal treatment plant equipment composed of a primary combustion chamber, a secondary combustion chamber, and other equipments for flue gas treatment. In both experiments, the unintentional formation of PCB occurred in the primary combustion chamber at the same time as the decomposition of PCB in input samples. By combusting RDF, non-ortho-PCB predominantly formed, whereas ortho-PCB and symmetric chlorinated biphenyls (e.g., #52/69, #87/108, and #151) tended to be decomposed. ASR formed the higher chlorinated biphenyls more than RDF. These by-products from ASR had no structural relation with ortho-chlorine. Lower chlorinated biphenyls appeared as predominant homologues at the final exit site, while all congeners from lower to higher chlorinated PCB were unintentionally formed as by-products in the primary combustion chamber. This result showed that the flue gas treatment equipments effectively removed higher chlorinated PCB. Input marker congeners of RDF were #11, #39, and #68, while those for ASR were #11, #101, #110/120, and #118. Otherwise, combustion marker congeners of RDF were #13/12, #35, #77, and #126, while those for ASR were #170, #194, #206, and #209. While the concentration of PCB increased significantly in the primary combustion chamber, the value of toxicity equivalency quantity for dioxin-like PCB decreased in the secondary combustion chamber and the flue gas treatment equipments. PMID:17134732

  20. Exogenous application of methyl jasmonate induces a defense response and resistance against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum in dry bean plants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marília Barros; Junior, Murillo Lobo; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima; Petrofeza, Silvana

    2015-06-15

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes a disease known as white mold, which is a major problem for dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and other crops in many growing areas in Brazil. To investigate the role of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) in defending dry bean plants against S. sclerotiorum, we used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) of cDNA and identified genes that are differentially expressed during plant-pathogen interactions after treatment. Exogenous MeJA application enhanced resistance to the pathogen, and SSH analyses led to the identification of 94 unigenes, presumably involved in a variety of functions, which were classified into several functional categories, including metabolism, signal transduction, protein biogenesis and degradation, and cell defense and rescue. Using RT-qPCR, some unigenes were found to be differentially expressed in a time-dependent manner in dry bean plants during the interaction with S. sclerotiorum after MeJA treatment, including the pathogenesis-related protein PR3 (chitinase), PvCallose (callose synthase), PvNBS-LRR (NBS-LRR resistance-like protein), PvF-box (F-box family protein-like), and a polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP). Based on these expression data, the putative roles of differentially expressed genes were discussed in relation to the disease and MeJA resistance induction. Changes in the activity of the pathogenesis-related proteins β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and peroxidase in plants after MeJA treatment and following inoculation of the pathogen were also investigated as molecular markers of induced resistance. Foliar application of MeJA induced partial resistance against S. sclerotiorum in plants as well as a consistent increase in pathogenesis-related protein activities. Our findings provide new insights into the physiological and molecular mechanisms of resistance induced by MeJA in the P. vulgaris-S. sclerotiorum pathosystem

  1. Mathematical modeling of pattern formation caused by drying of colloidal film under a mask.

    PubMed

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu; Vodolazskaya, Irina V; Sakharova, Lyudmila V

    2016-02-01

    In our model, we simulate an experiment (D.J. Harris, H. Hu, J.C. Conrad, J.A. Lewis, Patterning colloidal films via evaporative lithography, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 148301 (2007)). A thin colloidal sessile droplet is allowed to dry out on a horizontal hydrophilic surface. A mask just above the droplet predominantly allows evaporation from the droplet free surface directly beneath the holes in the mask. We consider one special case, when the holes in the mask are arranged so that the system has rotational symmetry of order m . We use a speculative evaporative flux to mimic the real system. Advection, diffusion, and sedimentation are taken into account. FlexPDE is utilized to solve an advection-diffusion equation using the finite element method. The simulation demonstrates that the colloidal particles accumulate below the holes as the solvent evaporates. Diffusion can reduce this accumulation. PMID:26920529

  2. [Indoor simulation on dew formation on plant leaves].

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhi-Yong; Wang, You-Ke; Wei, Xin-Guang; Liu, Shou-Yang; He, Zi-Li; Zhou, Yu-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Dew forming on plant leaves through water condensation plays a significant ecological role in arid and semi-arid areas as an ignorable fraction of water resources. In this study, an artificial intelligent climate chamber and an automatic temperature-control system for leaves were implemented to regulate the ambient temperature, the leaf surface temperature and the leaf inclination for dew formation. The impact of leaf inclination, ambient temperature and dew point-leaf temperature depression on the rate and quantity of dew accumulation on leaf surface were analyzed. The results indicated that the accumulation rate and the maximum volume of dew on leaves decreased with increasing the leaf inclination while increased with the increment of dew point-leaf temperature depression, ambient temperature and relative humidity. Under the horizontal configuration, dew accumulated linearly on leaf surface over time until the maximum volume (0.80 mm) was reached. However, dew would fall down after reaching the maximum volume when the leaf inclination existed (45 degrees or 90 degrees), significantly slowing down the accumulative rate, and the zigzag pattern for the dynamic of dew accumulation appeared. PMID:24984489

  3. Soil-plant-atmosphere processes along an elevation gradient in a dry alpine valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Chiesa, Stefano; Bertoldi, Giacomo; Niedrist, Georg Georg; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2013-04-01

    In mountain regions soil-plant-atmosphere processes exhibit rapid changes within short distance due to the complex pattern of topography and atmospheric processes. An elevation transect can be seen as a proxy of climate change (CC), as it affects air temperature, precipitation amount and its partitioning into snow and rain, snow cover duration, and the resulting changing length of vegetation period. In order to quantitatively investigate the exchange of energy, water and carbon with respect to elevation for mountain grassland ecosystems within an inner dry alpine valley, a transect of three micro-meteorological stations was established since 2009 in the Venosta valley (South Tyrol, Italy). It has been designed with three stations, with an elevation difference among the stations of 500 m, which means an average temperature gradient of 2.7 K. In this contribution, the GEOtop-dv model was employed to simulate the effects of the elevation gradient on snow, soil moisture, evapotranspiration (ET) and above ground net primary production (ANPP) dynamics in two years with different climatic conditions. Simulations have been validated with observations of soil moisture, snow height, ANPP and eddy-covariance measured ET. Considering the observed contrasting natural trends of increasing precipitation and of decreasing temperature with higher elevation, numerical simulation results show that, in this type of climate, snow dynamics are highly nonlinear with the elevation due to differential precipitation partitioning in early winter and spring. Despite the relatively cold climatic conditions, soil moisture dynamics indicate that severe drought occurs in the bottom of the valley, while at the higher elevations cold temperatures limit growing season duration, and therefore ET and ANPP. Those contrasting trends result in an optimal altitude at about 1400 m a.s.l., where temperature and water availability are optimal in terms of maximum annual ET and ANPP. Our results indicate that

  4. Formation dry-out from CO2 injection into saline aquifers: Part 1, Effects of solids precipitation and their mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, Karsten; Muller, Nadja

    2009-02-01

    Injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers may cause formation dry-out and precipitation of salt near the injection well, which may reduce formation porosity, permeability, and injectivity. This paper uses numerical simulation to explore the role of different processes and parameters in the salt precipitation process and to examine injection strategies that could mitigate the effects. The main physical mechanisms affecting the dry-out and salt precipitation process include (1) displacement of brine away from the injection well by injected CO{sub 2}, (2) dissolution (evaporation) of brine into the flowing CO{sub 2} stream, (3) upflow of CO{sub 2} due to gravity effects (buoyancy), (4) backflow of brine toward the injection point due to capillary pressure gradients that oppose the pressure gradient in the CO{sub 2}-rich ('gas') phase, and (5) molecular diffusion of dissolved salt. The different mechanisms operate on a range of spatial scales. CO{sub 2} injection at constant rate into a homogeneous reservoir with uniform initial conditions is simulated in 1-D radial geometry, to resolve multiscale processes by taking advantage of the similarity property, i.e., the evolution of system conditions as a function of radial distance R and time t depends only on the similarity variable R{sup 2}/t. Simulations in 2-D vertical cross sections are used to examine the role of gravity effects. We find that counterflow of CO{sub 2} and brine can greatly increase aqueous phase salinity and can promote substantial salt precipitation even in formations with low dissolved solids. Salt precipitation can accentuate effects of gravity override. We find that injecting a slug of fresh water prior to commencement of CO{sub 2} injection can reduce salt precipitation and permeability loss near the injection well.

  5. Wastewater treatment by batch adsorption method onto micro-particles of dried Withania frutescens plant as a new adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Chiban, Mohamed; Soudani, Amina; Sinan, Fouad; Persin, Michel

    2012-03-01

    A new adsorbent for removing metallic elements, nitrate and phosphate ions from municipal and industrial wastewaters has been investigated. This new adsorbent consists of micro-particles of dried Withania frutescens plant (<500 μm). Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the removal of metallic elements and anions from raw wastewaters by W. frutescens particles. The results show that the micro-particles of W. frutescens plant presented a good adsorption of metallic elements, nitrate and phosphate ions from both real wastewaters. This adsorption increased with increasing of contact time. The percentage of metallic elements removal from industrial wastewater by W. frutescens plant was 98 ≈ 99% for Pb(II), 92 ≈ 93% for Cd(II), 91 ≈ 92% for Cu(II) and 92 ≈ 93% for Zn(II). The maximum adsorption capacity was dependent on the type of ions. The results also indicate that the values of chemical oxygen demand (COD) decrease after the contact with W. frutescens particles. Based on the results it can be concluded that the dried W. frutescens plant appears to be an economical and environmentally friendly material for wastewater treatment. PMID:21803480

  6. Accelerated thermokarst formation in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Levy, Joseph S; Fountain, Andrew G; Dickson, James L; Head, James W; Okal, Marianne; Marchant, David R; Watters, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Thermokarst is a land surface lowered and disrupted by melting ground ice. Thermokarst is a major driver of landscape change in the Arctic, but has been considered to be a minor process in Antarctica. Here, we use ground-based and airborne LiDAR coupled with timelapse imaging and meteorological data to show that 1) thermokarst formation has accelerated in Garwood Valley, Antarctica; 2) the rate of thermokarst erosion is presently ~ 10 times the average Holocene rate; and 3) the increased rate of thermokarst formation is driven most strongly by increasing insolation and sediment/albedo feedbacks. This suggests that sediment enhancement of insolation-driven melting may act similarly to expected increases in Antarctic air temperature (presently occurring along the Antarctic Peninsula), and may serve as a leading indicator of imminent landscape change in Antarctica that will generate thermokarst landforms similar to those in Arctic periglacial terrains. PMID:23881292

  7. Accelerated thermokarst formation in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Joseph S.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Dickson, James L.; Head, James W.; Okal, Marianne; Marchant, David R.; Watters, Jaclyn

    2013-01-01

    Thermokarst is a land surface lowered and disrupted by melting ground ice. Thermokarst is a major driver of landscape change in the Arctic, but has been considered to be a minor process in Antarctica. Here, we use ground-based and airborne LiDAR coupled with timelapse imaging and meteorological data to show that 1) thermokarst formation has accelerated in Garwood Valley, Antarctica; 2) the rate of thermokarst erosion is presently ~ 10 times the average Holocene rate; and 3) the increased rate of thermokarst formation is driven most strongly by increasing insolation and sediment/albedo feedbacks. This suggests that sediment enhancement of insolation-driven melting may act similarly to expected increases in Antarctic air temperature (presently occurring along the Antarctic Peninsula), and may serve as a leading indicator of imminent landscape change in Antarctica that will generate thermokarst landforms similar to those in Arctic periglacial terrains. PMID:23881292

  8. Study of a dry room in a battery manufacturing plant using a process model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Nelson, Paul A.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2016-09-01

    The manufacture of lithium ion batteries requires some processing steps to be carried out in a dry room, where the moisture content should remain below 100 parts per million. The design and operation of such a dry room adds to the cost of the battery. This paper studied the humidity management of the air to and from the dry room to understand the impact of design and operating parameters on the energy demand and the cost contribution towards the battery manufacturing cost. The study was conducted with the help of a process model for a dry room with a volume of 16,000 cubic meters. For a defined base case scenario it was found that the dry room operation has an energy demand of approximately 400 kW. The paper explores some tradeoffs in design and operating parameters by looking at the humidity reduction by quenching the make-up air vs. at the desiccant wheel, and the impact of the heat recovery from the desiccant regeneration cycle.

