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Sample records for ductile transplutonium metal

  1. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  2. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  3. New look at the atomic volumes of the. beta. -form of the transplutonium metals

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Benedict, U.; Peterson, J.R.; Dufour, C.; Dabos, S.

    1986-01-01

    The atomic volumes of the beta-form of the first four transplutonium metals were evaluated using data for samples prepared by thermal and by pressure treatment. The volumes derived for curium, berkelium, and californium metals quenched from elevated temperatures were found to be consistently larger than those for ''pressure-quenched'' samples, whose volumes were in good agreement with values for the alpha-forms. The cubic lattice parameters from ''pressure-quenched'' samples also provided a more consistent trend than those obtained from thermally quenched samples when compared to the parameters for the mononitrides of the metals.

  4. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  5. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase’s size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses. PMID:23863967

  6. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase's size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses. PMID:23863967

  7. Tunable Tensile Ductility in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Magagnosc, D. J.; Ehrbar, R.; Kumar, G.; He, M. R.; Schroers, J.; Gianola, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Widespread adoption of metallic glasses (MGs) in applications motivated by high strength and elasticity combined with plastic-like processing has been stymied by their lack of tensile ductility. One emerging strategy to couple the attractive properties of MGs with resistance to failure by shear localization is to employ sub-micron sample or feature length scales, although conflicting results shroud an atomistic understanding of the responsible mechanisms in uncertainty. Here, we report in situ deformation experiments of directly moulded Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5 MG nanowires, which show tunable tensile ductility. Initially brittle as-moulded nanowires can be coerced to a distinct glassy state upon irradiation with Ga+ ions, leading to tensile ductility and quasi-homogeneous plastic flow. This behaviour is reversible and the glass returns to a brittle state upon subsequent annealing. Our results suggest a novel mechanism for homogenous plastic flow in nano-scaled MGs and strategies for circumventing the poor damage tolerance that has long plagued MGs.

  8. Determining Ductile Fracture Toughness in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Manneschmidt, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Ductile fracture toughness determination, such as the J-integral versus crack growth resistance (J-R) curve, is a useful tool for evaluating material structural integrity in the presence of pre-existing defects. The J-R curve represents a way to calculate the work (energy) per unit fracture surface area needed to drive the crack growth. A typical J-R curve is shown in Fig. 1 from which the material fracture toughness near the initiation of stable crack growth (Jq) can be derived. In addition, tearing modulus (TR), representing the material resistance to stable crack growth, can be calculated based on the slope of the J-R curve between two exclusion lines (red dashed lines in Fig. 1). Since the introduction of the J-R curve, extensive efforts have been continuously devoted to develop simplified and reliable methods for determining the material J-R curve. This article briefly reviews three widely-used J-R curve test methods in metals, i.e. elastic unloading compliance (EUC), normalization, and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The main difference in these methods relates to the determination of the crack size. More details of performing the J-R curve determination can be found in ASTM standard E1820-11.

  9. Shifted homologous relationships between the transplutonium and early rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The physico-chemical properties of the late actinide metals americium through einsteinium are compared with their rare-earth counterparts. Localization of the 5f electrons beginning at americium signals the appearance of true rare-earth-like properties, but the homologous relationship is shifted to place americium below praseodymium, einsteinium then below europium. The comparison of crystal structure, phase transitions, vapor pressures and heats of vaporization reveals remarkable similarities, especially for Sm-Cf and Eu-Es, where the stability of the divalent metal becomes established and divalent chemistry then follows. There is of course a major perturbation at the half-filled shell at curium, and it may be argued that americium is the anomaly in the so-called second rare-earth series. However, the response of americium, berkelium and californium under pressure reveals the true perturbation to be a thermodynamic one, occurring at curium.

  10. Brittle-to-Ductile Transition in Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Şopu, D; Foroughi, A; Stoica, M; Eckert, J

    2016-07-13

    When reducing the size of metallic glass samples down to the nanoscale regime, experimental studies on the plasticity under uniaxial tension show a wide range of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile ones. Simulations on the deformation behavior of nanoscaled metallic glasses report an unusual extended strain softening and are not able to reproduce the brittle-like fracture deformation as found in experiments. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations we provide an atomistic understanding of the deformation mechanisms of metallic glass nanowires and differentiate the extrinsic size effects and aspect ratio contribution to plasticity. A model for predicting the critical nanowire aspect ratio for the ductile-to-brittle transition is developed. Furthermore, the structure of brittle nanowires can be tuned to a softer phase characterized by a defective short-range order and an excess free volume upon systematic structural rejuvenation, leading to enhanced tensile ductility. The presented results shed light on the fundamental deformation mechanisms of nanoscaled metallic glasses and demarcate ductile and catastrophic failure. PMID:27248329

  11. Ductile damage prediction in sheet and bulk metal forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badreddine, Houssem; Labergère, Carl; Saanouni, Khemais

    2016-04-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation of an advanced 3D numerical methodology for virtual sheet and/or bulk metal forming simulation to predict the anisotropic ductile defects occurrence. First, the detailed formulation of thermodynamically-consistent fully coupled and fully anisotropic constitutive equations is given. The proposed constitutive equations account for the main material nonlinearities as the anisotropic plastic flow, the mixed isotropic and kinematic hardening and the anisotropic ductile damage under large inelastic strains. Second, the related numerical aspects required to solve the initial and boundary value problem (IBVP) are very briefly presented in the framework of the 3D finite element method. The global resolution schemes as well as the local integration schemes of the fully coupled constitutive equations are briefly discussed. Finally, some typical examples of sheet and bulk metal forming processes are numerically simulated using the proposed numerical methodology.

  12. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Okulov, I. V.; Soldatov, I. V.; Sarmanova, M. F.; Kaban, I.; Gemming, T.; Edström, K.; Eckert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties. PMID:26219864

  13. Design of ductile bulk metallic glasses by adding ''soft'' atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, N.; Pauly, S.; Calin, M.; Gemming, T.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.; Eckert, J.

    2012-04-02

    We propose a strategy for the design of ductile bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) through minor substitution using relatively large atoms, which make the bonding nature become more metallic and with it less shear resistant. Such a locally modified structure results in topological heterogeneity, which appears to be crucial for achieving enhanced plasticity. This strategy is verified for Ti-Zr-Cu-Pd glassy alloys, in which Cu was replaced by In, and seems to be extendable to other BMG systems. The atomic-scale heterogeneity in BMGs is somewhat analog to defects in crystalline alloys and helps to improve the overall plasticity of BMGs.

  14. Enhancement of Strength and Ductility in Bulk Nanocrystalline Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T; Schuh, C A; Caturla, M J; Hodge, A M

    2004-02-17

    The purpose of this project is to develop a robust scientific and technological framework for the design of high-strength and -ductility nanocrystalline materials for applications of technical importance to the Laboratory. The project couples theory and experiments with an emphasis on materials of macroscopic dimensions (mm to cm) that are composed of nanoscale (<100 nm) grains. There are four major tasks: (1) synthesize nanocrystalline materials with grain size in the 5- to 100-nm range; (2) conduct experimental studies to probe mechanisms of mechanical deformation and failure; (3) use large-scale simulation modeling technologies to provide insight to deformation mechanisms that may not be observable experimentally; and (4) check the results obtained from modeling, comparing experimental observations with results obtained from atomistic and dislocation-based simulations. This project supports efforts within the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) to understand and predict properties of metals such as strength and ductility.

  15. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  16. A model for ductile metal friction at high velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Ravelo, R. J.; Germann, T. C.

    We describe a meso-macro scale model for the frictional force at ductile metal interfaces for high velocities and large compressions. The model incorporates the micro-mesoscopic growth and refinement of material microstructure in a highly strained region at the sliding interface and incorporates both rate dependent plasticity and thermal conduction. The model compares favorably with recent large scale (1.8 billion atom) simulations to 50 ns of 3-dimensional polycrystalline 13-50 nm grain size Al-Al interfaces at pressures of 15 GPa using the SPaSM NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulation code. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Numerical method for shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Plohr, Jee Yeon N; Plohr, Bradley J

    2010-01-01

    A numerical method for mesoscale simulation of high strain-rate loading of ductile metal containing inclusions is described. Because of small-scale inhomogeneities, such a composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). The modeling framework is the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. /27-139, 1992], which ensures that the micromechanical response of the material is reflected in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To calculate the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands by Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996] is adapted and extended.

