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Sample records for ductile transplutonium metal

  1. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  2. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  3. New look at the atomic volumes of the. beta. -form of the transplutonium metals

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Benedict, U.; Peterson, J.R.; Dufour, C.; Dabos, S.

    1986-01-01

    The atomic volumes of the beta-form of the first four transplutonium metals were evaluated using data for samples prepared by thermal and by pressure treatment. The volumes derived for curium, berkelium, and californium metals quenched from elevated temperatures were found to be consistently larger than those for ''pressure-quenched'' samples, whose volumes were in good agreement with values for the alpha-forms. The cubic lattice parameters from ''pressure-quenched'' samples also provided a more consistent trend than those obtained from thermally quenched samples when compared to the parameters for the mononitrides of the metals.

  4. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  5. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase’s size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses. PMID:23863967

  6. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase's size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses. PMID:23863967

  7. Tunable Tensile Ductility in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Magagnosc, D. J.; Ehrbar, R.; Kumar, G.; He, M. R.; Schroers, J.; Gianola, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread adoption of metallic glasses (MGs) in applications motivated by high strength and elasticity combined with plastic-like processing has been stymied by their lack of tensile ductility. One emerging strategy to couple the attractive properties of MGs with resistance to failure by shear localization is to employ sub-micron sample or feature length scales, although conflicting results shroud an atomistic understanding of the responsible mechanisms in uncertainty. Here, we report in situ deformation experiments of directly moulded Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 MG nanowires, which show tunable tensile ductility. Initially brittle as-moulded nanowires can be coerced to a distinct glassy state upon irradiation with Ga+ ions, leading to tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic flow. This behaviour is reversible and the glass returns to a brittle state upon subsequent annealing. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for homogenous plastic flow in nano-scaled MGs and strategies for circumventing the poor damage tolerance that has long plagued MGs.

  8. Determining Ductile Fracture Toughness in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Manneschmidt, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Ductile fracture toughness determination, such as the J-integral versus crack growth resistance (J-R) curve, is a useful tool for evaluating material structural integrity in the presence of pre-existing defects. The J-R curve represents a way to calculate the work (energy) per unit fracture surface area needed to drive the crack growth. A typical J-R curve is shown in Fig. 1 from which the material fracture toughness near the initiation of stable crack growth (Jq) can be derived. In addition, tearing modulus (TR), representing the material resistance to stable crack growth, can be calculated based on the slope of the J-R curve between two exclusion lines (red dashed lines in Fig. 1). Since the introduction of the J-R curve, extensive efforts have been continuously devoted to develop simplified and reliable methods for determining the material J-R curve. This article briefly reviews three widely-used J-R curve test methods in metals, i.e. elastic unloading compliance (EUC), normalization, and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The main difference in these methods relates to the determination of the crack size. More details of performing the J-R curve determination can be found in ASTM standard E1820-11.

  9. Shifted homologous relationships between the transplutonium and early rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of the late actinide metals americium through einsteinium are compared with their rare-earth counterparts. Localization of the 5f electrons beginning at americium signals the appearance of true rare-earth-like properties, but the homologous relationship is shifted to place americium below praseodymium, einsteinium then below europium. The comparison of crystal structure, phase transitions, vapor pressures and heats of vaporization reveals remarkable similarities, especially for Sm-Cf and Eu-Es, where the stability of the divalent metal becomes established and divalent chemistry then follows. There is of course a major perturbation at the half-filled shell at curium, and it may be argued that americium is the anomaly in the so-called second rare-earth series. However, the response of americium, berkelium and californium under pressure reveals the true perturbation to be a thermodynamic one, occurring at curium.

  10. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure. PMID:27248329

  11. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Okulov, I. V.; Soldatov, I. V.; Sarmanova, M. F.; Kaban, I.; Gemming, T.; Edström, K.; Eckert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties. PMID:26219864

  12. Ductile damage prediction in sheet and bulk metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badreddine, Houssem; Labergère, Carl; Saanouni, Khemais

    2016-04-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation of an advanced 3D numerical methodology for virtual sheet and/or bulk metal forming simulation to predict the anisotropic ductile defects occurrence. First, the detailed formulation of thermodynamically-consistent fully coupled and fully anisotropic constitutive equations is given. The proposed constitutive equations account for the main material nonlinearities as the anisotropic plastic flow, the mixed isotropic and kinematic hardening and the anisotropic ductile damage under large inelastic strains. Second, the related numerical aspects required to solve the initial and boundary value problem (IBVP) are very briefly presented in the framework of the 3D finite element method. The global resolution schemes as well as the local integration schemes of the fully coupled constitutive equations are briefly discussed. Finally, some typical examples of sheet and bulk metal forming processes are numerically simulated using the proposed numerical methodology.

  13. Design of ductile bulk metallic glasses by adding ''soft'' atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, N.; Pauly, S.; Calin, M.; Gemming, T.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.; Eckert, J.

    2012-04-02

    We propose a strategy for the design of ductile bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) through minor substitution using relatively large atoms, which make the bonding nature become more metallic and with it less shear resistant. Such a locally modified structure results in topological heterogeneity, which appears to be crucial for achieving enhanced plasticity. This strategy is verified for Ti-Zr-Cu-Pd glassy alloys, in which Cu was replaced by In, and seems to be extendable to other BMG systems. The atomic-scale heterogeneity in BMGs is somewhat analog to defects in crystalline alloys and helps to improve the overall plasticity of BMGs.

  14. Enhancement of Strength and Ductility in Bulk Nanocrystalline Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T; Schuh, C A; Caturla, M J; Hodge, A M

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this project is to develop a robust scientific and technological framework for the design of high-strength and -ductility nanocrystalline materials for applications of technical importance to the Laboratory. The project couples theory and experiments with an emphasis on materials of macroscopic dimensions (mm to cm) that are composed of nanoscale (<100 nm) grains. There are four major tasks: (1) synthesize nanocrystalline materials with grain size in the 5- to 100-nm range; (2) conduct experimental studies to probe mechanisms of mechanical deformation and failure; (3) use large-scale simulation modeling technologies to provide insight to deformation mechanisms that may not be observable experimentally; and (4) check the results obtained from modeling, comparing experimental observations with results obtained from atomistic and dislocation-based simulations. This project supports efforts within the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) to understand and predict properties of metals such as strength and ductility.

  15. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  16. A model for ductile metal friction at high velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Ravelo, R. J.; Germann, T. C.

    We describe a meso-macro scale model for the frictional force at ductile metal interfaces for high velocities and large compressions. The model incorporates the micro-mesoscopic growth and refinement of material microstructure in a highly strained region at the sliding interface and incorporates both rate dependent plasticity and thermal conduction. The model compares favorably with recent large scale (1.8 billion atom) simulations to 50 ns of 3-dimensional polycrystalline 13-50 nm grain size Al-Al interfaces at pressures of 15 GPa using the SPaSM NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulation code. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Plohr, Jee Yeon N; Plohr, Bradley J

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

  18. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  19. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2007-07-17

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  20. Ultrahigh strength and ductility of metallic nanolayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Nathan Allan; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Dickerson, Pat; Hoagland, Richard; Misra, Amit

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the high strength of nanomaterials has gathered much interest in the materials community. Nanomaterials (polycrystalline and composites) have already been used, largely by the semiconductor community, as critical length scales for chip design have decreased to tens of nanometers. However, to ensure reliability of nanomaterials in almost any application, the mechanisms underlying their structural integrity must be well understood. For these materials to be put into service on a broader scale, not only should their strength be considered, but also ductility, toughness, formability, and fatigue resistance. While some progress has been made into constructing models for the deformation mechanisms governing these behaviors, the body of experimental knowledge is still limited, especially when length scales drop below 10 nanometers. This work produces stress-strain curves for nanolaminate composites with individual layer thickness of 40 nm and 5 run. Nanolaminate composites fabricated via magnetron sputtering comprised of alternating 5 nm thick Cu and Nb multilayers (two relatively soft metals) exhibit strengths on par with hardened tool steel and deformability in compression in excess of 25% [1]. The deformability of nanoscale composites is found to be limited by the onset of geometric instability, rather than due to intrinsic material behavior.

  1. An investigation into the role of adhesion in the erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing theories of erosion of ductile metals based on cutting and deformation mechanisms predict no material removal at normal incidence which is contradictory to experience. Thus, other mechanisms may be involved. The possible role of adhesive material transfer during erosion is investigated by both single-particle impingement experiments and erosion by streams of particles. Examination of the rebounding particles as well as the eroded surfaces yields evidence of a significant adhesive mechanism for the ductile metals investigated.

  2. An investigation into the role of adhesion in the erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing theories of erosion of ductile metals based on cutting and deformation mechanisms predict no material removal at normal incidence which is contradictory to experience. Thus, other mechanisms may be involved. The possible role of adhesive material transfer during erosion is investigated by both single particle impingement experiments and erosion by streams of particles. Examination of the rebounding particles as well as the eroded surface yields evidence of a significant adhesive mechanism for the ductile metals investigated.

  3. Steady crack growth through ductile metals: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, James C.

    This thesis examines the crack-front response during sustained ductile tearing in structural metals at quasistatic rates using high resolution finite element computations. At load levels approaching the steady-growth regime, well-established computational methods that model material damage break down numerically as vanishingly small load increments produce increasingly large amounts of crack extension. The computational model adopted here determines the deformation history of a steadily advancing crack directly without the need for a priori (transient) analysis that considers blunting of the pre-existing stationary crack and subsequent growth through the associated initial plastic zone. Crack extension occurs at the remotely applied, fixed loading without the need for a local growth criteria. This numerical scheme utilizes a streamline integration technique to determine the elastic-plastic fields, generalized from a two-dimensional to a fully three-dimensional setting and implemented within mixed Matlab/C++/F-90 based software. Modifications of the conventional finite element formulation lead to an efficient procedure -- readily parallelized -- and determine the invariant near-front fields, representative of steady-state growth, on a fixed mesh in a boundary-layer framework. In the small-scale yielding regime, the crack front does not sense the existence of remote boundaries, and computational results retain a strong transferability among various geometric configurations where near-front, plastic deformation remains entirely enclosed by the surrounding linear-elastic material. The global stress intensity factor (KI ) and imposed T-stress fully specify displacement constraints along the far-field boundary, and in a three-dimensional setting, the panel thickness reflects the only natural length scale. The initial studies in this work consider steady crack advance within the small-scale yielding context under plane-strain conditions and mode I loading. These analyses

  4. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  5. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  6. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  7. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  8. Transplutonium elements processed from rock debris of underground detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. A. A.; Harvey, H. W.; Hoh, J. C.; Horwitz, E. P.

    1969-01-01

    Six-step chemical processing method extracts minute quantities of transplutonium elements found in rock debris following a nuclear detonation. The process consists of dissolution of rock, feed preparation, liquid-liquid extraction, final purification of transplutonium elements and plutonium, and separation of the transplutonium elements.

  9. Ductility and work hardening in nano-sized metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D. Z.; Gu, X. W.; An, Q.; Goddard, W. A.; Greer, J. R.

    2015-02-09

    In-situ nano-tensile experiments on 70 nm-diameter free-standing electroplated NiP metallic glass nanostructures reveal tensile true strains of ∼18%, an amount comparable to compositionally identical 100 nm-diameter focused ion beam samples and ∼3 times greater than 100 nm-diameter electroplated samples. Simultaneous in-situ observations and stress-strain data during post-elastic deformation reveal necking and work hardening, features uncharacteristic for metallic glasses. The evolution of free volume within molecular dynamics-simulated samples suggests a free surface-mediated relaxation mechanism in nano-sized metallic glasses.

  10. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

  11. Microscopic dynamics perspective on the relationship between Poisson's ratio and ductility of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Wang, Li-Min; Liu, Riping; Wang, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    In metallic glasses a clear correlation had been established between plasticity or ductility with the Poisson's ratio νPoisson and alternatively the ratio of the elastic bulk modulus to the shear modulus, K/G. Such a correlation between these two macroscopic mechanical properties is intriguing and is challenging to explain from the dynamics on a microscopic level. A recent experimental study has found a connection of ductility to the secondary β-relaxation in metallic glasses. The strain rate and temperature dependencies of the ductile-brittle transition are similar to the reciprocal of the secondary β-relaxation time, τβ. Moreover, metallic glass is more ductile if the relaxation strength of the β-relaxation is larger and τβ is shorter. The findings indicate the β-relaxation is related to and instrumental for ductility. On the other hand, K/G or νPoisson is related to the effective Debye-Waller factor (i.e., the non-ergodicity parameter), f0, characterizing the dynamics of a structural unit inside a cage formed by other units, and manifested as the nearly constant loss shown in the frequency dependent susceptibility. We make the connection of f0 to the non-exponentiality parameter n in the Kohlrausch stretched exponential correlation function of the structural α-relaxation function, φ (t) = exp [ { - ( {t/{τ _α }})^{1 - n} }]. This connection follows from the fact that both f0 and n are determined by the inter-particle potential, and 1/f0 or (1 - f0) and n both increase with anharmonicity of the potential. A well tested result from the Coupling Model is used to show that τβ is completely determined by τα and n. From the string of relations, (i) K/G or νPoisson with 1/f0 or (1 - f0), (ii) 1/f0 or (1 - f0) with n, and (iii) τα and n with τβ, we arrive at the desired relation between K/G or νPoisson and τβ. On combining this relation with that between ductility and τβ, we have finally an explanation of the empirical correlation between

  12. Modeling Dynamic Ductility: An Equation of State for Porous Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J

    2007-07-27

    Enhanced heating from shock compression of a porous material can potentially suppress or delay cracking of the material on subsequent expansion. In this paper we quantify the expected enhanced heating in an experiment in which a sector of a thin cylindrical shell is driven from the inside surface by SEMTEX high explosive ({approx}1 {micro}s FWHM pressure pulse with peak pressure {approx}21.5 GPa). We first derive an analytical equation of state (EOS) for porous metals, then discuss the coupling of this EOS with material elastic-plastic response in a 2D hydrocode, and then discuss the modeling of the HE experiment with both fully dense and 10% porous Ta and a Bi/Ta composite. Finally, we compare our modeling with some recent experimental data.

  13. Computer simulation of strength and ductility of nanotwin-strengthened coarse-grained metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Ji, R.; Weng, G. J.; Zhu, L. L.; Lu, J.

    2014-10-01

    The superior strength-ductility combination in nanotwin (NT)-strengthened metals has provided a new potential for optimizing the mechanical properties of coarse-grained (CG) metals. In this paper computer simulations based on the mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity and the Johnson-Cook failure criterion have been carried out to uncover the critical factors that serve to provide this dual function. Our results indicate that both the distribution characteristics of the NT regions and the constitutive relations of the NT phase can have a significant impact on the strength and ductility of the CG Cu strengthened by the NT regions. In particular, twin spacing, distribution characteristics such as arrangement, shape and orientation, together with volume fraction of the NT regions, can all have significant effects. Along the way, we also discovered that microcrack initiation, coalescence and deflection constituted the entire failure process. Significant insights into the morphology of NT regions that could deliver superior strength and ductility combination for CG metals have been established.

  14. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  15. Ductility of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Skripnyak, Nataliya V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.

    Ductility of ultrafine grained (UFG) metal alloys with a distribution of grain size was investigated in wide loading conditions by numerical simulation. The multiscale models with a unimodal and a bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure research of hexagonal close packed and face center cubic UFG alloys. Macroscopic fracture is considered as a result of the formation of percolation clusters of damage at the mesoscopic level. The critical fracture strain of UFG alloys on the mesoscale level depends on the relative volumes of coarse grains. The nucleation of damages at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. The concentration of damages arise in the vicinity of the boundaries of coarse and ultrafine grains. The occurrence of a bimodal grain size distributions causes the increase of UFG alloys' ductility, but decrease of their tensile strength. Linkoping University, Sweden.