  9. User's guide for the BNW-III optimization code for modular dry/wet-cooled power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    This user's guide describes BNW-III, a computer code developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the Dry Cooling Enhancement Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The BNW-III code models a modular dry/wet cooling system for a nuclear or fossil fuel power plant. The purpose of this guide is to give the code user a brief description of what the BNW-III code is and how to use it. It describes the cooling system being modeled and the various models used. A detailed description of code input and code output is also included. The BNW-III code was developed to analyze a specific cooling system layout. However, there is a large degree of freedom in the type of cooling modules that can be selected and in the performance of those modules. The costs of the modules are input to the code, giving the user a great deal of flexibility.

  10. Analysis of liquid water formation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell flow fields with a dry cathode supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gößling, Sönke; Klages, Merle; Haußmann, Jan; Beckhaus, Peter; Messerschmidt, Matthias; Arlt, Tobias; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Manke, Ingo; Scholta, Joachim; Heinzel, Angelika

    2016-02-01

    PEM fuel cells can be operated within a wide range of different operating conditions. In this paper, the special case of operating a PEM fuel cell with a dry cathode supply and without external humidification of the cathode, is considered. A deeper understanding of the water management in the cells is essential for choosing the optimal operation strategy for a specific system. In this study a theoretical model is presented which aims to predict the location in the flow field at which liquid water forms at the cathode. It is validated with neutron images of a PEM fuel cell visualizing the locations at which liquid water forms in the fuel cell flow field channels. It is shown that the inclusion of the GDL diffusion resistance in the model is essential to describe the liquid water formation process inside the fuel cell. Good agreement of model predictions and measurement results has been achieved. While the model has been developed and validated especially for the operation with a dry cathode supply, the model is also applicable to fuel cells with a humidified cathode stream.

  11. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Wei Zhang

    2004-10-01

    This is the seventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with lignite and Powder River Basin coals to determine the effects of inlet air moisture level on the equilibrium relationship between coal moisture and exit air relative humidity and temperature. The results show that, for lignite, there is a slight dependence of equilibrium moisture on inlet humidity level. However, the equilibrium relationship for PRB coal appears to be independent of inlet air humidity level. The specific equilibrium model used for computing lignite coal dryer performance has a significant effect on the prediction accuracy for exit air relative humidity; but its effects on predicted coal product moisture, exit air temperature and specific humidity are minimal. Analyses were performed to determine the effect of lignite product moisture on unit performance for a high temperature drying system. With this process design, energy for drying is obtained from the hot flue gas entering the air preheater and the hot circulating cooling water leaving the steam condenser. Comparisons were made to the same boiler operating with lignite which had been dried off-site.

  12. Response of weeds and ornamental plants to potting soil amended with dried distillers grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) is a byproduct of ethanol produced from corn and developing new uses for DDGS could increase the profitability of ethanol production. This research evaluated DDGS as a soil amendment to container grown ornamentals to suppress weeds. Adding DDGS to a com...

  13. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Hugo Caram; Zheng Yao; Gu Feng

    2003-10-01

    This is the third Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A description is given of the equipment, instrumentation and procedures being used for the fluidized bed drying experiments. Laboratory data are presented on the effects of bed depth on drying rate. These show that drying rate decreased strongly with an increase in bed depth as the settled bed depth varied from 0.25 to 0.65 m. These tests were performed with North Dakota lignite having a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) top size, constant inlet air and heater surface temperatures, constant rate of heat addition per unit initial mass of wet coal and constant superficial air velocity. A theoretical model of the batch dryer is described. This model uses the equations for conservation of mass and energy and empirical data on the relationship between relative humidity of the air and coal moisture content at equilibrium. Outputs of the model are coal moisture content, bed temperature, and specific humidity of the outlet air as functions of time. Preliminary comparisons of the model to laboratory drying data show very good agreement.

  14. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy

    2003-03-01

    This is the first Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A description is given of the equipment and instrumentation being used for the fluidized bed drying experiments. Results of fluidization and drying tests performed with North Dakota lignite, having a 6.35 mm (1/4 inch) top size, are presented. The experiments were performed with a 381 mm (15 inch) settled bed depth, with inlet air and in-bed heater surface temperatures of 44.3 C (110 F), and with the superficial air velocity ranging from 0.2 m/s to 1.4 m/s. Drying rate is shown to be a strong function of air velocity, increasing seven-fold from 0.2 m/s to 1.4 m/s. Increases in velocity from 0.75 m/s (minimum fluidization velocity) to 1.4 m/s resulted in a doubling of the drying rate.

  15. Climatic, ecophysiological and phenological controls on plant ecohydrological strategies in seasonally dry ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large areas of tropical and mid-latitude regions are characterized by a pronounced seasonality and extreme inter-annual rainfall variability, which places local ecosystems under unique patterns of water availability, temperature, and irradiance. Despite the importance of these seasonally dry ecosyst...

  16. Three air quality studies: Great Lakes ozone formation and nitrogen dry deposition; and Tucson aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 was promulgated after thousands of lives were lost in four catastrophic air pollution events. It authorized the establishment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards or (NAAQS) for six pollutants that are harmful to human health and welfare: carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, ozone and sulfur dioxide. The Clean Air Act also led to the establishment of the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to set and enforce regulations. The first paper in this dissertation studies ozone in the Lake Michigan region (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Jacko, R., Hillery, J., 2011. Lake Michigan air quality: The 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP). Atmospheric Environment 45, 3192-3202.) The Chicago-Milwaukee-Gary metropolitan area has been unable to meet the ozone NAAQS since the Clean Air Act was implemented. The Lake Michigan Air Directors' Consortium (LADCO) hypothesized that land breezes transport ozone precursor compounds over the lake, where a large air/water temperature difference creates a shallow conduction layer, which is an efficient reaction chamber for ozone formation. In the afternoon, lake breezes and prevailing synoptic winds then transport ozone back over the land. To further evaluate this hypothesis, LADCO sponsored the 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP) to measure the air quality over Lake Michigan and the surrounding areas. This study has found that the LAP data supports this hypothesis of ozone formation, which has strong implications for ozone control strategies in the Lake Michigan region. The second paper is this dissertation (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Wolf, A.M.A., 2012. Ambient PM10 and metal concentrations measured in the Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, Arizona. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 43, 67-76) evaluated the airborne concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 microns or less) and eight metalloids and metals

  17. Nitrogen and dry-matter partitioning in soybean plants during onset of and recovery from nitrogen stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolley-Henry, L.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    The study tested the hypothesis that resupplying nitrogen after a period of nitrogen stress leads to restoration of the balance between root and shoot growth and normal functional activity. Nonnodulated soybean plants were grown hydroponically for 14 days with 1.0 mM NO3- in a complete nutrient solution. One set of plants was continued on the complete nutrient solution for 25 days; a second set was given 0.0 mM NO3- for 25 days; and the third set was given 0.0 mM NO3- for 10 days followed by transfer to the complete solution with 1.0 mM NO3- for 15 days. In continuously nitrogen-stressed plants, emergence and expansion of main-stem and branch leaves were severely inhibited as low nitrogen content limited further growth. This was followed by a shift in partitioning of dry matter from the leaves to the roots, resulting in an initial stimulation of root growth and a decreased shoot:root ratio. Reduced nitrogen also was redistributed from the leaves into the stem and roots. When nitrogen stress was relieved, leaf initiation and expansion were renewed. With the restoration of the balance between root and shoot function, the shoot:root ratio and distribution of reduced nitrogen within the plant organs returned to levels similar to those of nonstressed plants.

  18. High dry matter whole-plant corn as a biomass feedstock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research investigated the harvest, ambient pre-treatment, and storage of whole-plant corn as an alternative to conventional systems whereby corn grain and stover are fractionated at harvest. Harvesting the whole-plant, both grain and most of the above ground stover, after physiological maturity...

  19. Microautoradiography of Water-Soluble Compounds in Plant Tissue after Freeze-Drying and Pressure Infiltration with Epoxy Resin

    PubMed Central

    Vogelmann, Thomas C.; Dickson, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    It is difficult to retain and localize radioactive, water-soluble compounds within plant cells. Existing techniques retain water-soluble compounds with varying rates of efficiency and are limited to processing only a few samples at one time. We developed a modified pressure infiltration technique for the preparation of microautoradiographs of 14C-labeled, water-soluble compounds in plant tissue. Samples from cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) labeled with 14C were excised, quick frozen in liquid N2, freeze-dried at −50°C, and pressure-infiltrated with epoxy resin without intermediate solvents or prolonged incubation times. The technique facilitates the mass processing of samples for microautoradiography, gives good cellular retention of labeled water-soluble compounds, and is highly reproducible. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16662542

  20. Recent field studies of dry deposition to surfaces in plant canopies

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, S.E.; Lovett, G.M.; Bondietti, E.A.; Davidson, C.I.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of field techniques were used to assess the dry deposition of sulfur. In a deciduous forest canopy in eastern Tennessee, inert petri plates and adjacent chestnut oak leaves showed similar SO/sub 4//sup -2/ deposition velocities of about 0.1 cm s/sup -1/. In the same forest, statistical analysis of throughfall yielded a deposition velocity of 0.48 cm s/sup -1/ for total sulfur (SO/sub 4//sup -2/ plus SO/sub 2/). The throughfall technique appears useful for scaling individual surface measurements to larger spatial and temporal scales. On a grassy field in Illinois, flat Teflon plates, petri dishes, and dustfall buckets were exposed side by side. Measured sulfate deposition increased with increasing rim height on the collection surface, and deposition velocities ranged from 0.14 to 0.70 cm s/sup -1/. Much of the deposition to these surfaces can be attributed to large-particle SO/sub 4//sup -2/. Dry season (summer) deposition velocities of /sup 7/Be in California were found to be similar to dry deposition velocities of /sup 212/Pb in Tennessee, ranging from 0.18 to 0.35 cm s/sup -1/. These natural radionuclides attach to submicron aerosols in the atmosphere and may be useful tracers of submicron SO/sub 4//sup -2/ deposition. 9 references, 5 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Knowledge, use and management of native wild edible plants from a seasonal dry forest (NE, Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite being an ancient practice that satisfies basic human needs, the use of wild edible plants tends to be forgotten along with associated knowledge in rural communities. The objective of this work is to analyze existing relationships between knowledge, use, and management of native wild edible plants and socioeconomic factors such as age, gender, family income, individual income, past occupation and current occupation. Methods The field work took place between 2009 and 2010 in the community of Carão, Altinho municipality, in the state of Pernambuco in northeastern Brazil. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 39 members of the community regarding knowledge, use and management of 14 native wild edible plants from the Caatinga region, corresponding to 12 vegetable species. In parallel, we documented the socioeconomic aspects of the interviewed population (age, gender, family income, individual income, past occupation and current occupation). Results Knowledge about edible plants was related to age but not to current occupation or use. Current use was not associated with age, gender or occupation. The association between age and past use may indicate abandonment of these resources. Conclusion Because conservation of the species is not endangered by their use but by deforestation of the ecosystems in which these plants grow, we suggest that the promotion and consumption of the plants by community members is convenient and thereby stimulates the appropriation and consequent protection of the ecosystem. To promote consumption of these plants, it is important to begin by teaching people about plant species that can be used for their alimentation, disproving existing myths about plant use, and encouraging diversification of use by motivating the invention of new preparation methods. An example of how this can be achieved is through events like the “Preserves Festival”. PMID:24279311

  2. Dried, ground banana plant leaves (Musa spp.) for the control of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis infections in sheep.

