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Sample records for dual task conditions

  1. Performance Enhancements Under Dual-task Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, A. F.; Wickens, C. D.; Donchin, E.

    1984-01-01

    Research on dual-task performance has been concerned with delineating the antecedent conditions which lead to dual-task decrements. Capacity models of attention, which propose that a hypothetical resource structure underlies performance, have been employed as predictive devices. These models predict that tasks which require different processing resources can be more successfully time shared than tasks which require common resources. The conditions under which such dual-task integrality can be fostered were assessed in a study in which three factors likely to influence the integrality between tasks were manipulated: inter-task redundancy, the physical proximity of tasks and the task relevant objects. Twelve subjects participated in three experimental sessions in which they performed both single and dual-tasks. The primary task was a pursuit step tracking task. The secondary tasks required the discrimination between different intensities or different spatial positions of a stimulus. The results are discussed in terms of a model of dual-task integrality.

  2. Mind wandering in text comprehension under dual-task conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Peter; Li, Henry

    2013-01-01

    In two experiments, subjects responded to on-task probes while reading under dual-task conditions. The secondary task was to monitor the text for occurrences of the letter e. In Experiment 1, reading comprehension was assessed with a multiple-choice recognition test; in Experiment 2, subjects recalled the text. In both experiments, the secondary task replicated the well-known “missing-letter effect” in which detection of e's was less effective for function words and the word “the.” Letter detection was also more effective when subjects were on task, but this effect did not interact with the missing-letter effect. Comprehension was assessed in both the dual-task conditions and in control single-task conditions. In the single-task conditions, both recognition (Experiment 1) and recall (Experiment 2) was better when subjects were on task, replicating previous research on mind wandering. Surprisingly, though, comprehension under dual-task conditions only showed an effect of being on task when measured with recall; there was no effect on recognition performance. Our interpretation of this pattern of results is that subjects generate responses to on-task probes on the basis of a retrospective assessment of the contents of working memory. Further, we argue that under dual-task conditions, the contents of working memory is not closely related to the reading processes required for accurate recognition performance. These conclusions have implications for models of text comprehension and for the interpretation of on-task probe responses. PMID:24101909

  3. Dual-task conditions modulate the efficiency of selective attention mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Festa, Elena K; Heindel, William C; Ott, Brian R

    2010-09-01

    Given previous demonstrations of both selective and divided attention deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, understanding how declines in the integrity of component processes of selective attention in these patients interact with impairments to executive processes mediating dual-task performance has both theoretical and practical relevance. To address this issue, healthy elderly and AD patients performed computerized tasks of spatial orienting, Simon response interference, and visual search both in isolation and while simultaneously engaged in a visuomotor tracking task (i.e., maintaining car position within a simulated driving environment). Results from the single-task conditions confirmed previous demonstrations of selective attention deficits in AD. Dual-task conditions produced in AD patients (but not healthy elderly) a change in the efficiency of the selective attention mechanisms themselves, as reflected in differential effects on cue or display conditions within each task. Rather than exacerbating the selective attention deficits observed under single-task conditions, however, dual-task conditions produced an apparent diminution of these deficits. We suggest this diminution is due to the combination of deficient top-down inhibitory processes along with a decrease in the attention-capturing properties of cue information under dual-task conditions in AD patients. These findings not only increase our understanding of the nature of the attentional deficits in AD patients, but also have implications for understanding the processes mediating attention in neurologically intact individuals. PMID:20621109

  4. Parallel Response Selection Disrupts Sequence Learning under Dual-Task Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Eric H.; Schwarb, Hillary

    2009-01-01

    Some studies suggest that dual-task processing impairs sequence learning; others suggest it does not. The reason for this discrepancy remains obscure. It may have to do with the dual-task procedure often used. Many dual-task sequence learning studies pair the serial reaction time (SRT) task with a tone-counting secondary task. The tone-counting…

  5. Standing balance in individuals with Parkinson's disease during single and dual-task conditions.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ângela; Coelho, Tiago; Vitória, Ana; Ferreira, Augusto; Santos, Rubim; Rocha, Nuno; Fernandes, Lia; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the differences in standing balance between individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) and subjects without PD (control group), under single and dual-task conditions. A cross-sectional study was designed using a non-probabilistic sample of 110 individuals (50 participants with PD and 60 controls) aged 50 years old and over. The individuals with PD were in the early or middle stages of the disease (characterized by Hoehn and Yahr as stages 1-3). The standing balance was assessed by measuring the centre of pressure (CoP) displacement in single-task (eyes-open/eyes-closed) and dual-task (while performing two different verbal fluency tasks). No significant differences were found between the groups regarding sociodemographic variables. In general, the standing balance of the individuals with PD was worse than the controls, as the CoP displacement across tasks was significantly higher for the individuals with PD (p<0.01), both in anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. Moreover, there were significant differences in the CoP displacement based parameters between the conditions, mainly between the eyes-open condition and the remaining conditions. However, there was no significant interaction found between group and condition, which suggests that changes in the CoP displacement between tasks were not influenced by having PD. In conclusion, this study shows that, although individuals with PD had a worse overall standing balance than individuals without the disease, the impact of performing an additional task on the CoP displacement is similar for both groups. PMID:26149283

  6. Prefrontal Cortex Activation While Walking Under Dual-Task Conditions in Stroke: A Multimodal Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Yahya, Emad; Johansen-Berg, Heidi; Kischka, Udo; Zarei, Mojtaba; Cockburn, Janet; Dawes, Helen

    2016-07-01

    Background Walking while performing another task (eg, talking) is challenging for many stroke survivors, yet its neural basis are not fully understood. Objective To investigate prefrontal cortex activation and its relationship to gait measures while walking under single-task (ST) and dual-task (DT) conditions (ie, walking while simultaneously performing a cognitive task) in stroke survivors. Methods We acquired near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) data from the prefrontal cortex during treadmill walking in ST and DT conditions in chronic stroke survivors and healthy controls. We also acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and NIRS during simulated walking under these conditions. Results NIRS revealed increased oxygenated hemoglobin concentration in DT-walking compared with ST-walking for both groups. For simulated walking, NIRS showed a significant effect of group and group × task, being greater on both occasions, in stroke survivors. A greater increase in brain activation observed from ST to DT walking/ simulated walking was related to a greater change in motor performance in stroke survivors. fMRI revealed increased activity during DT relative to ST conditions in stroke patients in areas including the inferior temporal gyri, superior frontal gyri and cingulate gyri bilaterally, and the right precentral gyrus. The DT-related increase in fMRI activity correlated with DT-related change in behavior in stroke participants in the bilateral inferior temporal gyrus, left cingulate gyrus, and left frontal pole. Conclusion Our results provide novel evidence that enhanced brain activity changes relate to dual task motor decrements. PMID:26493732

  7. The relation between the Type A behavior pattern, pacing, and subjective workload under single- and dual-task conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damos, D.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty Type A and 20 Type B subjects performed two discrete tasks alone and together. Half of the subjects performed paced versions of both tasks; half, unpaced versions. Workload ratings were obtained for all subjects under single- and dual-task conditions using eight bipolar adjective scales. Under single-task conditions there was a significant interaction between behavior pattern and pacing on one of the tasks. This interaction indicated that Type A subjects responded more rapidly under unpaced conditions than did Type B subjects, although there was little difference between the groups under paced conditions. Under dual-task conditions, Type A subjects responded more rapidly than did Type B subjects regardless of pacing. There was one significant interaction between behavior pattern and task on one of the workload scales.

  8. Sonification of in-vehicle interface reduces gaze movements under dual-task condition.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, Julien; Misdariis, Nicolas; Langlois, Sabine; Gaillard, Pascal; Lemercier, Céline

    2015-09-01

    In-car infotainment systems (ICIS) often degrade driving performances since they divert the driver's gaze from the driving scene. Sonification of hierarchical menus (such as those found in most ICIS) is examined in this paper as one possible solution to reduce gaze movements towards the visual display. In a dual-task experiment in the laboratory, 46 participants were requested to prioritize a primary task (a continuous target detection task) and to simultaneously navigate in a realistic mock-up of an ICIS, either sonified or not. Results indicated that sonification significantly increased the time spent looking at the primary task, and significantly decreased the number and the duration of gaze saccades towards the ICIS. In other words, the sonified ICIS could be used nearly exclusively by ear. On the other hand, the reaction times in the primary task were increased in both silent and sonified conditions. This study suggests that sonification of secondary tasks while driving could improve the driver's visual attention of the driving scene. PMID:25959316

  9. Orienting attention in visual working memory requires central capacity: Decreased retro-cue effects under dual-task conditions

    PubMed Central

    Berryhill, Marian E.

    2014-01-01

    The retro-cue effect (RCE) describes superior working memory performance for validly cued stimulus locations long after encoding has ended. Importantly, this happens with delays beyond the range of iconic memory. In general, the RCE is a stable phenomenon that emerges under varied stimulus configurations and timing parameters. We investigated its susceptibility to dual-task interference to determine the attentional requirements at the time point of cue onset and encoding. In Experiment 1, we compared single- with dual-task conditions. In Experiment 2, we borrowed from the psychological refractory period paradigm and compared conditions with high and low (dual-) task overlap. The secondary task was always binary tone discrimination requiring amanual response. Across both experiments, an RCE was found, but it was diminished in magnitude in the critical dual-task conditions. A previous study did not find evidence that sustained attention is required in the interval between cue offset and test. Our results apparently contradict these findings and point to a critical time period around cue onset and briefly thereafter during which attention is required. PMID:24452383

  10. Effects of muscle fatigue on gait characteristics under single and dual-task conditions in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Muscle fatigue and dual-task walking (e.g., concurrent performance of a cognitive interference (CI) while walking) represent major fall risk factors in young and older adults. Thus, the objectives of this study were to examine the effects of muscle fatigue on gait characteristics under single and dual-task conditions in young and older adults and to determine the impact of muscle fatigue on dual-task costs while walking. Methods Thirty-two young (24.3 ± 1.4 yrs, n = 16) and old (71.9 ± 5.5 yrs, n = 16) healthy active adults participated in this study. Fatigue of the knee extensors/flexors was induced by isokinetic contractions. Subjects were tested pre and post fatigue, as well as after a 5 min rest. Tests included the assessment of gait velocity, stride length, and stride length variability during single (walking), and dual (CI+walking) task walking on an instrumented walkway. Dual-task costs while walking were additionally computed. Results Fatigue resulted in significant decreases in single-task gait velocity and stride length in young adults, and in significant increases in dual-task gait velocity and stride length in older adults. Further, muscle fatigue did not affect dual-task costs during walking in young and older adults. Performance in the CI-task was improved in both age groups post-fatigue. Conclusions Strategic and/or physiologic rationale may account for the observed differences in young and older adults. In terms of strategic rationale, older adults may walk faster with longer strides in order to overcome the feeling of fatigue-induced physical discomfort as quickly as possible. Alternatively, older adults may have learned how to compensate for age-related and/or fatigue-induced muscle deficits during walking by increasing muscle power of synergistic muscle groups (e.g., hip flexors). Further, a practice and/or learning effect may have occurred from pre to post testing. Physiologic rationale may comprise motor unit remodeling in old age

  11. Age-associated differences in global and segmental control during dual-task walking under sub-optimal sensory conditions.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Nandini; Hewston, Patricia; Yoshikawa, Mika

    2015-04-01

    The ability to safely perform cognitive-motor dual-tasks is critical for independence of older adults. We compared age-associated differences in global and segmental control during dual-task walking in sub-optimal sensory conditions. Thirteen young (YA) and 13 healthy older (OA) adults walked a straight pathway with cognitive dual-task of walking-while-talking (WT) or no-WT under four sensory conditions. On randomly selected trials, visual and vestibular inputs were manipulated using blurring goggles (BV) and Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS), respectively. Gait speed decreased more in YA than OA during WT. Gait speed increased with GVS with normal vision but not BV. Step length considerably decreased with WT. Trunk roll significantly decreased only in OA with GVS in WT. Head roll significantly decreased with GVS regardless of age. Results indicate GVS-induced adaptations were dependent on available visual information. YA reduced their gait speed more than OA to achieve a similar pace to safely perform WT. GVS resulted in both age-groups to reduce head movement. However, with the addition of WT during GVS, OA also stiffened their trunk. Therefore, with increased attentional demands healthy OA employed different compensatory strategies than YA to maintain postural control. PMID:25617991

  12. Task Interference in Time-Based, Event-Based, and Dual Intention Prospective Memory Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Jason L.; Marsh, Richard L.; Cook, Gabriel I.

    2005-01-01

    Forming the intention to complete an activity later is the standard definition of a prospective memory task. Recently, a debate has arisen concerning the degree to which near-term intentions usurp resources away from other ongoing activities. In four experiments the authors tested how much interference was caused by holding a variety of different…

  13. Dual task performance with LPC (Linear Predictive Coding) degraded speech in a sentence verification task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Nielsen, Astrid; Kallman, Howard J.; Meijer, Corinne

    1989-10-01

    The results of a preliminary study on the effects of reduced speech intelligibility on dual task performance are reported. The speech task was a sentence verification task, and the speech degradation was accomplished using a narrowband digital voice transmission system operating with and without random bit errors. The second task was a visual picture sorting task. There was a dual task decrement on the sorting task, and in addition, there was a further decrease in sorts per minute as the speech was increasingly degraded. Reaction time for the speech task increased with the concurrent sorting task, but the dual task condition did not affect speech task error rates.

  14. Task Prioritization in Dual-Tasking: Instructions versus Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Reinier J.; van Egmond, René; de Ridder, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The role of task prioritization in performance tradeoffs during multi-tasking has received widespread attention. However, little is known on whether people have preferences regarding tasks, and if so, whether these preferences conflict with priority instructions. Three experiments were conducted with a high-speed driving game and an auditory memory task. In Experiment 1, participants did not receive priority instructions. Participants performed different sequences of single-task and dual-task conditions. Task performance was evaluated according to participants’ retrospective accounts on preferences. These preferences were reformulated as priority instructions in Experiments 2 and 3. The results showed that people differ in their preferences regarding task prioritization in an experimental setting, which can be overruled by priority instructions, but only after increased dual-task exposure. Additional measures of mental effort showed that performance tradeoffs had an impact on mental effort. The interpretation of these findings was used to explore an extension of Threaded Cognition Theory with Hockey’s Compensatory Control Model. PMID:27391779

  15. A cognitive-motor intervention using a dance video game to enhance foot placement accuracy and gait under dual task conditions in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computer-based interventions have demonstrated consistent positive effects on various physical abilities in older adults. This study aims to compare two training groups that achieve similar amounts of strength and balance exercise where one group receives an intervention that includes additional dance video gaming. The aim is to investigate the different effects of the training programs on physical and psychological parameters in older adults. Methods Thirty-one participants (mean age ± SD: 86.2 ± 4.6 years), residents of two Swiss hostels for the aged, were randomly assigned to either the dance group (n = 15) or the control group (n = 16). The dance group absolved a twelve-week cognitive-motor exercise program twice weekly that comprised progressive strength and balance training supplemented with additional dance video gaming. The control group performed only the strength and balance exercises during this period. Outcome measures were foot placement accuracy, gait performance under single and dual task conditions, and falls efficacy. Results After the intervention between-group comparison revealed significant differences for gait velocity (U = 26, P = .041, r = .45) and for single support time (U = 24, P = .029, r = .48) during the fast walking dual task condition in favor of the dance group. No significant between-group differences were observed either in the foot placement accuracy test or in falls efficacy. Conclusions There was a significant interaction in favor of the dance video game group for improvements in step time. Significant improved fast walking performance under dual task conditions (velocity, double support time, step length) was observed for the dance video game group only. These findings suggest that in older adults a cognitive-motor intervention may result in more improved gait under dual task conditions in comparison to a traditional strength and balance exercise program. Trial registration

  16. Modulation of executive control in dual tasks with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).

    PubMed

    Strobach, Tilo; Soutschek, Alexander; Antonenko, Daria; Flöel, Agnes; Schubert, Torsten

    2015-02-01

    Executive processing in dual tasks is primarily associated with activation of the lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC), which is demonstrated in functional imaging studies (e.g., Szameitat et al., 2006). However, a causal relation between lPFC activity and executive functions in dual tasks has not been demonstrated so far. Here, we used anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (atDCS [1 mA, 20 min] vs. sham stimulation [1 mA, 30s]) over the left inferior frontal junction under conditions of random and fixed task order in dual tasks as well as in single tasks in healthy young individuals (Experiment 1). We found that atDCS, if administered simultaneously to the task, improved performance in random-order dual tasks, but not in fixed-order dual tasks and single tasks. Moreover, dual-task performance under random-order conditions did not improve if atDCS was applied prior to the task performance. The identical procedure in Experiment 2 showed no difference in dual-task performance under random-task order conditions when we compared cathodal tDCS (ctDCS) with sham stimulation. Our findings suggest that dual-task performance is causally related to lPFC activation under conditions that require task-order decisions and high demands on executive functioning. Subsequent studies may now explore if atDCS leads to sustained improvements parallel to the training of dual tasks. PMID:25556813

  17. Reduction of Dual-task Costs by Noninvasive Modulation of Prefrontal Activity in Healthy Elders

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Brad; Zhou, Junhong; Jor'dan, Azizah; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Dual tasking (e.g., walking or standing while performing a cognitive task) disrupts performance in one or both tasks, and such dual-task costs increase with aging into senescence. Dual tasking activates a network of brain regions including pFC. We therefore hypothesized that facilitation of prefrontal cortical activity via transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) would reduce dual-task costs in older adults. Thirty-seven healthy older adults completed two visits during which dual tasking was assessed before and after 20 min of real or sham tDCS targeting the left pFC. Trials of single-task standing, walking, and verbalized serial subtractions were completed, along with dual-task trials of standing or walking while performing serial subtractions. Dual-task costs were calculated as the percent change in markers of gait and postural control and serial subtraction performance, from single to dual tasking. Significant dual-task costs to standing, walking, and serial subtraction performance were observed before tDCS (p < .01). These dual-task costs were less after real tDCS as compared with sham tDCS as well as compared with either pre-tDCS condition (p < .03). Further analyses indicated that tDCS did not alter single task performance but instead improved performance solely within dual-task conditions (p < .02). These results demonstrate that dual tasking can be improved by modulating prefrontal activity, thus indicating that dual-task decrements are modifiable and may not necessarily reflect an obligatory consequence of aging. Moreover, tDCS may ultimately serve as a novel approach to preserving dual-task capacity into senescence. PMID:26488591

  18. Dual Task Performance in Normal Aging: A Comparison of Choice Reaction Time Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Vaportzis, Eleftheria; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Stout, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined dual task performance in 28 younger (18–30 years) and 28 older (>60 years) adults using two sets of choice reaction time (RT) tasks paired with digit tasks. Set one paired simple choice RT with digit forward; set two paired complex choice RT with digit backward. Each task within each set had easy and hard conditions. For the simple choice RT, participants viewed single letters and pressed a specified keyboard key if the letter was X or Z or a different key for other letters (easy). For the hard condition, there were 4 target letters (X, Z, O, Y). Digit forward consisted of 4 (easy) or 5 (hard) digits. For the complex choice RT, participants viewed 4×4 matrices of Xs and Os, and indicated whether four Xs (easy) or four Xs or four Os (hard) appeared in a row. Digit backward consisted of 3 (easy) or 4 (hard) digits. Within each set, participants performed every possible combination of tasks. We found that in the simple choice RT tasks older adults were significantly slower than, but as accurate as younger adults. In the complex choice RT tasks, older adults were significantly less accurate, but as fast as younger adults. For both age groups and both dual task sets, RT decreased and error rates increased with greater task difficulty. Older adults had greater dual task costs for error rates in the simple choice RT, whereas in the complex choice RT, it was the younger group that had greater dual task costs. Findings suggest that younger and older adults may adopt differential behavioral strategies depending on complexity and difficulty of dual tasks. PMID:23555937

  19. The Effect of Dual Task Demands and Proficiency on Second Language Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Declerck, Mathieu; Kormos, Judit

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examined how the introduction of a parallel finger-tapping task influences second language (L2) speech encoding mechanisms and monitoring processes, and how the level of proficiency impacts the efficiency and accuracy of L2 performance under single and dual task conditions. The results indicate that imposing dual task demands had…

  20. Why practice reduces dual-task interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, E.; Johnston, J. C.; Van Selst, M.

    2001-01-01

    M. A. Van Selst, E. Ruthruff, and J. C. Johnston (1999) found that practice dramatically reduced dual-task interference in a Psychological Refractory Period (PRP) paradigm with 1 vocal response and 1 manual response. Results from 3 further experiments using the highly trained participants of M. A. Van Selst et al. (1999) support 4 main conclusions: (a) A processing bottleneck exists even after extensive practice; (b) the principal cause of the reduction in PRP interference with practice is shortening of Task 1 bottleneck stages; (c) a secondary cause is that 1 or more, but not all, of the Task 2 substages that are postponed before practice are not postponed after practice (i.e., become automatized); and (d) the extent of PRP reduction with practice depends on the modalities of the 2 responses. A control experiment with 2 manual response tasks showed less PRP reduction with practice than that found by Van Selst et al.

  1. Brain activations during bimodal dual tasks depend on the nature and combination of component tasks.

    PubMed

    Salo, Emma; Rinne, Teemu; Salonen, Oili; Alho, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain activations during nine different dual tasks in which the participants were required to simultaneously attend to concurrent streams of spoken syllables and written letters. They performed a phonological, spatial or "simple" (speaker-gender or font-shade) discrimination task within each modality. We expected to find activations associated specifically with dual tasking especially in the frontal and parietal cortices. However, no brain areas showed systematic dual task enhancements common for all dual tasks. Further analysis revealed that dual tasks including component tasks that were according to Baddeley's model "modality atypical," that is, the auditory spatial task or the visual phonological task, were not associated with enhanced frontal activity. In contrast, for other dual tasks, activity specifically associated with dual tasking was found in the left or bilateral frontal cortices. Enhanced activation in parietal areas, however, appeared not to be specifically associated with dual tasking per se, but rather with intermodal attention switching. We also expected effects of dual tasking in left frontal supramodal phonological processing areas when both component tasks required phonological processing and in right parietal supramodal spatial processing areas when both tasks required spatial processing. However, no such effects were found during these dual tasks compared with their component tasks performed separately. Taken together, the current results indicate that activations during dual tasks depend in a complex manner on specific demands of component tasks. PMID:25767443

  2. Brain activations during bimodal dual tasks depend on the nature and combination of component tasks

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Emma; Rinne, Teemu; Salonen, Oili; Alho, Kimmo

    2015-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain activations during nine different dual tasks in which the participants were required to simultaneously attend to concurrent streams of spoken syllables and written letters. They performed a phonological, spatial or “simple” (speaker-gender or font-shade) discrimination task within each modality. We expected to find activations associated specifically with dual tasking especially in the frontal and parietal cortices. However, no brain areas showed systematic dual task enhancements common for all dual tasks. Further analysis revealed that dual tasks including component tasks that were according to Baddeley's model “modality atypical,” that is, the auditory spatial task or the visual phonological task, were not associated with enhanced frontal activity. In contrast, for other dual tasks, activity specifically associated with dual tasking was found in the left or bilateral frontal cortices. Enhanced activation in parietal areas, however, appeared not to be specifically associated with dual tasking per se, but rather with intermodal attention switching. We also expected effects of dual tasking in left frontal supramodal phonological processing areas when both component tasks required phonological processing and in right parietal supramodal spatial processing areas when both tasks required spatial processing. However, no such effects were found during these dual tasks compared with their component tasks performed separately. Taken together, the current results indicate that activations during dual tasks depend in a complex manner on specific demands of component tasks. PMID:25767443

  3. Evidence for parallel semantic memory retrieval in dual tasks.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Rico; Miller, Jeff; Shubert, Torsten

    2007-10-01

    In this dual-task study, we applied both cross-talk logic and locus-of-slack logic to test whether participants can retrieve semantic categories in Task 2 in parallel to Task 1 bottleneck processing. Whereas cross-talk logic can detect parallel memory retrieval only in conditions of categorical overlap between tasks, the locus-of-slack approach is independent of such restrictions. As was expected, using the cross-talk logic, we found clear evidence for parallel retrieval of semantic categories when there was categorical overlap between tasks (Experiment 1). Locus-of-slack-based evidence for parallel semantic retrieval was found, however, both in conditions with (Experiment 1) and in those without (Experiment 2) categorical overlap between tasks. Crucially,however, increasing the demand for resources required to switch from Task 1 to Task 2 eliminated even the locus-of-slack-based evidence for parallel memory retrieval during the psychological refractory period (Experiment 3). Together, our results suggest that parallel retrieval is not bound to conditions of categorical overlap between tasks but, instead, is contingent upon resources needed for switching between tasks (e.g., Oriet, Tombu, & Jolicoeur, 2005). PMID:18062546

  4. Dual task demands on encoding and retrieval processes: evidence from healthy adult ageing.

    PubMed

    Logie, Robert H; Della Sala, Sergio; MacPherson, Sarah E; Cooper, Janine

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies of dual-task performance have demonstrated that encoding and retrieval processes are differentially affected by the simultaneous performance of a secondary task. Whilst dual task demands during encoding have a detrimental effect on memory performance, dual task demands during retrieval have a detrimental effect on secondary task performance. However, dual task effects on memory during encoding appear unaffected by age, while effects at retrieval on secondary task performance are age sensitive. Most previous studies have focused on free recall or cued recall of word lists. In the current study, encoding and retrieval were examined in younger and older healthy adults performing a task typically thought to load verbal working memory, namely immediate serial ordered digit recall together with a response time (RT) task. In Experiment 1, the demands of a secondary RT task were varied as a function of response-to-stimulus interval, while in Experiment 2 the predictability of the stimulus location was manipulated. In both age groups, dual task during encoding, but not at retrieval, produced significant interference in memory performance and unlike most previous studies the impact at encoding was greater for the older group. In contrast, significantly slower RTs were demonstrated under dual task conditions during encoding and retrieval. Older adults produced significantly slower RTs than younger adults only for dual task at retrieval. Older people were more sensitive to time pressure in responding under dual task conditions, but neither group was sensitive to predictability of stimulus location. Results are consistent with the concept of a cognitive resource that supports dual task performance, and that is sensitive to the effects of age on memory encoding of items that rely heavily on the operation of verbal working memory resources. The age sensitivity to dual task only became apparent when effects at encoding and at retrieval were considered separately

  5. Investigating Perfect Timesharing: The Relationship between IM-Compatible Tasks and Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halvorson, Kimberly M.; Ebner, Herschel; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    Why are dual-task costs reduced with ideomotor (IM) compatible tasks (Greenwald & Shulman, 1973; Lien, Proctor & Allen, 2002)? In the present experiments, we first examine three different measures of single-task performance (pure single-task blocks, mixed blocks, and long stimulus onset asynchrony [SOA] trials in dual-task blocks) and two measures…

  6. Electronic map interpretation in a dual-task context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Henry P.; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1991-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to assess the extent to which spatial and verbal-analytic (VA) information processing resources are used in performing a simulated aircraft navigation task. Subjects were required to decide whether a 'match' or a mismatch' existed between a schematic 3D perspective forward field of view and a 2D top-down map. On dual-task trials, this navigation task was concurrently performed with either a VA side-task or with one of two tracking tasks. The data suggest that a VA strategy was most likely to be used when stimuli were simple or were mismatches, whereas a spatial mental rotation strategy was apparently used to confirm complex match stimuli. These results indicate that it may be possible to specify conditions wherein navigation is likely to compete for resources critical to other cockpit activities, such as aircraft control and communication.

  7. Instructions and skill level influence reliability of dual-task performance in young adults.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Prudence; Grewal, Gurtej; Najafi, Bijan; Ballard, Amy

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the trial-to-trial repeatability of dual-task performance and establish the minimal detectable change (MDC95) of gait-related dual-task interference. Thirty-one healthy young adults (22.5, SD 2.1 years) performed texting and walking tasks in isolation (single-task) and in combination (dual-task). The dual-task was repeated with three different instructional sets regarding how attention should be prioritized (no-priority, gait-priority, texting-priority) in two different environments (low-distraction, high-distraction). Participants performed two trials for each condition. Trial-to-trial repeatability of gait speed, texting speed, texting accuracy, and the relative dual-task effects (DTE) on each was examined using intraclass correlation coefficients and standard error of measurement. MDC95 scores were also computed for each performance measure. Among young adults, reliability of gait speed in a challenging dual-task situation is excellent, even in a high-distraction environment. In the absence of specific task prioritization instructions, changes in dual-task gait speed greater than 0.15m/s or 11.9% DTE represent real change. Reliability of the more novel, non-gait task has poor to good reliability. Dual-task effects are more reliable when participants are given specific instructions about how to prioritize their attention. The findings also suggest that reliability of dual-task performance in a novel or challenging task is greater when individuals are more skilled at the task. Implications for clinical assessment of dual-task performance are discussed. PMID:25891529

  8. The effects of dual tasking on handwriting in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Broeder, S; Nackaerts, E; Nieuwboer, A; Smits-Engelsman, B C M; Swinnen, S P; Heremans, E

    2014-03-28

    Previous studies have shown that patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) experience extensive problems during dual tasking. Up to now, dual-task interference in PD has mainly been investigated in the context of gait research. However, the simultaneous performance of two different tasks is also a prerequisite to efficiently perform many other tasks in daily life, including upper limb tasks. To address this issue, this study investigated the effect of a secondary cognitive task on the performance of handwriting in patients with PD. Eighteen PD patients and 11 age-matched controls performed a writing task involving the production of repetitive loops under single- and dual-task conditions. The secondary task consisted of counting high and low tones during writing. The writing tests were performed with two amplitudes (0.6 and 1.0cm) using a writing tablet. Results showed that dual-task performance was affected in PD patients versus controls. Dual tasking reduced writing amplitude in PD patients, but not in healthy controls (p=0.046). Patients' writing size was mainly reduced during the small-amplitude condition (small amplitude p=0.017; large amplitude p=0.310). This suggests that the control of writing at small amplitudes requires more compensational brain-processing recourses in PD and is as such less automatic than writing at large amplitudes. In addition, there was a larger dual-task effect on the secondary task in PD patients than controls (p=0.025). The writing tests on the writing tablet proved highly correlated to daily life writing as measured by the 'Systematic Screening of Handwriting Difficulties' test (SOS-test) and other manual dexterity tasks, particularly during dual-task conditions. Taken together, these results provide additional insights into the motor control of handwriting and the effects of dual tasking during upper limb movements in patients with PD. PMID:24447597

  9. Increased Brain Activation for Dual Tasking with 70-Days Head-Down Bed Rest.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A; De Dios, Yiri E; Gadd, Nichole E; Wood, Scott J; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor S; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Seidler, Rachael D

    2016-01-01

    Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) has been used as a spaceflight analog to simulate the effects of microgravity exposure on human physiology, sensorimotor function, and cognition on Earth. Previous studies have reported that concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can be impaired during space missions. Understanding the consequences of HDBR for neural control of dual tasking may possibly provide insight into neural efficiency during spaceflight. In the current study, we evaluated how dual task performance and the underlying brain activation changed as a function of HDBR. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. They remained continuously in the 6° head-down tilt position for 70 days. Functional MRI for bimanual finger tapping was acquired during both single task and dual task conditions, and repeated at 7 time points pre-, during- and post-HDBR. Another 12 healthy males participated as controls who did not undergo HDBR. A widely distributed network involving the frontal, parietal, cingulate, temporal, and occipital cortices exhibited increased activation for dual tasking and increased activation differences between dual and single task conditions during HDBR relative to pre- or post-HDBR. This HDBR-related brain activation increase for dual tasking implies that more neurocognitive control is needed for dual task execution during HDBR compared to pre- and post-HDBR. We observed a positive correlation between pre-to-post HDBR changes in dual-task cost of reaction time and pre-to-post HDBR change in dual-task cost of brain activation in several cerebral and cerebellar regions. These findings could be predictive of changes in dual task processing during spaceflight. PMID:27601982

  10. Increased Brain Activation for Dual Tasking with 70-Days Head-Down Bed Rest

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng; Koppelmans, Vincent; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A.; De Dios, Yiri E.; Gadd, Nichole E.; Wood, Scott J.; Riascos, Roy; Kofman, Igor S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2016-01-01

    Head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR) has been used as a spaceflight analog to simulate the effects of microgravity exposure on human physiology, sensorimotor function, and cognition on Earth. Previous studies have reported that concurrent performance of motor and cognitive tasks can be impaired during space missions. Understanding the consequences of HDBR for neural control of dual tasking may possibly provide insight into neural efficiency during spaceflight. In the current study, we evaluated how dual task performance and the underlying brain activation changed as a function of HDBR. Eighteen healthy men participated in this study. They remained continuously in the 6° head-down tilt position for 70 days. Functional MRI for bimanual finger tapping was acquired during both single task and dual task conditions, and repeated at 7 time points pre-, during- and post-HDBR. Another 12 healthy males participated as controls who did not undergo HDBR. A widely distributed network involving the frontal, parietal, cingulate, temporal, and occipital cortices exhibited increased activation for dual tasking and increased activation differences between dual and single task conditions during HDBR relative to pre- or post-HDBR. This HDBR-related brain activation increase for dual tasking implies that more neurocognitive control is needed for dual task execution during HDBR compared to pre- and post-HDBR. We observed a positive correlation between pre-to-post HDBR changes in dual-task cost of reaction time and pre-to-post HDBR change in dual-task cost of brain activation in several cerebral and cerebellar regions. These findings could be predictive of changes in dual task processing during spaceflight. PMID:27601982

  11. Persistency and flexibility of complex brain networks underlie dual-task interference.

    PubMed

    Alavash, Mohsen; Hilgetag, Claus C; Thiel, Christiane M; Gießing, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies on multitasking suggest that performance decline during concurrent task processing arises from interfering brain modules. Here, we used graph-theoretical network analysis to define functional brain modules and relate the modular organization of complex brain networks to behavioral dual-task costs. Based on resting-state and task fMRI we explored two organizational aspects potentially associated with behavioral interference when human subjects performed a visuospatial and speech task simultaneously: the topological overlap between persistent single-task modules, and the flexibility of single-task modules in adaptation to the dual-task condition. Participants showed a significant decline in visuospatial accuracy in the dual-task compared with single visuospatial task. Global analysis of topological similarity between modules revealed that the overlap between single-task modules significantly correlated with the decline in visuospatial accuracy. Subjects with larger overlap between single-task modules showed higher behavioral interference. Furthermore, lower flexible reconfiguration of single-task modules in adaptation to the dual-task condition significantly correlated with larger decline in visuospatial accuracy. Subjects with lower modular flexibility showed higher behavioral interference. At the regional level, higher overlap between single-task modules and less modular flexibility in the somatomotor cortex positively correlated with the decline in visuospatial accuracy. Additionally, higher modular flexibility in cingulate and frontal control areas and lower flexibility in right-lateralized nodes comprising the middle occipital and superior temporal gyri supported dual-tasking. Our results suggest that persistency and flexibility of brain modules are important determinants of dual-task costs. We conclude that efficient dual-tasking benefits from a specific balance between flexibility and rigidity of functional brain modules. PMID:26095953

  12. Dual-Task Interference When A Response is Not Required

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanSelst, Mark; Johnston, James C.; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When subjects are required to respond to two stimuli presented in rapid succession, responses to the second stimulus are delayed. Such dual-task interference has been attributed to a fundamental processing bottleneck preventing simultaneous processing on both tasks. Two experiments show dual-task interference even when the first task does not require a response. The observed interference is caused by a bottleneck in central cognitive processing, rather than in response initiation or execution.

  13. Operation Compatibility: A Neglected Contribution to Dual-Task Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannebakker, Merel M.; Band, Guido P. H.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, dual-task interference has been attributed to the consequences of task load exceeding capacity limitations. However, the current study demonstrates that in addition to task load, the mutual compatibility of the concurrent processes modulates whether 2 tasks can be performed in parallel. In 2 psychological refractory period…

  14. Unexpected Dual Task Benefits on Cycling in Parkinson Disease and Healthy Adults: A Neuro-Behavioral Model

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Lori J. P.; Stegemöller, Elizabeth; Hazamy, Audrey A.; Wilson, Jonathan P.; Okun, Michael S.; McFarland, Nikolaus R.; Shukla, Aparna Wagle; Hass, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Background When performing two tasks at once, a dual task, performance on one or both tasks typically suffers. People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) usually experience larger dual task decrements on motor tasks than healthy older adults (HOA). Our objective was to investigate the decrements in cycling caused by performing cognitive tasks with a range of difficulty in people with PD and HOAs. Methods Twenty-eight participants with Parkinson’s disease and 20 healthy older adults completed a baseline cycling task with no secondary tasks and then completed dual task cycling while performing 12 tasks from six cognitive domains representing a wide range of difficulty. Results Cycling was faster during dual task conditions than at baseline, and was significantly faster for six tasks (all p<.02) across both groups. Cycling speed improved the most during the easiest cognitive tasks, and cognitive performance was largely unaffected. Cycling improvement was predicted by task difficulty (p<.001). People with Parkinson’s disease cycled slower (p<.03) and showed reduced dual task benefits (p<.01) than healthy older adults. Conclusions Unexpectedly, participants’ motor performance improved during cognitive dual tasks, which cannot be explained in current models of dual task performance. To account for these findings, we propose a model integrating dual task and acute exercise approaches which posits that cognitive arousal during dual tasks increases resources to facilitate motor and cognitive performance, which is subsequently modulated by motor and cognitive task difficulty. This model can explain both the improvement observed on dual tasks in the current study and more typical dual task findings in other studies. PMID:25970607

  15. Physiological Synchronization in a Vigilance Dual Task.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization of autonomic arousal levels and other physio-logical responses between people is a potentially important component of work team performance, client-therapist relationships, and other types of human interaction. This study addressed several problems: What statistical models are viable for identifying synchronization for loosely coupled human systems? How is the level of synchronization related to psychosocial variables such as empathy, subjective ratings of workload, and actual performance? Participants were 70 undergraduates who worked in pairs on a vigilance dual task in which they watched a virtual reality security camera, rang a bell when they saw the target intruder, and completed a jig-saw puzzle. Event rates either increased or decreased during the 90 min work period. The average R2 values for each person were .66, .66, .62, and .53 for the linear autoregressive model, linear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, the nonlinear autoregressive model, and the nonlinear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, respectively. All models were more accurate at a lag of 20 sec compared to 50 sec or customized lag lengths. Although the linear models were more accurate overall, the nonlinear synchronization parameters were more often related to psychological variables and performance. In particular, greater synchronization was observed with the nonlinear model when the target event rate increased, compared to when it decreased, which was expected from the general theory of synchronization. Nonlinear models were also more effective for uncovering inhibitory or dampening relationships between the co-workers as well as mutually excitatory relationships. Future research should explore the comparative model results for tasks that induce higher levels of synchronization and involve different types of internal group coordination. PMID:26639921

  16. Dual-Task Crosstalk between Saccades and Manual Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huestegge, Lynn; Koch, Iring

    2009-01-01

    Between-task crosstalk has been discussed as an important source for dual-task costs. In this study, the authors examine concurrently performed saccades and manual responses as a means of studying the role of response-code conflict between 2 tasks. In Experiment 1, participants responded to an imperative auditory stimulus with a left or a right…

  17. Better dual-task processing in simultaneous interpreters

    PubMed Central

    Strobach, Tilo; Becker, Maxi; Schubert, Torsten; Kühn, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous interpreting (SI) is a highly complex activity and requires the performance and coordination of multiple, simultaneous tasks: analysis and understanding of the discourse in a first language, reformulating linguistic material, storing of intermediate processing steps, and language production in a second language among others. It is, however, an open issue whether persons with experience in SI possess superior skills in coordination of multiple tasks and whether they are able to transfer these skills to lab-based dual-task situations. Within the present study, we set out to explore whether interpreting experience is associated with related higher-order executive functioning in the context of dual-task situations of the Psychological Refractory Period (PRP) type. In this PRP situation, we found faster reactions times in participants with experience in simultaneous interpretation in contrast to control participants without such experience. Thus, simultaneous interpreters possess superior skills in coordination of multiple tasks in lab-based dual-task situations. PMID:26528232

  18. Better dual-task processing in simultaneous interpreters.

    PubMed

    Strobach, Tilo; Becker, Maxi; Schubert, Torsten; Kühn, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous interpreting (SI) is a highly complex activity and requires the performance and coordination of multiple, simultaneous tasks: analysis and understanding of the discourse in a first language, reformulating linguistic material, storing of intermediate processing steps, and language production in a second language among others. It is, however, an open issue whether persons with experience in SI possess superior skills in coordination of multiple tasks and whether they are able to transfer these skills to lab-based dual-task situations. Within the present study, we set out to explore whether interpreting experience is associated with related higher-order executive functioning in the context of dual-task situations of the Psychological Refractory Period (PRP) type. In this PRP situation, we found faster reactions times in participants with experience in simultaneous interpretation in contrast to control participants without such experience. Thus, simultaneous interpreters possess superior skills in coordination of multiple tasks in lab-based dual-task situations. PMID:26528232

  19. Dual-tasking interferes with obstacle avoidance reactions in healthy seniors.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, Judith; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; van den Bemt, Bart; Nienhuis, Bart; van Limbeek, Jacques; Duysens, Jacques

    2012-06-01

    Dual-tasking can lead to falls, as does a deterioration of obstacle avoidance (OA) skills. Hence, it is expected that a combination of both would be even more detrimental, especially when OA is time-critical. Previous studies confirmed this expectation, however, due to several limitations in their design it is yet too early to draw any definitive conclusions on the allocation of attentional resources in OA under dual-task conditions. Therefore, attentionally demanding primary and secondary tasks were used with the instruction to perform as well as possible on both tasks. Nineteen healthy senior individuals (60±4.7 years, 8 females) performed an OA task on a treadmill while walking at 3 km/h as a single task and combined with an auditory Stroop task. Biceps femoris (BF) muscle response times, OA failure rates and composite scores were used to evaluate the data. Increased OA failure rates (3%, p=0.03) and delayed BF response times (21 ms, p<0.001) were found under dual-task conditions. Composite scores were reduced during (p<0.001) and just after obstacle crossing (p=0.003). In conclusion, dual-tasking during time-critical OA affects the motor as well as the cognitive task when subjects are instructed to keep up performance on both tasks. This adds to the evidence indicating an increased risk of tripping or falling when attention is divided during walking in the presence of unexpected obstacles. PMID:22565318

  20. Dual-task backward compatibility effects are episodically mediated.

    PubMed

    Giammarco, Maria; Thomson, Sandra J; Watter, Scott

    2016-02-01

    In dual-task performance, the backward compatibility effect (BCE; faster Task 1 reaction time when Task 1 and Task 2 responses are compatible) is thought to represent automatic activation of Task 2 response information in parallel with attended Task 1 performance. Work by Hommel and Eglau (Psychological Research, 66, 260-273, 2002) has suggested the BCE relies on stimulus-response learning in long-term memory. Subsequent work by Ellenbogen and Meiran (Memory and Cognition, 36, 968-978, 2008), however, proposed that the BCE is mediated by Task 2 rules held in working memory (WM) during Task 1 performance. The present study aimed to dissociate these two theoretical claims. In Experiment 1, we assessed the effects of prior single-task practice with Task 1 or Task 2 of a subsequent dual-task paradigm. Where the WM-mediated model predicts both BCE and overall reaction time improvement relative to prior task practice, an episodic learning model makes divergent predictions for BCE based on the context specificity of prior Task 2 learning. Results showed a close fit with episodic predictions and contradicted WM model predictions. Experiment 2 examined the finer grained timecourse of BCE over initial development, subsequent interference of this initial learning on BCE development with new conflicting Task 2 response mappings, and finally reestablishment of BCE in the original dual task. Data again showed close agreement with long-term learning predictions. We argue in favor of an episodic account of the BCE, and consider implications of WM and episodic mechanisms of automatic response activation on other aspects of dual-task performance. PMID:26572914

  1. Human performance evaluation in dual-axis critical task tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, M. L.; Nataraj, N. S.

    1975-01-01

    A dual axis tracking using a multiloop critical task was set up to evaluate human performance. The effects of control stick variation and display formats are evaluated. A secondary loading was used to measure the degradation in tracking performance.

  2. Texting and walking: effect of environmental setting and task prioritization on dual-task interference in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Prudence; Apple, Sarah; Dowd, Colleen; Keith, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that young adults significantly reduce their gait speed and weave more when texting while walking. Previous research has not examined the simultaneous dual-task effects on texting performance, therefore, the attention prioritization strategy used by young adults while texting and walking is not currently known. Moreover, it is not known whether laboratory-based studies accurately reflect texting and walking performance in the real world. This study compared dual-task interference during texting and walking between laboratory and real-world settings, and examined the ability of young adults to flexibly prioritize their attention between the two tasks in each environment. Texting and walking were assessed in single-task and three dual-task conditions (no-priority, gait-priority, texting-priority) in the lab and a University Student Center, in 32 healthy young adults. Dual-task effects on gait speed, texting speed, and texting accuracy were significant, but did not significantly differ between the two environments. Young adults were able to flexibly prioritize their attention between texting and walking, according to specific instruction, and this ability was not influenced by environmental setting. In the absence of instructions, young adults prioritized the texting task in the low-distraction environment, but displayed more equal focus between tasks in the real world. The finding that young adults do not significantly modify their texting and walking behavior in high-distraction environments lends weight to growing concerns about cell phone use and pedestrian safety. PMID:25193796

  3. Dual Motor-Cognitive Virtual Reality Training Impacts Dual-Task Performance in Freezing of Gait.

    PubMed

    Killane, Isabelle; Fearon, Conor; Newman, Louise; McDonnell, Conor; Waechter, Saskia M; Sons, Kristian; Lynch, Timothy; Reilly, Richard B

    2015-11-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG), an episodic gait disturbance characterized by the inability to generate effective stepping, occurs in more than half of Parkinson's disease patients. It is associated with both executive dysfunction and attention and becomes most evident during dual tasking (performing two tasks simultaneously). This study examined the effect of dual motor-cognitive virtual reality training on dual-task performance in FOG. Twenty community dwelling participants with Parkinson's disease (13 with FOG, 7 without FOG) participated in a pre-assessment, eight 20-minute intervention sessions, and a post-assessment. The intervention consisted of a virtual reality maze (DFKI, Germany) through which participants navigated by stepping-in-place on a balance board (Nintendo, Japan) under time pressure. This was combined with a cognitive task (Stroop test), which repeatedly divided participants' attention. The primary outcome measures were pre- and post-intervention differences in motor (stepping time, symmetry, rhythmicity) and cognitive (accuracy, reaction time) performance during single- and dual-tasks. Both assessments consisted of 1) a single cognitive task 2) a single motor task, and 3) a dual motor-cognitive task. Following the intervention, there was significant improvement in dual-task cognitive and motor parameters (stepping time and rhythmicity), dual-task effect for those with FOG and a noteworthy improvement in FOG episodes. These improvements were less significant for those without FOG. This is the first study to show benefit of a dual motor-cognitive approach on dual-task performance in FOG. Advances in such virtual reality interventions for home use could substantially improve the quality of life for patients who experience FOG. PMID:26394439

  4. Transfer effects in task-set cost and dual-task cost after dual-task training in older and younger adults: further evidence for cognitive plasticity in attentional control in late adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bherer, Louis; Kramer, Arthur F; Peterson, Matthew S; Colcombe, Stanley; Erickson, Kirk; Becic, Ensar

    2008-01-01

    Older adults' difficulties in performing two tasks concurrently have been well documented (Kramer & Madden, 2008). It has been observed that the age-related differences in dual-task performance are larger when the two tasks require similar motor responses (2001) and that in some conditions older adults also show greater susceptibility than younger adults to input interference (Hein & Schubert, 2004). The authors recently observed that even when the two tasks require motor responses, both older and younger adults can learn to perform a visual discrimination task and an auditory discrimination task faster and more accurately (Bherer et al., 2005). In the present study, the authors extended this finding to a dual-task condition that involves two visual tasks requiring two motor responses. Older and younger adults completed a dual-task training program in which continuous individualized adaptive feedback was provided to enhance performance. The results indicate that, even with similar motor responses and two visual stimuli, both older and younger adults showed substantial gains in performance after training and that the improvement generalized to new task combinations involving new stimuli. These results suggest that dual-task skills can be substantially improved in older adults and that cognitive plasticity in attentional control is still possible in old age. PMID:18568979

  5. Reliability and Validity of Dual-Task Mobility Assessments in People with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; He, Chengqi; Pang, Marco Yiu Chung

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability to perform a cognitive task while walking simultaneously (dual-tasking) is important in real life. However, the psychometric properties of dual-task walking tests have not been well established in stroke. Objective To assess the test-retest reliability, concurrent and known-groups validity of various dual-task walking tests in people with chronic stroke. Design Observational measurement study with a test-retest design. Methods Eighty-eight individuals with chronic stroke participated. The testing protocol involved four walking tasks (walking forward at self-selected and maximal speed, walking backward at self-selected speed, and crossing over obstacles) performed simultaneously with each of the three attention-demanding tasks (verbal fluency, serial 3 subtractions or carrying a cup of water). For each dual-task condition, the time taken to complete the walking task, the correct response rate (CRR) of the cognitive task, and the dual-task effect (DTE) for the walking time and CRR were calculated. Forty-six of the participants were tested twice within 3–4 days to establish test-retest reliability. Results The walking time in various dual-task assessments demonstrated good to excellent reliability [Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,1) = 0.70–0.93; relative minimal detectable change at 95% confidence level (MDC95%) = 29%-45%]. The reliability of the CRR (ICC2,1 = 0.58–0.81) and the DTE in walking time (ICC2,1 = 0.11–0.80) was more varied. The reliability of the DTE in CRR (ICC2,1 = -0.31–0.40) was poor to fair. The walking time and CRR obtained in various dual-task walking tests were moderately to strongly correlated with those of the dual-task Timed-up-and-Go test, thus demonstrating good concurrent validity. None of the tests could discriminate fallers (those who had sustained at least one fall in the past year) from non-fallers. Limitation The results are generalizable to community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke only

  6. Fine and gross motor skills: The effects on skill-focused dual-tasks.

    PubMed

    Raisbeck, Louisa D; Diekfuss, Jed A

    2015-10-01

    Dual-task methodology often directs participants' attention towards a gross motor skill involved in the execution of a skill, but researchers have not investigated the comparative effects of attention on fine motor skill tasks. Furthermore, there is limited information about participants' subjective perception of workload with respect to task performance. To examine this, the current study administered the NASA-Task Load Index following a simulated shooting dual-task. The task required participants to stand 15 feet from a projector screen which depicted virtual targets and fire a modified Glock 17 handgun equipped with an infrared laser. Participants performed the primary shooting task alone (control), or were also instructed to focus their attention on a gross motor skill relevant to task execution (gross skill-focused) and a fine motor skill relevant to task execution (fine skill-focused). Results revealed that workload was significantly greater during the fine skill-focused task for both skill levels, but performance was only affected for the lesser-skilled participants. Shooting performance for the lesser-skilled participants was greater during the gross skill-focused condition compared to the fine skill-focused condition. Correlational analyses also demonstrated a significant negative relationship between shooting performance and workload during the gross skill-focused task for the higher-skilled participants. A discussion of the relationship between skill type, workload, skill level, and performance in dual-task paradigms is presented. PMID:26296039

  7. Probing attention prioritization during dual-task step initiation: a novel method.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruopeng; Shea, John B

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the attention allocation during reactive stepping using a continuous finger-tapping task. Ten healthy young subjects were recruited to participate in this study. Subjects were required to perform a rapid voluntary step with either left or right leg after hearing an auditory tone while tapping their right index finger on a handhold numeric keypad. Step initiation conditions included simple and choice reaction forward stepping with three variants of continuous tapping task that were: (1) single task-no concurrent finger-tapping task; (2) dual task easy-one-button tapping task; (3) dual task hard-four-button tapping task. Types of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) were determined by the center of pressure trajectory. Reaction time, APA duration, and stepping latency were compared between APA types and various dual-task conditions. Wavelet analysis was performed on the stimulus-locked finger-tapping data to determine the frequency change of tapping speed related to reactive stepping. Results showed that postural performance was negatively affected only by the high-attention-demanding cognitive task. Significant reduction of finger-tapping speed post-stimulus presentation was observed across all test conditions, indicating attention shift during the execution of a step. In addition, the DTH condition induced early postural prioritization in choice reaction stepping when different motor programs needed to be planned and executed. Error APA also triggered larger deterioration of tapping performance compared to correct APA, indicating the perceived error and the remedial action require additional attentional resources. PMID:26708519

  8. On the importance of Task 1 and error performance measures in PRP dual-task studies.

    PubMed

    Strobach, Tilo; Schütz, Anja; Schubert, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm is a dominant research tool in the literature on dual-task performance. In this paradigm a first and second component task (i.e., Task 1 and Task 2) are presented with variable stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) and priority to perform Task 1. The main indicator of dual-task impairment in PRP situations is an increasing Task 2-RT with decreasing SOAs. This impairment is typically explained with some task components being processed strictly sequentially in the context of the prominent central bottleneck theory. This assumption could implicitly suggest that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing, i.e., decreasing SOAs do not increase reaction times (RTs) and error rates of the first task. The aim of the present review is to assess whether PRP dual-task studies included both RT and error data presentations and statistical analyses and whether studies including both data types (i.e., RTs and error rates) show data consistent with this assumption (i.e., decreasing SOAs and unaffected RTs and/or error rates in Task 1). This review demonstrates that, in contrast to RT presentations and analyses, error data is underrepresented in a substantial number of studies. Furthermore, a substantial number of studies with RT and error data showed a statistically significant impairment of Task 1 performance with decreasing SOA. Thus, these studies produced data that is not primarily consistent with the strong assumption that processes of Task 1 are unaffected by Task 2 and bottleneck processing in the context of PRP dual-task situations; this calls for a more careful report and analysis of Task 1 performance in PRP studies and for a more careful consideration of theories proposing additions to the bottleneck assumption, which are sufficiently general to explain Task 1 and Task 2 effects. PMID:25904890

  9. Dual task effects for asymmetric stepping on a split-belt treadmill.

    PubMed

    McFadyen, Bradford J; Hegeman, Judith; Duysens, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Bilaterally asymmetric stepping during walking is common to a number of pathological gaits (e.g., hemiplegia, limping). In the present work, the attention level of asymmetric stepping was studied by having subjects walk on a split-belt treadmill with symmetric (2 km/h) and asymmetric (2 km/h vs 4 km/h and 2 km/h vs 6 km/h) belt speeds both with and without a dual auditory Stroop task. There was no significant change in response reaction times across walking conditions or between walking and standing. The proportion of stance phase was unchanged by the dual task during symmetric walking. Stance phase proportions, however, significantly increased during dual tasking for the limb on the faster belt for both asymmetric conditions, while they decreased for the limb on the slower belt for the most asymmetric condition. There were also small modifications to double support proportions and a main effect of dual tasking to double support proportion variability. Observed dual task changes showed interference by the cognitive task with asymmetric gait performance, suggesting that asymmetric stepping, such as seen in limping gaits, requires more attention than symmetric walking. Such attention may, in part, be due to the dynamic balance required in asymmetric limb loading and unloading. PMID:19595592

  10. The neural architecture of age-related dual-task interferences

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Witold X.; Yildiz, Ali; Beste, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In daily life elderly adults exhibit deficits when dual-tasking is involved. So far these deficits have been verified on a behavioral level in dual-tasking. Yet, the neuronal architecture of these deficits in aging still remains to be explored especially when late-middle aged individuals around 60 years of age are concerned. Neuroimaging studies in young participants concerning dual-tasking were, among others, related to activity in middle frontal (MFG) and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and the anterior insula (AI). According to the frontal lobe hypothesis of aging, alterations in these frontal regions (i.e., SFG and MFG) might be responsible for cognitive deficits. We measured brain activity using fMRI, while examining age-dependent variations in dual-tasking by utilizing the PRP (psychological refractory period) test. Behavioral data showed an increasing PRP effect in late-middle aged adults. The results suggest the age-related deteriorated performance in dual-tasking, especially in conditions of risen complexity. These effects are related to changes in networks involving the AI, the SFG and the MFG. The results suggest that different cognitive subprocesses are affected that mediate the observed dual-tasking problems in late-middle aged individuals. PMID:25132818

  11. Alzheimer's disease, but not ageing or depression, affects dual-tasking.

    PubMed

    Kaschel, Reiner; Logie, Robert H; Kazén, Miguel; Della Sala, Sergio

    2009-11-01

    Two experiments are reported that assess dual task performance in Alzheimer's disease (AD), in chronic depression and in healthy old age. Results suggest that dual task impairments are present in AD but are not shown in depression. This is true even when episodic memory performance is equated between the groups. These results, together with those of previous studies, point to dual task performance as an aid to diagnosis of AD relative to depression. This is of particular relevance when episodic memory tests cannot distinguish between the two conditions. The dual task paradigm appears to have considerable promise in assisting the early detection of the specific cognitive deficits associated with AD, and in monitoring their progression, both in the laboratory setting and in everyday tasks. Results also are of theoretical interest in pointing to a specific dual task coordination function in the healthy human cognitive system that allows for the coordination of two tasks performed simultaneously and which is damaged in AD but not in depression. PMID:19543789

  12. Bimanual interference in children performing a dual motor task.

    PubMed

    Otte, E; van Mier, H I

    2006-10-01

    The present study addressed the development of bimanual interference in children performing a dual motor task, in which each hand executes a different task simultaneously. Forty right-handed children (aged 4, 5-6, 7-8 and 9-11years, ten in each age group) were asked to perform a bimanual task in which they had to tap with a pen using the non-preferred hand and simultaneously trace a circle or a square with a pen using the preferred hand as quickly as possible. Tapping and tracing were also performed unimanually. Differences between unimanual and bimanual performance were assessed for number of taps, length of tap trace and mean tracing velocity. It was assumed that with increasing age, better bimanual coordination would result in better performance on the dual task showing less intermanual interference. The results showed that tapping and tracing performance increased with age, unimanually as well as bimanually, consistent with developmental advancement. However, the percentage of intermanual interference due to bimanual performance was not significantly different in the four age groups. Although performing the dual task resulted in mutual intermanual interference, all groups showed a significant effect of tracing shape. More specifically, all age groups showed a larger percentage decrease in tracing velocity when performing the circle compared to the square in the dual task. The present study reveals that children as young as four years are able to coordinate both hands when tapping and tracing bimanually. PMID:17011654

  13. Word Effects in Dual-Task Studies Using Lexical Decision and Naming as Task 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger; McCann, Robert S.; VanSelst, Mark; Shafto, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Word frequency effects in dual-task, lexical decision are variously reported to be additive or under-additive across SOA. We replicate and extend earlier lexical decision studies and find word frequency to be additive across SOA. To more directly capture lexical processing, we examine dual-task naming. Once again we find word frequency to be additive across SOA. Lexical processing appears to be constrained by central processing limitations.

  14. Word Frequency Effects in Dual-Task Studies Using Lexical Decision and Naming as Task 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W.; McCann, Robert S.; VanSelst, Mark; Shafto, Michael G. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Word frequency effects in dual-task lexical decision are variously reported to be additive or underadditive across SOA. We replicate and extend earlier lexical decision studies and find word frequency to be additive across SOA. To more directly capture lexical processing, we examine dual-task naming. Once again, we find word frequency to be additive across SOA. Lexical processing appears to be constrained by central processing limitations.

  15. Neural Correlates of Dual-Task Walking: Effects of Cognitive versus Motor Interference in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beurskens, Rainer; Steinberg, Fabian; Antoniewicz, Franziska; Wolff, Wanja; Granacher, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Walking while concurrently performing cognitive and/or motor interference tasks is the norm rather than the exception during everyday life and there is evidence from behavioral studies that it negatively affects human locomotion. However, there is hardly any information available regarding the underlying neural correlates of single- and dual-task walking. We had 12 young adults (23.8 ± 2.8 years) walk while concurrently performing a cognitive interference (CI) or a motor interference (MI) task. Simultaneously, neural activation in frontal, central, and parietal brain areas was registered using a mobile EEG system. Results showed that the MI task but not the CI task affected walking performance in terms of significantly decreased gait velocity and stride length and significantly increased stride time and tempo-spatial variability. Average activity in alpha and beta frequencies was significantly modulated during both CI and MI walking conditions in frontal and central brain regions, indicating an increased cognitive load during dual-task walking. Our results suggest that impaired motor performance during dual-task walking is mirrored in neural activation patterns of the brain. This finding is in line with established cognitive theories arguing that dual-task situations overstrain cognitive capabilities resulting in motor performance decrements. PMID:27200192

  16. Building a framework for a dual task taxonomy.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, Tara L; Lamberg, Eric M; Muratori, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    The study of dual task interference has gained increasing attention in the literature for the past 35 years, with six MEDLINE citations in 1979 growing to 351 citations indexed in 2014 and a peak of 454 cited papers in 2013. Increasingly, researchers are examining dual task cost in individuals with pathology, including those with neurodegenerative diseases. While the influence of these papers has extended from the laboratory to the clinic, the field has evolved without clear definitions of commonly used terms and with extreme variations in experimental procedures. As a result, it is difficult to examine the interference literature as a single body of work. In this paper we present a new taxonomy for classifying cognitive-motor and motor-motor interference within the study of dual task behaviors that connects traditional concepts of learning and principles of motor control with current issues of multitasking analysis. As a first step in the process we provide an operational definition of dual task, distinguishing it from a complex single task. We present this new taxonomy, inclusive of both cognitive and motor modalities, as a working model; one that we hope will generate discussion and create a framework from which one can view previous studies and develop questions of interest. PMID:25961027

  17. Building a Framework for a Dual Task Taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, Tara L.; Lamberg, Eric M.; Muratori, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    The study of dual task interference has gained increasing attention in the literature for the past 35 years, with six MEDLINE citations in 1979 growing to 351 citations indexed in 2014 and a peak of 454 cited papers in 2013. Increasingly, researchers are examining dual task cost in individuals with pathology, including those with neurodegenerative diseases. While the influence of these papers has extended from the laboratory to the clinic, the field has evolved without clear definitions of commonly used terms and with extreme variations in experimental procedures. As a result, it is difficult to examine the interference literature as a single body of work. In this paper we present a new taxonomy for classifying cognitive-motor and motor-motor interference within the study of dual task behaviors that connects traditional concepts of learning and principles of motor control with current issues of multitasking analysis. As a first step in the process we provide an operational definition of dual task, distinguishing it from a complex single task. We present this new taxonomy, inclusive of both cognitive and motor modalities, as a working model; one that we hope will generate discussion and create a framework from which one can view previous studies and develop questions of interest. PMID:25961027

  18. Isolating the neural mechanisms of interference during continuous multisensory dual-task performance.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Ryan W; Cecotti, Hubert; Touryan, Jon; Eckstein, Miguel P; Giesbrecht, Barry

    2014-03-01

    The need to engage in multiple tasks simultaneously is often encountered in everyday experience, but coordinating between two or more tasks can lead to impaired performance. Typical investigations of multitasking impairments have focused on the performance of two tasks presented in close temporal proximity on discrete trials; however, such paradigms do not match well with the continuous performance situations more typically encountered outside the laboratory. As a result, the stages of information processing that are affected during multisensory continuous dual tasks and how these changes in processing relate to behavior remain unclear. To address these issues, participants were presented simultaneous rapid visual and auditory stimulus sequences under three conditions: attend visual only, attend auditory only, and dual attention (attend both visual and auditory). Performance, measured in terms of response time and perceptual sensitivity (d'), revealed dual-task impairments only in the auditory task. Neural activity, measured by the ERP technique, revealed that both early stage sensory processing and later cognitive processing of the auditory task were affected by dual-task performance, but similar stages of processing of the visual task were not. Critically, individual differences in neural activity at both early and late stages of information processing accurately rank-ordered individuals based on the observed difference in behavioral performance between the single and dual attention conditions. These results reveal relationships between behavioral performance and the neural correlates of both early and late stage information processing that provide key insights into the complex interplay between the brain and behavior when multiple tasks are performed continuously. PMID:24047391

  19. Upper-Extremity Dual-Task Function: An Innovative Method to Assess Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Najafi, Bijan; Reiman, Eric M.; Mager, Reine M.; Veldhuizen, Jaimeson K.; O’Connor, Kathy; Zamrini, Edward; Mohler, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background: Difficulties in orchestrating simultaneous tasks (i.e., dual-tasking) have been associated with cognitive impairments in older adults. Gait tests have been commonly used as the motor task component for dual-task assessments; however, many older adults have mobility impairments or there is a lack of space in busy clinical settings. We assessed an upper-extremity function (UEF) test as an alternative motor task to study the dual-task motor performance in older adults. Methods: Older adults (≥65 years) were recruited, and cognitive ability was measured using the Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA). Participants performed repetitive elbow flexion with their maximum pace, once single-task, and once while counting backward by one (dual-task). Single- and dual-task gait tests were also performed with normal speed. Three-dimensional kinematics was measured both from upper-extremity and lower-extremity using wearable sensors to determine UEF and gait parameters. Parameters were compared between the cognitively impaired and healthy groups using analysis of variance tests, while controlling for age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). Correlations between UEF and gait parameters for dual-task and dual-task cost were assessed using linear regression models. Results: Sixty-seven older adults were recruited (age = 83 ± 10 years). Based on MoCA, 10 (15%) were cognitively impaired. While no significant differences were observed in the single-task condition, within the dual-task condition, the cognitively impaired group showed significantly less arm flexion speed (62%, d = 1.51, p = 0.02) and range of motion (27%, d = 0.93, p = 0.04), and higher speed variability (88%, d = 1.82, p < 0.0001) compared to the cognitively intact group, when adjusted with age, gender, and BMI. Significant correlations were observed between UEF speed parameters and gait stride velocity for dual-task condition (r = 0.55, p < 0.0001) and dual-task cost (r = 0.28, p = 0.03). Conclusion: We

  20. Short-term memory and dual task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Two hypotheses concerning the way in which short-term memory interacts with another task in a dual task situation are considered. It is noted that when two tasks are combined, the activity of controlling and organizing performance on both tasks simultaneously may compete with either task for a resource; this resource may be space in a central mechanism or general processing capacity or it may be some task-specific resource. If a special relationship exists between short-term memory and control, especially if there is an identity relationship between short-term and a central controlling mechanism, then short-term memory performance should show a decrement in a dual task situation. Even if short-term memory does not have any particular identity with a controlling mechanism, but both tasks draw on some common resource or resources, then a tradeoff between the two tasks in allocating resources is possible and could be reflected in performance. The persistent concurrence cost in memory performance in these experiments suggests that short-term memory may have a unique status in the information processing system.