  18. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  19. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2007-07-17

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  20. Ultrahigh strength and ductility of metallic nanolayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mara, Nathan Allan; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti; Dickerson, Pat; Hoagland, Richard; Misra, Amit

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the high strength of nanomaterials has gathered much interest in the materials community. Nanomaterials (polycrystalline and composites) have already been used, largely by the semiconductor community, as critical length scales for chip design have decreased to tens of nanometers. However, to ensure reliability of nanomaterials in almost any application, the mechanisms underlying their structural integrity must be well understood. For these materials to be put into service on a broader scale, not only should their strength be considered, but also ductility, toughness, formability, and fatigue resistance. While some progress has been made into constructing models for the deformation mechanisms governing these behaviors, the body of experimental knowledge is still limited, especially when length scales drop below 10 nanometers. This work produces stress-strain curves for nanolaminate composites with individual layer thickness of 40 nm and 5 run. Nanolaminate composites fabricated via magnetron sputtering comprised of alternating 5 nm thick Cu and Nb multilayers (two relatively soft metals) exhibit strengths on par with hardened tool steel and deformability in compression in excess of 25% [1]. The deformability of nanoscale composites is found to be limited by the onset of geometric instability, rather than due to intrinsic material behavior.

  1. An investigation into the role of adhesion in the erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing theories of erosion of ductile metals based on cutting and deformation mechanisms predict no material removal at normal incidence which is contradictory to experience. Thus, other mechanisms may be involved. The possible role of adhesive material transfer during erosion is investigated by both single particle impingement experiments and erosion by streams of particles. Examination of the rebounding particles as well as the eroded surface yields evidence of a significant adhesive mechanism for the ductile metals investigated.

  2. An investigation into the role of adhesion in the erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing theories of erosion of ductile metals based on cutting and deformation mechanisms predict no material removal at normal incidence which is contradictory to experience. Thus, other mechanisms may be involved. The possible role of adhesive material transfer during erosion is investigated by both single-particle impingement experiments and erosion by streams of particles. Examination of the rebounding particles as well as the eroded surfaces yields evidence of a significant adhesive mechanism for the ductile metals investigated.

  3. Steady crack growth through ductile metals: Computational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, James C.

    This thesis examines the crack-front response during sustained ductile tearing in structural metals at quasistatic rates using high resolution finite element computations. At load levels approaching the steady-growth regime, well-established computational methods that model material damage break down numerically as vanishingly small load increments produce increasingly large amounts of crack extension. The computational model adopted here determines the deformation history of a steadily advancing crack directly without the need for a priori (transient) analysis that considers blunting of the pre-existing stationary crack and subsequent growth through the associated initial plastic zone. Crack extension occurs at the remotely applied, fixed loading without the need for a local growth criteria. This numerical scheme utilizes a streamline integration technique to determine the elastic-plastic fields, generalized from a two-dimensional to a fully three-dimensional setting and implemented within mixed Matlab/C++/F-90 based software. Modifications of the conventional finite element formulation lead to an efficient procedure -- readily parallelized -- and determine the invariant near-front fields, representative of steady-state growth, on a fixed mesh in a boundary-layer framework. In the small-scale yielding regime, the crack front does not sense the existence of remote boundaries, and computational results retain a strong transferability among various geometric configurations where near-front, plastic deformation remains entirely enclosed by the surrounding linear-elastic material. The global stress intensity factor (KI ) and imposed T-stress fully specify displacement constraints along the far-field boundary, and in a three-dimensional setting, the panel thickness reflects the only natural length scale. The initial studies in this work consider steady crack advance within the small-scale yielding context under plane-strain conditions and mode I loading. These analyses

  4. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  5. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  6. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  7. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  8. Transplutonium elements processed from rock debris of underground detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. A. A.; Harvey, H. W.; Hoh, J. C.; Horwitz, E. P.

    1969-01-01

    Six-step chemical processing method extracts minute quantities of transplutonium elements found in rock debris following a nuclear detonation. The process consists of dissolution of rock, feed preparation, liquid-liquid extraction, final purification of transplutonium elements and plutonium, and separation of the transplutonium elements.

  9. Ductility and work hardening in nano-sized metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D. Z.; Gu, X. W.; An, Q.; Goddard, W. A.; Greer, J. R.

    2015-02-09

    In-situ nano-tensile experiments on 70 nm-diameter free-standing electroplated NiP metallic glass nanostructures reveal tensile true strains of ∼18%, an amount comparable to compositionally identical 100 nm-diameter focused ion beam samples and ∼3 times greater than 100 nm-diameter electroplated samples. Simultaneous in-situ observations and stress-strain data during post-elastic deformation reveal necking and work hardening, features uncharacteristic for metallic glasses. The evolution of free volume within molecular dynamics-simulated samples suggests a free surface-mediated relaxation mechanism in nano-sized metallic glasses.

  10. Superior Tensile Ductility in Bulk Metallic Glass with Gradient Amorphous Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.; Liu, C. T.; Ruan, H. H.; Lu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Over centuries, structural glasses have been deemed as a strong yet inherently ‘brittle’ material due to their lack of tensile ductility. However, here we report bulk metallic glasses exhibiting both a high strength of ~2 GPa and an unprecedented tensile elongation of 2–4% at room temperature. Our experiments have demonstrated that intense structural evolution can be triggered in theses glasses by the carefully controlled surface mechanical attrition treatment, leading to the formation of gradient amorphous microstructures across the sample thickness. As a result, the engineered amorphous microstructures effectively promote multiple shear banding while delay cavitation in the bulk metallic glass, thus resulting in superior tensile ductility. The outcome of our research uncovers an unusual work-hardening mechanism in monolithic bulk metallic glasses and demonstrates a promising yet low-cost strategy suitable for producing large-sized, ultra-strong and stretchable structural glasses. PMID:24755683

  11. Microscopic dynamics perspective on the relationship between Poisson's ratio and ductility of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Wang, Li-Min; Liu, Riping; Wang, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    In metallic glasses a clear correlation had been established between plasticity or ductility with the Poisson's ratio νPoisson and alternatively the ratio of the elastic bulk modulus to the shear modulus, K/G. Such a correlation between these two macroscopic mechanical properties is intriguing and is challenging to explain from the dynamics on a microscopic level. A recent experimental study has found a connection of ductility to the secondary β-relaxation in metallic glasses. The strain rate and temperature dependencies of the ductile-brittle transition are similar to the reciprocal of the secondary β-relaxation time, τβ. Moreover, metallic glass is more ductile if the relaxation strength of the β-relaxation is larger and τβ is shorter. The findings indicate the β-relaxation is related to and instrumental for ductility. On the other hand, K/G or νPoisson is related to the effective Debye-Waller factor (i.e., the non-ergodicity parameter), f0, characterizing the dynamics of a structural unit inside a cage formed by other units, and manifested as the nearly constant loss shown in the frequency dependent susceptibility. We make the connection of f0 to the non-exponentiality parameter n in the Kohlrausch stretched exponential correlation function of the structural α-relaxation function, φ (t) = exp [ { - ( {t/{τ _α }})^{1 - n} }]. This connection follows from the fact that both f0 and n are determined by the inter-particle potential, and 1/f0 or (1 - f0) and n both increase with anharmonicity of the potential. A well tested result from the Coupling Model is used to show that τβ is completely determined by τα and n. From the string of relations, (i) K/G or νPoisson with 1/f0 or (1 - f0), (ii) 1/f0 or (1 - f0) with n, and (iii) τα and n with τβ, we arrive at the desired relation between K/G or νPoisson and τβ. On combining this relation with that between ductility and τβ, we have finally an explanation of the empirical correlation between

  12. Modeling Dynamic Ductility: An Equation of State for Porous Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J

    2007-07-27

    Enhanced heating from shock compression of a porous material can potentially suppress or delay cracking of the material on subsequent expansion. In this paper we quantify the expected enhanced heating in an experiment in which a sector of a thin cylindrical shell is driven from the inside surface by SEMTEX high explosive ({approx}1 {micro}s FWHM pressure pulse with peak pressure {approx}21.5 GPa). We first derive an analytical equation of state (EOS) for porous metals, then discuss the coupling of this EOS with material elastic-plastic response in a 2D hydrocode, and then discuss the modeling of the HE experiment with both fully dense and 10% porous Ta and a Bi/Ta composite. Finally, we compare our modeling with some recent experimental data.