    PubMed

    Gregory, L; Yoshihara, E; Ribeiro, B L M; Silva, L K F; Marques, E C; Meira, E B S; Rossi, R S; Sampaio, P H; Louvandini, H; Hasegawa, M Y

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the anthelmintic effect of Musa spp. leaves, 12 animals were artificially infected with Haemonchus contortus, and another 12 animals were infected with Trichostrongylus colubriformis. Then, both treatment groups were offered 400 g of dried ground banana plant leaves, and the control animals were offered only 1000 g of coast cross hay. During the trials, the animals received weekly physical examinations. The methods used to evaluate the efficiency of this treatment were packed cell volume, total plasma protein and faecal egg counts, and egg hatchability tests were performed on days -2, +3, +6, +9, +13 and +15. Coproculture tests were performed on day -2 to confirm monospecific infections. In the FEC and EHT, a statistically significant difference (0.04, 0.005; p < 0.05) was noted for T. colubriformis. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) for Haemochus contortus group in all tests. Our results confirmed previous findings suggesting that dried ground banana plant leaves possess anthelmintic activity. PMID:26350377

  3. FIBER SEPARATED FROM DISTILLERS DRIED GRAINS WITH SOLUBLES AS A FEEDSTOCK FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION TO INCREASE OUTPUT FROM DRY GRIND CORN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the dry grind process, corn starch is converted into sugars which are fermented into ethanol. The remaining corn components (protein, fiber, fat, and ash) form coproduct, distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS). The combination of sieving and elutriation (air classification), known as elus...

  4. Removal of lead and cadmium ions from aqueous solution by adsorption onto micro-particles of dry plants.

    PubMed

    Benhima, H; Chiban, M; Sinan, F; Seta, P; Persin, M

    2008-01-15

    In the present work, Pb(II) and Cd(II) ion adsorption onto inert organic matter (IOM) obtained from ground dried plants: Euphorbia echinus, Launea arborescens, Senecio anthophorbium growing in semi-arid zones of Morocco and Carpobrotus edulis as the Mediterranean plant has been studied. A suspension of plant deroed micro-particles adsorbs lead and cadmium present as ionic species, with a higher affinity for Pb(II). The kinetics and the maximum capacity adsorption depend on the type of plant as well as on the metal ions (atomic weight, ionic radius and electronegativity). The adsorption process is affected by various parameters such as contact time, solution volume to mass of plant particles ratio (m/V), particle size, solution pH and metal concentration. A dose of 25 g/l of adsorbent was optimal to obtain maximum adsorption of both metal ions. The maximum metal uptake was obtained with particles of organic matter of <50 microm. As to classical ionic adsorption phenomena, the adsorption of both metal ions increases with the increase of the initial concentration in the solution. For the two metal cations, the uptake efficiency of the studied plants ranged from: C. edulis>E. echinus>S. anthophorbium>L. arborescens, however, the differences are rather small. Two different waste water types (domestic and industrial) were tested and good results were obtained for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) at more than 90%. The removal of the metal and mineral ions waste water was observed for PO(4)(3-) at 88%, for NO(3)(-) at 96.5% and for metal ions (Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II)) at about 100%, using IOM as absorbent. PMID:17869071

  5. Optimization of struvite fertilizer formation from baker's yeast wastewater: growth and nutrition of maize and tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Ayla; Demir, Sinan; Sayilgan, Emine; Eraslan, Figen; Kucukyumuk, Zeliha

    2014-03-01

    Struvite precipitate obtained from yeast industry anaerobic effluent with high ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) was investigated for fertilizer effect on plant growth and nutrition according to applications of N, nitrogen/phosphorus/potassium (NPK), and control. Optimum struvite formation conditions were determined via Box-Behnken design. Optimum condition was obtained at pH 9.0 and Mg/N/P molar ratio of 1.5:1:1. Under these conditions, heavy metal concentrations in the obtained struvite precipitate (except Cu) were below the detection limits. In addition to high N, P, and Mg content, energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis showed that the struvite also included the nutritional elements Ca, K, Na, and Fe. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed the complex structures of NaAl(SO4)2(H2O)12, NaMn(2+)Fe2(PO4)3, and (Na2,Ca)O2(Fe,Mn)O.P2O5 in the precipitate. High Na(+) and Ca(2+) concentrations in the anaerobic effluent reacted with phosphate during struvite precipitation. Different applications and struvite dosages significantly affected fresh and dry weights and nutrient element uptakes by plants (P < 0.05). N, P, and Mg uptakes of plants were significantly higher at struvite ×2, ×3, and ×4 dosages compared with NPK application. For adequate nutrition and supply of optimum dry weight, struvite ×2 dosage (5.71 g struvite/kg soil) was found appropriate for both maize and tomato plants. PMID:24217971

  6. Investigation of the chemical pathway of gaseous nitrogen dioxide formation during flue gas desulfurization with dry sodium bicarbonate injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Antoinette Weil

    The chemical reaction pathway for the viable flue gas desulfurization process, dry sodium bicarbonate injection, was investigated to mitigate undesirable plume discoloration. Based on a foundation of past findings, a simplified three-step reaction pathway was hypothesized for the formation of the plume-discoloring constituent, NO2. As the first step, it was hypothesized that sodium sulfite formed by sodium bicarbonate reaction with flue gas SO 2. As the second step, it was hypothesized that sodium nitrate formed by sodium sulfite reaction with flue gas NO. And as the third step, it was hypothesized that NO2 and sodium sulfate formed by sodium nitrate reaction with SO2. The second and third hypothesized steps were experimentally investigated using an isothermal fixed bed reactor. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium sulfite was found to be un-reactive with NO and O2. Freshly prepared sodium sulfite, maintained unexposed to moist air, was shown to react with NO and O2 resulting in a mixture of sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate together with a significant temperature rise. This reaction was found to proceed only when oxygen was present in the flue gas. As reported in the past, technical grade sodium nitrate was shown to be un-reactive with SO2. But freshly formed sodium nitrate kept unexposed to humidity was found to be reactive with SO2 and O 2 resulting in the formation of NO2 and sodium sulfate polymorphic Form I. The NO2 formation by this reaction was shown to be temperature dependent with maximum formation at 175°C. Plume mitigation methods were studied based on the validated three-step reaction pathway. Mitigation of NO2 was exhibited by limiting oxygen concentration in the flue gas to a level below 5%. It was also shown that significant NO2 mitigation was achieved by operating below 110°C or above 250°C. An innovative NO2 mitigation method was patented as a result of the findings of this study. The patented process incorporated a process step of

  7. High-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar age constraints on the basal Lanqi Formation and its implications for the origin of angiosperm plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Su-chin; Zhang, Haichun; Renne, Paul R.; Fang, Yan

    2009-03-01

    Abundant Mesozoic terrestrial fossils were discovered in the Haifanggou Formation and the overlying Lanqi Formation in northeastern China. The recent discovery of Schmeissneria sinensis from the Haifanggou Formation provides evidence that the origin of angiosperms could be much earlier than previously believed. 92 taxa of plant fossils from the Lanqi Formation provide unique opportunities to understand the floral evolution and its diversification in the Mesozoic. Here we present robust high-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar data of 160.7 ± 0.4 Ma and 158.7 ± 0.6 Ma for two tuffs from the lowest part of the Lanqi Formation near the main outcrop of floral fossils in Beipiao City, Liaoning, China. Our age results indicate the whole Lanqi Formation was deposited in the Late Jurassic; consequently, the underlying Haifanggou Formation and Schmeissneria sinensis are at least Middle Jurassic in age. Besides its importance for floral evolution, our high-precision age results for the basal Lanqi Formation indicate the paleoenvironment in the north margin of the North China Craton was dry and hot in the Late Jurassic. Moreover, the new age data for the basal Lanqi Formation suggest that the unearthed fossils from the Haifanggou Formation and Lanqi Formation should be equivalent to the Daohugou Biota in Inner Mongolia, China.

  8. Medicinal plants in the healing of dry socket in rats: microbiological and microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    de Melo Júnior, E J M; Raposo, M J; Lisboa Neto, J A; Diniz, M F A; Marcelino Júnior, C A C; Sant'Ana, A E G

    2002-03-01

    The effectiveness of medicinal herbs as antimicrobial agents was tested on isolated microorganisms from an induced alveolitis and on alveolitis in rats. Sixteen ethanolic extracts from plants were prepared and tested. The plant materials were selected from ethnobotanic data and the best result was obtained with Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi. The activity on Enterococcus, Bacillus corineforme, Streptococcus viridans and S. beta-hemolytic was better than the one presented by the antibiotic currently used for the treatment of alveolitis. The extract of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi has shown good wound-healing activity by histological analysis. PMID:11995943

  9. Adaptive transgenerational plasticity in an annual plant: grandparental and parental drought stress enhance performance of seedlings in dry soil.

    PubMed

    Herman, Jacob J; Sultan, Sonia E; Horgan-Kobelski, Tim; Riggs, Charlotte

    2012-07-01

    Stressful parental (usually maternal) environments can dramatically influence expression of traits in offspring, in some cases resulting in phenotypes that are adaptive to the inducing stress. The ecological and evolutionary impact of such transgenerational plasticity depends on both its persistence across generations and its adaptive value. Few studies have examined both aspects of transgenerational plasticity within a given system. Here we report the results of a growth-chamber study of adaptive transgenerational plasticity across two generations, using the widespread annual plant Polygonum persicaria as a naturally evolved model system. We grew five inbred Polygonum genetic lines in controlled dry vs. moist soil environments for two generations in a fully factorial design, producing replicate individuals of each genetic line with all permutations of grandparental and parental environment. We then measured the effects of these two-generational stress histories on traits critical for functioning in dry soil, in a third (grandchild) generation of seedling offspring raised in the dry treatment. Both grandparental and parental moisture environment significantly influenced seedling development: seedlings of drought-stressed grandparents or parents produced longer root systems that extended deeper and faster into dry soil compared with seedlings of the same genetic lines whose grandparents and/or parents had been amply watered. Offspring of stressed individuals also grew to a greater biomass than offspring of nonstressed parents and grandparents. Importantly, the effects of drought were cumulative over the course of two generations: when both grandparents and parents were drought-stressed, offspring had the greatest provisioning, germinated earliest, and developed into the largest seedlings with the most extensive root systems. Along with these functionally appropriate developmental effects, seedlings produced after two previous drought-stressed generations had

  10. Biocides in urban wastewater treatment plant influent at dry and wet weather: concentrations, mass flows and possible sources.

    PubMed

    Bollmann, Ulla E; Tang, Camilla; Eriksson, Eva; Jönsson, Karin; Vollertsen, Jes; Bester, Kai

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, exterior thermal insulation systems became more and more important leading to an increasing amount of houses equipped with biocide-containing organic façade coatings or fungicide treated wood. It is known that these biocides, e.g. terbutryn, carbendazim, and diuron, as well as wood preservatives as propiconazole, leach out of the material through contact with wind driven rain. Hence, they are present in combined sewage during rain events in concentrations up to several hundred ng L(-1). The present study focused on the occurrence of these biocides in five wastewater treatment plants in Denmark and Sweden during dry and wet weather. It was discovered, that biocides are detectable not only during wet weather but also during dry weather when leaching from façade coatings can be excluded as source. In most cases, the concentrations during dry weather were in the same range as during wet weather (up to 100 ng L(-1)); however, for propiconazole noteworthy high concentrations were detected in one catchment (4.5 μg L(-1)). Time resolved sampling (12 × 2 h) enabled assessments about possible sources. The highest mass loads during wet weather were detected when the rain was heaviest (e.g. up to 116 mg h(-1) carbendazim or 73 mg h(-1) mecoprop) supporting the hypothesis that the biocides were washed off by wind driven rain. Contrary, the biocide emissions during dry weather were rather related to household activities than with emissions from buildings, i.e., emissions were highest during morning and evening hours (up to 50 mg h(-1)). Emissions during night were significantly lower than during daytime. Only for propiconazole a different emission behaviour during dry weather was observed: the mass load peaked in the late afternoon (3 g h(-1)) and declined slowly afterwards. Most likely this emission was caused by a point source, possibly from inappropriate cleaning of spray equipment for agriculture or gardening. PMID:24830785

  11. Ethyl Formate Fumigation of Dry and Semidry Date Fruits: Experimental Kinetics, Modeling, and Lethal Effect on Carob Moth.