  1. Dual-task interference with equal task emphasis: graded capacity sharing or central postponement?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, Eric; Pashler, Harold E.; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    Most studies using the psychological refractory period (PRP) design suggest that dual-task performance is limited by a central bottleneck. Because subjects are usually told to emphasize Task 1, however, the bottleneck might reflect a strategic choice rather than a structural limitation. To evaluate the possibility that central operations can proceed in parallel, albeit with capacity limitations, we conducted two dual-task experiments with equal task emphasis. In both experiments, subjects tended to either group responses together or respond to one task well before the other. In addition, stimulus-response compatibility effects were roughly constant across stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). At the short SOA, compatibility effects also carried over onto response times for the other task. This pattern of results is difficult to reconcile with the possibility that subjects share capacity roughly equally between simultaneous central operations. However, this pattern is consistent with the existence of a structural central bottleneck.

  2. Dual-Task Research and the Development of Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttentag, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    This response to Brainerd and Reyna's paper (in this issue), questions whether output-interference and resource theories can readily be differentiated empirically. Argues that dual-task studies, while important, do not serve as the critical tests of the resources hypothesis. (RH)

  3. Characterization of cognitive and motor performance during dual-tasking in healthy older adults and patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wild, Lucia Bartmann; de Lima, Daiane Borba; Balardin, Joana Bisol; Rizzi, Luana; Giacobbo, Bruno Lima; Oliveira, Henrique Bianchi; de Lima Argimon, Irani Iracema; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Rieder, Carlos R M; Bromberg, Elke

    2013-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dual-tasking on cognitive performance and gait parameters in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) without dementia. The impact of cognitive task complexity on cognition and walking was also examined. Eighteen patients with PD (ages 53-88, 10 women; Hoehn and Yahr stage I-II) and 18 older adults (ages 61-84; 10 women) completed two neuropsychological measures of executive function/attention (the Stroop Test and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test). Cognitive performance and gait parameters related to functional mobility of stride were measured under single (cognitive task only) and dual-task (cognitive task during walking) conditions with different levels of difficulty and different types of stimuli. In addition, dual-task cognitive costs were calculated. Although cognitive performance showed no significant difference between controls and PD patients during single or dual-tasking conditions, only the patients had a decrease in cognitive performance during walking. Gait parameters of patients differed significantly from controls at single and dual-task conditions, indicating that patients gave priority to gait while cognitive performance suffered. Dual-task cognitive costs of patients increased with task complexity, reaching significantly higher values then controls in the arithmetic task, which was correlated with scores on executive function/attention (Stroop Color-Word Page). Baseline motor functioning and task executive/attentional load affect the performance of cognitive tasks of PD patients while walking. These findings provide insight into the functional strategies used by PD patients in the initial phases of the disease to manage dual-task interference. PMID:23052601

  4. The effects of stimulus modality and task integrality: Predicting dual-task performance and workload from single-task levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, S. G.; Shively, R. J.; Vidulich, M. A.; Miller, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of stimulus modality and task difficulty on workload and performance was investigated. The goal was to quantify the cost (in terms of response time and experienced workload) incurred when essentially serial task components shared common elements (e.g., the response to one initiated the other) which could be accomplished in parallel. The experimental tasks were based on the Fittsberg paradigm; the solution to a SternBERG-type memory task determines which of two identical FITTS targets are acquired. Previous research suggested that such functionally integrated dual tasks are performed with substantially less workload and faster response times than would be predicted by suming single-task components when both are presented in the same stimulus modality (visual). The physical integration of task elements was varied (although their functional relationship remained the same) to determine whether dual-task facilitation would persist if task components were presented in different sensory modalities. Again, it was found that the cost of performing the two-stage task was considerably less than the sum of component single-task levels when both were presented visually. Less facilitation was found when task elements were presented in different sensory modalities. These results suggest the importance of distinguishing between concurrent tasks that complete for limited resources from those that beneficially share common resources when selecting the stimulus modalities for information displays.

  5. Measuring listening effort: driving simulator vs. simple dual-task paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Hsiang; Aksan, Nazan; Rizzo, Matthew; Stangl, Elizabeth; Zhang, Xuyang; Bentler, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The dual-task paradigm has been widely used to measure listening effort. The primary objectives of the study were to (1) investigate the effect of hearing aid amplification and a hearing aid directional technology on listening effort measured by a complicated, more real world dual-task paradigm, and (2) compare the results obtained with this paradigm to a simpler laboratory-style dual-task paradigm. Design The listening effort of adults with hearing impairment was measured using two dual-task paradigms, wherein participants performed a speech recognition task simultaneously with either a driving task in a simulator or a visual reaction-time task in a sound-treated booth. The speech materials and road noises for the speech recognition task were recorded in a van traveling on the highway in three hearing aid conditions: unaided, aided with omni directional processing (OMNI), and aided with directional processing (DIR). The change in the driving task or the visual reaction-time task performance across the conditions quantified the change in listening effort. Results Compared to the driving-only condition, driving performance declined significantly with the addition of the speech recognition task. Although the speech recognition score was higher in the OMNI and DIR conditions than in the unaided condition, driving performance was similar across these three conditions, suggesting that listening effort was not affected by amplification and directional processing. Results from the simple dual-task paradigm showed a similar trend: hearing aid technologies improved speech recognition performance, but did not affect performance in the visual reaction-time task (i.e., reduce listening effort). The correlation between listening effort measured using the driving paradigm and the visual reaction-time task paradigm was significant. The finding showing that our older (56 to 85 years old) participants’ better speech recognition performance did not result in reduced

  6. Dual-task performance under acute stress in female adolescents with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Kaess, Michael; Parzer, Peter; Koenig, Julian; Resch, Franz; Brunner, Romuald

    2016-09-01

    Research to elucidate early alterations of higher cognitive processes in adolescents with BPD is rare. This study investigated differences in dual-task performance in adolescents with BPD during stress and non-stress conditions. The study sample comprised 30 female adolescents with BPD and 34 healthy controls. The impact of stress on dual-task performance was measured using a standardized stressor. Self-reports of distress and measures of heart rate (HR) were obtained to measure stress reactivity. There were no group differences in task performance. Under stress conditions, the performance on the auditory task decreased in both groups but without significant group differences. Healthy controls showed an increase of mean HR after stress induction compared to no change in the BPD group. The finding of attenuated HR response to acute stress in adolescent patients with BPD may contradict current theories that the affective hyperresponsivity in BPD is based on a biologically determined mechanism. PMID:26852226

  7. Information access in a dual-task context: testing a model of optimal strategy selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C. D.; Seidler, K. S.

    1997-01-01

    Pilots were required to access information from a hierarchical aviation database by navigating under single-task conditions (Experiment 1) and when this task was time-shared with an altitude-monitoring task of varying bandwidth and priority (Experiment 2). In dual-task conditions, pilots had 2 viewports available, 1 always used for the information task and the other to be allocated to either task. Dual-task strategy, inferred from the decision of which task to allocate to the 2nd viewport, revealed that allocation was generally biased in favor of the monitoring task and was only partly sensitive to the difficulty of the 2 tasks and their relative priorities. Some dominant sources of navigational difficulties failed to adaptively influence selection strategy. The implications of the results are to provide tools for jumping to the top of the database, to provide 2 viewports into the common database, and to provide training as to the optimum viewport management strategy in a multitask environment.

  8. Gait in Very Preterm School-Aged Children in Dual-Task Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Manicolo, Olivia; Perkinson-Gloor, Nadine; Weber, Peter; Grob, Alexander; Lemola, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Objective The control of gait requires executive and attentional functions. As preterm children show executive and attentional deficits compared to full-term children, performing concurrent tasks that impose additional cognitive load may lead to poorer walking performance in preterm compared to full-term children. Knowledge regarding gait in preterm children after early childhood is scarce. We examined straight walking and if it is more affected in very preterm than in full-term children in dual-task paradigms. Study design Twenty preterm children with very low birth-weight (≤ 1500 g), 24 preterm children with birth-weight > 1500 g, and 44 full-term children, born between 2001 and 2006, were investigated. Gait was assessed using an electronic walkway system (GAITRite) while walking without a concurrent task (single-task) and while performing one concurrent (dual-task) or two concurrent (triple-task) tasks. Spatio-temporal gait parameters (gait velocity, cadence, stride length, single support time, double support time), normalized gait parameters (normalized velocity, normalized cadence, normalized stride length) and gait variability parameters (stride velocity variability, stride length variability) were analyzed. Results In dual- and triple-task conditions children showed decreased gait velocity, cadence, stride length, as well as increased single support time, double support time and gait variability compared to single-task walking. Further, results showed systematic decreases in stride velocity variability from preterm children with very low birth weight (≤ 1500 g) to preterm children with birth weight > 1500 g to full-term children. There were no significant interactions between walking conditions and prematurity status. Conclusions Dual and triple tasking affects gait of preterm and full-term children, confirming previous results that walking requires executive and attentional functions. Birth-weight dependent systematic changes in stride velocity

  9. The relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung Bo; Kim, Jang Hwan; Lee, Kang Sung

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this study were to identify the relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke and determine automatic gait ability following stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three outpatients and twelve healthy subjects participated in a cross-sectional assessment. Community ambulation was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Outcome measures included the Motricity index, Berg Balance Scale, and gait speed under three conditions (self-paced ambulation for 10 m, ambulation while performing dual cognitive tasks, and ambulation while performing dual manual tasks). Gait automaticity was calculated. [Results] No significant differences were observed for muscle strength or balance between the limited community ambulation and the community ambulation groups. However, a significant difference in gait velocity was observed between the groups under the three conditions. In particular, a significant difference was detected only in the limited community ambulation group depending on the level of motor function recovery during cognitive and manual dual task ambulation. Additionally, we revealed that the community ambulation group had a lower level of gait automaticity compared with that in the normal group. [Conclusion] Our results show the influence of motor recovery on the change in gait velocity depending on the task if a patient is limitedly ambulatory. We revealed that community ambulators did not have a sufficient level of gait automaticity. PMID:25995582

  10. The relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Bo; Kim, Jang Hwan; Lee, Kang Sung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this study were to identify the relationship between motor recovery and gait velocity during dual tasks in patients with chronic stroke and determine automatic gait ability following stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three outpatients and twelve healthy subjects participated in a cross-sectional assessment. Community ambulation was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Outcome measures included the Motricity index, Berg Balance Scale, and gait speed under three conditions (self-paced ambulation for 10 m, ambulation while performing dual cognitive tasks, and ambulation while performing dual manual tasks). Gait automaticity was calculated. [Results] No significant differences were observed for muscle strength or balance between the limited community ambulation and the community ambulation groups. However, a significant difference in gait velocity was observed between the groups under the three conditions. In particular, a significant difference was detected only in the limited community ambulation group depending on the level of motor function recovery during cognitive and manual dual task ambulation. Additionally, we revealed that the community ambulation group had a lower level of gait automaticity compared with that in the normal group. [Conclusion] Our results show the influence of motor recovery on the change in gait velocity depending on the task if a patient is limitedly ambulatory. We revealed that community ambulators did not have a sufficient level of gait automaticity. PMID:25995582

  11. The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on task processing and prioritisation during dual-task gait.

    PubMed

    Wrightson, James G; Twomey, Rosie; Ross, Emma Z; Smeeton, Nicholas J

    2015-05-01

    The relationship between cognition and gait is often explored using a dual-task gait paradigm, which represents the ability to divide cognitive resources during walking. Recent evidence has suggested that the prefrontal cortex is involved in the allocation of cognitive resources during dual-task gait, though its precise role is unclear. Here, we used anodal and cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to probe the role of the prefrontal cortex in the control of stride time variability (STV), trunk RoM and cognitive task performance during dual-task gait. As task difficulty has been shown to mediate the dual-task cost, we also manipulated walking speed to see whether the effects of tDCS on dual-task gait were influenced by walking difficulty. Ten adults performed a serial subtraction task when walking at either preferred walking speed or 25 % of preferred walking speed, before and after receiving tDCS of the left prefrontal cortex. Anodal tDCS reduced STV and the dual-task cost on STV and improved cognitive task performance. Cathodal tDCS increased STV and appeared to increase the dual-task cost on STV, but did not affect cognitive task performance. There was no effect of tDCS on trunk RoM, and the effects of tDCS were not mediated by walking speed. The effect of dual-task gait on stride time variability and cognitive task performance was altered by the application of tDCS, and these effects were polarity dependent. These results highlight the role of the prefrontal cortex in biasing task performance during dual-task gait and indicate that tDCS may be a useful tool for examining the role of the cortex in the control of dual-task gait. PMID:25724513

  12. The effects of voice and manual control mode on dual task performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C. D.; Zenyuh, J.; Culp, V.; Marshak, W.

    1986-01-01

    Two fundamental principles of human performance, compatibility and resource competition, are combined with two structural dichotomies in the human information processing system, manual versus voice output, and left versus right cerebral hemisphere, in order to predict the optimum combination of voice and manual control with either hand, for time-sharing performance of a dicrete and continuous task. Eight right handed male subjected performed a discrete first-order tracking task, time-shared with an auditorily presented Sternberg Memory Search Task. Each task could be controlled by voice, or by the left or right hand, in all possible combinations except for a dual voice mode. When performance was analyzed in terms of a dual-task decrement from single task control conditions, the following variables influenced time-sharing efficiency in diminishing order of magnitude, (1) the modality of control, (discrete manual control of tracking was superior to discrete voice control of tracking and the converse was true with the memory search task), (2) response competition, (performance was degraded when both tasks were responded manually), (3) hemispheric competition, (performance degraded whenever two tasks were controlled by the left hemisphere) (i.e., voice or right handed control). The results confirm the value of predictive models invoice control implementation.

  13. Expertise, attention, and memory in sensorimotor skill execution: impact of novel task constraints on dual-task performance and episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Beilock, Sian L; Wierenga, Sarah A; Carr, Thomas H

    2002-10-01

    Two experiments explored the attention and memory processes governing sensorimotor skill. Experiment 1 compared novice and experienced golf putting performance in single-task (putting in isolation) and dual-task conditions (putting while performing an auditory word search task). At specific intervals, participants also produced episodic descriptions of specific putts. Experiment 2 assessed novice performance following training on the same putting task. In Experiment 1, experienced golfers did not differ in putting accuracy from single-to dual-task conditions and, compared to novices, had higher recognition memory for words heard while putting but diminished episodic memories of specific putts. However, when using an s-shaped arbitrarily weighted "funny putter" designed to disrupt the mechanics of skill execution, experienced golfers produced extensive episodic memories of specific putts but showed decreased dual-task putting accuracy and recognition memory for secondary task words. Trained novices produced results intermediate between the untrained novices and experienced golfers. As predicted by current theories of practice-based automaticity, expertise leads to proceduralized control that does not require constant attention. Resources are free to devote to secondary task demands, yet episodic memory for primary task performance is impoverished. Novel task constraints (e.g., a funny putter) increase attention to execution, compromising secondary task performance but enhancing memory for skill execution. PMID:12420993

  14. The effect of dual-task difficulty on the inhibition of the motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Corp, Daniel T; Rogers, Mark A; Youssef, George J; Pearce, Alan J

    2016-02-01

    Dual-tasking is intrinsic to many daily activities, including walking and driving. However, the activity of the primary motor cortex (M1) in response to dual-tasks (DT) is still not well characterised. A recent meta-analysis (Corp in Neurosci Biobehav Rev 43:74-87, 2014) demonstrated a reduction in M1 inhibition during dual-tasking, yet responses were not consistent between studies. It was suggested that DT difficulty might account for some of this between-study variability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether corticospinal excitability and M1 inhibition differed between an easier and more difficult dual-task. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to participants' abductor pollicis brevis muscle representation during a concurrent pincer grip task and stationary bike-riding. The margin of error in which to maintain pincer grip force was reduced to increase task difficulty. Compared to ST conditions, significantly increased M1 inhibition was demonstrated for the easier, but not more difficult, DT. However, there was no significant difference in M1 inhibition between easy and difficult DTs. The difference in difficulty between the two tasks may not have been wide enough to result in significant differences in M1 inhibition. Increased M1 inhibition for the easy DT condition was in opposition to the reduction in M1 inhibition found in our meta-analysis (Corp in Neurosci Biobehav Rev 43:74-87, 2014). We propose that this may be partially explained by differences in the timing of the TMS pulse between DT studies. PMID:26514811

  15. Video game practice optimizes executive control skills in dual-task and task switching situations.

    PubMed

    Strobach, Tilo; Frensch, Peter A; Schubert, Torsten

    2012-05-01

    We examined the relation of action video game practice and the optimization of executive control skills that are needed to coordinate two different tasks. As action video games are similar to real life situations and complex in nature, and include numerous concurrent actions, they may generate an ideal environment for practicing these skills (Green & Bavelier, 2008). For two types of experimental paradigms, dual-task and task switching respectively; we obtained performance advantages for experienced video gamers compared to non-gamers in situations in which two different tasks were processed simultaneously or sequentially. This advantage was absent in single-task situations. These findings indicate optimized executive control skills in video gamers. Similar findings in non-gamers after 15 h of action video game practice when compared to non-gamers with practice on a puzzle game clarified the causal relation between video game practice and the optimization of executive control skills. PMID:22426427

  16. Cerebellum and Integration of Neural Networks in Dual-Task Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Liu, Jun; Hallett, Mark; Zheng, Zheng; Chan, Piu

    2014-01-01

    Performing two tasks simultaneously (dual-task) is common in human daily life. The neural correlates of dual-task processing remain unclear. In the current study, we used a dual motor and counting task with functional MRI (fMRI) to determine whether there are any areas additionally activated for dual-task performance. Moreover, we investigated the functional connectivity of these added activated areas, as well as the training effect on brain activity and connectivity. We found that the right cerebellar vermis, left lobule V of the cerebellar anterior lobe and precuneus are additionally activated for this type of dual-tasking. These cerebellar regions had functional connectivity with extensive motor- and cognitive-related regions. Dual-task training induced less activation in several areas, but increased the functional connectivity between these cerebellar regions and numbers of motor- and cognitive-related areas. Our findings demonstrate that some regions within the cerebellum can be additionally activated with dual-task performance. Their role in dual motor and cognitive task processes is likely to integrate motor and cognitive networks, and may be involved in adjusting these networks to be more efficient in order to perform dual-tasking properly. The connectivity of the precuneus differs from the cerebellar regions. A possible role of the precuneus in dual-task may be monitoring the operation of active brain networks. PMID:23063842

  17. Musical training, bilingualism, and executive function: a closer look at task switching and dual-task performance.

    PubMed

    Moradzadeh, Linda; Blumenthal, Galit; Wiseheart, Melody

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated whether musical training and bilingualism are associated with enhancements in specific components of executive function, namely, task switching and dual-task performance. Participants (n = 153) belonging to one of four groups (monolingual musician, bilingual musician, bilingual non-musician, or monolingual non-musician) were matched on age and socioeconomic status and administered task switching and dual-task paradigms. Results demonstrated reduced global and local switch costs in musicians compared with non-musicians, suggesting that musical training can contribute to increased efficiency in the ability to shift flexibly between mental sets. On dual-task performance, musicians also outperformed non-musicians. There was neither a cognitive advantage for bilinguals relative to monolinguals, nor an interaction between music and language to suggest additive effects of both types of experience. These findings demonstrate that long-term musical training is associated with improvements in task switching and dual-task performance. PMID:25289704

  18. The effects on dynamic balance of dual-tasking using smartphone functions.

    PubMed

    Hyong, In Hyouk

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare dynamic balance with respect to completing a single task while not using smartrphone function and completing two task while using different smartphone functions, therby preventing falls or injuries resulting from completion of dual tasks. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 36 healthy males and females. The experiment was conducted for five situations: a Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) was performed (1) during single-tasking without a smartphone and during dual-tasking with a smartphone, (2) when listening to music using a smartphone, (3) when sending message using a smartphone, (4) when surfing the web using a smartphone, and (5) when playing a game using a smartphone. The condition were the same for all five experimentes. Random selection was done to prevent learing. All experiments were conducted three times, and the averaged values were used for analysis. The SEBT was performed in three directions: anterior, posterolateral, and posterormedial. In consideration the differences in leg length of the subjects, their actual leg length were measured to be used as percentages. Their leg length was measured from the anterior superior iliac spine of the femur to the medial malleolus. [Results] Compared with single task not done using a smartphone, dynamic balance statistically significantly changed for dual tasks done using a smartphone in all three directions. Dynamic balance decreased in all three directions when playing games, sending messages, web surfing, and listening to music. [Conclusion] Completing two tasks using a smartphone reduced cognitive ability, decreasing dynamic balance. Therefore, performing a single task rather than using the diverse functions of a smartphone while walking or working is considered a factor that can prevent falls and injuries. PMID:25729208

  19. The effects on dynamic balance of dual-tasking using smartphone functions

    PubMed Central

    Hyong, In Hyouk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to compare dynamic balance with respect to completing a single task while not using smartrphone function and completing two task while using different smartphone functions, therby preventing falls or injuries resulting from completion of dual tasks. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 36 healthy males and females. The experiment was conducted for five situations: a Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) was performed (1) during single-tasking without a smartphone and during dual-tasking with a smartphone, (2) when listening to music using a smartphone, (3) when sending message using a smartphone, (4) when surfing the web using a smartphone, and (5) when playing a game using a smartphone. The condition were the same for all five experimentes. Random selection was done to prevent learing. All experiments were conducted three times, and the averaged values were used for analysis. The SEBT was performed in three directions: anterior, posterolateral, and posterormedial. In consideration the differences in leg length of the subjects, their actual leg length were measured to be used as percentages. Their leg length was measured from the anterior superior iliac spine of the femur to the medial malleolus. [Results] Compared with single task not done using a smartphone, dynamic balance statistically significantly changed for dual tasks done using a smartphone in all three directions. Dynamic balance decreased in all three directions when playing games, sending messages, web surfing, and listening to music. [Conclusion] Completing two tasks using a smartphone reduced cognitive ability, decreasing dynamic balance. Therefore, performing a single task rather than using the diverse functions of a smartphone while walking or working is considered a factor that can prevent falls and injuries. PMID:25729208

  20. Dual task-related gait changes in patients with mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Nascimbeni, Alberto; Caruso, Shiva; Salatino, Adriana; Carenza, Marinella; Rigano, Marta; Raviolo, Andrea; Ricci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) entails a high risk of developing Alzheimer’s dementia. In MCI patients gait impairment, which increases the risk of falls and institutionalization, is an early motor sign. A dual-task (DT) paradigm might improve the observation of this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to investigate motor-cognitive interference in a sample of MCI patients and a group of matched healthy controls submitted to DT conditions. To this end, three different cognitive tasks were used: counting backwards, short story recall and a phonemic fluency task. Overall, the patients, compared with the healthy participants, performed worse on the cognitive tasks and showed some degree of gait impairment. In the DT conditions, both groups showed significant gait disruption independently of the concomitant cognitive task. As regards cognitive performance, counting backwards worsened during dual tasking, while short story recall improved in both groups. Overall, our results suggest that the use of a DT paradigm does not improve the early detection of MCI. Our findings of enhanced story recall during walking might have interesting implications for rehabilitation of memory function. PMID:26214028

  1. Modulation of hyperactive error signals in obsessive-compulsive disorder by dual-task demands.

    PubMed

    Klawohn, Julia; Endrass, Tanja; Preuss, Julia; Riesel, Anja; Kathmann, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Brain correlates of performance-monitoring have been shown to be hyperactive in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), indexed by enhanced amplitudes of the error-related negativity (ERN) in the event-related potential (ERP). This hyperactivity was found to be temporally stable, independent of symptom remission, and could not be further increased by punishing committed errors. The current study examined whether the ERN in OCD is generally insensitive to modulatory influences or can be decreased by manipulation of task demands. Twenty-two OCD patients and 22 control participants performed a flanker task alone or with a concurrent n-back task to manipulate attentional resource allocation. Response-related ERP data were examined. OCD patients showed enhanced ERN-amplitudes in the standard flanker (ηp2 = .13). In both groups a significant decrease in ERN was found under dual-task conditions (ηp2 = .72) that was larger in the OCD group (ηp2 = .14), resulting in a nonsignificant ERN group difference in dual-task conditions. The current study replicated enhanced performance-monitoring in OCD as indexed by higher ERN-amplitudes. Importantly, it further showed a larger ERN-reduction with dual-task demands in patients compared to healthy participants. These results suggest that overactive performance-monitoring was normalized in patients with OCD by experimental conditions. Changing the attentional focus appears to be an effective strategy in modifying hyperactive error-signals in OCD and might be a target for innovative interventions. PMID:26692121

  2. [Psychological and stabilographic features in healthy persons performing dual tasks with different quality].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The results of performance of 40 healthy volunteers (29.8 ± 2.47 y.o.) in four dual tasks that included postural balance task as a motor sub-task and calculation as a cognitive sub-task were compared to results of individual psychological assessment which measured working and spatial memory capacity, speed of attention switch etc. Performance of participants in dual tasks was not uniform. For each of four tasks four types of performance were observed. Those included decrease of performance in both or one task and increase of performance in both tasks. In one of the four dual tasks 30% of the group of participants performed in both components of dual task better then in separate motor and cognitive tasks. Better performance in this dual task correlated with higher speed of attention switch, higher estimates of spatial and working memory. Analysis of results of psychological and stabilografic investigations showed negative correlation between speed of sway of center of pressure (CoP) and speed of attention switch test, and also between amplitude of CoP sway along frontal axis and capacity of spatial and working memory. These correlations reflect involvement of cognitive resources in voluntary postural control and motor automatism in successful dual task performance. Selected variant of dual task could be used as an instrument of selection of individuals for activities related to high informational loads. PMID:25508959

  3. [Psychological and stabilographic features in healthy persons performing dual tasks with different quality].

    PubMed

    Zharikov, A V; Zhavoronkova, L A; Kuptsova, S B; Kushnir, E M; Kulikov, M A; Mikhalkova, A A

    2013-01-01

    The results of performance of 40 healthy volunteers (29.8 ± 2.47 y.o.) in four dual tasks that included postural balance task as a motor sub-task and calculation as a cognitive sub-task were compared to results of individual psychological assessment which measured working and spatial memory capacity, speed of attention switch etc. Performance of participants in dual tasks was not uniform. For each of four tasks four types of performance were observed. Those included decrease of performance in both or one task and increase of performance in both tasks. In one of the four dual tasks 30% of the group of participants performed in both components of dual task better then in separate motor and cognitive tasks. Better performance in this dual task correlated with higher speed of attention switch, higher estimates of spatial and working memory. Analysis of results of psychological and stabilografic investigations showed negative correlation between speed of sway of center of pressure (CoP) and speed of attention switch test, and also between amplitude of CoP sway along frontal axis and capacity of spatial and working memory. These correlations reflect involvement of cognitive resources in voluntary postural control and motor automatism in successful dual task performance. Selected variant of dual task could be used as an instrument of selection of individuals for activities related to high informational loads. PMID:25486828

  4. Stopping while Going! Response Inhibition Does Not Suffer Dual-Task Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaguchi, Motonori; Logan, Gordon D.; Bissett, Patrick G.

    2012-01-01

    Although dual-task interference is ubiquitous in a variety of task domains, stop-signal studies suggest that response inhibition is not subject to such interference. Nevertheless, no study has directly examined stop-signal performance in a dual-task setting. In two experiments, stop-signal performance was examined in a psychological refractory…

  5. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to Enhance Dual-Task Gait Training in Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot RCT

    PubMed Central

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.; Lamont, Robyn M.; Brauer, Sandra G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and safety of a combined anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and dual task gait training intervention in people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and to provide data to support a sample size calculation for a fully powered trial should trends of effectiveness be present. Design A pilot, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled parallel group trial with 12 week follow-up. Setting A university physiotherapy department. Interventions Sixteen participants diagnosed with PD received nine dual task gait training sessions over 3 weeks. Participants were randomized to receive either active or sham tDCS applied for the first 20 minutes of each session. Main Measures The primary outcome was gait speed while undertaking concurrent cognitive tasks (word lists, counting, conversation). Secondary measures included step length, cadence, Timed Up and Go, bradykinesia and motor speed. Results Gait speed, step length and cadence improved in both groups, under all dual task conditions. This effect was maintained at follow-up. There was no difference between the active and sham tDCS groups. Time taken to perform the TUGwords also improved, with no difference between groups. The active tDCS group did however increase their correct cognitive response rate during the TUGwords and TUGcount. Bradykinesia improved after training in both groups. Conclusion Three weeks of dual task gait training resulted in improved gait under dual task conditions, and bradykinesia, immediately following training and at 12 weeks follow-up. The only parameter enhanced by tDCS was the number of correct responses while performing the dual task TUG. tDCS applied to M1 may not be an effective adjunct to dual task gait training in PD. Trial Registration Australia-New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613001093774 PMID:27359338

  6. Interference effects of vocalization on dual task performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, J. M.; Goodman, L. S.; Pianka, M. J.

    1984-09-01

    Voice command and control systems have been proposed as a potential means of off-loading the typically overburdened visual information processing system. However, prior to introducing novel human-machine interfacing technologies in high workload environments, consideration must be given to the integration of the new technologists within existing task structures to ensure that no new sources of workload or interference are systematically introduced. This study examined the use of voice interactive systems technology in the joint performance of two cognitive information processing tasks requiring continuous memory and choice reaction wherein a basis for intertask interference might be expected. Stimuli for the continuous memory task were presented aurally and either voice or keyboard responding was required in the choice reaction task. Performance was significantly degraded in each task when voice responding was required in the choice reaction time task. Performance degradation was evident in higher error scores for both the choice reaction and continuous memory tasks. Performance decrements observed under conditions of high intertask stimulus similarity were not statistically significant. The results signal the need to consider further the task requirements for verbal short-term memory when applying speech technology in multitask environments.

  7. On the costs of parallel processing in dual-task performance: The case of lexical processing in word production.

    PubMed

    Paucke, Madlen; Oppermann, Frank; Koch, Iring; Jescheniak, Jörg D

    2015-12-01

    Previous dual-task picture-naming studies suggest that lexical processes require capacity-limited processes and prevent other tasks to be carried out in parallel. However, studies involving the processing of multiple pictures suggest that parallel lexical processing is possible. The present study investigated the specific costs that may arise when such parallel processing occurs. We used a novel dual-task paradigm by presenting 2 visual objects associated with different tasks and manipulating between-task similarity. With high similarity, a picture-naming task (T1) was combined with a phoneme-decision task (T2), so that lexical processes were shared across tasks. With low similarity, picture-naming was combined with a size-decision T2 (nonshared lexical processes). In Experiment 1, we found that a manipulation of lexical processes (lexical frequency of T1 object name) showed an additive propagation with low between-task similarity and an overadditive propagation with high between-task similarity. Experiment 2 replicated this differential forward propagation of the lexical effect and showed that it disappeared with longer stimulus onset asynchronies. Moreover, both experiments showed backward crosstalk, indexed as worse T1 performance with high between-task similarity compared with low similarity. Together, these findings suggest that conditions of high between-task similarity can lead to parallel lexical processing in both tasks, which, however, does not result in benefits but rather in extra performance costs. These costs can be attributed to crosstalk based on the dual-task binding problem arising from parallel processing. Hence, the present study reveals that capacity-limited lexical processing can run in parallel across dual tasks but only at the expense of extraordinary high costs. PMID:26375632

  8. Influence of dual-task on postexercise facilitation: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Concerto, Carmen; Amer, Bahaa; Abagyan, Anaida; Cao, Yisheng; Infortuna, Carmenrita; Chusid, Eileen; Coira, Diego; Battaglia, Fortunato

    2016-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of a dual task (DT) comprised of a nonfatiguing leg and foot extension coupled with a calculation task on postexercise facilitation (PEF) of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) tested by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve right-handed healthy subjects participated in the study. They were required to perform a motor task, a cognitive task and a DT. The motor task consisted of extending the right leg and foot for 30 sec at 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction. The cognitive task consisted of a 30-sec backward calculation. In the DT condition, motor and cognitive tasks were performed concurrently. Resting motor threshold and 10 MEPs were collected before and immediately after each task. TMS was delivered to the motor hot spot of the right vastus lateralis and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Results showed that exercise induced a significant PEF in both VL and TA muscles while calculation was not associated with significant PEF. Furthermore, DT was associated with lack of significant PEF in both muscles (VL, 116.1%±9.6%; TA, 115.7%±9%). Our data indicates DT interference on corticospinal excitability after a nonfatiguing exercise. Our experimental paradigm may be used to address postexercise motor cortex plastic adaptations induced by motor and cognitive tasks of different complexity in sport, aging and neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:27419111

  9. Influence of dual-task on postexercise facilitation: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study

    PubMed Central

    Concerto, Carmen; Amer, Bahaa; Abagyan, Anaida; Cao, Yisheng; Infortuna, Carmenrita; Chusid, Eileen; Coira, Diego; Battaglia, Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of a dual task (DT) comprised of a nonfatiguing leg and foot extension coupled with a calculation task on postexercise facilitation (PEF) of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) tested by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Twelve right-handed healthy subjects participated in the study. They were required to perform a motor task, a cognitive task and a DT. The motor task consisted of extending the right leg and foot for 30 sec at 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction. The cognitive task consisted of a 30-sec backward calculation. In the DT condition, motor and cognitive tasks were performed concurrently. Resting motor threshold and 10 MEPs were collected before and immediately after each task. TMS was delivered to the motor hot spot of the right vastus lateralis and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Results showed that exercise induced a significant PEF in both VL and TA muscles while calculation was not associated with significant PEF. Furthermore, DT was associated with lack of significant PEF in both muscles (VL, 116.1%±9.6%; TA, 115.7%±9%). Our data indicates DT interference on corticospinal excitability after a nonfatiguing exercise. Our experimental paradigm may be used to address postexercise motor cortex plastic adaptations induced by motor and cognitive tasks of different complexity in sport, aging and neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:27419111

  10. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on multiscale complexity of dual-task postural control in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Diange; Zhou, Junhong; Chen, Hu; Manor, Brad; Lin, Jianhao; Zhang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting the prefrontal cortex reduces the size and speed of standing postural sway in younger adults, particularly when performing a cognitive dual task. Here, we hypothesized that tDCS would alter the complex dynamics of postural sway as quantified by multiscale entropy (MSE). Twenty healthy older adults completed two study visits. Center-of-pressure (COP) fluctuations were recorded during single-task (i.e., quiet standing) and dual-task (i.e., standing while performing serial subtractions) conditions, both before and after a 20-min session of real or sham tDCS. MSE was used to estimate COP complexity within each condition. The percentage change in complexity from single- to dual-task conditions (i.e., dual-task cost) was also calculated. Before tDCS, COP complexity was lower (p = 0.04) in the dual-task condition as compared to the single-task condition. Neither real nor sham tDCS altered complexity in the single-task condition. As compared to sham tDCS, real tDCS increased complexity in the dual-task condition (p = 0.02) and induced a trend toward improved serial subtraction performance (p = 0.09). Moreover, those subjects with lower dual-task COP complexity at baseline exhibited greater percentage increases in complexity following real tDCS (R = −0.39, p = 0.05). Real tDCS also reduced the dual-task cost to complexity (p = 0.02), while sham stimulation had no effect. A single session of tDCS targeting the prefrontal cortex increased standing postural sway complexity with concurrent non-postural cognitive task. This form of noninvasive brain stimulation may be a safe strategy to acutely improve postural control by enhancing the system's capacity to adapt to stressors. PMID:25963755

  11. Age Differences between Children and Young Adults in the Dynamics of Dual-Task Prioritization: Body (Balance) versus Mind (Memory)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Sabine; Krampe, Ralf Th.; Lindenberger, Ulman; Baltes, Paul B.

    2008-01-01

    Task prioritization can lead to trade-off patterns in dual-task situations. The authors compared dual-task performances in 9- and 11-year-old children and young adults performing a cognitive task and a motor task concurrently. The motor task required balancing on an ankle-disc board. Two cognitive tasks measured working memory and episodic memory…

  12. Evaluation of an inertial sensor system for analysis of timed-up-and-go under dual-task demands.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, Jason T; Treen, Tanner T; Oates, Alison R; Lanovaz, Joel L

    2015-05-01

    Functional tests, such as the timed-up-and-go (TUG), are routinely used to screen for mobility issues and fall risk. While the TUG is easy to administer and evaluate, its single time-to-completion outcome may not discriminate between different mobility challenges. Wearable sensors provide an opportunity to collect a variety of additional variables during clinical tests. The purpose of this study was to assess a new wearable inertial sensor system (iTUG) by investigating the effects of cognitive tasks in a dual-task paradigm on spatiotemporal and kinematic variables during the TUG. No previous studies have looked at both spatiotemporal variables and kinematics during dual-task TUG tests. 20 healthy young participants (10 males) performed a total 15 TUG trials with two different cognitive tasks and a normal control condition. Total time, along with spatiotemporal gait parameters and kinematics for all TUG subtasks (sit-to-stand, walking, turn, turn-to-sit), were measured using the inertial sensors. Time-to-completion from iTUG was highly correlated with concurrent manual timing. Spatiotemporal variables during walking showed expected differences between control and cognitive dual-tasks while trunk kinematics appeared to show more sensitivity to dual-tasks than reported previously in straight line walking. Non-walking TUG subtasks showed only minor changes during dual-task conditions indicating a possible attentional shift away from the cognitive task. Stride length and some variability measures were significantly different between the two cognitive tasks suggesting an ability to discriminate between tasks. Overall, the use of the iTUG system allows the collection of both traditional and potentially more discriminatory variables with a protocol that is easily used in a clinical setting. PMID:25827680

  13. Individual differences in oscillatory brain activity in response to varying attentional demands during a word recall and oculomotor dual task

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Gusang; Lim, Sanghyun; Kim, Min-Young; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Suh, Minah

    2015-01-01

    Every day, we face situations that involve multi-tasking. How our brain utilizes cortical resources during multi-tasking is one of many interesting research topics. In this study, we tested whether a dual-task can be differentiated in the neural and behavioral responses of healthy subjects with varying degree of working memory capacity (WMC). We combined word recall and oculomotor tasks because they incorporate common neural networks including the fronto-parietal (FP) network. Three different types of oculomotor tasks (eye fixation, Fix-EM; predictive and random smooth pursuit eye movement, P-SPEM and R-SPEM) were combined with two memory load levels (low-load: five words, high-load: 10 words) for a word recall task. Each of those dual-task combinations was supposed to create varying cognitive loads on the FP network. We hypothesize that each dual-task requires different cognitive strategies for allocating the brain’s limited cortical resources and affects brain oscillation of the FP network. In addition, we hypothesized that groups with different WMC will show differential neural and behavioral responses. We measured oscillatory brain activity with simultaneous MEG and EEG recordings and behavioral performance by word recall. Prominent frontal midline (FM) theta (4–6 Hz) synchronization emerged in the EEG of the high-WMC group experiencing R-SPEM with high-load conditions during the early phase of the word maintenance period. Conversely, significant parietal upper alpha (10–12 Hz) desynchronization was observed in the EEG and MEG of the low-WMC group experiencing P-SPEM under high-load conditions during the same period. Different brain oscillatory patterns seem to depend on each individual’s WMC and varying attentional demands from different dual-task combinations. These findings suggest that specific brain oscillations may reflect different strategies for allocating cortical resources during combined word recall and oculomotor dual-tasks. PMID:26175681

  14. Do frailty and cognitive impairment affect dual-task cost during walking in the oldest old institutionalized patients?

    PubMed

    Cadore, Eduardo L; Casas-Herrero, Alvaro; Zambom-Ferraresi, Fabricio; Martínez-Ramírez, Alicia; Millor, Nora; Gómez, Marisol; Moneo, Ana B Bays; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate dual-task costs in several elderly populations, including robust oldest old, frail oldest old with MCI, frail oldest old without MCI, and frail elderly with dementia. Sixty-four elderly men and women categorized into frail without MCI (age 93.4 ± 3.2 years, n = 20), frail with MCI (age 92.4 ± 4.2 years, n = 13), robust (age 88.2 ± 4.1 years, n = 10), and patients with dementia (age 88.1 ± 5.1 years, n = 21). Five-meter gait ability and timed-up-and-go (TUG) tests with single and dual-task performance were assessed in the groups. Dual-task cost in both 5-m habitual gait velocity test and TUG test was calculated by the time differences between single and dual-task performance. The robust group exhibited better 5-m gait and TUG test performances in the single and dual-task conditions compared with the other three groups (P < 0.001), and the frail and frail + MCI groups exhibited better performances than the dementia group (P < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between the frail and frail + MCI groups. However, all groups exhibited lower gait velocities in the verbal and arithmetic task conditions, but the dual-task cost of the groups were similar. Robust individuals exhibited superior single and dual-task walking performances than the other three groups, and the frail and frail + MCI individuals exhibited performances that were superior to those of the patients with dementia. However, the dual-task costs, i.e., the changes in gait performance when elderly participants switch from a single to a dual task, were similar among all four of the investigated groups. Therefore, these results demonstrated that the magnitude of the impairment in gait pattern is independent of frailty and cognitive impairment status. PMID:26667940

  15. The Effects of Aging and Dual Task Demands on Language Production

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Susan; Schmalzried, RaLynn; Herman, Ruth; Leedahl, Skye; Mohankumar, Deepthi

    2008-01-01

    A digital pursuit rotor task was used to measure dual task costs of language production by young and older adults. After training on the pursuit rotor, participants were asked to track the moving target while providing a language sample. When simultaneously engaged, young adults experienced greater dual task costs to tracking, fluency, and grammatical complexity than older adults. Older adults were able to preserve their tracking performance by speaking more slowly. Individual differences in working memory, processing speed, and Stroop interference affected vulnerability to dual task costs. These results demonstrate the utility of using a digital pursuit rotor to study the effects of aging and dual task demands on language production and confirm prior findings that young and older adults use different strategies to accommodate to dual task demands. PMID:18982506

  16. Effect of dual-task training on postural stability in children with infantile hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Elhinidi, Elbadawi Ibrahim Mohammad; Ismaeel, Marwa Mostafa Ibrahim; El-Saeed, Tamer Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of using a selected dual-task training program to improve postural stability in infantile hemiparesis. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients participated in this study; patients were classified randomly into two equal groups: study and control groups. Both groups received conventional physical therapy treatment including mobility exercises, balance exercises, gait training exercises, and exercises to improve physical conditioning. In addition, the study group received a selected dual-task training program including balance and cognitive activities. The treatment program was conducted thrice per week for six successive weeks. The patients were assessed with the Biodex Balance System. These measures were recorded two times: before the application of the treatment program (pre) and after the end of the treatment program (post). [Results] There was a significant improvement for both groups; the improvement was significantly higher in the study group compared to the control group. [Conclusion] The selected dual-task training program is effective in improving postural stability in patients with infantile hemiparesis when added to the conventional physical therapy program. PMID:27134376

  17. Eliminating dual-task costs by minimizing crosstalk between tasks: The role of modality and feature pairings.

    PubMed

    Göthe, Katrin; Oberauer, Klaus; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2016-05-01

    We tested the independent influences of two content-based factors on dual-task costs, and on the parallel processing ability: The pairing of S-R modalities and the pairing of relevant features between stimuli and responses of two tasks. The two pairing factors were realized across four dual-task groups. Within each group the two tasks comprised two different stimulus modalities (visual and auditory), two different relevant stimulus features (spatial and verbal) and two response modalities (manual and vocal). Pairings of S-R modalities (standard: visual-manual and auditory-vocal, non-standard: visual-vocal and auditory-manual) and feature pairings (standard: spatial-manual and verbal-vocal, non-standard: spatial-vocal and verbal-manual) varied across groups. All participants practiced their respective dual-task combination in a paradigm with simultaneous stimulus onset before being transferred to a psychological refractory period paradigm varying stimulus-onset asynchrony. A comparison at the end of practice revealed similar dual-task costs and similar pairing effects in both paradigms. Dual-task costs depended on modality and feature pairings. Groups training with non-standard feature pairings (i.e., verbal stimulus features mapped to spatially separated response keys, or spatial stimulus features mapped to verbal responses) and non-standard modality pairings (i.e., auditory stimulus mapped to manual response, or visual stimulus mapped to vocal responses) had higher dual-task costs than respective standard pairings. In contrast, irrespective of modality pairing dual-task costs virtually disappeared with standard feature pairings after practice in both paradigms. The results can be explained by crosstalk between feature-binding processes for the two tasks. Crosstalk was present for non-standard but absent for standard feature pairings. Therefore, standard feature pairings enabled parallel processing at the end of practice. PMID:26878090

  18. Attentional Modulation of Word Recognition by Children in a Dual-Task Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sangsook; Lotto, Andrew; Lewis, Dawna; Hoover, Brenda; Stelmachowicz, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated an account of limited short-term memory capacity for children's speech perception in noise using a dual-task paradigm. Method: Sixty-four normal-hearing children (7-14 years of age) participated in this study. Dual tasks were repeating monosyllabic words presented in noise at 8 dB signal-to-noise ratio and…

  19. Capacity Demands of Phoneme Selection in Word Production: New Evidence from Dual-Task Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Amy E.; Meyer, Antje S.

    2008-01-01

    Three dual-task experiments investigated the capacity demands of phoneme selection in picture naming. On each trial, participants named a target picture (Task 1) and carried out a tone discrimination task (Task 2). To vary the time required for phoneme selection, the authors combined the targets with phonologically related or unrelated distractor…

  20. Walking in School-Aged Children in a Dual-Task Paradigm Is Related to Age But Not to Cognition, Motor Behavior, Injuries, or Psychosocial Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Manicolo, Olivia; Lemola, Sakari; Grob, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Age-dependent gait characteristics and associations with cognition, motor behavior, injuries, and psychosocial functioning were investigated in 138 typically developing children aged 6.7–13.2 years (M = 10.0 years). Gait velocity, normalized velocity, and variability were measured using the walkway system GAITRite without an additional task (single task) and while performing a motor or cognitive task (dual task). Assessment of children’s cognition included tests for intelligence and executive functions; parents reported on their child’s motor behavior, injuries, and psychosocial functioning. Gait variability (an index of gait regularity) decreased with increasing age in both single- and dual-task walking. Dual-task gait decrements were stronger when children walked in the motor compared to the cognitive dual-task condition and decreased with increasing age in both dual-task conditions. Gait alterations from single- to dual-task conditions were not related to children’s cognition, motor behavior, injuries, or psychosocial functioning. PMID:27014158

  1. Dual-task effects of simulated lane navigation and story recall in older adults with and without memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Sarah E.; Sisco, Shannon M.; Marsiske, Michael

    2013-01-01

    While driving is a complex task, it becomes relatively automatic over time although unfamiliar situations require increased cognitive effort. Much research has examined driving risk in cognitively impaired elders and found little effect. This study assessed whether mildly memory impaired elders made disproportionate errors in driving or story recall, under simultaneous simulated driving and story recall. Forty-six healthy (61% women; mean age = 76.4) and 15 memory impaired (66% women, mean age = 79.4) elders participated. Cognitive status was determined by neuropsychological performance. Results showed that during dual-task conditions, participants stayed in lane more, and recalled stories more poorly, than when they did the tasks separately. Follow-up analysis revealed that verbatim recall, in particular, was reduced while driving for healthy participants. While memory impaired participants performed more poorly than healthy controls on both tasks, cognitive status was not associated with greater dual-task costs when driving and story recall were combined. PMID:23043546

  2. The effects of dual-tasking on arm muscle responses in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Laing, Justin M; Tokuno, Craig D

    2016-04-01

    This study examined whether dual-tasking affects an individual's ability to generate arm muscle responses following a loss of balance. Nineteen young and 16 older adults recovered their balance in response to a surface translation. This balance task was either completed on its own or while counting backwards by 2's (easy counting difficulty) or 7's (hard counting difficulty). With increasing counting difficulty, less attentional resources were assumed to be available for balance recovery. The ability to generate arm muscle responses was quantified through the measurement of electromyographic (EMG) onset latencies and amplitudes from three arm muscles. Results indicated that the attentional requirements of the counting task did not greatly affect EMG onset latencies or amplitudes for both young and older adults. Even when an effect was observed, the magnitude of change was small (e.g., ∼3ms earlier EMG onset and ∼2.0%MVC smaller EMG amplitude during the dual- compared to the single-task conditions). Thus, the generation of arm muscle responses do not appear to require a significant amount of attentional resources and the decreased ability to cope with cognitive interference with ageing is unlikely to explain why older adults have difficulty in generating arm responses following a loss of balance. PMID:26784708

  3. Musical Training, Bilingualism, and Executive Function: A Closer Look at Task Switching and Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moradzadeh, Linda; Blumenthal, Galit; Wiseheart, Melody

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether musical training and bilingualism are associated with enhancements in specific components of executive function, namely, task switching and dual-task performance. Participants (n = 153) belonging to one of four groups (monolingual musician, bilingual musician, bilingual non-musician, or monolingual non-musician)…

  4. The Effect of Two Different Cognitive Tests on Gait Parameters during Dual Tasks in Healthy Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Kałużny, Krystian; Hagner, Wojciech; Kałużna, Anna; Kochański, Bartosz; Borkowska, Alina; Budzyński, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The paper aims to evaluate the influence of two different demanding cognitive tasks on gait parameters using BTS SMART system analysis. Patients and Methods. The study comprised 53 postmenopausal women aged 64.5 ± 6.7 years (range: 47–79). For every subject, gait analysis using a BTS SMART system was performed in a dual-task study design under three conditions: (I) while walking only (single task), (II) walking while performing a simultaneous simple cognitive task (SCT) (dual task), and (III) walking while performing a simultaneous complex cognitive task (CCT) (dual task). Time-space parameters of gait pertaining to the length of a single support phase, double support phase, gait speed, step length, step width, and leg swing speed were analyzed. Results. Performance of cognitive tests during gait resulted in a statistically significant prolongation of the left (by 7%) and right (by 7%) foot gait cycle, shortening of the length of steps made with the right extremity (by 4%), reduction of speed of swings made with the left (by 11%) and right (by 8%) extremity, and reduction in gait speed (by 6%). Conclusions. Performance of cognitive tests during gait changes its individual pattern in relation to the level of the difficulty of the task. PMID:27022602

  5. Dual task-related gait changes in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Alberto; Caruso, Shiva; Salatino, Adriana; Carenza, Marinella; Rigano, Marta; Raviolo, Andrea; Ricci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) entails a high risk of developing Alzheimer's dementia. In MCI patients gait impairment, which increases the risk of falls and institutionalization, is an early motor sign. A dualtask (DT) paradigm might improve the observation of this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to investigate motor-cognitive interference in a sample of MCI patients and a group of matched healthy controls submitted to DT conditions. To this end, three different cognitive tasks were used: counting backwards, short story recall and a phonemic fluency task. Overall, the patients, compared with the healthy participants, performed worse on the cognitive tasks and showed some degree of gait impairment. In the DT conditions, both groups showed significant gait disruption independently of the concomitant cognitive task. As regards cognitive performance, counting backwards worsened during dual tasking, while short story recall improved in both groups. Overall, our results suggest that the use of a DT paradigm does not improve the early detection of MCI. Our findings of enhanced story recall during walking might have interesting implications for rehabilitation of memory function. PMID:26214028

  6. The influence of spatial congruency and movement preparation time on saccade curvature in simultaneous and sequential dual-tasks.

    PubMed

    Moehler, Tobias; Fiehler, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Saccade curvature represents a sensitive measure of oculomotor inhibition with saccades curving away from covertly attended locations. Here we investigated whether and how saccade curvature depends on movement preparation time when a perceptual task is performed during or before saccade preparation. Participants performed a dual-task including a visual discrimination task at a cued location and a saccade task to the same location (congruent) or to a different location (incongruent). Additionally, we varied saccade preparation time (time between saccade cue and Go-signal) and the occurrence of the discrimination task (during saccade preparation=simultaneous vs. before saccade preparation=sequential). We found deteriorated perceptual performance in incongruent trials during simultaneous task performance while perceptual performance was unaffected during sequential task performance. Saccade accuracy and precision were deteriorated in incongruent trials during simultaneous and, to a lesser extent, also during sequential task performance. Saccades consistently curved away from covertly attended non-saccade locations. Saccade curvature was unaffected by movement preparation time during simultaneous task performance but decreased and finally vanished with increasing movement preparation time during sequential task performance. Our results indicate that the competing saccade plan to the covertly attended non-saccade location is maintained during simultaneous task performance until the perceptual task is solved while in the sequential condition, in which the discrimination task is solved prior to the saccade task, oculomotor inhibition decays gradually with movement preparation time. PMID:26410291

  7. Apolipoprotein E Genotype Linked to Spatial Gait Characteristics: Predictors of Cognitive Dual Task Gait Change

    PubMed Central

    MacAulay, Rebecca K.; Allaire, Ted; Brouillette, Robert; Foil, Heather; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing measures to detect preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease is vital, as prodromal stage interventions may prove more efficacious in altering the disease’s trajectory. Gait changes may serve as a useful clinical heuristic that precedes cognitive decline. This study provides the first systematic investigation of gait characteristics relationship with relevant demographic, physical, genetic (Apolipoprotein E genotype), and health risk factors in non-demented older adults during a cognitive-load dual task walking condition. Methods The GAITRite system provided objective measurement of gait characteristics in APOE-e4 “carriers” (n = 75) and “non-carriers” (n = 224). Analyses examined stride length and step time gait characteristics during simple and dual-task (spelling five-letter words backwards) conditions in relation to demographic, physical, genetic, and health risk factors. Results Slower step time and shorter stride length associated with older age, greater health risk, and worse physical performance (ps < .05). Men and women differed in height, gait characteristics, health risk factors and global cognition (ps < .05). APOE-e4 associated with a higher likelihood of hypercholesterolemia and overall illness index scores (ps < .05). No genotype-sex interactions on gait were found. APOE-e4 was linked to shorter stride length and greater dual-task related disturbances in stride length. Conclusions Stride length has been linked to heightened fall risk, attention decrements and structural brain changes in older adults. Our results indicate that stride length is a useful behavioral marker of cognitive change that is associated with genetic risk for AD. Sex disparities in motor decline may be a function of health risk factors. PMID:27486898

  8. Revisiting the Development of Time Sharing Using a Dual Motor Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getchell, Nancy; Pabreja, Priya

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss and examine how to develop time sharing using a dual motor task and its effects. They state that when one is required to perform two tasks at the same time (time sharing), an individual may experience difficulty in expressing one or both of the tasks. This phenomenon, known as interference, has been studied…

  9. Frequency Effects in Spoken and Visual Word Recognition: Evidence from Dual-Task Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Alexandra A.; Gaskell, M. Gareth; Quinlan, Philip T.; Tamminen, Jakke

    2006-01-01

    The authors report 3 dual-task experiments concerning the locus of frequency effects in word recognition. In all experiments, Task 1 entailed a simple perceptual choice and Task 2 involved lexical decision. In Experiment 1, an underadditive effect of word frequency arose for spoken words. Experiment 2 also showed underadditivity for visual lexical…

  10. Dynamic coupling of complex brain networks and dual-task behavior.

    PubMed

    Alavash, Mohsen; Thiel, Christiane M; Gießing, Carsten

    2016-04-01

    Multi-tasking is a familiar situation where behavioral performance is often challenged. To date, fMRI studies investigating the neural underpinning of dual-task interference have mostly relied on local brain activation maps or static brain connectivity networks. Here, based on task fMRI we explored how fluctuations in behavior during concurrent performance of a visuospatial and a speech task relate to alternations in the topology of dynamic brain connectivity networks. We combined a time-resolved functional connectivity and complex network analysis with a sliding window approach applied to the trial by trial behavioral responses to investigate the coupling between dynamic brain networks and dual-task behavior at close temporal proximity. Participants showed fluctuations in their dual-task behavior over time, with the accuracy in the component tasks being statistically independent from one another. On the global level of brain networks we found that dynamic changes of network topology were differentially coupled with the behavior in each component task during the course of dual-tasking. While momentary decrease in the global efficiency of dynamic brain networks correlated with subsequent increase in visuospatial accuracy, better speech performance was preceded by higher global network efficiency and was followed by an increase in between-module connectivity over time. Additionally, dynamic alternations in the modular organization of brain networks at the posterior cingulate cortex were differentially predictive for the visuospatial as compared to the speech accuracy over time. Our results provide the first evidence that, during the course of dual-tasking, each component task is supported by a distinct topological configuration of brain connectivity networks. This finding suggests that the failure of functional brain connectivity networks to adapt to an optimal topology supporting the performance in both component tasks at the same time contributes to the moment to

  11. Lexical Access and Dual-Task Performance: Determining the Locus of the Bottleneck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phil

    2004-01-01

    During the two years of funding for NASA Grant "NCC21325, Lexical access and dual-task performance: Determining the locus of the bottleneck," we completed three experiments involving the psychological refractory period (PRP) and word frequency.

  12. Parkinson's Disease and Cognitive-Motor Dual-Task: Is Motor Prioritization Possible in the Early Stages of the Disease?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ângela; Sousa, Andreia S P; Rocha, Nuno; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-01-01

    The authors aimed to compare the postural phase of gait initiation under single-task (gait initiation) and dual-task (gait initiation plus Stroop test) conditions in healthy subjects and in subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) in the early stages (Hoehn and Yahr scale < 3). The postural phase of gait initiation was assessed through the centre of pressure in single and dual task in 10 healthy subjects and 9 with PD. The analysis indicated that in the early stages of PD, an additional cognitive task did not affect the displacement of the gait initiation. No significant effects occurred between the groups and within-subjects (p > .05). Also, no interaction was found between the groups and the conditions (single- and dual-task). Differences were found in the duration of the mediolateral postural phase (p = .003), which was higher in PD subjects than in healthy subjects. The findings suggest that subjects in the early stages of PD prioritize gait initiation, as their motor performance was similar to that of healthy subjects. PMID:27159414

  13. Visual Scanning Training for Neglect after Stroke with and without a Computerized Lane Tracking Dual Task

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, M. E.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Brouwer, W. H.; Fasotti, L.