  13. Computer simulation of strength and ductility of nanotwin-strengthened coarse-grained metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Ji, R.; Weng, G. J.; Zhu, L. L.; Lu, J.

    2014-10-01

    The superior strength-ductility combination in nanotwin (NT)-strengthened metals has provided a new potential for optimizing the mechanical properties of coarse-grained (CG) metals. In this paper computer simulations based on the mechanism-based strain gradient plasticity and the Johnson-Cook failure criterion have been carried out to uncover the critical factors that serve to provide this dual function. Our results indicate that both the distribution characteristics of the NT regions and the constitutive relations of the NT phase can have a significant impact on the strength and ductility of the CG Cu strengthened by the NT regions. In particular, twin spacing, distribution characteristics such as arrangement, shape and orientation, together with volume fraction of the NT regions, can all have significant effects. Along the way, we also discovered that microcrack initiation, coalescence and deflection constituted the entire failure process. Significant insights into the morphology of NT regions that could deliver superior strength and ductility combination for CG metals have been established.

  14. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  15. Ductility of metal alloys with grain size distribution in a wide range of strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir V.; Skripnyak, Nataliya V.; Skripnyak, Evgeniya G.

    Ductility of ultrafine grained (UFG) metal alloys with a distribution of grain size was investigated in wide loading conditions by numerical simulation. The multiscale models with a unimodal and a bimodal grain size distributions were developed using the data of structure research of hexagonal close packed and face center cubic UFG alloys. Macroscopic fracture is considered as a result of the formation of percolation clusters of damage at the mesoscopic level. The critical fracture strain of UFG alloys on the mesoscale level depends on the relative volumes of coarse grains. The nucleation of damages at quasi-static and dynamic loading is associated with strain localization in UFG partial volumes with bimodal grain size distribution. The concentration of damages arise in the vicinity of the boundaries of coarse and ultrafine grains. The occurrence of a bimodal grain size distributions causes the increase of UFG alloys' ductility, but decrease of their tensile strength. Linkoping University, Sweden.

  16. Ductility dip cracking susceptibility of Inconel Filler Metal 52 and Inconel Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Kikel, J.M.; Parker, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 have become the materials of choice for commercial nuclear steam generator applications in recent years. Filler Metal 52 exhibits improved resistance to weld solidification and weld-metal liquation cracking as compared to other nickel-based filler metals. However, recently published work indicates that Filler Metal 52 is susceptible to ductility dip cracking (DDC) in highly restrained applications. Susceptibility to fusion zone DDC was evaluated using the transverse varestraint test method, while heat affected zone (HAZ) DDC susceptibility was evaluated using a newly developed spot-on-spot varestraint test method. Alloy 690 and Filler Metal 52 cracking susceptibility was compared to the DDC susceptibility of Alloy 600, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625. In addition, the effect of grain size and orientation on cracking susceptibility was also included in this study. Alloy 690, Filler Metal 82, Filler Metal 52, and Filler Metal 625 were found more susceptible to fusion zone DDC than Alloy 600. Filler Metal 52 and Alloy 690 were found more susceptible to HAZ DDC when compared to wrought Alloy 600, Filler Metal 82 and Filler Metal 625. Filler Metal 52 exhibited the greatest susceptibility to HAZ DDC of all the weld metals evaluated. The base materials were found much more resistant to HAZ DDC in the wrought condition than when autogenously welded. A smaller grain size was found to offer greater resistance to DDC. For weld metal where grain size is difficult to control, a change in grain orientation was found to improve resistance to DDC.

  17. Designing metallic glass matrix composites with high toughness and tensile ductility.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Wiest, Aaron; Duan, Gang; Lind, Mary-Laura; Demetriou, Marios D; Johnson, William L

    2008-02-28

    The selection and design of modern high-performance structural engineering materials is driven by optimizing combinations of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, toughness, elasticity and requirements for predictable and graceful (non-catastrophic) failure in service. Highly processable bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new class of engineering materials and have attracted significant technological interest. Although many BMGs exhibit high strength and show substantial fracture toughness, they lack ductility and fail in an apparently brittle manner in unconstrained loading geometries. For instance, some BMGs exhibit significant plastic deformation in compression or bending tests, but all exhibit negligible plasticity (<0.5% strain) in uniaxial tension. To overcome brittle failure in tension, BMG-matrix composites have been introduced. The inhomogeneous microstructure with isolated dendrites in a BMG matrix stabilizes the glass against the catastrophic failure associated with unlimited extension of a shear band and results in enhanced global plasticity and more graceful failure. Tensile strengths of approximately 1 GPa, tensile ductility of approximately 2-3 per cent, and an enhanced mode I fracture toughness of K(1C) approximately 40 MPa m(1/2) were reported. Building on this approach, we have developed 'designed composites' by matching fundamental mechanical and microstructural length scales. Here, we report titanium-zirconium-based BMG composites with room-temperature tensile ductility exceeding 10 per cent, yield strengths of 1.2-1.5 GPa, K(1C) up to approximately 170 MPa m(1/2), and fracture energies for crack propagation as high as G(1C) approximately 340 kJ m(-2). The K(1C) and G(1C) values equal or surpass those achievable in the toughest titanium or steel alloys, placing BMG composites among the toughest known materials. PMID:18305540

  18. Neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper continues, with respect to the transplutonium nuclides, earlier efforts to collate and evaluate data from the scientific literature on the prompt neutron multiplicity distribution from fission and its first moment = ..sigma..nuPnu. The isotopes considered here for which P/sub nu/ and or data (or both) were found in the literature are of americium (Am), curium (Cm), berkelium (Bk), californium (Cf), einsteinium (Es), fermium (Fm), and nobelium (No).

  19. Extraction of the transplutonium elements from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Karalova, Z.K.; Bukina, T.I.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-03-01

    This paper investigates the extraction of transplutonium elements (TPE) and other elements using aliquat-336 and alkylpyrocatechol from strongly alkaline solutions in the presence of complexforming substances. It was shown by the methods of NMR and IR spectroscopy that elements can be extracted from alkaline solutions both in the form of coordination-saturated internal complex compounds and in the form of ionic associates, the anionic portion of which consists either of hydroxo-complexes of the cooresponding metals or their compounds with the complex-forming substance. Together with the TPE and REE the authors also studied the extraction of Fe(III), Ru(III), Zr(IV), Pu(IV), Pa(V), Nb(V), U(VI), Cs(I), and Th(IV) from alkaline solutions.

  20. High velocity properties of the dynamic frictional force between ductile metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James Edward; Hollan, Brad L; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J

    2010-01-01

    The high velocity properties of the tangential frictional force between ductile metal interfaces seen in large-scale NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are characterized by interesting scaling behavior. In many cases a power law decrease in the frictional force with increasing velocity is observed at high velocities. We discuss the velocity dependence of the high velocity branch of the tangential force in terms of structural transformation and ultimate transition, at the highest velocities, to confined fluid behavior characterized by a critical strain rate. The particular case of an Al/Al interface is discussed.