  16. Ductility dip cracking susceptibility of Inconel Filler Metal 52 and Inconel Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Kikel, J.M.; Parker, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 have become the materials of choice for commercial nuclear steam generator applications in recent years. Filler Metal 52 exhibits improved resistance to weld solidification and weld-metal liquation cracking as compared to other nickel-based filler metals. However, recently published work indicates that Filler Metal 52 is susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC) in highly restrained applications. Susceptibility to fusion zone DDC was evaluated using the transverse varestraint test method, while heat affected zone (HAZ) DDC susceptibility was evaluated using a newly developed spot-on-spot varestraint test method. Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 cracking susceptibility was compared to the DDC susceptibility of Alloy 600, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625. In addition, the effect of grain size and orientation on cracking susceptibility was also included in this study. Alloy 690, Filler Metal 82, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625 were found more susceptible to fusion zone DDC than Alloy 600. Filler Metal 52 and Alloy 690 were found more susceptible to HAZ DDC when compared to wrought Alloy 600, Filler Metal 82 and Filler Metal 625. Filler Metal 52 exhibited the greatest susceptibility to HAZ DDC of all the weld metals evaluated. The base materials were found much more resistant to HAZ DDC in the wrought condition than when autogenously welded. A smaller grain size was found to offer greater resistance to DDC. For weld metal where grain size is difficult to control, a change in grain orientation was found to improve resistance to DDC.

  17. Designing metallic glass matrix composites with high toughness and tensile ductility.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Wiest, Aaron; Duan, Gang; Lind, Mary-Laura; Demetriou, Marios D; Johnson, William L

    2008-02-28

    The selection and design of modern high-performance structural engineering materials is driven by optimizing combinations of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, toughness, elasticity and requirements for predictable and graceful (non-catastrophic) failure in service. Highly processable bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new class of engineering materials and have attracted significant technological interest. Although many BMGs exhibit high strength and show substantial fracture toughness, they lack ductility and fail in an apparently brittle manner in unconstrained loading geometries. For instance, some BMGs exhibit significant plastic deformation in compression or bending tests, but all exhibit negligible plasticity (<0.5% strain) in uniaxial tension. To overcome brittle failure in tension, BMG-matrix composites have been introduced. The inhomogeneous microstructure with isolated dendrites in a BMG matrix stabilizes the glass against the catastrophic failure associated with unlimited extension of a shear band and results in enhanced global plasticity and more graceful failure. Tensile strengths of approximately 1 GPa, tensile ductility of approximately 2-3 per cent, and an enhanced mode I fracture toughness of K(1C) approximately 40 MPa m(1/2) were reported. Building on this approach, we have developed 'designed composites' by matching fundamental mechanical and microstructural length scales. Here, we report titanium-zirconium-based BMG composites with room-temperature tensile ductility exceeding 10 per cent, yield strengths of 1.2-1.5 GPa, K(1C) up to approximately 170 MPa m(1/2), and fracture energies for crack propagation as high as G(1C) approximately 340 kJ m(-2). The K(1C) and G(1C) values equal or surpass those achievable in the toughest titanium or steel alloys, placing BMG composites among the toughest known materials. PMID:18305540

  18. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  19. Understanding the changes in ductility and Poisson's ratio of metallic glasses during annealing from microscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-07-21

    In the paper K. L. Ngai et al., [J. Chem. 140, 044511 (2014)], the empirical correlation of ductility with the Poisson's ratio, ν{sub Poisson}, found in metallic glasses was theoretically explained by microscopic dynamic processes which link on the one hand ductility, and on the other hand the Poisson's ratio. Specifically, the dynamic processes are the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model which is the precursor of the Johari–Goldstein β-relaxation, and the caged atoms dynamics characterized by the effective Debye–Waller factor f{sub 0} or equivalently the nearly constant loss (NCL) in susceptibility. All these processes and the parameters characterizing them are accessible experimentally except f{sub 0} or the NCL of caged atoms; thus, so far, the experimental verification of the explanation of the correlation between ductility and Poisson's ratio is incomplete. In the experimental part of this paper, we report dynamic mechanical measurement of the NCL of the metallic glass La{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}Al{sub 25} as-cast, and the changes by annealing at temperature below T{sub g}. The observed monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time, reflecting the corresponding increase of f{sub 0}, correlates with the decrease of ν{sub Poisson}. This is important observation because such measurements, not made before, provide the missing link in confirming by experiment the explanation of the correlation of ductility with ν{sub Poisson}. On aging the metallic glass, also observed in the isochronal loss spectra is the shift of the β-relaxation to higher temperatures and reduction of the relaxation strength. These concomitant changes of the β-relaxation and NCL are the root cause of embrittlement by aging the metallic glass. The NCL of caged atoms is terminated by the onset of the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model, which is generally supported by experiments. From this relation, the monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time is caused by the slowing down

  20. Ductile to brittle transition in dynamic fracture of brittle bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Han, Y. N.; Han, B. S.; Wang, W. H.; Xu, X. H.; Ke, F. J.

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual transition from a locally ductile to a pure brittle fracture in the dynamic fracture of brittle Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 20}Gd{sub 10} bulk metallic glass. The fractographic evolution from a dimple structure to a periodic corrugation pattern and then to the mirror zone along the crack propagation direction during the dynamic fracture process is discussed within the framework of the meniscus instability of the fracture process zone. This work might provide an important clue in understanding of the energy dissipation mechanism for dynamic crack propagation in brittle glassy materials.

  1. Neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper continues, with respect to the transplutonium nuclides, earlier efforts to collate and evaluate data from the scientific literature on the prompt neutron multiplicity distribution from fission and its first moment = ..sigma..nuPnu. The isotopes considered here for which P/sub nu/ and or data (or both) were found in the literature are of americium (Am), curium (Cm), berkelium (Bk), californium (Cf), einsteinium (Es), fermium (Fm), and nobelium (No).

  2. Extraction of the transplutonium elements from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karalova, Z.K.; Bukina, T.I.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    This paper investigates the extraction of transplutonium elements (TPE) and other elements using aliquat-336 and alkylpyrocatechol from strongly alkaline solutions in the presence of complexforming substances. It was shown by the methods of NMR and IR spectroscopy that elements can be extracted from alkaline solutions both in the form of coordination-saturated internal complex compounds and in the form of ionic associates, the anionic portion of which consists either of hydroxo-complexes of the cooresponding metals or their compounds with the complex-forming substance. Together with the TPE and REE the authors also studied the extraction of Fe(III), Ru(III), Zr(IV), Pu(IV), Pa(V), Nb(V), U(VI), Cs(I), and Th(IV) from alkaline solutions.

  3. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: A general microscopic picture

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-01-01

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies. PMID:25382029

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-01

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking. PMID:17775040

  5. Ductile Damage and Fatigue Behavior of Semi-Finished Tailored Blanks for Sheet-Bulk Metal Forming Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Hildenbrand, Philipp; Gerstein, Gregory; Rodman, Dmytro; Nürnberger, Florian; Merklein, Marion; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    To produce parts from sheet metal with thickened functional elements, bulk forming operations can be employed. For this new process class, the term sheet-bulk metal forming has been established recently. Since sheet-bulk metal forming processes such as orbital forming generates triaxial stress and strain states, ductile damage is induced in the form of voids in the microstructure. Typical parts will experience cyclic loads during service, and thus, the influence of ductile damage on the fatigue life of parts manufactured by orbital forming is of interest. Both the formation and growth of voids were characterized following this forming process and then compared to the as-received condition of the ferritic deep drawing steel DC04 chosen for this study. Subsequent to the forming operation, the specimens were fatigued and the evolution of ductile damage and the rearrangement of the dislocation networks occurring during cyclic loading were determined. It was shown, that despite an increased ductile damage due to the forming process, the induced strain hardening has a positive effect on the fatigue life of the material. However, by analyzing the fatigued specimens a development of the ductile damage by an increasing number of voids and a change in the void shape were detected.

  6. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plohr, JeeYeon N.; Plohr, Bradley J.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127-139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211-220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of the transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Carnall, W.T.; Conway, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The challenging opportunity to develop insights into both atomic structure and the effects of bonding in compounds makes the study of actinide spectroscopy a particularly fruitful and exciting area of scientific endeavor. It is also the interpretation of f-element spectra that has stimulated the development of the most sophisticated theoretical modeling attempted for any elements in the periodic table. The unique nature of the spectra and the wealth of fine detail revealed make possible sensitive tests of both physical models and the results of Hartree-Fock type ab initio calculations. This paper focuses on the unique character of heavy actinide spectroscopy. It discusses how it differs from that of the lighter member of the series and what are the special properties that are manifested. Following the introduction, the paper covers the following: (1) the role of systematic studies and the relationships of heavy-actinide spectroscopy to ongoing spectroscopic investigations of the lighter members of the series; (2) atomic (free-ion) spectra which covers the present status of spectroscopic studies with transplutonium elements, and future needs and directions in atomic spectroscopy; (3) the spectra of actinide compounds which covers the present status and future directions of spectroscopic studies with compounds of the transplutonium elements; and other spectroscopies. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  8. Microstructural factors controlling the strength and ductility of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorca, J.; González, C.

    1998-01-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the mechanical response in tension of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites. The microstructure of the composite is represented as a three-dimensional array of hexagonal prisms with one reinforcement at the centre of each prism. The shape, volume fraction and state (either intact or broken) of the reinforcement is independent for each cell, so the interaction among all these factors could be studied. The tensile response of the composite is determined from the behaviour of the intact and damaged cells, the fraction of damaged cells being calculated on the assumption that the reinforcement strength follows the Weibull statistics. The model is used to determine the microstructural factors which provide optimum behaviour from the point of view of the tensile strength and ductility. The analyses included the effect of the matrix and reinforcement properties, the reinforcement volume fraction, the interaction between reinforcements of different shape and the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcements within the composite.

  9. Three-Dimensional Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Void Coalescence during Dynamic Fracture of Ductile Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2004-09-02

    Void coalescence and interaction in dynamic fracture of ductile metals have been investigated using three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. The interaction of the voids is not reflected in the volumetric asymptotic growth rate of the voids, as demonstrated here. Finally, the practice of using a single void and periodic boundary conditions to study coalescence is examined critically and shown to produce results markedly different than the coalescence of a pair of isolated voids.

  10. High-zirconium bulk metallic glasses with high strength and large ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, YaoWei; Hua, NengBin; Li, Ran; Pang, ShuJie; Zhang, Tao

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, high-zirconium Zr66+2 x Al9- x (Ni1/3Cu2/3)25- x ( x=0,1,2 at.%) bulk metallic glasses with high strength and large ductility were fabricated by copper mould casting. The effects of zirconium content on the glass-forming ability (GFA), thermal properties and mechanical properties were investigated using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and mechanical testing system in compressive and three-point bending modes, respectively. The high-zirconium BMGs show the critical diameters of 3-5 mm, the supercooled liquid region ranging from 70 K to 99 K, and the yield strength of over 1700 MPa. The Zr70Al7(Ni1/3Cu2/3)23 BMG exhibits a large compressive plastic strain up to 21% and a high notch toughness value of 60.6 MPa m1/2. The increase in Zr content results in the decrease in GFA and thermostability, and in the improvement of plasticity under compressive and three-point bending conditions. The superior plasticity of high-zirconium BMGs is attributed to their high Poisson's ratio and small elastic modulus ratio µ/ B.

  11. Improved ductility of Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites via phase and grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Jian, W R; Wang, L; Li, B; Yao, X H; Luo, S N

    2016-04-29

    We investigate tensile deformation of metallic glass/crystalline interpenetrating phase nanocomposites as regards the effects of specific area of amorphous/crystalline phase interfaces, and grain boundaries. As an illustrative case, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed on Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites with different specific interface areas and grain boundary characteristics. Plastic deformation is achieved via shear bands, shear transformation zones, and crystal plasticity. Three-dimensional amorphous/crystalline interfaces serve as effective barriers to the propagation of shear transformation zones and shear bands if formed, diffuse strain localizations, and give rise to improved ductility. Ductility increases with increasing specific interface area. In addition, introducing grain boundaries into the second phase facilitates crystal plasticity, which helps reduce or eliminate mature shear bands in the glass matrix. PMID:26965457

  12. Improved ductility of Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites via phase and grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, W. R.; Wang, L.; Li, B.; Yao, X. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate tensile deformation of metallic glass/crystalline interpenetrating phase nanocomposites as regards the effects of specific area of amorphous/crystalline phase interfaces, and grain boundaries. As an illustrative case, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed on Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites with different specific interface areas and grain boundary characteristics. Plastic deformation is achieved via shear bands, shear transformation zones, and crystal plasticity. Three-dimensional amorphous/crystalline interfaces serve as effective barriers to the propagation of shear transformation zones and shear bands if formed, diffuse strain localizations, and give rise to improved ductility. Ductility increases with increasing specific interface area. In addition, introducing grain boundaries into the second phase facilitates crystal plasticity, which helps reduce or eliminate mature shear bands in the glass matrix.

  13. Work-Hardening Induced Tensile Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses via High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  14. Tight-binding study of stacking fault energies and the Rice criterion of ductility in the fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Michael J.; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Kioussis, Nicholas; Herbranson, M.

    2000-02-01

    We have used the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) tight-binding (TB) method to calculate the generalized stacking fault energy and the Rice ductility criterion in the fcc metals Al, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, Au, and Pb. The method works well for all classes of metals, i.e., simple metals, noble metals, and transition metals. We compared our results with full potential linear-muffin-tin orbital and embedded atom method (EAM) calculations, as well as experiment, and found good agreement. This is impressive, since the NRL-TB approach only fits to first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave equations of state and band structures for cubic systems. Comparable accuracy with EAM potentials can be achieved only by fitting to the stacking fault energy.

  15. Production of transplutonium elements and radiation sources based on them

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil`ev, V.Ya.; Adaev, V.A.; Gordeev, Ya.N.

    1993-12-31

    The Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) has a complex experimental base for the required amount of transplutonium elements (TPE) production in reactors, their extraction from irradiated targets, preparing of necessary condition samples in purity and producing the radiation sources. Targets irradiation and target design are described. Californium 252 is used for neutron source production.

  16. Optical and analytical electron microscopy of ductility-dip cracking in Ni-base filler metal 52 -- Initial studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, M.J.; Teter, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    Microcharacterization studies were performed on weld-metal microstructures of a Ni-base filler metal. Specimens were taken from the fusion zone and the weld-metal heat-affected zone of transverse- and spot-Varestraint welds. The filler metal was first deposited onto a steel substrate by hot-wire, gas tungsten arc welding before specimen removal. Optical microscopy indicates the crack morphology is intergranular and is along high-angle, migrated grain boundaries. At low magnifications, scanning electron microscopy reveals a relatively smooth fracture surface. However, at higher magnifications the grain faces exhibit microductility. Analytical electron microscopy reveals high-angle, migrated grain boundaries decorated with MC (Ti, Cr) and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr, Ni, Fe) precipitates ranging from 10 to 200 n. Auger electron spectroscopy of pre-strained Gleeble specimens fractured in situ revealed internal ductility-dip cracks decorated with magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel particles (1,000 nm).