    2013-01-01

    Neglect patients typically fail to explore the contralesional half-space. During visual scanning training, these patients learn to consciously pay attention to contralesional target stimuli. It has been suggested that combining scanning training with methods addressing non-spatial attention might enhance training results. In the present study, a dual task training component was added to a visual scanning training (i.e., Training di Scanning Visuospaziale – TSVS; Pizzamiglio et al., 1990). Twenty-nine subacute right hemisphere stroke patients were semi-randomly assigned to an experimental (N = 14) or a control group (N = 15). Patients received 30 training sessions during 6 weeks. TSVS consisted of four standardized tasks (digit detection, reading/copying, copying drawings, and figure description). Moreover, a driving simulator task was integrated in the training procedure. Control patients practiced a single lane tracking task for 2 days a week during 6 weeks. The experimental group was administered the same training schedule, but in weeks 4–6 of the training, the TSVS digit detection task was combined with lane tracking on the same projection screen, so as to create a dual task (computerized visual reaction time task designed for training). Various neglect tests and driving simulator tasks were administered before and after training. No significant group and interaction effects were found that might reflect additional positive effects of dual task training. Significant improvements after training were observed in both groups taken together on most assessment tasks. Ameliorations were generally not correlated to post-onset time, but spontaneous recovery, test–retest variability, and learning effects could not be ruled out completely, since these were not controlled for. Future research might focus on increasing the amount of dual task training, the implementation of progressive difficulty levels in driving simulator tasks, and further exploration

  14. Visual Scanning Training for Neglect after Stroke with and without a Computerized Lane Tracking Dual Task.

    PubMed

    van Kessel, M E; Geurts, A C H; Brouwer, W H; Fasotti, L

    2013-01-01

    Neglect patients typically fail to explore the contralesional half-space. During visual scanning training, these patients learn to consciously pay attention to contralesional target stimuli. It has been suggested that combining scanning training with methods addressing non-spatial attention might enhance training results. In the present study, a dual task training component was added to a visual scanning training (i.e., Training di Scanning Visuospaziale - TSVS; Pizzamiglio et al., 1990). Twenty-nine subacute right hemisphere stroke patients were semi-randomly assigned to an experimental (N = 14) or a control group (N = 15). Patients received 30 training sessions during 6 weeks. TSVS consisted of four standardized tasks (digit detection, reading/copying, copying drawings, and figure description). Moreover, a driving simulator task was integrated in the training procedure. Control patients practiced a single lane tracking task for 2 days a week during 6 weeks. The experimental group was administered the same training schedule, but in weeks 4-6 of the training, the TSVS digit detection task was combined with lane tracking on the same projection screen, so as to create a dual task (computerized visual reaction time task designed for training). Various neglect tests and driving simulator tasks were administered before and after training. No significant group and interaction effects were found that might reflect additional positive effects of dual task training. Significant improvements after training were observed in both groups taken together on most assessment tasks. Ameliorations were generally not correlated to post-onset time, but spontaneous recovery, test-retest variability, and learning effects could not be ruled out completely, since these were not controlled for. Future research might focus on increasing the amount of dual task training, the implementation of progressive difficulty levels in driving simulator tasks, and further exploration of

  15. Analysis of dual-task elderly gait in fallers and non-fallers using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Howcroft, Jennifer; Kofman, Jonathan; Lemaire, Edward D; McIlroy, William E

    2016-05-01

    Dual-task (DT) gait involves walking while simultaneously performing an attention-demanding task and can be used to identify impaired gait or executive function in older adults. Advancment is needed in techniques that quantify the influence of dual tasking to improve predictive and diagnostic potential. This study investigated the viability of wearable sensor measures to identify DT gait changes in older adults and distinguish between elderly fallers and non-fallers. A convenience sample of 100 older individuals (75.5±6.7 years; 76 non-fallers, 24 fallers based on 6 month retrospective fall occurrence) walked 7.62m under single-task (ST) and DT conditions while wearing pressure-sensing insoles and tri-axial accelerometers at the head, pelvis, and left and right shanks. Differences between ST and DT gait were identified for temporal measures, acceleration descriptive statistics, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) quartiles, ratio of even to odd harmonics, center of pressure (CoP) stance path coefficient of variation, and deviations to expected CoP stance path. Increased posterior CoP stance path deviations, increased coefficient of variation, decreased FFT quartiles, and decreased ratio of even to odd harmonics suggested increased DT gait variability. Decreased gait velocity and decreased acceleration standard deviations (SD) at the pelvis and shanks could represent compensatory gait strategies that maintain stability. Differences in acceleration between fallers and non-fallers in head posterior SD and pelvis AP ratio of even to odd harmonics during ST, and pelvis vertical maximum Lyapunov exponent during DT gait were identified. Wearable-sensor-based DT gait assessments could be used in point-of-care environments to identify gait deficits. PMID:26994786

  16. High-Frequency Binaural Beats Increase Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from Dual-Task Crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Hommel, Bernhard; Sellaro, Roberta; Fischer, Rico; Borg, Saskia; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive-control processes can be configured to optimize either persistence of information processing (by amplifying competition between decision-making alternatives and top-down biasing of this competition) or flexibility (by dampening competition and biasing). We investigated whether high-frequency binaural beats, an auditory illusion suspected to act as a cognitive enhancer, have an impact on cognitive-control configuration. We hypothesized that binaural beats in the gamma range bias the cognitive-control style toward flexibility, which in turn should increase the crosstalk between tasks in a dual-task paradigm. We replicated earlier findings that the reaction time in the first-performed task is sensitive to the compatibility between the responses in the first and the second task-an indication of crosstalk. As predicted, exposing participants to binaural beats in the gamma range increased this effect as compared to a control condition in which participants were exposed to a continuous tone of 340 Hz. These findings provide converging evidence that the cognitive-control style can be systematically biased by inducing particular internal states; that high-frequency binaural beats bias the control style toward more flexibility; and that different styles are implemented by changing the strength of local competition and top-down bias. PMID:27605922

  17. An auditory display in a dual-axis tracking task.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirchandani, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Results of a study in which subjects were presented concurrently with the primary task of controlling a second-order plant and the secondary task of controlling a first-order plant. The plant errors for the two tasks were shown on separate visual displays. An auditory display, whose output varied in frequency and volume with the error, was used to supplement the secondary task in half of the runs. To study the effects of the auditory display, two performance measures were obtained: (1) the integral of the squared error (ISE) and (2) the describing functions of the human operator. Statistical analysis of the ISE measures indicated that when the secondary task was supplemented with an auditory display, there was a significant improvement in performance on the secondary task. The performance on the primary task improved on the average, but not significantly. The variances of the ISE values decreased for both the tasks, indicating a more consistent behavior with the auditory display. The describing function analysis showed that supplementing the secondary task with the auditory display increased the low frequency gain of the human operator for this task. The describing functions for the primary task did not show any apparent changes.

  18. Nonautomatic emotion perception in a dual-task situation.

    PubMed

    Tomasik, Dave; Ruthruff, Eric; Allen, Philip A; Lien, Mei-Ching

    2009-04-01

    Are emotions perceived automatically? Two psychological refractory period experiments were conducted to ascertain whether emotion perception requires central attentional resources. Task 1 required an auditory discrimination (tone vs. noise), whereas Task 2 required a discrimination between happy and angry faces. The difficulty of Task 2 was manipulated by varying the degree of emotional expression. The stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) between Task 1 and Task 2 was also varied. Experiment 1 revealed additive effects of SOA and Task 2 emotion-perception difficulty. Experiment 2 replicated the additive relationship with a stronger manipulation of emotion-perception difficulty. According to locus-of-slack logic, our participants did not process emotional expressions while central resources were devoted to Task 1. We conclude that emotion perception is not fully automatic. PMID:19293095

  19. Dual-Task Interference during Initial Learning of a New Motor Task Results from Competition for the Same Brain Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remy, Florence; Wenderoth, Nicole; Lipkens, Karen; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral patterns of activity elicited by dual-task performance throughout the learning of a complex bimanual coordination pattern were addressed. Subjects (N = 12) were trained on the coordination pattern and scanned using fMRI at early (PRE) and late (POST) learning stages. During scanning, the coordination pattern was performed either as a…

  20. The contribution of postural control and bilateral coordination to the impact of dual tasking on gait.

    PubMed

    Yogev-Seligmann, Galit; Giladi, Nir; Gruendlinger, Leor; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2013-04-01

    The simultaneous performance of a cognitive task while walking typically alters the gait pattern. In some populations, these alterations have been associated with an increased risk of falls, motivating study of this response from the clinical perspective. The mechanisms responsible for these effects are not fully understood. The concurrent requirement to control upright posture and stepping, a bilaterally coordinated rhythmic task, may be the cause of this so-called dual-tasking effect. To evaluate this possibility, the present study was designed to isolate the individual contribution of these two demands by assessing the effects of cognitive loading on standing (i.e., postural control without bilateral coordination of stepping), cycling (i.e., bilateral coordination similar to stepping, but with minimal postural demands), and walking. We also investigated the effects of aging and parkinsonism on the performance of these three tasks in response to cognitive loading, also referred to as a dual task. Twenty-one healthy young adults, 15 healthy older adults, and 18 patients with Parkinson's disease were assessed while walking, standing, and cycling, with and without an additional cognitive load. In the young adults, the performance on the two motor tasks that involved bilateral coordination deteriorated significantly in response to the dual task, while standing was not impacted. Similar results, although less robust, were observed among the healthy older adults. In contrast, among the patients with Parkinson's disease, the dual-task costs, i.e., the impact of the simultaneously performed cognitive task on the gait pattern, were high in all motor tasks. These findings suggest that walking is especially vulnerable to cognitive loading, in part, because of the unique sensitivity of bilateral coordination of limb movements to the effects of dual tasking. PMID:23371748

  1. Speech responses and dual-task performance - Better time-sharing or asymmetric transfer?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    The value of speech controls in a dual-task experiment that also evaluated asymmetric transfer effects is considered. There was no evidence of asymmetric transfer in spite of significant effects supporting the advantage of mixing manual and speech responses. The data suggest that speech controls can be used to enhance performance in operational multiple-task environments.

  2. Comparison of Psychophysiological and Dual-Task Measures of Listening Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeman, Scott; Sims, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We wished to make a comparison of psychophysiological measures of listening effort with subjective and dual-task measures of listening effort for a diotic-dichotic-digits and a sentences-in-noise task. Method: Three groups of young adults (18-38 years old) with normal hearing participated in three experiments: two psychophysiological…

  3. Using Dual-Task Methodology to Dissociate Automatic from Nonautomatic Processes Involved in Artificial Grammar Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Michelle A.; Conway, Christopher M.; Kellogg, Ronald T.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that both automatic and intentional processes contribute to the learning of grammar and fragment knowledge in artificial grammar learning (AGL) tasks. To explore the relative contribution of automatic and intentional processes to knowledge gained in AGL, we utilized dual-task methodology to dissociate automatic and…

  4. Dual-arm supervisory and shared control space servicing task experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    A dual-arm task execution primitive has been implemented for cooperative dual-arm telerobotic task execution utilizing multiple sensors concurrently. The primitive has been integrated into a telerobot task execution system and can be called by a task planning system for execution of tasks requiring dual-arm sensor based motion, e.g., force control, teleoperation, and shared control. The primitive has a large input parameter set which is used to specify the desired behavior of the motion. Move-squeeze decomposition is utilized to decompose forces sensed at the wrists of the two manipulators into forces in the move subspace, which cause system motion, and forces in the squeeze subspaces, which cause internal forces. The move and squeeze forces are then separately controlled. Several space servicing tasks utilizing the cooperative dual-arm control capability are described, and experimental results from the tasks are given. The supervisory and shared control tasks include capture of a rotating satellite, orbital replacement unit changeout, fluid coupler seating and locking, and contour following.

  5. Free-Throw Shooting during Dual-Task Performance: Implications for Attentional Demand and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Jayme; Gill, Diane L.; Etnier, Jennifer; Kornatz, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the dual-task paradigm was used to determine peak attentional demand during the free-throw process. Thirty participants completed 40 free-throw trials. The free throw was the primary task, but participants also verbally responded to a tone administered at one of four probe positions (PP). Repeated measures analysis of variance…

  6. The Neurocognitive Basis for Impaired Dual-Task Performance in Senior Fallers

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Hsu, C. Liang; Voss, Michelle W.; Chan, Alison; Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Handy, Todd C.; Graf, Peter; Beattie, B. Lynn; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Falls are a major health-care concern, and while dual-task performance is widely recognized as being impaired in those at-risk for falls, the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms remain unknown. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms could lead to the refinement and development of behavioral, cognitive, or neuropharmacological interventions for falls prevention. Therefore, we conducted a cross-sectional study with community-dwelling older adults aged 70–80 years with a history of falls (i.e., two or more falls in the past 12 months) or no history of falls (i.e., zero falls in the past 12 months); n = 28 per group. We compared functional activation during cognitive-based dual-task performance between fallers and non-fallers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Executive cognitive functioning was assessed via Stroop, Trail Making, and Digit Span. Mobility was assessed via the Timed Up and Go test (TUG). We found that non-fallers exhibited significantly greater functional activation compared with fallers during dual-task performance in key regions responsible for resolving dual-task interference, including precentral, postcentral, and lingual gyri. Further, we report slower reaction times during dual-task performance in fallers and significant correlations between level of functional activation and independent measures of executive cognitive functioning and mobility. Our study is the first neuroimaging study to examine dual-task performance in fallers, and supports the notion that fallers have reduced functional brain activation compared with non-fallers. Given that dual-task performance—and the underlying neural concomitants—appears to be malleable with relevant training, our study serves as a launching point for promising strategies to reduce falls in the future. PMID:26903862

  7. A Task that Elicits Reasoning: A Dual Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelewitz, Dina; Mueller, Mary; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the forms of reasoning elicited as fourth grade students in a suburban district and sixth grade students in an urban district worked on similar tasks involving reasoning with the use of Cuisenaire rods. Analysis of the two data sets shows similarities in the reasoning used by both groups of students on specific tasks, and the…

  8. Postural Control in Dual-Task Situations: Does Whole-Body Fatigue Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Beurskens, Rainer; Haeger, Matthias; Kliegl, Reinhold; Roecker, Kai; Granacher, Urs

    2016-01-01

    Postural control is important to cope with demands of everyday life. It has been shown that both attentional demand (i.e., cognitive processing) and fatigue affect postural control in young adults. However, their combined effect is still unresolved. Therefore, we investigated the effects of fatigue on single- (ST) and dual-task (DT) postural control. Twenty young subjects (age: 23.7 ± 2.7) performed an all-out incremental treadmill protocol. After each completed stage, one-legged-stance performance on a force platform under ST (i.e., one-legged-stance only) and DT conditions (i.e., one-legged-stance while subtracting serial 3s) was registered. On a second test day, subjects conducted the same balance tasks for the control condition (i.e., non-fatigued). Results showed that heart rate, lactate, and ventilation increased following fatigue (all p < 0.001; d = 4.2–21). Postural sway and sway velocity increased during DT compared to ST (all p < 0.001; d = 1.9–2.0) and fatigued compared to non-fatigued condition (all p < 0.001; d = 3.3–4.2). In addition, postural control deteriorated with each completed stage during the treadmill protocol (all p < 0.01; d = 1.9–3.3). The addition of an attention-demanding interference task did not further impede one-legged-stance performance. Although both additional attentional demand and physical fatigue affected postural control in healthy young adults, there was no evidence for an overadditive effect (i.e., fatigue-related performance decrements in postural control were similar under ST and DT conditions). Thus, attentional resources were sufficient to cope with the DT situations in the fatigue condition of this experiment. PMID:26796320

  9. Analysis of dual-task elderly gait using wearable plantar-pressure insoles and accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Howcroft, Jennifer D; Lemaire, Edward D; Kofman, Jonathan; McIlroy, William E

    2014-01-01

    Dual-task gait allows assessment of impaired executive function and mobility control in older individuals, which are risk factors of falls. This study investigated gait changes in older individuals due to the addition of a cognitive load, using wearable pressure-sensing insole and tri-axial accelerometer measures. These wearable sensors can be applied at the point-of-care. Eleven elderly (65 years or older) individuals walked 7.62 m with and without a verbal fluency cognitive load task while wearing FScan 3000E pressure-sensing insoles in both shoes and a Gulf Coast X16-1C tri-axial accelerometer at the pelvis. Plantar-pressure derived parameters included center of force (CoF) path and temporal measures. Acceleration derived measures were descriptive statistics, Fast Fourier Transform quartile, ratio of even-to-odd harmonics, and maximum Lyapunov exponent. Stride time, stance time, and swing time all significantly increased during dual-task compared to single-task walking. Minimum, mean, and median CoF stance velocity; cadence; and vertical, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral harmonic ratio all significantly decreased during dual-task walking. Wearable plantar pressure-sensing insole and lower back accelerometer derived-measures can identify gait differences between single-task and dual-task walking in older individuals and could be used in point-of-care environments to assess for deficits in executive function and mobility impairments. PMID:25571116

  10. High-Frequency Binaural Beats Increase Cognitive Flexibility: Evidence from Dual-Task Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Bernhard; Sellaro, Roberta; Fischer, Rico; Borg, Saskia; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that cognitive-control processes can be configured to optimize either persistence of information processing (by amplifying competition between decision-making alternatives and top-down biasing of this competition) or flexibility (by dampening competition and biasing). We investigated whether high-frequency binaural beats, an auditory illusion suspected to act as a cognitive enhancer, have an impact on cognitive-control configuration. We hypothesized that binaural beats in the gamma range bias the cognitive-control style toward flexibility, which in turn should increase the crosstalk between tasks in a dual-task paradigm. We replicated earlier findings that the reaction time in the first-performed task is sensitive to the compatibility between the responses in the first and the second task—an indication of crosstalk. As predicted, exposing participants to binaural beats in the gamma range increased this effect as compared to a control condition in which participants were exposed to a continuous tone of 340 Hz. These findings provide converging evidence that the cognitive-control style can be systematically biased by inducing particular internal states; that high-frequency binaural beats bias the control style toward more flexibility; and that different styles are implemented by changing the strength of local competition and top-down bias. PMID:27605922

  11. Inhibitory processes relate differently to balance/reaction time dual tasks in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, David N.; Redfern, Mark S.; Nebes, Robert D.; Jennings, J. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory processes have been suggested to be involved in maintaining balance in older adults, specifically in the integration of sensory information. This study investigated the association between inhibition and the ability to shift attention between auditory and visual modalities during a balance challenge. Young (21–35 yrs; n=24) and older (70–85 yrs; n=22) healthy subjects completed tasks assessing perceptual inhibition and motor inhibition. Subjects then performed dual-task paradigms pairing auditory and visual choice reaction time tasks with different postural conditions. Sensory channel switch cost was quantified as the difference between visual and auditory reaction times. Results showed that better perceptual and motor inhibition capabilities were associated with less sensory switch cost in the old (perceptual inhibition: r=0.51; motor inhibition: r=0.48). In the young, neither perceptual nor motor inhibition was associated with sensory switch cost. Inhibitory skills appear particularly important in the elderly for processing events from multiple sensory channels while maintaining balance. PMID:19526388

  12. Gait Adaptability Training Improves Both Postural Stability and Dual-Tasking Ability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Batson, Crystal D.; Peters, Brian T.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    After spaceflight, the process of readapting to Earth's gravity commonly presents crewmembers with a variety of locomotor challenges. Our recent work has shown that the ability to adapt to a novel discordant sensorimotor environment can be increased through preflight training, so one focus of our laboratory has been the development of a gait training countermeasure to expedite the return of normal locomotor function after spaceflight. We used a training system comprising a treadmill mounted on a motion base facing a virtual visual scene that provided a variety of sensory challenges. As part of their participation in a larger retention study, 10 healthy adults completed 3 training sessions during which they walked on a treadmill at 1.1 m/s while receiving discordant support-surface and visual manipulations. After a single training session, subjects stride frequencies improved, and after 2 training sessions their auditory reaction times improved, where improvement was indicated by a return toward baseline values. Interestingly, improvements in reaction time came after stride frequency improvements plateaued. This finding suggests that postural stability was given a higher priority than a competing cognitive task. Further, it demonstrates that improvement in both postural stability and dual-tasking can be achieved with multiple training exposures. We conclude that, with training, individuals become more proficient at walking in discordant sensorimotor conditions and are able to devote more attention to competing tasks.

  13. Corticospinal activity during dual tasking: a systematic review and meta-analysis of TMS literature from 1995 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Corp, Daniel T; Lum, Jarrad A G; Tooley, Gregory A; Pearce, Alan J

    2014-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted across studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate corticospinal excitability and inhibition in response to a dual task (DT). Quantitative analysis was performed on eleven controlled studies that had included healthy participants over the age of 18 years. Results showed a small effect size for increased corticospinal excitability for DT conditions (SMD=0.207; p=.217, and a small effect size (SMD=-0.253) demonstrating a significant decrease in corticospinal inhibition for DT conditions (p=.019). Meta-regression demonstrated that neither age, task type, or task prioritisation accounted for the high variability in effect sizes between studies. A number of possible sources of within study bias are identified, which reduced the level of evidence for study findings. The results show overall changes in corticospinal responses between ST and DT conditions; however further research is necessary to investigate variables that could account for differences in corticospinal responses between studies. PMID:24705270

  14. E-learning, dual-task, and cognitive load: The anatomy of a failed experiment.

    PubMed

    Van Nuland, Sonya E; Rogers, Kem A

    2016-03-01

    The rising popularity of commercial anatomy e-learning tools has been sustained, in part, due to increased annual enrollment and a reduction in laboratory hours across educational institutions. While e-learning tools continue to gain popularity, the research methodologies used to investigate their impact on learning remain imprecise. As new user interfaces are introduced, it is critical to understand how functionality can influence the load placed on a student's memory resources, also known as cognitive load. To study cognitive load, a dual-task paradigm wherein a learner performs two tasks simultaneously is often used, however, its application within educational research remains uncommon. Using previous paradigms as a guide, a dual-task methodology was developed to assess the cognitive load imposed by two commercial anatomical e-learning tools. Results indicate that the standard dual-task paradigm, as described in the literature, is insensitive to the cognitive load disparities across e-learning tool interfaces. Confounding variables included automation of responses, task performance tradeoff, and poor understanding of primary task cognitive load requirements, leading to unreliable quantitative results. By modifying the secondary task from a basic visual response to a more cognitively demanding task, such as a modified Stroop test, the automation of secondary task responses can be reduced. Furthermore, by recording baseline measures for the primary task as well as the secondary task, it is possible for task performance tradeoff to be detected. Lastly, it is imperative that the cognitive load of the primary task be designed such that it does not overwhelm the individual's ability to learn new material. Anat Sci Educ 9: 186-196. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists. PMID:26480302

  15. Simultaneous dual-task performance reveals parallel response selection after practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazeltine, Eliot; Teague, Donald; Ivry, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    E. H. Schumacher, T. L. Seymour, J. M. Glass, D. E. Kieras, and D. E. Meyer (2001) reported that dual-task costs are minimal when participants are practiced and give the 2 tasks equal emphasis. The present research examined whether such findings are compatible with the operation of an efficient response selection bottleneck. Participants trained until they were able to perform both tasks simultaneously without interference. Novel stimulus pairs produced no reaction time costs, arguing against the development of compound stimulus-response associations (Experiment 1). Manipulating the relative onsets (Experiments 2 and 4) and durations (Experiments 3 and 4) of response selection processes did not lead to dual-task costs. The results indicate that the 2 tasks did not share a bottleneck after practice.

  16. Memory performance and area-specific self-regulation of slow cortical potentials: dual-task interference.

    PubMed

    Lutzenberger, W; Roberts, L E; Birbaumer, N

    1993-11-01

    We examined the effect of area-specific feedback for slow potentials on sensorimotor and memory performance under single and dual-task conditions. Subjects observed a memory set for 400 ms and then determined 5 s later whether a target letter had been contained in the original presentation (Sternberg task). After one session of Sternberg-only training, feedback training was added for production of negative and positive slow potentials area-specifically at Fz, Cz or Pz during the 5-s interval separating the memory set and target probes. Addition of the feedback task resulted in an increase in Sternberg response latency and errors which was followed by gradual recovery over five dual-task sessions (recovery not complete for the error measure). Subjects successfully regulated their slow potentials, but only in an area-nonspecific fashion, even though area-specific control was observed in an earlier study under a feedback-only condition. Sternberg performance did not depend on whether slow potential negativity or positivity was produced. These findings indicate that competition between tasks was a more important determinant of performance than was modulation of dendritic polarization by feedback-induced slow potentials. PMID:8119840

  17. Dual-Task Processing in Younger and Older Adults: Similarities and Differences Revealed by fMRI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Alan A.; Jonides, John; Sylvester, Ching-Yune C.

    2011-01-01

    fMRI was used to explore age differences in the neural substrate of dual-task processing. Brain activations when there was a 100 ms SOA between tasks, and task overlap was high, were contrasted with activations when there was a 1000 ms SOA, and first task processing was largely complete before the second task began. Younger adults (M = 21 yrs)…

  18. Central as well as Peripheral Attentional Bottlenecks in Dual-Task Performance Activate Lateral Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Szameitat, André J.; Vanloo, Azonya; Müller, Hermann J.

    2016-01-01

    Human information processing suffers from severe limitations in parallel processing. In particular, when required to respond to two stimuli in rapid succession, processing bottlenecks may appear at central and peripheral stages of task processing. Importantly, it has been suggested that executive functions are needed to resolve the interference arising at such bottlenecks. The aims of the present study were to test whether central attentional limitations (i.e., bottleneck at the decisional response selection stage) as well as peripheral limitations (i.e., bottleneck at response initiation) both demand executive functions located in the lateral prefrontal cortex. For this, we re-analyzed two previous studies, in which a total of 33 participants performed a dual-task according to the paradigm of the psychological refractory period (PRP) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In one study (N = 17), the PRP task consisted of two two-choice response tasks known to suffer from a central bottleneck (CB group). In the other study (N = 16), the PRP task consisted of two simple-response tasks known to suffer from a peripheral bottleneck (PB group). Both groups showed considerable dual-task costs in form of slowing of the second response in the dual-task (PRP effect). Imaging results are based on the subtraction of both single-tasks from the dual-task within each group. In the CB group, the bilateral middle frontal gyri and inferior frontal gyri were activated. Higher activation in these areas was associated with lower dual-task costs. In the PB group, the right middle frontal and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were activated. Here, higher activation was associated with higher dual-task costs. In conclusion we suggest that central and peripheral bottlenecks both demand executive functions located in lateral prefrontal cortices (LPFC). Differences between the CB and PB groups with respect to the exact prefrontal areas activated and the correlational patterns

  19. The effect of task order predictability in audio-visual dual task performance: Just a central capacity limitation?

    PubMed Central

    Töllner, Thomas; Strobach, Tilo; Schubert, Torsten; Müller, Hermann J.

    2012-01-01

    In classic Psychological-Refractory-Period (PRP) dual-task paradigms, decreasing stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) between the two tasks typically lead to increasing reaction times (RT) to the second task and, when task order is non-predictable, to prolonged RTs to the first task. Traditionally, both RT effects have been advocated to originate exclusively from the dynamics of a central bottleneck. By focusing on two specific electroencephalographic brain responses directly linkable to perceptual or motor processing stages, respectively, the present study aimed to provide a more detailed picture as to the origin(s) of these behavioral PRP effects. In particular, we employed 2-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) tasks requiring participants to identify the pitch of a tone (high versus low) in the auditory, and the orientation of a target object (vertical versus horizontal) in the visual, task, with task order being either predictable or non-predictable. Our findings show that task order predictability (TOP) and inter-task SOA interactively determine the speed of (visual) perceptual processes (as indexed by the PCN timing) for both the first and the second task. By contrast, motor response execution times (as indexed by the LRP timing) are influenced independently by TOP for the first, and SOA for the second, task. Overall, this set of findings complements classical as well as advanced versions of the central bottleneck model by providing electrophysiological evidence for modulations of both perceptual and motor processing dynamics that, in summation with central capacity limitations, give rise to the behavioral PRP outcome. PMID:22973208

  20. The Effect of Various Dual Task Training Methods with Gait on the Balance and Gait of Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    An, Ho-Jung; Kim, Jae-Ic; Kim, Yang-Rae; Lee, Kyoung-Bo; Kim, Dai-Joong; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of various dual task gait training methods (motor dual task gait training, cognitive dual task gait training, and motor and cognitive dual task gait training) on the balance and gait abilities of chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-three outpatients performed dual task gait training for 30 minutes per day, three times a week, for eight weeks from June to August, 2012. Balance ability was measured pre-and posttest using the stability test index, the weight distribution index, the functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the four square step test. Gait ability was measured by the 10 m walk test and a 6 min walk test before and after the training. The paired t-test was used to compare measurements before and after training within each group, and ANOVA was used to compare measurements before and after training among the groups. [Results] Comparisons within each group indicated significant differences in all variables between before and after the training in all three groups. Comparison between the groups showed that the greatest improvements were seen in all tests, except for the timed up and go test, following motor and cognitive dual task gait training. [Conclusion] In a real walking environment, the motor and cognitive dual task gait training was more effective at improving the balance and gait abilities of chronic stroke patients than either the motor dual task gait training or the cognitive dual task gait training alone. PMID:25202199

  1. Dual design resistor for high voltage conditioning and transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Siggins, Timothy Lynn; Murray, Charles W.; Walker, Richard L.

    2007-01-23

    A dual resistor for eliminating the requirement for two different value resistors. The dual resistor includes a conditioning resistor at a high resistance value and a run resistor at a low resistance value. The run resistor can travel inside the conditioning resistor. The run resistor is capable of being advanced by a drive assembly until an electrical path is completed through the run resistor thereby shorting out the conditioning resistor and allowing the lower resistance run resistor to take over as the current carrier.

  2. Walking & Talking: Dual-Task Effects on Street Crossing Behavior in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Neider, Mark B.; Gaspar, John G.; McCarley, Jason S.; Crowell, James A.; Kaczmarski, Henry; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to perform multiple tasks simultaneously has become increasingly important as technologies such as cell phones and portable music players have become more common. In the current study, we examined dual-task costs in older and younger adults using a simulated street crossing task constructed in an immersive virtual environment with an integrated treadmill so that participants could walk as they would in the real world. Participants were asked to cross simulated streets of varying difficulty while either undistracted, listening to music, or conversing on a cell phone. Older adults were more vulnerable to dual-task impairments than younger adults when the crossing task was difficult; dual-task costs were largely absent in the younger adult group. Performance costs in older adults were primarily reflected in timeout rates. When conversing on a cell phone older adults were less likely to complete their crossing compared to when listening to music or undistracted. Analysis of time spent next to the street prior to each crossing, where participants were presumably analyzing traffic patterns and making decisions regarding when to cross, revealed that older adults took longer than younger adults to initiate their crossing, and that this difference was exacerbated during cell phone conversation, suggesting impairments in cognitive planning processes. Our data suggest that multi-tasking costs may be particularly dangerous for older adults even during everyday activities such as crossing the street. PMID:21401262

  3. A Novel Eye-Tracking Method to Assess Attention Allocation in Individuals with and without Aphasia Using a Dual-Task Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, Sabine; Hallowell, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Numerous authors report that people with aphasia have greater difficulty allocating attention than people without neurological disorders. Studying how attention deficits contribute to language deficits is important. However, existing methods for indexing attention allocation in people with aphasia pose serious methodological challenges. Eye-tracking methods have great potential to address such challenges. We developed and assessed the validity of a new dual-task method incorporating eye tracking to assess attention allocation. Twenty-six adults with aphasia and 33 control participants completed auditory sentence comprehension and visual search tasks. To test whether the new method validly indexes well-documented patterns in attention allocation, demands were manipulated by varying task complexity in single- and dual-task conditions. Differences in attention allocation were indexed via eye-tracking measures. For all participants significant increases in attention allocation demands were observed from single- to dual-task conditions and from simple to complex stimuli. Individuals with aphasia had greater difficulty allocating attention with greater task demands. Relationships between eye-tracking indices of comprehension during single and dual tasks and standardized testing were examined. Results support the validity of the novel eye-tracking method for assessing attention allocation in people with and without aphasia. Clinical and research implications are discussed. PMID:25913549

  4. Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This task list is intended for use in planning and/or evaluating a competency-based course in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. The guide outlines the tasks entailed in eight different duties typically required of employees in the following occupations: residential installer, domestic refrigeration technician, air conditioning and…

  5. Strategic Adaptation to Task Characteristics, Incentives, and Individual Differences in Dual-Tasking

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Christian P.; Brumby, Duncan P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how good people are at multitasking by comparing behavior to a prediction of the optimal strategy for dividing attention between two concurrent tasks. In our experiment, 24 participants had to interleave entering digits on a keyboard with controlling a randomly moving cursor with a joystick. The difficulty of the tracking task was systematically varied as a within-subjects factor. Participants were also exposed to different explicit reward functions that varied the relative importance of the tracking task relative to the typing task (between-subjects). Results demonstrate that these changes in task characteristics and monetary incentives, together with individual differences in typing ability, influenced how participants choose to interleave tasks. This change in strategy then affected their performance on each task. A computational cognitive model was used to predict performance for a wide set of alternative strategies for how participants might have possibly interleaved tasks. This allowed for predictions of optimal performance to be derived, given the constraints placed on performance by the task and cognition. A comparison of human behavior with the predicted optimal strategy shows that participants behaved near optimally. Our findings have implications for the design and evaluation of technology for multitasking situations, as consideration should be given to the characteristics of the task, but also to how different users might use technology depending on their individual characteristics and their priorities. PMID:26161851

  6. Bilateral coordination of gait and Parkinson's disease: the effects of dual tasking.

    PubMed

    Plotnik, M; Giladi, N; Hausdorff, J M

    2009-03-01

    The aetiology of gait disturbances in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not fully understood. Recently, it was shown that in patients with PD, bilateral coordination of gait is impaired and that walking while being simultaneously engaged in a cognitive task is detrimental to their gait. To assess whether cognitive function influences the bilateral coordination of gait in PD, this study quantified left-right stepping coordination using a phase coordination index (PCI) that evaluates both the variability and inaccuracy of the left-right stepping phase (phi) generation (where the ideal phi value between left and right stepping is 180 degrees ). This report calculated PCI values from data obtained from force sensitive insoles embedded in subjects' shoes during 2 min of walking in a group of patients with PD (n = 21) and in an age matched control group (n = 13). All subjects walked under two walking conditions: usual walking and dual tasking (DT) (ie, cognitive loading) condition. For patients with PD, PCI values were significantly higher (ie, poorer coordination) during the DT walking condition compared with usual walking (p<0.001). In contrast, DT did not significantly affect the PCI of the healthy controls (p = 0.29). PCI changes caused by DT were significantly correlated with changes in gait variability but not with changes in gait asymmetry that resulted from the DT condition. These changes were also associated with performance on a test of executive function. The present findings suggest that in patients with PD, cognitive resources are used in order to maintain consistent and accurate alternations in left-right stepping. PMID:19228674

  7. Static and dynamic posture control in postlingual cochlear implanted patients: effects of dual-tasking, visual and auditory inputs suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Léonard, Jacques; Dumitrescu, Michel; Meller, Renaud; Magnan, Jacques; Lacour, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Posture control is based on central integration of multisensory inputs, and on internal representation of body orientation in space. This multisensory feedback regulates posture control and continuously updates the internal model of body's position which in turn forwards motor commands adapted to the environmental context and constraints. The peripheral localization of the vestibular system, close to the cochlea, makes vestibular damage possible following cochlear implant (CI) surgery. Impaired vestibular function in CI patients, if any, may have a strong impact on posture stability. The simple postural task of quiet standing is generally paired with cognitive activity in most day life conditions, leading therefore to competition for attentional resources in dual-tasking, and increased risk of fall particularly in patients with impaired vestibular function. This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of postlingual cochlear implantation on posture control in adult deaf patients. Possible impairment of vestibular function was assessed by comparing the postural performance of patients to that of age-matched healthy subjects during a simple postural task performed in static (stable platform) and dynamic (platform in translation) conditions, and during dual-tasking with a visual or auditory memory task. Postural tests were done in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions, with the CI activated (ON) or not (OFF). Results showed that the postural performance of the CI patients strongly differed from the controls, mainly in the EC condition. The CI patients showed significantly reduced limits of stability and increased postural instability in static conditions. In dynamic conditions, they spent considerably more energy to maintain equilibrium, and their head was stabilized neither in space nor on trunk: they behaved dynamically without vision like an inverted pendulum while the controls showed a whole body rigidification strategy. Hearing (prosthesis on) as well

  8. Attention, Gaze Shifting, and Dual-Task Interference from Phonological Encoding in Spoken Word Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelofs, Ardi

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists about whether dual-task interference from word planning reflects structural bottleneck or attentional control factors. Here, participants named pictures whose names could or could not be phonologically prepared, and they manually responded to arrows presented away from (Experiment 1), or superimposed onto, the pictures…

  9. Short Term Auditory Pacing Changes Dual Motor Task Coordination in Children with and without Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getchell, Nancy; Mackenzie, Samuel J.; Marmon, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of short-term auditory pacing practice on dual motor task performance in children with and without dyslexia. Groups included dyslexic with Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC) scores greater than 15th percentile (D_HIGH, n = 18; mean age 9.89 [plus or minus] 2.0 years), dyslexic with MABC [less than or…

  10. The Source of Execution-Related Dual-Task Interference: Motor Bottleneck or Response Monitoring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratzke, Daniel; Rolke, Bettina; Ulrich, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The present study assessed the underlying mechanism of execution-related dual-task interference in the psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm. The motor bottleneck hypothesis attributes this interference to a processing limitation at the motor level. By contrast, the response monitoring hypothesis attributes it to a bottleneck process that…

  11. Locus of Semantic Interference in Picture Naming: Evidence from Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piai, Vitória; Roelofs, Ardi; Schriefers, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Disagreement exists regarding the functional locus of semantic interference of distractor words in picture naming. This effect is a cornerstone of modern psycholinguistic models of word production, which assume that it arises in lexical response-selection. However, recent evidence from studies of dual-task performance suggests a locus in…

  12. Dual-Tasking Alleviated Sleep Deprivation Disruption in Visuomotor Tracking: An fMRI Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazes, Yunglin; Rakitin, Brian C.; Steffener, Jason; Habeck, Christian; Butterfield, Brady; Basner, Robert C.; Ghez, Claude; Stern, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Effects of dual-responding on tracking performance after 49-h of sleep deprivation (SD) were evaluated behaviorally and with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Continuous visuomotor tracking was performed simultaneously with an intermittent color-matching visual detection task in which a pair of color-matched stimuli constituted a…

  13. Deep Thinking Increases Task-Set Shielding and Reduces Shifting Flexibility in Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Rico; Hommel, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Performing two tasks concurrently is difficult, which has been taken to imply the existence of a structural processing bottleneck. Here we sought to assess whether and to what degree one's multitasking abilities depend on the cognitive-control style one engages in. Participants were primed with creativity tasks that either called for divergent…

  14. A Roving Dual-Presentation Simultaneity-Judgment Task to Estimate the Point of Subjective Simultaneity.

    PubMed

    Yarrow, Kielan; Martin, Sian E; Di Costa, Steven; Solomon, Joshua A; Arnold, Derek H

    2016-01-01

    The most popular tasks with which to investigate the perception of subjective synchrony are the temporal order judgment (TOJ) and the simultaneity judgment (SJ). Here, we discuss a complementary approach-a dual-presentation (2x) SJ task-and focus on appropriate analysis methods for a theoretically desirable "roving" design. Two stimulus pairs are presented on each trial and the observer must select the most synchronous. To demonstrate this approach, in Experiment 1 we tested the 2xSJ task alongside TOJ, SJ, and simple reaction-time (RT) tasks using audiovisual stimuli. We interpret responses from each task using detection-theoretic models, which assume variable arrival times for sensory signals at critical brain structures for timing perception. All tasks provide similar estimates of the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) on average, and PSS estimates from some tasks were correlated on an individual basis. The 2xSJ task produced lower and more stable estimates of model-based (and thus comparable) sensory/decision noise than the TOJ. In Experiment 2 we obtained similar results using RT, TOJ, ternary, and 2xSJ tasks for all combinations of auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli. In Experiment 3 we investigated attentional prior entry, using both TOJs and 2xSJs. We found that estimates of prior-entry magnitude correlated across these tasks. Overall, our study establishes the practicality of the roving dual-presentation SJ task, but also illustrates the additional complexity of the procedure. We consider ways in which this task might complement more traditional procedures, particularly when it is important to estimate both PSS and sensory/decisional noise. PMID:27047434

  15. The Role of Input and Output Modality Pairings in Dual-Task Performance: Evidence for Content-Dependent Central Interference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazeltine, Eliot; Ruthruff, Eric; Remington, Roger W.

    2006-01-01

    Recent debate regarding dual-task performance has focused on whether costs result from limitations in central capacity, and whether central operations can be performed in parallel. While these questions are controversial, the dominant models of dual-task performance share the assumption that central operations are generic--that is, their…

  16. Age-Related Changes in Brain Activation Underlying Single- and Dual-Task Performance: Visuomanual Drawing and Mental Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Impe, A.; Coxon, J. P.; Goble, D. J.; Wenderoth, N.; Swinnen, S. P.

    2011-01-01

    Depending on task combination, dual-tasking can either be performed successfully or can lead to performance decrements in one or both tasks. Interference is believed to be caused by limitations in central processing, i.e. structural interference between the neural activation patterns associated with each task. In the present study, single- and…

  17. OTVE turbopump condition monitoring, task E.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Paul T.; Collins, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work has been carried out on development of isotope wear analysis and optical and eddy current technologies to provide bearing wear measurements and real time monitoring of shaft speed, shaft axial displacement and shaft orbit of the Orbit Transfer Vehicle hydrostatic bearing tester. Results show shaft axial displacement can be optically measured (at the same time as shaft orbital motion and speed) to within 0.3 mils by two fiberoptic deflectometers. Evaluation of eddy current probes showed that, in addition to measuring shaft orbital motion, they can be used to measure shaft speed without having to machine grooves on the shaft surface as is the usual practice for turbomachinery. The interim results of this condition monitoring effort are presented.

  18. A Roving Dual-Presentation Simultaneity-Judgment Task to Estimate the Point of Subjective Simultaneity

    PubMed Central

    Yarrow, Kielan; Martin, Sian E.; Di Costa, Steven; Solomon, Joshua A.; Arnold, Derek H.

    2016-01-01

    The most popular tasks with which to investigate the perception of subjective synchrony are the temporal order judgment (TOJ) and the simultaneity judgment (SJ). Here, we discuss a complementary approach—a dual-presentation (2x) SJ task—and focus on appropriate analysis methods for a theoretically desirable “roving” design. Two stimulus pairs are presented on each trial and the observer must select the most synchronous. To demonstrate this approach, in Experiment 1 we tested the 2xSJ task alongside TOJ, SJ, and simple reaction-time (RT) tasks using audiovisual stimuli. We interpret responses from each task using detection-theoretic models, which assume variable arrival times for sensory signals at critical brain structures for timing perception. All tasks provide similar estimates of the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS) on average, and PSS estimates from some tasks were correlated on an individual basis. The 2xSJ task produced lower and more stable estimates of model-based (and thus comparable) sensory/decision noise than the TOJ. In Experiment 2 we obtained similar results using RT, TOJ, ternary, and 2xSJ tasks for all combinations of auditory, visual, and tactile stimuli. In Experiment 3 we investigated attentional prior entry, using both TOJs and 2xSJs. We found that estimates of prior-entry magnitude correlated across these tasks. Overall, our study establishes the practicality of the roving dual-presentation SJ task, but also illustrates the additional complexity of the procedure. We consider ways in which this task might complement more traditional procedures, particularly when it is important to estimate both PSS and sensory/decisional noise. PMID:27047434

  19. Dual-Task Processing When Task 1 Is Hard and Task 2 Is Easy: Reversed Central Processing Order?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonhard, Tanja; Fernandez, Susana Ruiz; Ulrich, Rolf; Miller, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Five psychological refractory period (PRP) experiments were conducted with an especially time-consuming first task (Experiments 1, 3, and 5: mental rotation; Experiments 2 and 4: memory scanning) and with equal emphasis on the first task and on the second (left-right tone judgment). The standard design with varying stimulus onset asynchronies…

  20. The Effect of Writing Task and Task Conditions on Colombian EFL Learners' Language Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Fuentes, César García

    2015-01-01

    This classroom study examines whether English L2 writers' language use differs depending on the writing task (operationalized as paragraph type), and task conditions (operationalized as individual or collaborative writing). The texts written by English L2 university students in Colombia (N = 26) in response to problem/solution and cause/effect…

  1. Effect of dual task type on gait and dynamic stability during stair negotiation at different inclinations.

    PubMed

    Madehkhaksar, Forough; Egges, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Stair gait is a common daily activity with great potential risk for falls. Stairs have varying inclinations and people may perform other tasks concurrently with stair gait. This study investigated dual-task interference in the context of complex gait tasks, such as stair gait at different inclinations, a topic about which little is understood. We examined how secondary cognitive and manual tasks interfere with stair gait when a person concurrently performed tasks at different levels of complexity. Gait kinematic data and secondary task performance measures were obtained from fifteen healthy young males while ascending and descending a four-step staircase at three inclinations (17.7°, 29.4°, and 41.5°) as well as level walking. They performed a cognitive task, 'backward digit recall', a manual task, 'carrying a cup of water' and a combination of the two tasks. Gait performance and dynamic stability were assessed by gait speed and whole body center of mass (COM) range of motion in the medial-lateral direction, respectively. No significant effect of the gait task on the cognitive task performance was observed. In contrast, stair walking adversely affected the performance of the manual task compared to level walking. Overall, more difficult postural and secondary tasks resulted in a decrease in gait speed and variation in COM displacement within normal range. Results suggest that COM displacement and gait alterations might be adopted to enhance the stability, and optimize the secondary task performance while walking under challenging circumstances. Our findings are useful for balance and gait evaluation, and for future falls prediction. PMID:26410477

  2. The effect of processing code, response modality and task difficulty on dual task performance and subjective workload in a manual system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yili; Wickens, Christopher D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the first experiment of a series studying the effect of task structure and difficulty demand on time-sharing performance and workload in both automated and corresponding manual systems. The experimental task involves manual control time-shared with spatial and verbal decisions tasks of two levels of difficulty and two modes of response (voice or manual). The results provide strong evidence that tasks and processes competing for common processing resources are time shared less effecively and have higher workload than tasks competing for separate resources. Subjective measures and the structure of multiple resources are used in conjunction to predict dual task performance. The evidence comes from both single-task and from dual-task performance.

  3. Effect of Peripheral Communication Pace on Attention Allocation in a Dual-Task Situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueddana, Sofiane; Roussel, Nicolas

    Peripheral displays allow continuous awareness of information while performing other activities. Monitoring such a display while performing a central task has a cognitive cost that depends on its perceptual salience and the distraction it causes, i.e. the amount of attention it attracts away from the user’s primary action. This paper considers the particular case of peripheral displays for interpersonal communication. It reports on an experiment that studied the effect of peripheral communication pace on subjects’ allocation of attention in a dual-task situation: a snapshot-based peripheral monitoring task where participants need to assess the presence of a remote person, and a central text-correcting task against the clock. Our results show that the addition of the peripheral task caused a drop in the success rate of the central task. As the pace of snapshots increased, success rate decreased on the peripheral task while on the central one, success rate remained the same but failures to reply in time occurred more frequently. These results suggest that the increase in pace of snapshots caused participants to change their strategy for the central task and allocate more attention to the peripheral one, not enough to maintain peripheral performance but also not to the point where it would affect central performance. Overall, our work suggests that peripheral communication pace subtly influences attention allocation in dual-task situations. We conclude by discussing how control over information pace could help users of communication systems to adjust their local distraction as well as the attention they draw from remote users.

  4. Influence of dual task and frailty on gait parameters of older community-dwelling individuals

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Rita C.; Dias, Rosângela C.; Pereira, Leani S. M.; Silva, Sílvia L. A.; Lustosa, Lygia P.; Dias, João M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gait parameters such as gait speed (GS) are important indicators of functional capacity. Frailty Syndrome is closely related to GS and is also capable of predicting adverse outcomes. The cognitive demand of gait control is usually explored with dual-task (DT) methodology. Objective: To investigate the effect of DT and frailty on the spatio-temporal parameters of gait in older people and identify which variables relate to GS. Method: The presence of frailty was verified by Fried's Frailty Criteria. Cognitive function was evaluated with the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and gait parameters were analyzed through the GAITRite(r) system in the single-task and DT conditions. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA, and Pearson's Correlation tests were administered. Results: The participants were assigned to the groups frail (FG), pre-frail (PFG), and non-frail (NFG). During the DT, the three groups showed a decrease in GS, cadence, and stride length and an increase in stride time (p<0.001). The reduction in the GS of the FG during the DT showed a positive correlation with the MMSE scores (r=730; p=0.001) and with grip strength (r=681; p=0.001). Conclusions: Gait parameters are more affected by the DT, especially in the frail older subjects. The reduction in GS in the FG is associated with lower grip strength and lower scores in the MMSE. The GS was able to discriminate the older adults in the three levels of frailty, being an important measure of the functional capacity in this population. PMID:25372007

  5. The effects of display-control I/O, compatibility, and integrality on dual-task performance and subjective workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Pamela S.; Hart, Sandra G.; Vidulich, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    The utility of speech technology was evaluated in terms of three dual task principles: resource competition between the time shared tasks, stimulus central processing response compatibility, and task integrality. Empirical support for these principles was reviewed. Two studies investigating the interactive effects of the three principles were described. Objective performance and subjective workload ratings for both single and dual tasks were examined. It was found that the single task measures were not necessarily good predictors for the dual task measures. It was shown that all three principles played an important role in determining an optimal task configuration. This was reflected in both the performance measures and the subjective measures. Therefore, consideration of all three principles is required to insure proper use of speech technology in a complex environment.

  6. Associations between prefrontal cortex activation and H-reflex modulation during dual task gait

    PubMed Central

    Meester, Daan; Al-Yahya, Emad; Dawes, Helen; Martin-Fagg, Penny; Piñon, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Walking, although a largely automatic process, is controlled by the cortex and the spinal cord with corrective reflexes modulated through integration of neural signals from central and peripheral inputs at supraspinal level throughout the gait cycle. In this study we used an additional cognitive task to interfere with the automatic processing during walking in order to explore the neural mechanisms involved in healthy young adults. Participants were asked to walk on a treadmill at two speeds, both with and without additional cognitive load. We evaluated the impact of speed and cognitive load by analyzing activity of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) using functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) alongside spinal cord reflex activity measured by soleus H-reflex amplitude and gait changes obtained by using an inertial measuring unit. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed that fNIRS Oxy-Hb concentrations significantly increased in the PFC with dual task (walking while performing a cognitive task) compared to a single task (walking only; p < 0.05). PFC activity was unaffected by increases of walking speed. H-reflex amplitude and gait variables did not change in response to either dual task or increases in walking speed. When walking under additional cognitive load participants adapted by using greater activity in the PFC, but this adaptation did not detrimentally affect H-reflex amplitude or gait variables. Our findings suggest that in a healthy young population central mechanisms (PFC) are activated in response to cognitive loads but that H-reflex activity and gait performance can successfully be maintained. This study provides insights into the mechanisms behind healthy individuals safely performing dual task walking. PMID:24600375

  7. Contrasting single and multi-component working-memory systems in dual tasking.

    PubMed

    Nijboer, Menno; Borst, Jelmer; van Rijn, Hedderik; Taatgen, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Working memory can be a major source of interference in dual tasking. However, there is no consensus on whether this interference is the result of a single working memory bottleneck, or of interactions between different working memory components that together form a complete working-memory system. We report a behavioral and an fMRI dataset in which working memory requirements are manipulated during multitasking. We show that a computational cognitive model that assumes a distributed version of working memory accounts for both behavioral and neuroimaging data better than a model that takes a more centralized approach. The model's working memory consists of an attentional focus, declarative memory, and a subvocalized rehearsal mechanism. Thus, the data and model favor an account where working memory interference in dual tasking is the result of interactions between different resources that together form a working-memory system. PMID:26859518

  8. Effect of aquatic dual-task training on balance and gait in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aquatic dual-task training on balance and gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients were divided into the experimental (n=10) and control (n=10) groups. Both groups underwent neurodevelopmental treatment. The experimental group additionally underwent aquatic dual-task training for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks. Balance was measured using the Berg balance scale, Five Times Sit-to Stand Test, and Functional Reach Test. Gait was measured using the 10-Meter Walk Test, Timed Up and Go Test, and Functional Gait Assessment. [Results] For intragroup comparison, the experimental group showed a significant change after the experiment in all balance and gait assessment tests. For intergroup comparison, the experimental group showed relatively more significant change after the experiment in all balance and gait assessment tests. [Conclusion] Our results showed that aquatic dual-task training has a positive effect on balance and gait in stroke patients. PMID:27512261

  9. Maintaining Gait Performance by Cortical Activation during Dual-Task Interference: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yea-Ru; Wu, Yu-Te; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2015-01-01

    In daily life, mobility requires walking while performing a cognitive or upper-extremity motor task. Although previous studies have evaluated the effects of dual tasks on gait performance, few studies have evaluated cortical activation and its association with gait disturbance during dual tasks. In this study, we simultaneously assessed gait performance and cerebral oxygenation in the bilateral prefrontal cortices (PFC), premotor cortices (PMC), and supplemental motor areas (SMA), using functional near-infrared spectroscopy, in 17 young adults performing dual tasks. Each participant was evaluated while performing normal-pace walking (NW), walking while performing a cognitive task (WCT), and walking while performing a motor task (WMT). Our results indicated that the left PFC exhibited the strongest and most sustained activation during WCT, and that NW and WMT were associated with minor increases in oxygenation levels during their initial phases. We observed increased activation in channels in the SMA and PMC during WCT and WMT. Gait data indicated that WCT and WMT both caused reductions in walking speed, but these reductions resulted from differing alterations in gait properties. WCT was associated with significant changes in cadence, stride time, and stride length, whereas WMT was associated with reductions in stride length only. During dual-task activities, increased activation of the PMC and SMA correlated with declines in gait performance, indicating a control mechanism for maintaining gait performance during dual tasks. Thus, the regulatory effects of cortical activation on gait behavior enable a second task to be performed while walking. PMID:26079605

  10. The ecological approach to cognitive–motor dual-tasking: findings on the effects of expertise and age

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The underlying assumption of studies on cognitive–motor dual-tasking is that resources are limited, and when they have to be shared between a cognitive and a motor task, performances will suffer. Resource competition should therefore be particularly pronounced in children, older adults, or people who are just acquiring a new motor skill. The current review summarizes expertise and age comparative studies that have combined a cognitive and a motor task. Expertise studies have often assessed sports performances (e.g., golf putting, soccer dribbling, rugby drills) and have shown that experts are more successful than novices to keep up their performances in dual-task situations. The review also presents age-comparative studies that have used walking (on narrow tracks or on a treadmill) as the motor task. Older adults often show higher costs than young adults, and they tend to prioritize the motor domain. These findings are discussed in relation to the ecological approach to dual-task research originally introduced by Li et al. (2005). The approach proposes to study ecologically valid dual-task situations, and always to investigate dual-task costs for both domains (cognitive and motor performance) in order to assess potential tradeoffs. In addition, task difficulties should be individually adjusted, and differential-emphasis instructions should be included in the study design. PMID:25352820

  11. Role of the Frontal Cortex in Standing Postural Sway Tasks While Dual-Tasking: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study Examining Working Memory Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Kasubuchi, Kenji; Wakata, Satoshi; Hiyamizu, Makoto; Morioka, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Posture control during a dual-task involves changing the distribution of attention resources between the cognitive and motor tasks and involves the frontal cortex working memory (WM). The present study aimed to better understand the impact of frontal lobe activity and WM capacity in postural control during a dual-task. High and low WM-span groups were compared using their reading span test scores. High and low WM capacity were compared based on cognitive and balance performance and hemoglobin oxygenation (oxyHb) levels during standing during single (S-S), standing during dual (S-D), one leg standing during single (O-S), and one leg standing during dual (O-D) tasks. For sway pass length, significant difference in only the O-D task was observed between both groups. oxyHb levels were markedly increased in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor area in the high-span group during a dual-task. Therefore, WM capacity influenced the allocation of attentional resources and motor performance. PMID:27034947

  12. Role of the Frontal Cortex in Standing Postural Sway Tasks While Dual-Tasking: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study Examining Working Memory Capacity.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Kasubuchi, Kenji; Wakata, Satoshi; Hiyamizu, Makoto; Morioka, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Posture control during a dual-task involves changing the distribution of attention resources between the cognitive and motor tasks and involves the frontal cortex working memory (WM). The present study aimed to better understand the impact of frontal lobe activity and WM capacity in postural control during a dual-task. High and low WM-span groups were compared using their reading span test scores. High and low WM capacity were compared based on cognitive and balance performance and hemoglobin oxygenation (oxyHb) levels during standing during single (S-S), standing during dual (S-D), one leg standing during single (O-S), and one leg standing during dual (O-D) tasks. For sway pass length, significant difference in only the O-D task was observed between both groups. oxyHb levels were markedly increased in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor area in the high-span group during a dual-task. Therefore, WM capacity influenced the allocation of attentional resources and motor performance. PMID:27034947

  13. Dual Arm Work Package performance estimates and telerobot task network simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Blair, L.M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the methodology and results of a network simulation study of the Dual Arm Work Package (DAWP), to be employed for dismantling the Argonne National Laboratory CP-5 reactor. The development of the simulation model was based upon the results of a task analysis for the same system. This study was performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in the Robotics and Process Systems Division. Funding was provided the US Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development, Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). The RTDP is developing methods of computer simulation to estimate telerobotic system performance. Data were collected to provide point estimates to be used in a task network simulation model. Three skilled operators performed six repetitions of a pipe cutting task representative of typical teleoperation cutting operations.

  14. Locus of the single-channel bottleneck in dual-task interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccann, Robert S.; Johnston, James C.

    1992-01-01

    Two experiments used the locus-of-cognitive-slack method to determine whether dual-task interference occurs before or after the response selection stage. The experiments used the overlapping tasks paradigm, in which two signals, each requiring a different speeded choice response, are presented in rapid succession. In Experiment 1, stimulus-response (S-R) compatibility was manipulated by varying whether Task 2 stimuli were mapped onto their responses by a rule or arbitrarily. Compatibility effects were additive with the effects of degree of task overlap, manipulated by varying the stimulus onset asynchrony between the signals. Experiment 2 examined 2 additional forms of S-R compatibility: symbolic compatability (arrows vs. letters) and spatial compatibility (the 'Simon' effect). Effects of symbolic compatibility were additive with effects of degree of task overlap, whereas the effects of spatial compatibility and degree of task overlap were underadditive. It is argued that only a central-bottleneck model provides a consistent account of these results. The nature of the central bottleneck is considered.

  15. New normative standards of conditional reasoning and the dual-source model.

    PubMed

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Over, David

    2014-01-01

    There has been a major shift in research on human reasoning toward Bayesian and probabilistic approaches, which has been called a new paradigm. The new paradigm sees most everyday and scientific reasoning as taking place in a context of uncertainty, and inference is from uncertain beliefs and not from arbitrary assumptions. In this manuscript we present an empirical test of normative standards in the new paradigm using a novel probabilized conditional reasoning task. Our results indicated that for everyday conditional with at least a weak causal connection between antecedent and consequent only the conditional probability of the consequent given antecedent contributes unique variance to predicting the probability of conditional, but not the probability of the conjunction, nor the probability of the material conditional. Regarding normative accounts of reasoning, we found significant evidence that participants' responses were confidence preserving (i.e., p-valid in the sense of Adams, 1998) for MP inferences, but not for MT inferences. Additionally, only for MP inferences and to a lesser degree for DA inferences did the rate of responses inside the coherence intervals defined by mental probability logic (Pfeifer and Kleiter, 2005, 2010) exceed chance levels. In contrast to the normative accounts, the dual-source model (Klauer et al., 2010) is a descriptive model. It posits that participants integrate their background knowledge (i.e., the type of information primary to the normative approaches) and their subjective probability that a conclusion is seen as warranted based on its logical form. Model fits showed that the dual-source model, which employed participants' responses to a deductive task with abstract contents to estimate the form-based component, provided as good an account of the data as a model that solely used data from the probabilized conditional reasoning task. PMID:24860516

  16. Effects of nicotine on electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioural measures of visual working memory in non-smokers during a dual-task paradigm.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Derek J; Knobelsdorf, Amy; Jaworska, Natalia; Daniels, Richelle; Knott, Verner J

    2013-01-01

    Research in smokers has shown that nicotine may have the ability to improve certain aspects of cognitive performance, including working memory and attention, processes which implicate frontal and frontal-parietal brain networks. There is limited research on the cognitive effects of nicotine and their associated neural underpinnings in non-smokers. This study examined the effects of acute nicotine on a working memory task alone or combined with a visual detection task (single- and dual-task conditions) using electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings and behavioural performance measures. Twenty non-smokers (13 females; 7 males) received nicotine gum (6 mg) in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, repeated measures design. Spectral EEG, together with response speed and accuracy measures, were obtained while participants completed a series of N-Back tasks under single- and dual-task conditions. Nicotine failed to exert any significant effects on performance measures, however, EEG changes were observed, primarily in frontal recordings, which varied with memory load, task condition and hemisphere. These findings, discussed in relation to previous studies in smokers, support the notion that nicotine may modulate central executive systems and contribute to smoking behaviour. PMID:23026057

  17. The dual task-cost of standing balance affects quality of life in mildly disabled MS people.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Letizia; De Luca, Francesca; Marchetti, Maria Rita; Sellitto, Giovanni; Fanelli, Fulvia; Prosperini, Luca

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the correlations between the dual-task cost (DTC) of standing balance and quality of life (QoL) in mildly disabled patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this cross-sectional study, patients affected by MS with an expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score of 3.0 or less and without an overt balance impairment were tested by means of static posturography under eyes-opened (single-task condition) and while performing the Stroop word-color test (dual-task condition), to estimate the DTC of standing balance. The self-reported 54-item MS quality of life questionnaire (MSQoL-54) was also administered to obtain a MS-specific assessment of health-related QoL. Among the 120 screened patients, 75 (53 women, 22 men) were tested. Although there was no impact of the DTC of standing balance on the physical and mental composite scores of MSQoL-54, patients who had a greater DTC of standing balance scored worse on role limitations due to physical problems (p = 0.007) and social function (p < 0.001), irrespective of demographic and other clinical characteristics including walking performance and cognitive status. However, the EDSS step and fatigue also contributed to reduced scores in these two QoL domains (p-values < 0.01). In conclusion, the phenomenon of cognitive-motor interference, investigated as DTC of standing balance, may affect specific QoL domains even in mildly disabled patients with MS and in the absence of an overt balance dysfunction. PMID:26728268

  18. Effects of cognitive function on gait and dual tasking abilities in patients with Parkinson's disease suffering from motor response fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Plotnik, Meir; Dagan, Yaacov; Gurevich, Tanya; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that cognitive loading aggravates the gait impairments that are typically seen in Parkinson's disease (PD). To better understand the relationship between cognition and gait in PD, we evaluated 30 subjects with PD who suffer from motor response fluctuations. The subjects were clinically and cognitively assessed using standard clinical (e.g., Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) and cognitive tests while in the "ON" period of the medication cycle. In addition, the subjects wore force-sensitive insoles to quantify the timing of the gait cycles during 80-m walks at a self-selected, comfortable pace during three randomly presented gait conditions: (1) usual-walking, (2) dual tasking (DT), performing serial 3 subtractions (DT_S3), and (3) DT_S7. Stride length, gait speed, gait variability and bilateral coordination of gait were affected by DT, compared to the usual-walking (P < 0.001) as was gait asymmetry (P = 0.024). Stepwise regression analyses showed that a subset of the cognitive performance scores accounted for the changes seen in the gait parameters during DT, e.g., set shifting capabilities as expressed by the Trial Making Test Scores (P < 0.001). Affect (e.g., anxiety) was not associated with DT-related gait changes. For most gait features, DT had a large impact on the DT_S3 condition with only minimal additional effect in the DT_S7 condition. These results demonstrate that the complex cognitive-motor interplay in the control of gait in patients with PD who suffer from motor response fluctuations has a profound and marked effect during DT conditions on gait variability, asymmetry and bilateral coordination, even in the "ON" state when patients are likely to be most active, mobile and vulnerable to the negative effects of dual tasking. PMID:21063692

  19. The Role of Control Functions in Mentalizing: Dual-Task Studies of Theory of Mind and Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Rebecca; Phillips, Louise H.; Conway, Claire A.