  1. Understanding the changes in ductility and Poisson's ratio of metallic glasses during annealing from microscopic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-07-21

    In the paper K. L. Ngai et al., [J. Chem. 140, 044511 (2014)], the empirical correlation of ductility with the Poisson's ratio, ν{sub Poisson}, found in metallic glasses was theoretically explained by microscopic dynamic processes which link on the one hand ductility, and on the other hand the Poisson's ratio. Specifically, the dynamic processes are the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model which is the precursor of the Johari–Goldstein β-relaxation, and the caged atoms dynamics characterized by the effective Debye–Waller factor f{sub 0} or equivalently the nearly constant loss (NCL) in susceptibility. All these processes and the parameters characterizing them are accessible experimentally except f{sub 0} or the NCL of caged atoms; thus, so far, the experimental verification of the explanation of the correlation between ductility and Poisson's ratio is incomplete. In the experimental part of this paper, we report dynamic mechanical measurement of the NCL of the metallic glass La{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}Al{sub 25} as-cast, and the changes by annealing at temperature below T{sub g}. The observed monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time, reflecting the corresponding increase of f{sub 0}, correlates with the decrease of ν{sub Poisson}. This is important observation because such measurements, not made before, provide the missing link in confirming by experiment the explanation of the correlation of ductility with ν{sub Poisson}. On aging the metallic glass, also observed in the isochronal loss spectra is the shift of the β-relaxation to higher temperatures and reduction of the relaxation strength. These concomitant changes of the β-relaxation and NCL are the root cause of embrittlement by aging the metallic glass. The NCL of caged atoms is terminated by the onset of the primitive relaxation in the Coupling Model, which is generally supported by experiments. From this relation, the monotonic decrease of the NCL with aging time is caused by the slowing down

  2. Ductile to brittle transition in dynamic fracture of brittle bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Han, Y. N.; Han, B. S.; Wang, W. H.; Xu, X. H.; Ke, F. J.

    2008-05-01

    We report an unusual transition from a locally ductile to a pure brittle fracture in the dynamic fracture of brittle Mg{sub 65}Cu{sub 20}Gd{sub 10} bulk metallic glass. The fractographic evolution from a dimple structure to a periodic corrugation pattern and then to the mirror zone along the crack propagation direction during the dynamic fracture process is discussed within the framework of the meniscus instability of the fracture process zone. This work might provide an important clue in understanding of the energy dissipation mechanism for dynamic crack propagation in brittle glassy materials.

  3. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: A general microscopic picture

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-01-01

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies. PMID:25382029

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Metals: Atomic hydrogen from a variety of sources reduces the ductility of many metals.

    PubMed

    Rogers, H C

    1968-03-01

    Hydrogen interacts with many metals to reduce their ductility (2) and frequently their strength also. It enters metals in the atomic form, diffusing very rapidly even at normal temperatures. During melting and fabrication, as well as during use, there are various ways in which metals come in contact with hydrogen and absorb it. The absorbed hydrogen may react irreversibly with oxides or carbides in some metals to produce a permanently degraded structure. It may also recombine at internal surfaces of defects of various types to form gaseous molecular hydrogen under pressures sufficiently high to form metal blisters when the recombination occurs near the outer surface. In other metals, brittle hydrides that lower the mechanical properties of the metal are formed. Another type of embrittlement is reversible, depending on the presence of hydrogen in the metal lattice during deformation for its occurrence. Under some conditions the failure may be delayed for long periods. A number of different mechanisms have been postulated to explain reversible embrittlement. According to some theories hydrogen interferes with the processes of plastic deformation in metals, while according to others it enhances the tendency for cracking. PMID:17775040

  5. Ductile Damage and Fatigue Behavior of Semi-Finished Tailored Blanks for Sheet-Bulk Metal Forming Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Hildenbrand, Philipp; Gerstein, Gregory; Rodman, Dmytro; Nürnberger, Florian; Merklein, Marion; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    To produce parts from sheet metal with thickened functional elements, bulk forming operations can be employed. For this new process class, the term sheet-bulk metal forming has been established recently. Since sheet-bulk metal forming processes such as orbital forming generates triaxial stress and strain states, ductile damage is induced in the form of voids in the microstructure. Typical parts will experience cyclic loads during service, and thus, the influence of ductile damage on the fatigue life of parts manufactured by orbital forming is of interest. Both the formation and growth of voids were characterized following this forming process and then compared to the as-received condition of the ferritic deep drawing steel DC04 chosen for this study. Subsequent to the forming operation, the specimens were fatigued and the evolution of ductile damage and the rearrangement of the dislocation networks occurring during cyclic loading were determined. It was shown, that despite an increased ductile damage due to the forming process, the induced strain hardening has a positive effect on the fatigue life of the material. However, by analyzing the fatigued specimens a development of the ductile damage by an increasing number of voids and a change in the void shape were detected.

  6. Numerical simulation of systems of shear bands in ductile metal with inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plohr, JeeYeon N.; Plohr, Bradley J.

    2016-02-01

    We develop a method for numerical simulations of high strain-rate loading of mesoscale samples of ductile metal with inclusions. Because of its small-scale inhomogeneity, the composite material is prone to localized shear deformation (adiabatic shear bands). This method employs the Generalized Method of Cells of Paley and Aboudi [Mech. Materials, vol. 14, pp. 127-139, 1992] to ensure that the micro mechanical behavior of the metal and inclusions is reflected properly in the behavior of the composite at the mesoscale. To find the effective plastic strain rate when shear bands are present, we extend and apply the analytic and numerical analysis of shear bands of Glimm, Plohr, and Sharp [Mech. Materials, vol. 24, pp. 31-41, 1996]. Our tests of the method focus on the stress/strain response in uniaxial-strain flow, both compressive and tensile, of depleted uranium metal containing silicon carbide inclusions. We use the Preston-Tonks-Wallace viscoplasticity model [J. Appl. Phys., vol. 93, pp. 211-220, 2003], which applies to the high strain-rate regime of an isotropic viscoplastic solid. In results, we verify the elevated temperature and thermal softening at shear bands in our simulations of pure DU and DU/SiC composites. We also note that in composites, due the asymmetry caused by the inclusions, shear band form at different times in different subcells. In particular, in the subcells near inclusions, shear band form much earlier than they do in pure DU.

  7. Spectroscopic studies of the transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Carnall, W.T.; Conway, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    The challenging opportunity to develop insights into both atomic structure and the effects of bonding in compounds makes the study of actinide spectroscopy a particularly fruitful and exciting area of scientific endeavor. It is also the interpretation of f-element spectra that has stimulated the development of the most sophisticated theoretical modeling attempted for any elements in the periodic table. The unique nature of the spectra and the wealth of fine detail revealed make possible sensitive tests of both physical models and the results of Hartree-Fock type ab initio calculations. This paper focuses on the unique character of heavy actinide spectroscopy. It discusses how it differs from that of the lighter member of the series and what are the special properties that are manifested. Following the introduction, the paper covers the following: (1) the role of systematic studies and the relationships of heavy-actinide spectroscopy to ongoing spectroscopic investigations of the lighter members of the series; (2) atomic (free-ion) spectra which covers the present status of spectroscopic studies with transplutonium elements, and future needs and directions in atomic spectroscopy; (3) the spectra of actinide compounds which covers the present status and future directions of spectroscopic studies with compounds of the transplutonium elements; and other spectroscopies. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  8. Three-Dimensional Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Void Coalescence during Dynamic Fracture of Ductile Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Seppala, E T; Belak, J; Rudd, R E

    2004-09-02

    Void coalescence and interaction in dynamic fracture of ductile metals have been investigated using three-dimensional strain-controlled multi-million atom molecular dynamics simulations of copper. The correlated growth of two voids during the coalescence process leading to fracture is investigated, both in terms of its onset and the ensuing dynamical interactions. Void interactions are quantified through the rate of reduction of the distance between the voids, through the correlated directional growth of the voids, and through correlated shape evolution of the voids. The critical inter-void ligament distance marking the onset of coalescence is shown to be approximately one void radius based on the quantification measurements used, independent of the initial separation distance between the voids and the strain-rate of the expansion of the system. The interaction of the voids is not reflected in the volumetric asymptotic growth rate of the voids, as demonstrated here. Finally, the practice of using a single void and periodic boundary conditions to study coalescence is examined critically and shown to produce results markedly different than the coalescence of a pair of isolated voids.