  17. Numerical Study of the Effect of the Sample Aspect Ratio on the Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) Under Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunpeng

    2016-05-01

    In this article, a systematic numerical study was conducted to study the detailed shear banding evolution in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with various sample aspect ratios under uniaxial compression, and whereby the effect of the sample aspect ratio on the compressive ductility was elucidated. A finite strain viscoelastic model was employed to describe the shear banding nucleation, growth, and coalescence in BMG samples with the help of Anand and Su's theory, which was incorporated into the ABAQUS finite element method code as a user material subroutine VUMAT. The present numerical method was first verified by comparing with the corresponding experimental results, and then parameter analysis was performed to discuss the impact of microstructure parameters on the predicted results. The present modeling will shed some light on enhancing the toughness of BMG structures in the engineering applications.

  18. A Consistent Approach To Stochastic Seeding of Simulations of Fragmenting Ductile Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kumar, Mukul

    2013-06-01

    For failure by brittle fracture the well-known weakest-link arguments have led to widespread use of a two-parameter Weibull distribution. The probability of failure by a ductile damage mechanism at small plastic strains is exceedingly small. This results in a threshold for deformation induced damage and attendant failure that should be manifest in the statistical description. A three-parameter Weibull distribution with a lower cut-off satisfies this constraint. The three-parameters are determined systematically from experiments. The Weibull modulus is estimated by examining the results of scaled experiments. The values of the most-likely failure strain were inferred from simulations of quasi-static tests. The lower cut-off failure strain was estimated from the tensile test data. This approach was applied to different microstructures of AISI 4340 steel achieved through various heat treatments to determine the three parameters and constitutive response for each heat treatment. Exploding pipe simulations were run to determine fragment distributions for two explosives and each heat treatment. These simulated distributions were then compared to high fidelity experimental data for distributions of the same heat treatments and explosives simulated. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Synthesis of nanoparticles from malleable and ductile metals using powder-free, reactant-assisted mechanical attrition.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brandon W; Perez, Jesus Paulo L; Yu, Jiang; Boatz, Jerry A; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-11-26

    A reactant-assisted mechanochemical method was used to produce copious nanoparticles from malleable/ductile metals, demonstrated here for aluminum, iron, and copper. The milling media is intentionally degraded via a reactant-accelerated wear process, where the reactant aids particle production by binding to the metal surfaces, enhancing particle production, and reducing the tendency toward mechanochemical (cold) welding. The mechanism is explored by comparing the effects of different types of solvents and solvent mixtures on the amount and type of particles produced. Particles were functionalized with oleic acid to aid in particle size separation, enhance dispersion in hydrocarbon solvents, and protect the particles from oxidation. For aluminum and iron, the result is air-stable particles, but for copper, the suspended particles are found to dissolve when exposed to air. Characterization was performed using electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Density functional theory was used to examine the nature of carboxylic acid binding to the aluminum surface, confirming the dominance of bridging bidentate binding. PMID:25343708

  20. Experimental and numerical study of single and multiple impacts of angular particles on ductile metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaffoli, Mahdi

    multi-particle erosion tests, with good agreement. An investigation of the simulated trajectory of the impacting particles revealed various erosion mechanisms such as the micromachining of chips, the ploughing of craters, and the formation, forging and knocking off crater lips which were consistent with previously noted ductile solid particle erosion mechanisms in the literature.

  1. Chaotic state to self-organized critical state transition of serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We study serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition induced by tuning the sample aspect ratio in a Zr-based metallic glass. The statistical analysis reveals that the serrated flow dynamics transforms from a chaotic state characterized by Gaussian-distribution serrations corresponding to stick-slip motion of randomly generated and uncorrelated single shear band and brittle behavior, into a self-organized critical state featured by intermittent scale-free distribution of shear avalanches corresponding to a collective motion of multiple shear bands and ductile behavior. The correlation found between serrated flow dynamics and plastic deformation might shed light on the plastic deformation dynamic and mechanism in metallic glasses.

  2. Large-size ultrahigh strength Ni-based bulk metallic glassy matrix composites with enhanced ductility fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Guoqiang; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2008-03-24

    Ni-based bulk glassy alloy composites (GACs) simultaneously with ultrahigh strength and enhanced ductility and satisfying large-size requirements were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of gas-atomized Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} glassy alloy powder blend with ceramic or metal powders. No crystallization of metallic glassy matrix and good bonding state between the particles are responsible for good mechanical properties of the fabricated bulk GACs. The improvement of plastic ductility of the fabricated bulk GACs originates from the structural inhomogeneity caused by the particles inclusion. The additional particulates act as a resisting media causing deviation, branching, and multiplication of shear bands.

  3. Large-size ultrahigh strength Ni-based bulk metallic glassy matrix composites with enhanced ductility fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoqiang; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2008-03-01

    Ni-based bulk glassy alloy composites (GACs) simultaneously with ultrahigh strength and enhanced ductility and satisfying large-size requirements were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of gas-atomized Ni52.5Nb10Zr15Ti15Pt7.5 glassy alloy powder blend with ceramic or metal powders. No crystallization of metallic glassy matrix and good bonding state between the particles are responsible for good mechanical properties of the fabricated bulk GACs. The improvement of plastic ductility of the fabricated bulk GACs originates from the structural inhomogeneity caused by the particles inclusion. The additional particulates act as a resisting media causing deviation, branching, and multiplication of shear bands.

  4. EROSIVE WEAR OF DUCTILE METALS BY A PARTICLE-LADEN HIGH-VELOCITY LIQUID-JET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Simon Ka-Keung; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Levy, Alan

    1980-12-01

    A liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and alumina and silicon carbide suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft/sec (40 m/sec) and impingement angles ranging from 15 degrees to 90 degrees were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40% by weight. For high velocity the results of this study show two erosion maxima arising at impingement angles of 90 degrees and 40 degrees respectively~ whereas in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20 degrees. In the study both particle concentration and composition were varied. A polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semi-theoretical correlation constants.

  5. Solid impingement erosion mechanisms and characterization of erosion resistance of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, V. P.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results pertaining to spherical glass bead and angular crushed glass particle impingement are presented. A concept of energy adsorption to explain the failure of material is proposed. The erosion characteristics of several pure metals were correlated with the proposed energy parameters and with other properties. Correlations of erosion and material properties were also carried out with these materials to study the effect of the angle of impingement. Analyses of extensive erosion data indicate that surface energy, strain energy, melting point, bulk modulus, hardness, ultimate resilience, atomic volume and product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion, bulk modulus, and temperature rise required for melting, and ultimate resilience, and hardness exhibit the best correlations. It appears that both energy and thermal properties contribute to the total erosion.

  6. Characterization of solid particle erosion resistance of ductile metals based on their properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results pertaining to spherical glass bead and angular crushed glass particle impingement. A concept of energy absorption to explain the failure of material is proposed and is correlated with the erosion characteristics of several pure metals. Analyses of extensive erosion data indicate that the properties - surface energy, specific melting energy, strain energy, melting point, bulk modulus, hardness, atomic volume - and the product of the parameters - linear coefficient of thermal expansion x bulk modulus x temperature rise required for melting, and ultimate resilience x hardness - exhibit the best correlations. The properties of surface energy and atomic volume are suggested for the first time for correlation purposes and are found to correlate well with erosion rates at different angles of impingement. It further appears that both energy and thermal properties contribute to the total erosion.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis, structural, Raman, and luminescence studies of Am[M(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O and Nd[M(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O (M=Ag, Au): Bimetallic coordination polymers containing both trans-plutonium and transition metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Zerihun Kalachnikova, Katrina; Haire, Richard G.; Sykora, Richard E.

    2007-11-15

    dicyanides. - Graphical abstract: Coordination polymeric compounds between the 'man-made' trans-plutonium element, americium, and transition metal ions were prepared using the hydrothermal synthetic procedure. The Am{sup 3+} ion and the transition metals, Au and/or Ag, are interconnected through cyanide bridging. The coordination around americium consists of six CN{sup -} groups coordinated through the N atoms resulting in a trigonal prismatic environment. Three oxygen atoms of coordinated water molecules complete the tricapped trigonal prismatic coordination environment for Am{sup 3+}, providing a total coordination number of 9.

  8. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  9. Extraction radiopolarography for determining the oxidation potentials of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kosyakov, V.N.; Yakovlev, N.G.; Vlasov, M.M.

    1987-03-01

    A method is described for determining the oxidation potentials for valency transitions in transplutonium elements (TPE), which is usable when the element is present in trace amounts. This is based on electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the TPE in combination with a solvent-extraction method of determining the concentration ratio for the oxidized and reduced forms. The method is applicable to determining the potential of almost any reversible reaction if the solvent-extraction parameters for the oxidized and reduced forms differ substantially, while the potential (with allowance for the extraction system) lies in a region accessible to electrochemical oxidation or reduction. Two forms of use are considered: with liquid extraction and with extraction chromatography. The method is demonstrated on the Bk(IV)/Bk(III) transition with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid as extraction agent.

  10. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  11. Production of transplutonium elements in the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, J.E.; Corbett, B.L.; King, L.J.; McGuire, S.C.; Sims, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques described here have been demonstrated to predict the contents of transplutonium element production targets, at least for isotopes of mass 253 or less. The HFIR irradiation model is a workhorse for planning the TRU processing campaigns, for certifying the heat evolution rate of targets prior to insertion in the reactor, for predicting future production capabilities over a multi-year period, and for making optimization studies. Practical considerations, however, may limit the range of available options so that optimum operation is not always achievable. We do intend, however, to keep fine-tuning the constants which define the cross sections as time permits. We need to do more work on optimizing the production of /sup 250/Cm, /sup 254/Es, /sup 255/Es, and ultimately /sup 257/Fm, since researchers are interested in obtaining larger quantities of these rare and difficult-to-produce nuclides. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Probing the Statistical Validity of the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition in Metallic Nanowires Using GPU Computing.

    PubMed

    French, William R; Pervaje, Amulya K; Santos, Andrew P; Iacovella, Christopher R; Cummings, Peter T

    2013-12-10

    We perform a large-scale statistical analysis (>2000 independent simulations) of the elongation and rupture of gold nanowires, probing the validity and scope of the recently proposed ductile-to-brittle transition that occurs with increasing nanowire length [Wu et al. Nano Lett. 2012, 12, 910-914]. To facilitate a high-throughput simulation approach, we implement the second-moment approximation to the tight-binding (TB-SMA) potential within HOOMD-Blue, a molecular dynamics package which runs on massively parallel graphics processing units (GPUs). In a statistical sense, we find that the nanowires obey the ductile-to-brittle model quite well; however, we observe several unexpected features from the simulations that build on our understanding of the ductile-to-brittle transition. First, occasional failure behavior is observed that qualitatively differs from that predicted by the model prediction; this is attributed to stochastic thermal motion of the Au atoms and occurs at temperatures as low as 10 K. In addition, we also find that the ductile-to-brittle model, which was developed using classical dislocation theory, holds for nanowires as small as 3 nm in diameter. Finally, we demonstrate that the nanowire critical length is higher at 298 K relative to 10 K, a result that is not predicted by the ductile-to-brittle model. These results offer practical design strategies for adjusting nanowire failure and structure and also demonstrate that GPU computing is an excellent tool for studies requiring a large number of independent trajectories in order to fully characterize a system's behavior. PMID:26592289

  13. Directions for nuclear research in the transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Chasman, R.R.; Friedman, A.M.; Ahmad, I.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the heavy nuclides has played a vital role in our understanding of the alpha decay process, nuclear fission, nuclear binding energies and the limits of nuclear stability. This study has led to the understanding of novel shape degrees of freedom, such as the very large quadrupole deformations associated with the fission isomer process, and the very recently discovered octupole deformation. The existence of these unique phenomena in the heavy element region is not accidental. Fission isomerism is due to the delicate balance between nuclear forces holding the nucleus together and Coulomb forces causing nuclear fission. Octupole deformation arises from the increasing strength of matrix elements with increasing oscillator shell. Both illustrate the unique features of the heavy element region. Fission studies have given us information about large collective aspects in nuclei and the importance that nuclear structural effects can play in altering these macro properties. A new class of atomic studies has become possible with the availability of heavy elements. With these isotopes, we are now able to produce electric fields of such magnitude that it becomes possible to spontaneously create positron-electron pairs in the vacuum. We have organized this presentation into three major sections: nuclear structure, fission studies and atomic studies of supercritical systems. In each we will try to emphasize the new directions which can benefit from the continued availability of isotopes supplied by the Trans-plutonium Production Program. 117 references. (WHK)

  14. Ductile crystalline-amorphous nanolaminates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V; Barbee, Troy W

    2007-07-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper-zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline-amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 +/- 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 +/- 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline-crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous-crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  15. Ductile crystalline–amorphous nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V.; Barbee, Troy W.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper–zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline–amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 ± 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 ± 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline–crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous–crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  16. State of the art and development trends in the production, properties, and uses of transplutonium elements at the Lenin Reactor Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, V.Ya.; Gordeev, Ya.N.; Zinkovskii, V.I.; Karelin, E.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Kosulin, N.S.; Nikolaev, V.M.; Seleznev, A.G.; Timofeev, G.A.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Tsykanov, V.A.

    1987-03-01

    Some results are reported from the Reactor Research Institute on the properties, production methods, and uses of the transplutonium elements (TPE), which have been obtained between 1976 and 1982. A comprehensive technology has been devised for processing irradiated reactor targets, which provides high yields. Calculations and experiments have defined the optimum design of the high-frequency trap on the SM-2 reactor. Neutron sources have been made for general industrial and medical purposes containing californium 252. It is shown that curium occurs in the hexavalent state in aqueous solution. Measurements have been made on the resonant-level parameters of berkelium 249 and californium 249. TPE compounds with platinum-group metals have been made and examined. The properties of the TPE metals have also been examined. Future problems have been discussed.

  17. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluents. Batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 h (2 h to load the feed and 3 h for the elution), with two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution. The separations achieved in the column are preserved by routing the column effluent through an alpha detector and using the response from the detector to select appropriate product fractions. The high-pressure ion exchange process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate; therefore it will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU. 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluent. By using two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution, batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 hours (2 hours to load the feed and 3 hours for the elution). The number of effluent product fractions and the amount of actinides that must be collected in intermediate fractions are minimized by monitoring response from a flow-through alpha-detector. This process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate, and will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU.

  19. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  20. Ductility of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers have been investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The ductility can vary by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. For high mechanical and low thermal loading the ductility is small, for low mechanical and high thermal loading the ductility is an order of magnitude higher. Experiments on a beam in bending confirm that the ductility is strongly dependent on the loading conditions. The observations suggest a means of utilizing the inherent ductility of the matrix.

  1. A study of the effect of solid particle impact and particle shape on the erosion morphology of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Impulsive versus steady jet impingement of spherical glass bead particles on metal surfaces was studied using a gas gun facility and a commercial sand blasting apparatus. Crushed glass particles were also used in the sand blasting apparatus as well as glass beads. Comparisons of the different types of erosion patterns were made. Scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were used to characterize erosion patterns. The nature of the wear can be divided into cutting and deformation, each with its own characteristic features. Surface chemistry analysis indicates the possiblity of complex chemical and/or mechanical interactions between erodants and target materials.

  2. A study of the nature of solid particle impact and shape on the erosion morphology of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Impulsive versus steady jet impingement of spherical glass bead particles on metal surfaces was studied using a gas gun facility and a commercial sand blasting apparatus. Crushed glass particles were also used in the sand blasting apparatus as well as glass beads. Comparisons of the different types of erosion patterns were made. Scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were used to characterize erosion patterns. The nature of the wear can be divided into cutting and deformation, each with its own characteristic features. Surface chemistry analysis indicates the possibility of complex chemical and/or mechanical interactions between erodants and target materials.