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting evidence has arisen from correlational studies regarding the role of executive control functions in Theory of Mind. The current study used dual-task manipulations of executive functions (inhibition, updating and switching) to investigate the role of these control functions in mental state and non-mental state tasks. The "Eyes"…

  20. The Use of Cognitive Cues for Anticipatory Strategies in a Dynamic Postural Control Task - Validation of a Novel Approach to Dual-Task Testing

    PubMed Central

    Grarup, Bo; Bangshaab, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dual-task testing is relevant in the assessment of postural control. A combination of a primary (motor) and a secondary (distracting cognitive) tasks is most often used. It remains a challenge however, to standardize and monitor the cognitive task. In this study a new dual-task testing approach with a facilitating, rather than distracting, cognitive component was evaluated. Methods Thirty-one community-dwelling elderly and fifteen young people were tested with respect to their ability to use anticipatory postural control strategies. The motor task consisted of twenty-five repetitive tasks in which the participants needed to exceed their limit of stability in order to touch one out of eight lights. The participants performed three tests. In two of the tests the color cues of the lights allowed the participants to utilize cognitive strategies to plan their next movement and improve their performance time. Results The young performed the baseline motor task test in an average of 29 seconds, while the average time for the elderly was 44 seconds. When comparing the performance time with a leading cue to the time with no cue, the young group improved their performance time significantly better than the elderly did: young: 17% (5), elderly: 5% (8); p<0.001. Similar differences were seen with a more complicated leading cue: young: 12% (5), elderly: 4% (9); p<0.01. The reliability of the test showed moderate to substantial agreement (ICC = 0.74), with a small learning effect between two sessions. Conclusion The dual-task test was sensitive enough to discriminate between elderly and young people. It revealed that the elderly did not utilize cognitive cues for their anticipatory postural control strategies as well as the young were able to. The test procedure was feasible and comprehensible for the participants, and it may be relevant to standardize a similar test for an alternative dual-task approach in the clinical setting. PMID:27487000

  1. Dual-task interference and brain structural connectivity in people with Parkinson’s disease who freeze

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Daniel S; Fling, Brett W; Mancini, Martina; Cohen, Rajal G; Nutt, John G; Horak, Fay B

    2015-01-01

    Background Freezing of gait in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is likely related to attentional control (ie, ability to divide and switch attention). However, the neural pathophysiology of altered attentional control in individuals with PD who freeze is unknown. Structural connectivity of the pedunculopontine nucleus has been related to freezing and may play a role in altered attentional control; however, this relationship has not been investigated. We measured whether dual-task interference, defined as the reduction in gait performance during dual-task walking, is more pronounced in individuals with PD who freeze, and whether dual-task interference is associated with structural connectivity and/or executive function in this population. Methods We measured stride length in 13 people with PD with and 12 without freezing of gait during normal and dual-task walking. We also assessed asymmetry of pedunculopontine nucleus structural connectivity via diffusion tensor imaging and performance on cognitive tests assessing inhibition and set-shifting, cognitive domains related to freezing. Results Although stride length was not different across groups, change in stride length between normal and dual-task gait (ie, dual-task interference) was more pronounced in people with PD who freeze compared to non-freezers. Further, in people with PD who freeze, dual-task interference was correlated with asymmetry of pedunculopontine nucleus structural connectivity, Go-NoGo target accuracy (ability to release a response) and simple reaction time. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that freezing is related to altered attentional control during gait, and suggest that differences in pedunculopontine nucleus connectivity contribute to poorer attentional control in people with PD who freeze. PMID:25224677

  2. A dual-loop model of the human controller in single-axis tracking tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A dual loop model of the human controller in single axis compensatory tracking tasks is introduced. This model possesses an inner-loop closure which involves feeding back that portion of the controlled element output rate which is due to control activity. The sensory inputs to the human controller are assumed to be system error and control force. The former is assumed to be sensed via visual, aural, or tactile displays while the latter is assumed to be sensed in kinesthetic fashion. A nonlinear form of the model is briefly discussed. This model is then linearized and parameterized. A set of general adaptive characteristics for the parameterized model is hypothesized. These characteristics describe the manner in which the parameters in the linearized model will vary with such things as display quality. It is demonstrated that the parameterized model can produce controller describing functions which closely approximate those measured in laboratory tracking tasks for a wide variety of controlled elements.

  3. Cognition and dual-task performance in older adults with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Christofoletti, Gustavo; Andrade, Larissa Pires; Beinotti, Fernanda; Borges, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with neurodegenerative diseases usually experience significant functional deficits. Older adults with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) may suffer from both motor and cognitive impairments, making them especially vulnerable to poor dual-task performance. Objective To analyze the dual-task cost of walking in subjects with PD and AD exposed to motor and cognitive distracters. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 126 older adults comprising three groups: PD (n=43), AD (n=38), and control (n=45). The subjects were evaluated using the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test administered with motor and cognitive distracters. Mixed-design analysis of variance (ANOVA) with cognition as a covariant factor was used to test the possible main effects of dual-task on motion. A 5% threshold for significance was set, with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The partial eta square (n2p) analysis was included to estimate the magnitude of effect. Results Examining the effects for dual-task, ANOVA revealed the main effect for group×task interactions (F=13.09; P=0.001; n2p =0.178), for task (F=8.186; P=0.001; n2p =0.063) but not for group (F=2.954; P=0.056; n2p =0.047). Cognition applied as a covariant factor indicated interference on dual-tasks (F=30.43; P=0.001; n2p =0.201). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that dual-task interference is a particularly noticeable problem in PD and AD, affecting subjects’ ability to appropriately adapt to environmental challenges. PMID:25092996

  4. The planetary water drama: Dual task of feeding humanity and curbing climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockström, J.; Falkenmark, M.; Lannerstad, M.; Karlberg, L.

    2012-08-01

    This paper analyses the potential conflict between resilience of the Earth system and global freshwater requirements for the dual task of carbon sequestration to reduce CO2 in the atmosphere, and food production to feed humanity by 2050. It makes an attempt to assess the order of magnitude of the increased consumptive water use involved and analyses the implications as seen from two parallel perspectives; the global perspective of human development within a “safe operating space” with regard to the definition of the Planetary Boundary for freshwater; and the social-ecological implications at the regional river basin scale in terms of sharpening water shortages and threats to aquatic ecosystems. The paper shows that the consumptive water use involved in the dual task would both transgress the proposed planetary boundary range for global consumptive freshwater use and would further exacerbate already severe river depletion, causing societal problems related to water shortage and water allocation. Thus, strategies to rely on sequestration of CO2 as a mitigation strategy must recognize the high freshwater costs involved, implying that the key climate mitigation strategy must be to reduce emissions. The paper finally highlights the need to analyze both water and carbon tradeoffs from anticipated large scale biofuel production climate change mitigation strategy, to reveal gains and impact of this in contrast to carbon sequestration strategies.

  5. Comparison of model and human observer performance for detection and discrimination tasks using dual-energy x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Richard, Samuel; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2008-11-01

    Model observer performance, computed theoretically using cascaded systems analysis (CSA), was compared to the performance of human observers in detection and discrimination tasks. Dual-energy (DE) imaging provided a wide range of acquisition and decomposition parameters for which observer performance could be predicted and measured. This work combined previously derived observer models (e.g., Fisher-Hotelling and non-prewhitening) with CSA modeling of the DE image noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) and imaging task (e.g., sphere detection, shape discrimination, and texture discrimination) to yield theoretical predictions of detectability index (d') and area under the receiver operating characteristic (Az). Theoretical predictions were compared to human observer performance assessed using 9-alternative forced-choice tests to yield measurement of Az as a function of DE image acquisition parameters (viz., allocation of dose between the low- and high-energy images) and decomposition technique [viz., three DE image decomposition algorithms: standard log subtraction (SLS), simple-smoothing of the high-energy image (SSH), and anti-correlated noise reduction (ACNR)]. Results showed good agreement between theory and measurements over a broad range of imaging conditions. The incorporation of an eye filter and internal noise in the observer models demonstrated improved correspondence with human observer performance. Optimal acquisition and decomposition parameters were shown to depend on the imaging task; for example, ACNR and SSH yielded the greatest performance in the detection of soft-tissue and bony lesions, respectively. This study provides encouraging evidence that Fourier-based modeling of NEQ computed via CSA and imaging task provides a good approximation to human observer performance for simple imaging tasks, helping to bridge the gap between Fourier metrics of detector performance (e.g., NEQ) and human observer performance. PMID:19070238

  6. Comparison of model and human observer performance for detection and discrimination tasks using dual-energy x-ray images

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Samuel; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2008-11-15

    Model observer performance, computed theoretically using cascaded systems analysis (CSA), was compared to the performance of human observers in detection and discrimination tasks. Dual-energy (DE) imaging provided a wide range of acquisition and decomposition parameters for which observer performance could be predicted and measured. This work combined previously derived observer models (e.g., Fisher-Hotelling and non-prewhitening) with CSA modeling of the DE image noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ) and imaging task (e.g., sphere detection, shape discrimination, and texture discrimination) to yield theoretical predictions of detectability index (d{sup '}) and area under the receiver operating characteristic (A{sub Z}). Theoretical predictions were compared to human observer performance assessed using 9-alternative forced-choice tests to yield measurement of A{sub Z} as a function of DE image acquisition parameters (viz., allocation of dose between the low- and high-energy images) and decomposition technique [viz., three DE image decomposition algorithms: standard log subtraction (SLS), simple-smoothing of the high-energy image (SSH), and anti-correlated noise reduction (ACNR)]. Results showed good agreement between theory and measurements over a broad range of imaging conditions. The incorporation of an eye filter and internal noise in the observer models demonstrated improved correspondence with human observer performance. Optimal acquisition and decomposition parameters were shown to depend on the imaging task; for example, ACNR and SSH yielded the greatest performance in the detection of soft-tissue and bony lesions, respectively. This study provides encouraging evidence that Fourier-based modeling of NEQ computed via CSA and imaging task provides a good approximation to human observer performance for simple imaging tasks, helping to bridge the gap between Fourier metrics of detector performance (e.g., NEQ) and human observer performance.

  7. The relationship between dual-task and cognitive performance among elderly participants who exercise regularly

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luciana C. A.; Ansai, Juliana H.; Andrade, Larissa P.; Takahashi, Anielle C. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The dual-task performance is associated with the functionality of the elderly and it becomes more complex with age. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the Timed Up and Go dual task (TUG-DT) and cognitive tests among elderly participants who exercise regularly. METHOD: This study examined 98 non-institutionalized people over 60 years old who exercised regularly. Participants were assessed using the TUG-DT (i.e. doing the TUG while listing the days of the week in reverse order), the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), the Clock Drawing Test (CDT), and the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). The motor (i.e. time and number of steps) and cognitive (i.e. number of correct words) data were collected from TUG-DT . We used a significance level of α=0.05 and SPSS 17.0 for all data analyses. RESULTS: This current elderly sample featured a predominance of women (69.4%) who were highly educated (median=10 years of education) compared to Brazilian population and mostly non-fallers (86.7%). The volunteers showed a good performance on the TUG-DT and the other cognitive tests, except the MoCA, with scores below the cutoff of 26 points. Significant and weak correlations were observed between the TUG-DT (time) and the visuo-spatial/executive domain of the MoCA and the MMSE. The cognitive component of the TUG-DT showed strong correlations between the total MoCA performance score and its visuo-spatial/executive domain. CONCLUSIONS: The use of the TUG-DT to assess cognition is promising; however, the use of more challenging cognitive tasks should be considered when the study population has a high level of education. PMID:25993629

  8. Does extending the dual-task functional exercises workout improve postural balance in individuals with ID?

    PubMed

    Mikolajczyk, Edyta; Jankowicz-Szymanska, Agnieszka

    2015-03-01

    Maintaining postural balance, overcoming visual and motor coordination disorders and experiencing problems with low general fitness - typical of intellectually disabled individuals - adversely affect the performance quality of their activities of daily living (ADLs). Physical fitness and postural balance can be improved by taking part in special intervention programs. Our study was designed to test whether extending the dual-task intervention program (combining ADLs with balance exercises on unstable surfaces) from 12 to 24 weeks additionally improved postural balance in individuals with intellectual disability (ID). We also attempted to assess whether the effects of the above intervention program were still noticeable after 8 weeks of holidays, in which participants did not take any rehabilitation exercises. A total of 34 adolescents, aged 14-16 years (15.06±0.9), with moderate ID took part in our study. The experimental group (E) consisted of 17 individuals, who continued the intervention program originated 3 months earlier, and the control group (C) comprised the same number of participants. Postural balance was assessed on a stabilometric platform Alfa. Having extended the workout period by another 12 weeks, we noticed that the path length of the center of pressure (COP) covered by participants on tests with their eyes open and closed significantly shortened. After a lapse of 8 weeks from the completion of the program, the experimental group revealed a statistically significant decrease in the velocity along the medio-lateral (M/L) and anterior-posterior (A/P) axes. The remaining variables stayed at the same level and the control group did not demonstrate any statistically significant changes. Dual-task exercises, in which enhancing functional tasks of daily living is combined with a parallel stimulation of balance reactions, may improve static balance in persons with ID. PMID:25553534

  9. Predicting the language proficiency of Chinese student pilots within American airspace: Single-task versus dual-task English-language assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Clifford Elliott, II

    2002-09-01

    The problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of three single-task instruments---(a) the Test of English as a Foreign Language, (b) the Aviation Test of Spoken English, and (c) the Single Manual-Tracking Test---and three dual-task instruments---(a) the Concurrent Manual-Tracking and Communication Test, (b) the Certified Flight Instructor's Test, and (c) the Simulation-Based English Test---to predict the language performance of 10 Chinese student pilots speaking English as a second language when operating single-engine and multiengine aircraft within American airspace. Method. This research implemented a correlational design to investigate the ability of the six described instruments to predict the mean score of the criterion evaluation, which was the Examiner's Test. This test assessed the oral communication skill of student pilots on the flight portion of the terminal checkride in the Piper Cadet, Piper Seminole, and Beechcraft King Air airplanes. Results. Data from the Single Manual-Tracking Test, as well as the Concurrent Manual-Tracking and Communication Test, were discarded due to performance ceiling effects. Hypothesis 1, which stated that the average correlation between the mean scores of the dual-task evaluations and that of the Examiner's Test would predict the mean score of the criterion evaluation with a greater degree of accuracy than that of single-task evaluations, was not supported. Hypothesis 2, which stated that the correlation between the mean scores of the participants on the Simulation-Based English Test and the Examiner's Test would predict the mean score of the criterion evaluation with a greater degree of accuracy than that of all single- and dual-task evaluations, was also not supported. The findings suggest that single- and dual-task assessments administered after initial flight training are equivalent predictors of language performance when piloting single-engine and multiengine aircraft.

  10. Dual Task Costs of Oral Reading for Young versus Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Susan; Bontempo, Daniel; Schmalzried, RaLynn; McKedy, Whitney; Tagliaferri, Bruno; Kieweg, Doug

    2013-01-01

    A digital pursuit rotor was used to monitor oral reading costs by time-locking tracking performance to the auditory wave form produced as young and older adults were reading out short paragraphs. Multilevel modeling was used to determine how paragraph-level predictors of length, grammatical complexity, and readability and person-level predictors such as speaker age or working memory capacity predicted reading and tracking performance. In addition, sentence-by-sentence variation in tracking performance was examined during the production of individual sentences and during the pauses before upcoming sentences. The results suggest that dual tasking has a greater impact on older adults’ reading comprehension and tracking performance. At the level of individual sentences, young and older adults adopt different strategies to deal with grammatically complex and propositionally dense sentences. PMID:23463405

  11. Tracking reading: dual task costs of oral reading for young versus older adults.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Susan; Bontempo, Daniel; Schmalzried, RaLynn; McKedy, Whitney; Tagliaferri, Bruno; Kieweg, Doug

    2014-02-01

    A digital pursuit rotor was used to monitor oral reading costs by time-locking tracking performance to the auditory wave form produced as young and older adults were reading out short paragraphs. Multilevel modeling was used to determine how paragraph-level predictors of length, grammatical complexity, and readability and person-level predictors such as speaker age or working memory capacity predicted reading and tracking performance. In addition, sentence-by-sentence variation in tracking performance was examined during the production of individual sentences and during the pauses before upcoming sentences. The results suggest that dual tasking has a greater impact on older adults' reading comprehension and tracking performance. At the level of individual sentences, young and older adults adopt different strategies to deal with grammatically complex and propositionally dense sentences. PMID:23463405

  12. Serial or overlapping processing in multitasking as individual preference: Effects of stimulus preview on task switching and concurrent dual-task performance.

    PubMed

    Reissland, Jessika; Manzey, Dietrich

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and performance consequences of multitasking has long been in focus of scientific interest, but has been investigated by three research lines more or less isolated from each other. Studies in the fields of the psychological refractory period, task switching, and interruptions have scored with a high experimental control, but usually do not give participants many degrees of freedom to self-organize the processing of two concurrent tasks. Individual strategies as well as their impact on efficiency have mainly been neglected. Self-organized multitasking has been investigated in the field of human factors, but primarily with respect to overall performance without detailed investigation of how the tasks are processed. The current work attempts to link aspects of these research lines. All of them, explicitly or implicitly, provide hints about an individually preferred type of task organization, either more cautious trying to work strictly serially on only one task at a time or more daring with a focus on task interleaving and, if possible, also partially overlapping (parallel) processing. In two experiments we investigated different strategies of task organization and their impact on efficiency using a new measure of overall multitasking efficiency. Experiment 1 was based on a classical task switching paradigm with two classification tasks, but provided one group of participants with a stimulus preview of the task to switch to next, enabling at least partial overlapping processing. Indeed, this preview led to a reduction of switch costs and to an increase of dual-task efficiency, but only for a subgroup of participants. They obviously exploited the possibility of overlapping processing, while the others worked mainly serially. While task-sequence was externally guided in the first experiment, Experiment 2 extended the approach by giving the participants full freedom of task organization in concurrent performance of the same tasks. Fine

  13. Dual-Task Performance with Ideomotor-Compatible Tasks: Is the Central Processing Bottleneck Intact, Bypassed, or Shifted in Locus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Mei-Ching; McCann, Robert S.; Ruthruff, Eric; Proctor, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether the central bottleneck, assumed to be primarily responsible for the psychological refractory period (PRP) effect, is intact, bypassed, or shifted in locus with ideomotor (IM)-compatible tasks. In 4 experiments, factorial combinations of IM- and non-IM-compatible tasks were used for Task 1 and Task 2. All…

  14. Psychophysiological response to cognitive workload during symmetrical, asymmetrical and dual-task walking.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Marusic, Uros; Crea, Simona; Rodríguez Guerrero, Carlos D; Vitiello, Nicola; Pattyn, Nathalie; Mairesse, Olivier; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-04-01

    Walking with a lower limb prosthesis comes at a high cognitive workload for amputees, possibly affecting their mobility, safety and independency. A biocooperative prosthesis which is able to reduce the cognitive workload of walking could offer a solution. Therefore, we wanted to investigate whether different levels of cognitive workload can be assessed during symmetrical, asymmetrical and dual-task walking and to identify which parameters are the most sensitive. Twenty-four healthy subjects participated in this study. Cognitive workload was assessed through psychophysiological responses, physical and cognitive performance and subjective ratings. The results showed that breathing frequency and heart rate significantly increased, and heart rate variability significantly decreased with increasing cognitive workload during walking (p<.05). Performance measures (e.g., cadence) only changed under high cognitive workload. As a result, psychophysiological measures are the most sensitive to identify changes in cognitive workload during walking. These parameters reflect the cognitive effort necessary to maintain performance during complex walking and can easily be assessed regardless of the task. This makes them excellent candidates to feed to the control loop of a biocooperative prosthesis in order to detect the cognitive workload. This information can then be used to adapt the robotic assistance to the patient's cognitive abilities. PMID:25617994

  15. What Phonological Facilitation Tells about Semantic Interference: A Dual-Task Study

    PubMed Central

    Ayora, Pauline; Peressotti, Francesca; Alario, F.-Xavier; Mulatti, Claudio; Pluchino, Patrick; Job, Remo; Dell'Acqua, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in the topic, the extent to which linguistic processing demands attentional resources remains poorly understood. We report an empirical re-examination of claims about lexical processing made on the basis of the picture–word interference task when merged in a dual-task psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm. Two experiments were conducted in which participants were presented with a tone followed, at varying stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), by a picture–word stimulus. In Experiment 1, the phonological relatedness between pictures and words was manipulated. Begin- and end-related words decreased picture naming latencies relative to unrelated words. This effect was additive with SOA effects. In Experiment 2, both the semantic and the phonological relatedness between pictures and words were manipulated. Replicating Experiment 1, effects arising from the phonological manipulation were additive with SOA effects on picture naming latencies. In contrast, effects arising from the semantic manipulation were under additive with SOA effects on picture naming latencies, that is, semantic interference decreased as SOA was decreased. Such contrastive pattern suggests that semantic and phonological effects on picture naming latencies are characterized by distinguishable sources, the former prior to the PRP bottleneck and the latter at the PRP bottleneck or after. The present findings are discussed in relation to current models of language production. PMID:21716584

  16. Dual-task performance with ideomotor-compatible tasks: is the central processing bottleneck intact, bypassed, or shifted in locus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, Mei-Ching; McCann, Robert S.; Ruthruff, Eric; Proctor, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether the central bottleneck, assumed to be primarily responsible for the psychological refractory period (PRP) effect, is intact, bypassed, or shifted in locus with ideomotor (IM)-compatible tasks. In 4 experiments, factorial combinations of IM- and non-IM-compatible tasks were used for Task 1 and Task 2. All experiments showed substantial PRP effects, with a strong dependency between Task 1 and Task 2 response times. These findings, along with model-based simulations, indicate that the processing bottleneck was not bypassed, even with two IM-compatible tasks. Nevertheless, systematic changes in the PRP and correspondence effects across experiments suggest that IM compatibility shifted the locus of the bottleneck. The findings favor an engage-bottleneck-later hypothesis, whereby parallelism between tasks occurs deeper into the processing stream for IM- than for non-IM-compatible tasks, without the bottleneck being actually eliminated.

  17. Dual-Task Processing as a Measure of Executive Function: A Comparison between Adults with Williams and Down Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kittler, Phyllis M.; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J.; Devenny, Darlynne A.

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral phenotypes of individuals with Williams syndrome and individuals with Down syndrome have been contrasted in relation to short-term memory. People with Down syndrome are stronger visuospatially and those with Williams syndrome are stronger verbally. We examined short-term memory, then explored whether dual-task processing further…

  18. The Costs of Changing the Representation of Action: Response Repetition and Response-Response Compatibility in Dual Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuch, Stefanie; Koch, Iring

    2004-01-01

    In 5 experiments, the authors investigated the costs associated with repeating the same or a similar response in a dual-task setting. Using a psychological refractory period paradigm, they obtained response-repetition costs when the cognitive representation of a specific response (i.e., the category-response mapping) changed (Experiment 1) but…

  19. Reduced mental capacity and behavior of a rider of a bicycle simulator under alcohol stress or under dual task load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soede, M.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on a bicycle simulator with alcohol administration and a binary choice task in separate sessions, intending to reduce the subject's mental capacity. Before and after such sessions a visual evoked response measurement was done. The subject's performance was analyzed with describing function techniques. The results indicate that the alcohol affects the course-following task as well as the balancing task. The binary choice task is more specifically influencing the course-following task. The dual task shows a more pronounced effect on the recovery of the evoked response. The alcohol is delaying the recovery curve of the evoked response. A tentative explanation can be given which agrees with the performance data.

  20. Gait in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Is gait pattern differently affected in spinal and bulbar onset of the disease during dual task walking?

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Sasa; Milićev, Milena; Perić, Stojan; Basta, Ivana; Kostić, Vladimir; Stević, Zorica

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by weakness, fatigue, loss of balance and coordination. The purpose of the study was to examine gait in ALS patients. Gait was compared in ALS with spinal and bulbar onset, while performing dual mental and motor tasks. Dual-task walking was performed by 27 ALS patients, 13 with spinal- and 14 with bulbar-onset disease. Twenty-nine healthy subjects were used as a control group. The subjects performed a basic, simple walking task, dual-motor task, dual-mental task, and combined motor and mental tasks. Results showed that dual-task paradigm has an effect on gait in ALS patients. Gait was differently affected in spinal and bulbar onset of ALS by some of the given tasks. Mental tasks had a larger effect than motor tasks in all gait parameters. In conclusion, both ALS forms have impaired gait in dual tasks. Simple walk in patients with spinal onset shows higher variability of certain gait parameters compared to bulbar-onset patients and controls. Differences in gait could also indicate postural instability and possible falls in complex walking situations. PMID:24918304

  1. Vanishing dual-task interference after practice: has the bottleneck been eliminated or is it merely latent?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, Eric; Johnston, James C.; Van Selst, Mark; Whitsell, Shelly; Remington, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Practice can, in some cases, largely eliminate measured dual-task interference. Does this absence of interference indicate the absence of a processing bottleneck (defined as an inability to carry out certain stages in parallel)? The authors show that a bottleneck need not produce any observable interference, provided that there is no temporal overlap in the demand for bottleneck stages on the 2 tasks. Such a "latent" bottleneck is especially likely after practice, when central stages are short. The authors provide new evidence that a latent bottleneck occurred for a participant who produced no interference in M. Van Selst, E. Ruthruff, and J. C. Johnston (1999). These findings demonstrate that the absence of dual-task interference does not necessarily indicate the absence of a processing bottleneck.

  2. Anatomically ordered tapping interferes more with one-digit addition than two-digit addition: a dual-task fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Firat; Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-02-01

    Fingers are used as canonical representations for numbers across cultures. In previous imaging studies, it was shown that arithmetic processing activates neural resources that are known to participate in finger movements. Additionally, in one dual-task study, it was shown that anatomically ordered finger tapping disrupts addition and subtraction more than multiplication, possibly due to a long-lasting effect of early finger counting experiences on the neural correlates and organization of addition and subtraction processes. How arithmetic task difficulty and tapping complexity affect the concurrent performance is still unclear. If early finger counting experiences have bearing on the neural correlates of arithmetic in adults, then one would expect anatomically and non-anatomically ordered tapping to have different interference effects, given that finger counting is usually anatomically ordered. To unravel these issues, we studied how (1) arithmetic task difficulty and (2) the complexity of the finger tapping sequence (anatomical vs. non-anatomical ordering) affect concurrent performance and use of key neural circuits using a mixed block/event-related dual-task fMRI design with adult participants. The results suggest that complexity of the tapping sequence modulates interference on addition, and that one-digit addition (fact retrieval), compared to two-digit addition (calculation), is more affected from anatomically ordered tapping. The region-of-interest analysis showed higher left angular gyrus BOLD response for one-digit compared to two-digit addition, and in no-tapping conditions than dual tapping conditions. The results support a specific association between addition fact retrieval and anatomically ordered finger movements in adults, possibly due to finger counting strategies that deploy anatomically ordered finger movements early in the development. PMID:26410214

  3. Simulated Firefighting Task Performance and Physiology Under Very Hot Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Brianna; Snow, Rod; Williams-Bell, Michael; Aisbett, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of very hot (45°C) conditions on the performance of, and physiological responses to, a simulated firefighting manual-handling task compared to the same work in a temperate environment (18°C). Methods: Ten male volunteer firefighters performed a 3-h protocol in both 18°C (CON) and 45°C (VH). Participants intermittently performed 12 × 1-min bouts of raking, 6 × 8-min bouts of low-intensity stepping, and 6 × 20-min rest periods. The area cleared during the raking task determined work performance. Core temperature, skin temperature, and heart rate were measured continuously. Participants also periodically rated their perceived exertion (RPE) and thermal sensation. Firefighters consumed water ad libitum. Urine specific gravity (USG) and changes in body mass determined hydration status. Results: Firefighters raked 19% less debris during the VH condition. Core and skin temperature were 0.99 ± 0.20 and 5.45 ± 0.53°C higher, respectively, during the VH trial, and heart rate was 14–36 beats.min−1 higher in the VH trial. Firefighters consumed 2950 ± 1034 mL of water in the VH condition, compared to 1290 ± 525 in the CON trial. Sweat losses were higher in the VH (1886 ± 474 mL) compared to the CON trial (462 ± 392 mL), though both groups were hydrated upon protocol completion (USG < 1.020). Participants' average RPE was higher in the VH (15.6 ± 0.9) compared to the CON trial (12.6 ± 0.9). Similarly, the firefighers' thermal sensation scores were significantly higher in the VH (6.4 ± 0.5) compared to the CON trial (4.4 ± 0.4). Conclusions: Despite the decreased work output and aggressive fluid replacement observed in the VH trial, firefighters' experienced increases in thermal stress, and exertion. Fire agencies should prioritize the health and safety of fire personnel in very hot temperatures, and consider the impact of reduced productivity on fire suppression efforts. PMID:26617527

  4. [Peculiarities of changes of EEG reactivity during performance of dual tasks in healthy subjects (voluntary postural control and calculation)].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkova, L A; Zharikova, A V; Kushnir, E M; Mikhalkova, A A; Kuptsova, S B

    2011-01-01

    Complex EEG and stabilography investigation with separate and simultaneous performance of motor (voluntary postural control) and cognitive (calculation) tasks has been performed in 20 healthy subjects (22 +/- 0.7 yo.). Specific spatial and frequency reactive changes have been revealed during motor task performance. These included increase of coherence in alpha-band for long pair of channels in right hemisphere as well as in symmetric parietal-occipital regions in both hemispheres. Cognitive task performance has been accompanied by coherence increase for low bands (delta- and theta-) with higher activation in left hemisphere and frontal regions. In dual tasks where both components were performed worse comparing to control, performance led to reactive spatial and frequency changes of both--motor and cognitive--tasks, though these changes were less than during separate task performance. Decrease of coherence in alphal-band in frontal areas appeared as a zone of "conflict of interest - interferention". In dual tasks with better performance of each component comparing to control EEG coherence increased in each specific area as well as in areas of "conflict of interest". PMID:22332430

  5. A preliminary study of longitudinal differences in local dynamic stability between recently concussed and healthy athletes during single and dual-task gait.

    PubMed

    Fino, Peter C

    2016-06-14

    Concussed individuals commonly exhibit locomotor deficits during dual-task gait that can last substantially longer than clinical signs and symptoms. Previous studies have examined traditional stability measures, but nonlinear stability may offer further information about the health of the motor control system post-concussion. For up to one year post-concussion, this study longitudinally examined the local dynamic stability of five concussed athletes and four matched healthy controls during single- and dual-task gait. Local dynamic stability (LDS) was estimated using short-term, finite-time maximum Lyapunov exponents calculated from tri-axial accelerometers placed on the trunk and head. No main effects of group or task were found for LDS or stride time variability, but significant group*task interactions were apparent for trunk stability and stride time variability. Concussed individuals exhibited decreased trunk LDS and increased stride time variability during dual-task walking compared to matched controls despite similar single-task stability and variability. These preliminary results reinforce previous reports that concussions persistently affect dual-task processes even when single-tasks may be unaffected. Furthermore, the decreased local dynamic stability during dual-task gait indicates the concussed group attenuated local disturbances less than their healthy teammates. The decreased dynamic stability during dual-task activities was present after the athletes were cleared for competition and may be a contributing factor in the higher rates of musculoskeletal injuries in athletes post-concussion. PMID:27207386

  6. Condition interference in rats performing a choice task with switched variable- and fixed-reward conditions

    PubMed Central

    Funamizu, Akihiro; Ito, Makoto; Doya, Kenji; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    Because humans and animals encounter various situations, the ability to adaptively decide upon responses to any situation is essential. To date, however, decision processes and the underlying neural substrates have been investigated under specific conditions; thus, little is known about how various conditions influence one another in these processes. In this study, we designed a binary choice task with variable- and fixed-reward conditions and investigated neural activities of the prelimbic cortex and dorsomedial striatum in rats. Variable- and fixed-reward conditions induced flexible and inflexible behaviors, respectively; one of the two conditions was randomly assigned in each trial for testing the possibility of condition interference. Rats were successfully conditioned such that they could find the better reward holes of variable-reward-condition and fixed-reward-condition trials. A learning interference model, which updated expected rewards (i.e., values) used in variable-reward-condition trials on the basis of combined experiences of both conditions, better fit choice behaviors than conventional models which updated values in each condition independently. Thus, although rats distinguished the trial condition, they updated values in a condition-interference manner. Our electrophysiological study suggests that this interfering value-updating is mediated by the prelimbic cortex and dorsomedial striatum. First, some prelimbic cortical and striatal neurons represented the action-reward associations irrespective of trial conditions. Second, the striatal neurons kept tracking the values of variable-reward condition even in fixed-reward-condition trials, such that values were possibly interferingly updated even in the fixed-reward condition. PMID:25741231

  7. The Effect of a Six-Month Dancing Program on Motor-Cognitive Dual-Task Performance in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Dennis; Hamacher, Daniel; Rehfeld, Kathrin; Hökelmann, Anita; Schega, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Dancing is a complex sensorimotor activity involving physical and mental elements which have positive effects on cognitive functions and motor control. The present randomized controlled trial aims to analyze the effects of a dancing program on the performance on a motor-cognitive dual task. Data of 35 older adults, who were assigned to a dancing group or a health-related exercise group, are presented in the study. In pretest and posttest, we assessed cognitive performance and variability of minimum foot clearance, stride time, and stride length while walking. Regarding the cognitive performance and the stride-to-stride variability of minimum foot clearance, interaction effects have been found, indicating that dancing lowers gait variability to a higher extent than conventional health-related exercise. The data show that dancing improves minimum foot clearance variability and cognitive performance in a dual-task situation. Multi-task exercises (like dancing) might be a powerful tool to improve motor-cognitive dual-task performance. PMID:25642826

  8. Mental subtraction and multiplication recruit both phonological and visuospatial resources: evidence from a symmetric dual-task design.

    PubMed

    Cavdaroglu, Seda; Knops, A

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies pointed out a selective interaction between different working memory subsystems (i.e., phonological and visuospatial) and arithmetic operations (i.e., multiplication and subtraction). This was interpreted to support the idea that multiplication and subtraction predominantly rely on a phonologically or spatially organized number code, respectively. Here, we investigated this idea in two groups (multiplication and subtraction group) using a dual-task paradigm. Going beyond previous studies, we carefully controlled and balanced the difficulty of both working memory and calculation tasks within and across participants. This allowed us to test the reciprocal impact of calculations on working memory. We observed no selective interaction between different working memory subsystems and arithmetic operations. Instead, both types of arithmetic operations were impaired by both types of concurrent working memory tasks. Likewise, both types of working memory tasks were impaired by both types of concurrent arithmetic. Our findings suggest that multiplication and subtraction depend on both phonological and visuospatial codes and highlight the importance of balancing task demands within and between participants in the context of dual-task studies. PMID:25952478

  9. Effects of cues in a binary categorization task on dual-task performance, mental workload, and effort.

    PubMed

    Botzer, Assaf; Meyer, Joachim; Parmet, Yisrael

    2016-09-01

    Binary cues help operators perform binary categorization tasks, such as monitoring for system failures. They may also allow them to attend to other tasks they concurrently perform. If the time saved by using cues is allocated to other concurrent tasks, users' overall effort may remain unchanged. In 2 experiments, participants performed a simulated quality control task, together with a tracking task. In half the experimental blocks cues were available, and participants could use them in their decisions about the quality of products (intact or faulty). In Experiment 1, the difficulty of tracking was constant, while in Experiment 2, tracking difficulty differed in the 2 halves of the experiment. In both experiments, participants reported on the NASA Task Load Index that cues improved their performance and reduced their frustration. Consequently, their overall score on mental workload (MWL) was lower with cues. They also reported, however, that cues did not reduce their effort. We conclude that cues and other forms of automation may support task performance and reduce overall MWL, but this will not necessarily mean that users will work less hard. Thus, effort and overall MWL should be evaluated separately, if one wants to obtain a full picture of the effects of automation. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27505049

  10. Virtual dual-task treadmill training using video recording for gait of chronic stroke survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunseung; Choi, Wonjae; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of virtual dual-task treadmill training using a real-world video recording of the gait of individuals with chronic stroke. [Subjects] Forty chronic stroke survivors were randomly divided into two groups of 20 subjects each. [Methods] The experimental group performed virtual dual-task treadmill training using a video recording for 30 minutes per session, three times a week for 4 weeks, whereas the control group performed only treadmill training for 30 minutes per session, three times a week for 4 weeks. A video recording was performed in a large supermarket, and the subjects could walk at their favorable speed on a treadmill. The temporospatial gait variables were measured to examine the training effect. [Results] The experimental and control groups showed statistically significant improvements in the gait variables after training. The enhancement of gait ability was statistically better in the experimental group than in the control group. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that virtual dual-task treadmill training using a video recording can improve the gait parameters of chronic stroke survivors. PMID:26834334

  11. Brain activation during dual-task processing is associated with cardiorespiratory fitness and performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Chelsea N.; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Voss, Michelle W.; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z.; Basak, Chandramallika; Erickson, Kirk I.; Prakash, Ruchika S.; Szabo-Reed, Amanda N.; Phillips, Siobhan M.; Wojcicki, Thomas; Mailey, Emily L.; McAuley, Edward; Kramer, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Higher cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with better cognitive performance and enhanced brain activation. Yet, the extent to which cardiorespiratory fitness-related brain activation is associated with better cognitive performance is not well understood. In this cross-sectional study, we examined whether the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and executive function was mediated by greater prefrontal cortex activation in healthy older adults. Brain activation was measured during dual-task performance with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a sample of 128 healthy older adults (59–80 years). Higher cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with greater activation during dual-task processing in several brain areas including the anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortex (ACC/SMA), thalamus and basal ganglia, right motor/somatosensory cortex and middle frontal gyrus, and left somatosensory cortex, controlling for age, sex, education, and gray matter volume. Of these regions, greater ACC/SMA activation mediated the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and dual-task performance. We provide novel evidence that cardiorespiratory fitness may support cognitive performance by facilitating brain activation in a core region critical for executive function. PMID:26321949

  12. Do Aging and Dual-Tasking Impair the Capacity to Store and Retrieve Visuospatial Information Needed to Guide Perturbation-Evoked Reach-To-Grasp Reactions?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kenneth C.; Pratt, Jay; Maki, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    A recent study involving young adults showed that rapid perturbation-evoked reach-to-grasp balance-recovery reactions can be guided successfully with visuospatial-information (VSI) retained in memory despite: 1) a reduction in endpoint accuracy due to recall-delay (time between visual occlusion and perturbation-onset, PO) and 2) slowing of the reaction when performing a concurrent cognitive task during the recall-delay interval. The present study aimed to determine whether this capacity is compromised by effects of aging. Ten healthy older adults were tested with the previous protocol and compared with the previously-tested young adults. Reactions to recover balance by grasping a small handhold were evoked by unpredictable antero-posterior platform-translation (barriers deterred stepping reactions), while using liquid-crystal goggles to occlude vision post-PO and for varying recall-delay times (0-10s) prior to PO (the handhold was moved unpredictably to one of four locations 2s prior to vision-occlusion). Subjects also performed a spatial- or non-spatial-memory cognitive task during the delay-time in a subset of trials. Results showed that older adults had slower reactions than the young across all experimental conditions. Both age groups showed similar reduction in medio-lateral end-point accuracy when recall-delay was longest (10s), but differed in the effect of recall delay on vertical hand elevation. For both age groups, engaging in either the non-spatial or spatial-memory task had similar (slowing) effects on the arm reactions; however, the older adults also showed a dual-task interference effect (poorer cognitive-task performance) that was specific to the spatial-memory task. This provides new evidence that spatial working memory plays a role in the control of perturbation-evoked balance-recovery reactions. The delays in completing the reaction that occurred when performing either cognitive task suggest that such dual-task situations in daily life could

  13. Dual-task and electrophysiological markers of executive cognitive processing in older adult gait and fall-risk

    PubMed Central

    Walshe, Elizabeth A.; Patterson, Matthew R.; Commins, Seán; Roche, Richard A. P.

    2015-01-01

    The role of cognition is becoming increasingly central to our understanding of the complexity of walking gait. In particular, higher-level executive functions are suggested to play a key role in gait and fall-risk, but the specific underlying neurocognitive processes remain unclear. Here, we report two experiments which investigated the cognitive and neural processes underlying older adult gait and falls. Experiment 1 employed a dual-task (DT) paradigm in young and older adults, to assess the relative effects of higher-level executive function tasks (n-Back, Serial Subtraction and visuo-spatial Clock task) in comparison to non-executive distracter tasks (motor response task and alphabet recitation) on gait. All DTs elicited changes in gait for both young and older adults, relative to baseline walking. Significantly greater DT costs were observed for the executive tasks in the older adult group. Experiment 2 compared normal walking gait, seated cognitive performances and concurrent event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in healthy young and older adults, to older adult fallers. No significant differences in cognitive performances were found between fallers and non-fallers. However, an initial late-positivity, considered a potential early P3a, was evident on the Stroop task for older non-fallers, which was notably absent in older fallers. We argue that executive control functions play a prominent role in walking and gait, but the use of neurocognitive processes as a predictor of fall-risk needs further investigation. PMID:25941481

  14. Brain activation for language dual-tasking: listening to two people speak at the same time and a change in network timing.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, Augusto; Keller, Timothy A; Meyler, Ann; Just, Marcel Adam

    2012-08-01

    The study used fMRI to investigate brain activation in participants who were able to listen to and successfully comprehend two people speaking at the same time (dual-tasking). The study identified brain mechanisms associated with high-level, concurrent dual-tasking, as compared with comprehending a single message. Results showed an increase in the functional connectivity among areas of the language network in the dual task. The increase in synchronization of brain activation for dual-tasking was brought about primarily by a change in the timing of left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) activation relative to posterior temporal activation, bringing the LIFG activation into closer correspondence with temporal activation. The results show that the change in LIFG timing was greater in participants with lower working memory capacity, and that recruitment of additional activation in the dual-task occurred only in the areas adjacent to the language network that was activated in the single task. The shift in LIFG activation may be a brain marker of how the brain adapts to high-level dual-tasking. PMID:21618666

  15. Context-Sensitive Adjustment of Cognitive Control in Dual-Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Rico; Gottschalk, Caroline; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2014-01-01

    Performing 2 highly similar tasks at the same time requires an adaptive regulation of cognitive control to shield prioritized primary task processing from between-task (cross-talk) interference caused by secondary task processing. In the present study, the authors investigated how implicitly and explicitly delivered information promotes the…

  16. Dual task abilities as a possible preclinical marker of Alzheimer's disease in carriers of the E280A presenilin-1 mutation.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Sarah E; Parra, Mario A; Moreno, Sonia; Lopera, Francisco; Della Sala, Sergio

    2012-03-01

    Previous dual task studies have demonstrated that patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) are impaired in their ability to perform two tasks simultaneously compared with healthy controls, despite being able to successfully perform the tasks alone relatively well. Yet, it remains unclear what the earliest clinical manifestation of this dual task coordination deficit is. This study examined dual task abilities in individuals who are at risk of early-onset familial AD due to an E280A presenilin-1 mutation. Thirty-nine carriers of the gene mutation who did not meet the criteria for AD and 29 non-carrier healthy controls were asked to perform digit recall accompanied by a secondary tracking task. Individuals who were carriers of the genetic mutation demonstrated significantly higher dual task costs than healthy non-carriers. Dual task performance was found to be more sensitive to this very early stage of FAD than episodic memory measures. The findings support the notion that a deficit in the coordination mechanism of the central executive may be a pre-clinical marker for the early detection of AD due to the E280A presenilin-1 gene mutation. PMID:22133015

  17. Sequential and simultaneous dual-isotope brain SPECT: Comparison with PET for estimation and discrimination tasks in early Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Trott, Cathryn M.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the second most frequently occurring cerebral degenerative disease, after Alzheimer disease. Treatments are available, but their efficacy is diminished unless they are administered in the early stages. Therefore, early identification of PD is crucial. In addition to providing perfectly registered studies, simultaneous 99mTc∕123I imaging makes possible the assessment of pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission functions under identical physiological conditions, while doubling the number of counts for the same total imaging time. These advantages are limited, however, by cross talk between the two radionuclides due to the close emission energies of 99mTc (140 keV) and 123I (159 keV). PET, on the other hand, provides good temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity but usually requires the use of a single radionuclide. In the present work, the authors compared brain PET with sequential and simultaneous dual-isotope SPECT for the task of estimating striatal activity concentration and striatal size for a normal brain and two stages of early PD. Realistic Monte Carlo simulations of a time-of-flight PET scanner and gamma cameras were performed while modeling all interactions in the brain, collimator (gamma camera) and crystal (detector block in PET), as well as population biological variability of pre- and postsynaptic uptake. For SPECT imaging, we considered two values of system energy resolution and scanners with two and three camera heads. The authors used the Cramer–Rao bound, as a surrogate for the best theoretical performance, to optimize the SPECT acquisition energy windows and objectively compare PET and SPECT. The authors determined the discrimination performance between 500 simulated subjects in every disease stage as measured by the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The discrimination accuracy between a normal subject and a subject in the prodromal disease stage was AUC=0.924 with PET, compared to 0.863 and 0.831 with simultaneous

  18. Is Semantic Processing During Sentence Reading Autonomous or Controlled? Evidence from the N400 Component in a Dual Task Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hohlfeld, Annette; Martín-Loeches, Manuel; Sommer, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The present study contributes to the discussion on the automaticity of semantic processing. Whereas most previous research investigated semantic processing at word level, the present study addressed semantic processing during sentence reading. A dual task paradigm was combined with the recording of event-related brain potentials. Previous research at word level processing reported different patterns of interference with the N400 by additional tasks: attenuation of amplitude or delay of latency. In the present study, we presented Spanish sentences that were semantically correct or contained a semantic violation in a critical word. At different intervals preceding the critical word a tone was presented that required a high-priority choice response. At short intervals/high temporal overlap between the tasks mean amplitude of the N400 was reduced relative to long intervals/low temporal overlap, but there were no shifts of peak latency. We propose that processing at sentence level exerts a protective effect against the additional task. This is in accord with the attentional sensitization model (Kiefer & Martens, 2010), which suggests that semantic processing is an automatic process that can be enhanced by the currently activated task set. The present experimental sentences also induced a P600, which is taken as an index of integrative processing. Additional task effects are comparable to those in the N400 time window and are briefly discussed. PMID:26203312

  19. The significance of task significance: Job performance effects, relational mechanisms, and boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Grant, Adam M

    2008-01-01

    Does task significance increase job performance? Correlational designs and confounded manipulations have prevented researchers from assessing the causal impact of task significance on job performance. To address this gap, 3 field experiments examined the performance effects, relational mechanisms, and boundary conditions of task significance. In Experiment 1, fundraising callers who received a task significance intervention increased their levels of job performance relative to callers in 2 other conditions and to their own prior performance. In Experiment 2, task significance increased the job dedication and helping behavior of lifeguards, and these effects were mediated by increases in perceptions of social impact and social worth. In Experiment 3, conscientiousness and prosocial values moderated the effects of task significance on the performance of new fundraising callers. The results provide fresh insights into the effects, relational mechanisms, and boundary conditions of task significance, offering noteworthy implications for theory, research, and practice on job design, social information processing, and work motivation and performance. PMID:18211139

  20. The Association between High Neuroticism-Low Extraversion and Dual-Task Performance during Walking While Talking in Non-demented Older Adults.

    PubMed

    LeMonda, Brittany C; Mahoney, Jeannette R; Verghese, Joe; Holtzer, Roee

    2015-08-01

    The Walking While Talking (WWT) dual-task paradigm is a mobility stress test that predicts major outcomes, including falls, frailty, disability, and mortality in aging. Certain personality traits, such as neuroticism, extraversion, and their combination, have been linked to both cognitive and motor outcomes. We examined whether individual differences in personality dimensions of neuroticism and extraversion predicted dual-task performance decrements (both motor and cognitive) on a WWT task in non-demented older adults. We hypothesized that the combined effect of high neuroticism-low extraversion would be related to greater dual-task costs in gait velocity and cognitive performance in non-demented older adults. Participants (N=295; age range,=65-95 years; female=164) completed the Big Five Inventory and WWT task involving concurrent gait and a serial 7's subtraction task. Gait velocity was obtained using an instrumented walkway. The high neuroticism-low extraversion group incurred greater dual-task costs (i.e., worse performance) in both gait velocity {95% confidence interval (CI) [-17.68 to -3.07]} and cognitive performance (95% CI [-19.34 to -2.44]) compared to the low neuroticism-high extraversion group, suggesting that high neuroticism-low extraversion interferes with the allocation of attentional resources to competing task demands during the WWT task. Older individuals with high neuroticism-low extraversion may be at higher risk for falls, mobility decline and other adverse outcomes in aging. PMID:26527241

  1. The Association between High Neuroticism-Low Extraversion and Dual-Task Performance during Walking While Talking in Non-demented Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    LeMonda, Brittany C.; Mahoney, Jeannette R.; Verghese, Joe; Holtzer, Roee

    2016-01-01

    The Walking While Talking (WWT) dual-task paradigm is a mobility stress test that predicts major outcomes, including falls, frailty, disability, and mortality in aging. Certain personality traits, such as neuroticism, extraversion, and their combination, have been linked to both cognitive and motor outcomes. We examined whether individual differences in personality dimensions of neuroticism and extraversion predicted dual-task performance decrements (both motor and cognitive) on a WWT task in non-demented older adults. We hypothesized that the combined effect of high neuroticism-low extraversion would be related to greater dual-task costs in gait velocity and cognitive performance in non-demented older adults. Participants (N = 295; age range, = 65–95 years; female = 164) completed the Big Five Inventory and WWT task involving concurrent gait and a serial 7's subtraction task. Gait velocity was obtained using an instrumented walkway. The high neuroticism-low extraversion group incurred greater dual-task costs (i.e., worse performance) in both gait velocity {95% confidence interval (CI) [−17.68 to −3.07]} and cognitive performance (95% CI [−19.34 to −2.44]) compared to the low neuroticism-high extraversion group, suggesting that high neuroticism-low extraversion interferes with the allocation of attentional resources to competing task demands during the WWT task. Older individuals with high neuroticism-low extraversion may be at higher risk for falls, mobility decline and other adverse outcomes in aging. PMID:26527241

  2. Cross-Modal Transfer of Conditioned Suppression in Rats: Effects of US Intensity and Extinction of the Initial Conditioning Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doe, Nobutaka; Nakajima, Sadahiko; Tamai, Noriko

    2004-01-01

    In conditioned suppression of water licking behavior by rats, we obtained data indicating general transfer of fear conditioning. A series of experiments resulted in two major findings. First, pairing of a neutral stimulus with a shock in the initial conditioning task facilitated acquisition of subsequent fear conditioning to another neutral…

  3. Spatial release of cognitive load measured in a dual-task paradigm in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jing; Nooraei, Nazanin; Kalluri, Sridhar; Edwards, Brent

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated whether spatial separation between talkers helps reduce cognitive processing load, and how hearing impairment interacts with the cognitive load of individuals listening in multi-talker environments. A dual-task paradigm was used in which performance on a secondary task (visual tracking) served as a measure of the cognitive load imposed by a speech recognition task. Visual tracking performance was measured under four conditions in which the target and the interferers were distinguished by (1) gender and spatial location, (2) gender only, (3) spatial location only, and (4) neither gender nor spatial location. Results showed that when gender cues were available, a 15° spatial separation between talkers reduced the cognitive load of listening even though it did not provide further improvement in speech recognition (Experiment I). Compared to normal-hearing listeners, large individual variability in spatial release of cognitive load was observed among hearing-impaired listeners. Cognitive load was lower when talkers were spatially separated by 60° than when talkers were of different genders, even though speech recognition was comparable in these two conditions (Experiment II). These results suggest that a measure of cognitive load might provide valuable insight into the benefit of spatial cues in multi-talker environments. PMID:25920841

  4. Conditional Reasoning in Context: A Dual-Source Model of Probabilistic Inference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klauer, Karl Christoph; Beller, Sieghard; Hutter, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    A dual-source model of probabilistic conditional inference is proposed. According to the model, inferences are based on 2 sources of evidence: logical form and prior knowledge. Logical form is a decontextualized source of evidence, whereas prior knowledge is activated by the contents of the conditional rule. In Experiments 1 to 3, manipulations of…

  5. Do Children with Autism Use Inner Speech and Visuospatial Resources for the Service of Executive Control? Evidence From Suppression in Dual Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Lucy; Low, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments used dual-task suppression methodology to study the use of inner speech and visuospatial resources for mediating central executive performance by children with autism (CWA) and group-matched typically developing (TD) controls. Expt 1 revealed that CWA did not recruit inner speech to facilitate arithmetic task-switching…

  6. A dual phosphorylation switch controls 14-3-3-dependent cell surface expression of TASK-1

    PubMed Central

    Kilisch, Markus; Lytovchenko, Olga; Arakel, Eric C.; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwappach, Blanche

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transport of the K+ channels TASK-1 and TASK-3 (also known as KCNK3 and KCNK9, respectively) to the cell surface is controlled by the binding of 14-3-3 proteins to a trafficking control region at the extreme C-terminus of the channels. The current model proposes that phosphorylation-dependent binding of 14-3-3 sterically masks a COPI-binding motif. However, the direct effects of phosphorylation on COPI binding and on the binding parameters of 14-3-3 isoforms are still unknown. We find that phosphorylation of the trafficking control region prevents COPI binding even in the absence of 14-3-3, and we present a quantitative analysis of the binding of all human 14-3-3 isoforms to the trafficking control regions of TASK-1 and TASK-3. Surprisingly, the affinities of 14-3-3 proteins for TASK-1 are two orders of magnitude lower than for TASK-3. Furthermore, we find that phosphorylation of a second serine residue in the C-terminus of TASK-1 inhibits 14-3-3 binding. Thus, phosphorylation of the trafficking control region can stimulate or inhibit transport of TASK-1 to the cell surface depending on the target serine residue. Our findings indicate that control of TASK-1 trafficking by COPI, kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins is highly dynamic. PMID:26743085

  7. A dual phosphorylation switch controls 14-3-3-dependent cell surface expression of TASK-1.

    PubMed

    Kilisch, Markus; Lytovchenko, Olga; Arakel, Eric C; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwappach, Blanche

    2016-02-15

    The transport of the K(+) channels TASK-1 and TASK-3 (also known as KCNK3 and KCNK9, respectively) to the cell surface is controlled by the binding of 14-3-3 proteins to a trafficking control region at the extreme C-terminus of the channels. The current model proposes that phosphorylation-dependent binding of 14-3-3 sterically masks a COPI-binding motif. However, the direct effects of phosphorylation on COPI binding and on the binding parameters of 14-3-3 isoforms are still unknown. We find that phosphorylation of the trafficking control region prevents COPI binding even in the absence of 14-3-3, and we present a quantitative analysis of the binding of all human 14-3-3 isoforms to the trafficking control regions of TASK-1 and TASK-3. Surprisingly, the affinities of 14-3-3 proteins for TASK-1 are two orders of magnitude lower than for TASK-3. Furthermore, we find that phosphorylation of a second serine residue in the C-terminus of TASK-1 inhibits 14-3-3 binding. Thus, phosphorylation of the trafficking control region can stimulate or inhibit transport of TASK-1 to the cell surface depending on the target serine residue. Our findings indicate that control of TASK-1 trafficking by COPI, kinases, phosphatases and 14-3-3 proteins is highly dynamic. PMID:26743085

  8. Cognitive and Neural Determinants of Response Strategy in the Dual-Solution Plus-Maze Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Leonibus, Elvira; Costantini, Vivian J. A.; Massaro, Antonio; Mandolesi, Georgia; Vanni, Valentina; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Response strategy in the dual-solution plus maze is regarded as a form of stimulus-response learning. In this study, by using an outcome devaluation procedure, we show that it can be based on both action-outcome and stimulus-response habit learning, depending on the amount of training that the animals receive. Furthermore, we show that…

  9. Crafting Instructions Collaboratively: Student Questions and Dual Addressivity in Classroom Task Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Oliver; Cromdal, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    This study examines classroom task instructions--phases traditionally associated with noninteractional objectives and operations--and reveals their composition as interactionally complex and cocrafted. Analyses of video sequences of task instructional activity from three different secondary school lessons show that student questions routinely…

  10. Working Memory Deficits in Children with Reading Difficulties: Memory Span and Dual Task Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shinmin; Gathercole, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the cause of the reported problems in working memory in children with reading difficulties. Verbal and visuospatial simple and complex span tasks, and digit span and reaction times tasks performed singly and in combination, were administered to 46 children with single word reading difficulties and 45 typically…

  11. Role of Dual Task Design When Measuring Cognitive Load during Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoor, Cornelia; Bannert, Maria; Brunken, Roland

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the role different kinds of secondary tasks play for researching the modality effect of cognitive load theory. Ninety-six university students worked with a computer-based training program for approximately 13 min and had to fulfill an additional secondary task. In a 2 x 2 factorial design, modality of information presentation…

  12. Assessing Relational Complexity in Hierarchical Reasoning: A Dual-Task Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Elizabeth J.; Berch, Daniel B.

    This study used the "double easy-to-hard" paradigm to examine the hypothesis that the class inclusion (CI) task should be equivalent in relational complexity to the transitive inference (TI) problem. Participating in the study were 64 girls and 50 boys, with a mean age of 8 years, 6 months. Stimuli for easy versions of the tasks were displayed…

  13. Evaluation of 2 cognitive abilities tests in a dual-task environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidulich, M. A.; Tsang, P. S.

    1986-01-01

    Most real world operators are required to perform multiple tasks simultaneously. In some cases, such as flying a high performance aircraft or trouble shooting a failing nuclear power plant, the operator's ability to time share or process in parallel" can be driven to extremes. This has created interest in selection tests of cognitive abilities. Two tests that have been suggested are the Dichotic Listening Task and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Correlations between these test results and time sharing performance were obtained and the validity of these tests were examined. The primary task was a tracking task with dynamically varying bandwidth. This was performed either alone or concurrently with either another tracking task or a spatial transformation task. The results were: (1) An unexpected negative correlation was detected between the two tests; (2) The lack of correlation between either test and task performance made the predictive utility of the tests scores appear questionable; (3) Pilots made more errors on the Dichotic Listening Task than college students.

  14. A dual-task investigation of automaticity in visual word processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCann, R. S.; Remington, R. W.; Van Selst, M.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of activation models of visual word processing suggests that frequency-sensitive forms of lexical processing should proceed normally while unattended. This hypothesis was tested by having participants perform a speeded pitch discrimination task followed by lexical decisions or word naming. As the stimulus onset asynchrony between the tasks was reduced, lexical-decision and naming latencies increased dramatically. Word-frequency effects were additive with the increase, indicating that frequency-sensitive processing was subject to postponement while attention was devoted to the other task. Either (a) the same neural hardware shares responsibility for lexical processing and central stages of choice reaction time task processing and cannot perform both computations simultaneously, or (b) lexical processing is blocked in order to optimize performance on the pitch discrimination task. Either way, word processing is not as automatic as activation models suggest.

  15. Dual clearance squeeze film damper for high load conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Squeeze film dampers are widely used to control vibrations in aircraft turbine engines and other rotating machinery. However, if shaft unbalance rises appreciably above the design value (e.g., due to a turbine blade loss), a conventional squeeze film becomes overloaded, and is no longer effective in controlling vibration amplitudes and bearing forces. A damper concept characterized by two oil films is described. Under normal conditions, only one low-clearance film is active, allowing precise location of the shaft centerline. Under high unbalance conditions, both films are active, controlling shaft vibration in a near-optimum manner, and allowing continued operation until a safe shutdown can be made.

  16. The Association between Different Levels of Alcohol Use and Gait under Single and Dual Task in Community-Dwelling Older Persons Aged 65 to 70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Büla, Christophe; Santos-Eggimann, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between alcohol intake and gait parameters in older persons. Methods. Community-dwelling persons aged 65–70 years (N = 807). Information on health, functional status, and alcohol use was self-reported at baseline and at 3-year follow-up, whereas gait speed and stride-to-stride variability were measured while walking only (single task) and under dual tasking (counting backwards). Results. Compared to light-to-moderate drinking, heavy drinking was associated with slower gait speed in single task (adj. coeff.: −.040, 95% CI: −.0.78 to −.002, p = .035). No significant association was observed between heavy drinking and gait speed variability. Nondrinkers walked significantly slower than light-to-moderate drinkers in dual task and had significantly higher gait speed variability in both single and dual task, but these associations disappeared after adjustment for comorbidity. At follow-up, 35.2% and 34.1% of the participants walked significantly slower in single and dual task, respectively. This proportion varied a little across drinking categories. Conclusion. At baseline, heavy alcohol consumption was significantly associated with slower gait speed in single task. Selective survival of the fittest heavy drinkers probably explains why this association faded in longitudinal analyses. The trend of poorer gait performance in nondrinkers disappeared after adjustment for comorbidity, suggesting confounding by a worse health status. PMID:27516773

  17. The Association between Different Levels of Alcohol Use and Gait under Single and Dual Task in Community-Dwelling Older Persons Aged 65 to 70 Years.

    PubMed

    Seematter-Bagnoud, Laurence; Büla, Christophe; Santos-Eggimann, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between alcohol intake and gait parameters in older persons. Methods. Community-dwelling persons aged 65-70 years (N = 807). Information on health, functional status, and alcohol use was self-reported at baseline and at 3-year follow-up, whereas gait speed and stride-to-stride variability were measured while walking only (single task) and under dual tasking (counting backwards). Results. Compared to light-to-moderate drinking, heavy drinking was associated with slower gait speed in single task (adj. coeff.: -.040, 95% CI: -.0.78 to -.002, p = .035). No significant association was observed between heavy drinking and gait speed variability. Nondrinkers walked significantly slower than light-to-moderate drinkers in dual task and had significantly higher gait speed variability in both single and dual task, but these associations disappeared after adjustment for comorbidity. At follow-up, 35.2% and 34.1% of the participants walked significantly slower in single and dual task, respectively. This proportion varied a little across drinking categories. Conclusion. At baseline, heavy alcohol consumption was significantly associated with slower gait speed in single task. Selective survival of the fittest heavy drinkers probably explains why this association faded in longitudinal analyses. The trend of poorer gait performance in nondrinkers disappeared after adjustment for comorbidity, suggesting confounding by a worse health status. PMID:27516773

  18. Performance under dichoptic versus binocular viewing conditions - Effects of attention and task requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimchi, Ruth; Gopher, Daniel; Rubin, Yifat; Raij, David

    1993-01-01

    Three experiments investigated subjects' ability to allocate attention and cope with task requirements under dichoptic versus binocular viewing conditions. Experiments 1 and 2 employed a target detection task in compound and noncompound stimuli, and Experiment 3 employed a relative-proximity judgment task. The tasks were performed in a focused attention condition in which subjects had to attend to the stimulus presented to one eye or field (under dichoptic and binocular viewing conditions, respectively) while ignoring the stimulus presented to the other eye or field, and in a divided attention condition in which subjects had to attend to the stimuli presented to both eyes or fields. Subjects' performance was affected by the interaction of attention conditions with task requirements, but it was generally the same under dichoptic and binocular viewing conditions. The more dependent the task was on finer discrimination, the more performance was impaired by divided attention. These results suggest that at least with discrete tasks and relatively short exposure durations, performance when each eye is presented with a separate stimulus is the same as when the entire field of stimulation is viewed by both eyes.

  19. Engine performance analysis and optimization of a dual-mode scramjet with varied inlet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lu; Chen, Li-Hong; Chen, Qiang; Zhong, Feng-Quan; Chang, Xin-Yu

    2016-02-01

    A dual-mode scramjet can operate in a wide range of flight conditions. Higher thrust can be generated by adopting suitable combustion modes. Based on the net thrust, an analysis and preliminary optimal design of a kerosene-fueled parameterized dual-mode scramjet at a crucial flight Mach number of 6 were investigated by using a modified quasi-one-dimensional method and simulated annealing strategy. Engine structure and heat release distributions, affecting the engine thrust, were chosen as analytical parameters for varied inlet conditions (isolator entrance Mach number: 1.5-3.5). Results show that different optimal heat release distributions and structural conditions can be obtained at five different inlet conditions. The highest net thrust of the parameterized dual-mode engine can be achieved by a subsonic combustion mode at an isolator entrance Mach number of 2.5. Additionally, the effects of heat release and scramjet structure on net thrust have been discussed. The present results and the developed analytical method can provide guidance for the design and optimization of high-performance dual-mode scramjets.

  20. Survey and analyze the business conditions of the solar industry, June-July 1981. Task I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following tasks: surveying and analyzing the business conditions of the solar industry, administrative analysis of solar system product certification standards and codes, and solar industry advertising guidelines. (MHR)

  1. Processing bottlenecks in dual-task performance: structural limitation or strategic postponement?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruthruff, E.; Pashler, H. E.; Klaassen, A.