  9. High-zirconium bulk metallic glasses with high strength and large ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, YaoWei; Hua, NengBin; Li, Ran; Pang, ShuJie; Zhang, Tao

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, high-zirconium Zr66+2 x Al9- x (Ni1/3Cu2/3)25- x ( x=0,1,2 at.%) bulk metallic glasses with high strength and large ductility were fabricated by copper mould casting. The effects of zirconium content on the glass-forming ability (GFA), thermal properties and mechanical properties were investigated using X-ray diffractometer (XRD), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and mechanical testing system in compressive and three-point bending modes, respectively. The high-zirconium BMGs show the critical diameters of 3-5 mm, the supercooled liquid region ranging from 70 K to 99 K, and the yield strength of over 1700 MPa. The Zr70Al7(Ni1/3Cu2/3)23 BMG exhibits a large compressive plastic strain up to 21% and a high notch toughness value of 60.6 MPa m1/2. The increase in Zr content results in the decrease in GFA and thermostability, and in the improvement of plasticity under compressive and three-point bending conditions. The superior plasticity of high-zirconium BMGs is attributed to their high Poisson's ratio and small elastic modulus ratio µ/ B.

  10. Microstructural factors controlling the strength and ductility of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorca, J.; González, C.

    1998-01-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the mechanical response in tension of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites. The microstructure of the composite is represented as a three-dimensional array of hexagonal prisms with one reinforcement at the centre of each prism. The shape, volume fraction and state (either intact or broken) of the reinforcement is independent for each cell, so the interaction among all these factors could be studied. The tensile response of the composite is determined from the behaviour of the intact and damaged cells, the fraction of damaged cells being calculated on the assumption that the reinforcement strength follows the Weibull statistics. The model is used to determine the microstructural factors which provide optimum behaviour from the point of view of the tensile strength and ductility. The analyses included the effect of the matrix and reinforcement properties, the reinforcement volume fraction, the interaction between reinforcements of different shape and the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcements within the composite.

  11. Improved ductility of Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites via phase and grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Jian, W R; Wang, L; Li, B; Yao, X H; Luo, S N

    2016-04-29

    We investigate tensile deformation of metallic glass/crystalline interpenetrating phase nanocomposites as regards the effects of specific area of amorphous/crystalline phase interfaces, and grain boundaries. As an illustrative case, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed on Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites with different specific interface areas and grain boundary characteristics. Plastic deformation is achieved via shear bands, shear transformation zones, and crystal plasticity. Three-dimensional amorphous/crystalline interfaces serve as effective barriers to the propagation of shear transformation zones and shear bands if formed, diffuse strain localizations, and give rise to improved ductility. Ductility increases with increasing specific interface area. In addition, introducing grain boundaries into the second phase facilitates crystal plasticity, which helps reduce or eliminate mature shear bands in the glass matrix. PMID:26965457

  12. Improved ductility of Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites via phase and grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, W. R.; Wang, L.; Li, B.; Yao, X. H.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate tensile deformation of metallic glass/crystalline interpenetrating phase nanocomposites as regards the effects of specific area of amorphous/crystalline phase interfaces, and grain boundaries. As an illustrative case, large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are performed on Cu64Zr36 metallic glass/Cu nanocomposites with different specific interface areas and grain boundary characteristics. Plastic deformation is achieved via shear bands, shear transformation zones, and crystal plasticity. Three-dimensional amorphous/crystalline interfaces serve as effective barriers to the propagation of shear transformation zones and shear bands if formed, diffuse strain localizations, and give rise to improved ductility. Ductility increases with increasing specific interface area. In addition, introducing grain boundaries into the second phase facilitates crystal plasticity, which helps reduce or eliminate mature shear bands in the glass matrix.

  13. Work-Hardening Induced Tensile Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses via High-Pressure Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Soo-Hyun; Pi, Dong-Hai; Setyawan, Albertus Deny Heri; Kato, Hidemi; Janecek, Milos; Kim, Yong Chan; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2015-04-01

    The mechanical properties of engineering materials are key for ensuring safety and reliability. However, the plastic deformation of BMGs is confined to narrow regions in shear bands, which usually result in limited ductilities and catastrophic failures at low homologous temperatures. The quasi-brittle failure and lack of tensile ductility undercut the potential applications of BMGs. In this report, we present clear tensile ductility in a Zr-based BMG via a high-pressure torsion (HPT) process. Enhanced tensile ductility and work-hardening behavior after the HPT process were investigated, focusing on the microstructure, particularly the changed free volume, which affects deformation mechanisms (i.e., initiation, propagation, and obstruction of shear bands). Our results provide insights into the basic functions of hydrostatic pressure and shear strain in the microstructure and mechanical properties of HPT-processed BMGs.

  14. Tight-binding study of stacking fault energies and the Rice criterion of ductility in the fcc metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Michael J.; Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios A.; Kioussis, Nicholas; Herbranson, M.

    2000-02-01

    We have used the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) tight-binding (TB) method to calculate the generalized stacking fault energy and the Rice ductility criterion in the fcc metals Al, Cu, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt, Au, and Pb. The method works well for all classes of metals, i.e., simple metals, noble metals, and transition metals. We compared our results with full potential linear-muffin-tin orbital and embedded atom method (EAM) calculations, as well as experiment, and found good agreement. This is impressive, since the NRL-TB approach only fits to first-principles full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave equations of state and band structures for cubic systems. Comparable accuracy with EAM potentials can be achieved only by fitting to the stacking fault energy.

  15. Production of transplutonium elements and radiation sources based on them

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil`ev, V.Ya.; Adaev, V.A.; Gordeev, Ya.N.

    1993-12-31

    The Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) has a complex experimental base for the required amount of transplutonium elements (TPE) production in reactors, their extraction from irradiated targets, preparing of necessary condition samples in purity and producing the radiation sources. Targets irradiation and target design are described. Californium 252 is used for neutron source production.

  16. Optical and analytical electron microscopy of ductility-dip cracking in Ni-base filler metal 52 -- Initial studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, M.J.; Teter, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    Microcharacterization studies were performed on weld-metal microstructures of a Ni-base filler metal. Specimens were taken from the fusion zone and the weld-metal heat-affected zone of transverse- and spot-Varestraint welds. The filler metal was first deposited onto a steel substrate by hot-wire, gas tungsten arc welding before specimen removal. Optical microscopy indicates the crack morphology is intergranular and is along high-angle, migrated grain boundaries. At low magnifications, scanning electron microscopy reveals a relatively smooth fracture surface. However, at higher magnifications the grain faces exhibit microductility. Analytical electron microscopy reveals high-angle, migrated grain boundaries decorated with MC (Ti, Cr) and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (Cr, Ni, Fe) precipitates ranging from 10 to 200 n. Auger electron spectroscopy of pre-strained Gleeble specimens fractured in situ revealed internal ductility-dip cracks decorated with magnesium aluminate (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) spinel particles (1,000 nm).

  17. Numerical Study of the Effect of the Sample Aspect Ratio on the Ductility of Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) Under Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunpeng

    2016-05-01

    In this article, a systematic numerical study was conducted to study the detailed shear banding evolution in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with various sample aspect ratios under uniaxial compression, and whereby the effect of the sample aspect ratio on the compressive ductility was elucidated. A finite strain viscoelastic model was employed to describe the shear banding nucleation, growth, and coalescence in BMG samples with the help of Anand and Su's theory, which was incorporated into the ABAQUS finite element method code as a user material subroutine VUMAT. The present numerical method was first verified by comparing with the corresponding experimental results, and then parameter analysis was performed to discuss the impact of microstructure parameters on the predicted results. The present modeling will shed some light on enhancing the toughness of BMG structures in the engineering applications.