  3. Intrinsic ductility of glassy solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunfeng; Luo, Jian; Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Glasses are usually brittle, seriously limiting their practical usage. Recently, the intrinsic ductility of glass was found to increase with the Poisson's ratio (v), with a sharp brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition at vBTD = 0.31-0.32. Such a correlation between far-from-equilibrium fracture and near-equilibrium elasticity is unexpected and not understood. Molecular dynamics simulations, on three families of glasses (metallic glasses, amorphous silicon, and silica) with controlled bonding, processing, and testing conditions, show that glasses with low covalency and high structural disorder have high v and ductility, and vice versa. The BTD transitions triggered by the aforementioned causes in each system correspond to a unified vBTD value, which increases with its average coordination number (CN). The vBTD-CN relation can be comprehended by recognizing v as a measure of covalency and disorder, and the BTD transition as a competition between shear and cleavage. Our results provide guidelines for developing new recipes and processes for tough glasses.

  4. Ductility enhancement of iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Iron aluminides based on Fe{sub 3}Al are ordered intermetallic alloys that offer good oxidation resistance, excellent sulfidation resistance, and low material cost. These materials also conserve strategic elements such as chromium and have a lower density than stainless steels. However, limited ductility at ambient temperature and a sharp drop in strength above 600C have been major deterrents to their acceptance for structural applications. This paper presents results on iron aluminides with room-temperature elongations of 15 to 20%. Ductility values were improved by a combination of thermomechanical processing and heat-treatment control. This method of ductility improvement has been demonstrated for a range of compositions. The data presented in this paper suggest that the Fe{sub 3}Al-based compositions tested are sensitive to environmental effects. The environment of concern is moisture in air that reacts with aluminum to form hydrogen at the metal surface. The hydrogen produced is adsorbed and absorbed in the specimens during plastic strain and results in low room-temperature ductilities. Results showed that the use of highly elongated grains produced by warm working increases ductility. A special heat treatment produces an additional improvement in ductility.

  5. Behavior of transplutonium elements on thin-layer silica gel using di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Molochnikova, N.P.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1995-03-01

    The behavior of transplutonium elements (TPE) on thin-layer silica gel on domestic sorbphil thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is investigated using di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) solutions in HNO{sub 3} of various concentrations. Conditions are found for separating Bk(IV) from other TPE in solutions with [HNO{sub 3}] > 5 M and also for separating Bk(III) and Ce. Solutions of D2EHPA as the mobile phase are recommended for TLC identification of tracer amounts of different oxidation states Am in HNO{sub 3}.

  6. GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING WHEELABORATOR THAT IMPALE SHOT AT TUMBLING CASTINGS TO REMOVE EXCESS SURFACE METALS AND SAND; ANNEALING OVENS TO HEAT CERTAIN CASTINGS TO ACHIEVE A DESIRED CHARACTERISTIC; AND GRINDING WHEELS USED TO REMOVE GATES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Ductile failure X-prize.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Wellman, Gerald William; Emery, John M.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Foster, John T.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Mota, Alejandro; Bishop, Joseph E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Foulk, James W., III; Dowding, Kevin J.; Dion, Kristin; Boyce, Brad Lee; Robbins, Joshua H.; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-09-01

    Fracture or tearing of ductile metals is a pervasive engineering concern, yet accurate prediction of the critical conditions of fracture remains elusive. Sandia National Laboratories has been developing and implementing several new modeling methodologies to address problems in fracture, including both new physical models and new numerical schemes. The present study provides a double-blind quantitative assessment of several computational capabilities including tearing parameters embedded in a conventional finite element code, localization elements, extended finite elements (XFEM), and peridynamics. For this assessment, each of four teams reported blind predictions for three challenge problems spanning crack initiation and crack propagation. After predictions had been reported, the predictions were compared to experimentally observed behavior. The metal alloys for these three problems were aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and precipitation hardened stainless steel PH13-8Mo H950. The predictive accuracies of the various methods are demonstrated, and the potential sources of error are discussed.

  8. Material Characterization for Ductile Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The research summarized in this document provides valuable information for structural health evaluation of NASA infrastructure. Specifically, material properties are reported which will enable calibration of ductile fracture prediction methods for three high-toughness metallic materials and one aluminum alloy which can be found in various NASA facilities. The task of investigating these materials has also served to validate an overall methodology for ductile fracture prediction is currently being employed at NASA. In facilitating the ability to incorporate various materials into the prediction scheme, we have provided data to enable demonstration of the overall generality of the approach.

  9. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, Kevin; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite.

  10. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  11. Mathematical modeling and remote monitoring of ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tselishchev, I.V.; Elesin, A.A.

    1988-07-01

    A mathematical model and calculational algorithms for the elution curves for ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements (TPE) and the limits of optimal fractionation of the substances being separated, based on indicators of the process (yield, purification), are presented. The calculational programs are part of the programming provision of a small informational-calculational system based on the microcomputer Elektronika DZ-28, intended for remote monitoring of TPE separation. The elaborated programs can be implemented in the preliminary choice of necessary conditions of the TPE separation process, and also during and after the separation process for comparison of calculated results with the results of continuous, on-line remote monitoring and with the results of laboratory sample analysis. The possible application of the programs has been checked in the instance of the separation of curium and americium, and einsteinium and californium, the results of which are in satisfactory agreement with the results of remote and laboratory-analytical monitoring.

  12. On the development of a simple lumped system micro-model of ductile iron solidification for application to the control of molten metal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraghavan, R.; Bradley, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents results to date in a project concerning the application of micro-modeling of ductile iron solidification to the development of a process control methodology for the assessment of the effectiveness of magnesium treatment and post-inoculation and the prediction of shrinkage tendency. The approach is to utilize a simple lumped system heat transfer model which incorporates a new formulation for simulating eutectic ductile iron solidification to analyze and interpret cooling curve data routinely acquired for process control purposes. A key feature of the eutectic solidification micro-model is that the graphite kinetics is de-coupled from the austenite kinetics which are completely determined by thermodynamic and mass balance considerations. In addition, the graphite kinetics expression accounts for the evolution of a lognormally distributed nodule size distribution. An empirical two-parameter continuous nucleation model is employed and a new grain impingement function is proposed. Solute redistribution in the ternary Fe-C-Si system is considered. The influence of magnesium on undercooling the melt is simulated by introducing an additional term into the expression for the graphite liquidus surface. Preliminary results are presented which illustrate the time-dependence of the liquidus and eutectic temperatures, the concentration of carbon and silicon in the liquid, and volume changes occurring during solidification.

  13. Purifying transplutonium elements from iron, zirconium, and aluminum by extraction with D2EHPA from citrate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kasimov, F.D.; Gordeev, Ya.N.; Kovanseva, S.N.; Kasimova, V.A.; Nikolaev, V.M.; Skobelev, N.F.; Filimonov, V.T.; Yadovin, A.A.

    1987-03-01

    A study has been made on the effects of various factors on the zirconium extraction kinetics in the system consisting of citric acid with di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid. It has been found that zirconium, iron (III), and aluminum are extracted much more slowly than the transplutonium elements (TPE). The process can be operated under nonequilibrium conditions to increase the separation factors considerably, which has been employed to improve the purification of TPE.

  14. Towards mesh independent simulation of ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Huei Eliot; Veilleux, Michael; Emery, John M.; Wellman, Gerald William; Foulk, James W., III

    2010-11-01

    Recent work at Sandia National Laboratories has focused on preparing strong predictive models for the simulation of ductile failure in metals. The focus of this talk is on the development of engineering-ready models that use a phenomenological approach to represent the ductile fracture processes. As such, an empirical tearing parameter that accounts for mean stress effects along the crack front is presented. A critical value of the tearing parameter is used in finite element calculations as the criterion for crack growth. Regularization is achieved with three different methods and the results are compared. In the first method, upon reaching the critical tearing, the stress within a solid element is decayed by uniformly shrinking the yield surface over a user specified amount of strain. This yields mesh-size dependent results. As a second method for regularization, cohesive surface elements are inserted using an automatic remeshing technique. In the third method, strain-localization elements are inserted with the automated remeshing.

  15. Weldable ductile molybdenum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Byun, Thak Sang; Schneibel, Joachim H; Miller, Michael K; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys are attractive structural materials for high-temperature applications. However, various practical issues have limited its use. One concern relates to the loss of ductility occurring in the heat-affected weld zone caused by segregation of oxygen to grain boundaries. In this study, a series of arc melted molybdenum alloys have been produced containing controlled additions of B, C, Zr, and Al. These alloys were characterized with respect to their tensile properties, smooth bend properties, and impact energy for both the base metal and welds. These alloys were compared with a very high purity low carbon arc cast molybdenum reference. For discussion purposes the alloys produced are separated into two categories: Mo Al B alloys, and Mo Zr B alloys. The properties of Mo Zr B alloy welds containing higher carbon levels exhibited slight improvement over unalloyed molybdenum, though the base-metal properties for all Mo Zr B alloys were somewhat inconsistent with properties better, or worse, than unalloyed molybdenum. A Mo Al B alloy exhibited the best DBTT values for welds, and the base metal properties were comparable to or slightly better than unalloyed molybdenum. The Mo Al B alloy contained a low volume fraction of second-phase particles, with segregation of boron and carbon to grain boundaries believed to displace oxygen resulting in improved weld properties. The volume fractions of second-phase particles are higher for the Mo Zr B alloys, and these alloys were prone to brittle fracture. It is also noted that these Mo Zr B alloys exhibited segregation of zirconium, boron and carbon to the grain boundaries.

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  17. Ductile damage model with void coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. Underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. Implementation of the model in hydrocodes is discussed.

  18. Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of Circumferential Multipass Dissimilar Weld Between 20MND5 and Z2CND18-12NS with Ni-Base Filler Metal 52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Duan, Zhaoling; He, Guo

    2013-10-01

    The large circumferential multipass dissimilar weld between 20MND5 steel and Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel welded with FM52 filler material was investigated in terms of the diluted composition, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility of the weld. The diluted composition of the weld is composed of 37 to 47 pct Ni, 21 to 24 pct Cr, and 28 to 40 pct Fe, which are inhomogeneous along the depth and over the width of the deep weld. The carbon content has a distribution in the region of the surface weld from a high level (~0.20 pct) in the zone near 20MND5 steel to a normal level (~0.03 pct) in the zone near Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel. The carbon distribution is corresponding to the grain boundary carbides. The minimum threshold strains for DDC occur in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1323 K (950 °C to 1050 °C), which are 0.5, 0.35, and 0.4 pct for the root weld, middle region, and the surface weld, respectively. The dissimilar weld has the largest susceptibility to the DDC compared to the filler metal 52 and the Inconel 690.

  19. A new insight into ductile fracture of ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloys

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A. Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Mao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that when coarse-grained metals undergo severe plastic deformation to be transformed into nano-grained metals, their ductility is reduced. However, there are no ductile fracture criteria developed based on grain refinement. In this paper, we propose a new relationship between ductile fracture and grain refinement during deformation, considering factors besides void nucleation and growth. Ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloy sheets were fabricated using different rolling techniques at room and cryogenic temperatures. It is proposed for the first time that features of the microstructure near the fracture surface can be used to explain the ductile fracture post necking directly. We found that as grains are refined to a nano size which approaches the theoretical minimum achievable value, the material becomes brittle at the shear band zone. This may explain the tendency for ductile fracture in metals under plastic deformation. PMID:25851228

  20. Behavior of transplutonium elements on ion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirov, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-03-01

    Systematic studies are reported on the behavior of transplutonium elements (TPE) on cation-exchange and anion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids (HClO/sub 4/, HCl, HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) as affected by solution composition, nature of acid, and nature of organic solvent. With all these acids, replacing most of the water by alcohol increases the TPE uptake on the ion exchangers, and the effect occurs for the cation exchangers at lower contents of the organic component. Optimum conditions have been identified for concentrating and separating TPE from numerous elements. The most effective system consists of anion exchanger with HNO/sub 3/ and alcohol.

  1. Recovery of transplutonium elements from aqueous and water-ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid and their separation from other actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on anion and cation exchangers in aqueous and water-ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid as a function of the various components of the solution has been investigated. It has been discovered that the presence of ethanol in sulfuric acid solutions causes an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchangers and on anion exchangers. The possibility of the use of ion exchangers for the preconcentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements which form strong complexes with sulfate ions over a broad range of concentrations of sulfuric acid has been demonstrated.

  2. Tuning ideal tensile strengths and intrinsic ductility of bcc refractory alloys.

    PubMed

    Qi, Liang; Chrzan, D C

    2014-03-21

    An important theoretical ductility criterion for group V and VI metal-based refractory alloys in body-centered cubic (bcc) lattices is the mechanical failure mode of their perfect crystals under tension along the weakest direction [100]. Pure Mo and W fail by cleavage and are deemed intrinsically brittle. However, first-principles calculations show that alloying with group IV or V transition metals can transform these materials into ones that display intrinsically ductile behavior, failing in shear under [100] tension. Remarkably, this transition can be understood as an electron filling effect with the intrinsically ductile response the manifestation of a Jahn-Teller distortion. PMID:24702389

  3. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  4. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  5. NEMD simulations for ductile metal sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James E; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J; Holian, Brad L

    2011-01-31

    We have studied the sliding behavior for a 19 M Al(110)/Al(110) defective crystal at 15 GPa as a function of relative sliding velocity. The general features are qualitatively similar to smaller scale (1.4 M) atom simulations for Al(111)/Al(110) nondefective single crystal sliding. The critical velocity, v{sub c}, is approximately the same for the defective crystal as the size scaled v{sub c}. The lower velocity tangential force is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. The critical temperature, T*, is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. These conclusions are consistent with a lower value for f{sub c} for the defective crystal. The detailed features of structural transformation and the high velocity regime remain to be mapped.

  6. Ductile extension in alpine Corsica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Dubois, Roland; Fournier, Marc; Goffé, Bruno; Michard, André; Jourdan, Claudie

    1990-10-01

    Ductile deformation in high-pressure (P)-low temperature (T) conditions due to the westward thrusting of oceanic material onto a continental basement in alpine Corsica is overprinted by a late deformation event with a reverse shear sense (eastward) that took place in less severe P-T conditions. We show that the late deformation can be linked to extension during rifting and spreading of the Liguro Provençal basin from late Oligocene to late-middle Miocene time. Major compressive thrust contacts were reactivated as ductile normal faults and, in some units, only a penetrative eastward shear can be observed. This extension following the thickening of the crust brought tectonic units which underwent very different P- T conditions during the earlier stage into close contact. The Balagne nappe, which shows neither significant ductile deformation nor metamorphism, directly overlies the high-P units. The extensional deformation is distributed through the entire thickness of the nappe stack but is more important along the major thrust contacts, which localize the strain. The geometry of the crustal extension is controlled by that of the early compressive thrusts. The latest structures are east-dipping brittle normal faults which bound the early to middle Miocene Saint Florent half graben.

  7. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S. )

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alternatives to high-tensile-strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine-tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive-contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and microhardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of ductile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricant sliding wear tests on specimens and components for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylindrical unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine-tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  8. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-06-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation.