    PubMed

    Bessi, Haithem; Bellagha, Sihem; Lebdi, Kaouthar Grissa; Bikoba, Veronique; Mitcham, Elizabeth J

    2015-06-01

    Ethyl formate (EF) was studied as a fumigant agent with the objective to replace methyl bromide (MB) for date fruit disinfestations. Date fruits Phoenix dactylifera 'Deglet Nour' with different initial moisture content (16% for dry dates, 20% for semidry dates, and a mixture of the two types) were separately fumigated with EF at different concentrations: 28.6, 57.3, 85.9, and 114.6 g/m3 for 2 h. Experimental data of EF sorption during fumigation was successfully fitted to Peleg's model. This model allows the prediction of the effects of date moisture content and EF concentration on sorption behavior. Samples with different moisture content showed similar EF sorption behavior. Dates were artificially infested with carob moth (Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Zeller)) at different life stages. Eggs, third- and fifth-instars, and pupae were exposed to 28.6, 57.3, 85.9, and 114.6 g/m3 EF for 2 h. Among these life stages, fifth-instars were the most resistant to EF fumigation. A 2-h fumigation with 114.6 g/m3 EF provided complete control of eggs, third-instars, and pupae of carob moth, and generated 91.6% mortality of fifth-instars. A longer fumigation time or higher EF concentration may provide complete control of all life stages of carob moth. PMID:26470221

  12. PLANT FRUCTANS: A NOVEL CLASS OF POLYMERIC PROTECTANTS FOR MEMBRANES DURING DRYING.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fructan (polyfructose)-family of oligo- and polysaccharides is a group of compounds that have for a long time been implicated as protective agents in the drought and freezing tolerance of many plant species. We have shown before that low concentrations (up to 10 mg/mL) of inulins (linear fructos...

  13. FORMATION OF A DETACHED PLUME FROM A CEMENT PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A coordinated study of process, source emissions, and plume sampling was conducted at a coal-fired cement production plant. Both source and plume sampling consisted of particle and gas measurement and characterization. Particulate sampling of both the source and plume addressed p...

  14. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 84-307-1581, Big Dry Creek Plant, Westminister, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, P.

    1985-04-01

    Environmental and breathing-zone samples were analyzed for acrylamide, butyl-acetate, acetic-acid, and hydrogen-sulfide at Big Dry Creek waste water treatment facility, Westminister, Colorado in July and November, 1984. Noise monitoring was also conducted. The survey was requested by a facility representative to evaluate potential health hazards associated with chemicals used in the waste-water-treatment process and from noise. The author concludes that a health hazard from chemical over exposure at the facility does not exist. A potential hazard does exist from noise over exposure. Evaluation of all air compressors, periodic noise monitoring, use of hearing protective devices using EPA noise reduction ratings, and an employee education program about chemical and noise exposure hazards are recommended.

  15. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Gu Feng; Wei Zhang

    2004-04-01

    This is the fifth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A theoretical model, for computing the effects of dryer design and operating conditions on performance of a continuous flow fluidized bed dryer, operating at steady state conditions, is described. Numerical results from the model, compared to data from a pilot scale lignite dryer located at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station, show good agreement. The dryer model was used to perform parametric calculations on the effects of dryer design and operating conditions on dryer performance and required in-bed heat transfer. Other analyses show the first order effects of firing lignite and PRB coals, dried to various moisture levels, on flow rates of coal, combustion air and flue gas, fan and mill power and unit heat rate.

  16. Preschool Children's Explanations of Plant Growth and Rain Formation: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christidou, Vasilia; Hatzinikita, Vassilia

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the different types and characteristics of preschool children's explanations of plant growth and rain formation. The children's explanations were categorized as naturalistic, non-naturalistic, or synthetic, i.e., explanations containing both naturalistic and non-naturalistic parts. In regards to plant growth the children…

  17. Adventitious Root Formation of Forest Trees and Horticultural Plants - From Genes to Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adventitious root formation is a key step in the clonal propagation of forest trees and horticultural crops. Difficulties in forming adventitious roots (ARs) on stem cuttings and plants produced in vitro hinders the propagation of elite trees and efficient production of many horticultural plant spec...

  18. Plant hydraulic responses to long-term dry season nitrogen deposition alter drought tolerance in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Pivovaroff, Alexandria L; Santiago, Louis S; Vourlitis, George L; Grantz, David A; Allen, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition represents a significant N input for many terrestrial ecosystems. N deposition can affect plants on scales ranging from photosynthesis to community composition, yet few studies have investigated how changes in N availability affect plant water relations. We tested the effects of N addition on plant water relations, hydraulic traits, functional traits, gas exchange, and leaf chemistry in a semi-arid ecosystem in Southern California using long-term experimental plots fertilized with N for over a decade. The dominant species were Artemisia california and Salvia mellifera at Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve and Adenostoma fasciculatum and Ceanothus greggii at Sky Oaks Field Station. All species, except Ceanothus, showed increased leaf N concentration, decreased foliar carbon to N ratio, and increased foliar N isotopic composition with fertilization, indicating that added N was taken up by study species, yet each species had a differing physiological response to long-term N addition. Dry season predawn water potentials were less negative with N addition for all species except Adenostoma, but there were no differences in midday water potentials, or wet season water potentials. Artemisia was particularly responsive, as N addition increased stem hydraulic conductivity, stomatal conductance, and leaf carbon isotopic composition, and decreased wood density. The alteration of water relations and drought resistance parameters with N addition in Artemisia, as well as Adenostoma, Ceanothus, and Salvia, indicate that N deposition can affect the ability of native Southern California shrubs to respond to drought. PMID:27017604

  19. Limited influence of dry deposition of semivolatile organic vapors on secondary organic aerosol formation in the urban plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Karl, T.; Camredon, M.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.

    2013-06-01

    The dry deposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its impact on secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are investigated in the Mexico City plume. Gas-phase chemistry and gas-particle partitioning of oxygenated VOCs are modeled with the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) from C3 to C25 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics. Results show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. Dry deposition competes with the gas-particle uptake, and only gases with fewer than ~12 carbons dry deposit while longer species partition to SOA. Because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition, thus increasing their atmospheric burden and lifetime. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass would have been dry deposited.

  20. Single-droplet evaporation kinetics and particle formation in an acoustic levitator. Part 2: drying kinetics and particle formation from microdroplets of aqueous mannitol, trehalose, or catalase.

    PubMed

    Schiffter, Heiko; Lee, Geoffrey

    2007-09-01

    A single droplet drying acoustic levitator has been used to examine the drying behavior of droplets of pharmaceutically relevant solutes used to produce protein-loaded particles via spray-drying. The drying behavior of solution droplets of mannitol, trehalose, or catalase was determined. Evidence of super-saturation of the solute in the droplet surface up to the critical point of drying was obtained. The trehalose achieves a lower degree of super-saturation than does the mannitol before precipitating at the droplet surface. This results in a shorter duration of the constant-rate period, but protracted further drying of this amorphous material. Mannitol achieved a higher degree of super-saturation, and a later critical point with shorter falling-rate period. Measurements of dried particle radius showed that both solutes form hollow particles. The catalase formed holed, hollow particles with characteristic drying rate profiles that correlated well with developing particle morphology. A strong similarity between the morphologies of dried particles of mannitol, trehalose, or catalase produced either in the levitator or in a spray-dryer was found. PMID:17523166

  1. Biofilm formation by enteric pathogens and its role in plant colonization and persistence

    PubMed Central

    Yaron, Sima; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The significant increase in foodborne outbreaks caused by contaminated fresh produce, such as alfalfa sprouts, lettuce, melons, tomatoes and spinach, during the last 30 years stimulated investigation of the mechanisms of persistence of human pathogens on plants. Emerging evidence suggests that Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, which cause the vast majority of fresh produce outbreaks, are able to adhere to and to form biofilms on plants leading to persistence and resistance to disinfection treatments, which subsequently can cause human infections and major outbreaks. In this review, we present the current knowledge about host, bacterial and environmental factors that affect the attachment to plant tissue and the process of biofilm formation by S. enterica and E. coli, and discuss how biofilm formation assists in persistence of pathogens on the plants. Mechanisms used by S. enterica and E. coli to adhere and persist on abiotic surfaces and mammalian cells are partially similar and also used by plant pathogens and symbionts. For example, amyloid curli fimbriae, part of the extracellular matrix of biofilms, frequently contribute to adherence and are upregulated upon adherence and colonization of plant material. Also the major exopolysaccharide of the biofilm matrix, cellulose, is an adherence factor not only of S. enterica and E. coli, but also of plant symbionts and pathogens. Plants, on the other hand, respond to colonization by enteric pathogens with a variety of defence mechanisms, some of which can effectively inhibit biofilm formation. Consequently, plant compounds might be investigated for promising novel antibiofilm strategies. PMID:25351039

  2. Historical climate change and speciation: neotropical seasonally dry forest plants show patterns of both tertiary and quaternary diversification.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, R Toby; Lavin, Matt; Prado, Darién E; Pendry, Colin A; Pell, Susan K; Butterworth, Charles A

    2004-01-01

    Historical climate changes have had a major effect on the distribution and evolution of plant species in the neotropics. What is more controversial is whether relatively recent Pleistocene climatic changes have driven speciation, or whether neotropical species diversity is more ancient. This question is addressed using evolutionary rate analysis of sequence data of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers in diverse taxa occupying neotropical seasonally dry forests, including Ruprechtia (Polygonaceae), robinioid legumes (Fabaceae), Chaetocalyx and Nissolia (Fabaceae), and Loxopterygium (Anacardiaceae). Species diversifications in these taxa occurred both during and before the Pleistocene in Central America, but were primarily pre-Pleistocene in South America. This indicates plausibility both for models that predict tropical species diversity to be recent and that invoke a role for Pleistocene climatic change, and those that consider it ancient and implicate geological factors such as the Andean orogeny and the closure of the Panama Isthmus. Cladistic vicariance analysis was attempted to identify common factors underlying evolution in these groups. In spite of the similar Mid-Miocene to Pliocene ages of the study taxa, and their high degree of endemism in the different fragments of South American dry forests, the analysis yielded equivocal, non-robust patterns of area relationships. PMID:15212100

  3. Identification of Chromium Resistant Bacteria from Dry Fly Ash Sample of Mejia MTPS Thermal Power Plant, West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Roopali; Mukherjee, Pritam; Roy, Madhumita

    2016-02-01

    Eight chromium resistant bacteria were isolated from a dry fly ash sample of DVC-MTPS thermal power plant located in Bankura, West Bengal, India. These isolates displayed different degrees of chromate reduction under aerobic conditions. According to 16S rDNA gene analysis, five of them were Staphylococcus, two were Bacillus and one was Micrococcus. The minimum inhibitory concentration towards chromium and the ability to reduce hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium was highest in Staphylococcus haemolyticus strain HMR17. All the strains were resistant to multiple heavy metals (As, Cu, Cd, Co, Zn, Mn, Pb and Fe) and reduced toxic hexavalent chromium to relatively non toxic trivalent chromium even in the presence of these multiple heavy metals. All of them showed resistance to different antibiotics. In a soil microcosm study, S. haemolyticus strain HMR17 completely reduced 4 mM hexavalent chromium within 7 days of incubation. PMID:26602566

  4. Studies on mycorrhizal inoculation on dry matter yield and root colonization of some medicinal plants grown in stress and forest soils.

    PubMed

    Chandra, K K; Kumar, Neeraj; Chand, Gireesh

    2010-11-01

    Five medicinal plants viz. Abelmoschatus moschatus Linn., Clitoria tematea L., Plumbagozeylanica L., Psorolea corylifolia L. and Withania sominifera L. were grown in a polypot experiment in five soils representing coal mine soil, coppermine soil, fly ash, skeletal soil and forest soil with and without mycorrhizal inoculations in a completely randomized block design. Dry matter yield and mycorrhizal root colonization of plants varied both in uninoculated and inoculated conditions. The forest soil rendered highest dry matter due to higher yield of A. moschatus, P. zeylanica and P corylifolia while fly ash showed lowest dry matter without any inoculants. P. cematea were best in coalmine soil and W. sominifera in copper mine soil without mycorrhizal inoculation. The mycorrhiza was found to enhance the dry matter yield. This contributed minimum 0.19% to maximum up to 422.0% in different soils as compared to uninoculated plants. The mycorrhizal dependency was noticed maximum in plants grown in fly ash followed by coal mine soil, copper mine soil, skeletal soil and forest soil. The mycorrhizal response was increased maximum in W. sominifera due to survival in fly ash after inoculation followed by P corylifolia and P cematea. Percent root colonization in inoculated plant was increased minimum of 1.10 fold to maximum of 12.0 folds in comparison to un-inoculated plants . The native mycorrhiza fungi were also observed to colonize 4.0 to 32.0% roots in plants understudy. This study suggests that mycorrhizal inoculation increased the dry matter yield of medicinal plants in all soils under study. It also helps in survival of W. sominifera in fly ash. PMID:21506485

  5. The implications of a dry climate for the paleoecology of the fauna of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelmann, George F.; Chure, Daniel J.; Fiorillo, Anthony R.