    2001-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that a central bottleneck causes much of the slowing that occurs when two tasks are performed at the same time. This bottleneck might reflect a structural limitation inherent in the cognitive architecture. Alternatively, the bottleneck might reflect strategic (i.e., voluntary) postponement, induced by instructions to emphasize one task over the other. To distinguish structural limitations from strategic postponement, we examine a new paradigm in which subjects are told to place equal emphasis on both tasks and to emit both responses at about the same time. An experiment using this paradigm demonstrated patterns of interference that cannot easily be attributed to strategic postponement, preparation effects, or conflicts in response production. The data conform closely to the predictions of structural central bottleneck models.

  2. Perceiving and Remembering Events Cross-Linguistically: Evidence from Dual-Task Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueswell, John C.; Papafragou, Anna

    2010-01-01

    What role does language play during attention allocation in perceiving and remembering events? We recorded adults' eye movements as they studied animated motion events for a later recognition task. We compared native speakers of two languages that use different means of expressing motion (Greek and English). In Experiment 1, eye movements revealed…

  3. Mapping Introspection's Blind Spot: Reconstruction of Dual-Task Phenomenology Using Quantified Introspection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marti, Sebastien; Sackur, Jerome; Sigman, Mariano; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2010-01-01

    Psychologists often dismiss introspection as an inappropriate measure, yet subjects readily volunteer detailed descriptions of the time and effort that they spent on a task. Are such reports really so inaccurate? We asked subjects to perform a psychological refractory period experiment followed by extensive quantified introspection. On each trial,…

  4. Working Memory in Wayfinding--A Dual Task Experiment in a Virtual City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilinger, Tobias; Knauff, Markus; Bulthoff, Heinrich H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the working memory systems involved in human wayfinding. In the learning phase, 24 participants learned two routes in a novel photorealistic virtual environment displayed on a 220 degrees screen while they were disrupted by a visual, a spatial, a verbal, or--in a control group--no secondary task. In the following wayfinding…

  5. Working Memory in Nonsymbolic Approximate Arithmetic Processing: A Dual-Task Study with Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xenidou-Dervou, Iro; van Lieshout, Ernest C. D. M.; van der Schoot, Menno

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children have been proven to possess nonsymbolic approximate arithmetic skills before learning how to manipulate symbolic math and thus before any formal math instruction. It has been assumed that nonsymbolic approximate math tasks necessitate the allocation of Working Memory (WM) resources. WM has been consistently shown to be an…

  6. A longitudinal study on dual-tasking effects on gait: cognitive change predicts gait variance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    MacAulay, Rebecca K; Brouillette, Robert M; Foil, Heather C; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological abilities have found to explain a large proportion of variance in objective measures of walking gait that predict both dementia and falling within the elderly. However, to this date there has been little research on the interplay between changes in these neuropsychological processes and walking gait overtime. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate intra-individual changes in neurocognitive test performance and gait step time at two-time points across a one-year span. Neuropsychological test scores from 440 elderly individuals deemed cognitively normal at Year One were analyzed via repeated measures t-tests to assess for decline in cognitive performance at Year Two. 34 of these 440 individuals neuropsychological test performance significantly declined at Year Two; whereas the "non-decliners" displayed improved memory, working memory, attention/processing speed test performance. Neuropsychological test scores were also submitted to factor analysis at both time points for data reduction purposes and to assess the factor stability overtime. Results at Year One yielded a three-factor solution: Language/Memory, Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Year Two's test scores also generated a three-factor solution (Working Memory, Language/Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Memory). Notably, language measures loaded on Executive Attention/Processing Speed rather than on the Memory factor at Year Two. Hierarchal multiple regression revealed that both Executive Attention/Processing Speed and sex significantly predicted variance in dual task step time at both time points. Remarkably, in the "decliners", the magnitude of the contribution of the neuropsychological characteristics to gait variance significantly increased at Year Two. In summary, this study provides longitudinal evidence of the dynamic relationship between intra-individual cognitive change and its influence on dual task gait step time. These

  7. Human Hepatocytes and Hematolymphoid Dual Reconstitution in Treosulfan-Conditioned uPA-NOG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutti, Tanuja L.; Knibbe, Jaclyn S.; Makarov, Edward; Zhang, Jinjin; Yannam, Govardhana R.; Gorantla, Santhi; Sun, Yimin; Mercer, David F.; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Wisecarver, James L.; Osna, Natalia A.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Poluektova, Larisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    Human-specific HIV-1 and hepatitis co-infections significantly affect patient management and call for new therapeutic options. Small xenotransplantation models with human hepatocytes and hematolymphoid tissue should facilitate antiviral/antiretroviral drug trials. However, experience with mouse strains tested for dual reconstitution is limited, with technical difficulties such as risky manipulations with newborns and high mortality rates due to metabolic abnormalities. The best animal strains for hepatocyte transplantation are not optimal for human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment, and vice versa. We evaluated a new strain of highly immunodeficient nonobese diabetic/Shi-scid (severe combined immunodeficiency)/IL-2Rγcnull (NOG) mice that carry two copies of the mouse albumin promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator transgene for dual reconstitution with human liver and immune cells. Three approaches for dual reconstitution were evaluated: i) freshly isolated fetal hepatoblasts were injected intrasplenically, followed by transplantation of cryopreserved HSCs obtained from the same tissue samples 1 month later after treosulfan conditioning; ii) treosulfan conditioning is followed by intrasplenic simultaneous transplantation of fetal hepatoblasts and HSCs; and iii) transplantation of mature hepatocytes is followed by mismatched HSCs. The long-term dual reconstitution was achieved on urokinase-type plasminogen activator–NOG mice with mature hepatocytes (not fetal hepatoblasts) and HSCs. Even major histocompatibility complex mismatched transplantation was sustained without any evidence of hepatocyte rejection by the human immune system. PMID:24200850

  8. Effects of contextual interference and conditions of movement task on acquisition, retention, and transfer of motor skills by women.

    PubMed

    Jarus, T; Wughalter, E H; Gianutsos, J G

    1997-02-01

    This experiment was designed to investigate varying conditions of contextual interference within two different conditions of movement tasks during acquisition on the acquisition and retention of a computerized task and transfer to a functional skill. Performance of head movements was conducted under open- or closed-task conditions and with random or blocked schedules of practice. Analysis indicated that learning under the open-task condition resulted in better retention and transfer than the closed-task condition. It is suggested that increasing the within-trial variability in the open-task condition produced a contextual interference effect. In this regard, support for Battig's predictions is provided by the current findings in that the high variability present during the open-task condition was more beneficial for retention and transfer than the low variability present during the closed-task condition. Differences between random and blocked schedules of practice on the retention and transfer data were not statistically significant. PMID:9132708

  9. Reliability of a novel serious game using dual-task gait profiles to early characterize aMCI

    PubMed Central

    Tarnanas, Ioannis; Papagiannopoulos, Sotirios; Kazis, Dimitris; Wiederhold, Mark; Widerhold, Brenda; Tsolaki, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Background: As the population of older adults is growing, the interest in a simple way to detect characterize amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), a prodromal stage of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is becoming increasingly important. Serious game (SG) -based cognitive and motor performance profiles while performing everyday activities and dual-task walking (DTW) “motor signatures” are two very promising markers that can be detected in predementia states. We aim to compare the consistency, or conformity, of measurements made by a custom SG with DTW (NAV), a SG without DTW (DOT), neuropsychological measures and genotyping as markers for early detection of aMCI. Methods: The study population included three groups: early AD (n = 86), aMCI (n = 65), and healthy control subjects (n = 76), who completed the custom SG tasks in three separate sessions over a 3-month period. Outcome measures were neuropsychological data across-domain and within-domain intra-individual variability (IIV) and DOT and NAV latency-based and accuracy-based IIV. IIV reflects a transient, within-person change in behavioral performance, either during different cognitive domains (across-domain) or within the same domain (within-domain). Test–retest reliability of the DOT and NAV markers were assessed using an intraclass correlation (ICC) analysis. Results: Results indicated that performance data, such as the NAV latency-based and accuracy-based IIV, during the task displayed greater reliability across sessions compared to DOT. During the NAV task-engagement, the executive function, planning, and motor performance profiles exhibited moderate to good reliability (ICC = 0.6–0.8), while during DOT, executive function and spatial memory accuracy profiles exhibited fair to moderate reliability (ICC = 0.3–0.6). Additionally, reliability across tasks was more stable when three sessions were used in the ICC calculation relative to two sessions. Discussion: Our findings suggest that

  10. A comparison of the degree of effort involved in the TOMM and the ACS Word Choice Test using a dual-task paradigm.

    PubMed

    Barhon, Lucienne Isabel; Batchelor, Jennifer; Meares, Susanne; Chekaluk, Eugene; Shores, E Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to: (a) examine the predictive validity and efficacy of the Advanced Clinical Solutions Word Choice Test (WCT) as a measure of effort relative to the Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM); (b) investigate whether performing a dual (distraction) task would undermine performance on either test; (c) assess the effect of coaching on the diagnostic accuracy of both the WCT and the TOMM; and (d) establish an optimal cut score for the WCT. The current study used a simulation design based on an analogue design in which normal participants were instructed to either apply full effort or simulate a brain injury on the tasks without being detected. Participants included 93 undergraduate university students who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions: (a) distraction, (b) uncoached traumatic brain injury (TBI) simulators, (c) coached TBI simulators, or (d) full effort. The results demonstrated that the WCT and the TOMM were effective in detecting simulated cognitive impairment. Both tests were resistant to the effects of distraction and were equally effective in detecting coached and uncoached simulators. A cut score of 42 on the WCT was found to provide optimal specificity and sensitivity on the test. PMID:25117219

  11. Evaluating the Effort Expended to Understand Speech in Noise Using a Dual-Task Paradigm: The Effects of Providing Visual Speech Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Sarah; Gagne, Jean-Pierre; Alepins, Majolaine; Dubois, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Using a dual-task paradigm, 2 experiments (Experiments 1 and 2) were conducted to assess differences in the amount of listening effort expended to understand speech in noise in audiovisual (AV) and audio-only (A-only) modalities. Experiment 1 had equivalent noise levels in both modalities, and Experiment 2 equated speech recognition…

  12. Deficits in Interval Timing Measured by the Dual-Task Paradigm among Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Shoou-Lian; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Hsu, Wen-Yau; Wu, Yu-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Background: The underlying mechanism of time perception deficit in long time intervals in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is still unclear. This study used the time reproduction dual task to explore the role of the attentional resource in time perception deficits among children and adolescents with ADHD. Methods: Participants…

  13. Solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual bed photosystem. Task 2 report; Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Linkous, C.A.; McKaige, G.T.; Slattery, D.K.; Ouellette, A.J.A.; Austin, B.C.N.

    1995-12-01

    This work is an investigation into the use of photocatalytic particles in a dual bed configuration, so as to effect the solar-driven decomposition of water to its constituent elements, particularly hydrogen. The system envisioned would consist of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which micron-sized photocatalytic particles are immobilized. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers. Different photoparticles and catalysts are chosen for their respective modules so as to effect oxidative water-splitting in one vessel to evolve oxygen gas, and reductive water-splitting in the other to evolve hydrogen. This is a direct photoconversion scheme that breaks down the energetic requirement for water decomposition into a 2-photon process, and enables separate production of hydrogen and oxygen. Titanium dioxide, TiO{sub 2}, and indium phosphide, InP, were employed as photoparticles in the O{sub 2}- and H{sub 2}-evolving beds, respectively. Platinum catalysts were evaluated to prompt H{sub 2}-evolution. Calculations on the energy band structure of free and immobilized particles provided guidance as to how the microstructure of the particles should be configured. A series of redox mediators, spanning a range of redox potentials, were tested. While many electron donors facilitated H{sub 2}-evolution, only the most oxidizing ones enabled O{sub 2}-evolution. A single redox couple, capable of charge exchange in both modules, is desirable to avoid system design complexity.

  14. Strength of hand preference and dual task performance by common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Piddington, T; Rogers, L J

    2013-01-01

    Study of avian and piscine species has shown that animals with stronger lateralization of the brain are able to perform two tasks presented simultaneously better than can animals with weaker lateralization. We investigated whether this might apply also to primates by testing common marmosets to see whether there is a relationship between the strength of hand preference, as an indicator of strength of brain lateralization, and the ability to carry out two tasks simultaneously. A model predator was introduced into the testing room while the marmoset was foraging. Marmosets with stronger hand preferences detected the 'predator' after shorter latency than those with weaker hand preferences. Furthermore, the marmosets with stronger hand preferences produced more mobbing (tsik) vocalizations when they reacted to the predators than did those with weaker hand preferences. There was no such association between hand preference and either latency to respond to the predator or mobbing reaction when the marmosets were not foraging at the time the predator was introduced. Hence, strength of lateralization is associated with the ability to perform foraging and predator detection simultaneously. These results are discussed with reference to the evolution of brain lateralization. PMID:23053795

  15. Task-related functional connectivity in autism spectrum conditions: an EEG study using wavelet transform coherence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are a set of pervasive neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by a wide range of lifelong signs and symptoms. Recent explanatory models of autism propose abnormal neural connectivity and are supported by studies showing decreased interhemispheric coherence in individuals with ASC. The first aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of reduced interhemispheric coherence in ASC, and secondly to investigate specific effects of task performance on interhemispheric coherence in ASC. Methods We analyzed electroencephalography (EEG) data from 15 participants with ASC and 15 typical controls, using Wavelet Transform Coherence (WTC) to calculate interhemispheric coherence during face and chair matching tasks, for EEG frequencies from 5 to 40 Hz and during the first 400 ms post-stimulus onset. Results Results demonstrate a reduction of interhemispheric coherence in the ASC group, relative to the control group, in both tasks and for all electrode pairs studied. For both tasks, group differences were generally observed after around 150 ms and at frequencies lower than 13 Hz. Regarding within-group task comparisons, while the control group presented differences in interhemispheric coherence between faces and chairs tasks at various electrode pairs (FT7-FT8, TP7-TP8, P7-P8), such differences were only seen for one electrode pair in the ASC group (T7-T8). No significant differences in EEG power spectra were observed between groups. Conclusions Interhemispheric coherence is reduced in people with ASC, in a time and frequency specific manner, during visual perception and categorization of both social and inanimate stimuli and this reduction in coherence is widely dispersed across the brain. Results of within-group task comparisons may reflect an impairment in task differentiation in people with ASC relative to typically developing individuals. Overall, the results of this research support the value of WTC in examining the time

  16. A Longitudinal Study on Dual-Tasking Effects on Gait: Cognitive Change Predicts Gait Variance in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    MacAulay, Rebecca K.; Brouillette, Robert M.; Foil, Heather C.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropsychological abilities have found to explain a large proportion of variance in objective measures of walking gait that predict both dementia and falling within the elderly. However, to this date there has been little research on the interplay between changes in these neuropsychological processes and walking gait overtime. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate intra-individual changes in neurocognitive test performance and gait step time at two-time points across a one-year span. Neuropsychological test scores from 440 elderly individuals deemed cognitively normal at Year One were analyzed via repeated measures t-tests to assess for decline in cognitive performance at Year Two. 34 of these 440 individuals neuropsychological test performance significantly declined at Year Two; whereas the “non-decliners” displayed improved memory, working memory, attention/processing speed test performance. Neuropsychological test scores were also submitted to factor analysis at both time points for data reduction purposes and to assess the factor stability overtime. Results at Year One yielded a three-factor solution: Language/Memory, Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Working Memory. Year Two's test scores also generated a three-factor solution (Working Memory, Language/Executive Attention/Processing Speed, and Memory). Notably, language measures loaded on Executive Attention/Processing Speed rather than on the Memory factor at Year Two. Hierarchal multiple regression revealed that both Executive Attention/Processing Speed and sex significantly predicted variance in dual task step time at both time points. Remarkably, in the “decliners”, the magnitude of the contribution of the neuropsychological characteristics to gait variance significantly increased at Year Two. In summary, this study provides longitudinal evidence of the dynamic relationship between intra-individual cognitive change and its influence on dual task gait step time

  17. Rotating objects to determine orientation, not identity: evidence from a backward-masking/dual-task procedure.

    PubMed

    De Caro, S A; Reeves, A

    2000-10-01

    The effects of picture-plane rotations on times taken to name familiar objects (RTs) may reflect a process of mental rotation to stored viewpoint-specific representations: the rotate-to-recognize hypothesis. Alternatively, mental rotation might be used after stored object representations are activated by a misoriented stimulus in order to verify a weak or distorted shape percept: the double-checking hypothesis. We tested these two accounts of rotation effects in object recognition by having subjects verify the orientations (to within 90 degrees) and basic-level names of 14-msec, backward-masked depictions of common objects. The stimulus-mask interval (SOA) varied from 14 to 41 msec, permitting interpolation of the SOA required for 75% accuracy (SOAc). Whereas the SOAc to verify orientation increased with rotation up to 180 degrees, the SOAc to verify identity was briefer and asymptoted at approximately 60 degrees. We therefore reject the rotate-to-recognize hypothesis, which implies that SOAc should increase steadily with rotation in both tasks. Instead, we suggest that upright and near-upright stimuli are matched by a fast direct process and that misoriented stimuli are matched at a featural level by a slightly slower view-independent process. We also suggest that rotation effects on RTs reflect a postrecognition stage of orientation verification: the rotate-to-orient hypothesis, a version of double-checking that also explains the well-known reduction in orientation effects on RTs when naming repeated objects. PMID:11143448

  18. Dual Effects on Choice of Conditioned Reinforcement Frequency and Conditioned Reinforcement Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Margaret A.; Williams, Ben A.

    2010-01-01

    Pigeons were presented with a concurrent-chains schedule in which the total time to primary reinforcement was equated for the two alternatives (VI 30 s VI 60 s vs. VI 60 s VI 30 s). In one set of conditions, the terminal links were signaled by the same stimulus, and in another set of conditions they were signaled by different stimuli. Choice was…

  19. Condition Monitoring of Cables Task 3 Report: Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electric Cables

    SciTech Connect

    Villaran, M.; Lofaro, R.; na

    2009-11-30

    For more than 20 years the NRC has sponsored research studying electric cable aging degradation, condition monitoring, and environmental qualification testing practices for electric cables used in nuclear power plants. This report summarizes several of the most effective and commonly used condition monitoring techniques available to detect damage and measure the extent of degradation in electric cable insulation. The technical basis for each technique is summarized, along with its application, trendability of test data, ease of performing the technique, advantages and limitations, and the usefulness of the test results to characterize and assess the condition of electric cables.

  20. Simultaneous Training on Two Hippocampus-Dependent Tasks Facilitates Acquisition of Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Grace; Disterhoft, John F.; Kuo, Amy G.

    2006-01-01

    A common cellular alteration, reduced post-burst afterhyperpolarization (AHP) in CA1 neurons, is associated with acquisition of the hippocampus-dependent tasks trace eyeblink conditioning and the Morris water maze. As a similar increase in excitability is correlated with these two learning paradigms, we sought to determine the interactive…

  1. Formative Research on the Simplifying Conditions Method (SCM) for Task Analysis and Sequencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, YoungHwan; Reigluth, Charles M.

    The Simplifying Conditions Method (SCM) is a set of guidelines for task analysis and sequencing of instructional content under the Elaboration Theory (ET). This article introduces the fundamentals of SCM and presents the findings from a formative research study on SCM. It was conducted in two distinct phases: design and instruction. In the first…

  2. The effects of age and workload on 3D spatial attention in dual-task driving

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Russell S.; Andersen, George J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we assessed whether the limits in visual-spatial attention associated with aging affect the spatial extent of attention in depth during driving performance. Drivers in the present study performed a car-following and light-detection task. To assess the extent of visual-spatial attention, we compared reaction times and accuracy to light change targets that varied in horizontal position and depth location. In addition, because workload has been identified as a factor that can change the horizontal and vertical extent of attention, we tested whether variability of the lead car speed influenced the extent of spatial attention for younger or older drivers. For younger drivers, reaction time (RT) to light-change targets varied as a function of distance and horizontal position. For older drivers RT varied only as a function of distance. There was a distance by horizontal position interaction for younger drivers but not for older drivers. Specifically, there was no effect of horizontal position at any given level of depth for older drivers. However, for younger drivers there was an effect of horizontal position for targets further in depth but not for targets nearer in depth. With regards to workload, we found no statistically reliable evidence that variability of the lead car speed had an effect on the spatial extent of attention for younger or older drivers. In a control experiment, we examined the effects of depth on light detection when the projected size and position of the targets was constant. Consistent with our previous results, we found that drivers’ reaction time to light-change targets varied as a function of distance even when 2D position and size were controlled. Given that depth is an important dimension in driving performance, an important issue for assessing driving safety is to consider the limits of attention in the depth dimension. Therefore, we suggest that future research should consider the importance of depth as a dimension of

  3. The effects of age and workload on 3D spatial attention in dual-task driving.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Russell S; Andersen, George J

    2014-06-01

    In the present study we assessed whether the limits in visual-spatial attention associated with aging affect the spatial extent of attention in depth during driving performance. Drivers in the present study performed a car-following and light-detection task. To assess the extent of visual-spatial attention, we compared reaction times and accuracy to light change targets that varied in horizontal position and depth location. In addition, because workload has been identified as a factor that can change the horizontal and vertical extent of attention, we tested whether variability of the lead car speed influenced the extent of spatial attention for younger or older drivers. For younger drivers, reaction time (RT) to light-change targets varied as a function of distance and horizontal position. For older drivers RT varied only as a function of distance. There was a distance by horizontal position interaction for younger drivers but not for older drivers. Specifically, there was no effect of horizontal position at any given level of depth for older drivers. However, for younger drivers there was an effect of horizontal position for targets further in depth but not for targets nearer in depth. With regards to workload, we found no statistically reliable evidence that variability of the lead car speed had an effect on the spatial extent of attention for younger or older drivers. In a control experiment, we examined the effects of depth on light detection when the projected size and position of the targets was constant. Consistent with our previous results, we found that drivers' reaction time to light-change targets varied as a function of distance even when 2D position and size were controlled. Given that depth is an important dimension in driving performance, an important issue for assessing driving safety is to consider the limits of attention in the depth dimension. Therefore, we suggest that future research should consider the importance of depth as a dimension of

  4. Target enhancement and distractor inhibition affect transitory surround suppression in dual tasks using multiple rapid serial visual presentation streams.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xia; Greenwood, Pamela; Fu, Shimin

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have investigated the interaction between temporal and spatial dimensions on selective attention using dual tasks in the multiple rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm. A phenomenon that the surround suppression in space changes over time (termed transitory surround suppression, TSS, in the present study) has been observed, suggesting the existence of this time-space interaction. However, it is still unclear whether target enhancement or distractor inhibition modulates TSS. Four behavioural experiments were conducted to investigate the mechanism of TSS by manipulating the temporal lag and spatial distance factors between two targets embedded in six RSVP streams. The TSS effect was replicated in a study that eliminated confounds of perceptual effects and attentional switch (Experiment 1). However, the TSS disappeared when two targets shared the same colour in a between-subjects design (Experiment 2a) and a within-subject design (Experiment 2b), suggesting the impact of target enhancement on TSS. Moreover, the TSS was larger for within-category than for between-category distractors (Experiment 3), indicating the impact of distractor inhibition on TSS. These two influences on TSS under different processing demands of target and distractor processing were further confirmed in a skeletal design (Experiment 4). Overall, combinative effects of target enhancement and distractor suppression contribute to the mechanisms of time-space interaction in selective attention during visual search. PMID:26447933

  5. Prefrontal Single-Neuron Responses after Changes in Task Contingencies during Trace Eyeblink Conditioning in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A number of studies indicate that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a role in mediating the expression of behavioral responses during tasks that require flexible changes in behavior. During trace eyeblink conditioning, evidence suggests that the mPFC provides the cerebellum with a persistent input to bridge the temporal gap between conditioned and unconditioned stimuli. Therefore, the mPFC is in a position to directly mediate the expression of trace conditioned responses. However, it is unknown whether persistent neural responses are associated with the flexible expression of behavior when task contingencies are changed during trace eyeblink conditioning. To investigate this, single-unit activity was recorded in the mPFC of rabbits during extinction and reacquisition of trace eyeblink conditioning, and during training to a different conditional stimulus. Persistent responses remained unchanged after full extinction, and also did not change during reacquisition training. During training to a different tone, however, the generalization of persistent responses to the new stimulus was associated with an animal’s performance—when persistent responses generalized to the new tone, performance was high (>50% response rate). When persistent responses decreased to baseline rates, performance was poor (<50% response rate). The data suggest that persistent mPFC responses do not appear to mediate flexible changes in the expression of the original learning, but do appear to play a role in the generalization of that learning when the task is modified. PMID:27517083

  6. STUDIES OF THE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMATIC VARIATION OF CERTAIN CONDITIONS RELATED TO LEARNING. III. TASK CONDITIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BLAKE, KATHRYN A.; AND OTHERS

    A SERIES OF RESEARCH PROGRAMS CONCERNED WITH THE EFFECTS OF SYSTEMATIC VARIATIONS OF CERTAIN CONDITIONS RELATED TO LEARNING HAS BEEN CONDUCTED. PROJECTS PREVIOUSLY REPORTED INCLUDED TWO INVESTIGATIONS OF REINFORCEMENT AND SUBJECT VARIABLES AND ONE ON THE STUDY OF PRACTICE AND SUBJECT VARIABLES. THE NATURE OF THE OVERALL PROGRAM WAS DISCUSSED IN…

  7. Probabilistic conditional reasoning: Disentangling form and content with the dual-source model.

    PubMed

    Singmann, Henrik; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Beller, Sieghard

    2016-08-01

    The present research examines descriptive models of probabilistic conditional reasoning, that is of reasoning from uncertain conditionals with contents about which reasoners have rich background knowledge. According to our dual-source model, two types of information shape such reasoning: knowledge-based information elicited by the contents of the material and content-independent information derived from the form of inferences. Two experiments implemented manipulations that selectively influenced the model parameters for the knowledge-based information, the relative weight given to form-based versus knowledge-based information, and the parameters for the form-based information, validating the psychological interpretation of these parameters. We apply the model to classical suppression effects dissecting them into effects on background knowledge and effects on form-based processes (Exp. 3) and we use it to reanalyse previous studies manipulating reasoning instructions. In a model-comparison exercise, based on data of seven studies, the dual-source model outperformed three Bayesian competitor models. Overall, our results support the view that people make use of background knowledge in line with current Bayesian models, but they also suggest that the form of the conditional argument, irrespective of its content, plays a substantive, yet smaller, role. PMID:27416493

  8. Viewing time effects revisited: prolonged response latencies for sexually attractive targets under restricted task conditions.

    PubMed

    Imhoff, Roland; Schmidt, Alexander F; Nordsiek, Uta; Luzar, Charlotte; Young, Andrew W; Banse, Rainer

    2010-12-01

    Sexually attractive stimuli are watched longer than unattractive stimuli. The processes underlying this robust and reliable viewing time effect are presently not well understood. In the present research comprising four experiments (total N = 250), four classes of potential explanations are proposed and the derived implications were experimentally tested. Contrary to explanations based on either deliberate delay or attentional adhesion to sexually attractive stimuli, prolonged response latencies were also found under restricted task conditions. Sexually preferred targets elicited longer response latencies in a self-paced evaluation task when stimulus pictures were presented for 750 ms (Experiment 1) or for 500 ms and followed by a pattern mask (Experiment 2). Prolonged latencies for sexually preferred targets were also observed when sexual attractiveness was rated in a speeded binary decision task with a response window of 1000 ms (Experiment 3). Eventually, it was shown that the response latency effect in the speeded binary choice task was still preserved when only the heads of target individuals were presented instead of the bodies (Experiment 4). Mate identification and schematic processes are discussed as the remaining plausible mechanisms for prolonged response latencies for sexually attractive targets under restricted conditions. PMID:20198414

  9. Beyond a mask and against the bottleneck: retroactive dual-task interference during working memory consolidation of a masked visual target.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenstein, Mark; Wyble, Brad

    2014-06-01

    While studies on visual memory commonly assume that the consolidation of a visual stimulus into working memory is interrupted by a trailing mask, studies on dual-task interference suggest that the consolidation of a stimulus can continue for several hundred milliseconds after a mask. As a result, estimates of the time course of working memory consolidation differ more than an order of magnitude. Here, we contrasted these opposing views by examining if and for how long the processing of a masked display of visual stimuli can be disturbed by a trailing 2-alternative forced choice task (2-AFC; a color discrimination task or a visual or auditory parity judgment task). The results showed that the presence of the 2-AFC task produced a pronounced retroactive interference effect that dissipated across stimulus onset asynchronies of 250-1,000 ms, indicating that the processing elicited by the 2-AFC task interfered with the gradual consolidation of the earlier shown stimuli. Furthermore, this interference effect occurred regardless of whether the to-be-remembered stimuli comprised a string of letters or an unfamiliar complex visual shape, and it occurred regardless of whether these stimuli were masked. Conversely, the interference effect was reduced when the memory load for the 1st task was reduced, or when the 2nd task was a color detection task that did not require decision making. Taken together, these findings show that the formation of a durable and consciously accessible working memory trace for a briefly shown visual stimulus can be disturbed by a trailing 2-AFC task for up to several hundred milliseconds after the stimulus has been masked. By implication, the current findings challenge the common view that working memory consolidation involves an immutable central processing bottleneck, and they also make clear that consolidation does not stop when a stimulus is masked. PMID:24364683

  10. Associations between Tactile Sensory Threshold and Postural Performance and Effects of Healthy Aging and Subthreshold Vibrotactile Stimulation on Postural Outcomes in a Simple Dual Task.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Specific activities that require concurrent processing of postural and cognitive tasks may increase the risk for falls in older adults. We investigated whether peripheral receptor sensitivity was associated with postural performance in a dual-task and whether an intervention in form of subthreshold vibration could affect performance. Ten younger (age: 20-35 years) and ten older adults (70-85 years) performed repeated auditory-verbal 1-back tasks while standing quietly on a force platform. Foot sole vibration was randomly added during several trials. Several postural control and performance measures were assessed and statistically analyzed (significance set to α-levels of .05). There were moderate correlations between peripheral sensitivity and several postural performance and control measures (r = .45 to .59). Several postural performance measures differed significantly between older and younger adults (p < 0.05); addition of vibration did not affect outcome measures. Aging affects healthy older adults' performance in dual-tasks, and peripheral sensitivity may be a contributor to the observed differences. A vibration intervention may only be useful when there are more severe impairments of the sensorimotor system. Hence, future research regarding the efficacy of sensorimotor interventions in the form of vibrotactile stimulation should focus on older adults whose balance is significantly affected. PMID:27143967

  11. Associations between Tactile Sensory Threshold and Postural Performance and Effects of Healthy Aging and Subthreshold Vibrotactile Stimulation on Postural Outcomes in a Simple Dual Task

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Marius; Pourmoghaddam, Amir; Lee, Beom-Chan; Layne, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    Specific activities that require concurrent processing of postural and cognitive tasks may increase the risk for falls in older adults. We investigated whether peripheral receptor sensitivity was associated with postural performance in a dual-task and whether an intervention in form of subthreshold vibration could affect performance. Ten younger (age: 20–35 years) and ten older adults (70–85 years) performed repeated auditory-verbal 1-back tasks while standing quietly on a force platform. Foot sole vibration was randomly added during several trials. Several postural control and performance measures were assessed and statistically analyzed (significance set to α-levels of .05). There were moderate correlations between peripheral sensitivity and several postural performance and control measures (r = .45 to .59). Several postural performance measures differed significantly between older and younger adults (p < 0.05); addition of vibration did not affect outcome measures. Aging affects healthy older adults' performance in dual-tasks, and peripheral sensitivity may be a contributor to the observed differences. A vibration intervention may only be useful when there are more severe impairments of the sensorimotor system. Hence, future research regarding the efficacy of sensorimotor interventions in the form of vibrotactile stimulation should focus on older adults whose balance is significantly affected. PMID:27143967

  12. An extension of the functional cerebral systems approach to hostility: a capacity model utilizing a dual concurrent task paradigm.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alissa K; Carmona, Joseph E; Harrison, David W

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory control of emotions and expressive fluency (verbal or design) have historically been associated with the frontal lobes. Moreover, research has demonstrated the importance of cerebral laterality with a prominent role of the right frontal regions in the regulation of negative affect (anger, hostility) and in the fluent production of designs rather than verbal fluency. In the present research, participants identified with high and with low levels of hostility were evaluated on a design fluency test twice in one experimental session. Before the second administration of the fluency test, each participant underwent physiological (cold pressor) stress. It was hypothesized that diminished right frontal capacity in high-hostile men would be evident through lowered performance on this cognitive stressor. Convergent validity of the capacity model was supported wherein high-hostile men evidenced reduced delta magnitude over the right frontal region after exposure to the physiological stressor but failed to maintain consistent levels of right cerebral activation across conditions. The results suggest an inability for high-hostile men to maintain stable levels of cerebral activation after exposure to physiological and cognitive stress. Moreover, low-hostiles showed enhanced cognitive performance on the design task with lower levels of arousal (heightened delta magnitude). In contrast, reduced arousal yielded increased executive deficits in high-hostiles as evidenced through increased perseverative errors on the design fluency task. PMID:22091622

  13. Conditioning-induced attentional bias for face stimuli measured with the emotional Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Lim, Seung-Lark; Lee, Kanghee; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Choi, June-Seek

    2009-02-01

    People with anxiety disorder display attentional bias toward threat-related objects. Using classical fear conditioning, the authors investigated the possible source of such bias in normal participants. Following differential fear conditioning in which an angry face of either male or female (conditioned stimulus: CS+) was paired with mild electric fingershock (unconditioned stimulus: US) but the angry face of the other gender and all other facial expressions unpaired (CS-), an emotional Stroop task was administered. In the Stroop task, participants were required to identify the color of the facial stimuli (red, green, blue, or yellow). Response latency was significantly longer for the CS+ angry face than the other unpaired facial stimuli (CS-). Furthermore, this acquired attentional bias was positively correlated with the level of trait-anxiety measured before the conditioning and the degree of self-reported aversiveness of the US. Our results demonstrated that attentional bias could be induced in normal individuals through a simple associative learning procedure, and the acquisition is modulated by the level of trait anxiety and the level of perceived fear of the aversive US. PMID:19186927

  14. [Visual field differences in a letter classification task in unilateral and bilateral presentation conditions].

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Y

    1984-04-01

    Kimura's "access model" (1966) of functional difference between the two cerebral hemispheres was examined in a letter classification task. Subjects were required to judge whether or not two Japanese Kana letters in different forms, simultaneously or successively presented, had the same phonemes. Letter stimuli were tachistoscopically projected unilaterally in either right visual field (UR) or left visual field (UL), or bilaterally one in each visual field (B). In successive condition, three interstimulus-interval (ISI) conditions were provided, and bilateral pairs were divided into BL and BR conditions according to the visual field of the first letter. RTs for UR were shorter than UL both in simultaneous and successive conditions. Bilateral pairs in simultaneous condition showed shorter RTs than UL. In successive condition, both BL and BR showed longer RTs than UR in all ISI conditions. The fact that RTs for BL did not approach to UR suggested the necessity of some additional assumptions to Kimura's access model. Reservation of the processing of first stimuli was discussed as one of the possible interpretations for the present results. PMID:6471627

  15. Executive function is necessary for perspective selection, not Level-1 visual perspective calculation: evidence from a dual-task study of adults.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adam W; Apperly, Ian A; Samson, Dana

    2010-11-01

    Previous research suggests that perspective-taking and other "theory of mind" processes may be cognitively demanding for adult participants, and may be disrupted by concurrent performance of a secondary task. In the current study, a Level-1 visual perspective task was administered to 32 adults using a dual-task paradigm in which the secondary task tapped executive function. Results suggested that the secondary task did not affect the calculation of perspective, but did affect the selection of the relevant (Self or Other) perspective for a given trial. This is the first direct evidence of a cognitively efficient process for "theory of mind" in adults that operates independently of executive function. The contrast between this and previous findings points to a distinction between simple perspective-taking and the more complex and cognitively demanding abilities more typically examined in studies of "theory of mind". It is suggested that these findings may provide a parsimonious explanation of the success of infants on 'indirect' measures of perspective-taking that do not explicitly require selection of the relevant perspective. PMID:20817158

  16. How demanding is the brain on a reversal task under day and night conditions?

    PubMed

    Arias, N; Fidalgo, C; Méndez, M; Arias, J L

    2015-07-23

    Reversal learning has been studied as the process of learning to inhibit previously rewarded actions. These behavioral studies are usually performed during the day, when animals are in their daily period rest. However, how day or night affects spatial reversal learning and the brain regions involved in the learning process are still unknown. We conducted two experiments using the Morris Water Maze under different light-conditions: naïve group (CN, n=8), day group (DY, n=8), control DY group (CDY, n=8) night group (NG, n=8), and control NG group (CNG, n=7). Distance covered, velocity and latencies to reach the platform were examined. After completing these tasks, cytochrome c-oxidase activity (CO) in several brain limbic system structures was compared between groups. There were no behavioral differences in the time of day when the animals were trained. However, the metabolic brain consumption was higher in rats trained in the day condition. This CO increase was supported by the prefrontal cortex, thalamus, dorsal and ventral striatum, hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, revealing their role in the performance of the spatial reversal learning task. Finally, the orbitofrontal cortex has been revealed as a key structure in reversal learning execution. PMID:26071902

  17. Fearless Dominance and reduced feedback-related negativity amplitudes in a time-estimation task – Further neuroscientific evidence for dual-process models of psychopathy☆

    PubMed Central

    Schulreich, Stefan; Pfabigan, Daniela M.; Derntl, Birgit; Sailer, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Dual-process models of psychopathy postulate two etiologically relevant processes. Their involvement in feedback processing and its neural correlates has not been investigated so far. Multi-channel EEG was collected while healthy female volunteers performed a time-estimation task and received negative or positive feedback in form of signs or emotional faces. The affective-interpersonal factor Fearless Dominance, but not Self-Centered Impulsivity, was associated with reduced feedback-related negativity (FRN) amplitudes. This neural dissociation extends previous findings on the impact of psychopathy on feedback processing and further highlights the importance of distinguishing psychopathic traits and extending previous (neuroscientific) models of psychopathy. PMID:23607997

  18. QUALITY OR SACRIFICE? THE INFLUENCE OF DECISION TASK AND PRODUCT CHARACTERISTICS ON THE DUAL ROLE OF PRICE.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shin-Shin; Chang, Chung-Chau; Su, Wei-Gan

    2015-08-01

    People perceive price as a cue of monetary sacrifice, a quality signal, or both. However, this research proposed that the relative salience of these two roles varies with different decision tasks (i.e., selection and rejection). Furthermore, the effect of decision task type on price perception differs by product type (i.e., tangible goods or services). Two experiments show that (1) the price-quality perception under the selection task is higher than that of a rejection task for tangible goods but not for services; and (2) for goods and services, the sacrifice perception is greater in the rejection task than that in a selection task. These findings have important implications for formulating product assortment and marketing communications strategies. PMID:26241098

  19. Visual mental image generation does not overlap with visual short-term memory: a dual-task interference study.

    PubMed

    Borst, Gregoire; Niven, Elaine; Logie, Robert H

    2012-04-01

    Visual mental imagery and working memory are often assumed to play similar roles in high-order functions, but little is known of their functional relationship. In this study, we investigated whether similar cognitive processes are involved in the generation of visual mental images, in short-term retention of those mental images, and in short-term retention of visual information. Participants encoded and recalled visually or aurally presented sequences of letters under two interference conditions: spatial tapping or irrelevant visual input (IVI). In Experiment 1, spatial tapping selectively interfered with the retention of sequences of letters when participants generated visual mental images from aural presentation of the letter names and when the letters were presented visually. In Experiment 2, encoding of the sequences was disrupted by both interference tasks. However, in Experiment 3, IVI interfered with the generation of the mental images, but not with their retention, whereas spatial tapping was more disruptive during retention than during encoding. Results suggest that the temporary retention of visual mental images and of visual information may be supported by the same visual short-term memory store but that this store is not involved in image generation. PMID:21989739

  20. Returning service members to duty following mild traumatic brain injury: exploring the use of dual-task and multitask assessment methods.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Matthew R; Weightman, Margaret M; Radomski, Mary V; Davidson, Leslie F; McCulloch, Karen L

    2013-09-01

    Within the last decade, more than 220,000 service members have sustained traumatic brain injury (TBI) in support of military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mild TBI may result in subtle cognitive and sensorimotor deficits that adversely affect warfighter performance, creating significant challenges for service members, commanders, and clinicians. In recent conflicts, physical therapists and occupational therapists have played an important role in evaluating service member readiness to return to duty (RTD), incorporating research and best practices from the sports concussion literature. Because premorbid (baseline) performance metrics are not typically available for deployed service members as for athletes, clinicians commonly determine duty readiness based upon the absence of postconcussive symptoms and return to "normal" performance on clinical assessments not yet validated in the military population. Although practices described in the sports concussion literature guide "return-to-play" determinations, resolution of symptoms or improvement of isolated impairments may be inadequate to predict readiness in a military operational environment. Existing clinical metrics informing RTD decision making are limited because they fail to emphasize functional, warrior task demands and they lack versatility to assess the effects of comorbid deficits. Recently, a number of complex task-oriented RTD approaches have emerged from Department of Defense laboratory and clinical settings to address this gap. Immersive virtual reality environments, field-based scenario-driven assessment programs, and militarized dual-task and multitask-based approaches have all been proposed for the evaluation of sensorimotor and cognitive function following TBI. There remains a need for clinically feasible assessment methods that can be used to verify functional performance and operational competence in a variety of practice settings. Complex and ecologically valid assessment techniques

  1. Deep abdominal muscle thickness measured under sitting conditions during different stability tasks

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Hideyuki; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Sawada, Yutaka; Okubo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate ultrasonically determined changes in the thickness of the transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscles during different sitting conditions. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy men volunteered to participate in this study. Four different sitting conditions including (A) sitting, (B) sitting with left hip flexion, (C) sitting with an abdominal hollowing maneuver (AHM), and (D) sitting with an AHM and left hip flexion, were used. Subjective exercise difficulty was evaluated. [Results] Transversus abdominis and internal oblique muscle thicknesses significantly differed between conditions, with significantly greater thickness between positions from (A) to (D). Stability of the surface when sitting had no effect on the muscle thickness of the transversus abdominis. By contrast, sitting on an unstable surface caused an increase in muscle thickness of the internal oblique in each condition. The subjects reported progressively increasing difficulty in performing each exercise in a stable position from (A) to (D), while the difficulty in an unstable position was significantly different between (A) and (B), and between (C) and (D). [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that task (B) on a stable surface should be chosen for maximal activation of transversus abdominis without inducing overactivation of the internal oblique muscle. PMID:27134381

  2. A New Tool for Assessing Context Conditioning Induced by US-Unpredictability in Humans: The Martians Task Restyled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meulders, Ann; Vervliet, Bram; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Hermans, Dirk; Baeyens, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Unpredictability of an unconditioned stimulus (US) typically produces context conditioning in animals and humans. We modified the Martians task--a computer game measuring learning of Pavlovian associations through conditioned suppression--for assessing context conditioning in humans. One between-subjects and one within-subjects study are reported.…

  3. The Resistance of Renewal to Instructions that Devalue the Role of Contextual Cues in a Conditioned Suppression Task with Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The renewal of extinguished conditioned behaviour appears to reflect context-dependent learning. The present research used a conditioned suppression task with humans to examine whether instructions concerning the context could influence renewal. Pairings of a conditional stimulus (CS) and unconditional stimulus (US) were made in one context,…

  4. Moral dilemmas film task: A study of spontaneous narratives by individuals with autism spectrum conditions.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jennifer L; Lombardo, Michael V; Wheelwright, Sally; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2009-06-01

    People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties with mentalizing, empathy, and narrative comprehension. A new test of social and narrative cognition, the Moral Dilemmas Film Task, was developed to probe individuals' spontaneous understanding of naturalistic film scenes. Twenty-eight individuals with ASC and 28 neurotypical controls, matched for age, sex, and IQ, watched four short emotionally charged film clips each depicting a moral dilemma, and were asked to write about what they had seen. Individuals with ASC produced significantly shorter film-based narratives and showed a smaller bias for mental states over objects in their narratives than controls. A significant correlation was found between verbal IQ and the level of mentalizing in film narratives for the ASC group, but not the control group, while the reverse pattern was found with a measure of self-reported cognitive and affective empathy. These results suggest that to the extent that both groups succeed in viewing moral dilemmas in terms of mental content, they do so in different ways, with individuals with ASC using verbal scaffolding to increase their ability to draw meaning from social scenes. The well-established empathy deficit in ASC extends to spontaneous interpretation of moral dilemmas. This new film task has the potential to assay different aspects of how the social world is represented differently in ASC, including during moral comprehension. PMID:19575384

  5. Hippocampal lesions impair performance on a conditional delayed matching and non-matching to position task in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Hazel L; Döbrössy, Màtè; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2006-08-10

    The hippocampus is thought to be involved in a range of cognitive processes, from the ability to acquire new memories, to the ability to learn about spatial relationships. Humans and monkeys with damage to the hippocampus are typically impaired on delayed matching to sample tasks, of which the operant delayed matching to position task (DMTP) is a rat analogue. The reported effects of hippocampal damage on DMTP vary, ranging from delay-dependent deficits to no deficit whatsoever. The present study investigates a novel memory task; the conditional delayed matching/non-matching to position task (CDM/NMTP) in the Skinner box. CDM/NMTP uses the presence of specific stimulus cues to signify whether a particular trial is matching or non-matching in nature. Thus, it incorporates both the task contingencies within one session, and supplements the requirement for remembering the side of the lever in the sample phase with attending to the stimulus and remembering the conditional discrimination for the rule. Rats were trained preoperatively and the effects of bilateral excitotoxic lesions of the hippocampus were examined on postoperative retention of the task. Rats with lesions of the hippocampus incurred a significant impairment on the task that was manifest at all delays intervals. Despite a bias towards matching during training, trials of either type were performed with equivalent accuracy and neither rule was affected differentially by the lesion. This task may prove useful in determining the cognitive roles of a range of brain areas. PMID:16697059

  6. Task Encoding across the Multiple Demand Cortex Is Consistent with a Frontoparietal and Cingulo-Opercular Dual Networks Distinction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daniel J.; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Multiple-demand (MD) regions of the human brain show coactivation during many different kinds of task performance. Previous work based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown that MD regions may be divided into two closely coupled subnetworks centered around the lateral frontoparietal (FP) and cingulo-opercular cortex. Here, we used on-task fMRI to test whether this division is apparent during the performance of an executive task. Furthermore, we investigated whether there is a difference in the encoding of task between the two subnetworks. Using connectivity methods, we found that activity across the entire MD cortex is correlated during task performance. Meanwhile, however, there was significantly stronger connectivity within each of the subnetworks than between them. Using multivoxel pattern analysis, we also found that, although we were able to decode task-relevant information from all regions of the MD cortex, classification accuracy scores were significantly higher in the FP subnetwork. These results suggest a nested picture with MD regions as a whole showing coactivation and broad rule representation, but with significant functional distinctions between component subnetworks. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Multiple-demand (MD) regions of frontal and parietal cortex appear essential for the orchestration of goal-directed behavior and problem solving. Understanding the relative specialization of regions within the MD cortex is crucial to understanding how we can coordinate and execute complex action plans. By examining functional connectivity during task performance, we extend previous findings suggesting that the MD cortex can be divided into two subnetworks centered around the frontoparietal (FP) and cingulo-opercular (CO) cortex. Furthermore, using multivoxel pattern analysis, we show that, compared with the CO subnetwork, the FP subnetwork manifests more differentiated coding of specific task events. PMID:27277793

  7. Field study of the impact of a desktop task/ambient conditioning system in office buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, F.S.; Carter, T.G.; Baughman, A.V.; Arens, E.A.

    1998-10-01

    A field study was carried out to assess the impact of installing a desktop task/ambient conditioning (TAC) system at 42 selected workstations within three San Francisco office buildings occupied by a large financial institution. In this study, field measurements, including subjective surveys and physical monitoring, were performed both before and after the TAC system installation to evaluate the impact of the TAC system on occupant satisfaction and thermal comfort, as well as the thermal environments within the office buildings. For comparative purposes within each building, a control group, consisting of workers who did not receive a desktop TAC unit, was studied concurrently. During the follow-up field tests, performed three months after the TAC system installation, measurements were repeated under three different room temperature setpoint conditions (normal, set-up, and set-down) to investigate the ability of the occupants to use the desktop TAC units to control their local environment in response to a wider range of ambient temperatures. Survey results show that among the six building assessment categories investigated, installation of the desktop TAC system provided the largest increases in overall occupant satisfaction for thermal quality, acoustical quality, and air quality.

  8. Imaging tasks scheduling for high-altitude airship in emergency condition based on energy-aware strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhimeng, Li; Chuan, He; Dishan, Qiu; Jin, Liu; Manhao, Ma

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to the imaging tasks scheduling problem on high-altitude airship in emergency condition, the programming models are constructed by analyzing the main constraints, which take the maximum task benefit and the minimum energy consumption as two optimization objectives. Firstly, the hierarchy architecture is adopted to convert this scheduling problem into three subproblems, that is, the task ranking, value task detecting, and energy conservation optimization. Then, the algorithms are designed for the sub-problems, and the solving results are corresponding to feasible solution, efficient solution, and optimization solution of original problem, respectively. This paper makes detailed introduction to the energy-aware optimization strategy, which can rationally adjust airship's cruising speed based on the distribution of task's deadline, so as to decrease the total energy consumption caused by cruising activities. Finally, the application results and comparison analysis show that the proposed strategy and algorithm are effective and feasible. PMID:23864822

  9. Imaging Tasks Scheduling for High-Altitude Airship in Emergency Condition Based on Energy-Aware Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhimeng, Li; Chuan, He; Dishan, Qiu; Jin, Liu; Manhao, Ma

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to the imaging tasks scheduling problem on high-altitude airship in emergency condition, the programming models are constructed by analyzing the main constraints, which take the maximum task benefit and the minimum energy consumption as two optimization objectives. Firstly, the hierarchy architecture is adopted to convert this scheduling problem into three subproblems, that is, the task ranking, value task detecting, and energy conservation optimization. Then, the algorithms are designed for the sub-problems, and the solving results are corresponding to feasible solution, efficient solution, and optimization solution of original problem, respectively. This paper makes detailed introduction to the energy-aware optimization strategy, which can rationally adjust airship's cruising speed based on the distribution of task's deadline, so as to decrease the total energy consumption caused by cruising activities. Finally, the application results and comparison analysis show that the proposed strategy and algorithm are effective and feasible. PMID:23864822

  10. Deficits of Semantic Control Produce Absent or Reverse Frequency Effects in Comprehension: Evidence from Neuropsychology and Dual Task Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almaghyuli, Azizah; Thompson, Hannah; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.; Jefferies, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Patients with multimodal semantic impairment following stroke (referred to here as "semantic aphasia" or SA) fail to show the standard effects of frequency in comprehension tasks. Instead, they show absent or even "reverse" frequency effects: i.e., better understanding of less common words. In addition, SA is associated with poor regulatory…

  11. The Role of Domain-General Frontal Systems in Language Comprehension: Evidence from Dual-Task Interference and Semantic Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Jennifer M.; Johnsrude, Ingrid S.; Davis, Matthew H.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shown that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) plays a critical role in semantic and syntactic aspects of speech comprehension. It appears to be recruited when listeners are required to select the appropriate meaning or syntactic role for words within a sentence. However, this region is also recruited during tasks not…

  12. Generalization of Pain-Related Fear Using a Left-Right Hand Judgment Conditioning Task.

    PubMed

    Meulders, Ann; Harvie, Daniel S; Lorimer Moseley, G; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2015-09-01

    Recent research suggests that the mere intention to perform a painful movement can elicit pain-related fear. Based on these findings, the present study aimed to determine whether imagining a movement that is associated with pain (CS+) can start to elicit conditioned pain-related fear as well and whether pain-related fear elicited by imagining a painful movement can spread towards novel, similar but distinct imagined movements. We proposed a new experimental paradigm that integrates the left-right hand judgment task (HJT) with a differential fear conditioning procedure. During Acquisition, one hand posture (CS+) was consistently followed by a painful electrocutaneous stimulus (pain-US) and another hand posture (CS-) was not. Participants were instructed to make left-right judgments, which involve mentally rotating their own hand to match the displayed hand postures (i.e., motor imagery). During Generalization, participants were presented with a series of novel hand postures with six grades of perceptual similarity to the CS+ (generalization stimuli; GSs). Finally, during Extinction, the CS+ hand posture was no longer reinforced. The results showed that (1) a painful hand posture triggers fear and increased US-expectancy as compared to a nonpainful hand posture, (2) this pain-related fear spreads to similar but distinct hand postures following a generalization gradient, and subsequently, (3) it can be successfully reduced during extinction. These effects were apparent in the verbal ratings, but not in the startle measures. Because of the lack of effect in the startle measures, we cannot draw firm conclusions about whether the "imagined movements" (i.e., motor imagery of the hand postures) gained associative strength rather than the hand posture pictures itself. From a clinical perspective, basic research into generalization of pain-related fear triggered by covert CSs such as intentions, imagined movements and movement-related cognitions might further our

  13. Student Achievement on Different Types of Tasks under Cooperative, Competitive, and Individualistic Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David W.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The effects of interpersonal cooperation, competition, and individualistic efforts were compared on math and reading drill-review, story problems, sequencing, triangle identification, and visual sorting according to attributes tasks, using first-grade students. The cooperative group achieved higher scores and found the tasks easier than the…

  14. Depth of processing in the stroop task: evidence from a novel forced-reading condition.

    PubMed

    Eidels, Ami; Ryan, Kathryn; Williams, Paul; Algom, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The presence of the Stroop effect betrays the fact that the carrier words were read in the face of instructions to ignore them and to respond to the target ink colors. In this study, we probed the nature of this involuntary reading by comparing color performance with that in a new forced-reading Stroop task in which responding is strictly contingent on reading each and every word. We found larger Stroop effects in the forced-reading task than in the classic Stroop task and concluded that words are processed to a shallower level in the Stroop task than they are in routine voluntary reading. The results show that the two modes of word processing differ in systematic ways and are conductive to qualitatively different representations. These results can pose a challenge to the strongly automatic view of word reading in the Stroop task. PMID:24836124

  15. Measuring the cognitive resources consumed per second for real-time lie-production and recollection: a dual-tasking paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chao; Huang, Kun; Hu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yanshuo; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Qiandong; Fu, Genyue

    2015-01-01

    This research report presents a novel method of dual-tasking lie-detection. Novel software “Follow Me” was invented for a concurrent eye-hand coordination task during truth-telling/lying. Undergraduate participants were instructed to tell truths on questions about undergraduate school whereas they were instructed to tell lies on interview questions about graduate school, pretending they were graduate students. Throughout the experiment, they operated the “Follow Me” software: moving the mouse pointer to follow a randomly-moving dot on a computer screen. The distance between the mouse pointer tip and the dot center was measured by the software every 50 ms. Frequency of distance fluctuation was analyzed as the index of cognitive effort consumed per second (i.e., “degree of cognitive effort”). The results revealed that the dominant frequency of distance fluctuation was significantly lower during encoding than during retrieving responses; and lower during lying than truth-telling. Thus, dominant frequency of distance fluctuation may be an effective index of cognitive effort. Moreover, both encoding and retrieving bald-faced lies were more cognitively effortful than truth-telling. This novel definition and measurement of degree of cognitive effort may contribute to the research field of deception as well as to many other fields in social cognition. PMID:25999903

  16. Measuring the cognitive resources consumed per second for real-time lie-production and recollection: a dual-tasking paradigm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Huang, Kun; Hu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Yanshuo; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Qiandong; Fu, Genyue

    2015-01-01

    This research report presents a novel method of dual-tasking lie-detection. Novel software "Follow Me" was invented for a concurrent eye-hand coordination task during truth-telling/lying. Undergraduate participants were instructed to tell truths on questions about undergraduate school whereas they were instructed to tell lies on interview questions about graduate school, pretending they were graduate students. Throughout the experiment, they operated the "Follow Me" software: moving the mouse pointer to follow a randomly-moving dot on a computer screen. The distance between the mouse pointer tip and the dot center was measured by the software every 50 ms. Frequency of distance fluctuation was analyzed as the index of cognitive effort consumed per second (i.e., "degree of cognitive effort"). The results revealed that the dominant frequency of distance fluctuation was significantly lower during encoding than during retrieving responses; and lower during lying than truth-telling. Thus, dominant frequency of distance fluctuation may be an effective index of cognitive effort. Moreover, both encoding and retrieving bald-faced lies were more cognitively effortful than truth-telling. This novel definition and measurement of degree of cognitive effort may contribute to the research field of deception as well as to many other fields in social cognition. PMID:25999903

  17. Orbital cortex neuronal responses during an odor-based conditioned associative task in rats.

    PubMed

    Yonemori, M; Nishijo, H; Uwano, T; Tamura, R; Furuta, I; Kawasaki, M; Takashima, Y; Ono, T

    2000-01-01

    Neuronal activity in the rat orbital cortex during discrimination of various odors [five volatile organic compounds (acetophenone, isoamyl acetate, cyclohexanone, p-cymene and 1,8-cineole), and food- and cosmetic-related odorants (black pepper, cheese, rose and perfume)] and other conditioned sensory stimuli (tones, light and air puff) was recorded and compared with behavioral responses to the same odors (black pepper, cheese, rose and perfume). In a neurophysiological study, the rats were trained to lick a spout that protruded close to its mouth to obtain sucrose or intracranial self-stimulation reward after presentation of conditioned stimuli. Of 150 orbital cortex neurons recorded during the task, 65 responded to one or more types of sensory stimuli. Of these, 73.8% (48/65) responded during presentation of an odor. Although the mean breadth of responsiveness (entropy) of the olfactory neurons based on the responses to five volatile organic compounds and air (control) was rather high (0.795), these stimuli were well discriminated in an odor space resulting from multidimensional scaling using Pearson's correlation coefficients between the stimuli. In a behavioral study, a rat was housed in an equilateral octagonal cage, with free access to food and choice among eight levers, four of which elicited only water (no odor, controls), and four of which elicited both water and one of four odors (black pepper, cheese, rose or perfume). Lever presses for each odor and control were counted. Distributions of these five stimuli (four odors and air) in an odor space derived from the multidimensional scaling using Pearson's correlation coefficients based on behavioral responses were very similar to those based on neuronal responses to the same five stimuli. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation coefficients between the same five stimuli based on the neuronal responses and those based on behavioral responses were significantly correlated. The results demonstrated a pivotal role of

  18. Changes in cortical negative DC shifts due to different motor task conditions.

    PubMed

    Niemann, J; Winker, T; Jung, R

    1992-11-01

    The experiments were performed to study the relationship between motor performance and DC potential curves recorded by scalp electrodes. Accordingly, we studied the influence of different movements (e.g., unilateral versus bilateral, simple versus complex, active versus passive, phasic versus tonic muscle activity) on negative DC potentials. Our results confirm that spatial distributions of DC potential maxima can be used as an indicator of the activation of distinct cortical areas. Furthermore, evidence is presented that some motor tasks have a greater influence on the magnitude of surface electronegativity than others. (1) Phasic muscle activity revealed a significantly larger potential size than tonic. (2) Performance of a complex finger movement task elicited an increased surface electronegativity compared with performance of a simple task. (3) No significant differences in potential size were found between left (untrained) and right (skilled) hand use during the performance of the same complex motor task. (4) This was also true for the performance of an active and a passive finger movement task, indicating that, at least in simple motor tasks, somatosensory afferents significantly contribute to the recorded potential curve. PMID:1385086

  19. Relationships between Spontaneous Note-Taking, Self-Reported Strategies and Comprehension When Reading Multiple Texts in Different Task Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Åste M.; Braasch, Jason L. G.; Bråten, Ivar

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated note-taking during multiple-text reading across two different task conditions in relation to comprehension performance and self-reports of strategy use. Forty-four undergraduates read multiple texts about climate change to write an argument or a summary. Analysis of students' spontaneous note-taking during reading…

  20. Tense or Aspect?: A Review of Initial Past Tense Marking and Task Conditions for Beginning Classroom Learners of Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilla, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    This essay contributes to the research on the emergence of tense/aspect morphology by reviewing the results and task conditions of studies supporting either the Aspect Hypothesis (AH) or the Default Past Tense Hypothesis (DPTH) for second language (L2) learners of Spanish. The AH has found that past marking emerges based on inherent aspectual…

  1. Dual routes to cognitive flexibility: learning and response-conflict resolution in the dimensional change card sort task.

    PubMed

    Ramscar, Michael; Dye, Melody; Gustafson, Jessica W; Klein, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive control, the ability to align our actions with goals or context, is largely absent in children under four. How then are preschoolers able to tailor their behavior to best match the situation? Learning may provide an alternative route to context-sensitive responding. This study investigated this hypothesis in the Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS), a classic test of cognitive control that most under-fours fail. A training intervention based on learning theoretic principles proved highly effective: Three-year-olds who learned about DCCS rules and game contexts in a card-labeling task, subsequently transferred this knowledge to sorting in the DCCS, passing at more than 3 times the rate of controls (N = 47). This surprising finding reveals much about the nature of the developing mind. PMID:23311677

  2. The use of uncertainty forecasts in complex decision tasks and various weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Joslyn, Susan L; Grounds, Margaret A

    2015-12-01

    Recent research on weather-related decision-making suggests that the inclusion of numeric uncertainty estimates in weather forecasts improves decision quality over single value forecasts or specific advice. However, it is unclear if the benefit of uncertainty estimates extends to more complex decision tasks, presumably requiring greater cognitive effort, or to tasks in which the decision is clear-cut, perhaps making the additional uncertainty information unnecessary. In the present research, participants completed a task in which they used single value weather forecasts, either alone, with freeze probabilities, advice, or both, to decide whether to apply salt to roads in winter to prevent icing or to withhold salt and risk a penalty. Participants completed either a simple binary choice version of the task or a complex version with 3 response options and accompanying rules for application. Some participants were shown forecasts near the freezing point, such that the need for salt was ambiguous, whereas other participants were shown forecasts well below the freezing point. Results suggest that participants with uncertainty estimates did better overall, and neither the task complexity nor the coldness of the forecasts reduced that advantage. However, unexpectedly colder forecasts lead to poorer decisions and an advantage for specific advice. PMID:26479974

  3. Effects of sleep deprivation on different phases of memory in the rat: dissociation between contextual and tone fear conditioning tasks

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Vanessa Contatto; Tiba, Paula Ayako; Moreira, Karin Di Monteiro; Ferreira, Tatiana Lima; Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Menezes; Suchecki, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies show that sleep deprivation (SD) impacts negatively on cognitive processes, including learning and memory. Memory formation encompasses distinct phases of which acquisition, consolidation and retrieval are better known. Previous studies with pre-training SD induced by the platform method have shown impairment in fear conditioning tasks. Nonetheless, pre-training manipulations do not allow the distinction between effects on acquisition and/or consolidation, interfering, ultimately, on recall of/performance in the task. In the present study, animals were first trained in contextual and tone fear conditioning (TFC) tasks and then submitted to SD with the purpose to evaluate the effect of this manipulation on different stages of the learning process, e.g., in the uptake of (new) information during learning, its encoding and stabilization, and the recall of stored memories. Besides, we also investigated the effect of SD in the extinction of fear memory and a possible state-dependent learning induced by this manipulation. For each task (contextual or TFC), animals were trained and then distributed into control, not sleep-deprived (CTL) and SD groups, the latter being submitted to the modified multiple platform paradigm for 96 h. Subsets of eight rats in each group/experiment were submitted to the test of the tasks, either immediately or at different time intervals after SD. The results indicated that (a) pre- but not post-training SD impaired recall in the contextual and TFC; (b) this impairment was not state-dependent; and (c) in the contextual fear conditioning (CFC), pre-test SD prevented extinction of the learned task. Overall, these results suggest that SD interferes with acquisition, recall and extinction, but not necessarily with consolidation of emotional memory. PMID:25426040

  4. A new technique for simulating composite material. Task 2: Analytical solutions with Generalized Impedance Boundary Conditions (GIBCs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricoy, M. A.; Volakis, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    The diffraction problem associated with a multilayer material slab recessed in a perfectly conducting ground plane is formulated and solved via the Generalized Scattering Matrix Formulation (GSMF) in conjunction with the dual integral equation approach. The multilayer slab is replaced by a surface obeying a generalized impedance boundary condition (GIBC) to facilitate the computation of the pertinent Wiener Hopf split functions and their zeros. Both E(sub z) and H(sub z) polarizations are considered and a number of scattering patterns are presented, some of which are compared to exact results available for a homogeneous recessed slab.