  18. A Consistent Approach To Stochastic Seeding of Simulations of Fragmenting Ductile Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barham, Matthew; Stölken, James; Kumar, Mukul

    2013-06-01

    For failure by brittle fracture the well-known weakest-link arguments have led to widespread use of a two-parameter Weibull distribution. The probability of failure by a ductile damage mechanism at small plastic strains is exceedingly small. This results in a threshold for deformation induced damage and attendant failure that should be manifest in the statistical description. A three-parameter Weibull distribution with a lower cut-off satisfies this constraint. The three-parameters are determined systematically from experiments. The Weibull modulus is estimated by examining the results of scaled experiments. The values of the most-likely failure strain were inferred from simulations of quasi-static tests. The lower cut-off failure strain was estimated from the tensile test data. This approach was applied to different microstructures of AISI 4340 steel achieved through various heat treatments to determine the three parameters and constitutive response for each heat treatment. Exploding pipe simulations were run to determine fragment distributions for two explosives and each heat treatment. These simulated distributions were then compared to high fidelity experimental data for distributions of the same heat treatments and explosives simulated. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Synthesis of nanoparticles from malleable and ductile metals using powder-free, reactant-assisted mechanical attrition.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Brandon W; Perez, Jesus Paulo L; Yu, Jiang; Boatz, Jerry A; Anderson, Scott L

    2014-11-26

    A reactant-assisted mechanochemical method was used to produce copious nanoparticles from malleable/ductile metals, demonstrated here for aluminum, iron, and copper. The milling media is intentionally degraded via a reactant-accelerated wear process, where the reactant aids particle production by binding to the metal surfaces, enhancing particle production, and reducing the tendency toward mechanochemical (cold) welding. The mechanism is explored by comparing the effects of different types of solvents and solvent mixtures on the amount and type of particles produced. Particles were functionalized with oleic acid to aid in particle size separation, enhance dispersion in hydrocarbon solvents, and protect the particles from oxidation. For aluminum and iron, the result is air-stable particles, but for copper, the suspended particles are found to dissolve when exposed to air. Characterization was performed using electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Density functional theory was used to examine the nature of carboxylic acid binding to the aluminum surface, confirming the dominance of bridging bidentate binding. PMID:25343708

  20. Experimental and numerical study of single and multiple impacts of angular particles on ductile metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaffoli, Mahdi

    multi-particle erosion tests, with good agreement. An investigation of the simulated trajectory of the impacting particles revealed various erosion mechanisms such as the micromachining of chips, the ploughing of craters, and the formation, forging and knocking off crater lips which were consistent with previously noted ductile solid particle erosion mechanisms in the literature.

  1. Chaotic state to self-organized critical state transition of serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We study serrated flow dynamics during brittle-to-ductile transition induced by tuning the sample aspect ratio in a Zr-based metallic glass. The statistical analysis reveals that the serrated flow dynamics transforms from a chaotic state characterized by Gaussian-distribution serrations corresponding to stick-slip motion of randomly generated and uncorrelated single shear band and brittle behavior, into a self-organized critical state featured by intermittent scale-free distribution of shear avalanches corresponding to a collective motion of multiple shear bands and ductile behavior. The correlation found between serrated flow dynamics and plastic deformation might shed light on the plastic deformation dynamic and mechanism in metallic glasses.

  2. Large-size ultrahigh strength Ni-based bulk metallic glassy matrix composites with enhanced ductility fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Guoqiang; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2008-03-24

    Ni-based bulk glassy alloy composites (GACs) simultaneously with ultrahigh strength and enhanced ductility and satisfying large-size requirements were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of gas-atomized Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} glassy alloy powder blend with ceramic or metal powders. No crystallization of metallic glassy matrix and good bonding state between the particles are responsible for good mechanical properties of the fabricated bulk GACs. The improvement of plastic ductility of the fabricated bulk GACs originates from the structural inhomogeneity caused by the particles inclusion. The additional particulates act as a resisting media causing deviation, branching, and multiplication of shear bands.

  3. Large-size ultrahigh strength Ni-based bulk metallic glassy matrix composites with enhanced ductility fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoqiang; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa; Wakai, Fumihiro

    2008-03-01

    Ni-based bulk glassy alloy composites (GACs) simultaneously with ultrahigh strength and enhanced ductility and satisfying large-size requirements were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of gas-atomized Ni52.5Nb10Zr15Ti15Pt7.5 glassy alloy powder blend with ceramic or metal powders. No crystallization of metallic glassy matrix and good bonding state between the particles are responsible for good mechanical properties of the fabricated bulk GACs. The improvement of plastic ductility of the fabricated bulk GACs originates from the structural inhomogeneity caused by the particles inclusion. The additional particulates act as a resisting media causing deviation, branching, and multiplication of shear bands.

  4. Solid impingement erosion mechanisms and characterization of erosion resistance of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, V. P.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental results pertaining to spherical glass bead and angular crushed glass particle impingement are presented. A concept of energy adsorption to explain the failure of material is proposed. The erosion characteristics of several pure metals were correlated with the proposed energy parameters and with other properties. Correlations of erosion and material properties were also carried out with these materials to study the effect of the angle of impingement. Analyses of extensive erosion data indicate that surface energy, strain energy, melting point, bulk modulus, hardness, ultimate resilience, atomic volume and product of linear coefficient of thermal expansion, bulk modulus, and temperature rise required for melting, and ultimate resilience, and hardness exhibit the best correlations. It appears that both energy and thermal properties contribute to the total erosion.

  5. EROSIVE WEAR OF DUCTILE METALS BY A PARTICLE-LADEN HIGH-VELOCITY LIQUID-JET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Simon Ka-Keung; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Levy, Alan

    1980-12-01

    A liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and alumina and silicon carbide suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft/sec (40 m/sec) and impingement angles ranging from 15 degrees to 90 degrees were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40% by weight. For high velocity the results of this study show two erosion maxima arising at impingement angles of 90 degrees and 40 degrees respectively~ whereas in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20 degrees. In the study both particle concentration and composition were varied. A polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semi-theoretical correlation constants.

  6. Characterization of solid particle erosion resistance of ductile metals based on their properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results pertaining to spherical glass bead and angular crushed glass particle impingement. A concept of energy absorption to explain the failure of material is proposed and is correlated with the erosion characteristics of several pure metals. Analyses of extensive erosion data indicate that the properties - surface energy, specific melting energy, strain energy, melting point, bulk modulus, hardness, atomic volume - and the product of the parameters - linear coefficient of thermal expansion x bulk modulus x temperature rise required for melting, and ultimate resilience x hardness - exhibit the best correlations. The properties of surface energy and atomic volume are suggested for the first time for correlation purposes and are found to correlate well with erosion rates at different angles of impingement. It further appears that both energy and thermal properties contribute to the total erosion.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis, structural, Raman, and luminescence studies of Am[M(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O and Nd[M(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O (M=Ag, Au): Bimetallic coordination polymers containing both trans-plutonium and transition metal elements

    SciTech Connect

    Assefa, Zerihun Kalachnikova, Katrina; Haire, Richard G.; Sykora, Richard E.

    2007-11-15

    dicyanides. - Graphical abstract: Coordination polymeric compounds between the 'man-made' trans-plutonium element, americium, and transition metal ions were prepared using the hydrothermal synthetic procedure. The Am{sup 3+} ion and the transition metals, Au and/or Ag, are interconnected through cyanide bridging. The coordination around americium consists of six CN{sup -} groups coordinated through the N atoms resulting in a trigonal prismatic environment. Three oxygen atoms of coordinated water molecules complete the tricapped trigonal prismatic coordination environment for Am{sup 3+}, providing a total coordination number of 9.

  8. Extraction radiopolarography for determining the oxidation potentials of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kosyakov, V.N.; Yakovlev, N.G.; Vlasov, M.M.

    1987-03-01

    A method is described for determining the oxidation potentials for valency transitions in transplutonium elements (TPE), which is usable when the element is present in trace amounts. This is based on electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the TPE in combination with a solvent-extraction method of determining the concentration ratio for the oxidized and reduced forms. The method is applicable to determining the potential of almost any reversible reaction if the solvent-extraction parameters for the oxidized and reduced forms differ substantially, while the potential (with allowance for the extraction system) lies in a region accessible to electrochemical oxidation or reduction. Two forms of use are considered: with liquid extraction and with extraction chromatography. The method is demonstrated on the Bk(IV)/Bk(III) transition with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid as extraction agent.

  9. Redox reactions and complex formation of transplutonium elements in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper gives a brief analysis of the kinetics and mechanism of a number of redox processes and the complex formation of transplutonium elements in unusual oxidation states. The composition and strength of complexes of TPE with various addends have been determined. The new experimental data on the oxidation potentials of americium and berkelium ions in solutions are cited in abbreviated form. It follows from the data that in phosphoric acid solutions, when the H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ concentration is increased from 10 to 15 M, the oxidation potential of the couple Am(IV)-Am(III) decreases. The oxidation potentials of the couples Am(VI)-Am(V), Cm(V)-Cm(IV), and Bk(IV)Bk(III) are also presented.