  9. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation. PMID:26122728

  10. What drives polymer glasses ductile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Panpan; Liu, Jianning

    2015-03-01

    The presentation aims to explore an important question in polymer physics: what makes polymer glasses of high molecular weight ductile? Upon deformation, load-bearing strands (LBS) emerge along the direction of the stress. Chain tension builds up in LBS due to the displacement of LBS. Segments that do not belong to LBS sequentially get activated by the LBS in the order of their proximity to LBS. If the chain network breaks down before driving the glass into a state of global plasticity, crazing and brittle fracture takes place instead of yielding and macroscopic plastic deformation. Fast deformation assures that chain pullout does not have time to materialize. Global plasticity also takes time to develop. Thus, the outcome is dictated by which process takes place first. In light of the recently proposed molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses, we present different examples from experiment to illustrate the importance to understand the interplay between short-ranged intersegmental interactions and long-ranged intrachain networking. NSF-DMR (EAGER- 1444859)

  11. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-11-24

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems. PMID:26554017

  12. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-01-01

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems. PMID:26554017

  13. Separation of berkelium (IV) from trivalent transplutonium elements on ion-exchangers in solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependences of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf and Es behavior on anion- and cation-exchangers in solutions of 0.1-8.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ on acid concentration and oxidant content in solution (KBrO/sub 3/) or in resin (PbO/sub 2/) have been studied. Significant differences in distribution coefficients of Bk and other transplutonium elements (TPE) have been found that can be explained by Bk oxidation to the tetravalent state. A simple and effective method of Bk (IV) separation from trivalent TPE has been developed. The method was applied to the isolation of isotopes Bk-249 and Bk-250; the purification factor of Bk (IV) from other TPE is 10/sup 4/-10/sub 6/ per cycle. The possibility of Bk separation from bromate and phosphate ions by its sorption on a cation-exchanger from diluted H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ solutions with subsequent desorption by the mineral acid has been shown. 20 references, 8 figures.

  14. Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

  15. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1993-02-01

    Research has addressed the role of martensitic transformation plasticity in the enhancement of toughness in high-strength austenitic steels, and the enhancement of formability in multiphase low-alloy sheet steels. In the austenitic steels, optimal processing conditions have been established to achieve a significant increase in strength level, in order to investigate the interaction of strain-induced transformation with the microvoid nucleation and shear localization mechanisms operating at ultrahigh strength levels. The stress-state dependence of transformation and fracture mechanisms has been investigated in model alloys, comparing behavior in uniaxial tension and blunt-notch tension specimens. A numerical constitutive model for transformation plasticity has been reformulated to allow a more thorough analysis of transformation/fracture interactions. Processing of a new low alloy steel composition has been optimized to stabilize retained austenite by isothermal bainitic transformation after intercritical annealing. Preliminary results show a good correlation of uniform ductility with the austenite amount and stability.

  16. Utilization of cation exchange resins for the isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from others in aqueous and non aqueous-alcohol solutions of hydrochloric and nitric acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-07-01

    The authors study the sorption of several transplutonium and fission elements on cation exchange resins in relation to the acid concentration and content of alcohol in solution. They observe a significant increase in sorption of the TPE on the cation exchanges from nitric acid solutions containing more than 50% of alcohol. On the basis of the experimental results they determine the optimum conditions for the concentration of TPE on cation exchangers with their subsequent separation from certain fission and other elements by means of hydrochloric acid and nitric acid solutions.

  17. Ductile fracture processes in 7075 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    You, C.P. ); Thompson, A.W. ); Bernstein, I.M. )

    1995-02-01

    The ductile fracture of 7075 aluminum was examined as a function of aging condition, from underaged to overaged. Notched specimens allowed the triaxiality of stress to be varied. Increasing triaxiality, which was due to increasing notch acuity, decreased ductility and increased nucleation of voids, in accord with expectations from ductile fracture models. Overaged material, which is generally resistant to environmental damage, was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement even with high triaxiality, but void sizes were increased by hydrogen. That increase suggested that void growth rates may be assisted by hydrogen in overaged 7075 aluminum.

  18. Ductile damage modeling based on void coalescence and percolation theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included, and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. The underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. The model is intended for hydrocode based computer simulation. An experimental program is underway to validate the model.

  19. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  20. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  1. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  3. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  4. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sizedd Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Kang

    2008-07-31

    The present research is focused on ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) alloys by adding nano-sized oxide particles to the alloy system. The research approach includes: (1) determination of microscopic mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic ductility enhancement effects through atomistic modeling of the metal-ceramic interface; (2) subsequent computer simulation-aided optimization of composition and nanoparticle size of the dispersion for improved performance; (3) synthesis and characterization of nanoparticle dispersion following the guidance from atomistic computational modeling analyses (e.g., by processing a small sample of Mo alloy for evaluation); and (4) experimental testing of the mechanical properties to determine optimal ductility enhancement.Through atomistic modeling and electronic structure analysis using full-potential linearized muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) techniques, research to date has been performed on a number of selected chromium (Cr) systems containing nitrogen (N) and/or magnesium oxide (MgO) impurities. The emphasis has been on determining the properties of the valence electrons and the characteristics of the chemical bonds they formed. It was found that the brittle/ductile behavior of this transitional metal system is controlled by the relative population of valence charges: bonds formed by s valence electrons yield metallic, ductile behavior, whereas bonds formed by d valence electrons lead to covalent, brittle behavior. The presence of valence bands from impurities also affects the metal bonding, thereby explaining the detrimental and beneficial effects induced by the inclusion of N impurities and MgO dispersions. These understandings are useful for optimizing ductility enhancement effects on the dispersion materials.

  5. Analytical prediction of the location of ductility dip cracking in the trans-varestraint test

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, I.; Kroenke, W.; Cola, M.

    1997-05-01

    Some NiCrFe weld metals exhibit decreased ductility over a temperature range known as the {open_quotes}ductility dip{close_quotes} temperature (DDT) range. Ductility dip cracking (DDT) is a phenomenon which occurs in a zone bounded by the DDT range on its sides and a threshold plastic strain on its bottom as shown in figure 1. Figure 1 illustrates how ductility varies as weld metal cools from the solidus temperature for materials with and without a ductility dip. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the ability to predict the location of the DDC in a Trans-Varestraint Test (TVT) for a specimen machined from a weld deposited EN52 plate. The DDC predictions require a combination of Trans-Varestraint testing and finite element analysis. The test provides the threshold value of externally applied nominal strain below which DDC does not occur. The analysis provides the corresponding threshold local or peak strain. The threshold local plastic strain level and the DDT range are used to predict the location of the DDC. The ultimate purpose of this work is to evaluate susceptibility of highly constrained, component welds to DDC. Test results for Trans-Varestraint Testing for a weld deposited EN52 plate are reported in reference. The ability to predict the location of the DDC in the Trans-Varestraint Test using the techniques reported herein is demonstrated by showing good comparison between the analytical results and the test data.

  6. Prospects for Ductility and Toughness Enhancement of Nial by Ductile Phase Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Ritzert, F. J.; Misra, A.; Gibala, R.

    1991-01-01

    The use of NiAl as a structural material has been hindered by the fact that this ordered intermetallic does not exhibit significant tensile ductility or toughness at room temperature. A critical review of the operative flow and fracture mechanisms in monolithic NiAl has thus established the need for ductile phase toughening in this order system. Progress in ductile phase reinforced intermetallic systems in general and specifically NiAl-based materials has been reviewed. In addition, further clarification of the primary mechanisms involved in the flow and fracture of ductile phase reinforced alloys has evolved from ongoing investigations of several model NiAl-based materials. The mechanical behavior of these model directionally-solidified alloys (Ni-30Al and Ni-30Fe-20Al) are discussed. Finally, the prospects for developing a ductile phase toughened NiAl-based alloy and the shortcomings presently inherent in these systems are analyzed.

  7. Phase-field modeling of ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, M.; Gerasimov, T.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-05-01

    Phase-field modeling of brittle fracture in elastic solids is a well-established framework that overcomes the limitations of the classical Griffith theory in the prediction of crack nucleation and in the identification of complicated crack paths including branching and merging. We propose a novel phase-field model for ductile fracture of elasto-plastic solids in the quasi-static kinematically linear regime. The formulation is shown to capture the entire range of behavior of a ductile material exhibiting -plasticity, encompassing plasticization, crack initiation, propagation and failure. Several examples demonstrate the ability of the model to reproduce some important phenomenological features of ductile fracture as reported in the experimental literature.

  8. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  9. Isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from other actinides on ion exchange resins from aqueous and aqueous ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in aqueous and aqueous alcohol solutions of sulfuric acid was investigated as a function of the concentration of various components of the solution. It was found that the presence of alcohol in sulfuric acid solutions leads to an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchange resins and on anion exchange resins. The possibility of using ion exchange resins for the concentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements that form strong complexes with sulfate ions in a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations was demonstrated.

  10. Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

    1981-05-01

    The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

  11. A Study on Fracture Locus of St12 Steel And Implementation Ductile Damage Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khataei, Mohammad; Poursina, Mehrdad; Kadkhodaei, Mahmoud

    2010-06-01

    In a metal forming process, the state of stress is one of the most important parameters on forming and behavior of the material. According to ductile damage criteria, the magnitudes of fracture strain for various stress triaxiality values should be determined for prediction of the place and time of ductile fracture. In this paper, the magnitudes of fracture strain of St12 steel is measured using several tensile tests on notched samples. Johnson-Cook equation for fracture strain as a function of stress triaxiality is calibrated for St12 steel, using the obtained experimental data. The accuracy of this function is achieved by comparison of the FEM results with experimental data which are achieved during simple tension and Erichsen tests. The simulation results have shown that the ductile damage model is a suitable criterion for prediction of fracture in St12 steel. In addition, notched samples tensile tests are suitable for calibration of Johnson-Cook equation for St12 steel.

  12. Ductile aluminide alloys for high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Stiegler, J.O.

    1986-09-16

    An alloy is described consisting essentially of sufficient nickel and aluminum to form Ni/sub 3/A1, an amount of boron sufficient to promote ductility in the alloy and 0.3 to 1.5 atomic percent of an element selected from the group consisting of hafnium and zirconium. The alloy further including 6 to 12 atomic percent iron.

  13. Nanostructuring and ductility of crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructuring of crystals into domains under uniform compression, the ductility of a solid nanostructure under pressure, and the bimodal distribution of domain size are explained based on the dependence of the surface energy and surface pressure on the shape, size, and density of a nanocrystal.

  14. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sized Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Bruce

    2008-07-18

    The objective of this research is to understand and to remedy the impurity effects for room-temperature ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) based alloys by the inclusion of nano-sized metal oxide dispersions. This research combines theoretical, computational, and experimental efforts. The results will help to formulate systematic strategies in searching for better composed Mo-based alloys with optimal mechanical properties. For this project, majority of the research effort was directed to atomistic modeling to identify the mechanisms responsible for the oxygen embrittling and ductility enhancement based on fundamental electronic structure analysis. Through first principles molecular dynamics simulations, it was found that the embrittling impurity species were attracted to the metal oxide interface, consistent with previous experiments. Further investigation on the electronic structures reveals that the presence of embrittling species degrades the quality of the metallic chemical bonds in the hosting matrix in a number of ways, the latter providing the source of ductility. For example, the spatial flexibility of the bonds is reduced, and localization of the impurity states occurs to pin the dislocation flow. Rice’s criterion has been invoked to explain the connections of electronic structure and mechanical properties. It was also found that when impurity species become attracted to the metal oxide interface, some of the detrimental effects are alleviated, thus explaining the observed ductility enhancement effects. These understandings help to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of Mo and other high temperature alloys (e.g. ODS alloys) for fossil energy materials applications. Based on the theoretical and computational studies, the experimental work includes the preparation of Mo powders mixed with candidate nano-sized metal oxides, which were then vacuum hot-pressed to make the Mo alloys. Several powder mixing methods

  15. Ductile mandrel and parting compound facilitate tube drawing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, W. R., Jr.; Mayfield, R. M.; Polakowski, N. H.

    1966-01-01

    Refractory tubing is warm drawn over a solid ductile mandrel with a powder parting compound packed between mandrel and the tubes inner surface. This method applies also to the coextrusion of a billet and a ductile mandrel.

  16. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A SPANISH-MADE FORADIA BORING MACHINE IN THE FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Microalloying ultrafine grained Al alloys with enhanced ductility.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Li, J K; Cheng, P M; Liu, G; Wang, R H; Chen, B A; Zhang, J Y; Sun, J; Yang, M X; Yang, G

    2014-01-01

    Bulk ultrafine grained (UFG)/nanocrystal metals possess exceptional strength but normally poor ductility and thermal stability, which hinder their practical applications especially in high-temperature environments. Through microalloying strategy that enables the control of grains and precipitations in nanostructured regime, here we design and successfully produce a highly microstructure-stable UFG Al-Cu-Sc alloy with ~275% increment in ductility and simultaneously ~50% enhancement in yield strength compared with its Sc-free counterpart. Although the precipitations in UFG alloys are usually preferentially occurred at grain boundaries even at room temperature, minor Sc addition into the UFG Al-Cu alloys is found to effectively stabilize the as-processed microstructure, strongly suppress the θ-Al2Cu phase precipitation at grain boundary, and remarkably promote the θ'-Al2Cu nanoparticles dispersed in the grain interior in artificial aging. A similar microalloying strategy is expected to be equally effective for other UFG heat-treatable alloys. PMID:24398915

  18. Microalloying Ultrafine Grained Al Alloys with Enhanced Ductility

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, L.; Li, J. K.; Cheng, P. M.; Liu, G.; Wang, R. H.; Chen, B. A.; Zhang, J. Y.; Sun, J.; Yang, M. X.; Yang, G.

    2014-01-01

    Bulk ultrafine grained (UFG)/nanocrystal metals possess exceptional strength but normally poor ductility and thermal stability, which hinder their practical applications especially in high-temperature environments. Through microalloying strategy that enables the control of grains and precipitations in nanostructured regime, here we design and successfully produce a highly microstructure-stable UFG Al-Cu-Sc alloy with ~275% increment in ductility and simultaneously ~50% enhancement in yield strength compared with its Sc-free counterpart. Although the precipitations in UFG alloys are usually preferentially occurred at grain boundaries even at room temperature, minor Sc addition into the UFG Al-Cu alloys is found to effectively stabilize the as-processed microstructure, strongly suppress the θ-Al2Cu phase precipitation at grain boundary, and remarkably promote the θ′-Al2Cu nanoparticles dispersed in the grain interior in artificial aging. A similar microalloying strategy is expected to be equally effective for other UFG heat-treatable alloys. PMID:24398915

  19. On probabilistic aspects in the dynamic degradation of ductile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Gilles; Trumel, Hervé; Hild, Francois; Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick; Denoual, Christophe

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic loadings produce high stress waves leading to the spallation of ductile materials such as aluminium, copper, magnesium or tantalum [1-3]. The main mechanism used to explain the change in the number of cavities with the stress rate is nucleation inhibition, induced by the growth of already nucleated cavities [4]. The dependence of the spall strength and critical time with the loading rate is investigated in the framework of a probabilistic model [4]. The present approach, which explains previous experimental findings on the strain rate dependence of the spall strength, is applied to analyze experimental data on tantalum [5]. [3pt] References: [1] Meyers M.A., Aimone C. T., 1983, ``Dynamic Fracture (Spalling) of Metals'', Prog. Mater. Sci., 18(1),pp. 1-96 [2] Curran D.R., Seaman L., Shockey D.A., 1987, ``Dynamic Fracture of Solids'', Phys. Rep., 147, pp. 253-388 [3] Grady D.E., 1988, ``The Spall Strength of Condensed Matter'', J. Mech. Phys. Sol., 36(3), pp. 353-384 [4] Trumel H., Hild F., Roy G., Pellegrini Y.-P., Denoual C., submitted to J. Mech. Phys. Sol., 2008. [5] Roy G., 2003, ``Vers une modelisation approfondie de l'endommagement dynamique ductile. Investigation experimentale d'une nuance de tantale et developpements theoriques'', Ph.D. Thesis, Poitiers University, France

  20. Calculation Method of Lateral Strengths and Ductility Factors of Constructions with Shear Walls of Different Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyoshi; Nakao, Masato; Murakami, Masahide; Miyazawa, Kenji

    2008-07-08

    For seismic design, ductility-related force modification factors are named R factor in Uniform Building Code of U.S, q factor in Euro Code 8 and Ds (inverse of R) factor in Japanese Building Code. These ductility-related force modification factors for each type of shear elements are appeared in those codes. Some constructions use various types of shear walls that have different ductility, especially for their retrofit or re-strengthening. In these cases, engineers puzzle the decision of force modification factors of the constructions. Solving this problem, new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories for simple shear wall systems is proposed and named 'Stiffness--Potential Energy Addition Method' in this paper. This method uses two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in damage limit state and safety limit state. Two lateral strengths of stories in both limit states are calculated from these two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in both limit states. Calculated strengths have the same quality as values obtained by strength addition method using many steps of load-deformation data of shear walls. The new method to calculate ductility factors is also proposed in this paper. This method is based on the new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories. This method can solve the problem to obtain ductility factors of stories with shear walls of different ductility.