    2004-05-01

    In light of diverse geological evidence that indicates a seasonal, semiarid climate for the time of deposition of the Morrison Formation, one can assume these general environmental conditions for the purpose of reconstructing the ancient ecosystem. Wet environments that preserved plant fossils and some invertebrates and small vertebrates in the Morrison can be interpreted as representing local conditions limited in space and/or time. These elements of the biota and the smaller dinosaurs were probably restricted to such wetland areas at times of environmental stress. A diverse fauna of large, herbivorous, sauropod dinosaurs ranged throughout the environment. Although this seems to be inconsistent with an environment with sparse resources, large size confers physiologic advantages that are adaptive for just such conditions. The scaling effect of large size makes large herbivores very efficient relative to their size in needing proportionately less food and food of poorer quality than smaller herbivores. They can also survive starvation longer and travel more efficiently to reach widely separated resource patches. Although few in number at any time, the sauropod dinosaurs are locally abundant and seemingly ubiquitous in the fossil record of the Morrison Formation because of overrepresentation of their highly preservable remains in an attritional fossil assemblage.

  6. Plant Sexual Systems and a Review of the Breeding System Studies in the Caatinga, a Brazilian Tropical Dry Forest

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, ISABEL CRISTINA; LOPES, ARIADNA VALENTINA; SAZIMA, MARLIES

    2006-01-01

    • Backgrounds and Aims The reproductive biology of a community can provide answers to questions related to the maintenance of the intraspecific pollen flow and reproductive success of populations, sharing and competition for pollinators and also questions on conservation of natural habitats affected by fragmentation processes. This work presents, for the first time, data on the occurrence and frequency of plant sexual systems for Caatinga communities, and a review of the breeding system studies of Caatinga species. • Methods The sexual systems of 147 species from 34 families and 91 genera occurring in three Caatinga areas in north-eastern Brazil were analysed and compared with worldwide studies focusing on reproductive biology of different tropical communities. • Key Results The frequency of hermaphrodite species was 83·0 % (122 species), seven of these (or 4·8 % of the total) being heterostylous. Monoecy occurred in 9·5 % (14) of the species, and andromonoecy in 4·8 % (seven). Only 2·7 % (four) of the species were dioecious. A high percentage of hermaphrodite species was expected and has been reported for other tropical ecosystems. With respect to the breeding system studies with species of the Caatinga, the authors' data for 21 species and an additional 18 species studied by others (n = 39) revealed a high percentage (61·5 %) of obligatory self-incompatibility. Agamospermy was not recorded among the Caatinga studied species. • Conclusions The plant sexual systems in the Caatinga, despite the semi-arid climate, are similar to other tropical dry and wet forest communities, including those with high rainfall levels, except for the much lower percentage of dioecious species. The high frequency of self-incompatible species is similar to that reported for Savanna areas in Brazil, and also for dry (deciduous and semideciduous) and humid tropical forest communities. PMID:16377654

  7. Effects of Dry Chilling on the Microflora on Beef Carcasses at a Canadian Beef Packing Plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Youssef, M K; Yang, X

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the course of effects on the microflora on beef carcasses of a commercial dry chilling process in which carcasses were dry chilled for 3 days. Groups of 25 carcasses selected at random were sampled when the chilling process commenced and after the carcasses were chilled for 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 67 h for determination of the numbers of aerobes, coliforms, and Escherichia coli. The temperatures of the surfaces and the thickest part of the hip (deep leg) of carcasses, as well as the ambient air conditions, including air temperature, velocity, and relative humidity (RH), were monitored throughout the chilling process. The chiller was operated at 0°C with an off-coil RH of 88%. The air velocity was 1.65 m/s when the chiller was loaded. The initial RH levels of the air in the vicinity of carcasses varied with the locations of carcasses in the chiller and decreased rapidly during the first hour of chilling. The average times for shoulder surfaces, rump surfaces, and the deep leg of carcasses to reach 7°C were 13.6 ± 3.1, 16.0 ± 2.4 and 32.4 ± 3.2 h, respectively. The numbers of aerobes, coliforms, and E. coli on carcasses before chilling were 5.33 ± 0.42, 1.95 ± 0.77, 1.42 ± 0.78 log CFU/4,000 cm(2), respectively. The number of aerobes on carcasses was reduced by 1 log unit each in the first hour of chilling and in the subsequent 23 h of chilling. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between the numbers of aerobes recovered from carcasses after 24 and 67 h of chilling. The total numbers (log CFU/100,000 cm(2)) on carcasses before chilling and after the first hour of chilling were 3.86 and 2.24 for coliforms and 3.30 and 2.04 for E. coli. The subsequent 23 h of chilling reduced the numbers of both groups of organisms by a further log unit. No coliforms or E. coli were recovered after 67 h of chilling. The findings show that the chilling regime investigated in this study resulted in significant reductions of all

  8. An integrated database of wood-formation related genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Ma, Tao; Hu, Quanjun; Liu, Jianquan

    2015-01-01

    Wood, which consists mainly of plant cell walls, is an extremely important resource in daily lives. Genes whose products participate in the processes of cell wall and wood formation are therefore major subjects of plant science research. The Wood-Formation Related Genes database (WFRGdb, http://me.lzu.edu.cn/woodformation/) serves as a data resource center for genes involved in wood formation. To create this database, we collected plant genome data published in other online databases and predicted all cell wall and wood formation related genes using BLAST and HMMER. To date, 47 gene families and 33 transcription factors from 57 genomes (28 herbaceous, 22 woody and 7 non-vascular plants) have been covered and more than 122,000 genes have been checked and recorded. To provide easy access to these data, we have developed several search methods, which make it easy to download targeted genes or groups of genes free of charge in FASTA format. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses are also available online. WFRGdb brings together cell wall and wood formation related genes from all available plant genomes, and provides an integrative platform for gene inquiry, downloading and analysis. This database will therefore be extremely useful for those who focuses on cell wall and wood research. PMID:26078228

  9. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Castiblanco, Luisa F; Sundin, George W

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extracellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multicellular behavior. PMID:26377849

  10. Characteristics of fly ash from the dry flue gas desulfurization system for iron ore sintering plants.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guanghong; Huang, Peng; Mou, Yaqin; Zhou, Chenhui

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of fly ash from the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system are important for its reuse and are mainly depend on the desulfurization process. The physical and chemical properties of DSF ash, which refers to fly ash from the dry FGD system for the iron ore sintering process, were investigated. Its mineralogical contents were determined by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis, and its micro-morphology was studied by scanning electric micrograph analysis. The results show that DSF ash has a higher CaO and SO3 content, and the main sulfur form is sulfite, with only a part of it oxidized to sulfate. The major minerals present in DSF ash are hannebachite, anhydrite, calcite and portlandite; a minor constituent is calcium chloride. The particles of DSF ash are irregular, fragmentary and small, and hannebachite grows on their surfaces. Particle size is affected by the FGD process, and the ash size from the maximized emission reduction of the sintering-FGD process is lower than that from the circulating fluidized bed-FGD process. The particle size distribution of DSF ash follows the Rosin--Rammler-Bennet equation. PMID:22720407

  11. Formation of stable chlorinated hydrocarbons in weathering plant material

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Satish C. B.

    2001-10-01

    Though several chlorinated organic compounds produced by humans are carcinogenic and toxic, some are also produced by the biotic and abiotic processes in the environment. In situ x-ray spectroscopy data indicate that natural organic matter in soils, sediments, and natural waters contain stable, less volatile organic compounds with chlorinated phenolic and aliphatic groups as the principal Cl forms. These compounds are formed at rapid rates from the transformation of inorganic Cl during humification of plant material and, thus, play a critical role in the cycling of Cl and of several major and trace elements in the environment and may influence human health. [References: 19

  12. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  13. Evaluation of plant constituents associated with pecan phylloxera gall formation.

    PubMed

    Hedin, P A; Neel, W W; Burks, M L; Grimley, E

    1985-04-01

    The weights of pecanCarya illinoensis Koch galls caused by several species ofPhylloxera (Homoptera: Phylloxeridae) were negatively correlated with leaf and nut weights and nut production. Several allelochemicals (isoquercitrin, juglone, and 2 proanthocyanidins) were isolated from galls, and their antibiotic potentials were estimated, based on their toxicity to the bacteriaPseudomones maltophilia (Hugh et Ryschenkow). Pecan proanthocyanidins (condensed tannins) were characterized for the first time, and their stereochemistry was elucidated. The protein and total sugar contents of total leaves and leaf surface washings were determined. The leaf surface sugar content was very low, suggesting that the puncturing strategy of this insect may be for the purpose of finding sugars. The plant growth hormones gibberellic acid, zeatin, zeatin riboside, kinetin, indole acetic acid, and abscisic acid were found in pecan leaves, stems, and their galls. Gibberellic and abscisic acids were present in highest concentrations in all tissues, but lower in galled tissues, suggesting that increased biosynthesis by pecan plant growth regulators did not occur in response to insect attack. PMID:24310069

  14. Gap formation following climatic events in spatially structured plant communities.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinbao; De Boeck, Hans J; Li, Zhenqing; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Gaps play a crucial role in maintaining species diversity, yet how community structure and composition influence gap formation is still poorly understood. We apply a spatially structured community model to predict how species diversity and intraspecific aggregation shape gap patterns emerging after climatic events, based on species-specific mortality responses. In multispecies communities, average gap size and gap-size diversity increased rapidly with increasing mean mortality once a mortality threshold was exceeded, greatly promoting gap recolonization opportunity. This result was observed at all levels of species richness. Increasing interspecific difference likewise enhanced these metrics, which may promote not only diversity maintenance but also community invasibility, since more diverse niches for both local and exotic species are provided. The richness effects on gap size and gap-size diversity were positive, but only expressed when species were sufficiently different. Surprisingly, while intraspecific clumping strongly promoted gap-size diversity, it hardly influenced average gap size. Species evenness generally reduced gap metrics induced by climatic events, so the typical assumption of maximum evenness in many experiments and models may underestimate community diversity and invasibility. Overall, understanding the factors driving gap formation in spatially structured assemblages can help predict community secondary succession after climatic events. PMID:26114803

  15. The formation and function of plant volatiles: perfumes for pollinator attraction and defense.

    PubMed

    Pichersky, Eran; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2002-06-01

    Plants synthesize and emit a large variety of volatile organic compounds with terpenoids and fatty-acid derivatives the dominant classes. Whereas some volatiles are probably common to almost all plants, others are specific to only one or a few related taxa. The rapid progress in elucidating the biosynthetic pathways, enzymes, and genes involved in the formation of plant volatiles allows their physiology and function to be rigorously investigated at the molecular and biochemical levels. Floral volatiles serve as attractants for species-specific pollinators, whereas the volatiles emitted from vegetative parts, especially those released after herbivory, appear to protect plants by deterring herbivores and by attracting the enemies of herbivores. PMID:11960742

  16. Therapeutic Efficacy of Topically Applied Antioxidant Medicinal Plant Extracts in a Mouse Model of Experimental Dry Eye.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won; Lee, Jee Bum; Cui, Lian; Li, Ying; Li, Zhengri; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hyo Seok; Yoon, Kyung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the therapeutic effects of topical administration of antioxidant medicinal plant extracts in a mouse model of experimental dry eye (EDE). Methods. Eye drops containing balanced salt solution (BSS) or 0.001%, 0.01%, and 0.1% extracts were applied for the treatment of EDE. Tear volume, tear film break-up time (BUT), and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured 10 days after desiccating stress. In addition, we evaluated the levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, IL-6, interferon- (IFN-) γ, and IFN-γ associated chemokines, percentage of CD4+C-X-C chemokine receptor type 3 positive (CXCR3+) T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) positive cells, and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Results. Compared to the EDE and BSS control groups, the mice treated with topical application of the 0.1% extract showed significant improvements in all clinical parameters, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels, percentage of CD4+CXCR3+ T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-HNE-positive cells, and extracellular ROS production (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Topical application of 0.1% medicinal plant extracts improved clinical signs, decreased inflammation, and ameliorated oxidative stress marker and ROS production on the ocular surface of the EDE model mice. PMID:27313829