  10. Production of transplutonium elements in the high flux isotope reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, J.E.; Corbett, B.L.; King, L.J.; McGuire, S.C.; Sims, T.M.

    1981-01-01

    The techniques described here have been demonstrated to predict the contents of transplutonium element production targets, at least for isotopes of mass 253 or less. The HFIR irradiation model is a workhorse for planning the TRU processing campaigns, for certifying the heat evolution rate of targets prior to insertion in the reactor, for predicting future production capabilities over a multi-year period, and for making optimization studies. Practical considerations, however, may limit the range of available options so that optimum operation is not always achievable. We do intend, however, to keep fine-tuning the constants which define the cross sections as time permits. We need to do more work on optimizing the production of /sup 250/Cm, /sup 254/Es, /sup 255/Es, and ultimately /sup 257/Fm, since researchers are interested in obtaining larger quantities of these rare and difficult-to-produce nuclides. 7 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Effects of Non-metallic Inclusions on Hot Ductility of High Manganese TWIP Steels Containing Different Aluminum Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Nan; Yang, Jian; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Xin, Xiu-Ling; Xu, Long-Yun

    2016-06-01

    The characteristics of inclusions in Fe-16Mn- xAl-0.6C ( x = 0.002, 0.033, 0.54, 2.10 mass pct) steels have been investigated and their effects on hot ductility of the high manganese TWIP steels have been discussed. Ductility is very poor in the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, which is lower than 20 pct in the temperature range of 873 K to 1473 K (600 °C to 1200 °C). For the steels containing 0.002 and 2.10 mass pct aluminum, ductility is higher than 40 pct in the same temperature range. The hot ductility of steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum is higher than 30 pct throughout the temperature range under examination. With increasing aluminum content, the main inclusions in the steels change along the route of MnO/(MnO + MnS) → MnS/(Al2O3 + MnS) → AlN/(Al2O3 + MnS)/(MgAl2O4 + MnS) → AlN. The thermodynamic results of inclusion types calculated with FactSage software are in agreement with the experimental observation results. The inclusions in the steels containing 0.002 mass pct aluminum do not deteriorate the hot ductility. MnS inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 1.12 μm, 15.62 mm-2, and 2.51 × 10-6 in the steel containing 0.033 mass pct aluminum reduce the ductility. In the steel containing 0.54 mass pct aluminum, AlN inclusions whose average size, number density, and volume ratio are 0.878 μm, 16.28 mm-2 and 2.82 × 10-6 can precipitate at the austenite grain boundaries, prevent dynamic recrystallization and deteriorate the hot ductility. On the contrary, in the steel containing 2.10 mass pct aluminum, the average size, number density and volume ratio of AlN inclusions change to 2.418 μm, 35.95 mm-2, and 2.55 × 10-5. They precipitate in the matrix, which do not inhibit dynamic recrystallization and thereby do not lead to poor hot ductility.

  12. Probing the Statistical Validity of the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition in Metallic Nanowires Using GPU Computing.

    PubMed

    French, William R; Pervaje, Amulya K; Santos, Andrew P; Iacovella, Christopher R; Cummings, Peter T

    2013-12-10

    We perform a large-scale statistical analysis (>2000 independent simulations) of the elongation and rupture of gold nanowires, probing the validity and scope of the recently proposed ductile-to-brittle transition that occurs with increasing nanowire length [Wu et al. Nano Lett. 2012, 12, 910-914]. To facilitate a high-throughput simulation approach, we implement the second-moment approximation to the tight-binding (TB-SMA) potential within HOOMD-Blue, a molecular dynamics package which runs on massively parallel graphics processing units (GPUs). In a statistical sense, we find that the nanowires obey the ductile-to-brittle model quite well; however, we observe several unexpected features from the simulations that build on our understanding of the ductile-to-brittle transition. First, occasional failure behavior is observed that qualitatively differs from that predicted by the model prediction; this is attributed to stochastic thermal motion of the Au atoms and occurs at temperatures as low as 10 K. In addition, we also find that the ductile-to-brittle model, which was developed using classical dislocation theory, holds for nanowires as small as 3 nm in diameter. Finally, we demonstrate that the nanowire critical length is higher at 298 K relative to 10 K, a result that is not predicted by the ductile-to-brittle model. These results offer practical design strategies for adjusting nanowire failure and structure and also demonstrate that GPU computing is an excellent tool for studies requiring a large number of independent trajectories in order to fully characterize a system's behavior. PMID:26592289

  13. Directions for nuclear research in the transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Chasman, R.R.; Friedman, A.M.; Ahmad, I.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the heavy nuclides has played a vital role in our understanding of the alpha decay process, nuclear fission, nuclear binding energies and the limits of nuclear stability. This study has led to the understanding of novel shape degrees of freedom, such as the very large quadrupole deformations associated with the fission isomer process, and the very recently discovered octupole deformation. The existence of these unique phenomena in the heavy element region is not accidental. Fission isomerism is due to the delicate balance between nuclear forces holding the nucleus together and Coulomb forces causing nuclear fission. Octupole deformation arises from the increasing strength of matrix elements with increasing oscillator shell. Both illustrate the unique features of the heavy element region. Fission studies have given us information about large collective aspects in nuclei and the importance that nuclear structural effects can play in altering these macro properties. A new class of atomic studies has become possible with the availability of heavy elements. With these isotopes, we are now able to produce electric fields of such magnitude that it becomes possible to spontaneously create positron-electron pairs in the vacuum. We have organized this presentation into three major sections: nuclear structure, fission studies and atomic studies of supercritical systems. In each we will try to emphasize the new directions which can benefit from the continued availability of isotopes supplied by the Trans-plutonium Production Program. 117 references. (WHK)

  14. Ductile crystalline-amorphous nanolaminates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V; Barbee, Troy W

    2007-07-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper-zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline-amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 +/- 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 +/- 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline-crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous-crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  15. Ductile crystalline–amorphous nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V.; Barbee, Troy W.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper–zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline–amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 ± 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 ± 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline–crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous–crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  16. State of the art and development trends in the production, properties, and uses of transplutonium elements at the Lenin Reactor Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, V.Ya.; Gordeev, Ya.N.; Zinkovskii, V.I.; Karelin, E.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Kosulin, N.S.; Nikolaev, V.M.; Seleznev, A.G.; Timofeev, G.A.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Tsykanov, V.A.

    1987-03-01

    Some results are reported from the Reactor Research Institute on the properties, production methods, and uses of the transplutonium elements (TPE), which have been obtained between 1976 and 1982. A comprehensive technology has been devised for processing irradiated reactor targets, which provides high yields. Calculations and experiments have defined the optimum design of the high-frequency trap on the SM-2 reactor. Neutron sources have been made for general industrial and medical purposes containing californium 252. It is shown that curium occurs in the hexavalent state in aqueous solution. Measurements have been made on the resonant-level parameters of berkelium 249 and californium 249. TPE compounds with platinum-group metals have been made and examined. The properties of the TPE metals have also been examined. Future problems have been discussed.

  17. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluents. Batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 h (2 h to load the feed and 3 h for the elution), with two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution. The separations achieved in the column are preserved by routing the column effluent through an alpha detector and using the response from the detector to select appropriate product fractions. The high-pressure ion exchange process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate; therefore it will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU. 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluent. By using two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution, batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 hours (2 hours to load the feed and 3 hours for the elution). The number of effluent product fractions and the amount of actinides that must be collected in intermediate fractions are minimized by monitoring response from a flow-through alpha-detector. This process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate, and will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU.

  19. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  20. Ductility of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers have been investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The ductility can vary by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. For high mechanical and low thermal loading the ductility is small, for low mechanical and high thermal loading the ductility is an order of magnitude higher. Experiments on a beam in bending confirm that the ductility is strongly dependent on the loading conditions. The observations suggest a means of utilizing the inherent ductility of the matrix.