  1. Metallic glass composition

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  2. Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Gschneidner; A.O. Pecharsky; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from {approx}3 to {approx}350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature (<15 K) prototype cryocooler regenerator materials HoCu{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K.

  3. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  4. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductilemore » tearing earlier in the loading process.« less

  5. Weldability and hot ductility of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, D.I.; Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); David, S.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The weldability of iron aluminide alloys is discussed. Although readily welded with electron beam (EB) and gas-tungsten arc (GTA) techniques, iron aluminides are sometimes susceptible to cracking during cooling when welded with the GTA welding process. Taken into account are the effects of microstructural instability (grain growth), weld heat input (cooling rate) and environment on the hot ductility of an iron aluminide alloy designated FA-129. 64 refs., 59 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Rapid ductile afterslip from coseismic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Meade, B. J.; Savage, H. M.; Rowe, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes are typically followed by months of afterslip, the total of which is generally an order of magnitude smaller than the seismic slip. The classic model for afterslip envisions seismic slip transferring stress to adjacent regions, driving accelerated stable sliding that expands the rupture area. However, a small proportion of earthquakes exhibit unusually large and rapid afterslip in the hours immediately following rupture. Here we present a new model that bridges the transition from seismic to postseismic deformation and may explain these observations of rapid afterslip. Seismic slip produces a significant temperature rise that slowly diffuses into the surrounding material following the cessation of seismic slip. Any process with strong temperature dependence is more sensitive to this heat transient than to the ambient temperatures present during the interseismic period. Coupling the temperature evolution of a fault to a ductile flow law we model postseismic deformation during the heat transient. Our idea of coseismic heating enhancing ductile flow is supported by field observations of micro-shear zones adjacent to psuedotachylyte veins. Enhanced ductility is largely confined to the zone that deformed seismically, making our model equivalent to rapid afterslip. Combining analytic and numerical methods we solve for the total afterslip in terms of the slip rate and fault strength during seismic slip and the ductile flow parameters. Our results are sensitive to the assumed rheology and deforming zone thickness, and while total afterslip is generally small some plausible parameter ranges predict afterslip comparable to or greater than the seismic slip developing over timescales shorter than an hour. We demonstrate that rapid afterslip can drive significant frictional heating, leading to a thermal runaway instability that produces a near total postseismic stress drop. To conclude we investigate the tsunami magnitude that rapid afterslip could produce.

  7. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  8. Preparation of nanostructured materials having improved ductility

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2010-04-20

    A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an aluminum alloy workpiece at temperature sufficient to produce a single phase coarse grained aluminum alloy, then refining the grain size of the workpiece at a temperature at or below room temperature, and then aging the workpiece to precipitate second phase particles in the nanosized grains of the workpiece that increase the ductility without decreasing the strength of the workpiece.

  9. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  10. Testing Bonds Between Brittle And Ductile Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    Simple uniaxial strain test devised to measure intrinsic shear strength. Brittle film deposited on ductile stubstrate film, and combination stretched until brittle film cracks, then separates from substrate. Dimensions of cracked segments related in known way to tensile strength of brittle film and shear strength of bond between two films. Despite approximations and limitations of technique, tests show it yields semiquantitative measures of bond strengths, independent of mechanical properties of substrates, with results reproducible with plus or minus 6 percent.

  11. Postweld solution annealing effects on the ductility of ni-co-cr-base alloy gas tungsten arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C.-S.; Baek, K.-K.

    1996-12-01

    The welding characteristics of a commercial wrought alloy with a nominal composition of Ni-29Co-28Cr-2.75Si were investigated. Gas tungsten arc weldments with filler metal matching the chemistry of the alloy were found to have limited room-temperature ductility in the as-welded condition. Since welding is the main fabrication method of this alloy, the welding and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) characteristics were examined to provide guidelines for fabrication in the field. Metallographic evaluation revealed that the weld metal was characterized by the distribution of a continuous eutectic phase consisting primarily of (Si,Ti)xNiy The continuous eutectic phase in the as-welded deposit, which caused poor ductility of the welds, was successfully reduced or removed with proper PWHT. The PWHT is necessary if cold forming of a weldment is required after welding or if adequate joint ductility is a design requirement. The recommended PWHT temperature is 1050 °C.

  12. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility

    PubMed Central

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here. PMID:26887444

  13. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-02-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here.

  14. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility.

    PubMed

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here. PMID:26887444

  15. Ductile Titanium Alloy with Low Poisson's Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y. L.; Li, S. J.; Sun, B. B.; Sui, M. L.; Yang, R.

    2007-05-25

    We report a ductile {beta}-type titanium alloy with body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure having a low Poisson's ratio of 0.14. The almost identical ultralow bulk and shear moduli of {approx}24 GPa combined with an ultrahigh strength of {approx}0.9 GPa contribute to easy crystal distortion due to much-weakened chemical bonding of atoms in the crystal, leading to significant elastic softening in tension and elastic hardening in compression. The peculiar elastic and plastic deformation behaviors of the alloy are interpreted as a result of approaching the elastic limit of the bcc crystal under applied stress.

  16. Continuous-Discontinuous Model for Ductile Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Seabra, Mariana R. R.; Cesar de Sa, Jose M. A.

    2010-06-15

    In this contribution, a continuum-dicontinuum model for ductile failure is presented. The degradation of material properties trough deformation is described by Continuum Damage Mechanics in a non-local integral formulation to avoid mesh dependence. In the final stage of failure, the damaged zone is replaced by a cohesive macro crack and subsequent traction-free macro crack for a more realistic representation of the phenomenon. The inclusion of the discontinuity surfaces is performed by the XFEM and Level Set Method and avoids the spurious damage growth typical of this class of models.

  17. Rapid method of separating Am(VI) from transplutonium and rare-earth elements on a cation exchanger in phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, G.S.; Guseva, L.I.

    1988-07-01

    Measurements have been made on cation-exchanger sorption of americium, other actinoids, and certain rare-earth elements from 0.1-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ when the elements have been oxidized with ammonium persulfate alone or mixed with silver phosphate. There are considerable differences in behavior between the americium and the other elements on account of its being oxidized to a higher valency state. Measurements have been made on the effects of acid and oxidant concentrations and of the oxidation and elution conditions on the americium yield when the exchanger is treated with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Optimum oxidation conditions have been chosen, and a rapid method has been devised for separating americium(VI) from other transplutonium elements and REE on Dowex 50 /times/ 8, where the eluent is 0.1-1.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ plus 0.05 M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/.

  18. Phase stability in heavy f-electron metals from first-principles theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P

    2005-11-17

    The structural phase stability of heavy f-electron metals is studied by means of density-functional theory (DFT). These include temperature-induced transitions in plutonium metal as well as pressure-induced transitions in the trans-plutonium metals Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf. The early actinides (Th-Np) display phases that could be rather well understood from the competition of a crystal-symmetry breaking mechanism (Peierls distortion) of the 5f states and electrostatic forces, while for the trans-plutonium metals (Am-Cf) the ground-state structures are governed by 6d bonding. We show in this paper that new physics is needed to understand the phases of the actinides in the volume range of about 15-30 {angstrom}{sup 3}. At these volumes one would expect, from theoretical arguments made in the past, to encounter highly complex crystal phases due to a Peierls distortion. Here we argue that the symmetry reduction associated with spin polarization can make higher symmetry phases competitive. Taking this into account, DFT is shown to describe the well-known phase diagram of plutonium and also the recently discovered complex and intriguing high-pressure phase diagrams of Am and Cm. The theory is further applied to investigate the behaviors of Bk and Cf under compression.

  19. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN THEIR MOLDS. AS A JOBBING FOUNDRY MAKING CASTINGS ON AN CONTRACTUAL-ORDER BASIS, THEIR CUSTOMERS PROVIDE, OR CONTRACT FOR PATTERN CONSTRUCTION. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES, HOWEVER, PROVIDE REPAIR SERVICES SHOWN AS JOHNNY TIDWELL PREPARES A PLATE, FORM -FITTING TO THEIR MOLDING MACHINES, THAT A PATTERN WILL BE AFFIXED TO. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Impact testing of ductile cast iron: Tension and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.; Takata, T.; Sogabe, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Impact tension and compression tests on ferritic ductile cast iron (JIS FCD370) are conducted by means of the split Hopkinson bar technique. Reliable stress-strain relations in tension and compression for ductile cast iron are determined at strain rates of over 10{sup 3}/s. The test results indicate that ductile cast iron shows different strength characteristics in tension and compression under impact loading as well as under quasi-static loading. Microscopic examinations of the post-test specimens reveal that this mechanical behavior is attributed to the presence of spheroidal graphites in a ferritic matrix of ductile cast iron.

  1. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S.; Kingsbury, G.R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  2. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  3. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Martin, Heidi B.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  4. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind's most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  5. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength–ductility trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind’s most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength–ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy

  6. A diffraction based study of the deformation mechanisms in anomalously ductile B2 intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Rupalee Prashant

    For many decades, the brittle nature of most intermetallic compounds (e.g. NiAl) has been the limiting factor in their practical application. Many B2 (CsCl prototypical structure) intermetallics are known to exhibit slip on the <001>{110} slip mode, which provides only 3 independent slip systems and, hence, is unable to satisfy the von Mises (a.k.a. Taylor) criterion for polycrystalline ductility. As a result, inherent polycrystalline ductility is unexpected. Recent discovery of a number of ductile B2 intermetallics has raised questions about possible violation of the von Mises criterion by these alloys. These ductile intermetallic compounds are MR (metal (M) combined with a rare earth metal or group IV refractory metal (R)) alloys and are stoichiometric, ordered compounds. Single crystal slip trace analyses have only identified the presence of <100>{011} or <100>{010} slip systems. More than 100 other B2 MR compounds are known to exist and many of them have already been shown to be ductile (e.g., CuY, AgY, CuDy, CoZr, CoTi, etc.). Furthermore, these alloys exhibit a large Bauschinger effect. The present work uses several diffraction based techniques including electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in-situ neutron diffraction; in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mechanical testing, and crystal plasticity modeling, to elucidate the reason for ductility in select B2 alloys, explore the spread of this ductility over the B2 family, and understand the Bauschinger effect in these alloys. Several possible explanations (e.g., slip of <111> dislocations, strong texture, phase transformations and twinning) for the anomalous ductility were explored. An X-ray diffraction based analysis ruled out texture, phase purity and departure from order as explanations for the anomalous ductility in MR alloys. In-situ neutron diffraction and post deformation SEM, EBSD, and TEM were unable to

  7. Enhancing tensile ductility of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC by lamination with Mg-9% Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1995-05-01

    A laminated metal composite has been made by press bonding alternating layers of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC, 6090/SiC/25p, and a Mg-9%Li alloy. The mechanical properties including tensile ductility were evaluated. The tensile ductility of the Al MMC was found to increase from 3.5% to 11.5%. In contrast to other laminates based on ultrahigh carbon, steel, the laminate of this study and other Al MMC laminates exhibited tensile yield strengths that did not follow the rule of averages. This is attributed to interlayer reaction products developed during processing of the Al MMC laminates.

  8. High velocity sliding at polycrystalline ductile metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Milhans, J. L.; Ravelo, R.; Germann, T. C.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of large scale 3-dimensional NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations for Al-Al and Al-Ta interfaces for sliding velocities in the range 20-4000 m/s at pressures of 15 GPa. System sizes include 8 M, 26 M and 138 M atoms for times to 40 ns. We discuss polycrystalline samples with initial grain sizes of 13 nm and 20 nm. For velocities above a size dependent critical velocity, vc, the frictional force per unit area agrees with single crystal simulations. For velocities below vc, the polycrystalline interfaces evolve to a new steady state grain size distribution characterized by very large plastic deformation with larger grain sizes, time dependent coarsening and refinement, a graded size distribution in the direction normal to the sliding interface, and significantly larger frictional forces per unit area compared to similar single crystal sliding interfaces. We also find that for the Al-Ta interface the frictional properties are determined by the weaker Al material. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Abrasive wear behavior of a brittle matrix (MoSi2) composite reinforced with a ductile phase (Nb)

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-10-01

    The toughness of a variety of brittle ceramic and intermetallic matrices has been improved through the incorporation of ductile metallic reinforcements. In these composites resistance to catastrophic failure of the matrix is derived through a combination of mechanisms, including matrix crack bridging, matrix crack defection and rupturing of the ductile phase. The degree to which these mechanisms operate is a function of composite microstructure. In general, the ductile phase is softer than the matrix phase. This may have unique implications when the materials are subjected to a wear environment, whether intentional or not. Hence, it is important to understand the wear behavior of these new materials. MoSi2–Nb was selected as a model composite system, in part because of the wide body of open literature regarding this system. The influences of abrasive wear environment and the composite microstructure (Nb reinforcement size, shape and volume fraction) on the wear resistance of the composites are reported.

  10. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  11. Study made of ductility limitations of aluminum-silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. A.; Frederick, S. F.

    1967-01-01

    Study of the relation between microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum-silicon alloys determines the cause of the variations in properties resulting from differences in solidification rate. It was found that variations in strength are a consequence of variations in ductility and that ductility is inversely proportional to dendrite cell size.

  12. ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED TO STORE THEM AND KEEP THEM AVAILABLE FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS ORDERS. THE BARRET/DOUGLAS LIFTING TRUCK IS USED TO REACH AND TRANSPORT PATTERNS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  13. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  14. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  15. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  16. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  17. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  18. Evaluation of varying ductile fracture criteria for 42CrMo steel by compressions at different temperatures and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s(-1) are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture. PMID:24592175

  19. Post Quench Ductility Evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and Select Iron Alloys under Design Basis and Extended LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Keiser, James R; Terrani, Kurt A; Bell, Gary L; Snead, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post quench ductility of these alloys under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 were determined to be k = 2.173 107 g2/cm4/s C, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to four hours.

  20. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s−1 are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture. PMID:24592175

  1. X-ray diffraction study of the phase purity, order, and texture of ductile B2 intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Mulay, Rupalee; Wollmershauser, J.A. A.; Heisel, M A; Bei, Hongbin; Russell, A M; Agnew, S R

    2010-01-01

    Representatives (AgY, CuY, AgEr, CuDy, MgY and MgCe) of the newly discovered family of ductile stoichiometric B2 intermetallic (metal-rare-earth element, MR) compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction, to determine if their anomalous ductility is related to an exceptional level of phase purity, lack of chemical ordering or a strong crystallographic texture. Brittle NiAl served as an anti-type in this study. We found that all of the rare-earth compounds, except MgY, have a significant volume fraction (-5-20vol.%) of second phases (M{sub 2}R intermetallics and R{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides), which has not been reported in previous studies of these materials. The most ductile of observed MR compounds, AgY, is highly ordered. A moderate texture was observed in AgY, which may explain its higher ductility (using polycrystal modeling) as compared to other MR compounds. However, the intrinsic polycrystalline ductility of these compounds in the randomly textured state (like that observed in CuY) still has no specific, definitive explanation.