  17. Therapeutic Efficacy of Topically Applied Antioxidant Medicinal Plant Extracts in a Mouse Model of Experimental Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Bum; Li, Ying; Choi, Ji Suk; Lee, Hyo Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the therapeutic effects of topical administration of antioxidant medicinal plant extracts in a mouse model of experimental dry eye (EDE). Methods. Eye drops containing balanced salt solution (BSS) or 0.001%, 0.01%, and 0.1% extracts were applied for the treatment of EDE. Tear volume, tear film break-up time (BUT), and corneal fluorescein staining scores were measured 10 days after desiccating stress. In addition, we evaluated the levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β, tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, IL-6, interferon- (IFN-) γ, and IFN-γ associated chemokines, percentage of CD4+C-X-C chemokine receptor type 3 positive (CXCR3+) T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) positive cells, and extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Results. Compared to the EDE and BSS control groups, the mice treated with topical application of the 0.1% extract showed significant improvements in all clinical parameters, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ levels, percentage of CD4+CXCR3+ T cells, goblet cell density, number of 4-HNE-positive cells, and extracellular ROS production (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Topical application of 0.1% medicinal plant extracts improved clinical signs, decreased inflammation, and ameliorated oxidative stress marker and ROS production on the ocular surface of the EDE model mice. PMID:27313829

  18. A Numerical Study of the Impacts of Dry Air on Tropical Cyclone Formation: A Development Case and a Non-development Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, C.; Wang, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The impacts of dry air on tropical cyclone formation are examined in the numerical model simulations of ex-Gaston (2010) and pre-Fay (2008). The former, a remnant low downgraded from a short-lived tropical cyclone, can be regarded as a non-developing system as it failed to redevelop, and the latter developed into a tropical cyclone despite lateral dry air entrainment and a transient upper-level dry air intrusion. Water vapor budget analysis suggests that the mean vertical moisture transport plays the dominant role in moistening the free atmosphere. Backward trajectory analysis and water budget analysis show that vertical transport of dry air from the middle and upper troposphere, where a well-defined wave pouch is absent, contributes to the mid-level drying near the pouch center in ex-Gaston. The mid-level drying suppresses deep convection, reduces moisture supply from the boundary layer, and contributes to the non-development of ex-Gaston. Three-dimensional trajectory analysis based on the numerical model simulation of Fay suggests that dry air entrained at the pouch periphery tends to stay off the pouch center due to the weak mid-level inflow or gets moistened along its path even if being wrapped into the wave pouch. Lateral entrainment in the middle troposphere thus does not suppress convection near the pouch center or prevent the development of Tropical Storm Fay. This study suggests that the upper troposphere is a weak spot of the wave pouch at the early formation stage and that the vertical transport is likely a more direct pathway for dry air to influence moist convection near the pouch center. Fig. 1 (a) 3 km relative humidity and storm relative streamlines for Gaston (2010) at 0800 UTC 05 September 2010 with a group of ensemble forward parcel trajectories (gray); (b) vertical cross section of RH along 17.5°N (contour intervals are set to 15%) and backward trajectories (gray) projected on the longitude-height plane. The box in (a) highlights a pocket of

  19. Structural transitions in the intrinsically disordered plant dehydration stress protein LEA7 upon drying are modulated by the presence of membranes.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Hundertmark, Michaela; Seckler, Robert; Hincha, Dirk K

    2011-07-01

    Dehydration stress-related late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins have been found in plants, invertebrates and bacteria. Most LEA proteins are unstructured in solution, but some fold into amphipathic α-helices during drying. The Pfam LEA_4 (Group 3) protein LEA7 from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana was predicted to be 87% α-helical, while CD spectroscopy showed it to be largely unstructured in solution and only 35% α-helical in the dry state. However, the dry protein contained 15% β-sheets. FTIR spectroscopy revealed the β-sheets to be largely due to aggregation. β-Sheet content was reduced and α-helix content increased when LEA7 was dried in the presence of liposomes with secondary structure apparently influenced by lipid composition. Secondary structure was also affected by the presence of membranes in the fully hydrated state. A temperature-induced increase in the flexibility of the dry protein was also only observed in the presence of membranes. Functional interactions of LEA7 with membranes in the dry state were indicated by its influence on the thermotropic phase transitions of the lipids and interactions with the lipid headgroup phosphates. PMID:21443857

  20. Effects of VA mycorrhiza formation on plant nitrogen uptake and rhizosphere bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal sorghum plants were grown in pots at three levels of fertilizer nitrogen ((NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) which had been enriched with /sup 15/N. Root colonization by Glomus mosseae did not affect plant growth or total N uptake, but significant reductions in mycorrhizal plant /sup 15/N:/sup 14/N ratios and increased 'A' values were found. This suggested that mycorrhizal plants had access to an N source which was less available to nonmycorrhizal plants. In two additional experiments, mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal celery plants were grown in pots which allowed VAM fungal hyphae, but not roots, to have direct access to /sup 15/N-enriched organic or inorganic N sources. Root dry weight was significantly reduced in mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal plants had significantly greater shoot and root /sup 15/N content than nonmycorrhizal plants. Number and length of VAM fungal hyphae crossing into the area of /sup 15/N placement were positively correlated with mycorrhizal plant /sup 15/N content in the inorganic-N but not organic-N treatment. In a fourth experiment, the effect of G. mosseae on the rhizosphere populations of five bacterial isolates associated with blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis) was examined. No significant differences in bacterial populations were found in nonrhizosphere soil samples from pots of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants. One bacterial isolate was significantly increased in number, while a different isolate and total bacterial populations were significantly reduced by the presence of the mycorrhizal fungus. The results suggest that root colonization by VAM fungi can alter rhizosphere bacterial populations.

  1. Influence of dry deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC) on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the Mexico City plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, Alma; Madronich, Sasha; Aumont, Bernard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Karl, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The dry deposition removal of organic compounds from the atmosphere and its impact on organic aerosol mass is currently unexplored and unaccounted for in chemistry-climate models. The main reason for this omission is that current models use simplified SOA mechanisms that lump precursors and their products into volatility bins, therefore losing information on other important properties of individual molecules (or groups) that are needed to calculate dry deposition. In this study, we apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to simulate SOA formation and estimate the influence of dry deposition of VOCs on SOA concentrations downwind of Mexico City. SOA precursors considered here include short- and long-chain alkanes (C3-25), alkenes, and light aromatics. The results suggest that 90% of SOA produced in Mexico City originates from the oxidation and partitioning of long-chain (C>12) alkanes, while the regionally exported SOA is almost equally produced from long-chain alkanes and from shorter alkanes and light aromatics. We show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. We discuss reasons for this limited influence, and investigate separately the impacts on short and long-chain species. We show that the dry deposition is competing with the uptake of gases to the aerosol phase, and because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition and therefore increases their atmospheric burden and lifetime. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass would have been dry-deposited.

  2. Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1996-01-01

    A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains.

  3. Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.

    1996-06-04

    A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2} Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains. 11 figs.

  4. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  5. Reduction in energy usage during dry grind ethanol production by enhanced enzymatic dewatering of whole stillage: plant trial, process model and economic analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant trial was conducted at a 54 MGPY dry grind fuel ethanol facility to evaluate the use of enhanced water removal from whole stillage by enzyme addition during fermentation. Laboratory data had previously shown significant improvements in water removal that could potentially result in significa...

  6. DIVALENT INORGANIC REACTIVE GASEOUS MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM A MERCURY CELL CHLOR-ALKALI PLANT AND ITS IMPACT ON NEAR FIELD ATMOSPHERIC DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emission of inorganic divalent reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) from a mercury cell chlor-alkali plant (MCCAP) cell building and the impact on near field (100 km) dry deposition was investigated as part of a larger collaborative study between EPA, University of Michigan, Oak ...

  7. Differences in Leaf Flammability, Leaf Traits and Flammability-Trait Relationships between Native and Exotic Plant Species of Dry Sclerophyll Forest

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Brad R.; Hardstaff, Lyndle K.; Phillips, Megan L.

    2013-01-01

    The flammability of plant leaves influences the spread of fire through vegetation. Exotic plants invading native vegetation may increase the spread of bushfires if their leaves are more flammable than native leaves. We compared fresh-leaf and dry-leaf flammability (time to ignition) between 52 native and 27 exotic plant species inhabiting dry sclerophyll forest. We found that mean time to ignition was significantly faster in dry exotic leaves than in dry native leaves. There was no significant native-exotic difference in mean time to ignition for fresh leaves. The significantly higher fresh-leaf water content that was found in exotics, lost in the conversion from a fresh to dry state, suggests that leaf water provides an important buffering effect that leads to equivalent mean time to ignition in fresh exotic and native leaves. Exotic leaves were also significantly wider, longer and broader in area with significantly higher specific leaf area–but not thicker–than native leaves. We examined scaling relationships between leaf flammability and leaf size (leaf width, length, area, specific leaf area and thickness). While exotics occupied the comparatively larger and more flammable end of the leaf size-flammability spectrum in general, leaf flammability was significantly correlated with all measures of leaf size except leaf thickness in both native and exotic species such that larger leaves were faster to ignite. Our findings for increased flammability linked with larger leaf size in exotics demonstrate that exotic plant species have the potential to increase the spread of bushfires in dry sclerophyll forest. PMID:24260169

  8. Salt drying: a low-cost, simple and efficient method for storing plants in the field and preserving biological repositories for DNA diversity research.

    PubMed

    Carrió, Elena; Rosselló, Josep A

    2014-03-01

    Although a variety of methods have been optimized for the collection and storage of plant specimens, most of these are not suited for field expeditions for a variety of logistic reasons. Drying specimens with silica gel in polyethylene bags is currently the standard for field-sampling methods that are suitable for subsequent DNA extraction. However, silica-gel repositories are not readily available in remote areas, and its use is not very cost-effective for the long-term storage of collections or in developing countries with limited research budgets. Salting is an ancient and traditional drying process that preserves food samples by dehydrating tissues and inhibiting water-dependent cellular metabolism. We compared salt and silica-gel drying methods with respect to dehydration rates overtime, DNA quality and polymerase chain reaction(PCR) success to assess whether dry salting can be used as an effective plant preservation method for DNA analysis. Specimens from eleven plant species covering a variety of leaf structures, leaf thicknesses and water contents were analysed. Experimental work indicated that (i) levels of dehydration in sodium chloride were usually comparable to those obtained when silica gel was used, (ii) no spoilage, fungal or bacterial growth was observed for any of the species with all drying treatments and (iii) good yields of quality genomic DNA suitable for PCR applications were obtained in the salt-drying treatments. The preservation of plant tissues in commercial table salt appears to be a satisfactory, and versatile method that may be suitable in remote areas where cryogenic resources and silica repositories are not available. PMID:24103361

  9. Preschool Children's Explanations of Plant Growth and Rain Formation: A Comparative Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christidou, Vasilia; Hatzinikita, Vassilia

    2006-09-01

    This paper explores the different types and characteristics of preschool children's explanations of plant growth and rain formation. The children's explanations were categorized as naturalistic, non-naturalistic, or synthetic, i.e., explanations containing both naturalistic and non-naturalistic parts. In regards to plant growth the children tended to rely on synthetic or on naturalistic explanations, which involved direct and indirect agents (such as water, a person, fertilizers, roots) enabling the plant to grow. Non-naturalistic explanations of plant growth, or the non-naturalistic parts of synthetic explanations, were mainly animistic (anthropomorphic). In the case of rain formation the children most frequently used non-naturalistic explanations, which were mainly teleological or metaphysical. The naturalistic explanations recorded on rain formation, as well as the naturalistic parts of synthetic explanations tended to have a non-agentive character, i.e., children considered rainwater as preexisting in containers such as the clouds. Overall, the explanations recorded about plant growth tended to be more complex than the ones for rain formation. It is suggested that science activities designed for preschool children should take into account the types and characteristics of their explanations in order to select which phenomena are appropriate for this age group, and aim at fostering the children's ability at formulating naturalistic explanations.