  5. Embedding an identity-matching task within a prompting hierarchy to facilitate acquisition of conditional discriminations in children with autism.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Wayne W; Kodak, Tiffany; Moore, James W

    2007-01-01

    Least-to-most prompting hierarchies (e.g., progressing from verbal to modeled to physical prompts until the target response occurs) may be ineffective when the prompts do not cue the individual to attend to the relevant stimulus dimensions. In such cases, emission of the target response persistently requires one or more of the higher level prompts, a condition called prompt dependence (Clark & Green, 2004). Reinforcement of differential observing responses (DORs) has sometimes been used to ensure that participants attend to the relevant stimulus dimensions in matching-to-sample (MTS) tasks (e.g., Dube & McIlvane, 1999). For 2 participants with autism, we embedded an identity-matching task within a prompting hierarchy as a DOR to increase the likelihood that the participants attended to and discriminated the relevant features of the comparison stimuli in an MTS task. This procedure was compared with a traditional least-to-most prompting hierarchy and a no-reinforcement control condition in a multielement design. Results for both participants indicated that mastery-level acquisition of spoken-word-to-picture relations occurred only under the identity-matching condition. Findings are discussed relative to the use of DORs to facilitate acquisition of conditional discriminations in persons with autism or other conditions who do not attend to the comparison stimuli. PMID:17970262

  6. Performing Isometric Force Control in Combination with a Cognitive Task: A Multidimensional Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Vieluf, Solveig; Bricot, Nicolas; Berton, Eric; Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We used a multidimensional approach to study isometric force control in single and dual-task conditions. Methods Multiple measures of performance, efficiency, variability, and structural interference were calculated at low and higher force levels under single (force maintenance) and dual-task (force maintenance and reaction time) conditions. Results Reaction time and signal-to-noise ratio were larger in the dual-task conditions. They were also greater for the higher force condition, while sample entropy was lower. Perturbation analyses revealed smaller relative amplitude of downward perturbations for the higher force level. Discussion Attentional effort and efficiency are positively related when force level increases, and inversely related to entropy. These relations were presumably mediated by attentional investment. Behavioral perturbations show that attentional resources and structural interference models are not mutually exclusive to account for dual-task situation. Overall, the present study highlights the interest of a multidimensional assessment of force control. PMID:26571036

  7. The Educator's Dual Role: Expressing Ideals While Educating in Nonideal Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Jennifer Morton discusses educators as central examples of agents who engage in ideal and nonideal ways of thinking. The educator, as a representative of the political community, is tasked with two aims. The first is nurturing students with the skills and knowledge they need for the world as they will find it. In pursuing this goal,…

  8. The Roles of Private Speech and Inner Speech in Planning during Middle Childhood: Evidence from a Dual Task Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lidstone, Jane S. M.; Meins, Elizabeth; Fernyhough, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Children often talk themselves through their activities, producing private speech that is internalized to form inner speech. This study assessed the effect of articulatory suppression (which suppresses private and inner speech) on Tower of London performance in 7- to 10-year-olds, relative to performance in a control condition with a nonverbal…

  9. Overlapping communities reveal rich structure in large-scale brain networks during rest and task conditions.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahshid; McMenamin, Brenton W; Simon, Jonathan Z; Pessoa, Luiz

    2016-07-15

    Large-scale analysis of functional MRI data has revealed that brain regions can be grouped into stable "networks" or communities. In many instances, the communities are characterized as relatively disjoint. Although recent work indicates that brain regions may participate in multiple communities (for example, hub regions), the extent of community overlap is poorly understood. To address these issues, here we investigated large-scale brain networks based on "rest" and task human functional MRI data by employing a mixed-membership Bayesian model that allows each brain region to belong to all communities simultaneously with varying membership strengths. The approach allowed us to 1) compare the structure of disjoint and overlapping communities; 2) determine the relationship between functional diversity (how diverse is a region's functional activation repertoire) and membership diversity (how diverse is a region's affiliation to communities); 3) characterize overlapping community structure; 4) characterize the degree of non-modularity in brain networks; 5) study the distribution of "bridges", including bottleneck and hub bridges. Our findings revealed the existence of dense community overlap that was not limited to "special" hubs. Furthermore, the findings revealed important differences between community organization during rest and during specific task states. Overall, we suggest that dense overlapping communities are well suited to capture the flexible and task dependent mapping between brain regions and their functions. PMID:27129758

  10. The role of cue-response mapping in motorvisual impairment and facilitation: Evidence for different roles of action planning and action control in motorvisual dual-task priming

    PubMed Central

    Thomaschke, Roland; Hopkins, Brian; Christopher Miall, R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that actions impair the visual perception of categorically action-consistent stimuli. On the other hand, actions can also facilitate the perception of spatially action-consistent stimuli. We suggest that motorvisual impairment is due to action planning processes, while motorvisual facilitation is due to action control mechanisms. This implies that because action planning is sensitive to modulations by cue-response mapping so should motorvisual impairment, while motorvisual facilitation should be insensitive to manipulations of cue-response mapping as is action control. We tested this prediction in three dual-task experiments. The impact of performing left and right key presses on the perception of unrelated, categorically or spatially consistent, stimuli was studied. As expected, we found motorvisual impairment for categorically consistent stimuli and motorvisual facilitation for spatially consistent stimuli. In all experiments, we compared congruent with incongruent cue-key mappings. Mapping manipulations affected motorvisual impairment, but not motorvisual facilitation. The results support our suggestion that motorvisual impairment is due to action planning, and motorvisual facilitation to action control. PMID:21806310

  11. Unidirectional interference in use of nondominant hand during concurrent Grooved Pegboard and random number generation tasks.

    PubMed

    Strenge, Hans; Niederberger, Uwe

    2008-06-01

    The interference effect between Grooved Pegboard task with either hand and the executive task of cued verbal random number generation was investigated. 24 normal right-handed subjects performed each task under separate (single-task) and concurrent (dual-task) conditions. Articulatory suppression was required as an additional secondary task during pegboard performance. Analysis indicated an unambiguous distinction between the two hands. Comparisons of single-task and dual-task conditions showed an asymmetrical pattern of unidirectional interference with no practice effects during pegboard performance. Concurrent performance with nondominant hand but not the dominant hand of random number generation performance became continuously slower. There was no effect of divided attention on pegboard performance. Findings support the idea that the nondominant hand on the pegboard and random number tasks draw from the same processing resources but that for the executive aspect random number generation is more sensitive to changes in allocation of attentional resources. PMID:18712198

  12. Conditioned discrimination of magnetic inclination in a spatial-orientation arena task by homing pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Mora, Cordula V; Acerbi, Merissa L; Bingman, Verner P

    2014-12-01

    It has been well established that homing pigeons are able to use the Earth's magnetic field to obtain directional information when returning to their loft and that their magnetic compass is based, at least in part, on the perception of magnetic inclination. Magnetic inclination has also been hypothesized in pigeons and other long-distance navigators, such as sea turtles, to play a role providing positional information as part of a map. Here we developed a behavioral paradigm which allows us to condition homing pigeons to discriminate magnetic inclination cues in a spatial-orientation arena task. Six homing pigeons were required to discriminate in a circular arena between feeders located either in a zone with a close to 0 deg inclination cue or in a zone with a rapidly changing inclination cue (-3 deg to +85 deg when approaching the feeder and +85 deg to -3 deg when moving away from the feeder) to obtain a food reward. The pigeons consistently performed this task above chance level. Control experiments, during which the coils were turned off or the current was running anti-parallel through the double-wound coil system, confirmed that no alternative cues were used by the birds in the discrimination task. The results show that homing pigeons can be conditioned to discriminate differences in magnetic field inclination, enabling investigation into the peripheral and central neural processing of geomagnetic inclination under controlled laboratory conditions. PMID:25278470

  13. Housing conditions and stimulus females: a robust social discrimination task for studying male rodent social recognition

    PubMed Central

    Macbeth, Abbe H.; Edds, Jennifer Stepp; Young, W. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Social recognition (SR) enables rodents to distinguish between familiar and novel conspecifics, largely through individual odor cues. SR tasks utilize the tendency for a male to sniff and interact with a novel individual more than a familiar individual. Many paradigms have been used to study the roles of the neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin in SR. However, inconsistencies in results have arisen within similar mouse strains, and across different paradigms and laboratories, making reliable testing of social recognition difficult. The current protocol details a novel approach that is replicable across investigators and in different strains of mice. We created a protocol that utilizes gonadally intact, singly housed females presented within corrals to group-housed males. Housing females singly prior to testing is particularly important for reliable discrimination. This methodology will be useful for studying short-term social memory in rodents, and may also be applicable for longer-term studies. PMID:19816420

  14. Analytical display design for flight tasks conducted under instrument meteorological conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A relatively straightforward, nearly algorithmic procedure for deriving model-based pilot-centered display requirements is presented. A pilot model based on modern control theory serves as the backbone of the design methodology, which is specifically directed toward the synthesis of head-down, electronic cockpit display formats. Some novel applications of the optimal pilot model are discussed, including the generation of vehicle-handling-qualities levels via numerical pilot-opinion ratings. An analytical design example is offered which aids in the definition of a format for the electronic display to be used in a UH-1H helicopter in a landing-approach task involving longitudinal and lateral degrees of freedom. It is proposed that the design procedure offers a systematic means for generating candidate display formats and flight-director laws for simulator evaluation.

  15. Trial-to-Trial Modulations of the Simon Effect in Conditions of Attentional Limitations : Evidence from Dual Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Rico; Plessow, Franziska; Kunde, Wilfried; Kiesel, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Interference effects are reduced after trials including response conflict. This sequential modulation has often been attributed to a top-down mediated adaptive control mechanism and/or to feature repetition mechanisms. In the present study we tested whether mechanisms responsible for such sequential modulations are subject to attentional…

  16. Dual mode diffusion of NaCl in Japanese radish under cooking conditions.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, H; Komiyama, J; Nakanishi, T; Gocho, H

    2007-04-01

    Sorption and diffusion of NaCl in Japanese radish have been studied. The sorption isotherm was obtained at 98 degrees C by the conventional method. The concentration profile by the 1-dimensional diffusion of NaCl in Japanese radish from the 3.0% solution was measured at 98 degrees C with the FRITRUC method involving a foodstuff rod in a thin rubber casing. Fick's diffusion coefficient, D, calculated therefrom showed a threefold variation with a maximum. This variation was quantitatively interpreted by applying a dual-mode sorption and diffusion theory under an assumption that the rate determining step of the diffusion is that in the cell wall. Two thermodynamic diffusion coefficients, D(T)(p) and D(T)(L), where p and L are the species of NaCl sorbed by partition and Langmuir modes, respectively, a parameter, alpha, derived from the local equilibrium relations between the p and L species, and S, the concentration of the Langmuir adsorption site in the cell wall of the radish, were estimated. D(T)(p) was found to be smaller than D(T)(L). As an explanation of the larger D(T)(L), we invoked the higher hydration state of the adsorption site of the L species, being ascribed to residual anionic pectin in the radish than the local environment of the p species. The sorption isotherm showed a convex upward deviation from the linear relation. By using the parameters for the local equilibrium and some assumed parameters, the isotherm was found to be explainable. We suggest possible applications of the present method and interpretation to the diffusion study on the cooking systems comprising varieties of seasoning components and foodstuffs. PMID:17995794

  17. Brain c-Fos immunocytochemistry and cytochrome oxidase histochemistry after a fear conditioning task.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Nélida M; González Pardo, Héctor; López, Matías; Cantora, Raúl; Arias, Jorge L

    2007-05-01

    The involvement of the basolateral and the medial amygdala in fear conditioning was evaluated using different markers of neuronal activation. The method described here is a combination of cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry and c-Fos immunocytochemistry on fresh frozen brain sections. Freezing behavior was used as an index of auditory and contextual fear conditioning. As expected, freezing scores were significantly higher in rats exposed to tone-shock pairings in a distinctive environment (conditioned; COND), as compared to rats that did not receive any shocks (UNCD). CO labeling was increased in the basolateral and medial amygdala of the COND group. Conversely, c-Fos expression in the basolateral and medial amygdala was lower in the COND group as compared to the UNCD group. Furthermore, c-Fos expression was particularly high in the medial amygdala of the UNCD group. The data provided by both techniques indicate that these amygdalar nuclei could play different roles on auditory and contextual fear conditioning. PMID:17425902

  18. Age-related deficits in a forebrain-dependent task, trace-eyeblink conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Galvez, Roberto; Cua, Sabrina; Disterhoft, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Trace-eyeblink conditioning is a forebrain-dependent learning paradigm that has assisted in our understanding of age-related hippocampal neuronal plasticity; however, the hippocampus is not believed to be the permanent site for most long-term-memory storage. Studies in adult subjects have suggested the neocortex as one such site. Whisker plucking studies have further suggested that the ability for plasticity in the neocortex declines with age. Mice were trained in trace- and delay-eyeblink conditioning with whisker or auditory stimulation as the conditioned stimulus to examine possible age-related behavioral and neocortical abnormalities. Whisker stimulation was determined to be a more effective stimulus for examining age-related behavioral abnormalities in C57 mice. Additionally, neocortical barrel expansion, observed in trace conditioned adult mice and rabbits, does not occur in mice conditioned on a delay paradigm or in old mice unable to learn the whisker trace association. Abnormalities in neocortical memory storage in the elderly could contribute to normal age-dependent declines in associative learning abilities. PMID:20018411

  19. Spatiotemporal activity patterns of rat cortical neurons predict responses in a conditioned task

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Alessandro E. P.; Tetko, Igor V.; Hyland, Brian; Najem, Abdellatif

    1999-01-01

    Precise and repeated spike-train timings within and across neurons define spatiotemporal patterns of activity. Although the existence of these patterns in the brain is well established in several species, there has been no direct evidence of their influence on behavioral output. To address this question, up to 15 neurons were recorded simultaneously in the auditory cortex of freely moving rats while animals waited for acoustic cues in a Go/NoGo task. A total of 235 significant patterns were detected during this interval from an analysis of 13 hr of recording involving over 1 million spikes. Of particular interest were 129 (55%) patterns that were significantly associated with the type of response the animal made later, independent of whether the response was that prompted by the cue because the response occurred later and the cue was chosen randomly. Of these behavior-predicting patterns, half (59/129) were associated with an enhanced tendency to go in response to the stimulus, and for 11 patterns of this subset, trials including the pattern were followed by significantly faster reaction time than those lacking the pattern. The remaining behavior-predicting patterns were associated with an enhanced NoGo tendency. Overall mean discharge rates did not vary across trials. Hence, these data demonstrate that particular spatiotemporal patterns predict future behavioral responses. Such presignal activity could form templates for extracting specific sensory information, motor programs prespecifying preference for a particular act, and/or some intermediate, associative brain process. PMID:9927701

  20. Testing boundary conditions of the ideomotor hypothesis using a delayed response task.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yun Kyoung; Proctor, Robert W

    2012-11-01

    Ideomotor theory accounts for how an action's consequence is incorporated into an action concept in the form of a perceptual image that, when retrieved, serves to initiate the action. The ideomotor idea is compelling, because the ultimate purpose of an action is to bring about a certain change in the environment. This study investigated the time-course of response-effect compatibility (REC), which produces a shorter reaction-time when response effects are compatible with the responses than when they are not. We used a delayed choice-reaction task that required the response to be withheld until a Go signal occurred. In Experiment 1 an effect was delivered by the location of a square in either a spatially compatible or incompatible relation to the keypress action. A significant REC effect for reaction time was found only when an effect-achieving instruction was used, for which evidence indicated a locus in an early action phase. In Experiment 2 a cursor effect occurred causally, continuously and simultaneously with the movement of a computer mouse. No matter whether instructions in terms of cursor or mouse movement were used, a strong REC effect was found that preserved its power from the early to later parts of motor planning until execution ended. The results provide evidence that an action concept incorporates the action's consequent changes more strongly when they are goal-satisfying or highly causal events. PMID:23089044

  1. Microcontroller Based Proportional Derivative Plus Conditional Integral Controller for Electro-Mechanical Dual Acting Pulley Continuously Variable Transmission Ratio Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budianto, A.; Tawi, K. B.; Hussein, M.; Supriyo, B.; Ariyono, S.; Che Kob, M. S.; Ezlamy Zulkifli, Mohd; K, Khairuldean A.; Daraoh, Aishah

    2012-09-01

    Electro-Mechanical Dual Acting Pulley (EMDAP) Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) is a transmission utilized by electro-mechanical actuated system. It has a potential to reduce energy consumption because it only needs power during changing CVT ratio and no power is needed to maintain CVT ratio due to self lock mechanism design. This paper proposed simple proportional derivative plus conditional integral (PDCI) controller to control EMDAP CVT ratio which can be simply implemented on a microcontroller. This proposed controller used Astrom-Hagglund method and Ziegler-Nichols formula to tune PDCI gain. The Proportional Derivative controller is directly activated from the start but Integral controller is only activated when the error value reaches error value setting point. Simulation using Matlab/Simulink software was conducted to evaluate PDCI system performance. The simulation results showed PDCI controller has ability to perform maximum overshoot 0.1%, 0.001 steady state error and 0.5s settling time. For clamping condition, settling time is about 11.46s during changing ratio from 2.0 to 0.7, while for release condition, settling time is about 8.33s during changing ratio from 0.7 to 2.0.

  2. Conditional Discriminations by Preverbal Children in an Identity Matching-to-Sample Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alcantara Gil, Maria Stella C.; de Oliveira, Thais Porlan; McIlvane, William J.

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to develop methodology for assessing whether children ages 16-21 months could learn to match stimuli on the basis of physical identity in conditional discrimination procedures routinely used in stimulus equivalence research with older participants. The study was conducted in a private room at a day-care center for children and…

  3. Event-related desynchronization/synchronization during discrimination task conditions in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dushanova, Juliana; Philipova, Dolja; Nikolova, Gloria

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with symptoms, which include movement disturbances and changes of cognitive information processing. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional relationships between oscillatory electroencephalographic (EEG) dominant components with event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) method for idiopathic non-demented Parkinson's patients (PP) and control subjects (CS) during auditory discrimination tasks within two post-stimulus intervals of 0-250 and 250-600 ms. When comparing the CS and PP during the first post-stimulus period, we found delta- and theta-ERS significantly pronounced in CS for both tone types (low--800, high--1,000 Hz) with the following exceptions: at Fz, PP displayed higher delta-ERS, while at C3' theta-ERD in response to a high tone. Alpha-ERS was found in PP in response to either tone at all electrodes and mainly alpha-ERD in CS. In the second post-stimulus interval, the significant differences between the groups were: (i) delta-ERS in CS and delta-ERD in PP in response to the low tone and (ii) delta-ERS for both groups in answer to the high tone, more prominent in CS at Cz and Pz, except for delta-ERD in PP at C3'. For both groups, we detected predominantly theta-ERD and alpha-ERD following both tone types within this second interval. PP showed more expressed theta-ERD at Fz and parietal theta-ERS. Alpha-ERD was significantly higher in CS, while frontal alpha-ERD was more prominent in the PP in response to both tones. The data obtained showed specific functional differences of event-related oscillatory activity in cognitive and sensory-motor information processing between the PP and CS. PMID:19291392

  4. Evaluation of Wall Boundary Conditions for Impedance Eduction Using a Dual-Source Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition and a recently proposed modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition is evaluated for use in impedance eduction under the assumption of uniform mean flow. The evaluation is performed at three centerline Mach numbers, using data acquired in a grazing flow impedance tube, using both upstream and downstream propagating sound sources, and on a database of test liners for which the expected behavior of the impedance spectra is known. The test liners are a hard-wall insert consisting of 12.6 mm thick aluminum, a linear liner without a facesheet consisting of a number of small diameter but long cylindrical channels embedded in a ceramic material, and two conventional nonlinear liners consisting of a perforated facesheet bonded to a honeycomb core. The study is restricted to a frequency range for which only plane waves are cut on in the hard-wall sections of the flow impedance tube. The metrics used to evaluate each boundary condition are 1) how well it educes the same impedance for upstream and downstream propagating sources, and 2) how well it predicts the expected behavior of the impedance spectra over the Mach number range. The primary conclusions of the study are that the same impedance is educed for upstream and downstream propagating sources except at the highest Mach number, that an effective impedance based on both the upstream and downstream measurements is more accurate than an impedance based on the upstream or downstream data alone, and that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition with an effective impedance produces results similar to that achieved with the modified Ingard-Myers boundary condition.

  5. Role of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Serial Feature-Positive Discrimination Task during Eyeblink Conditioning in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Ashrafur; Tanaka, Norifumi; Usui, Koji; Kawahara, Shigenori

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in eyeblink serial feature-positive discrimination learning in mice using the mAChR antagonist. A 2-s light cue was delivered 5 or 6 s before the presentation of a 350-ms tone paired with a 100-ms periorbital electrical shock (cued trial) but not before the tone-alone presentation (non-cued trial). Mice received 30 cued and 30 non-cued trials each day in a random order. We found that saline-injected control mice were successfully discriminating between cued and non-cued trials within a few days of conditioning. The mice responded more frequently to the tone in cued trials than in non-cued trials. Analysis of conditioned response (CR) dynamics revealed that the CR onset latency was shorter in cued trials than in non-cued trials, despite the CR peak amplitude not differing significantly between the two conditions. In contrast, scopolamine-injected mice developed an equal number of CRs with similar temporal patterns irrespective of the presence of the cue during the 7 days of conditioning, indicating in a failure to acquire conditional discrimination. In addition, the scopolamine administration to the control mice after they had successfully acquired discrimination did not impair the conditional discrimination and expression of pre-acquired CR. These results suggest that mAChRs may play a pivotal role in memory formation in the conditional brain state associated with the feature cue; however they are unlikely to be involved in the development of discrimination after conditional memory had formed in the serial feature-positive discrimination task during eyeblink conditioning. PMID:26808980

  6. Aged neuronal nitric oxide knockout mice show preserved olfactory learning in both social recognition and odor-conditioning tasks

    PubMed Central

    James, Bronwen M.; Li, Qin; Luo, Lizhu; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence for both neurotoxic and neuroprotective roles of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain and changes in the expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS) gene occur during aging. The current studies have investigated potential support for either a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role of NO derived from nNOS in the context of aging by comparing olfactory learning and locomotor function in young compared to old nNOS knockout (nNOS−/−) and wildtype control mice. Tasks involving social recognition and olfactory conditioning paradigms showed that old nNOS−/− animals had improved retention of learning compared to similar aged wildtype controls. Young nNOS−/− animals showed superior reversal learning to wildtypes in a conditioned learning task, although their performance was weakened with age. Interestingly, whereas young nNOS−/− animals were impaired in long term memory for social odors compared to wildtype controls, in old animals this pattern was reversed, possibly indicating beneficial compensatory changes influencing olfactory memory may occur during aging in nNOS−/− animals. Possibly such compensatory changes may have involved increased NO from other NOS isoforms since the memory deficit in young nNOS−/− animals could be rescued by the NO-donor, molsidomine. Both nNOS−/− and wildtype animals showed an age-associated decline in locomotor activity although young nNOS−/− animals were significantly more active than wildtypes, possibly due to an increased interest in novelty. Overall our findings suggest that lack of NO release via nNOS may protect animals to some extent against age-associated cognitive decline in memory tasks typically involving olfactory and hippocampal regions, but not against declines in reversal learning or locomotor activity. PMID:25870540

  7. Task switching and response correspondence in the psychological refractory period paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, Mei-Ching; Schweickert, Richard; Proctor, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effects of task switching and response correspondence in a psychological refractory period paradigm. A letter task (vowel-consonant) and a digit task (odd-even) were combined to form 4 possible dual-task pairs in each trial: letter-letter, letter-digit, digit-digit, and digit-letter. Foreknowledge of task transition (repeat or switch) and task identity (letter or digit) was varied across experiments: no foreknowledge in Experiment 1, partial foreknowledge (task transition only) in Experiment 2, and full foreknowledge in Experiment 3. For all experiments, the switch cost for Task 2 was additive with stimulus onset asynchrony, and the response-correspondence effect for Task 2 was numerically smaller in the switch condition than in the repeat condition. These outcomes suggest that reconfiguration for Task 2 takes place after the central processing of Task 1 and that the crosstalk correspondence effect is due to response activation by way of stimulus-response associations.

  8. Dual drive actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A new class of electromechanical actuators is described. These dual drive actuators were developed for the NASA-JPL Galileo Spacecraft. The dual drive actuators are fully redundant and therefore have high inherent reliability. They can be used for a variety of tasks, and they can be fabricated quickly and economically.

  9. Dual vulnerability of TDP-43 to calpain and caspase-3 proteolysis after neurotoxic conditions and traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihui; Lin, Fan; Robertson, Claudia S; Wang, Kevin K W

    2014-09-01

    Transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathy has recently been reported in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative condition linked to prior history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While TDP-43 appears to be vulnerable to proteolytic modifications under neurodegenerative conditions, the mechanism underlying the contribution of TDP-43 to the pathogenesis of TBI remains unknown. In this study, we first mapped out the calpain or caspase-3 TDP-43 fragmentation patterns by in vitro protease digestion. Concurrently, in cultured cerebrocortical neurons subjected to cell death challenges, we identified distinct TDP-43 breakdown products (BDPs) of 35, 33, and 12 kDa that were indicative of dual calpain/caspase attack. Cerebrocortical culture incubated with calpain and caspase-fragmented TDP-43 resulted in neuronal injury. Furthermore, increased TDP-43 BDPs as well as redistributed TDP-43 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm were observed in the mouse cortex in two TBI models: controlled cortical impact injury and overpressure blast-wave-induced brain injury. Finally, TDP-43 and its 35 kDa fragment levels were also elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of severe TBI patients. This is the first evidence that TDP-43 might be involved in acute neuroinjury and TBI pathology, and that TDP-43 and its fragments may have biomarker utilities in TBI patients. PMID:24917042

  10. Dual vulnerability of TDP-43 to calpain and caspase-3 proteolysis after neurotoxic conditions and traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihui; Lin, Fan; Robertson, Claudia S; Wang, Kevin K W

    2014-01-01

    Transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathy has recently been reported in chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative condition linked to prior history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While TDP-43 appears to be vulnerable to proteolytic modifications under neurodegenerative conditions, the mechanism underlying the contribution of TDP-43 to the pathogenesis of TBI remains unknown. In this study, we first mapped out the calpain or caspase-3 TDP-43 fragmentation patterns by in vitro protease digestion. Concurrently, in cultured cerebrocortical neurons subjected to cell death challenges, we identified distinct TDP-43 breakdown products (BDPs) of 35, 33, and 12 kDa that were indicative of dual calpain/caspase attack. Cerebrocortical culture incubated with calpain and caspase-fragmented TDP-43 resulted in neuronal injury. Furthermore, increased TDP-43 BDPs as well as redistributed TDP-43 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm were observed in the mouse cortex in two TBI models: controlled cortical impact injury and overpressure blast-wave-induced brain injury. Finally, TDP-43 and its 35 kDa fragment levels were also elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of severe TBI patients. This is the first evidence that TDP-43 might be involved in acute neuroinjury and TBI pathology, and that TDP-43 and its fragments may have biomarker utilities in TBI patients. PMID:24917042

  11. Reasons for recall following conditional discharge: explanations given by male patients suffering from dual diagnosis in a London Forensic Unit.

    PubMed

    Chiringa, J; Robinson, J E; Clancy, C

    2014-05-01

    Patients who have been discharged from forensic services often have conditions they have to abide by as part of their discharge, and failure to do so leads to recall. We interviewed six men who had been conditionally discharged from forensic services and then been recalled into hospital to find out what they thought went wrong. The reasons they gave for why things went wrong included feeling that the system was unfair and made them feel like criminals even though they did not feel they had put anyone at risk. Some of them were not fully aware of the conditions they needed to adhere to, and some of them had breached the conditions but did not take responsibility for what had happened. In addition, supervision was felt to be very controlling and disruptive rather than supportive when patients were often lonely, bored and needing support. Most participants reported that they experienced poor standards of aftercare in hostels they were required to reside in. In the future, care of patients after conditional discharge should include better communication between patients and their supervisory team, recognition of the need for more support and improvements in the standards of care in hostels, as well as a collaborative approach to risk assessment that might reduce the frequency of relapse and readmission. This study explores how male patients suffering from dual diagnosis in a forensic unit perceive being recalled and readmitted following conditional discharge and their views about how services might be improved. A qualitative approach was used drawing on grounded theory techniques. Audiotaped semistructured interviews collected data from a purposefully selected sample of six participants who had been recalled and met the inclusion criteria of the study. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Most participants perceived the recall system as unfair, inappropriately criminalized their behaviour and was based on an assessment of risk that they did not

  12. OTVE turbopump condition monitoring, task E. 5. Final report, October 1988-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, P.T.; Collins, J.J.

    1989-08-01

    Recent work has been carried out on development of isotope wear analysis and optical and eddy current technologies to provide bearing wear measurements and real time monitoring of shaft speed, shaft axial displacement and shaft orbit of the Orbit Transfer Vehicle hydrostatic bearing tester. Results show shaft axial displacement can be optically measured (at the same time as shaft orbital motion and speed) to within 0.3 mils by two fiberoptic deflectometers. Evaluation of eddy current probes showed that, in addition to measuring shaft orbital motion, they can be used to measure shaft speed without having to machine grooves on the shaft surface as is the usual practice for turbomachinery. The interim results of this condition monitoring effort are presented.

  13. Time-of-day effect on a food-induced conditioned place preference task in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Monclaro, Antonielle V; Sampaio, Ana Cristhina; Ribeiro, Natália B; Barros, Marilia

    2014-02-01

    Time can be an important contextual cue for cognitive performance, with implications for reward-associated learned behaviors such as (drug and food) addiction. So, we analyzed: (1) if marmoset monkeys develop a place preference that is conditioned to previous pairings with a highly-palatable food reward; (2) if the response is strongest when training and testing times match - time stamp effect; and (3) if there is an optimal time of the day (morning vs. afternoon) when this preference occurs - time-of-day effect. Subjects were first habituated to a two-compartment conditioned-place-preference (CPP) box. Then, during six training sessions held either in the morning or afternoon, a mixture of jellybeans and live mealworms was made available in a specific compartment. Marmosets were subsequently tested for preferring the food-paired context at the circadian time that either matched or was different from that of training. Compared to baseline levels, only subjects trained and tested in the afternoon made significantly longer and more frequent visits to the food-paired context and with a shorter latency to first entry. Thus, highly-palatable food rewards induced a CPP response. This behavior was exhibited only when training and testing times overlapped and during a restricted circadian timeframe (afternoon), consistent with a time-stamp and time-of-day effect, respectively. In this case, time may have been an internal circadian contextual cue. Whether due to circadian-mediated oscillations in memory and/or reward processes, such findings may be applied to addiction and other learned behaviors. PMID:24280121

  14. Optimal behavior by rats in a choice task is associated to a persistent conditioned inhibition effect.

    PubMed

    Trujano, R Emmanuel; López, Paulina; Rojas-Leguizamón, Maryed; Orduña, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    When given a choice between an alternative with a low probability of reinforcement and discriminative stimuli, and another with a higher probability of reinforcement and non-discriminative stimuli, pigeons show a clear preference for the former but rats clearly prefer the later. It has been reported that pigeon's suboptimal choice is associated to a diminishing effect of the stimulus correlated with non-reinforcement. In the present paper, we explored the possibility that rats' optimal choice is more strongly influenced than pigeons' by the stimulus associated to non-reinforcement and that the effects of it do not dissipate during training. We trained rats to choose between an alternative with 0.50 probability of reinforcement and discriminative stimuli, and an alternative with 0.75 probability of reinforcement and non-discriminative stimuli. We replicated the strong preference for the optimal alternative. Then, after several sessions of training, we presented summation trials in which both the stimulus associated to reinforcement and the stimulus associated to non-reinforcement were simultaneously presented. The results showed that the stimulus associated to non-reinforcement exerted a strong effect on choice, and, more importantly, that it did not seem to dissipate across training. These results suggest that the strong difference found between pigeons and rats in the suboptimal choice procedure is potentially related to differences in the impact of conditioned inhibitors. PMID:27421608

  15. The dual function of nitrite under stomach conditions is modulated by reducing compounds.

    PubMed

    Volk, J; Gorelik, S; Granit, R; Kohen, R; Kanner, J

    2009-09-01

    Salivary nitrite plays a role in the lipid peroxidation process of muscle tissue in simulated gastric fluid. The objectives of our study were to elucidate the fate of nitrite in the presence of reducing compounds and to evaluate its effect on lipid peroxidation during digestion. Nitrite at pH 3 (possibly NO(2.), not NO.) can oxidize beta-carotene, but the addition of reducing compounds, ascorbic acid or polyphenols, alters its effect. Ascorbic acid alone promoted the formation of NO. from nitrite only up to pH 3, but the addition of iron ions facilitated the formation of NO. up to pH 5.5. NO prevented membranal lipid peroxidation under stomach conditions. Nitrite, only in the presence of reducing compounds, achieved the same goal but at much higher concentrations. Addition of polyphenols to nitrite synergistically improved its antioxidant effect. Therefore, to promote NO. production and to achieve better control of the lipid peroxidation process in the stomach, a nitrite-rich meal should be consumed simultaneously with food rich in polyphenols. PMID:19375499

  16. Does Exercise Reduce Aggressive Feelings? An Experiment Examining the Influence of Movement Type and Social Task Conditions on Testiness and Anger Reduction.

    PubMed

    Pels, Fabian; Kleinert, Jens

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, it was assumed that a decrease in aggressive feelings is stronger with movements that are unlike aggressive actions compared with those that are similar to aggressive actions. Furthermore, cooperative exercise tasks were expected to lead to lower aggressive feelings compared with competitive tasks. After undergoing an induction of aggressive feelings, 60 participants were randomly assigned to one of six experimental treatment groups, each differing in "movement type" (rowing and combat exercise) and "social task condition" (cooperation, competition, and individualization). A significant reduction of aggressive feelings was only found for participants exercising individually in the rowing condition compared with the individual combat exercise condition. There were no sole effects of "movement type" and "social task condition." PMID:27184261

  17. The Effects of Physical Context Changes and Multiple Extinction Contexts on Two Forms of Renewal in a Conditioned Suppression Task with Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effects of physical context changes and multiple extinction contexts on the renewal of conditioned suppression in humans. A conditioned suppression task used an undesirable event as the unconditional stimulus (US). One conditional stimulus (CS+) predicted the occurrence of the US and another (CS-) predicted US…

  18. The importance of the context in the hippocampus and brain related areas throughout the performance of a fear conditioning task.

    PubMed

    Arias, Natalia; Méndez, Marta; Arias, Jorge L

    2015-11-01

    The importance context has been broadly studied in the management of phobias and in the drug addiction literature. The way in which changes to a context influence behavior after the simple acquisition of a passive avoidance task remains unclear. The hippocampus has long been implicated in the contextual and spatial processing required for contextual fear, but its role in encoding the aversive component of a contextual fear memory is still inconclusive. Our work tries to elucidate whether a change in context, represented as differences in the load of the stimuli, is critical for learning about the context-shock association and whether this manipulation of the context could be linked to any change in metabolic brain activity requirements. For this purpose, we used an avoidance conditioning task. Animals were divided into three different experimental conditions. In one group, acquisition was performed in an enriched stimuli environment and retention was performed in a typically lit chamber (the PA-ACQ-CONTX group). In another group, acquisition was performed in the typically lit chamber and retention was undertaken in the highly enriched chamber (the PA-RET-CONTX group). Finally, for the control group, PA-CN-CONTX, acquisition, and retention were performed in the enriched stimuli environment. Our results showed that the PA-ACQ-CONTX group had longer escape latencies and poorer retention than the PA-RET-CONTX and PA-CN-CONTX groups after 24 h of acquisition under contextual changes. To study metabolic brain activity, histochemical labelling of cytochrome c-oxidase (CO) was performed. CO results suggested a neural circuit including the hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, parahippocampal cortices, and mammillary nuclei that is involved in the learning and memory processes that enable context-dependent behavior. These results highlight how dysfunction in this network may be involved in the contextualization of fear associations that underlie several forms of psychopathology

  19. Cognitive and Physical Fatigue Tasks Enhance Pain, Cognitive Fatigue and Physical Fatigue in People with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Dana L; Keffala, Valerie J; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibromyalgia is a condition characterized by chronic widespread muscle pain and fatigue. The primary objective of this study was to determine if pain, perceived cognitive fatigue, and perceived physical fatigue were enhanced in participants with fibromyalgia compared to healthy controls during a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task and a dual fatigue task. Methods Twenty four people with fibromyalgia and 33 healthy controls completed pain, fatigue and function measures. A cognitive fatigue task (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) and physical fatigue task (Valpar peg test) were done individually and combined for a dual fatigue task. Resting pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue were assessed during each task using visual analogue scales. Function was assessed with shoulder range of motion and grip. Results People with fibromyalgia had significantly higher increases in pain, cognitive fatigue and physical fatigue when compared to healthy controls after completion of a cognitive fatigue task, a physical fatigue task, or a dual fatigue task (p<0.01). People with fibromyalgia performed equivalently on measures of physical performance and cognitive performance on the physical and cognitive fatigue tasks, respectively. Conclusions These data show that people with fibromyalgia show larger increases in pain, perceived cognitive fatigue and perceived physical fatigue to both cognitive and physical fatigue tasks compared to healthy controls. The increases in pain and fatigue during cognitive and physical fatigue tasks could influence subject participation in daily activities and rehabilitation. PMID:25074583

  20. Application of Discrete Event Control to the Insertion Task of Electric Line Using 6-Link Electro-Hydraulic Manipulators with Dual Arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyoungkwan; Yokota, Shinichi

    Uninterrupted power supply has become indispensable during the maintenance task of active electric power lines as a result of today's highly information-oriented society and increasing demand of electric utilities. The maintenance task has the risk of electric shock and the danger of falling from high place. Therefore it is necessary to realize an autonomous robot system using electro-hydraulic manipulator because hydraulic manipulators have the advantage of electric insulation. Meanwhile it is relatively difficult to realize autonomous assembly tasks particularly in the case of manipulating flexible objects such as electric lines. In this report, a discrete event control system is introduced for automatic assembly task of electric lines into sleeves as one of a typical task of active electric power lines. In the implementation of a discrete event control system, LVQNN (learning vector quantization neural network) is applied to the insertion task of electric lines to sleeves. In order to apply these proposed control system to the unknown environment, virtual learning data for LVQNN was generated by fuzzy inference. By the experimental results of two types of electric lines and sleeves, these proposed discrete event control and neural network learning algorithm are confirmed very effective to the insertion tasks of electric lines to sleeves as a typical task of active electric power maintenance tasks.

  1. Effects of a secondary task on obstacle avoidance in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Siu, Ka-Chun; Catena, Robert D; Chou, Li-Shan; van Donkelaar, Paul; Woollacott, Marjorie H

    2008-01-01

    Research on attention and gait stability has suggested that the process of recovering gait stability requires attentional resources, but the effect of performing a secondary task on stability during obstacle avoidance is poorly understood. Using a dual-task paradigm, the present experiment investigated the extent to which young adults are able to respond to a secondary auditory Stroop task (requiring executive attentional network resources) concurrently with obstacle crossing during gait when compared with performing unobstructed walking or sitting (control task). Our results demonstrated that as the level of difficulty in the postural task increased, there was a significant reduction in verbal response time from congruent to incongruent conditions in the auditory Stroop task, but no differences in gait parameters, indicating that these postural tasks require attention, and that young adults use a strategy of modulating the auditory Stroop task performance while keeping stable gait performance under the dual-task situations. Our findings suggest the existence of a hierarchy of control within both postural task (obstacle avoidance requires the most information processing resources) and dual-task (with gait stability being a priority) conditions. PMID:17717655

  2. A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study of Lexical Decision Task Supports the Dual Route Model and the Phonological Deficit Theory of Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sela, Itamar; Izzetoglu, Meltem; Izzetoglu, Kurtulus; Onaral, Banu

    2014-01-01

    The dual route model (DRM) of reading suggests two routes of reading development: the phonological and the orthographic routes. It was proposed that although the two routes are active in the process of reading; the first is more involved at the initial stages of reading acquisition, whereas the latter needs more reading training to mature. A…

  3. Testing the attentional boundary conditions of subliminal semantic priming: the influence of semantic and phonological task sets

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sarah C.; Kiefer, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies challenged the classical notion of automaticity and indicated that even unconscious automatic semantic processing is under attentional control to some extent. In line with our attentional sensitization model, these data suggest that a sensitization of semantic pathways by a semantic task set is necessary for subliminal semantic priming to occur while non-semantic task sets attenuate priming. In the present study, we tested whether masked semantic priming is also reduced by phonological task sets using the previously developed induction task paradigm. This would substantiate the notion that attention to semantics is necessary for eliciting unconscious semantic priming. Participants first performed semantic and phonological induction tasks that should either activate a semantic or a phonological task set. Subsequent to the induction task, a masked prime word, either associated or non-associated with the following lexical decision target word, was presented. Across two experiments, we varied the nature of the phonological induction task (word phonology vs. letter phonology) to assess whether the attentional focus on the entire word vs. single letters modulates subsequent masked semantic priming. In both experiments, subliminal semantic priming was only found subsequent to the semantic induction task, but was attenuated following either phonological induction task. These results indicate that attention to phonology attenuates subsequent semantic processing of unconsciously presented primes whether or not attention is directed to the entire word or to single letters. The present findings therefore substantiate earlier evidence that an attentional orientation toward semantics is necessary for subliminal semantic priming to be elicited. PMID:22952461

  4. Comparison of the flexural strength of two dual cure adhesive resin cements under oral simulated conditions: an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, P; Nair, A; Regish, K M; Viswambaran, M; Kumar, M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the flexural strength of the newly developed self-adhesive dual cure resin cement and compare it with conventional resin cement under oral simulated conditions. A conventional resin cement (Calibra) and self adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100) were selected and 40 specimens of each cement were fabricated for the study. Half of these specimens were polymerized directly whereas the other half were polymerized through 2 mm of porcelain disc. Specimens were tested after 24hrs and after 30 days immersion in artificial saliva. A three point bending test was performed using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Overall RelyX U100 showed higher mean flexural strength compared to Calibra (141.55 MPa, 119.46MPa, respectively). When the specimens of both the cements were light cured through 2 mm porcelain disc, their flexural strength decreased significantly. The mean flexural strength of both self adhesive and conventional dual cure adhesive resin cements was increased significantly after storage in artificial saliva for 30 days at 37 degreeC. Among the two dual cure resin cements, the self adhesive dual cure cement (RelyX U100) showed increased overall mean flexural strength as compared to conventional resin cement (Calibra) under all the curing and storage protocols. PMID:23888528

  5. Learning Task Inventories (LTIs). Exploration of Optimal Conditions to Help Students Develop, Improve and Sustain Good Study and Learning Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeil, Stephen; Wood, Eileen; Zivcakova, Lucia; Glover, Robyn; Smith, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    To support students in an introductory organic chemistry course, scaffolding in the form of weekly Learning Task Inventories (LTIs) were introduced. LTIs are chapter-by-chapter lists of detailed learning tasks students are expected to master during the course. This paper describes efforts to effectively implement LTIs, the effect of differing…

  6. The Relationship between Working Memory Capacity and L2 Oral Performance under Task-Based Careful Online Planning Condition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmadian, Mohammad Javad

    2012-01-01

    The study reported in this article aimed to investigate the way working memory capacity (WMC) interacts with careful online planning--a task-based implementation variable--to affect second language (L2) speech production. This issue is important to teachers, because it delves into one of the possible task-based implementation variables and thus…

  7. Cognitive Workload and Fatigue in a Vigilance Dual Task: Miss Errors, False Alarms, and the Effect of Wearing Biometric Sensors While Working.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Reiter, Katherine E; Malon, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The effects of workload, fatigue, and practice on the performance of cognitive tasks are often intertwined. Previous research has shown that these influences can be separated with the two cusp catastrophe models. This study expanded an earlier investigation of the two models for workload and fatigue in a vigilance task to include a wider range of bifurcation variables that could affect the elasticity versus rigidity of the operator in response to workload and added performance variability resulting from fatigue. The study also responded to a concern in the literature that performance on cognitive tasks can be complicated by adaptive responses to artificial task situations and thus distort underlying cognitive events. Therefore, we also explored whether wearing biometric sensors, frequently used in workload studies, can affect performance dynamics. Participants were 279 undergraduates who responded to target stimuli that appeared on a simulated security camera display at three rates of speed while completing a secondary task. Participants worked alone, in pairs, or in pairs wearing GSR sensors. Results supported the efficacy of the two models and isolated the impact of wearing sensors on the fatigue process. The strongest control variables across both the workload and fatigue models were field independence, anxiety, indecisiveness, inflexibility, secondary task completion, working in pairs, and wearing the sensors. The contributing effect of wearing sensors could possibly extend to other types of wearable technologies. PMID:27550706

  8. A dual-temperature-difference approach to estimate daytime sensible and latent heat fluxes under advective conditions during BEAREX08

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dual-Temperature-Difference (DTD) approach uses continuous radiometric surface temperature measurements in a two-source (soil + vegetation) energy balance model to solve for the daytime evolution of the sensible and latent heat fluxes. By using the surface-air temperature difference at two time...

  9. A functional approach for research on cognitive control: Analysing cognitive control tasks and their effects in terms of operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Liefooghe, Baptist; De Houwer, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive control is an important mental ability that is examined using a multitude of cognitive control tasks and effects. The present paper presents the first steps in the elaboration of a functional approach, which aims to uncover the communalities and differences between different cognitive control tasks and their effects. Based on the idea that responses in cognitive control tasks qualify as operant behaviour, we propose to reinterpret cognitive control tasks in terms of operant contingencies and cognitive control effects as instances of moderated stimulus control. We illustrate how our approach can be used to uncover communalities between topographically different cognitive control tasks and can lead to novel questions about the processes underlying cognitive control. PMID:26033418

  10. Neural Correlates of Task Cost for Stance Control with an Additional Motor Task: Phase-Locked Electroencephalogram Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate reallocation of central resources, the ability to maintain an erect posture is not necessarily degraded by a concurrent motor task. This study investigated the neural control of a particular postural-suprapostural procedure involving brain mechanisms to solve crosstalk between posture and motor subtasks. Participants completed a single posture task and a dual-task while concurrently conducting force-matching and maintaining a tilted stabilometer stance at a target angle. Stabilometer movements and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The added force-matching task increased the irregularity of postural response rather than the size of postural response prior to force-matching. In addition, the added force-matching task during stabilometer stance led to marked topographic ERP modulation, with greater P2 positivity in the frontal and sensorimotor-parietal areas of the N1-P2 transitional phase and in the sensorimotor-parietal area of the late P2 phase. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP primary principal component revealed that the dual-task condition manifested more pronounced delta (1–4 Hz) and beta (13–35 Hz) synchronizations but suppressed theta activity (4–8 Hz) before force-matching. The dual-task condition also manifested coherent fronto-parietal delta activity in the P2 period. In addition to a decrease in postural regularity, this study reveals spatio-temporal and temporal-spectral reorganizations of ERPs in the fronto-sensorimotor-parietal network due to the added suprapostural motor task. For a particular set of postural-suprapostural task, the behavior and neural data suggest a facilitatory role of autonomous postural response and central resource expansion with increasing interregional interactions for task-shift and planning the motor-suprapostural task. PMID:27010634

  11. Neural Correlates of Task Cost for Stance Control with an Additional Motor Task: Phase-Locked Electroencephalogram Responses.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ing-Shiou; Huang, Cheng-Ya

    2016-01-01

    With appropriate reallocation of central resources, the ability to maintain an erect posture is not necessarily degraded by a concurrent motor task. This study investigated the neural control of a particular postural-suprapostural procedure involving brain mechanisms to solve crosstalk between posture and motor subtasks. Participants completed a single posture task and a dual-task while concurrently conducting force-matching and maintaining a tilted stabilometer stance at a target angle. Stabilometer movements and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The added force-matching task increased the irregularity of postural response rather than the size of postural response prior to force-matching. In addition, the added force-matching task during stabilometer stance led to marked topographic ERP modulation, with greater P2 positivity in the frontal and sensorimotor-parietal areas of the N1-P2 transitional phase and in the sensorimotor-parietal area of the late P2 phase. The time-frequency distribution of the ERP primary principal component revealed that the dual-task condition manifested more pronounced delta (1-4 Hz) and beta (13-35 Hz) synchronizations but suppressed theta activity (4-8 Hz) before force-matching. The dual-task condition also manifested coherent fronto-parietal delta activity in the P2 period. In addition to a decrease in postural regularity, this study reveals spatio-temporal and temporal-spectral reorganizations of ERPs in the fronto-sensorimotor-parietal network due to the added suprapostural motor task. For a particular set of postural-suprapostural task, the behavior and neural data suggest a facilitatory role of autonomous postural response and central resource expansion with increasing interregional interactions for task-shift and planning the motor-suprapostural task. PMID:27010634

  12. Concurrent processing of vehicle lane keeping and speech comprehension tasks.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shi; Liu, Yili

    2013-10-01

    With the growing prevalence of using in-vehicle devices and mobile devices while driving, a major concern is their impact on driving performance and safety. However, the effects of cognitive load such as conversation on driving performance are still controversial and not well understood. In this study, an experiment was conducted to investigate the concurrent performance of vehicle lane keeping and speech comprehension tasks with improved experimental control of the confounding factors identified in previous studies. The results showed that the standard deviation of lane position (SDLP) was increased when the driving speed was faster (0.30 m at 36 km/h; 0.36 m at 72 km/h). The concurrent comprehension task had no significant effect on SDLP (0.34 m on average) or the standard deviation of steering wheel angle (SDSWA; 5.20° on average). The correct rate of the comprehension task was reduced in the dual-task condition (from 93.4% to 91.3%) compared with the comprehension single-task condition. Mental workload was significantly higher in the dual-task condition compared with the single-task conditions. Implications for driving safety were discussed. PMID:23764876

  13. The Personality Trait of Intolerance to Uncertainty Affects Behavior in a Novel Computer-Based Conditioned Place Preference Task.

    PubMed

    Radell, Milen L; Myers, Catherine E; Beck, Kevin D; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Allen, Michael Todd

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has found that personality factors that confer vulnerability to addiction can also affect learning and economic decision making. One personality trait which has been implicated in vulnerability to addiction is intolerance to uncertainty (IU), i.e., a preference for familiar over unknown (possibly better) options. In animals, the motivation to obtain drugs is often assessed through conditioned place preference (CPP), which compares preference for contexts where drug reward was previously received. It is an open question whether participants with high IU also show heightened preference for previously rewarded contexts. To address this question, we developed a novel computer-based CPP task for humans in which participants guide an avatar through a paradigm in which one room contains frequent reward (i.e., rich) and one contains less frequent reward (i.e., poor). Following exposure to both contexts, subjects are assessed for preference to enter the previously rich and previously poor room. Individuals with low IU showed little bias to enter the previously rich room first, and instead entered both rooms at about the same rate which may indicate a foraging behavior. By contrast, those with high IU showed a strong bias to enter the previously rich room first. This suggests an increased tendency to chase reward in the intolerant group, consistent with previously observed behavior in opioid-addicted individuals. Thus, the personality factor of high IU may produce a pre-existing cognitive bias that provides a mechanism to promote decision-making processes that increase vulnerability to addiction. PMID:27555829

  14. The Personality Trait of Intolerance to Uncertainty Affects Behavior in a Novel Computer-Based Conditioned Place Preference Task

    PubMed Central

    Radell, Milen L.; Myers, Catherine E.; Beck, Kevin D.; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Allen, Michael Todd

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has found that personality factors that confer vulnerability to addiction can also affect learning and economic decision making. One personality trait which has been implicated in vulnerability to addiction is intolerance to uncertainty (IU), i.e., a preference for familiar over unknown (possibly better) options. In animals, the motivation to obtain drugs is often assessed through conditioned place preference (CPP), which compares preference for contexts where drug reward was previously received. It is an open question whether participants with high IU also show heightened preference for previously rewarded contexts. To address this question, we developed a novel computer-based CPP task for humans in which participants guide an avatar through a paradigm in which one room contains frequent reward (i.e., rich) and one contains less frequent reward (i.e., poor). Following exposure to both contexts, subjects are assessed for preference to enter the previously rich and previously poor room. Individuals with low IU showed little bias to enter the previously rich room first, and instead entered both rooms at about the same rate which may indicate a foraging behavior. By contrast, those with high IU showed a strong bias to enter the previously rich room first. This suggests an increased tendency to chase reward in the intolerant group, consistent with previously observed behavior in opioid-addicted individuals. Thus, the personality factor of high IU may produce a pre-existing cognitive bias that provides a mechanism to promote decision-making processes that increase vulnerability to addiction. PMID:27555829

  15. A dual-porous, biophysical void structure model of soil for the understanding of the conditions causing nitrous oxide emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, G. Peter; Maurizio Laudone, G.; Whalle, W. Richard; Bird, Nigel; Gregory, Andrew; Cardenas, Laura; Misselbrook, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Nitrous oxide is the fourth most important greenhouse gas. It is 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide, and two-thirds of anthropogenic nitrous oxide is emitted by agricultural land. This presentation will begin with a brief overview of the laboratory measurements of nitrous oxide emission from carefully characterised soils, presented in more detail by Cardenas et al.. The measurements were made in a twelve-chamber, gas chromatographic apparatus at North Wyke Research (formerly IGER). The presentation will then continue with a description of a void network model of sufficient accuracy and authenticity that it can be used to explain and predict the nitrous oxide production, and the modelling of the biological, chemical and physical processes for the production of nitrous oxide within the constructed network. Finally, conclusions will be drawn from a comparison of the model results with experiment. The void network model Nitrous oxide is produced by microbial activity located in ‘hotspots' within the microstructure of soil, and nutrients and gases flow or diffuse to and from these hotspots through the water or gas-filled macro-porosity. It is clear, therefore, that a network model to describe and explain nitrous oxide production must encompass the full size range of pore space active within the process, which covers 6 orders of magnitude, and must make realistic suppositions about the positional relationship of the hotspots relative to the soil macro-porosity. Previous experimental (Tsakiroglou, C. D. et al, European J.Soil Sci., 2008) and theoretical approaches to the modelling of soil void structure cannot generally meet these two requirements. We have therefore built on the success of the previous uni-porous model of soil (Matthews, G. P. et al, Wat.Resour.Res, 2010), and the concept of a critical percolation path, to develop a dual porous model (Laudone, G. M. et al, European J.Soil Sci., 2010) with the following features: • A porous unit cell, with

  16. The aging brain shows less flexible reallocation of cognitive resources during dual-task walking: A mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) study.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Brenda R; Foxe, John J; Butler, John S; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo

    2015-08-15

    Aging is associated with reduced abilities to selectively allocate attention across multiple domains. This may be particularly problematic during everyday multitasking situations when cognitively demanding tasks are performed while walking. Due to previous limitations in neuroimaging technology, much remains unknown about the cortical mechanisms underlying resource allocation during locomotion. Here, we utilized an EEG-based mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI) technique that integrates high-density event-related potential (ERP) recordings with simultaneously acquired foot-force sensor data to monitor gait patterns and brain activity concurrently. To assess effects of motor load on cognition we evaluated young (N=17; mean age=27.2) and older adults (N=16; mean age=63.9) and compared behavioral and ERP measures associated with performing a Go/No-Go response inhibition task as participants sat stationary or walked on a treadmill. Stride time and variability were also measured during task performance and compared to stride parameters obtained without task performance, thereby assessing effects of cognitive load on gait. Results showed that older, but not young adults' accuracy dropped significantly when performing the inhibitory task while walking. Young adults revealed ERP modulations at relatively early (N2 amplitude reduction) and later (earlier P3 latency) stages within the processing stream as motor load increased while walking. In contrast, older adults' ERP modulations were limited to later processing stages (increased P3 amplitude) of the inhibitory network. The relative delay and attenuation of ERP modulations accompanied by behavioral costs in older participants might indicate an age-associated loss in flexible resource allocation across multiple tasks. Better understanding of the neural underpinnings of these age-related changes may lead to improved strategies to reduce fall risk and enhance mobility in aging. PMID:25988225

  17. The "Reading the Mind in Films" Task [Child Version]: Complex Emotion and Mental State Recognition in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Ofer; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Golan, Yael

    2008-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing others' emotions. Research has mostly focused on "basic" emotion recognition, devoid of context. This study reports the results of a new task, assessing recognition of "complex" emotions and mental states in social contexts. An ASC group (n = 23) was compared to a general…

  18. Do Amnesic Patients with Korsakoff's Syndrome Use Feedback when Making Decisions under Risky Conditions? An Experimental Investigation with the Game of Dice Task with and without Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Matthias; Pawlikowski, Mirko; Labudda, Kirsten; Laier, Christian; von Rothkirch, Nadine; Markowitsch, Hans J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the role of feedback processing in decision making under risk conditions in 50 patients with amnesia in the course of alcoholic Korsakoff's syndrome (KS). Half of the patients were administered the Game of Dice Task (GDT) and the remaining 25 patients were examined with a modified version of the GDT in which no feedback was…

  19. Influence of Pharmacological Manipulations of NMDA and Cholinergic Receptors on Working versus Reference Memory in a Dual Component Odor Span Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacQueen, David A.; Dalrymple, Savannah R.; Drobes, David J.; Diamond, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Developed as a tool to assess working memory capacity in rodents, the odor span task (OST) has significant potential to advance drug discovery in animal models of psychiatric disorders. Prior investigations indicate OST performance is impaired by systemic administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-r) antagonists and is sensitive to…

  20. Housing conditions affect rat responses to two types of ambiguity in a reward–reward discrimination cognitive bias task

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Richard M.A.; Paul, Elizabeth S.; Burman, Oliver H.P.; Browne, William J.; Mendl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making under ambiguity in cognitive bias tasks is a promising new indicator of affective valence in animals. Rat studies support the hypothesis that animals in a negative affective state evaluate ambiguous cues negatively. Prior automated operant go/go judgement bias tasks have involved training rats that an auditory cue of one frequency predicts a Reward and a cue of a different frequency predicts a Punisher (RP task), and then measuring whether ambiguous cues of intermediate frequency are judged as predicting reward (‘optimism’) or punishment (‘pessimism’). We investigated whether an automated Reward–Reward (RR) task yielded similar results to, and was faster to train than, RP tasks. We also introduced a new ambiguity test (simultaneous presentation of the two training cues) alongside the standard single ambiguous cue test. Half of the rats experienced an unpredictable housing treatment (UHT) designed to induce a negative state. Control rats were relatively ‘pessimistic’, whilst UHT rats were quicker, but no less accurate, in their responses in the RR test, and showed less anxiety-like behaviour in independent tests. A possible reason for these findings is that rats adapted to and were stimulated by UHT, whilst control rats in a predictable environment were more sensitive to novelty and change. Responses in the new ambiguity test correlated positively with those in single ambiguous cue tests, and may provide a measure of attention bias. The RR task was quicker to train than previous automated RP tasks. Together, they could be used to disentangle how reward and punishment processes underpin affect-induced cognitive biases. PMID:25106739

  1. Housing conditions affect rat responses to two types of ambiguity in a reward-reward discrimination cognitive bias task.

    PubMed

    Parker, Richard M A; Paul, Elizabeth S; Burman, Oliver H P; Browne, William J; Mendl, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Decision-making under ambiguity in cognitive bias tasks is a promising new indicator of affective valence in animals. Rat studies support the hypothesis that animals in a negative affective state evaluate ambiguous cues negatively. Prior automated operant go/go judgement bias tasks have involved training rats that an auditory cue of one frequency predicts a Reward and a cue of a different frequency predicts a Punisher (RP task), and then measuring whether ambiguous cues of intermediate frequency are judged as predicting reward ('optimism') or punishment ('pessimism'). We investigated whether an automated Reward-Reward (RR) task yielded similar results to, and was faster to train than, RP tasks. We also introduced a new ambiguity test (simultaneous presentation of the two training cues) alongside the standard single ambiguous cue test. Half of the rats experienced an unpredictable housing treatment (UHT) designed to induce a negative state. Control rats were relatively 'pessimistic', whilst UHT rats were quicker, but no less accurate, in their responses in the RR test, and showed less anxiety-like behaviour in independent tests. A possible reason for these findings is that rats adapted to and were stimulated by UHT, whilst control rats in a predictable environment were more sensitive to novelty and change. Responses in the new ambiguity test correlated positively with those in single ambiguous cue tests, and may provide a measure of attention bias. The RR task was quicker to train than previous automated RP tasks. Together, they could be used to disentangle how reward and punishment processes underpin affect-induced cognitive biases. PMID:25106739

  2. Computed Tomography Number Measurement Consistency Under Different Beam Hardening Conditions: Comparison Between Dual-Energy Spectral Computed Tomography and Conventional Computed Tomography Imaging in Phantom Experiment

    PubMed Central

    He, Tian; Qian, Xiaojun; Zhai, Renyou; Yang, Zongtao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare computed tomography (CT) number measurement consistency under different beam hardening conditions in phantom experiment between dual-energy spectral CT and conventional CT imaging. Materials and Methods A phantom with 8 cells in periphery region and 1 cell in central region were used. The 8 conditioning tubes in the periphery region were filled with 1 of the 3 iodine solutions to simulate different beam hardening conditions: 0 for no beam hardening (NBH), 20 mg/mL for weak beam hardening (WBH) and 50 mg/mL for severe beam hardening (SBH) condition. Test tube filled with 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 50 mg/mL iodine solution was placed in the central cell alternately. The phantom was scanned with conventional CT mode with 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp and dual energy spectral CT mode. For spectral CT, 11 monochromatic image sets from 40 to 140 keV with interval of 10 keV were reconstructed. The CT number shift caused by beam hardening was evaluated by measuring the CT number difference (ΔCT) with and without beam hardening, with the following formulas: ΔCTWBH = |CTWBH − CTNBH| and ΔCTSBH = |CTSBH − CTNBH|. Data were compared with 1-way analysis of variance. Results Under both WBH and SBH conditions, the CT number shifts in all monochromatic image sets were less than those for polychromatic images (all P < 0.001). Under WBH condition, the maximum CT number shift was less than 6 Hounsfield units for monochromatic spectral CT images of all energy levels; under SBH condition, only monochromatic images at 70 keV and 80 keV had CT number shift less than 6 HU. Conclusion Dual energy spectral CT imaging provided more accurate CT number measurement than conventional CT under various beam hardening conditions. The optimal keV level for monochromatic spectral CT images with the most accurate CT number measurement depends on the severities of beam hardening condition. PMID:26196347

  3. Metacognition of Multi-Tasking: How Well Do We Predict the Costs of Divided Attention?

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Jason R.; Benjamin, Aaron S.; McCarley, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Risky multi-tasking, such as texting while driving, may occur because people misestimate the costs of divided attention. In two experiments, participants performed a computerized visual-manual tracking task in which they attempted to keep a mouse cursor within a small target that moved erratically around a circular track. They then separately performed an auditory n-back task. After practicing both tasks separately, participants received feedback on their single-task tracking performance and predicted their dual-task tracking performance before finally performing the two tasks simultaneously. Most participants correctly predicted reductions in tracking performance under dual-task conditions, with a majority overestimating the costs of dual-tasking. However, the between-subjects correlation between predicted and actual performance decrements was near zero. This combination of results suggests that people do anticipate costs of multi-tasking, but have little metacognitive insight on the extent to which they are personally vulnerable to the risks of divided attention, relative to other people. PMID:24490818

  4. Questioning and Reading Goals: Information-Seeking Questions Asked on Scientific Texts Read under Different Task Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishiwa, Koto; Sanjose, Vicente; Otero, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Background: A number of studies report that few questions are asked in classrooms and that many of them are shallow questions. Aims: This study investigates the way in which reading goals determine questioning on scientific texts. Reading goals were manipulated through two different tasks: reading for understanding versus reading to solve a…

  5. Dual-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKitric, Eloise J.

    The impact of economic conditions on two-earner families was examined. Three family types were studied: (1) dual-career family--both the husband and wife are in the labor force but in occupations classified as professional-technical or managerial; (2) dual-earner--both the husband and wife are in the labor force; and (3) traditional family--the…

  6. Adolescent and adult rats differ in the amnesic effects of acute ethanol in two hippocampus-dependent tasks: Trace and contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Pamela S; Barnet, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Experience-produced deficits in trace conditioning and context conditioning have been useful tools for examining the role of the hippocampus in learning. It has also been suggested that learning in these tasks is especially vulnerable to neurotoxic effects of alcohol during key developmental periods such as adolescence. In five experiments we systematically examined the presence and source of age-dependent vulnerability to the memory-disrupting effects of acute ethanol in trace conditioning and contextual fear conditioning. In Experiment 1a pre-training ethanol disrupted trace conditioning more strongly in adolescent (postnatal day, PD30-35) than adult rats (PD65-75). In Experiment 1b when pre-training ethanol was accompanied by pre-test ethanol no deficit in trace conditioning was observed in adolescents, suggesting that state-dependent retrieval failure mediated ethanol's disruption of trace conditioning at this age. Experiment 2a and b examined the effect of ethanol pretreatment on context conditioning. Here, adult but not adolescent rats were impaired in conditioned freezing to context cues. Experiment 2c explored state-dependency of this effect. Pre-training ethanol continued to disrupt context conditioning in adults even when ethanol was also administered prior to test. Collectively these findings reveal clear age-dependent and task-dependent vulnerabilities in ethanol's disruptive effects on hippocampus-dependent memory. Adolescents were more disrupted by ethanol in trace conditioning than adults, and adults were more disrupted by ethanol in context conditioning than adolescents. We suggest that adolescents may be more susceptible to changes in internal state (state-dependent retrieval failure) than adults and that ethanol disrupted performance in trace and context conditioning through different mechanisms. Relevance of these findings to theories of hippocampus function is discussed. PMID:26192910

  7. Conditions under Which Children Experience Inhibitory Difficulty with a "Button-Press" Go/No-Go Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andrew; Riggs, Kevin J.