  2. Three Dimensional Forming Simulation of the Shielded Slot Plate for the MCFC Using a Ductile Fracture Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Yang, D. Y.; Lee, S. R.; Chang, I. G.; Lee, T. W.

    2011-08-01

    The shielded slot plate, which has a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern, is a component of the metallic bipolar plate for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the fuel cell, the unit cell of the shielded slot plate should have a relatively large upper area. Additionally, defects from the forming process should be minimized. In order to simulate the slitting process, whereby sheared corrugated patterns are formed, ductile fracture criteria based on the histories of stress and strain are employed. The user material subroutine VUMAT is employed for implementation of the material and ductile fracture criteria in the commercial FEM software ABAQUS. The variables of the ductile fracture criteria were determined by comparing the simulation results and the experimental results of the tension test and the shearing test. Parametric studies were conducted to determine the critical value of the ductile fracture criterion. Employing these ductile fracture criteria, the three dimensional forming process of the shielded slot plate was numerically simulated. The effects of the slitting process in the forming process of the shielded slot plate were analyzed through a FEM simulation and experimental studies. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations were conducted to verify the numerical simulations of the 3-step forming process.

  3. Causes of the hot ductility drops of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasnikov, N. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Mishin, V. V.; Mishnev, P. A.; Nikonov, S. V.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of conditions of continuous casting and hot rolling of steel on the high-temperature ductility of a microalloyed pipe steel of strength class Kh42 and 17G1S-U steel is studied. A Gleeble-3800 thermomechanical facility is used to perform physical modeling of the hot ductility of steel. The temperature dependence of the hot ductility of steel is determined under various slab cooling conditions in a continuous caster and during hot rolling. The ductility drops of iron and steels is found to be mainly caused by an increase in the elastic modulus near the temperatures of the polymorphic transformation caused by first- and secondorder phase transformations (polymorphic and magnetic transformations, respectively). Structural factors, such as the grain size, excess-phase inclusions located along initial grain boundaries, and interstitial impurities, lead to an additional decrease in the ductility.

  4. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H. ); Lee, J.L. )

    1992-07-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated.

  5. Recommendations for ductile and brittle failure design criteria for ductile cast iron spent-fuel shipping containers

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents recommendations for establishing design and acceptance criteria for the ductile cast iron to be used for fabricating spent-fuel shipping casks. These recommendations address design criteria for preventing ductile failure, and acceptance criteria for preventing brittle fracture, based upon drop testing a flawed prototype cask.

  6. Hot Ductility Behavior of an 8 Pct Cr Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Shuhua; Shi, Zhongping; Wang, Bo; Fu, Wantang

    2015-04-01

    The hot ductility of an 8 pct Cr roller steel was determined between 1173 K and 1473 K (900 °C and 1200 °C) at strain rates of 0.01 to 10 s-1 through tensile testing. The fracture morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and the microstructure was examined through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The dependence of the hot ductility behavior on the deformation conditions, grain size, and precipitation was analyzed. The relationship between the reduction in area and the natural logarithm of the Zener-Hollomon parameter (ln Z) was found to be a second-order polynomial. When ln Z was greater than 40 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by incompatible deformation between the grains. When ln Z was between 32 and 40 s-1, the hot ductility was excellent and the main fracture mechanism was void linking. When ln Z was below 32 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by grain boundary sliding. A fine grain structure is beneficial for homogenous deformation and dynamic recrystallization, which induces better hot ductility. The effect of M7C3 carbide particles dispersed in the matrix on the hot ductility was small. The grain growth kinetics in the 8 pct Cr steel were obtained between 1373 K and 1473 K (1100 °C and 1200 °C). Finally, optimized preheating and forging procedures for 8 pct Cr steel rollers are provided.

  7. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND OTHER COMPONENTS ARE MELTED TO CREATE DUCTILE IRON. BRIGHT FLASH IN BACKGROUND RESULTS FROM MOLTEN METAL (DUCTILE IRON) BEING POURED FROM CUPOLA INTO TRANSFER LADLE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Creep deformation characteristics of ductile discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-10-01

    Role of material parameters and geometric parameters of ductile reinforcing phase on the creep deformation behavior of 20% discontinuously reinforced composite was numerically investigated including debonding and pull-out mechanisms. Results indicate that for rigidly bonded interfaces, the creep rate of the composite is not significantly influenced by the material properties and geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase due to development of large hydrostatic stress and constrained deformation in the reinforcement. For debonding interfaces, the geometric parameters of the reinforcing phase are important; however, event with very weak interfacial behavior low composite creep rates can be achieved by suitable selection of the geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase.

  9. High-temperature ductility of electro-deposited nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Work done during the past several months on high temperature ductility of electrodeposited nickel is summarized. Data are presented which show that earlier measurements made at NASA-Langley erred on the low side, that strain rate has a marked influence on high temperature ductility, and that codeposition of a small amount of manganese helps to improve high temperature ductility. Influences of a number of other factors on nickel properties were also investigated. They included plating solution temperature, current density, agitation, and elimination of the wetting agent from the plating solution. Repair of a large nozzle section by nickel plating is described.

  10. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  11. Experimental aspects of an investigation of macroscopic ductile failure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Soo Hoo, M.S.; Benzley, S.E.; Priddy, T.G.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental results for the ductile failure of 7075-T651 aluminum are presented. Four separate shapes were tested to investigate the importance that macroscopic effective shear stress, hydrostatic stress, and plastic strain play in describing ductile failure of materials. The specimens used were: thin wall torsion tubes to create a state of pure shear, uniform hollow tubes to create a state of uniaxial stress; hour-glass shaped hollow tubes to create a state of biaxial stress; and notched round bars to create a state of triaxial stress. Two proposed ductile failure criteria are discussed in conjunction with the experimental results presented.

  12. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:321-327, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26854331

  13. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woll, K.; Bergamaschi, A.; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C.; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F.

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (±0.33) ms-1 and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material.

  14. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2010-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  15. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2009-12-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  16. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Woll, K.; Bergamaschi, A.; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C.; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F.

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (±0.33) ms−1 and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material. PMID:26822309

  17. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  18. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritic particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  19. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Ostenson, Jerome E.

    1983-03-29

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and orientated dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritric particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  20. Retention of ductility in high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. R.; Zackay, V. F.

    1969-01-01

    To produce high strength alloy steel with retention of ductility, include tempering, cooling and subsequent tempering. Five parameters for optimum results are pretempering temperature, amount of strain, strain rate, temperature during strain, and retempering temperature.

  1. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 20' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 20' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED USING PIPE PULLERS. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED FROM CASTING MACHINE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING WEIGHED ON SCALES AT CASTING MACHINE. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST, AS OPERATOR WATCHES TO ENSURE QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Stiffness, strength, and ductility of nanoscale thin films and membranes: a combined wrinkling-cracking methodology.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun Young; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Beers, Kathryn L; Stafford, Christopher M

    2011-08-10

    We establish and validate a measurement method based on wrinkling-cracking phenomena that allows unambiguous measurements of three fundamental mechanical properties in nanoscale thin film geometries, including elastic modulus, strength, and fracture strain. In addition to polymer and metal thin films, the method is applied to the active nanolayers of a composite reverse osmosis membrane before and after chlorination, illustrating the ability to detect a ductile-to-brittle transition in these materials indicative of "embrittlement", a behavior that impairs long-term durability and is detrimental to membrane performance. PMID:21761850

  6. Ductile flow by water-assisted cataclasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Brok, Bas

    2003-04-01

    In the presence of water otherwise brittle materials may deform macroscopically ductile by water-assisted cataclastic creep. This is possible as long as (i) solubility is high enough, so that stress-corrosion can occur, and (ii) local stress is low enough, to that fracturing remains subcritical. Water-assisted cataclastic creep (WACC) may play an important role in the middle and lower continental crust where mineral solubilities are high and stresses low. WACC is a poorly understood deformation process. Experiments were performed on very soluble brittle salts (Na-chlorate; K-alum) to study microstructure development by WACC. The experiments were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a small see-through vessel. In this way the cataclastic deformation process could be studied "in-situ" under the microscope. Crystals were loaded in the presence of saturated salt solution. It appeared that originally straight mineral surfaces were instable when kept under stress. Grooves (or channels) slowly developed in the surface by local dissolution. These grooves behave like so-called Grinfeld instabilities. They develop because the energy of a grooved surface under stress is lower than the energy of a straight surface under stress. The grooves may deepen and turn into subcritical cracks when local stress further increases. These cracks propagate slowly. They propagate parallel to sigma1 but also at an angle and even perpendicular to sigma1, often following crystallographically controlled directions. The fractures mostly change direction while propagating, locally making turns of more than 180 degrees. Irregular fracture fragments thus develop. The fractures may migrate sideways (as with grain bounday migration) probably by solution-redeposition driven by differences in stress between both sides of the fracture. Thus the shape of the fragments changes. The size of the fracture fragments seems to be controlled by the distance of the grooves, which decreases

  7. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B C; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-06-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp(3) bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the "grain size". On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures. PMID:27181833

  8. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Tang, M.; Anderson, T.L.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (J{sub c}) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often < 1-2 mm) routinely precede termination of the J-{Delta}a curve by brittle fracture. Large-scale yielding, coupled with small amounts of ductile tearing, magnifies the impact of small variations in microscale material properties on the macroscopic fracture toughness which contributes to the large amount scatter observed in measured J{sub c}-values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured J{sub c}-values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515).

  9. Welding of nickel-base superalloys having a nil-ductility range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An article made of a nickel-base superalloy having a nil-ductility range from the solidus temperature of the alloy to about 600.degree. F. below the solidus temperature is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, adjusting the temperature of the article to a welding temperature of from about 1800.degree. F. to about 2100.degree. F., welding a preselected area in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected area so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected area, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the nickel-based superalloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  10. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  11. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  12. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  13. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  14. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  15. Theory of nonequilibrium segregation in an Fe-Mn-Ni ternary alloy and a ductile-brittle-ductile transition

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, N.H.

    1996-07-01

    In an Fe-8Mn-7Ni ternary alloy, age-hardened by coherently formed face-centered tetragonal MnNi intermetallic compounds within the matrix, a modeling based on a regular solution model is performed to formulate the nonequilibrium grain boundary segregation behaviors of the alloying elements, followed by a ductile-brittle-ductile transition in the alloy. An equation is derived representing the segregation kinetics. It is confirmed from the calculations that the segregation behaviors of the elements are directly controlled by the precipitation reaction in the matrix. The nonequilibrium segregation behaviors are characterized by time-temperature diagrams, which show maximum segregation levels of the elements in an intermediate aging time and temperature range. The calculated results explain theoretically and semiquantitatively the relationship between the nonequilibrium segregation of the elements and the ductile-brittle-ductile transition.

  16. Ductile iron data base: correlations between microstructure and fracture toughness: Background document for draft ASTM ductile iron specification

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, P.; Lombrozo, P.

    1987-02-01

    A computer data base was generated to relate ductile iron fracture toughness with microstructural parameters, chemistry, and mechanical properties. Such relationships are considered necessary before a ductile iron material specification can be generated for spent nuclear fuel containers. Although scatter exists in the available data and more data are desirable, tentative conclusions can be drawn. In particular, ductile iron with high ferrite content (>80%) and spherical graphite nodules shows relatively high fracture toughness values suggesting its suitability for use in spent nuclear fuel casks. A material specification based upon nodule count (or the inversely related nodule spacing) may ensure a minimum fracture toughness in ductile iron. Increasing nodule spacing (decreasing count) increases the fracture toughness. Other relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure/chemistry are evaluated.

  17. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  18. Improvement in Abrasion Wear Resistance and Microstructural Changes with Deep Cryogenic Treatment of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolić, Sanja; Godec, Matjaž; Schauperl, Zdravko; Donik, Črtomir

    2016-07-01

    The application of a deep cryogenic treatment during the heat-treatment processes for different types of steels has demonstrated a significant influence on their mechanical and tribological properties. A great deal of research was conducted on steels, as well as on other kinds of materials, such as hard metal, gray cast iron, aluminum, aluminum alloys, etc., but not on austempered ductile iron (ADI). In this research the influence of a deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of austempered ductile iron was investigated. The ductile cast iron was austempered at the upper ausferritic temperature, deep cryogenically treated, and afterwards tempered at two different temperatures. The abrasion wear resistance was tested using the standard ASTM G65 method. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction in order to define the microstructural changes that influenced the properties of the ADI. The obtained results show that the deep cryogenic treatment, in combination with different tempering temperatures, affects the matrix microstructure of the austempered ductile iron, which leads to an increase in both the abrasion wear resistance and the hardness.

  19. Mechanical Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to characterize the strength and fracture response of nodular ductile iron (NDI) and its underlying ferritic matrix phase. Quasistatic and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) compression tests were performed on NDI and a model material for the NDI matrix phase (Fe-Si alloy). Smooth and notch round bar (NRB) samples were loaded in tension until fracture to determine strain-at-failure with varying stress triaxiality. Multiple tests were performed on each small and large smooth bar samples to obtain fracture statistics with sample size. Fracture statistics are important for initializing simulations of fragmentation events. Johnson-Cook strength models were developed for the NDI and the Fe-Si alloy. NDI strength model parameters are: A = 525 MPa, B = 650 MPa, n = 0.6, and C = 0.0205. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2312/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. Fe-Si alloy strength model parameters are: A=560 MPa, B = 625 MPa, n = 0.5, and C = 0.02. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2850/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. A Johnson-Cook failure model was developed for NDI with model parameters: D{sub 1} = 0.029, D{sub 2} = 0.44, D{sub 3} = -1.5, and D{sub 4} = D{sub 5} = 0. An exponential relationship was developed for the elongation-at-failure statistics as a function of length-scale with model parameters: S{sub f1} = 0.108, S{sub f2} = -0.00169, and L{sub m} = 32.4 {mu}m. NDI strength and failure models, including failure statistics, will be used in continuum-scale simulations of explosively-driven ring fragmentation. The Fe-Si alloy strength model will be used in mesoscale simulations of spall fracture in NDI, where the NDI matrix phase is captured explicitly.

  20. Group separation of transplutonium and rare-earth elements by liquid chromatography with a free stationary phase using 2,4,6-Tris[ditolylphosphoryl]-1,3,5-triazine

    SciTech Connect

    Chmutova, M.K.; Ivanova, L.A.; Bodrin, G.B.

    1995-03-01

    Methods are developed for group separation of trace quantities of transplutonium (TPE) and weighable amounts of rare-earth elements (REE) by liquid chromatography with a free stationary phase in systems based on bifunctional neutral organophosphorus compounds. Using a stationary phase of 2,4,6-tris(ditolylphosphoryl)-1,3,5-triazine in CHCl{sub 3}, REE are first eluted by 0.5 M NH{sub 4}SCN-1 M HCl and then TPE by 0.025 M hydroxyethylidenediphosphonic acid in H{sub 2}O. The fractions contained {approximately} 100% of one of the groups without an impurity of the other. Use of the same eluents and a CHCl{sub 3} solution of tetraphenyl-methylenediphosphine dioxide as the stationary phase gave 95.4% pure REE and 97.5% pure TPE.