  10. Novel ideas for maximising dew collection to aid plant establishment to combat desertification and restore degraded dry and arid lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzen, Benz

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on the potential of dew to provide water to plants and potentially to people as well in remote and difficult to reach areas where rainfall and underground water cannot be harvested. The combat of desertification and the restoration of degraded and desertified dry and arid lands has never been more urgent. A key practical component of this strategy is the restoration of habitat with planting. But for habitat and planting to survive there needs to be an adequate supply of water. In most cases providing water to the plant's roots is vital. In some areas where habitats have been destroyed, sufficient water is immediately available, for example through seasonal rainfall, or it can be harvested to concentrate adequate supplies of water to the roots. However, in arid and hyper arid areas, as well as in some dryland areas, a consistent and adequate supply of water cannot be provided by any conventional proven method. Thus, as the need to combat desertification and to restore desertified dry and arid land increases, so the need to find novel methods of establishing and maintaining planting and thus habitat increases. In more traditional land management scenarios this can be achieved through manipulating landform on a micro and macro scale, for example, by creating catchments, thereby collecting precipitation and directing it to the plants. Where this cannot be done, other means of water supply are usually required. Bainbridge (2007) and others have shown that supplying water to plants is possible through a number of traditional methods, for example, using clay pots. But most of these techniques require an introduced source of water, for example, obtained through water harvesting methods or by delivering water to site in tanks and by water bowser. This can work but requires continuous manpower. It is expensive and can be physically prohibitive in areas where access is difficult and/or remote. The concept of using dew to supply water in drylands is not new

  11. Novel ideas for maximising dew collection to aid plant establishment to combat desertification and restore degraded dry and arid lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotzen, Benz

    2014-05-01

    This paper focuses on the potential of dew to provide water to plants and potentially to people as well in remote and difficult to reach areas where rainfall and underground water cannot be harvested. The combat of desertification and the restoration of degraded and desertified dry and arid lands has never been more urgent. A key practical component of this strategy is the restoration of habitat with planting. But for habitat and planting to survive there needs to be an adequate supply of water. In most cases providing water to the plant's roots is vital. In some areas where habitats have been destroyed, sufficient water is immediately available, for example through seasonal rainfall, or it can be harvested to concentrate adequate supplies of water to the roots. However, in arid and hyper arid areas, as well as in some dryland areas, a consistent and adequate supply of water cannot be provided by any conventional proven method. Thus, as the need to combat desertification and to restore desertified dry and arid land increases, so the need to find novel methods of establishing and maintaining planting and thus habitat increases. In more traditional land management scenarios this can be achieved through manipulating landform on a micro and macro scale, for example, by creating catchments, thereby collecting precipitation and directing it to the plants. Where this cannot be done, other means of water supply are usually required. Bainbridge (2007) and others have shown that supplying water to plants is possible through a number of traditional methods, for example, using clay pots. But most of these techniques require an introduced source of water, for example, obtained through water harvesting methods or by delivering water to site in tanks and by water bowser. This can work but requires continuous manpower. It is expensive and can be physically prohibitive in areas where access is difficult and/or remote. The concept of using dew to supply water in drylands is not new

  12. Biofilm formation by enteric pathogens and its role in plant colonization and persistence.

    PubMed

    Yaron, Sima; Römling, Ute

    2014-11-01

    The significant increase in foodborne outbreaks caused by contaminated fresh produce, such as alfalfa sprouts, lettuce, melons, tomatoes and spinach, during the last 30 years stimulated investigation of the mechanisms of persistence of human pathogens on plants. Emerging evidence suggests that Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, which cause the vast majority of fresh produce outbreaks, are able to adhere to and to form biofilms on plants leading to persistence and resistance to disinfection treatments, which subsequently can cause human infections and major outbreaks. In this review, we present the current knowledge about host, bacterial and environmental factors that affect the attachment to plant tissue and the process of biofilm formation by S. enterica and E. coli, and discuss how biofilm formation assists in persistence of pathogens on the plants. Mechanisms used by S. enterica and E. coli to adhere and persist on abiotic surfaces and mammalian cells are partially similar and also used by plant pathogens and symbionts. For example, amyloid curli fimbriae, part of the extracellular matrix of biofilms, frequently contribute to adherence and are upregulated upon adherence and colonization of plant material. Also the major exopolysaccharide of the biofilm matrix, cellulose, is an adherence factor not only of S. enterica and E. coli, but also of plant symbionts and pathogens. Plants, on the other hand, respond to colonization by enteric pathogens with a variety of defence mechanisms, some of which can effectively inhibit biofilm formation. Consequently, plant compounds might be investigated for promising novel antibiofilm strategies. PMID:25351039

  13. Contribution of plant lignin to the soil organic matter formation and stabilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is the third most abundant plant constituent after cellulose and hemicellulose and thought to be one of the building blocks for soil organic matter formation. Lignin can be used as a predictor for long-term soil organic matter stabilization and C sequestration. Soils and humic acids from fo...

  14. Plant calcium oxalate crystal formation, function, and its impact on human health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystals of calcium oxalate have been observed among members from most taxonomic groups of photosynthetic organisms ranging from the smallest algae to the largest trees. The biological roles for calcium oxalate crystal formation in plant growth and development include high capacity calcium regulatio...

  15. ADVANCES IN OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CALCIUM OXALATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND FUNCTION IN PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium oxalate crystal formation in plants appears to play a central role in a variety of important functions, including tissue calcium regulation, protection from herbivory, and metal detoxification. Evidence is mounting to support ascorbic acid as the primary precursor to oxalate biosynthesis. ...

  16. Endocytosis of cell surface material mediates cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Baluska, Frantisek; Schlicht, Markus; Hlavacka, Andrej; Samaj, Jozef; Friml, Jirí; Gadella, Theodorus W J

    2006-01-01

    Dividing plant cells perform a remarkable task of building a new cell wall within the cytoplasm in a few minutes. A long-standing paradigm claims that this primordial cell wall, known as the cell plate, is generated by delivery of newly synthesized material from Golgi apparatus-originated secretory vesicles. Here, we show that, in diverse plant species, cell surface material, including plasma membrane proteins, cell wall components, and exogenously applied endocytic tracers, is rapidly delivered to the forming cell plate. Importantly, this occurs even when de novo protein synthesis is blocked. In addition, cytokinesis-specific syntaxin KNOLLE as well as plasma membrane (PM) resident proteins localize to endosomes that fuse to initiate the cell plate. The rate of endocytosis is strongly enhanced during cell plate formation, and its genetic or pharmacological inhibition leads to cytokinesis defects. Our results reveal that endocytic delivery of cell surface material significantly contributes to cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis. PMID:16399085

  17. Plant metabolism and cell wall formation in space (microgravity) and on Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Norman G.

    1994-01-01

    Variations in cell wall chemistry provide vascular plants with the ability to withstand gravitational forces, as well as providing facile mechanisms for correctional responses to various gravitational stimuli, e.g., in reaction wood formation. A principal focus of our current research is to precisely and systematically dissect the essentially unknown mechanism(s) of vascular plant cell wall assembly, particularly with respect to formation of its phenolic constituents, i.e., lignins and suberins, and how gravity impacts upon these processes. Formation of these phenolic polymers is of particular interest, since it appears that elaboration of their biochemical pathways was essential for successful land adaptation. By extrapolation, we are also greatly intrigued as to how the microgravity environment impacts upon 'normal' cell wall assembly mechanisms/metabolism.

  18. A year (2014-2015) of plants in Proteomics journal. Progress in wet and dry methodologies, moving from protein catalogs, and the view of classic plant biochemists.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lucas, Rosa; Mehta, Angela; Valledor, Luis; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco; Romero-Rodrıguez, M Cristina; Simova-Stoilova, Lyudmila; Demir, Sekvan; Rodriguez-de-Francisco, Luis E; Maldonado-Alconada, Ana M; Jorrin-Prieto, Ana L; Jorrín-Novo, Jesus V

    2016-03-01

    The present review is an update of the previous one published in Proteomics 2015 Reviews special issue [Jorrin-Novo, J. V. et al., Proteomics 2015, 15, 1089-1112] covering the July 2014-2015 period. It has been written on the bases of the publications that appeared in Proteomics journal during that period and the most relevant ones that have been published in other high-impact journals. Methodological advances and the contribution of the field to the knowledge of plant biology processes and its translation to agroforestry and environmental sectors will be discussed. This review has been organized in four blocks, with a starting general introduction (literature survey) followed by sections focusing on the methodology (in vitro, in vivo, wet, and dry), proteomics integration with other approaches (systems biology and proteogenomics), biological information, and knowledge (cell communication, receptors, and signaling), ending with a brief mention of some other biological and translational topics to which proteomics has made some contribution. PMID:26621614

  19. High genetic diversity declines towards the geographic range periphery of Adonis vernalis, a Eurasian dry grassland plant.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H; Wagner, V; Danihelka, J; Ruprecht, E; Sánchez-Gómez, P; Seifert, M; Hensen, I

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity is important for species' fitness and evolutionary processes but our knowledge on how it varies across a species' distribution range is limited. The abundant centre hypothesis (ACH) predicts that populations become smaller and more isolated towards the geographic range periphery - a pattern that in turn should be associated with decreasing genetic diversity and increasing genetic differentiation. We tested this hypothesis in Adonis vernalis, a dry grassland plant with an extensive Eurasian distribution. Its life-history traits and distribution characteristics suggest a low genetic diversity that decreases and a high genetic differentiation that increases towards the range edge. We analysed AFLP fingerprints in 28 populations along a 4698-km transect from the geographic range core in Russia to the western range periphery in Central and Western Europe. Contrary to our expectation, our analysis revealed high genetic diversity (range of proportion of polymorphic bands = 56-81%, He = 0.168-0.238) and low genetic differentiation across populations (Φ(ST) = 0.18). However, in congruence with the genetic predictions of the ACH, genetic diversity decreased and genetic differentiation increased towards the range periphery. Spanish populations were genetically distinct, suggesting a divergent post-glacial history in this region. The high genetic diversity and low genetic differentiation in the remaining A. vernalis populations is surprising given the species' life-history traits and points to the possibility that the species has been widely distributed in the studied region or that it has migrated from a diverse source in an East-West direction, in the past. PMID:26122089

  20. Pectinous cell wall thickenings formation - A common defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb.

    PubMed

    Krzesłowska, Magdalena; Rabęda, Irena; Basińska, Aneta; Lewandowski, Michał; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Napieralska, Anna; Samardakiewicz, Sławomir; Woźny, Adam

    2016-07-01

    Lead, one of the most abundant and hazardous trace metals affecting living organisms, has been commonly detected in plant cell walls including some tolerant plants, mining ecotypes and hyperaccumulators. We have previously shown that in tip growing Funaria sp. protonemata cell wall is remodeled in response to lead by formation of thickenings rich in low-methylesterified pectins (pectin epitope JIM5 - JIM5-P) able to bind metal ions, which accumulate large amounts of Pb. Hence, it leads to the increase of cell wall capacity for Pb compartmentalization. Here we show that diverse plant species belonging to different phyla (Arabidopsis, hybrid aspen, star duckweed), form similar cell wall thickenings in response to Pb. These thickenings are formed in tip growing cells such as the root hairs, and in diffuse growing cells such as meristematic and root cap columella cells of root apices in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis and in mesophyll cells in star duckweed fronds. Notably, all analyzed cell wall thickenings were abundant in JIM5-P and accumulated high amounts of Pb. In addition, the co-localization of JIM5-P and Pb commonly occurred in these cells. Hence, cell wall thickenings formed the extra compartment for Pb accumulation. In this way plant cells increased cell wall capacity for compartmentalization of this toxic metal, protecting protoplast from its toxicity. As cell wall thickenings occurred in diverse plant species and cell types differing in the type of growth we may conclude that pectinous cell wall thickenings formation is a widespread defense strategy of plants to cope with Pb. Moreover, detection of natural defense strategy, increasing plant cell walls capacity for metal accumulation, reveals a promising direction for enhancing plant efficiency in phytoremediation. PMID:27107260

  1. Screening of dried plant seed extracts for adiponectin production activity and tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitory activity on 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshinori; Okada, Mizue; Sagesaka, Yumi

    2010-09-01

    To search for dried plant seeds with potent anti-diabetes activity, we conducted a large scale screening for inhibitory activity on tumor necrosis factor-alpha and facilitating activity on adiponectin production in vitro. These activities in 3T3-L1 adipocytes were screened from ethanol extracts of 20 kinds of dried plant seed marketed in Japan. komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. perviridis), common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), qing geng cai (Brassica rapa var. chinensis), green soybean (Glycine max), spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) and sugar snap pea (Pisum sativum L.) markedly enhanced adiponectin production (11.3 ~ 12.7 ng/ml) but Japanese radish (Raphanus sativus), edible burdock (Arctium lappa L.), bitter melon (Momordica charantia) and broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) did not (0.9 ~ 2.7 ng/ml). All adiponectin-production-enhancing seeds except spinach (2.7 pg/ml) and okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (6.6 pg/ml) effectively decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels (0.0 pg/ml). We further examined the effects on free radical scavenging activities in the dried seed extracts. Although scavenging activity correlated well with total phenolic content of samples, no correlation was observed with adiponectin production. These results point to the potential of dried seed extracts as a means to modify the activity of tumor necrosis factor-alpha for the adiponectin production. PMID:20717728

  2. The dependence of aerosol formation in a plant chamber on temperature, UV radiation and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Hohaus, T.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tillmann, R.; Wildt, J.