    2006-01-01

    Go/no-go tasks seem to provide a simple marker of inhibitory development in young children. Children are told to respond to one stimulus on go trials but to make no response to another stimulus on no-go trials; responding on no-go trials is assumed to reflect a failure to inhibit the go response. However, there is evidence to suggest that a type…

  8. 6-Hydroxydopamine and radiofrequency lesions of the lateral entorhinal cortex facilitate an operant appetitive conditioning task in mice.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Soumireu-Mourat, B

    1981-07-01

    The entorhinal cortex seems heterogeneous as dopaminergic terminals are present only in the anterior part of the lateral entorhinal cortex. In order to clarify the interaction of this cortex with the hippocampus in memory processes, the effects of either 6-hydroxydopamine or radiofrequency bilateral lesions were compared. Both lesions enhance the retention of a Skinner task with continuous reinforcement schedule. Involvement of dopamine in memory processes is discussed. PMID:7254716

  9. Allocation of Attentional Resources toward a Secondary Cognitive Task Leads to Compromised Ankle Proprioceptive Performance in Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Sato, Yuki; Iimura, Naoyuki; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether increased attentional demands influence the assessment of ankle joint proprioceptive ability in young adults. We used a dual-task condition, in which participants performed an ankle ipsilateral position-matching task with and without a secondary serial auditory subtraction task during target angle encoding. Two experiments were performed with two different cohorts: one in which the auditory subtraction task was easy (experiment 1a) and one in which it was difficult (experiment 1b). The results showed that, compared with the single-task condition, participants had higher absolute error under dual-task conditions in experiment 1b. The reduction in position-matching accuracy with an attentionally demanding cognitive task suggests that allocation of attentional resources toward a difficult second task can lead to compromised ankle proprioceptive performance. Therefore, these findings indicate that the difficulty level of the cognitive task might be the possible critical factor that decreased accuracy of position-matching task. We conclude that increased attentional demand with difficult cognitive task does influence the assessment of ankle joint proprioceptive ability in young adults when measured using an ankle ipsilateral position-matching task. PMID:24523966

  10. Progesterone to ovariectomized mice enhances cognitive performance in the spontaneous alternation, object recognition, but not placement, water maze, and contextual and cued conditioned fear tasks

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Cheryl A.; Walf, Alicia A.

    2008-01-01

    Research on how steroid hormones mediate mnemonic processes have focused on effects of 17β-estradiol (E2); yet, progesterone (P4) co-varies with E2 across endogenous hormonal milieu, and itself may influence cognitive processes. We investigated the hypothesis that acute P4 treatment enhances cognitive performance compared to vehicle. Ovariectomized (OVX) c57/BL6J mice were randomly assigned to be subcutaneously injected with oil vehicle or P4 (10 mg/kg). Mice were trained in the spontaneous alternation, object recognition, object placement, water maze, or fear conditioning tasks, and injected with vehicle or P4 before training or immediately post-training, and then were tested 1, 4, or 24 h later. The data obtained from these experiments supported our hypothesis. P4 increased the percentage of spontaneous alterations made in a T-maze more so than did vehicle. P4, compared to vehicle, increased the percentage of time spent exploring the novel object in the object recognition task, but did not alter performance in the object placement task. P4, compared to vehicle, decreased latencies to reach the location in the water maze where the platform had been during training in a probe trial, but did not alter performance in the control, cued trial. Compared to vehicle, P4 treatment increased freezing in contextual and cued fear testing. Thus, acute P4 treatment to OVX mice can improve cognitive performance across a variety of tasks. PMID:18455450

  11. Boundary conditions for the influence of unfamiliar non-target primes in unconscious evaluative priming: The moderating role of attentional task sets.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Markus; Sim, Eun-Jim; Wentura, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Evaluative priming by masked emotional stimuli that are not consciously perceived has been taken as evidence that affective stimulus evaluation can also occur unconsciously. However, as masked priming effects were small and frequently observed only for familiar primes that there also presented as visible targets in an evaluative decision task, priming was thought to reflect primarily response activation based on acquired S-R associations and not evaluative semantic stimulus analysis. The present study therefore assessed across three experiments boundary conditions for the emergence of masked evaluative priming effects with unfamiliar primes in an evaluative decision task and investigated the role of the frequency of target repetition on priming with pictorial and verbal stimuli. While familiar primes elicited robust priming effects in all conditions, priming effects by unfamiliar primes were reliably obtained for low repetition (pictures) or unrepeated targets (words), but not for targets repeated at a high frequency. This suggests that unfamiliar masked stimuli only elicit evaluative priming effects when the task set associated with the visible target involves evaluative semantic analysis and is not based on S-R triggered responding as for high repetition targets. The present results therefore converge with the growing body of evidence demonstrating attentional control influences on unconscious processing. PMID:25680827

  12. Helicopter control response types for hover and low-speed near-earth tasks in degraded visual conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, Christopher L.; Hart, Daniel C.; Hoh, Roger H.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator and Dig 1 Computer Image Generator (CIG) have been used to simulate a helicopter cockpit in a degraded visual environment in order to assess several control-response types during low-level flight. CIG visibility was reduced to the point where the horizon and other far-field cues were indiscernible. The control-response types encompassed a rate command, an attitude command/hold, and a translational rate command; piloting tasks were hover, vertical landing, a pirouette, acceleration/deceleration, and a sidestep maneuver. Visual cue ratings with a rate-command response type were initially collected to set the usable cue environment at 3. A rate-command response type provided poor Level 2 handling qualities.

  13. Analytical prediction and experimental verification of performance at various operating conditions of a dual-mode traveling wave tube with multistage depressed collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Kosmahl, H. G.; Ramins, P.; Stankiewicz, N.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of analytical and experimental results is presented for a high performance dual-mode traveling wave tube (TWT) operated over a wide range conditions. The computations are carried out with advanced multidimensional computer programs. These programs model the electron beam as a series of disks or rings of charge and follow their trajectories from the rf input of the TWT through the slow-wave structure refocusing system to their points of impacts in the depressed collector. TWT performance, collector efficiency, and collector current distribution are computed and compared with measurements. Very good agreement was obtained between computed and measured TWT performance and collector efficiencies, and the computer design of a highly efficient collector was demonstrated.

  14. Auditory temporal preparation induced by rhythmic cues during concurrent auditory working memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Cutanda, Diana; Correa, Ángel; Sanabria, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The present study investigated whether participants can develop temporal preparation driven by auditory isochronous rhythms when concurrently performing an auditory working memory (WM) task. In Experiment 1, participants had to respond to an auditory target presented after a regular or an irregular sequence of auditory stimuli while concurrently performing a Sternberg-type WM task. Results showed that participants responded faster after regular compared with irregular rhythms and that this effect was not affected by WM load; however, the lack of a significant main effect of WM load made it difficult to draw any conclusion regarding the influence of the dual-task manipulation in Experiment 1. In order to enhance dual-task interference, Experiment 2 combined the auditory rhythm procedure with an auditory N-Back task, which required WM updating (monitoring and coding of the information) and was presumably more demanding than the mere rehearsal of the WM task used in Experiment 1. Results now clearly showed dual-task interference effects (slower reaction times [RTs] in the high- vs. the low-load condition). However, such interference did not affect temporal preparation induced by rhythms, with faster RTs after regular than after irregular sequences in the high-load and low-load conditions. These results revealed that secondary tasks demanding memory updating, relative to tasks just demanding rehearsal, produced larger interference effects on overall RTs in the auditory rhythm task. Nevertheless, rhythm regularity exerted a strong temporal preparation effect that survived the interference of the WM task even when both tasks competed for processing resources within the auditory modality. PMID:25893682

  15. A Study of Some Conditions Relating to the Retarded Adult's Stereotyped Responding in a Binary-Choice Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Siegel, Paul S.

    1977-01-01

    Examined in a longitudinal study were the effects of conditions on alternation and perseveration of eight moderately and severely mentally retarded institutionalized adults. Available from: Ablex Publishing Corporation, 355 Chestnut Street, Norwood, New Jersey 07648. (CL)

  16. Oral intake of γ-aminobutyric acid affects mood and activities of central nervous system during stressed condition induced by mental tasks.

    PubMed

    Yoto, A; Murao, S; Motoki, M; Yokoyama, Y; Horie, N; Takeshima, K; Masuda, K; Kim, M; Yokogoshi, H

    2012-09-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a kind of amino acid contained in green tea leaves and other foods. Several reports have shown that GABA might affect brain protein synthesis, improve many brain functions such as memory and study capability, lower the blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats, and may also have a relaxation effect in humans. However, the evidence for its mood-improving function is still not sufficient. In this study, we investigated how the oral intake of GABA influences human adults psychologically and physiologically under a condition of mental stress. Sixty-three adults (28 males, 35 females) participated in a randomized, single blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-designed study over two experiment days. Capsules containing 100 mg of GABA or dextrin as a placebo were used as test samples. The results showed that EEG activities including alpha band and beta band brain waves decreased depending on the mental stress task loads, and the condition of 30 min after GABA intake diminished this decrease compared with the placebo condition. That is to say, GABA might have alleviated the stress induced by the mental tasks. This effect also corresponded with the results of the POMS scores. PMID:22203366

  17. Modelling individual differences in the form of Pavlovian conditioned approach responses: a dual learning systems approach with factored representations.

    PubMed

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Flagel, Shelly B; Robinson, Terry E; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2014-02-01

    Reinforcement Learning has greatly influenced models of conditioning, providing powerful explanations of acquired behaviour and underlying physiological observations. However, in recent autoshaping experiments in rats, variation in the form of Pavlovian conditioned responses (CRs) and associated dopamine activity, have questioned the classical hypothesis that phasic dopamine activity corresponds to a reward prediction error-like signal arising from a classical Model-Free system, necessary for Pavlovian conditioning. Over the course of Pavlovian conditioning using food as the unconditioned stimulus (US), some rats (sign-trackers) come to approach and engage the conditioned stimulus (CS) itself - a lever - more and more avidly, whereas other rats (goal-trackers) learn to approach the location of food delivery upon CS presentation. Importantly, although both sign-trackers and goal-trackers learn the CS-US association equally well, only in sign-trackers does phasic dopamine activity show classical reward prediction error-like bursts. Furthermore, neither the acquisition nor the expression of a goal-tracking CR is dopamine-dependent. Here we present a computational model that can account for such individual variations. We show that a combination of a Model-Based system and a revised Model-Free system can account for the development of distinct CRs in rats. Moreover, we show that revising a classical Model-Free system to individually process stimuli by using factored representations can explain why classical dopaminergic patterns may be observed for some rats and not for others depending on the CR they develop. In addition, the model can account for other behavioural and pharmacological results obtained using the same, or similar, autoshaping procedures. Finally, the model makes it possible to draw a set of experimental predictions that may be verified in a modified experimental protocol. We suggest that further investigation of factored representations in computational

  18. Modelling Individual Differences in the Form of Pavlovian Conditioned Approach Responses: A Dual Learning Systems Approach with Factored Representations

    PubMed Central

    Lesaint, Florian; Sigaud, Olivier; Flagel, Shelly B.; Robinson, Terry E.; Khamassi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Reinforcement Learning has greatly influenced models of conditioning, providing powerful explanations of acquired behaviour and underlying physiological observations. However, in recent autoshaping experiments in rats, variation in the form of Pavlovian conditioned responses (CRs) and associated dopamine activity, have questioned the classical hypothesis that phasic dopamine activity corresponds to a reward prediction error-like signal arising from a classical Model-Free system, necessary for Pavlovian conditioning. Over the course of Pavlovian conditioning using food as the unconditioned stimulus (US), some rats (sign-trackers) come to approach and engage the conditioned stimulus (CS) itself – a lever – more and more avidly, whereas other rats (goal-trackers) learn to approach the location of food delivery upon CS presentation. Importantly, although both sign-trackers and goal-trackers learn the CS-US association equally well, only in sign-trackers does phasic dopamine activity show classical reward prediction error-like bursts. Furthermore, neither the acquisition nor the expression of a goal-tracking CR is dopamine-dependent. Here we present a computational model that can account for such individual variations. We show that a combination of a Model-Based system and a revised Model-Free system can account for the development of distinct CRs in rats. Moreover, we show that revising a classical Model-Free system to individually process stimuli by using factored representations can explain why classical dopaminergic patterns may be observed for some rats and not for others depending on the CR they develop. In addition, the model can account for other behavioural and pharmacological results obtained using the same, or similar, autoshaping procedures. Finally, the model makes it possible to draw a set of experimental predictions that may be verified in a modified experimental protocol. We suggest that further investigation of factored representations in

  19. Study Task for Determining the Effects of Boost-Phase Environments on Densified Propellants Thermal Conditions for Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberbusch, Mark S.; Meyer, Michael L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermodynamic study has been conducted that investigated the effects of the boost-phase environment on densified propellant thermal conditions for expendable launch vehicles. Two thermodynamic models were developed and utilized to bound the expected thermodynamic conditions inside the cryogenic liquid hydrogen and oxygen propellant tanks of an Atlas IIAS/Centaur launch vehicle during the initial phases of flight. The ideal isentropic compression model was developed to predict minimum pressurant gas requirements. The thermal equilibrium model was developed to predict the maximum pressurant gas requirements. The models were modified to simulate the required flight tank pressure profiles through ramp pressurization, liquid expulsion, and tank venting. The transient parameters investigated were: liquid temperature, liquid level, and pressurant gas consumption. Several mission scenarios were analyzed using the thermodynamic models, and the results indicate that flying an Atlas IIAS launch vehicle with densified propellants is feasible and beneficial but may require some minor changes to the vehicle.

  20. Differential biofilm formation and chemical disinfection resistance of sessile cells of Listeria monocytogenes strains under monospecies and dual-species (with Salmonella enterica) conditions.

    PubMed

    Kostaki, Maria; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Braxou, Elli; Nychas, George-John; Giaouris, Efstathios

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible influence of bacterial intra- and interspecies interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica to develop mixed-culture biofilms on an abiotic substratum, as well as on the subsequent resistance of sessile cells to chemical disinfection. Initially, three strains from each species were selected and left to attach and form biofilms on stainless steel (SS) coupons incubated at 15°C for 144 h, in periodically renewable tryptone soy broth (TSB), under either monoculture or mixed-culture (mono-/dual-species) conditions. Following biofilm formation, mixed-culture sessile communities were subjected to 6-min disinfection treatments with (i) benzalkonium chloride (50 ppm), (ii) sodium hypochlorite (10 ppm), (iii) peracetic acid (10 ppm), and (iv) a mixture of hydrogen peroxide (5 ppm) and peracetic acid (5 ppm). Results revealed that both species reached similar biofilm counts (ca. 10(5) CFU cm(-2)) and that, in general, interspecies interactions did not have any significant effect either on the biofilm-forming ability (as this was assessed by agar plating enumeration of the mechanically detached biofilm bacteria) or on the antimicrobial resistance of each individual species. Interestingly, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis clearly showed that the three L. monocytogenes strains did not contribute at the same level either to the formation of mixed-culture sessile communities (mono-/dual species) or to their antimicrobial recalcitrance. Additionally, the simultaneous existence inside the biofilm structure of S. enterica cells seemed to influence the occurrence and resistance pattern of L. monocytogenes strains. In sum, this study highlights the impact of microbial interactions taking place inside a mixed-culture sessile community on both its population dynamics and disinfection resistance. PMID:22307304

  1. Differential Biofilm Formation and Chemical Disinfection Resistance of Sessile Cells of Listeria monocytogenes Strains under Monospecies and Dual-Species (with Salmonella enterica) Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kostaki, Maria; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Braxou, Elli; Nychas, George-John

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible influence of bacterial intra- and interspecies interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica to develop mixed-culture biofilms on an abiotic substratum, as well as on the subsequent resistance of sessile cells to chemical disinfection. Initially, three strains from each species were selected and left to attach and form biofilms on stainless steel (SS) coupons incubated at 15°C for 144 h, in periodically renewable tryptone soy broth (TSB), under either monoculture or mixed-culture (mono-/dual-species) conditions. Following biofilm formation, mixed-culture sessile communities were subjected to 6-min disinfection treatments with (i) benzalkonium chloride (50 ppm), (ii) sodium hypochlorite (10 ppm), (iii) peracetic acid (10 ppm), and (iv) a mixture of hydrogen peroxide (5 ppm) and peracetic acid (5 ppm). Results revealed that both species reached similar biofilm counts (ca. 105 CFU cm−2) and that, in general, interspecies interactions did not have any significant effect either on the biofilm-forming ability (as this was assessed by agar plating enumeration of the mechanically detached biofilm bacteria) or on the antimicrobial resistance of each individual species. Interestingly, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis clearly showed that the three L. monocytogenes strains did not contribute at the same level either to the formation of mixed-culture sessile communities (mono-/dual species) or to their antimicrobial recalcitrance. Additionally, the simultaneous existence inside the biofilm structure of S. enterica cells seemed to influence the occurrence and resistance pattern of L. monocytogenes strains. In sum, this study highlights the impact of microbial interactions taking place inside a mixed-culture sessile community on both its population dynamics and disinfection resistance. PMID:22307304

  2. Pre-test metyrapone impairs memory recall in fear conditioning tasks: lack of interaction with β-adrenergic activity

    PubMed Central

    Careaga, Mariella B. L.; Tiba, Paula A.; Ota, Simone M.; Suchecki, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive processes, such as learning and memory, are essential for our adaptation to environmental changes and consequently for survival. Numerous studies indicate that hormones secreted during stressful situations, such as glucocorticoids (GCs), adrenaline and noradrenaline, regulate memory functions, modulating aversive memory consolidation and retrieval, in an interactive and complementary way. Thus, the facilitatory effects of GCs on memory consolidation as well as their suppressive effects on retrieval are substantially explained by this interaction. On the other hand, low levels of GCs are also associated with negative effects on memory consolidation and retrieval and the mechanisms involved are not well understood. The present study sought to investigate the consequences of blocking the rise of GCs on fear memory retrieval in multiple tests, assessing the participation of β-adrenergic signaling on this effect. Metyrapone (GCs synthesis inhibitor; 75 mg/kg), administered 90 min before the first test of contextual or tone fear conditioning (TFC), negatively affected animals’ performances, but this effect did not persist on a subsequent test, when the conditioned response was again expressed. This result suggested that the treatment impaired fear memory retrieval during the first evaluation. The administration immediately after the first test did not affect the animals’ performances in contextual fear conditioning (CFC), suggesting that the drug did not interfere with processes triggered by memory reactivation. Moreover, metyrapone effects were independent of β-adrenergic signaling, since concurrent administration with propranolol (2 mg/kg), a β-adrenergic antagonist, did not modify the effects induced by metyrapone alone. These results demonstrate that pre-test metyrapone administration led to negative effects on fear memory retrieval and this action was independent of a β-adrenergic signaling. PMID:25784866

  3. Task reports on developing techniques for scattering by 3D composite structures and to generate new solutions in diffraction theory using higher order boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    There are two tasks described in this report. First, an extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. With the introduction of a Fourier expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields, a coupled two dimensional system is generated and solved via the finite element method. An exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh and the fast fourier transformation is used to evaluate the boundary integrals for low O(n) memory demand when an iterative solution algorithm is used. Second, the diffraction by a material discontinuity in a thick dielectric/ferrite layer is considered by modeling the layer as a distributed current sheet obeying generalized sheet transition conditions (GSTC's).

  4. Task reports on developing techniques for scattering by 3D composite structures and to generate new solutions in diffraction theory using higher order boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    There are two tasks described in this report. First, an extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and an exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that it leads to convolutional boundary operators for low O(n) memory demand. Second, rigorous uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) diffraction coefficients are presented for a coated convex cylinder simulated with generalized impedance boundary conditions. Ray solutions are obtained which remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly those in the deep lit and shadow regions. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder.

  5. A comparative analysis of functional connectivity data in resting and task-related conditions of the brain for disease signature of OCD.

    PubMed

    Shenas, Sona Khaneh; Halici, Ugur; Çiçek, Metehan

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a frequent, chronic disorder producing intrusive thoughts which results in repetitive behaviors. It is thought that this psychological disorder occurs due to abnormal functional connectivity in certain regions of the brain called Default Mode Network (DMN) mainly. Recently, functional MRI (FMRI) studies were performed in order to compare the differences in brain activity between patients with OCD and healthy individuals through different conditions of the brain. Our previous study on extraction of disease signature for OCD that is determining the features for discrimination of OCD patients from healthy individuals based on their resting-sate functional connectivity (rs-FC) data had given encouraging results. In the present study, functional data extracted from FMRI images of subjects under imagination task (maintaining an image in mind, im-FC) is considered. The aim of this study is to compare classification results achieved from both resting and task-related (imagination) conditions. This research has shown quite interesting and promising results using the same classification (SVM) method. PMID:25570124

  6. The Effect of Oxygen Supply on the Dual Growth Kinetics of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans under Acidic Conditions for Biogas Desulfurization

    PubMed Central

    Namgung, Hyeong-Kyu; Song, JiHyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, to simulate a biogas desulfurization process, a modified Monod-Gompertz kinetic model incorporating a dissolved oxygen (DO) effect was proposed for a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) strain, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, under extremely acidic conditions of pH 2. The kinetic model was calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from a bubble-column bioreactor. The SOB strain was effective for H2S degradation, but the H2S removal efficiency dropped rapidly at DO concentrations less than 2.0 mg/L. A low H2S loading was effectively treated with oxygen supplied in a range of 2%–6%, but a H2S guideline of 10 ppm could not be met, even with an oxygen supply greater than 6%, when the H2S loading was high at a short gas retention time of 1 min and a H2S inlet concentration of 5000 ppm. The oxygen supply should be increased in the aerobic desulfurization to meet the H2S guideline; however, the excess oxygen above the optimum was not effective because of the decline in oxygen efficiency. The model estimation indicated that the maximum H2S removal rate was approximately 400 ppm/%-O2 at the influent oxygen concentration of 4.9% under the given condition. The kinetic model with a low DO threshold for the interacting substrates was a useful tool to simulate the effect of the oxygen supply on the H2S removal and to determine the optimal oxygen concentration. PMID:25633028

  7. The effect of oxygen supply on the dual growth kinetics of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans under acidic conditions for biogas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Namgung, Hyeong-Kyu; Song, JiHyeon

    2015-02-01

    In this study, to simulate a biogas desulfurization process, a modified Monod-Gompertz kinetic model incorporating a dissolved oxygen (DO) effect was proposed for a sulfur-oxidizing bacterial (SOB) strain, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, under extremely acidic conditions of pH 2. The kinetic model was calibrated and validated using experimental data obtained from a bubble-column bioreactor. The SOB strain was effective for H2S degradation, but the H2S removal efficiency dropped rapidly at DO concentrations less than 2.0 mg/L. A low H2S loading was effectively treated with oxygen supplied in a range of 2%-6%, but a H2S guideline of 10 ppm could not be met, even with an oxygen supply greater than 6%, when the H2S loading was high at a short gas retention time of 1 min and a H2S inlet concentration of 5000 ppm. The oxygen supply should be increased in the aerobic desulfurization to meet the H2S guideline; however, the excess oxygen above the optimum was not effective because of the decline in oxygen efficiency. The model estimation indicated that the maximum H2S removal rate was approximately 400 ppm/%-O2 at the influent oxygen concentration of 4.9% under the given condition. The kinetic model with a low DO threshold for the interacting substrates was a useful tool to simulate the effect of the oxygen supply on the H2S removal and to determine the optimal oxygen concentration. PMID:25633028

  8. Multicomponent physical exercise with simultaneous cognitive training to enhance dual-task walking of older adults: a secondary analysis of a 6-month randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Eggenberger, Patrick; Theill, Nathan; Holenstein, Stefan; Schumacher, Vera; de Bruin, Eling D

    2015-01-01

    Background About one-third of people older than 65 years fall at least once a year. Physical exercise has been previously demonstrated to improve gait, enhance physical fitness, and prevent falls. Nonetheless, the addition of cognitive training components may potentially increase these effects, since cognitive impairment is related to gait irregularities and fall risk. We hypothesized that simultaneous cognitive–physical training would lead to greater improvements in dual-task (DT) gait compared to exclusive physical training. Methods Elderly persons older than 70 years and without cognitive impairment were randomly assigned to the following groups: 1) virtual reality video game dancing (DANCE), 2) treadmill walking with simultaneous verbal memory training (MEMORY), or 3) treadmill walking (PHYS). Each program was complemented with strength and balance exercises. Two 1-hour training sessions per week over 6 months were applied. Gait variables, functional fitness (Short Physical Performance Battery, 6-minute walk), and fall frequencies were assessed at baseline, after 3 months and 6 months, and at 1-year follow-up. Multiple regression analyses with planned comparisons were carried out. Results Eighty-nine participants were randomized to three groups initially; 71 completed the training and 47 were available at 1-year follow-up. DANCE/MEMORY showed a significant advantage compared to PHYS in DT costs of step time variability at fast walking (P=0.044). Training-specific gait adaptations were found on comparing DANCE and MEMORY: DANCE reduced step time at fast walking (P=0.007) and MEMORY reduced gait variability in DT and DT costs at preferred walking speed (both trend P=0.062). Global linear time effects showed improved gait (P<0.05), functional fitness (P<0.05), and reduced fall frequency (−77%, P<0.001). Only single-task fast walking, gait variability at preferred walking speed, and Short Physical Performance Battery were reduced at follow-up (all P<0.05 or

  9. High versus low fat/sugar food affects the behavioral, but not the cortisol response of marmoset monkeys in a conditioned-place-preference task.

    PubMed

    Duarte, R B M; Patrono, E; Borges, A C; Tomaz, C; Ventura, R; Gasbarri, A; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Barros, M

    2015-02-01

    The effect of a high (chocolate) versus low fat/sugar (chow) food on a conditioned-place-preference (CPP) task was evaluated in marmoset monkeys. Anxiety-related behaviors and cortisol levels before and after the CPP task were also measured. Subjects were habituated to a two-compartment CPP box and then, on alternate days, had access to only one compartment during daily 15-min conditionings, for a total of 14 trials. Marmosets were provisioned with chocolate chips in the CC-paired compartment on odd-numbered trials and standard chow in the CW-paired compartment on even-numbered trials. They were then tested for preferring the CC-paired context after a 24-h interval. During the conditioning, a significantly greater amount (in kcal/trial) of chocolate was consumed than chow, yet the foraging pattern of both food types was similar. On the test trial, the time spent in the CC-paired context increased significantly compared to pre-CPP levels, yet this response was not readily predicted by baseline behavioral or cortisol levels. Also, the chocolate CPP response was positively correlated with foraging time, rather than the amount of calories consumed. The sudden absence of the food increased exploration, while the chocolate CPP effect was associated with vigilance - both anxiety-related behaviors in marmosets. This behavioral profile occurred regardless of any concomitant change or correlation with cortisol. Therefore, the high fat/sugar food was more prone to be overly consumed by the marmosets, to induce a CPP response and to lead to anxiety-related behavior in its absence. PMID:25447426

  10. The effect of cognitive task complexity on gait stability in adolescents following concussion.

    PubMed

    Howell, David R; Osternig, Louis R; Koester, Michael C; Chou, Li-Shan

    2014-06-01

    Concussion has been reported to result in disturbances to motor and cognitive functions. One way to examine these disturbances is through a dual-task assessment. Many secondary cognitive tasks have been proposed as appropriate tools during concussion assessment; however, task complexity has not been compared within a dual-task investigation. The purpose of this study was to prospectively examine how gait balance control was affected by three secondary cognitive tasks of varying complexity following concussion. Forty-six adolescents completed a dual-task walking protocol which included walking without any cognitive task (WALK), walking while completing a single auditory Stroop (SAS), multiple auditory Stroop (MAS), and a question and answer task (Q&A). Those who sustained a concussion (n = 23, mean age 15.4 ± 1.3 years) reported to the laboratory within 72 h of injury and in the following time increments: 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 2 months post-injury. Twenty-three healthy control subjects (mean age 15.4 ± 1.3 years), individually matched to each concussion subject, completed the same protocol in similar time increments. The concussion group demonstrated greater total center of mass (COM) medial/lateral displacement in the MAS and Q&A conditions compared with the control group. The concussion group also displayed the greatest peak COM anterior velocity in the least complex condition (WALK), and a significant decrease was observed as task complexity increased (SAS > MAS > Q&A). These findings indicate that gait balance control may be affected by task complexity following concussion and represent a way to identify motor recovery following concussion. PMID:24531643

  11. Dual Circuitry for Odor–Shock Conditioning during Infancy: Corticosterone Switches between Fear and Attraction via Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Moriceau, Stephanie; Wilson, Donald A.; Levine, Seymour; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2006-01-01

    Rat pups must learn maternal odor to support attachment behaviors, including nursing and orientation toward the mother. Neonates have a sensitive period for rapid, robust odor learning characterized by increased ability to learn odor preferences and decreased ability to learn odor aversions. Specifically, odor–0.5 mA shock association paradoxically causes an odor preference and coincident failure of amygdala activation in pups until postnatal day 10 (P10). Because sensitive-period termination coincides with a declining “stress hyporesponsive period” when corticosterone release is attenuated, we explored the role of corticosterone in sensitive-period termination. Odor was paired with 0.5 mA shock in either sensitive-period (P8) or postsensitive-period (P12) pups while manipulating corticosterone. We then assessed preference/aversion learning and the olfactory neural circuitry underlying its acquisition. Although sensitive-period control paired odor–shock pups learned an odor preference without amygdala participation, systemic (3 mg/kg, i.p.; 24 h and 30 min before training) or intra-amygdala corticosterone (50 or 100 ng; during training) permitted precocious odor-aversion learning and evoked amygdala neural activity similar to that expressed by older pups. In postsensitive-period (P12) pups, control paired odor–shock pups showed an odor aversion and amygdala activation, whereas corticosterone-depleted (adrenalectomized) paired odor–shock pups showed odor-preference learning and activation of an odor learning circuit characteristic of the sensitive period. Intra-amygdala corticosterone receptor antagonist (0.3 ng; during training) infused into postsensitive-period (P12) paired odor–shock pups also showed odor-preference learning. These results suggest corticosterone is important in sensitive-period termination and developmental emergence of olfactory fear conditioning, acting via the amygdala as a switch between fear and attraction. Because maternal

  12. Task shifting in primary eye care: how sensitive and specific are common signs and symptoms to predict conditions requiring referral to specialist eye personnel?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The inclusion of primary eye care (PEC) in the scope of services provided by general primary health care (PHC) workers is a ‘task shifting’ strategy to help increase access to eye care in Africa. PEC training, in theory, teaches PHC workers to recognize specific symptoms and signs and to treat or refer according to these. We tested the sensitivity of these symptoms and signs at identifying significant eye pathology. Methods Specialized eye care personnel in three African countries evaluated specific symptoms and signs, using a torch alone, in patients who presented to eye clinics. Following this, they conducted a more thorough examination necessary to make a definite diagnosis and manage the patient. The sensitivities and specificities of the symptoms and signs for identifying eyes with conditions requiring referral or threatening sight were calculated. Results Sensitivities of individual symptoms and signs to detect sight threatening pathology ranged from 6.0% to 55.1%; specificities ranged from 8.6 to 98.9. Using a combination of symptoms or signs increased the sensitivity to 80.8 but specificity was 53.2. Conclusions In this study, the sensitivity and specificity of commonly used symptoms and signs were too low to be useful in guiding PHC workers to accurately identify and refer patients with eye complaints. This raises the question of whether this task shifting strategy is likely to contribute to reducing visual loss or to providing an acceptable quality service. PMID:25860992

  13. The impact of a concurrent motor task on auditory and visual temporal discrimination tasks.

    PubMed

    Mioni, Giovanna; Grassi, Massimo; Tarantino, Vincenza; Stablum, Franca; Grondin, Simon; Bisiacchi, Patrizia S

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the presence of an interference effect on temporal perception when participants are required to simultaneously execute a nontemporal task. Such interference likely has an attentional source. In the present work, a temporal discrimination task was performed alone or together with a self-paced finger-tapping task used as concurrent, nontemporal task. Temporal durations were presented in either the visual or the auditory modality, and two standard durations (500 and 1,500 ms) were used. For each experimental condition, the participant's threshold was estimated and analyzed. The mean Weber fraction was higher in the visual than in the auditory modality, but only for the subsecond duration, and it was higher with the 500-ms than with the 1,500-ms standard duration. Interestingly, the Weber fraction was significantly higher in the dual-task condition, but only in the visual modality. The results suggest that the processing of time in the auditory modality is likely automatic, but not in the visual modality. PMID:26965441

  14. Characterization of size, strength and structure of aluminum-polymer dual-coagulant flocs under different pH and hydraulic conditions.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hongyan; Gao, Baoyu; Dong, Min; Zhao, Yanxia; Sun, Shenglei; Yanwang; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2013-05-15

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of papermaking sludge product (LA) on coagulation performance and floc properties under different solution pH and hydraulic conditions. LA was synthetized by grafting acrylamide onto the lignin that contained in papermaking sludge. Characterization of LA, such as FTIR, SEM, zeta potential and molecular weight, showed that target product was obtained successfully. LA was used in combination with aluminum sulfate or polyaluminum chloride, namely Al-LA (Al was dosed firstly) and LA-Al (LA was dosed firstly), in humic acid water treatment. Floc properties and coagulation behaviors of aluminum salts and the dual-coagulants were comparatively evaluated. Results showed that DOC removal was improved by LA at pH 4 ~ 9 and the removal variations caused by different pH were decreased. Flocs formed at pH 5 and pH 8 gave quite large floc size. Floc recoverability declined as initial pH increased. Floc size, growth rate and recoverability were in the order of Al-LA>LA-Al>Al. Furthermore, flocs formed at pH 7 showed the weakest resistance to increasing shear force. Fractal dimension was rather high at pH 7 and 8 and it was in the following order: Al>LA-Al>Al-LA. PMID:23542601

  15. Assessment of conditioning-specific movement tasks and physical fitness measures in talent identified under 16-year-old rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Parsonage, Joanna R; Williams, Rhodri S; Rainer, Paul; McKeown, Ian; Williams, Morgan D

    2014-06-01

    Preparedness to train was assessed using a battery of conditioning-specific movement tasks (CSMTs) on a group of talent identified rugby union players (n = 156; age = 15 ± 7 years; stature = 176 ± 7 cm; and mass = 74 ± 14 kg). In addition to explore the link between movement competency and performance, a series of standard fitness tests was conducted. Overall the group's CSMTs competency ratings were low, but task dependent. The proportion of competent players ranged from 14% for a single leg squat to 70% for a double to single leg landing. Players were subsequently grouped based on their CSMTs ratings using cluster analysis. This analysis classified players on features of the CSMT battery that distinguished between groups rather than an arbitrary score. Fitness test scores were then compared between the 3 groups identified. The "general low competency" group jumped 9.1 cm lower (p = 0.0218), sprinted slower across 10, 20 and 40 m (range, p = 0.0126-0.0018) and covered 389 m less (p = 0.0105) Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 distance compared with the "squat competent group." In summary, at this important time before academy selection, most players could not competently perform the CSMTs that underpin rugby conditioning and may not be prepared for the transition into the "training to compete" stage of the suggested long-term athlete development model. For this sample of players, the athlete development process may therefore be unnecessarily inhibited. Moreover, our observations that competency in some CSMTs may explain better running and jumping performances in some players suggest that a focus on monitoring and addressing movement competencies during the training to train stage of player development should be considered. PMID:24852126

  16. Physiological Roles of the Dual Phosphate Transporter Systems in Low and High Phosphate Conditions and in Capsule Maintenance of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiaqi J.; Sinha, Dhriti; Wayne, Kyle J.; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike most bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) has two evolutionarily distinct ABC transporters (Pst1 and Pst2) for inorganic phosphate (Pi) uptake. The genes encoding a two-component regulator (PnpRS) are located immediately upstream of the pst1 operon. Both the pst1 and pst2 operons encode putative PhoU-family regulators (PhoU1 and PhoU2) at their ends. This study addresses why S. pneumoniae contains dual Pi uptake systems and the regulation and contribution of the Pst1 and Pst2 systems in conditions of high (mM) Pi amount and low (μM) Pi amount. We show that in unencapsulated mutants, both pst1 and pst2 can be deleted, and Pi is taken up by a third Na+/Pi co-transporter, designated as NptA. In contrast, either pst1 or pst2 is unexpectedly required for the growth of capsule producing strains. We used a combination of mutational analysis, transcript level determinations by qRT-PCR and RNA-Seq, assays for cellular PnpR~P amounts by SDS-PAGE, and pulse-Pi uptake experiments to study the regulation of Pi uptake. In high Pi medium, PhoU2 serves as the master negative regulator of Pst2 transporter function and PnpR~P levels (post-transcriptionally). ΔphoU2 mutants have high PnpR~P levels and induction of the pst1 operon, poor growth, and sensitivity to antibiotics, possibly due to high Pi accumulation. In low Pi medium, Pst2 is still active, but PnpR~P amount and pst1 operon levels increase. Together, these results support a model in which pneumococcus maintains high Pi transport in high and low Pi conditions that is required for optimal capsule biosynthesis. PMID:27379215

  17. σ(B) affects biofilm formation under the dual stress conditions imposed by adding salt and low temperature in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Ju; Lee, Gilho; Shin, Ji-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    The food-borne pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can form biofilms on various surfaces including food-processing equipment. Biofilms offer survival benefits to the organisms entrapped against environmental insults. Moreover, the σ(B) transcription factor of L. monocytogenes plays an important role in its survival under various stress conditions. In this study, we evaluated whether σ(B) contributes to biofilm formation when L. monocytogenes is grown under various temperatures and media. When the wild-type strain was grown under static biofilm culture below ambient temperature (15°C) for 72 h, the difference in viable cell number (in both planktonic and biofilm cells) between the wild-type and ΔsigB mutant increased by adding NaCl to BHI broth (9% salt BHI > 6% salt BHI > BHI, w/v), and the specific activity of β-galactosidase was highly induced in the wild-type strain grown in 6% salt containing BHI broth. Furthermore, we measured surface-adhered biofilm forming ability using the crystal violet staining method. The wild-type strain formed a four times larger biofilm than that of the ΔsigB mutant in 6% salt-BHI medium at 15°C over a 72 h incubation and also showed the highest level of β-galactosidase specific activity. However, both the wild-type and ΔsigB mutant L. monocytogenes were defective for forming a biofilm in 9% salt-BHI medium at 15°C. Our results suggest that σ(B) plays an enhanced role in surface-adhered biofilm formation when L. monocytogenes encounters dual stress conditions, such as 6% NaCl and low temperature. PMID:25269605

  18. On the automaticity of semantic processing during task switching.

    PubMed

    Vachon, François; Jolicœur, Pierre

    2012-03-01

    There is growing evidence that processes formerly believed to be automatic are, in fact, strongly modulated by top-down influences. The purpose of the present work was to investigate how cognitive control can affect the purported automaticity of word processing by examining the impact of task switching on semantic processing using the ERP technique. In the context of the psychological refractory period dual-task paradigm, two experiments contrasted the context-sensitive N400 ERP elicited by the second of two target words under conditions that involved either a task switch or no-task switch. Although the N400 was not affected by SOA in the absence of switching, it was strongly attenuated at short SOAs when the psychological refractory period procedure involved a switch from a perceptual to a semantic task (Experiment 1) or a switch between two different semantic tasks (Experiment 2). These findings suggest that semantic processing cannot be performed in parallel with task switching and illustrate limitations in the ability of the cognitive system to adapt flexibly to the dynamically changing challenges of the environment according to task demands and behavioral goals. PMID:21981671

  19. Grid Task Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Chaumin

    2007-01-01

    IPG Execution Service is a framework that reliably executes complex jobs on a computational grid, and is part of the IPG service architecture designed to support location-independent computing. The new grid service enables users to describe the platform on which they need a job to run, which allows the service to locate the desired platform, configure it for the required application, and execute the job. After a job is submitted, users can monitor it through periodic notifications, or through queries. Each job consists of a set of tasks that performs actions such as executing applications and managing data. Each task is executed based on a starting condition that is an expression of the states of other tasks. This formulation allows tasks to be executed in parallel, and also allows a user to specify tasks to execute when other tasks succeed, fail, or are canceled. The two core components of the Execution Service are the Task Database, which stores tasks that have been submitted for execution, and the Task Manager, which executes tasks in the proper order, based on the user-specified starting conditions, and avoids overloading local and remote resources while executing tasks.

  20. Stroop proactive control and task conflict are modulated by concurrent working memory load.

    PubMed

    Kalanthroff, Eyal; Avnit, Amir; Henik, Avishai; Davelaar, Eddy J; Usher, Marius

    2015-06-01

    Performance on the Stroop task reflects two types of conflict-informational (between the incongruent word and font color) and task (between the contextually relevant color-naming task and the irrelevant, but automatic, word-reading task). According to the dual mechanisms of control theory (DMC; Braver, 2012), variability in Stroop performance can result from variability in the deployment of a proactive task-demand control mechanism. Previous research has shown that when proactive control (PC) is diminished, both increased Stroop interference and a reversed Stroop facilitation (RF) are observed. Although the current DMC model accounts for the former effect, it does not predict the observed RF, which is considered to be behavioral evidence for task conflict in the Stroop task. Here we expanded the DMC model to account for Stroop RF. Assuming that a concurrent working memory (WM) task reduces PC, we predicted both increased interference and an RF. Nineteen participants performed a standard Stroop task combined with a concurrent n-back task, which was aimed at reducing available WM resources, and thus overloading PC. Although the results indicated common Stroop interference and facilitation in the low-load condition (zero-back), in the high-load condition (two-back), both increased Stroop interference and RF were observed, consistent with the model's prediction. These findings indicate that PC is modulated by concurrent WM load and serves as a common control mechanism for both informational and task Stroop conflicts. PMID:25257710

  1. Development of a conditioning system for the dual-purpose transport and storage cask for spent nuclear fuel from decommissioned Russian submarines

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.S.; Barnes, E.; Snipes, R.L.; Guskov, V.; Makarchuk, T.

    2007-07-01

    Russia, stores large quantities of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from submarine and ice-breaker nuclear powered naval vessels. This high-level radioactive material presents a significant threat to the Arctic and marine environments. Much of the SNF from decommissioned Russian nuclear submarines is stored either onboard the submarines or in floating storage vessels in Northwest and Far East Russia. Some of the SNF is damaged, stored in an unstable condition, or of a type that cannot currently be reprocessed. In many cases, the existing Russian transport infrastructure and reprocessing facilities cannot meet the requirements for moving and reprocessing all of this fuel from remote locations. Additional transport and storage options are required. Some of the existing storage facilities being used in Russia do not meet health and safety and physical security requirements. The U.S. has assisted Russia in the development of a new dual-purpose metal-concrete transport and storage cask (TUK-108/1) for their military SNF and assisted them in building several new facilities for off-loading submarine SNF and storing these TUK-108/1 casks. These efforts have reduced the technical, ecological, and security challenges for removal, handling, interim storage, and shipment of this submarine fuel. Currently, Russian licensing limits the storage period of the TUK-108/1 casks to no more than two years before the fuel must be shipped for reprocessing. In order to extend this licensed storage period, a system is required to condition the casks by removing residual water and creating an inert storage environment by backfilling the internal canisters with a noble gas such as argon. The U.S. has assisted Russia in the development of a mobile cask conditioning system for the TUK-108/1 cask. This new conditioning system allows the TUK 108/1 casks to be stored for up to five years after which the license may be considered for renewal for an additional five years or the fuel will be shipped to

  2. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) reduces the cost of performing a cognitive task on gait and postural control

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junhong; Hao, Ying; Wang, Ye; Jor’dan, Azizah; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Manor, Brad

    2014-01-01

    This proof-of-concept, double-blind study is designed to determine the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the “cost” of performing a secondary cognitive task on gait and postural control in healthy young adults. Twenty adults aged 22±2yrs completed two separate double-blind visits in which gait and postural control were assessed immediately before and after a 20-minute session of either real or sham tDCS (1.5 mA) targeting the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Gait speed and stride duration variability, along with standing postural sway speed and area, were recorded under normal conditions and while simultaneously performing a serial-subtraction cognitive task. Dual task cost was calculated as the percent change in each outcome from normal to dual task conditions. tDCS was well-tolerated by all subjects. Stimulation did not alter gait or postural control under normal conditions. As compared to sham stimulation, real tDCS led to increased gait speed (p=0.006), as well as decreased standing postural sway speed (p=0.01) and area (p=0.01), when performing serial-subtraction task. Real tDCS also diminished (p<0.01) the dual task cost on each of these outcomes. No effects of tDCS were observed for stride duration variability. A single session of tDCS targeting the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex improved the ability to adapt one’s gait and postural control to a concurrent cognitive task and reduced the cost normally associated with such dual tasking. These results highlight the involvement of cortical brain networks in gait and posture control, and implicate the modulation of prefrontal cortical excitability as a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:24443958

  3. Transcranial direct current stimulation reduces the cost of performing a cognitive task on gait and postural control.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhong; Hao, Ying; Wang, Ye; Jor'dan, Azizah; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing; Manor, Brad

    2014-04-01

    This proof-of-concept, double-blind study was designed to determine the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on the 'cost' of performing a secondary cognitive task on gait and postural control in healthy young adults. Twenty adults aged 22 ± 2 years completed two separate double-blind visits in which gait and postural control were assessed immediately before and after a 20 min session of either real or sham tDCS (1.5 mA) targeting the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Gait speed and stride duration variability, along with standing postural sway speed and area, were recorded under normal conditions and while simultaneously performing a serial-subtraction cognitive task. The dual task cost was calculated as the percent change in each outcome from normal to dual task conditions. tDCS was well tolerated by all subjects. Stimulation did not alter gait or postural control under normal conditions. As compared with sham stimulation, real tDCS led to increased gait speed (P = 0.006), as well as decreased standing postural sway speed (P = 0.01) and area (P = 0.01), when performing the serial-subtraction task. Real tDCS also diminished (P < 0.01) the dual task cost on each of these outcomes. No effects of tDCS were observed for stride duration variability. A single session of tDCS targeting the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex improved the ability to adapt gait and postural control to a concurrent cognitive task and reduced the cost normally associated with such dual tasking. These results highlight the involvement of cortical brain networks in gait and postural control, and implicate the modulation of prefrontal cortical excitability as a potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:24443958

  4. Concurrent working memory task decreases the Stroop interference effect as indexed by the decreased theta oscillations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Tang, D; Hu, L; Zhang, L; Hitchman, G; Wang, L; Chen, A

    2014-03-14

    Working memory (WM) tasks may increase or decrease the interference effect of concurrently performed cognitive control tasks. However, the neural oscillatory correlates of this modulation effect of WM on the Stroop task are still largely unknown. In the present study, behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG) data were recorded from 32 healthy participants during their performance of the single Stroop task and the same task with a concurrent WM task. We observed that the Stroop interference effect represented in both response times (RTs) and theta-band event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) magnitude reduced under the dual-task condition compared with the single-task condition. The reduction of interference in theta-band ERSP was further positively correlated with interference reduction in RTs, and was mainly explained by the source in the left middle frontal gyrus. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the effect of concurrent WM tasks on the reduction of the Stroop interference effect can be indexed by EEG oscillations in theta-band rhythm in the centro-frontal regions and this modulation was mediated by the reduced cognitive control under the concurrent WM task. PMID:24406438

  5. Executive Resources and Item-Context Binding: Exploring the Influence of Concurrent Inhibition, Updating, and Shifting Tasks on Context Memory

    PubMed Central

    Nieznański, Marek; Obidziński, Michał; Zyskowska, Emilia; Niedziałkowska, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that context memory performance decreases as a result of cognitive load. However, the role of specific executive resources availability has not been specified yet. In a dual-task experiment, participants performed three kinds of concurrent task engaging: inhibition, updating, or shifting operations. In comparison with a no-load single-task condition, a significant decrease in item and context memory was observed, regardless of the kind of executive task. When executive load conditions were compared with non-specific cognitive load conditions, a significant interference effect was observed in the case of the inhibition task. The inhibition process appears to be an aspect of executive control, which relies on the same resource as item-context binding does, especially when binding refers to associations retrieved from long-term memory. PMID:26435761

  6. Dual of QCD with one adjoint fermion

    SciTech Connect

    Mojaza, Matin; Nardecchia, Marco; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-03-15

    We construct the magnetic dual of QCD with one adjoint Weyl fermion. The dual is a consistent solution of the 't Hooft anomaly matching conditions, allows for flavor decoupling, and remarkably constitutes the first nonsupersymmetric dual valid for any number of colors. The dual allows to bound the anomalous dimension of the Dirac fermion mass operator to be less than one in the conformal window.

  7. Using memory for prior aircraft events to detect conflicts under conditions of proactive air traffic control and with concurrent task requirements.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Vanessa K; Loft, Shayne

    2016-06-01

    In 2 experiments we examined the impact of memory for prior events on conflict detection in simulated air traffic control under conditions where individuals proactively controlled aircraft and completed concurrent tasks. Individuals were faster to detect conflicts that had repeatedly been presented during training (positive transfer). Bayesian statistics indicated strong evidence for the null hypothesis that conflict detection was not impaired for events that resembled an aircraft pair that had repeatedly come close to conflicting during training. This is likely because aircraft altitude (the feature manipulated between training and test) was attended to by participants when proactively controlling aircraft. In contrast, a minor change to the relative position of a repeated nonconflicting aircraft pair moderately impaired conflict detection (negative transfer). There was strong evidence for the null hypothesis that positive transfer was not impacted by dividing participant attention, which suggests that part of the information retrieved regarding prior aircraft events was perceptual (the new aircraft pair "looked" like a conflict based on familiarity). These findings extend the effects previously reported by Loft, Humphreys, and Neal (2004), answering the recent strong and unanimous calls across the psychological science discipline to formally establish the robustness and generality of previously published effects. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27295467

  8. Paradoxical mineralocorticoid receptor-mediated effect in fear memory encoding and expression of rats submitted to an olfactory fear conditioning task.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rimenez R; Dal Bó, Silvia; de Kloet, E Ronald; Oitzl, Melly S; Carobrez, Antonio P

    2014-04-01

    There is general agreement that the substantial modification in memory and motivational states exerted by corticosteroids after a traumatic experience is mediated in complementary manner by the mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors. Here we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological manipulation of MR activity would affect behavioral strategy and information storage in an olfactory fear conditioning (OFC) task. Male Wistar rats were submitted to the OFC with different training intensities. We observed that following high intensity OFC acquisition, a set of defensive coping strategies, which includes avoidance and risk assessment behaviors, was elicited when subjects were exposed to the conditioned stimulus (CS) 48 h later. In addition, following either OFC acquisition or retrieval (CS-I test) a profound corticosterone secretion was also detected. Systemic administration of the MR antagonist spironolactone altered the behavioral coping style irrespective the antagonist was administered 60 min prior to the acquisition or before the retrieval session. Surprisingly, the MR agonist fludrocortisone given 60 min prior to acquisition or retrieval of OFC had similar effects as the antagonist. In addition, post-training administration of fludrocortisone, following a weak training procedure, facilitated the consolidation of OFC. Fludrocortisone rather than spironolactone reduced serum corticosterone levels, suggesting that, at least in part, the effects of the MR agonist may derive from additional GR-mediated HPA-axis suppression. In conclusion, the present study suggests the involvement of the MR in the fine-tuning of behavioral adaptation necessary for optimal information storage and expression, as revealed by the marked alterations in the risk assessment behavior. PMID:24296155

  9. Creativity as a Matter of Choice: Prior Experience and Task Instruction as Boundary Conditions for the Positive Effect of Choice on Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chua, Roy Yong-Joo; Iyengar, Sheena S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of prior experience, task instruction, and choice on creative performance. Although extant research suggests that giving people choice in how they approach a task could enhance creative performance, we propose that this view needs to be circumscribed. Specifically, we argue that when choice is administered…

  10. Evaluating the potential of a novel dual heat-pulse sensor to measure volumetric water use in grapevines under a range of flow conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to validate dual sap flow sensors that combine two heat pulse techniques to measure volumetric water use over the full range of sap flows found in grapevines. The heat ratio method (HRM), which works well at measuring low and reverse flows, was combined with the compensati...

  11. Defining conditions where long-term glucocorticoid treatment has an acceptably low level of harm to facilitate implementation of existing recommendations: viewpoints from an EULAR task force.

    PubMed

    Strehl, Cindy; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; de Wit, Maarten; Boers, Maarten; Caeyers, Nele; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Dixon, William G; Geenen, Rinie; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kent, Alison; de Thurah, Annette Ladefoged; Listing, Joachim; Mariette, Xavier; Ray, David W; Scherer, Hans U; Seror, Raphaèle; Spies, Cornelia M; Tarp, Simon; Wiek, Dieter; Winthrop, Kevin L; Buttgereit, Frank

    2016-06-01

    There is convincing evidence for the known and unambiguously accepted beneficial effects of glucocorticoids at low dosages. However, the implementation of existing recommendations and guidelines on the management of glucocorticoid therapy in rheumatic diseases is lagging behind. As a first step to improve implementation, we aimed at defining conditions under which long-term glucocorticoid therapy may have an acceptably low level of harm. A multidisciplinary European League Against Rheumatism task force group of experts including patients with rheumatic diseases was assembled. After a systematic literature search, breakout groups critically reviewed the evidence on the four most worrisome adverse effects of glucocorticoid therapy (osteoporosis, hyperglycaemia/diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases and infections) and presented their results to the other group members following a structured questionnaire for final discussion and consensus finding. Robust evidence on the risk of harm of long-term glucocorticoid therapy was often lacking since relevant study results were often either missing, contradictory or carried a high risk of bias. The group agreed that the risk of harm is low for the majority of patients at long-term dosages of ≤5 mg prednisone equivalent per day, whereas at dosages of >10 mg/day the risk of harm is elevated. At dosages between >5 and ≤10 mg/day, patient-specific characteristics (protective and risk factors) determine the risk of harm. The level of harm of glucocorticoids depends on both dose and patient-specific parameters. General and glucocorticoid-associated risk factors and protective factors such as a healthy lifestyle should be taken into account when evaluating the actual and future risk. PMID:26933146

  12. Tracking performance under time sharing conditions with a digit processing task: A feedback control theory analysis. [attention sharing effect on operator performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopher, D.; Wickens, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    A one dimensional compensatory tracking task and a digit processing reaction time task were combined in a three phase experiment designed to investigate tracking performance in time sharing. Adaptive techniques, elaborate feedback devices, and on line standardization procedures were used to adjust task difficulty to the ability of each individual subject and manipulate time sharing demands. Feedback control analysis techniques were employed in the description of tracking performance. The experimental results show that when the dynamics of a system are constrained, in such a manner that man machine system stability is no longer a major concern of the operator, he tends to adopt a first order control describing function, even with tracking systems of higher order. Attention diversion to a concurrent task leads to an increase in remnant level, or nonlinear power. This decrease in linearity is reflected both in the output magnitude spectra of the subjects, and in the linear fit of the amplitude ratio functions.

  13. Conflict monitoring and adjustment in the task-switching paradigm under different memory load conditions: an ERP/sLORETA analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuqin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Xiaoqian; Tang, Yi-Yuan

    2015-02-11

    The aim of the present study was to examine electrophysiological and behavioral changes caused by different memory loads in a task-switching paradigm. A total of 31 healthy individuals were subjected to a task, in which the stimulus-response reversal paradigm was combined with the task-switching paradigm. The event-related potentials were recorded and the N2 component, an index of conflict processing, was measured. In addition, the neural sources of N2 were further analyzed by standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography. The event-related potential results showed that high memory load triggered a higher N2 mean amplitude. Moreover, the standardized low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography data showed that high memory load caused an increase in current densities at the anterior cingulate cortex and the prefrontal cortex in the task-switching paradigm. In summary, our findings provide electrophysiological evidence to interpret possible influences of memory loads on conflict monitoring and modulation during the task switching. These results imply that the working memory load overrules the influence of task-switching performance on the intensification of cognitive control. PMID:25569792

  14. Word Fluency: A Task Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laine, Matti

    It is suggested that models of human problem solving are useful in the analysis of word fluency (WF) test performance. In problem-solving terms, WF tasks would require the subject to define and clarify the conditions of the task (task acquisition), select and employ appropriate strategies, and monitor one's performance. In modern neuropsychology,…

  15. Prefrontal cortex activity during motor tasks with additional mental load requiring attentional demand: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Mandrick, Kevin; Derosiere, Gérard; Dray, Gérard; Coulon, Denis; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Perrey, Stéphane

    2013-07-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is suitable for investigating cerebral oxygenation changes during motor and/or mental tasks. In the present study, we investigated how an additional mental load during a motor task at two submaximal loadings affects the fNIRS-measured brain activation over the right prefrontal cortex (PFC). Fifteen healthy males performed isometric grasping contractions at 15% and 30% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) with or without an additional mental (i.e., arithmetic) task. Mental performance, force variability, fNIRS and subjective perception responses were measured in each condition. The performance of the mental task decreased significantly while the force variability increased significantly at 30% MVC as compared to 15% MVC, suggesting that performance of dual-task required more attentional resources. PFC activity increased significantly as the effort increased from 15% to 30% MVC (p<.001). Although a larger change in the deoxyhemoglobin was observed in dual-task conditions (p=.051), PFC activity did not change significantly as compared to the motor tasks alone. In summary, participants were unable to invest more attention and effort in performing the more difficult levels in order to maintain adequate mental performance. PMID:23665138

  16. FNAS/summer faculty fellowship research continuation program. Task 6: Integrated model development for liquid fueled rocket propulsion systems. Task 9: Aspects of model-based rocket engine condition monitoring and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, L. Michael; Helmicki, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of Phase I of this research effort was to develop an advanced mathematical-empirical model of SSME steady-state performance. Task 6 of Phase I is to develop component specific modification strategy for baseline case influence coefficient matrices. This report describes the background of SSME performance characteristics and provides a description of the control variable basis of three different gains models. The procedure used to establish influence coefficients for each of these three models is also described. Gains model analysis results are compared to Rocketdyne's power balance model (PBM).