  1. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M.; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-05-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the ``grain size''. On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different

  2. Radiation-Induced Helium Nanobubbles Enhance Ductility in Submicron-Sized Single-Crystalline Copper.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming-Shuai; Du, Jun-Ping; Wan, Liang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Tian, Lin; Ma, Evan; Han, Wei-Zhong; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-07-13

    The workability and ductility of metals usually degrade with exposure to irradiation, hence the phrase "radiation damage". Here, we found that helium (He) radiation can actually enhance the room-temperature deformability of submicron-sized copper. In particular, Cu single crystals with diameter of 100-300 nm and containing numerous pressurized sub-10 nm He bubbles become stronger, more stable in plastic flow and ductile in tension, compared to fully dense samples of the same dimensions that tend to display plastic instability (strain bursts). The sub-10 nm He bubbles are seen to be dislocation sources as well as shearable obstacles, which promote dislocation storage and reduce dislocation mean free path, thus contributing to more homogeneous and stable plasticity. Failure happens abruptly only after significant bubble coalescence. The current findings can be explained in light of Weibull statistics of failure and the beneficial effects of bubbles on plasticity. These results shed light on plasticity and damage developments in metals and could open new avenues for making mechanically robust nano- and microstructures by ion beam processing and He bubble engineering. PMID:27249672

  3. Prevention of ductility loss in hydrogen-charged steel by gamma-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, T.; Ikeya, M.; Touge, M.

    1984-11-01

    Hydrogen is known as a constituent which degrades the mechanical properties of metals and alloys, particularly their ductility. The degradation of mechanical properties, called hydrogen embrittlement, is a serious problem in metals and alloys under a hydrogen environment, e.g., pickling, welding, plating, etc. Although many researches have been made to clarify the nature and the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in steels (1), little has been reported on the method of prevention of hydrogen embrittlement except for works by Pressouyre and Bernstein (2,3). They showed that the susceptibility of ferrous alloys to hydrogen embrittlement is reduced by addition of titanium. Recently, we found that hydrogen in stainless steels is outgassed upon exposure to ionizing radiation (4-7). Therefore, hydrogen embrittlement in steels is expected to be influenced by ionizing radiation. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of prevension of hydrogen embrittlement by examining the effect of gammairradiation on the ductility in a low carbon steel electrolytically charged with hydrogen.

  4. Ductile electroactive biodegradable hyperbranched polylactide copolymers enhancing myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Myotube formation is crucial to restoring muscular functions, and biomaterials that enhance the myoblast differentiation into myotubes are highly desirable for muscular repair. Here, we report the synthesis of electroactive, ductile, and degradable copolymers and their application in enhancing the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes. A hyperbranched ductile polylactide (HPLA) was synthesized and then copolymerized with aniline tetramer (AT) to produce a series of electroactive, ductile and degradable copolymers (HPLAAT). The HPLA and HPLAAT showed excellent ductility with strain to failure from 158.9% to 42.7% and modulus from 265.2 to 758.2 MPa. The high electroactivity of the HPLAAT was confirmed by UV spectrometer and cyclic voltammogram measurements. These HPLAAT polymers also showed improved thermal stability and controlled biodegradation rate compared to HPLA. Importantly, when applying these polymers for myotube formation, the HPLAAT significantly improved the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in vitro compared to HPLA. Furthermore, these polymers greatly promoted myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells as measured by quantitative analysis of myotube number, length, diameter, maturation index, and gene expression of MyoD and TNNT. Together, our study shows that these electroactive, ductile and degradable HPLAAT copolymers represent significantly improved biomaterials for muscle tissue engineering compared to HPLA. PMID:26335860

  5. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Chris; Auton, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the high-pressure injection of fluid into the bulk of the rock. The goal is to initiate and propagate fractures that will provide hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir, enabling gas or oil to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We first consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We use this model to show that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. We then complement these results with laboratory experiments in an analogue system, and with numerical simulations based on the discrete element method (DEM), both of which suggest that ductile failure can indeed dramatically change the resulting deformation pattern. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from models that assume purely elastic mechanical behavior.

  6. An investigation of the mechanical damping of ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, S.H.; Stuch, T.E.; Salzbrenner, R.

    1995-11-01

    Ductile iron has been suggested as a candidate material for a number of practical applications, including turbine casings, automotive components, and transportation and storage casks for hazardous and radioactive materials. The applications require the enhanced ductility resulting from the presence of spherical graphite nodules in the ductile ferrite iron matrix. Proper design of such components requires a knowledge of the mechanical properties, including how energy is absorbed and dissipated (mechanical damping) by the test material. This article is a study of the mechanical damping of a series of well-characterized ductile iron materials (four separate materials) as a function of strain amplitude, temperature over the range of {minus}100 C to + 100 C, and magnetic field. The major sources of damping were found to be dislocation motion in the graphite phase and magnetomechanical damping in the ferrite phase. The magnitude of the magnetomechanical damping was much larger than that due to dislocation motion. An additional goal of the investigation was to determine if any correlation existed between the measured mechanical damping and the fracture toughness of the ductile iron materials; no correlation was found.

  7. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  8. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in this impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.

  9. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in thismore » impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.« less

  10. TEM investigation of ductile iron alloyed with vanadium.

    PubMed

    Dymek, S; Blicharski, M; Morgiel, J; Fraś, E

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the processing and microstructure evolution of ductile cast iron, modified by an addition of vanadium. The ductile iron was austenitized closed to the solidus (1095 degrees C) for 100 h, cooled down to 640 degrees C and held on at this temperature for 16 h. The heat treatment led to the dissolution of primary vanadium-rich carbides and their subsequent re-precipitation in a more dispersed form. The result of mechanical tests indicated that addition of vanadium and an appropriate heat treatment makes age hardening of ductile iron feasible. The precipitation processes as well as the effect of Si content on the alloy microstructure were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that adjacent to uniformly spread out vanadium-rich carbides with an average size of 50 nm, a dispersoid composed of extremely small approximately 1 nm precipitates was also revealed. PMID:20500418

  11. Brittle to Ductile Transition in Densified Silica Glass

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of the brittleness of glass is limited by our poor understanding and control over the microscopic structure. In this study, we used a pressure quenching route to tune the structure of silica glass in a controllable manner, and observed a systematic increase in ductility in samples quenched under increasingly higher pressure. The brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass can be attributed to the critical role of 5-fold Si coordination defects (bonded to 5 O neighbors) in facilitating shear deformation and in dissipating energy by converting back to the 4-fold coordination state during deformation. As an archetypal glass former and one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crest, a fundamental understanding of the microscopic structure underpinning the ductility of silica glass will not only pave the way toward rational design of strong glasses, but also advance our knowledge of the geological processes in the Earth's interior. PMID:24849328

  12. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Meshfree simulations of thermo-mechanical ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkins, D. C.; Li, S.

    2006-08-01

    In this work, a meshfree method is used to simulate thermo-mechanical ductile fracture under finite deformation. A Galerkin meshfree formulation incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model is implemented in numerical computations. We are interested in the simulation of thermo-mechanical effects on ductile fracture under large scale yielding. A rate form adiabatic split is proposed in the constitutive update. Meshfree techniques, such as the visibility criterion, are used to modify the particle connectivity based on evolving crack surface morphology. The numerical results have shown that the proposed meshfree algorithm works well, the meshfree crack adaptivity and re-interpolation procedure is versatile in numerical simulations, and it enables us to predict thermo-mechanical effects on ductile fracture.

  14. Ductile Faults Control Seismogenic Movement on Oceanic Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, G. S.; Tkalcic, H.; Forster, M. A.; McClusky, S.

    2014-12-01

    Structural Geology is about 3D geometry and the symphony of kinematically-coordinated movement. In this case we discuss patterns of violent relative displacement inferred from focal plane data for earthquakes. Systematic stereographic analysis of centroid moment tensor data often shows well-defined orientation groups in scatterplots of fault plane normals and associated slip line vectors. These allow important geodynamic inferences, e.g., we can show that ductile faults control the geometry of oceanic transforms, and that normal fault earthquakes on spreading ridges are usually skewed with respect to adjacent transform faults. To explain this asymmetry requires finite rock strength, but it also means that it is not brittle failure that controls the orientation of oceanic transforms. This asymmetry also requires formation of tilt block geometries reminiscent of Basin-and-Range-style continental extension, systematic offset of earthquake hypocentres from the spreading ridge, and a general complexity in magma-fault interactions that is far beyond what might be expected if ocean-floor spreading is the result of dilating tension-mode fractures in dyke swarms. The role of ductile faulting should be given special mention because mostly it is argued that brittle faults are responsible for earthquakes. Yet many other examples of ductile faults in operation can be inferred, e.g., ductile faults associated with slab drop-off, where slab boudinage leads to extensional ductile faults and seismic activity driven by the pulling away of a relict slab, e.g., beneath the Hindu Kush. Another example might be found by close examination of the tectonic significance of the lowermost of the double (or paired) seismic zones such as can be seen in cross-sections of the subducting slab beneath Japan. The lowermost of the paired seismic zones may mark the locus of aseismic ductile shears or detachments formed by slumping of gigantic sheets of rock attempting to slide down the face of

  15. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moumeni, E.; Tutum, C. C.; Tiedje, N. S.; Hattel, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis, metallographic investigation and thermal analysis of the specimens have been carried out. A numerical model has been implemented and the results (i.e. cooling curve, cooling rate, nodule count and solid fraction) have shown a good agreement with experimental studies; following this, inoculation parameters in the model have been studied and discussed.

  16. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY SHOWING MOLD MAKING WITH PNEWMATIC JOLT SQUEEZE COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINES THAT INDIVIDUALLY MADE EITHER A COPE OR DRAG AND A SMALL WHEELED MATCHPLATE JOLT-SQUEEZE MACHINE THAT COMPRESSED AN ENTIRE MOLD AT A SINGLE TIME USING A DOUBLE-SIDED PATTERN (MATCHPLATE). ALSO SHOWN ARE RAILED PALLET CAR CONVEYORS THAT CARRIED COMPLETED MOLDS FROM MOLDING MACHINES TO POURING AREAS WHERE WORKERS USED SMALL OVERHEAD CRANE TO LIFT JACKETS AND WEIGHTS ONTO THE MOLDS TO HOLD THEM TOGETHER WHILE POURING. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  17. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others. PMID:25652998

  18. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J.

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  19. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.R.

    1987-04-21

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80 C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5--5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150 C to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2 [times] 10[sup 5] gave improved ductility modulus effect. 5 figs.

  20. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Carciello, Neal R.

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80.degree. C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5-5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150.degree. C. to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2.times.10.sup.5 gave improved ductility modulus effect.

  1. Ductility of a dental Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    PubMed

    Syverud, M; Herø, H

    1984-02-01

    A silver-palladium type of dental alloy for fixed restorations has been investigated with regard to the ability of the material to be plastically deformed in uniaxial tensile testing after two different age-hardening treatments. A certain degree of ductility is required for the burnishing of the margins. Aged to peak hardness at 350 degrees C after solid-solution annealing at 900 degrees C, the material was found to be brittle owing to a reaction zone along the grain boundaries, promoting an intergranular fracture. When the age-hardening temperature was lowered to 275 degrees C, a less pronounced reaction zone along the grain boundaries could be observed. The accompanying mechanical properties after precipitation hardening at 275 degrees C are probably an acceptable compromise between mechanical strength and ductility. Small particles along grain boundaries and brittleness were also found after solid-solution annealing at 900 degrees C and quenching. It is suggested that the improved ductility after subsequent aging at 275 degrees C is due to a coarsening of these small particles. In the as-cast condition the alloy was softer and more ductile than in the age-hardened state. PMID:6585123

  2. Heat treatment procedure to increase ductility of degraded nickel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Tests demonstrate the room temperature ductility of degraded Rene 41 can be increased to acceptable values by solution heat treatment at a temperature of 2050 degrees to 2150 degrees F /1 to 2 hours/ and cooling through a controlled temperature range followed by normal aging in air /16 hours at 1400 degrees F/.

  3. Ductile-regime turning of germanium and silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter N.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    1989-01-01

    Single-point diamond turning of silicon and germanium was investigated in order to clarify the role of cutting depth in coaxing a ductile chip formation in normally brittle substances. Experiments based on the rapid withdrawal of the tool from the workpiece have shown that microfracture damage is a function of the effective depth of cut (as opposed to the nominal cutting depth). In essence, damage created by the leading edge of the tool is removed several revolutions later by lower sections of the tool edge, where the effective cutting depth is less. It appears that a truly ductile cutting response can be achieved only when the effective cutting depth, or critical chip thickness, is less than about 20 nm. Factors such as tool rake angle are significant in that they will affect the actual value of the critical chip thickness for transition from brittle to ductile response. It is concluded that the critical chip thickness is an excellent parameter for measuring the effects of machining conditions on the ductility of the cut and for designing tool-workpiece geometry in both turning and grinding.

  4. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, Lucy; MacMinn, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the injection of fluid at high pressure. This creates fractures in the rock, providing hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir and enabling gas to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We solve the model semi-analytically at steady state, and numerically in general. We find that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from purely elastic models.

  5. Defect assessment procedure based on ductile tearing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yang

    1987-11-01

    Strain hardening, crack growth resistance and nonuniform load distribution have significant effects on the ductile tearing process. A defect assessment procedure incorporating with the above features is proposed in the present paper, with the final appearance of “design curves” to facilitate engineering applications.

  6. How plasticizer makes a ductile polymer glass brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Li, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Shi-Qing

    During uniaxial extension, a polymer glass of high molecular weight is ductile at high temperatures (still below Tg) and turns brittle when the temperature is sufficiently lowered. Incorporation of small-molecular additives to polymer glasses can speed up segmental relaxation considerably. The effect of such plasticization should be to make the polymers more ductile. We examined the effect of blending a few weight percent of either triphenyl phosphate (TPP) or a mineral oil to a commercial-grade PS and PMMA. Our Instron tests show that the plasticized PS is less ductile. Specifically, at 70 oC, the original PS is ductile at an extensional rate of 0.02 s-1 whereas the PS with 4 wt. % TPP turns brittle. Mechanical spectroscopic measurements show that the alpha relaxation time is shortened by more than two orders of magnitude with 4 wt. % TPP. On the other hand, such anomalous behavior did not occur in PMMA. We need to go beyond the conventional description to rationalize these results This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859).

  7. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  8. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  9. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES, LADLE TRANSFER CRANE ON FAR LEFT. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  10. Thermo-Mechanical Processing and Properties of a Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, R.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-07-14

    Thermo-mechanical processing of ductile irons is a potential method for enhancing their mechanical properties. A ductile cast iron containing 3.6% C, 2.6% Si and 0.045% Mg was continuously hot-and-warm rolled or one-step press-forged from a temperature in the austenite range (900{degrees}C-1100{degrees}C) to a temperature below the A, temperature. Various amounts of reduction were used (from 60% to more than 90%) followed by a short heat ent at 600`C. The heat ent lead to a structure of fine graphite in a matrix of ferrite and carbides. The hot-and- warm worked materials developed a pearlitic microstructure while the press-forged material developed a spheroidite-like carbide microstructure in the matrix. Cementite-denuded ferrite zones were developed around graphite stringers in the hot-and-warm worked materials, but such zones were absent in the press-forged material. Tensile properties including tensile strength and total elongation were measured along the direction parallel and transverse to the rolling direction and along the direction transverse to the press-forging direction. The tensile ductility and strength both increased with a decrease in the amount of hot-and-warm working. The press- forged materials showed higher strength (645 MPa) than the hot-and-warrn worked materials (575 MPa) when compared at the same ductility level (22% elongation).