    2009-04-01

    The ongoing climate change is expected to raise air temperatures; this will have an effect on the vegetation and its emission pattern. Biogenic VOC emissions are temperature dependent, with increasing temperatures causing increasing emissions. Increased temperatures could also lead to increased occurrences of heat stress in plants, inducing changes in plant emission patterns. This has given rise to propositions for a feedback between vegetation and climate, with increasing temperatures causing increased aerosol loading, which in turn has a cooling effect. We have investigated the dependence on the aerosol production from plant emissions on various environmental factors, such as temperature, RH or UV intensity in the Jülich Aerosol Atmosphere Plant Chamber setup (JPAC). Higher temperatures in the plant chamber lead to higher emissions; this also lead to higher particle number production as well as increased growth rates. Relative humidity and UV irradiation were also shown to influence particle formation; the possible chemical and physical pathways causing this will be discussed. We will also discuss the relative roles of formation rate and growth rate enhancements in producing cloud condensation nuclei utilising a simple aerosol dynamics modelling approach.

  3. [Microcrystalline cellulose and their flow -- morphological properties modifications as an effective excpients in tablet formulation technology containing lattice established API and also dry plant extract].

    PubMed

    Zgoda, Marian Mikołaj; Nachajski, Michał Jakub; Kołodziejczyk, Michał Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    The production technology of powder cellulose (Arbocel) and microcrystaline cellulose (Vivapur) and their application in the composition of direct compression tablet mass was provided. The function of silicified microcrystaline cellulose type Prosolv in the direct compression process of dry plant extract was discussed. An analysis of the chemical structure of cellulose fiber (Vitacel) enabled determining its properties and applications in the manufacture of diet supplement, pharmaceutical and food products. PMID:19580170

  4. Plant Hormone Homeostasis, Signaling, and Function during Adventitious Root Formation in Cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Druege, Uwe; Franken, Philipp; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R.

    2016-01-01

    Adventitious root (AR) formation in cuttings is a multiphase developmental process, resulting from wounding at the cutting site and isolation from the resource and signal network of the whole plant. Though, promotive effects of auxins are widely used for clonal plant propagation, the regulation and function of plant hormones and their intricate signaling networks during AR formation in cuttings are poorly understood. In this focused review, we discuss our recent publications on the involvement of polar auxin transport (PAT) and transcriptional regulation of auxin and ethylene action during AR formation in petunia cuttings in a broad context. Integrating new findings on cuttings of other plant species and general models on plant hormone networks, a model on the regulation and function of auxin, ethylene, and jasmonate in AR formation of cuttings is presented. PAT and cutting off from the basipetal auxin drain are considered as initial principles generating early accumulation of IAA in the rooting zone. This is expected to trigger a self-regulatory process of auxin canalization and maximization to responding target cells, there inducing the program of AR formation. Regulation of auxin homeostasis via auxin influx and efflux carriers, GH3 proteins and peroxidases, of flavonoid metabolism, and of auxin signaling via AUX/IAA proteins, TOPLESS, ARFs, and SAUR-like proteins are postulated as key processes determining the different phases of AR formation. NO and H2O2 mediate auxin signaling via the cGMP and MAPK cascades. Transcription factors of the GRAS-, AP2/ERF-, and WOX-families link auxin signaling to cell fate specification. Cyclin-mediated governing of the cell cycle, modifications of sugar metabolism and microtubule and cell wall remodeling are considered as important implementation processes of auxin function. Induced by the initial wounding and other abiotic stress factors, up-regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, and signaling via ERFs and early accumulation of

  5. Plant Hormone Homeostasis, Signaling, and Function during Adventitious Root Formation in Cuttings.

    PubMed

    Druege, Uwe; Franken, Philipp; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R

    2016-01-01

    Adventitious root (AR) formation in cuttings is a multiphase developmental process, resulting from wounding at the cutting site and isolation from the resource and signal network of the whole plant. Though, promotive effects of auxins are widely used for clonal plant propagation, the regulation and function of plant hormones and their intricate signaling networks during AR formation in cuttings are poorly understood. In this focused review, we discuss our recent publications on the involvement of polar auxin transport (PAT) and transcriptional regulation of auxin and ethylene action during AR formation in petunia cuttings in a broad context. Integrating new findings on cuttings of other plant species and general models on plant hormone networks, a model on the regulation and function of auxin, ethylene, and jasmonate in AR formation of cuttings is presented. PAT and cutting off from the basipetal auxin drain are considered as initial principles generating early accumulation of IAA in the rooting zone. This is expected to trigger a self-regulatory process of auxin canalization and maximization to responding target cells, there inducing the program of AR formation. Regulation of auxin homeostasis via auxin influx and efflux carriers, GH3 proteins and peroxidases, of flavonoid metabolism, and of auxin signaling via AUX/IAA proteins, TOPLESS, ARFs, and SAUR-like proteins are postulated as key processes determining the different phases of AR formation. NO and H2O2 mediate auxin signaling via the cGMP and MAPK cascades. Transcription factors of the GRAS-, AP2/ERF-, and WOX-families link auxin signaling to cell fate specification. Cyclin-mediated governing of the cell cycle, modifications of sugar metabolism and microtubule and cell wall remodeling are considered as important implementation processes of auxin function. Induced by the initial wounding and other abiotic stress factors, up-regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, and signaling via ERFs and early accumulation of

  6. Bacterial biofilm formation inhibitory activity revealed for plant derived natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Artini, M; Papa, R; Barbato, G; Scoarughi, G L; Cellini, A; Morazzoni, P; Bombardelli, E; Selan, L

    2012-01-15

    Use of herbal plant remedies to treat infectious diseases is a common practice in many countries in traditional and alternative medicine. However to date there are only few antimicrobial agents derived from botanics. Based on microbiological screening tests of crude plant extracts we identified four compounds derived from Krameria, Aesculus hippocastanum and Chelidonium majus that showed a potentially interesting antimicrobial activity. In this work we present an in depth characterization of the inhibition activity of these pure compounds on the formation of biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus as well as of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. We show that two of these compounds possess interesting potential to become active principles of new drugs. PMID:22182580

  7. Alternative modes of biofilm formation by plant-associated Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Tantan; Foulston, Lucy; Chai, Yunrong; Wang, Qi; Losick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The ability to form multicellular communities known as biofilms is a widespread adaptive behavior of bacteria. Members of the Bacillus group of bacteria have been found to form biofilms on plant roots, where they protect against pathogens and promote growth. In the case of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis the genetic pathway controlling biofilm formation and the production of an extracellular matrix is relatively well understood. However, it is unclear whether other members of this genus utilize similar mechanisms. We determined that a plant-associated strain of Bacillus cereus (905) can form biofilms by two seemingly independent pathways. In one mode involving the formation of floating biofilms (pellicles) B. cereus 905 appears to rely on orthologs of many of the genes known to be important for B. subtilis biofilm formation. We report that B. cereus 905 also forms submerged, surface-associated biofilms and in a manner that resembles biofilm formation by the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. This alternative mode, which does not rely on B. subtilis-like genes for pellicle formation, takes place under conditions of glucose fermentation and depends on a drop in the pH of the medium. PMID:25828975

  8. Colorimetric Method for Identifying Plant Essential Oil Components That Affect Biofilm Formation and Structure

    PubMed Central

    Niu, C.; Gilbert, E. S.

    2004-01-01

    The specific biofilm formation (SBF) assay, a technique based on crystal violet staining, was developed to locate plant essential oils and their components that affect biofilm formation. SBF analysis determined that cinnamon, cassia, and citronella oils differentially affected growth-normalized biofilm formation by Escherichia coli. Examination of the corresponding essential oil principal components by the SBF assay revealed that cinnamaldehyde decreased biofilm formation compared to biofilms grown in Luria-Bertani broth, eugenol did not result in a change, and citronellol increased the SBF. To evaluate these results, two microscopy-based assays were employed. First, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to examine E. coli biofilms cultivated in flow cells, which were quantitatively analyzed by COMSTAT, an image analysis program. The overall trend for five parameters that characterize biofilm development corroborated the findings of the SBF assay. Second, the results of an assay measuring growth-normalized adhesion by direct microscopy concurred with the results of the SBF assay and CLSM imaging. Viability staining indicated that there was reduced toxicity of the essential oil components to cells in biofilms compared to the toxicity to planktonic cells but revealed morphological damage to E. coli after cinnamaldehyde exposure. Cinnamaldehyde also inhibited the swimming motility of E. coli. SBF analysis of three Pseudomonas species exposed to cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, or citronellol revealed diverse responses. The SBF assay could be useful as an initial step for finding plant essential oils and their components that affect biofilm formation and structure. PMID:15574886

  9. Cadmium induces hypodermal periderm formation in the roots of the monocotyledonous medicinal plant Merwilla plumbea

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Alexander; Vaculík, Marek; Martinka, Michal; Lišková, Desana; Kulkarni, Manoj G.; Stirk, Wendy A.; Van Staden, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Merwilla plumbea is an important African medicinal plant. As the plants grow in soils contaminated with metals from mining activities, the danger of human intoxication exists. An experiment with plants exposed to cadmium (Cd) was performed to investigate the response of M. plumbea to this heavy metal, its uptake and translocation to plant organs and reaction of root tissues. Methods Plants grown from seeds were cultivated in controlled conditions. Hydroponic cultivation is not suitable for this species as roots do not tolerate aquatic conditions, and additional stress by Cd treatment results in total root growth inhibition and death. After cultivation in perlite the plants exposed to 1 and 5 mg Cd L−1 in half-strength Hoagland's solution were compared with control plants. Growth parameters were evaluated, Cd content was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and root structure was investigated using various staining procedures, including the fluorescent stain Fluorol yellow 088 to detect suberin deposition in cell walls. Key Results The plants exposed to Cd were significantly reduced in growth. Most of the Cd taken up by plants after 4 weeks cultivation was retained in roots, and only a small amount was translocated to bulbs and leaves. In reaction to higher Cd concentrations, roots developed a hypodermal periderm close to the root tip. Cells produced by cork cambium impregnate their cell walls by suberin. Conclusions It is suggested that the hypodermal periderm is developed in young root parts in reaction to Cd toxicity to protect the root from radial uptake of Cd ions. Secondary meristems are usually not present in monocotyledonous species. Another interpretation explaining formation of protective suberized layers as a result of periclinal divisions of the hypodermis is discussed. This process may represent an as yet unknown defence reaction of roots when exposed to elemental stress. PMID:21118841

  10. Modelling new particle formation from Jülich plant atmosphere chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Li; Boy, Michael; Mogensen, Ditte; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Franchin, Alessandro; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kleist, Einhard; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kulmala, Markku; dal Maso, Miikka

    2013-05-01

    An MALTE-BOX model is used to study the effects of oxidation of SO2 and BVOCs to new particle formation from Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements. Several days of continuously measurements were chosen for the simulation. Our preliminary results show that H2SO4 is one of the critical compounds in nucleation process. Nucleation involving the oxidation of BVOCs shows better agreements with measurements.