  17. Walking while Performing Working Memory Tasks Changes the Prefrontal Cortex Hemodynamic Activations and Gait Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-I B.; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing evidence suggests that walking while performing a concurrent task negatively influences gait performance. However, it remains unclear how higher-level cognitive processes and coordination of limb movements are altered in challenging walking environments. This study investigated the influence of cognitive task complexity and walking road condition on the neutral correlates of executive function and postural control in dual-task walking. Methods: Twenty-four healthy young adults completed a series of overground walks with three walking road conditions (wide, narrow, with obstacles) with and without the concurrent n-back working memory tasks of two complexity levels (1-back and 3-back). Prefrontal brain activation was assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy. A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used simultaneously to measure gait performance and lower-extremity kinematics. Repeated measures analysis of variance were performed to examine the differences between the conditions. Results: In comparison with standing still, participants showed lower n-back task accuracy while walking, with the worst performance from the road with obstacles. Spatiotemporal gait parameters, lower-extremity joint movements, and the relative changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) concentration levels were all significantly different across the task complexity and walking path conditions. While dual-tasking participants were found to flex their hips and knees less, leading to a slower gait speed, longer stride time, shorter step length, and greater gait variability than during normal walking. For narrow-road walking, smaller ankle dorsiflexion and larger hip flexion were observed, along with a reduced gait speed. Obstacle negotiation was mainly characterized by increased gait variability than other conditions. HbO levels appeared to be lower during dual-task walking than normal walking. Compared to wide and obstacle conditions, walking on the narrow

  18. Stability control during the performance of a simultaneous obstacle avoidance and auditory Stroop task.

    PubMed

    Worden, Timothy A; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-02-01

    Navigation through complex environments requires a greater degree of control and attentional resources from the central nervous system to ensure postural stability and efficient goal completion as compared to quiet standing or unobstructed walking. Furthermore, when a cognitive task is also performed in a dual-task scenario, additional resources may be required. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of performing a concurrent cognitive (auditory Stroop task) and complex locomotor task (with a stationary or dynamic obstacle) on frontal plane stability control quantified using a margin of stability (MOS) measure. Fourteen healthy young adults performed 40 dual-task trials (randomized in a balanced design for auditory Stroop congruency and obstacle movement). Results indicated that frontal plane MOS was greatest for the obstacle crossing step and was greater for the dynamic obstacle as compared to the stationary obstacle. Conversely, frontal plane MOS was the smallest for the pre-crossing step, indicating that this point in the obstacle stepping strategy may be the least stable. No effect of cognitive task difficulty was observed for any of the experimental conditions, providing support for a 'posture-first' strategy. These findings suggest that an increase in stability is prioritized for the obstacle crossing step, potentially at the expense of reduced stability in the step immediately preceding the obstacle. These results have implications for better understanding how the CNS controls stability at different events during the obstacle crossing strategy in a complex environment. PMID:26487180

  19. The influence of dimensional overlap on location-related priming in the Simon task.

    PubMed

    Lehle, Carola; Stürmer, Birgit; Sommer, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Choice reaction times are shorter when stimulus and response locations are compatible than when they are incompatible as in the Simon effect. Recent studies revealed that Simon effects are strongly attenuated when there is temporal overlap with a different high-priority task, accompanied by a decrease of early location-related response priming as reflected in the lateralized readiness potential (LRP). The latter result was obtained in a study excluding overlap of stimulus location with any other dimension in the tasks. Independent evidence suggests that location-related priming might be present in conditions with dimensional overlap. Here we tested this prediction in a dual-task experiment supplemented with recording LRPs. The secondary task was either a standard Simon task where irrelevant stimulus location overlapped with dimensions of the primary task or a Stroop-like Simon task including additional overlap of irrelevant and relevant stimulus attributes. At high temporal overlap, there was no Simon effect nor was there stimulus-related response priming in either condition. Therefore stimulus-triggered response priming seems to be abolished in conditions of limited capacity even if the likelihood of an S-R compatibility effect is maximized. PMID:23581810

  20. Response Activation in Overlapping Tasks and the Response-Selection Bottleneck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Torsten; Fischer, Rico; Stelzel, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of response activation on dual-task performance by presenting a subliminal prime before the stimulus in Task 2 (S2) of a psychological refractory period (PRP) task. Congruence between prime and S2 modulated the reaction times in Task 2 at short stimulus onset asynchrony despite a PRP effect. This Task 2…

  1. On the manipulability of dual cooperative robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiacchio, P.; Chiaverini, S.; Sciavicco, L.; Siciliano, B.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of manipulability ellipsoids for dual robot systems is given. A suitable kineto-static formulation for dual cooperative robots is adopted which allows for a global task space description of external and internal forces, and relative velocities. The well known concepts of force and velocity manipulability ellipsoids for a single robot are formally extended and the contributions of the two single robots to the cooperative system ellipsoids are illustrated. Duality properties are discussed. A practical case study is developed.

  2. The effects of participatory mode and task workload on the detection of dynamic system failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C. D.; Kessel, C.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of operators to detect step changes in the dynamics of control systems is investigated as a joint function of, (1) participatory mode: whether subjects are actively controlling those dynamics or are monitoring an autopilot controlling them, and (2) concurrent task workload. A theoretical analysis of detection in the two modes identifies factors that will favor detection in either mode. Three subjects detected system failures in either an autopilot or manual controlling mode, under single-task conditions and concurrently with a subcritical tracking task. Latency and accuracy of detection were assessed and related through a speed accuracy tradeoff representation. It was concluded that failure detection performance was better during manual control than during autopilot control, and that the extent of this superiority was enhanced as dual-task load increased. Ensemble averaging and multiple regression techniques were then employed to investigate the cues utilized by the subjects in making their detection decisions.

  3. Dual-arm manipulation module for use in decontamination and decommissioning operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, W.R.; Haley, D.C.; Dixon, W.E.

    1994-06-01

    A dual-arm manipulation module is under development for application in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) tasks. The development is led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory with support from Sandia National Laboratories, and with university and industry participation. The project is part of the Robotics Technology Development Program funded by the US Department of Energy, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Office of Technology Development. The dual-arm module is designed to provide dexterous manipulation capability for remote characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement operations, and the module is reconfigurable to meet various deployment requirements. Remote manipulation capability can benefit D&D activities through reduced worker exposure to both contaminant and industrial hazards. When tasks conditions permit, increased use of robotic features reduce costs by increased efficiency of operation.

  4. Dual-Use Review and the IRB

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Given the growing threat of the misuse of biomedical research by terrorists or others, institutional review boards (IRBs) are likely to encounter research protocols that raise dual-use issues. While IRBs should be informed about these issues and should be prepared to address them, they should not be burdened with the responsibility of conducting their own dual-use review. A dual-use committee (DUC), institutional biosafety committee (IBC), or other committee should handle this task and convey its findings and recommendations to institutional officials. PMID:22262959

  5. Dual-Use Review and the IRB.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2010-01-01

    Given the growing threat of the misuse of biomedical research by terrorists or others, institutional review boards (IRBs) are likely to encounter research protocols that raise dual-use issues. While IRBs should be informed about these issues and should be prepared to address them, they should not be burdened with the responsibility of conducting their own dual-use review. A dual-use committee (DUC), institutional biosafety committee (IBC), or other committee should handle this task and convey its findings and recommendations to institutional officials. PMID:22262959

  6. Task attention facilitates learning of task-irrelevant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsung-Ren; Watanabe, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Attention plays a fundamental role in visual learning and memory. One highly established principle of visual attention is that the harder a central task is, the more attentional resources are used to perform the task and the smaller amount of attention is allocated to peripheral processing because of limited attention capacity. Here we show that this principle holds true in a dual-task setting but not in a paradigm of task-irrelevant perceptual learning. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to identify either bright or dim number targets at the screen center and to remember concurrently presented scene backgrounds. Their recognition performances for scenes paired with dim/hard targets were worse than those for scenes paired with bright/easy targets. In Experiment 2, eight participants were asked to identify either bright or dim letter targets at the screen center while a task-irrelevant coherent motion was concurrently presented in the background. After five days of training on letter identification, participants improved their motion sensitivity to the direction paired with hard/dim targets improved but not to the direction paired with easy/bright targets. Taken together, these results suggest that task-irrelevant stimuli are not subject to the attentional control mechanisms that task-relevant stimuli abide. PMID:22563424

  7. Task Attention Facilitates Learning of Task-Irrelevant Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tsung-Ren; Watanabe, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Attention plays a fundamental role in visual learning and memory. One highly established principle of visual attention is that the harder a central task is, the more attentional resources are used to perform the task and the smaller amount of attention is allocated to peripheral processing because of limited attention capacity. Here we show that this principle holds true in a dual-task setting but not in a paradigm of task-irrelevant perceptual learning. In Experiment 1, eight participants were asked to identify either bright or dim number targets at the screen center and to remember concurrently presented scene backgrounds. Their recognition performances for scenes paired with dim/hard targets were worse than those for scenes paired with bright/easy targets. In Experiment 2, eight participants were asked to identify either bright or dim letter targets at the screen center while a task-irrelevant coherent motion was concurrently presented in the background. After five days of training on letter identification, participants improved their motion sensitivity to the direction paired with hard/dim targets improved but not to the direction paired with easy/bright targets. Taken together, these results suggest that task-irrelevant stimuli are not subject to the attentional control mechanisms that task-relevant stimuli abide. PMID:22563424

  8. Effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 positive allosteric modulator CDPPB on rats tested with the paired associates learning task in touchscreen-equipped operant conditioning chambers.

    PubMed

    Lins, Brittney R; Howland, John G

    2016-03-15

    Effective treatments for the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia are critically needed. Positive allosteric modulation (PAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is one strategy currently under investigation to improve these symptoms. Examining cognition using touchscreen-equipped operant chambers may increase translation between preclinical and clinical research through analogous behavioral testing paradigms in rodents and humans. We used acute CDPPB (1-30mg/kg) treatment to examine the effects of mGluR5 PAM in the touchscreen paired associates learning (PAL) task using well-trained rats with and without co-administration of acute MK-801 (0.15mg/kg). CDPPB had no consistent effects on task performance when administered alone and failed to reverse the MK-801 induced impairments at any of the examined doses. Overall, the disruptive effects of MK-801 on PAL were consistent with previous research but increasing mGluR5 signaling is not beneficial in the PAL task. Future research should test whether administration of CDPPB during PAL acquisition increases performance. PMID:26721467

  9. No transfer between conditions in balance training regimes relying on tasks with different postural demands: Specificity effects of two different serious games.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Tim; Kindermann, Stefan; Joch, Michael; Munzert, Jörn; Reiser, Mathias

    2015-03-01

    Despite the increasing use of video games involving whole body movements to enhance postural control in health prevention and rehabilitation, there is no consistent proof that training effects actually transfer to other balance tasks. The present study aimed to determine whether training effects on two different video-game-based training devices were task-specific or could be transferred to either postural control in quiet stance or to performance on the other device. 37 young healthy adults were split into three groups: two intervention groups that trained for 30min on either the Nintendo(®) Wii Fit Balance Board or the MFT Challenge Disc(®) three times per week for 4 weeks and a control group that received no training. All games require participants to control virtual avatars by shifting the center of mass in different directions. Both devices differ in their physical properties. The Balance Board provides a stable surface, whereas the Challenge Disc can be tilted in all directions. Dependent variables were the game scores on both devices and the center of pressure (COP) displacements measured via force plate. At posttest, both intervention groups showed significant increases in performance on the trained games compared to controls. However, there were no relevant transfer effects to performance on the untrained device and no changes in COP path length in quiet stance. These results suggest that training effects on both devices are highly specific and do not transfer to tasks with different postural demands. PMID:25791870

  10. Suppression of the Arboviruses Dengue and Chikungunya Using a Dual-Acting Group-I Intron Coupled with Conditional Expression of the Bax C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Carter, James R.; Taylor, Samantha; Fraser, Tresa S.; Kucharski, Cheryl A.; Dawson, James L.; Fraser, Malcolm J.

    2015-01-01

    In portions of South Asia, vectors and patients co-infected with dengue (DENV) and chikungunya (CHIKV) are on the rise, with the potential for this occurrence in other regions of the world, for example the United States. Therefore, we engineered an antiviral approach that suppresses the replication of both arboviruses in mosquito cells using a single antiviral group I intron. We devised unique configurations of internal, external, and guide sequences that permit homologous recognition and splicing with conserved target sequences in the genomes of both viruses using a single trans-splicing Group I intron, and examined their effectiveness to suppress infections of DENV and CHIKV in mosquito cells when coupled with a proapoptotic 3' exon, ΔN Bax. RT-PCR demonstrated the utility of these introns in trans-splicing the ΔN Bax sequence downstream of either the DENV or CHIKV target site in transformed Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, independent of the order in which the virus specific targeting sequences were inserted into the construct. This trans-splicing reaction forms DENV or CHIKV ΔN Bax RNA fusions that led to apoptotic cell death as evidenced by annexin V staining, caspase, and DNA fragmentation assays. TCID50-IFA analyses demonstrate effective suppression of DENV and CHIKV infections by our anti-arbovirus group I intron approach. This represents the first report of a dual-acting Group I intron, and demonstrates that we can target DENV and CHIKV RNAs in a sequence specific manner with a single, uniquely configured CHIKV/DENV dual targeting group I intron, leading to replication suppression of both arboviruses, and thus providing a promising single antiviral for the transgenic suppression of multiple arboviruses. PMID:26580561

  11. Measuring cognitive load during simulation-based psychomotor skills training: sensitivity of secondary-task performance and subjective ratings.

    PubMed

    Haji, Faizal A; Khan, Rabia; Regehr, Glenn; Drake, James; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Dubrowski, Adam

    2015-12-01

    As interest in applying cognitive load theory (CLT) to the study and design of pedagogic and technological approaches in healthcare simulation grows, suitable measures of cognitive load (CL) are needed. Here, we report a two-phased study investigating the sensitivity of subjective ratings of mental effort (SRME) and secondary-task performance (signal detection rate, SDR and recognition reaction time, RRT) as measures of CL. In phase 1 of the study, novice learners and expert surgeons attempted a visual-monitoring task under two conditions: single-task (monitoring a virtual patient's heart-rate) and dual-task (tying surgical knots on a bench-top simulator while monitoring the virtual patient's heart-rate). Novices demonstrated higher mental effort and inferior secondary-task performance on the dual-task compared to experts (RRT 1.76 vs. 0.73, p = 0.012; SDR 0.27 vs. 0.97, p < 0.001; SRME 7.75 vs. 2.80, p < 0.001). Similarly, secondary task performance deteriorated from baseline to dual-task among novices (RRT 0.63 vs. 1.76 s, p < 0.006 and SDR 1.00 vs. 0.27, p < 0.001), but not experts (RRT 0.63 vs. 0.73 s, p = 0.124 and SDR 1.00 vs. 0.97, p = 0.178). In phase 2, novices practiced surgical knot-tying on the bench top simulator during consecutive dual-task trials. A significant increase in SDR (F(9,63) = 6.63, p < 0.001, f = 0.97) and decrease in SRME (F(9,63) = 9.39, p < 0.001, f = 1.04) was observed during simulation training, while RRT did not change significantly (F(9,63) = 1.18, p < 0.32, f = 0.41). The results suggest subjective ratings and dual-task performance can be used to track changes in CL among novices, particularly in early phases of simulation-based skills training. The implications for measuring CL in simulation instructional design research are discussed. PMID:25761454

  12. Bivalent task switching and memory load: Similar costs on reaction times, different costs on concurrent timing.

    PubMed

    Viau-Quesnel, Charles; Fortin, Claudette

    2014-09-01

    Some studies suggest that time estimation involves executive control resources. This proposition was challenged recently, however, by results showing simultaneous performance of executive and timing tasks with no cost. The present study examined whether bivalent switching, in which targets may be relevant in more than one task, would interfere with timing. In Experiment 1, the effect of switching between memory search and a classification task was compared with the effect of varying load in memory search. Effects of task switching and of increasing load were similar on reaction times (RTs) in an RT control condition, but drastically different on concurrent timing: Time productions were affected by memory search only. In Experiment 2, the effect of task switching preparation, which involves advance reconfiguration in the switching paradigm, was examined. Preparation to a switch and timing could be performed simultaneously with no cost. These results reveal a fundamental difference between memory search and task switching in terms of dual-task costs, and show that timing and some executive control tasks do not share cognitive resources. PMID:25383477

  13. Exploratory factor analysis of neuropsychological tests and their relationship to the Brown-Peterson task.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Valérie B; Gagnon, Michèle; Coulombe, Daniel; Messier, Claude

    2006-10-01

    The interference condition of the Brown-Peterson task and the auditory consonant trigrams test was designed to evaluate working memory in that it required a division of attentional processes to complete two cognitive tasks. However, the specific cognitive functions contributing to the performance of this interference task have yet to be determined. The objective of this study was to determine what other tasks are comparable to the Brown-Peterson task and conduct an exploratory factor analysis that included the measures from the Brown-Peterson task and other neuropsychological measures. A neuropsychological battery was administered to younger participants (n=107, mean age=20.83) and older participants (n=93, mean age=70.14). Factor analysis yielded a two-factor solution. Performance after the intervening serial subtraction task loaded on an auditory/visual working memory and complex attention factor and had common loadings with working memory subtests of the WAIS-III and the spatial span subtest of the WMS-III. Results suggest that the performance after the intervening serial subtraction task evaluates dual information processing, complex attention, and working memory. PMID:17071363

  14. Combustion of LOX with H2(sub g) under subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions (Task 1) and experimental observation of dense spray and mixing of impinging jets (Task 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, W. H.; Cheung, F. B.; Yang, A. S.; Brown, J. J.; Woodward, R. D.; Kline, M. C.; Burch, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to achieve a better understanding of the combustion processes of liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen under broad range of pressure covering subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. The scope of the experimental work falls into the following areas: (1) design of the overall experimental setup; (2) modification of an existing windowed high pressure chamber; (3) design of the LOX feeding system; (4) provision of the safety features in the test rig design; (5) LOX cleanliness requirements; (6) cold shock testing; (7) implementation of data acquisition systems; (8) preliminary tests for system checkout; (9) modification of LOX feeding system; and (10) evaporation tests. Progress in each area is discussed.

  15. Approximate entropy detects the effect of a secondary cognitive task on postural control in healthy young adults: a methodological report

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, James T; Mercer, Vicki S; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    Background Biomechanical measures of postural stability, while generally useful in neuroscience and physical rehabilitation research, may be limited in their ability to detect more subtle influences of attention on postural control. Approximate entropy (ApEn), a regularity statistic from nonlinear dynamics, recently has demonstrated relatively good measurement precision and shown promise for detecting subtle change in postural control after cerebral concussion. Our purpose was to further explore the responsiveness of ApEn by using it to evaluate the immediate, short-term effect of secondary cognitive task performance on postural control in healthy, young adults. Methods Thirty healthy, young adults performed a modified version of the Sensory Organization Test featuring single (posture only) and dual (posture plus cognitive) task trials. ApEn values, root mean square (RMS) displacement, and equilibrium scores (ES) were calculated from anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) center of pressure (COP) component time series. For each sensory condition, we compared the ability of the postural control parameters to detect an effect of cognitive task performance. Results COP AP time series generally became more random (higher ApEn value) during dual task performance, resulting in a main effect of cognitive task (p = 0.004). In contrast, there was no significant effect of cognitive task for ApEn values of COP ML time series, RMS displacement (AP or ML) or ES. Conclusion During dual task performance, ApEn revealed a change in the randomness of COP oscillations that occurred in a variety of sensory conditions, independent of changes in the amplitude of COP oscillations. The finding expands current support for the potential of ApEn to detect subtle changes in postural control. Implications for future studies of attention in neuroscience and physical rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:17971209

  16. Dual-Arm Generalized Compliant Motion With Shared Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1994-01-01

    Dual-Arm Generalized Compliant Motion (DAGCM) primitive computer program implementing improved unified control scheme for two manipulator arms cooperating in task in which both grasp same object. Provides capabilities for autonomous, teleoperation, and shared control of two robot arms. Unifies cooperative dual-arm control with multi-sensor-based task control and makes complete task-control capability available to higher-level task-planning computer system via large set of input parameters used to describe desired force and position trajectories followed by manipulator arms. Some concepts discussed in "A Generalized-Compliant-Motion Primitive" (NPO-18134).

  17. Task-specific Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Russotto, Diego; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific dystonias are primary focal dystonias characterized by excessive muscle contractions producing abnormal postures during selective motor activities that often involve highly skilled, repetitive movements. Historically these peculiar postures were considered psychogenic but have now been classified as forms of dystonia. Writer’s cramp is the most commonly identified task-specific dystonia and has features typical of this group of disorders. Symptoms may begin with lack of dexterity during performance of a specific motor task with increasingly abnormal posturing of the involved body part as motor activity continues. Initially, the dystonia may manifest only during the performance of the inciting task, but as the condition progresses it may also occur during other activities or even at rest. Neurological exam is usually unremarkable except for the dystonia-related abnormalities. Although the precise pathophysiology remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests reduced inhibition at different levels of the sensorimotor system. Symptomatic treatment options include oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, neurosurgical procedures, and adaptive strategies. Prognosis may vary depending upon body part involved and specific type of task affected. Further research may reveal new insights into the etiology, pathophysiology, natural history, and improved treatment of these conditions. PMID:18990127

  18. Dual condensate and QCD phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Bo; Bruckmann, Falk; Fodor, Zoltan; Szabo, Kalman K.; Gattringer, Christof

    2011-05-23

    The dual condensate is a new QCD phase transition order parameter, which connnects confinement and chiral symmetry breaking as different mass limits. We discuss the relation between the fermion spectrum at general boundary conditions and the dual condensate and show numerical results for the latter from unquenched SU(3) lattice configurations.

  19. Preparation time modulates pro-active control and enhances task conflict in task switching.

    PubMed

    Kalanthroff, Eyal; Henik, Avishai

    2014-03-01

    Performance in the Stroop task reflects two conflicts--informational (between the incongruent word and ink color) and task (between relevant color naming and irrelevant word reading). Neuroimaging findings support the existence of task conflict in congruent trials. A behavioral indication for task conflict--Stroop reverse facilitation--was found in previous studies under low task-control conditions. Task switching also causes reduction in task control because the task set frequently changes. We hypothesized that it would be harder to efficiently manage task conflicts in switching situations and, specifically, as cue-target interval (CTI) decreases. This suggestion was examined in two experiments using a combined Stroop task-switching design. We found a large interference effect and reverse facilitation that decreased with elongation of CTI. Results imply that task switching reduces pro-active task control and thereby enhances the informational and the task conflicts. This calls for a revision of recent control models to include task conflict. PMID:23712333

  20. Effects of Practice on Task Architecture: Combined Evidence from Interference Experiments and Random-Walk Models of Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamienkowski, Juan E.; Pashler, Harold; Dehaene, Stanislas; Sigman, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Does extensive practice reduce or eliminate central interference in dual-task processing? We explored the reorganization of task architecture with practice by combining interference analysis (delays in dual-task experiment) and random-walk models of decision making (measuring the decision and non-decision contributions to RT). The main delay…

  1. Analytical display design for flight tasks conducted under instrument meteorological conditions. [human factors engineering of pilot performance for display device design in instrument landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Paramount to proper utilization of electronic displays is a method for determining pilot-centered display requirements. Display design should be viewed fundamentally as a guidance and control problem which has interactions with the designer's knowledge of human psychomotor activity. From this standpoint, reliable analytical models of human pilots as information processors and controllers can provide valuable insight into the display design process. A relatively straightforward, nearly algorithmic procedure for deriving model-based, pilot-centered display requirements was developed and is presented. The optimal or control theoretic pilot model serves as the backbone of the design methodology, which is specifically directed toward the synthesis of head-down, electronic, cockpit display formats. Some novel applications of the optimal pilot model are discussed. An analytical design example is offered which defines a format for the electronic display to be used in a UH-1H helicopter in a landing approach task involving longitudinal and lateral degrees of freedom.

  2. Postural instability in Parkinson's disease: a comparison with and without a concurrent task.

    PubMed

    Morris, M; Iansek, R; Smithson, F; Huxham, F

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of dual task performance on postural instability in subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) compared with healthy elderly people. In particular, we aimed to divert attention to a secondary task so the full extent of balance disturbance could be revealed without compensation by attentional mechanisms. Forty-five subjects were tested: 15 PD subjects with a past history of falls; 15 PD subjects with no history of falls; and 15 unimpaired individuals. Groups were matched for age and sex and subjects with PD were tested at peak dose in the levodopa medication cycle. Each subject was tested on their ability to maintain stability in three conditions: (1) steady standing (feet apart, feet together, step stance, tandem stance, single leg stance); (2) in response to perturbations generated by self-initiated movements (arm raise test, step test); and (3) in response to an unexpected external perturbation in upright stance, the shoulder tug test. The concurrent task was verbal-cognitive and required subjects to recite the days of the week backwards. The concurrent task produced a significant deterioration in performance for the arm raise test in all groups, the step test for the PD fallers and controls and for tandem stance in the PD fallers. Ceiling effects were evident for timed tests with feet apart and feet together resulting in poor discriminative validity for these tests. The external perturbation test showed differences between the three groups for both unitask and concurrent task conditions, yet similar rates of change from unitask to dual task conditions. Because PD fallers had a more severe initial deficit than controls, deterioration placed them in that part of the balance continuum at high risk of losing equilibrium. PMID:11154931

  3. Functional mobility in a divided attention task in older adults with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Borges, Sheila de Melo; Radanovic, Márcia; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Motor disorders may occur in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and at early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), particularly under divided attention conditions. We examined functional mobility in 104 older adults (42 with MCI, 26 with mild AD, and 36 cognitively healthy) using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) under 4 experimental conditions: TUG single task, TUG plus a cognitive task, TUG plus a manual task, and TUG plus a cognitive and a manual task. Statistically significant differences in mean time of execution were found in all four experimental conditions when comparing MCI and controls (p < .001), and when comparing MCI and AD patients (p < .05). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses showed that all four testing conditions could differentiate the three groups (area under the curve > .8, p < .001 for MCI vs. controls; area under the curve > .7, p < .001 for MCI vs. AD). The authors conclude that functional motor deficits occurring in MCI can be assessed by the TUG test, in single or dual task modality. PMID:25610990

  4. Dual Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem. These conditions occur together frequently. In particular, alcohol and drug problems tend to occur with Depression Anxiety disorders Schizophrenia Personality disorders Sometimes the mental ...

  5. A Comparison of the Visual Attention Patterns of People with Aphasia and Adults without Neurological Conditions for Camera-Engaged and Task-Engaged Visual Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiessen, Amber; Beukelman, David; Hux, Karen; Longenecker, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to compare the visual attention patterns of adults with aphasia and adults without neurological conditions when viewing visual scenes with 2 types of engagement. Method: Eye-tracking technology was used to measure the visual attention patterns of 10 adults with aphasia and 10 adults without neurological…

  6. Learning the way to blood: first evidence of dual olfactory conditioning in a blood-sucking insect, Rhodnius prolixus. II. Aversive learning.

    PubMed

    Vinauger, Clément; Buratti, Laura; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2011-09-15

    After having demonstrated that blood-sucking bugs are able to associate a behaviourally neutral odour (L-lactic acid) with positive reinforcement (i.e. appetitive conditioning) in the first part of this study, we tested whether these insects were also able to associate the same odour with a negative reinforcement (i.e. aversive conditioning). Learned aversion to host odours has been repeatedly suggested as a determinant for the distribution of disease vectors among host populations. Nevertheless, no experimental evidence has been obtained so far. Adapting a classical conditioning approach to our haematophagous model, we trained larvae of Rhodnius prolixus to associate L-lactic acid, an odour perceived by bugs but behaviourally neutral when presented alone, with a mechanical perturbation (i.e. negative reinforcement). Naive bugs and bugs exposed to CS, punishment, or CS and punishment without contingency remained indifferent to the presence of an air stream loaded with L-lactic acid (random orientation on a locomotion compensator), whereas the groups previously exposed to the contingency CS-punishment were significantly repelled by L-lactic acid. In a companion paper, the opposite, i.e. attraction, was induced in bugs exposed to the contingency of the same odour with a positive reinforcement. These constitute the first pieces of evidence of olfactory conditioning in triatomine bugs and the first demonstration that the same host odour can be used by insects that are disease vectors to learn to recognize either a host to feed on or a potentially defensive one. The orientation mechanism during repulsion is also discussed in light of our results. PMID:21865516

  7. Evaluating Cognitive Action Control Using Eye-Movement Analysis: An Oculomotor Adaptation of the Simon Task.

    PubMed

    Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Naudet, Florian; Dondaine, Thibaut; Auffret, Manon; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Argaud, Soizic; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive action control has been extensively studied using conflict tasks such as the Simon task. In most recent studies, this process has been investigated in the light of the dual route hypothesis and more specifically of the activation-suppression model using distributional analyses. Some authors have suggested that cognitive action control assessment is not specific to response modes. In this study we adapted the Simon task, using oculomotor responses instead of manual responses, in order to evaluate whether the resolution of conflict induced by a two-dimensional stimulus yielded similar results to what is usually reported in tasks with manual responses. Results obtained from 43 young healthy participants revealed the typical congruence effect, with longer reaction times (RT) and lesser accuracy in the incongruent condition. Conditional accuracy functions (CAF) also revealed a higher proportion of fast errors in the incongruent condition and delta plots confirmed that conflict resolution was easier, as the time taken to respond increased. These results are very similar to what has been reported in the literature. Furthermore, our observations are in line with the assumptions of the activation-suppression model, in which automatic activation in conflict situations is captured in the fastest responses and selective inhibition of cognitive action control needs time to build up. Altogether, our results suggest that conflict resolution has core mechanisms whatever the response mode, manual or oculomotor. Using oculomotor responses in such tasks could be of interest when investigating cognitive action control in patients with severe motor disorders. PMID:26973499

  8. Evaluating Cognitive Action Control Using Eye-Movement Analysis: An Oculomotor Adaptation of the Simon Task

    PubMed Central

    Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Naudet, Florian; Dondaine, Thibaut; Auffret, Manon; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Argaud, Soizic; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive action control has been extensively studied using conflict tasks such as the Simon task. In most recent studies, this process has been investigated in the light of the dual route hypothesis and more specifically of the activation-suppression model using distributional analyses. Some authors have suggested that cognitive action control assessment is not specific to response modes. In this study we adapted the Simon task, using oculomotor responses instead of manual responses, in order to evaluate whether the resolution of conflict induced by a two-dimensional stimulus yielded similar results to what is usually reported in tasks with manual responses. Results obtained from 43 young healthy participants revealed the typical congruence effect, with longer reaction times (RT) and lesser accuracy in the incongruent condition. Conditional accuracy functions (CAF) also revealed a higher proportion of fast errors in the incongruent condition and delta plots confirmed that conflict resolution was easier, as the time taken to respond increased. These results are very similar to what has been reported in the literature. Furthermore, our observations are in line with the assumptions of the activation-suppression model, in which automatic activation in conflict situations is captured in the fastest responses and selective inhibition of cognitive action control needs time to build up. Altogether, our results suggest that conflict resolution has core mechanisms whatever the response mode, manual or oculomotor. Using oculomotor responses in such tasks could be of interest when investigating cognitive action control in patients with severe motor disorders. PMID:26973499

  9. DUAL ALKALI TEST AND EVALUATION PROGRAM. VOLUME I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume I of the report is an executive summary of the results of a three-task program to investigate, characterize, and evaluate the basic process chemistry and the various operating modes of sodium-based dual alkali scrubbing processes. The tasks were: I, laboratory studies at b...

  10. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  11. Working memory effects in speeded RSVP tasks.

    PubMed

    Gil-Gómez de Liaño, Beatriz; Potter, Mary C; Rodríguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The present paper examines the effects of memory contents and memory load in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) speeded tasks, trying to explain previous inconsistent results. We used a one target (Experiment 1) and a two-target (Experiment 2) RSVP task with a concurrent memory load of one or four items, in a dual-task paradigm. A relation between material in working memory and the target in the RSVP impaired the identification of the target. In Experiments 3 and 4, the single task was to determine whether any information in memory matched the target in the RSVP, while varying the memory load. A match was detected faster than a non-match, although only when there was some distance between targets in the RSVP (Experiment 4). The results suggest that memory contents automatically capture attention, slowing processing when the memory contents are irrelevant to the task, and speeding processing when they are relevant. PMID:23397260

  12. Examining interference of different cognitive tasks on voluntary balance control in aging and stroke.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Tanvi; Subramaniam, Savitha; Varghese, Rini

    2016-09-01

    This study compared the effect of semantic and working memory tasks when each was concurrently performed with a voluntary balance task to evaluate the differences in the resulting cognitive-motor interference (CMI) between healthy aging and aging with stroke. Older stroke survivors (n = 10), older healthy (n = 10) and young adults (n = 10) performed the limits of stability, balance test under single task (ST) and dual task (DT) with two different cognitive tasks, word list generation (WLG) and counting backwards (CB). Cognitive ability was evaluated by recording the number of words and digits counted while sitting (ST) and during balance tasks (DT). The balance and cognitive costs were computed using [(ST-DT)/ST] × 100 for all the variables. Across groups, the balance cost was significantly higher for the older stroke survivors group in the CB condition than older healthy (p < 0.05) and young adult groups (p < 0.05) but was similar between these two groups for the WLG task. Similarly, the cognitive cost was significantly higher in older stroke survivors than in older healthy (p < 0.05) and young adults (p < 0.01) for both the cognitive tasks. The working memory task resulted in greater CMI than the semantic one, and this difference seemed to be most apparent in older stroke survivors. Young adults showed the least CMI, with a similar performance on the two memory tasks. On the other hand, healthy aging and stroke impact both semantic and working memory. Stroke-related cognitive deficits may further significantly decrease working memory function. PMID:27302401

  13. A Simulation Study of Instrument Meteorological Condition Approaches to Dual Parallel Runways Spaced 3400 and 2500 Feet Apart Using Flight-Deck-Centered Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Marvin C.; Scanlon, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    A number of our nations airports depend on closely spaced parallel runway operations to handle their normal traffic throughput when weather conditions are favorable. For safety these operations are curtailed in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) when the ceiling or visibility deteriorates and operations in many cases are limited to the equivalent of a single runway. Where parallel runway spacing is less than 2500 feet, capacity loss in IMC is on the order of 50 percent for these runways. Clearly, these capacity losses result in landing delays, inconveniences to the public, increased operational cost to the airlines, and general interruption of commerce. This document presents a description and the results of a fixed-base simulation study to evaluate an initial concept that includes a set of procedures for conducting safe flight in closely spaced parallel runway operations in IMC. Consideration of flight-deck information technology and displays to support the procedures is also included in the discussions. The procedures and supporting technology rely heavily on airborne capabilities operating in conjunction with the air traffic control system.

  14. Inter-annual and seasonal trends of vegetation condition in the Upper Blue Nile (Abbay) basin: dual scale time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teferi, E.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Bewket, W.

    2015-02-01

    A long-term decline in ecosystem functioning and productivity, often called land degradation, is a serious environmental and development challenge to Ethiopia that needs to be understood so as to develop sustainable land use strategies. This study examines inter-annual and seasonal trends of vegetation cover in the Upper Blue Nile (UBN) or Abbay basin. Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) based Global Inventory, Monitoring, and Modelling Studies (GIMMS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was used for course scale long-term vegetation trend analysis. Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) NDVI data (MOD13Q1) was used for finer scale vegetation trend analysis. Harmonic analyses and non-parametric trend tests were applied to both GIMMS NDVI (1981-2006) and MODIS NDVI (2001-2011) data sets. Based on a robust trend estimator (Theil-Sen slope) most part of the UBN (~77%) showed a positive trend in monthly GIMMS NDVI with a mean rate of 0.0015 NDVI units (3.77% yr-1), out of which 41.15% of the basin depicted significant increases (P < 0.05) with a mean rate of 0.0023 NDVI units (5.59% yr-1) during the period. However, the finer scale (250 m) MODIS-based vegetation trend analysis revealed that about 36% of the UBN shows a significantly decreasing trend (P < 0.05) over the period 2001-2011 at an average rate of 0.0768 NDVI yr-1. This indicates that the greening trend of vegetation condition was followed by browning trend since the mid-2000s in the basin, which requires the attention of land users and decision makers. Seasonal trend analysis was found to be very useful in identifying changes in vegetation condition that could be masked if only inter-annual vegetation trend analysis was performed. The finer scale intra-annual trend analysis revealed trends that were more linked to human activities. This study concludes that integrated analysis of course and fine scale, inter-annual and intra-annual trends enables a more robust

  15. Inter-annual and seasonal trends of vegetation condition in the Upper Blue Nile (Abay) Basin: dual-scale time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teferi, E.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Bewket, W.

    2015-09-01

    A long-term decline in ecosystem functioning and productivity, often called land degradation, is a serious environmental challenge to Ethiopia that needs to be understood so as to develop sustainable land use strategies. This study examines inter-annual and seasonal trends of vegetation cover in the Upper Blue Nile (UBN) or Abbay Basin. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-based Global Inventory, Monitoring, and Modeling Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) was used for long-term vegetation trend analysis at low spatial resolution. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) NDVI data (MOD13Q1) were used for medium-scale vegetation trend analysis. Harmonic analyses and non-parametric trend tests were applied to both GIMMS NDVI (1981-2006) and MODIS NDVI (2001-2011) data sets. Based on a robust trend estimator (Theil-Sen slope), most parts of the UBN (~ 77 %) showed a positive trend in monthly GIMMS NDVI, with a mean rate of 0.0015 NDVI units (3.77 % yr-1), out of which 41.15 % of the basin depicted significant increases (p < 0.05), with a mean rate of 0.0023 NDVI units (5.59 % yr-1) during the period. However, the MODIS-based vegetation trend analysis revealed that about 36 % of the UBN showed a significant decreasing trend (p < 0.05) over the period 2001-2011 at an average rate of 0.0768 NDVI yr-1. This indicates that the greening trend of the vegetation condition was followed by decreasing trend since the mid-2000s in the basin, which requires the attention of land users and decision makers. Seasonal trend analysis was found to be very useful to identify changes in vegetation condition that could be masked if only inter-annual vegetation trend analysis was performed. Over half (60 %) of the Abay Basin was found to exhibit significant trends in seasonality over the 25-year period (1982-2006). About 17 and 16 % of the significant trends consisted of areas experiencing a uniform increase in NDVI throughout the year

  16. Freudenthal dual Lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsten, L.; Duff, M. J.; Ferrara, S.; Marrani, A.

    2013-12-01

    The global U-dualities of extended supergravity have played a central role in differentiating the distinct classes of extremal black hole solutions. When the U-duality group satisfies certain algebraic conditions, as is the case for a broad class of supergravities, the extremal black holes enjoy a further symmetry known as Freudenthal duality (F-duality), which although distinct from U-duality preserves the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. Here it is shown that, by adopting the doubled Lagrangian formalism, F-duality, defined on the doubled field strengths, is not only a symmetry of the black hole solutions, but also of the equations of motion themselves. A further role for F-duality is introduced in the context of world-sheet actions. The Nambu-Goto world-sheet action in any (t, s) signature spacetime can be written in terms of the F-dual. The corresponding field equations and Bianchi identities are then related by F-duality allowing for an F-dual formulation of Gaillard-Zumino duality on the world-sheet. An equivalent polynomial ‘Polyakov-type’ action is introduced using the so-called black hole potential. Such a construction allows for actions invariant under all groups of type E7, including E7 itself, although in this case the stringy interpretation is less clear.

  17. Physiological and behavioural changes associated to the management of secondary tasks while driving.

    PubMed

    Collet, C; Clarion, A; Morel, M; Chapon, A; Petit, C

    2009-11-01

    Sharing attention between two tasks requiring the same mental resources is supposed to increase the resulting strain. Phoning while driving may elicit cognitive interference between driving operations and conversation and consequently, may affect driving efficiency. The road scene cues may thus be perceived late or even omitted, increasing the probability to be involved in a critical situation. The aim of the experiment was to study how the additional strain elicited by a secondary task may change drivers' arousal with potential consequences on driving performance. Electrodermal activity, heart rate and reaction time (RT) were the dependent variables. Listening to the radio, holding an in-vehicle or a cell-phone conversation were the secondary communication tasks, performed by 10 participants during a driving sequence on a private circuit. Within nominal driving, each communication task was requested at random to prevent any habituation or anticipation. The cell-phone conversation made RT increase by about 20%, by comparison to the nominal driving condition. Nevertheless, the in-vehicle conversation impacted RT almost in the same proportion. Physiological data showed that arousal level increased as a function of dual-tasks requirements, the in-vehicle conversation eliciting the same strain as the remote conversation. With caution due to contextual differences between these two communication tasks, conversing with a passenger was thus as detrimental as using a cell-phone. PMID:19249012

  18. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  19. Dual clearance squeeze film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A dual clearance hydrodynamic liquid squeeze film damper for a gas turbine engine is described. Under normal operating conditions, the device functions as a conventional squeeze film damper, using only one of its oil films. When an unbalance reaches abusive levels, as may occur with a blade loss or foreign object damage, a second, larger clearance film becomes active, controlling vibration amplitudes in a near optimum manner until the engine can be safely shut down and repaired.

  20. Steering Demands Diminish the Early-P3, Late-P3 and RON Components of the Event-Related Potential of Task-Irrelevant Environmental Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Menja; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.; Chuang, Lewis L.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigates the demands that steering places on mental resources. Instead of a conventional dual-task paradigm, participants of this study were only required to perform a steering task while task-irrelevant auditory distractor probes (environmental sounds and beep tones) were intermittently presented. The event-related potentials (ERPs), which were generated by these probes, were analyzed for their sensitivity to the steering task’s demands. The steering task required participants to counteract unpredictable roll disturbances and difficulty was manipulated either by adjusting the bandwidth of the roll disturbance or by varying the complexity of the control dynamics. A mass univariate analysis revealed that steering selectively diminishes the amplitudes of early P3, late P3, and the re-orientation negativity (RON) to task-irrelevant environmental sounds but not to beep tones. Our findings are in line with a three-stage distraction model, which interprets these ERPs to reflect the post-sensory detection of the task-irrelevant stimulus, engagement, and re-orientation back to the steering task. This interpretation is consistent with our manipulations for steering difficulty. More participants showed diminished amplitudes for these ERPs in the “hard” steering condition relative to the “easy” condition. To sum up, the current work identifies the spatiotemporal ERP components of task-irrelevant auditory probes that are sensitive to steering demands on mental resources. This provides a non-intrusive method for evaluating mental workload in novel steering environments. PMID:26973494

  1. Postural responses to changing task conditions.

    PubMed

    Hansen, P D; Woollacott, M H; Debu, B

    1988-01-01

    The experimental goal was to investigate discrepancies in the literature concerning postural adaptation and to determine if the prior presentation of horizontal perturbations affected the amplitude of responses to rotational perturbations. Surface EMG recordings from lower leg muscles (gastrocnemius (GAS) and tibialis anterior (TA)) were recorded in twelve subjects, and the amplitudes of the responses were statistically analyzed. We did not find differences between the responses to rotational perturbations which preceded or followed horizontal perturbations. This finding did not support the hypothesis that differences in the order of presentation of the different types of perturbations accounted for the discrepancies in the literature. Furthermore, our design did not show the progressive elimination of the GAS response within three to five sequential trials. Instead, we found a slow but significant response amplitude reduction over ten trials without yielding a permanent disappearance of the response. When analyzing the GAS responses to the rotational perturbations only, we found two components that contributed to the response reduction: 1) an initial reduction between trials one and subsequent trials, which could be due to habituation of a startle-like response; and 2) a second reduction which was more gradual. Our results also showed an immediate change in the response amplitude on the first trial, when the type of perturbation was changed. This is inconsistent with the view that ankle musculature stretch and joint movement are the primary inputs driving the postural responses. Since small ankle dorsiflexing rotations produced by the platform translations caused large GAS responses while large ankle dorsiflexing rotations produced by direct platform rotations caused small GAS responses, this suggests that multiple sensory inputs contribute to the responses. We propose that an initial compensation to a new perturbation type occurs within the first trial by the integration of these divergent sensory inputs. PMID:3224672

  2. Guessing versus Choosing an Upcoming Task

    PubMed Central

    Kleinsorge, Thomas; Scheil, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    We compared the effects of guessing vs. choosing an upcoming task. In a task-switching paradigm with four tasks, two groups of participants were asked to either guess or choose which task will be presented next under otherwise identical conditions. The upcoming task corresponded to participants’ guesses or choices in 75 % of the trials. However, only participants in the Choosing condition were correctly informed about this, whereas participants in the Guessing condition were told that tasks were determined at random. In the Guessing condition, we replicated previous findings of a pronounced reduction of switch costs in case of incorrect guesses. This switch cost reduction was considerably less pronounced with denied choices in the Choosing condition. We suggest that in the Choosing condition, the signaling of prediction errors associated with denied choices is attenuated because a certain proportion of denied choices is consistent with the overall representation of the situation as conveyed by task instructions. In the Guessing condition, in contrast, the mismatch of guessed and actual task is resolved solely on the level of individual trials by strengthening the representation of the actual task. PMID:27047423

  3. Guessing versus Choosing an Upcoming Task.

    PubMed

    Kleinsorge, Thomas; Scheil, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    We compared the effects of guessing vs. choosing an upcoming task. In a task-switching paradigm with four tasks, two groups of participants were asked to either guess or choose which task will be presented next under otherwise identical conditions. The upcoming task corresponded to participants' guesses or choices in 75 % of the trials. However, only participants in the Choosing condition were correctly informed about this, whereas participants in the Guessing condition were told that tasks were determined at random. In the Guessing condition, we replicated previous findings of a pronounced reduction of switch costs in case of incorrect guesses. This switch cost reduction was considerably less pronounced with denied choices in the Choosing condition. We suggest that in the Choosing condition, the signaling of prediction errors associated with denied choices is attenuated because a certain proportion of denied choices is consistent with the overall representation of the situation as conveyed by task instructions. In the Guessing condition, in contrast, the mismatch of guessed and actual task is resolved solely on the level of individual trials by strengthening the representation of the actual task. PMID:27047423

  4. DUAL ALKALI TEST AND EVALUATION PROGRAM. VOLUME II. LABORATORY AND PILOT PLANT PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume II of the report covers Tasks I and II of a three-task program to investigate, characterize, and evaluate the basic process chemistry and the various operating modes of sodium-based dual alkali scrubbing processes. The tasks were: I, laboratory studies at both Arthur D. Li...

  5. DUAL ALKALI TEST AND EVALUATION PROGRAM. VOLUME III. PROTOTYPE TEST PROGRAM--PLANT SCHOLZ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volume III of the report covers Task III of a three-task program to investigate, characterize, and evaluate the basic process chemistry and the various operating modes of sodium-based dual alkali scrubbing processes. The tasks were: (I) laboratory studies at both Arthur D. Little...

  6. Thermal management and performance evaluation of a dual bi-directional, soft-switched IGBT-based inverter for the 1st autonomous microgrid power system in Taiwan under various operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tien-Chan; Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Lu, Hong-Yi; Tu, Sheng-Xun

    2016-06-01

    The thermal management of the inverter system is of great importance since very high voltage/current will be switched intermittently and/or continuously and high temperature is excruciably detrimental to the service life of electronics, especially for the switching devices such as insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). In this study, a newly developed dual bi-directional IGBT-based inverter in conjunction with autonomous microgrid system is investigated with particular focus on the thermal management and performance evaluation under various operation conditions. Locally enhanced heat transfer approach such as oblique orientation and heat dissipating materials are experimentally investigated. The studied inverter system is initially packaged by a galvanized steel plate (size 62 × 48 × 18 cm) and the switching power is set in the range of 0.5-3 kW. The module is operated at the switching and pulse frequencies of 60 Hz and 20 kHz, respectively. The adoption of heat dissipating material in either paste or film form had experimentally shown to possess the flexibility tailoring heat transfer performance locally. Experimental studies of heat dissipating film with various hotspot scenarios showed that the temperature difference can be appreciably reduced as much as 13.1 and 15.4 °C, respectively with facilitation of one- and two-layers of heat dissipating film. From the measurement results, the measured peak temperature is highly dominated by the thickness of heat dissipating film, showing the dominance of thickness-dependent thermal resistance and resultant heat accumulation phenomena.

  7. Unraveling Executive Functioning in Dual Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Duijkers, Judith C L M; Vissers, Constance Th W M; Egger, Jos I M

    2016-01-01

    In mental health, the term dual-diagnosis is used for the co-occurrence of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) with another mental disorder. These co-occurring disorders can have a shared cause, and can cause/intensify each other's expression. Forming a threat to health and society, dual-diagnosis is associated with relapses in addiction-related behavior and a destructive lifestyle. This is due to a persistent failure to control impulses and the maintaining of inadequate self-regulatory behavior in daily life. Thus, several aspects of executive functioning like inhibitory, shifting and updating processes seem impaired in dual-diagnosis. Executive (dys-)function is currently even seen as a shared underlying key component of most mental disorders. However, the number of studies on diverse aspects of executive functioning in dual-diagnosis is limited. In the present review, a systematic overview of various aspects of executive functioning in dual-diagnosis is presented, striving for a prototypical profile of patients with dual-diagnosis. Looking at empirical results, inhibitory and shifting processes appear to be impaired for SUD combined with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or cluster B personality disorders. Studies involving updating process tasks for dual-diagnosis were limited. More research that zooms in to the full diversity of these executive functions is needed in order to strengthen these findings. Detailed insight in the profile of strengths and weaknesses that underlies one's behavior and is related to diagnostic classifications, can lead to tailor-made assessment and indications for treatment, pointing out which aspects need attention and/or training in one's self-regulative abilities. PMID:27445939

  8. Unraveling Executive Functioning in Dual Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Duijkers, Judith C. L. M.; Vissers, Constance Th. W. M.; Egger, Jos I. M.

    2016-01-01

    In mental health, the term dual-diagnosis is used for the co-occurrence of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) with another mental disorder. These co-occurring disorders can have a shared cause, and can cause/intensify each other’s expression. Forming a threat to health and society, dual-diagnosis is associated with relapses in addiction-related behavior and a destructive lifestyle. This is due to a persistent failure to control impulses and the maintaining of inadequate self-regulatory behavior in daily life. Thus, several aspects of executive functioning like inhibitory, shifting and updating processes seem impaired in dual-diagnosis. Executive (dys-)function is currently even seen as a shared underlying key component of most mental disorders. However, the number of studies on diverse aspects of executive functioning in dual-diagnosis is limited. In the present review, a systematic overview of various aspects of executive functioning in dual-diagnosis is presented, striving for a prototypical profile of patients with dual-diagnosis. Looking at empirical results, inhibitory and shifting processes appear to be impaired for SUD combined with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or cluster B personality disorders. Studies involving updating process tasks for dual-diagnosis were limited. More research that zooms in to the full diversity of these executive functions is needed in order to strengthen these findings. Detailed insight in the profile of strengths and weaknesses that underlies one’s behavior and is related to diagnostic classifications, can lead to tailor-made assessment and indications for treatment, pointing out which aspects need attention and/or training in one’s self-regulative abilities. PMID:27445939

  9. Sensorimotor Adaptability Training Improves Motor and Dual-Task Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J.J.; Peters, B.T.; Mulavara, A.P.; Brady, R.; Batson, C.; Cohen, H.S.

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of our project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program designed to facilitate recovery of functional capabilities when astronauts transition to different gravitational environments. The goal of our current study was to determine if SA training using variation in visual flow and support surface motion produces improved performance in a novel sensory environment and demonstrate the retention characteristics of SA training.

  10. Discourse Coherence and Cognition after Stroke: A Dual Task Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogalski, Yvonne; Altmann, Lori J. P.; Plummer-D'Amato, Prudence; Behrman, Andrea L.; Marsiske, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested that the maintenance of global coherence (topic maintenance) and local coherence (maintenance between utterances) in discourse requires cognitive resources. This study directly tests this hypothesis by examining the relationship between cognitive variables and coherence in narrative discourse produced by…

  11. Abnormal Ventral and Dorsal Attention Network Activity during Single and Dual Target Detection in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Amy M.; Lee, Junghee; Wynn, Jonathan K.; Cohen, Mark S.; Engel, Stephen A.; Glahn, David C.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Reavis, Eric A.; Green, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Early visual perception and attention are impaired in schizophrenia, and these deficits can be observed on target detection tasks. These tasks activate distinct ventral and dorsal brain networks which support stimulus-driven and goal-directed attention, respectively. We used single and dual target rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) tasks during fMRI with an ROI approach to examine regions within these networks associated with target detection and the attentional blink (AB) in 21 schizophrenia outpatients and 25 healthy controls. In both tasks, letters were targets and numbers were distractors. For the dual target task, the second target (T2) was presented at three different lags after the first target (T1) (lag1 = 100 ms, lag3 = 300 ms, lag7 = 700ms). For both single and dual target tasks, patients identified fewer targets than controls. For the dual target task, both groups showed the expected AB effect with poorer performance at lag 3 than at lags 1 or 7, and there was no group by lag interaction. During the single target task, patients showed abnormally increased deactivation of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), a key region of the ventral network. When attention demands were increased during the dual target task, patients showed overactivation of the posterior intraparietal cortex, a key dorsal network region, along with failure to deactivate TPJ. Results suggest inefficient and faulty suppression of salience-oriented processing regions, resulting in increased sensitivity to stimuli in general, and difficulty distinguishing targets from non-targets. PMID:27014135

  12. The Dual Career Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurtin, Lee

    1980-01-01

    The dual career couple is forced to make a series of choices and compromises that impact the realms of marriage and career. The dilemmas that confront dual career marriages can be overcome only by compromise, accommodation, and mutual understanding on the part of the individuals involved. A revamping of human resources and recruitment programs is…

  13. Dual Enrollment Academy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Nicolas; Chavez, Guadalupe

    2009-01-01

    Dual Enrollment Engineering (DEEA) and Medical Science (DEMSA) Academies are two-year dual enrollment programs for high school students. Students explore engineering and medical careers through college coursework. Students prepare for higher education in engineering and medical fields while completing associate degrees in biology or engineering…

  14. Implicit and Explicit Learning of a Sequential Postural Weight-Shifting Task in Young and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Caljouw, Simone R.; Veldkamp, Renee; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-specific postural motor learning in a target-directed weight-shifting task in 12 older and 12 young participants was assessed. In the implicit sequence learning condition participants performed a concurrent spatial cognitive task and in the two explicit conditions participants were required to discover the sequence order either with or without the concurrent cognitive task. Participants moved a cursor on the screen from the center location to one of the target locations projected in a semi-circle and back by shifting their center of pressure (CoP) on force plates. During the training the targets appeared in a simple fixed 5-target sequence. Plan-based control (i.e., direction of the CoP displacement in the first part of the target-directed movement) improved by anticipating the sequence order in the implicit condition but not in the explicit dual task condition. Only the young participants were able to use the explicit knowledge of the sequence structure to improve the directional error as indicated by a significant decrease in directional error over practice and an increase in directional error with sequence removal in the explicit single task condition. Time spent in the second part of the movement trajectory to stabilize the cursor on the target location improved over training in both the implicit and explicit sequence learning conditions, for both age groups. These results might indicate that an implicit motor learning method, which holds back explicit awareness of task relevant features, may be desirable for improving plan-based motor control in older adults. PMID:27252670

  15. Unravelling developmental disregard in children with unilateral cerebral palsy by measuring event-related potentials during a simple and complex task

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In a subset of children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) a discrepancy between capacity and performance of the affected upper limb can be observed. This discrepancy is known as Developmental Disregard (DD). Though the phenomenon of DD has been well documented, its underlying cause is still under debate. DD has originally been explained based on principles of operant conditioning. Alternatively, it has been proposed that DD results from a diminished automaticity of movements, resulting in an increased cognitive load when using the affected hand. To investigate the amount of involved cognitive load we studied Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) preceding task-related motor responses during a single-hand capacity and a dual-hand performance task. It was hypothesised that children with DD show alterations related to long-latency ERP components when selecting a response with the affected upper limb, reflecting increased cognitive load in order to generate an adequate response and especially so within the dual-hand task. Methods Fifteen children with unilateral CP participated in the study. One of the participants was excluded due to major visual impairments. Seven of the remaining participants displayed DD. The other seven children served as a control group. All participants performed two versions of a cue-target paradigm, a single-hand capacity and a dual-hand performance task. The ERP components linked to target presentation were inspected: the mid-latency P2 component and the consecutive long-latency N2b component. Results In the dual-hand performance task children with DD showed an enhancement in mean amplitude of the long-latency N2b component when selecting a response with their affected hand. No differences were found regarding the amplitude of the mid-latency P2 component. No differences were observed regarding the single-hand capacity task. The control group did not display any differences in ERPs linked to target evaluation processes between both

  16. Task Definition: A Motivating Task = Eager Learners!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Teachers who design meaningful and developmentally appropriate tasks will motivate their students to engage in the content and as students work through the Big6 process, interacting with the content, they learn and practice information and technology skills. A valuable task definition technique is to develop questions that students in each group…

  17. Incidental Learning and Task Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedberg, Michael; Wagschal, Tana T.; Hazeltine, Eliot

    2014-01-01

    For skill learning processes to be effective, they must encode associations that are inherent to the current task and avoid those that are spurious or particular to training conditions so that learning can transfer to novel situations. Some everyday contexts even require grouped responding to simultaneously presented stimuli. Here we test whether…

  18. Developmental changes in using verbal self-cueing in task-switching situations: the impact of task practice and task-sequencing demands.

    PubMed

    Kray, Jutta; Gaspard, Hanna; Karbach, Julia; Blaye, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    In this study we examined whether developmental changes in using verbal self-cueing for task-goal maintenance are dependent on the amount of task practice and task-sequencing demands. To measure task-goal maintenance we applied a switching paradigm in which children either performed only task A or B in single-task blocks or switched between them on every second trial in mixed-task blocks. Task-goal maintenance was determined by comparing the performance between both blocks (mixing costs). The influence of verbal self-cueing was measured by instructing children to either name the next task aloud or not to verbalize during task preparation. Task-sequencing demands were varied between groups whereas one group received spatial task cues to support keeping track of the task sequence, while the other group did not. We also varied by the amount of prior practice in task switching while one group of participants practiced task switching first, before performing the task naming in addition, and the other group did it vice versa. Results of our study investigating younger (8-10 years) and older children (11-13 years) revealed no age differences in beneficial effects of verbal self-cueing. In line with previous findings, children showed reduced mixing costs under task-naming instructions and under conditions of low task-sequence demands (with the presence of spatial task cues). Our results also indicated that these benefits were only obtained for those groups of children that first received practice in task switching alone with no additional verbalization instruction. These findings suggest that internal task-cueing strategies can be efficiently used in children but only if they received prior practice in the underlying task so that demands on keeping and coordinating various instructions are reduced. Moreover, children benefitted from spatial task cues for better task-goal maintenance only if no verbal task-cueing strategy was introduced first. PMID:24381566

  19. Professional and Institutional Morality: Building Ethics Programmes on the Dual Loyalty of Academic Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhof, Andre; Wilderom, Celeste; Oost, Marlies

    2012-01-01

    Most professionals have the arduous task of managing their own dual loyalty: in one contextual relationship, they are members of a profession while simultaneously they are employed as members of a locally established organisation. This sense of a dual loyalty has to be taken into account when professional bureaucracies develop ethics programmes.…

  20. Dual arm robotic system with sensory input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozguner, U.

    1987-01-01

    The need for dual arm robots in space station assembly and satellite maintainance is of increasing significance. Such robots will be in greater demand in the future when numerous tasks will be assigned to them to relieve the direct intervention of humans in space. Technological demands from these robots will be high. They will be expected to perform high speed tasks with a certain degree of autonomy. Various levels of sensing will have to be used in a sophisticated control scheme. Ongoing research in control, sensing and real-time software to produce a two-arm robotic system than can accomplish generic assembly tasks is discussed. The control hierarchy and the specific control approach are discussed. A decentralized implementation of model-reference adaptive control using Variable Structure controllers and the incorporation of tactile feedback is considered.

  1. Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment and Data Driven Policy Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberger, Eric; Witt, M. Allison; Blankenberger, Bob; Franklin, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The use of dual credit has been expanding rapidly. Dual credit is a college course taken by a high school student for which both college and high school credit is given. Previous studies provided limited quantitative evidence that dual credit/dual enrollment is directly connected to positive student outcomes. In this study, predictive statistics…

  2. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  3. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  4. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  5. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  6. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee...

  7. Effects of Alcohol on Performance on a Distraction Task During Simulated Driving

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Allyssa J.; Meda, Shashwath A.; Skudlarski, Pawel; Calhoun, Vince; Astur, Robert; Ruopp, Kathryn C.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Prior studies report that accidents involving intoxicated drivers are more likely to occur during performance of secondary tasks. We studied this phenomenon, using a dual-task paradigm, involving performance of a visual oddball (VO) task while driving in an alcohol challenge paradigm. Previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies of the VO task have shown activation in the anterior cingulate, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex. Thus, we predicted dose-dependent decreases in activation of these areas during VO performance. Methods Forty healthy social drinkers were administered 3 different doses of alcohol, individually tailored to their gender and weight. Participants performed a VO task while operating a virtual reality driving simulator in a 3T fMRI scanner. Results Analysis showed a dose-dependent linear decrease in Blood Oxygen Level Dependent activation during task performance, primarily in hippocampus, anterior cingulate, and dorsolateral prefrontal areas, with the least activation occurring during the high dose. Behavioral analysis showed a dose-dependent linear increase in reaction time, with no effects associated with either correct hits or false alarms. In all dose conditions, driving speed decreased significantly after a VO stimulus. However, at the high dose this decrease was significantly less. Passenger-side line crossings significantly increased at the high dose. Conclusions These results suggest that driving impairment during secondary task performance may be associated with alcohol-related effects on the above brain regions, which are involved with attentional processing/decision-making. Drivers with high blood alcohol concentrations may be less able to orient or detect novel or sudden stimuli during driving. PMID:19183133

  8. The Effects of Task Structure on Time-sharing Efficiency and Resource Allocation Optimality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, P. S.; Wickens, C. D.

    1984-01-01

    A distinction was made between two aspects of time sharing performance: time sharing efficiency and attention allocation optimality. A secondary task technique was employed to evaluate the effects of the task structures of the component time shared tasks on both aspects of the time sharing performance. Five pairs of dual tasks differing in their structural configurations were investigated. The primary task was a visual/manual tracking task which requires spatial processing. The secondary task was either another tracking task or a verbal memory task with one of four different input/output configurations. Congruent to a common finding, time-sharing efficiency was observed to decrease with an increasing overlap of resources utilized by the time shared tasks. Research also tends to support the hypothesis that resource allocation is more optimal when the time shared tasks placed heavy demands on common processing resources than when they utilized separate resources.

  9. Physiological assessment of task underload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, J. Raymond, Jr.; Harris, Randall L., Sr.; Pope, Alan T.

    1988-01-01

    The ultimate goal of research efforts directed at underload, boredom, or complacency in high-technology work environments is to detect conditions or states of the operator that can be demonstrated to lead to performance degradation, and then to intervene in the environment to restore acceptable system performance. Physiological measures may provide indices of changes in condition or state of the operator that may be of value in high-technology work environments. The focus of the present study was on the use of physiological measures in the assessment of operator condition or state in a task underload scenario. A fault acknowledgement task characterized by simple repetitive responses with minimal novelty, complexity, and uncertainty was employed to place subjects in a task underload situation. Physiological measures (electrocardiogram (ECG), electroencephalogram (EEG), and pupil diameter) were monitored during task performance over a one-hour test session for 12 subjects. Each of the physiological measures exhibited changes over the test session indicative of decrements in subject arousal level. While high correlations between physiological measures were found across subjects, individual differences between subjects support the use of profiling techniques to establish baselines unique to each subject.

  10. Dual redundant arm system operational quality measures and their applications - Dynamic measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Kim, Sungbok

    1990-01-01

    Dual-arm dynamic operation quality measures are presented which quantify the efficiency and capability of generating Cartesian accelerations by two cooperative arms based on the analysis of dual-arm dynamic interactions. Dual-arm dynamic manipulability is defined as the efficiency of generating Cartesian accelerations under the dynamic and kinematic interactions between individual arms and an object under manipulation. The analysis of dual-arm dynamic interactions is based on the so-called Cartesian space agent model of an arm, which represents an individual arm as a force source acting upon a point mass with the effective Cartesian space arm dynamics and an environment or an object under manipulation. The Cartesian space agent model of an arm makes it possible to derive the dynamic and kinematic constraints involved in the transport, assembly and grasping modes of dual-arm cooperation. A task-oriented operational quality measure, (TOQd) is defined by evaluating dual-arm dynamic manipulability in terms of given task requirements. TOQd is used in dual-arm joint configuration optimization. Simulation results are shown. A complete set of forward dynamic equations for a dual-arm system is derived, and dual-arm dynamic operational quality measures for various modes of dual-arm cooperation allowing sliding contacts are established.

  11. Universal Signal Conditioning Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1997-01-01

    The Technological Research and Development Authority (TRDA) and NASA-KSC entered into a cooperative agreement in March of 1994 to achieve the utilization and commercialization of a technology development for benefiting both the Space Program and U.S. industry on a "dual-use basis". The technology involved in this transfer is a new, unique Universal Conditioning Amplifier (USCA) used in connection with various types of transducers. The project was initiated in partnership with I-Net Corporation, Lockheed Martin Telemetry & Instrumentation (formerly Loral Test and Information Systems) and Brevard Community College. The project consists of designing, miniaturizing, manufacturing, and testing an existing prototype of USCA that was developed for NASA-KSC by the I-Net Corporation. The USCA is a rugged and field-installable self (or remotely)- programmable amplifier that works in combination with a tag random access memory (RAM) attached to various types of transducers. Thi