  1. A study of the effect of solid particle impact and particle shape on the erosion morphology of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Impulsive versus steady jet impingement of spherical glass bead particles on metal surfaces was studied using a gas gun facility and a commercial sand blasting apparatus. Crushed glass particles were also used in the sand blasting apparatus as well as glass beads. Comparisons of the different types of erosion patterns were made. Scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were used to characterize erosion patterns. The nature of the wear can be divided into cutting and deformation, each with its own characteristic features. Surface chemistry analysis indicates the possiblity of complex chemical and/or mechanical interactions between erodants and target materials.

  2. A study of the nature of solid particle impact and shape on the erosion morphology of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Young, S. G.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Impulsive versus steady jet impingement of spherical glass bead particles on metal surfaces was studied using a gas gun facility and a commercial sand blasting apparatus. Crushed glass particles were also used in the sand blasting apparatus as well as glass beads. Comparisons of the different types of erosion patterns were made. Scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were used to characterize erosion patterns. The nature of the wear can be divided into cutting and deformation, each with its own characteristic features. Surface chemistry analysis indicates the possibility of complex chemical and/or mechanical interactions between erodants and target materials.

  3. Intrinsic ductility of glassy solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunfeng; Luo, Jian; Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Glasses are usually brittle, seriously limiting their practical usage. Recently, the intrinsic ductility of glass was found to increase with the Poisson's ratio (v), with a sharp brittle-to-ductile (BTD) transition at vBTD = 0.31-0.32. Such a correlation between far-from-equilibrium fracture and near-equilibrium elasticity is unexpected and not understood. Molecular dynamics simulations, on three families of glasses (metallic glasses, amorphous silicon, and silica) with controlled bonding, processing, and testing conditions, show that glasses with low covalency and high structural disorder have high v and ductility, and vice versa. The BTD transitions triggered by the aforementioned causes in each system correspond to a unified vBTD value, which increases with its average coordination number (CN). The vBTD-CN relation can be comprehended by recognizing v as a measure of covalency and disorder, and the BTD transition as a competition between shear and cleavage. Our results provide guidelines for developing new recipes and processes for tough glasses.

  4. Ductility enhancement of iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Iron aluminides based on Fe{sub 3}Al are ordered intermetallic alloys that offer good oxidation resistance, excellent sulfidation resistance, and low material cost. These materials also conserve strategic elements such as chromium and have a lower density than stainless steels. However, limited ductility at ambient temperature and a sharp drop in strength above 600C have been major deterrents to their acceptance for structural applications. This paper presents results on iron aluminides with room-temperature elongations of 15 to 20%. Ductility values were improved by a combination of thermomechanical processing and heat-treatment control. This method of ductility improvement has been demonstrated for a range of compositions. The data presented in this paper suggest that the Fe{sub 3}Al-based compositions tested are sensitive to environmental effects. The environment of concern is moisture in air that reacts with aluminum to form hydrogen at the metal surface. The hydrogen produced is adsorbed and absorbed in the specimens during plastic strain and results in low room-temperature ductilities. Results showed that the use of highly elongated grains produced by warm working increases ductility. A special heat treatment produces an additional improvement in ductility.

  5. Behavior of transplutonium elements on thin-layer silica gel using di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Molochnikova, N.P.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1995-03-01

    The behavior of transplutonium elements (TPE) on thin-layer silica gel on domestic sorbphil thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates is investigated using di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA) solutions in HNO{sub 3} of various concentrations. Conditions are found for separating Bk(IV) from other TPE in solutions with [HNO{sub 3}] > 5 M and also for separating Bk(III) and Ce. Solutions of D2EHPA as the mobile phase are recommended for TLC identification of tracer amounts of different oxidation states Am in HNO{sub 3}.

  6. GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GRINDING ROOM AT SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, BESSEMER FOUNDRY SHOWING WHEELABORATOR THAT IMPALE SHOT AT TUMBLING CASTINGS TO REMOVE EXCESS SURFACE METALS AND SAND; ANNEALING OVENS TO HEAT CERTAIN CASTINGS TO ACHIEVE A DESIRED CHARACTERISTIC; AND GRINDING WHEELS USED TO REMOVE GATES. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Grinding & Shipping, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Ductile failure X-prize.

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, James V.; Wellman, Gerald William; Emery, John M.; Ostien, Jakob T.; Foster, John T.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Mota, Alejandro; Bishop, Joseph E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Littlewood, David John; Foulk, James W., III; Dowding, Kevin J.; Dion, Kristin; Boyce, Brad Lee; Robbins, Joshua H.; Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-09-01

    Fracture or tearing of ductile metals is a pervasive engineering concern, yet accurate prediction of the critical conditions of fracture remains elusive. Sandia National Laboratories has been developing and implementing several new modeling methodologies to address problems in fracture, including both new physical models and new numerical schemes. The present study provides a double-blind quantitative assessment of several computational capabilities including tearing parameters embedded in a conventional finite element code, localization elements, extended finite elements (XFEM), and peridynamics. For this assessment, each of four teams reported blind predictions for three challenge problems spanning crack initiation and crack propagation. After predictions had been reported, the predictions were compared to experimentally observed behavior. The metal alloys for these three problems were aluminum alloy 2024-T3 and precipitation hardened stainless steel PH13-8Mo H950. The predictive accuracies of the various methods are demonstrated, and the potential sources of error are discussed.

  8. Material Characterization for Ductile Fracture Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The research summarized in this document provides valuable information for structural health evaluation of NASA infrastructure. Specifically, material properties are reported which will enable calibration of ductile fracture prediction methods for three high-toughness metallic materials and one aluminum alloy which can be found in various NASA facilities. The task of investigating these materials has also served to validate an overall methodology for ductile fracture prediction is currently being employed at NASA. In facilitating the ability to incorporate various materials into the prediction scheme, we have provided data to enable demonstration of the overall generality of the approach.

  9. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, Kevin; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite.

  10. Method of making sintered ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Plucknett, K.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.

    1999-05-18

    A method of making an intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite involves combining a particulate brittle intermetallic precursor with a particulate reactant metal and a particulate ceramic to form a mixture and heating the mixture in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a sufficient temperature and for a sufficient time to react the brittle intermetallic precursor and the reactant metal to form a ductile intermetallic and sinter the mixture to form a ductile intermetallic-bonded ceramic composite. 2 figs.

  11. Mathematical modeling and remote monitoring of ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Tselishchev, I.V.; Elesin, A.A.

    1988-07-01

    A mathematical model and calculational algorithms for the elution curves for ion-exchange separation of transplutonium elements (TPE) and the limits of optimal fractionation of the substances being separated, based on indicators of the process (yield, purification), are presented. The calculational programs are part of the programming provision of a small informational-calculational system based on the microcomputer Elektronika DZ-28, intended for remote monitoring of TPE separation. The elaborated programs can be implemented in the preliminary choice of necessary conditions of the TPE separation process, and also during and after the separation process for comparison of calculated results with the results of continuous, on-line remote monitoring and with the results of laboratory sample analysis. The possible application of the programs has been checked in the instance of the separation of curium and americium, and einsteinium and californium, the results of which are in satisfactory agreement with the results of remote and laboratory-analytical monitoring.

  12. On the development of a simple lumped system micro-model of ductile iron solidification for application to the control of molten metal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayaraghavan, R.; Bradley, F.J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents results to date in a project concerning the application of micro-modeling of ductile iron solidification to the development of a process control methodology for the assessment of the effectiveness of magnesium treatment and post-inoculation and the prediction of shrinkage tendency. The approach is to utilize a simple lumped system heat transfer model which incorporates a new formulation for simulating eutectic ductile iron solidification to analyze and interpret cooling curve data routinely acquired for process control purposes. A key feature of the eutectic solidification micro-model is that the graphite kinetics is de-coupled from the austenite kinetics which are completely determined by thermodynamic and mass balance considerations. In addition, the graphite kinetics expression accounts for the evolution of a lognormally distributed nodule size distribution. An empirical two-parameter continuous nucleation model is employed and a new grain impingement function is proposed. Solute redistribution in the ternary Fe-C-Si system is considered. The influence of magnesium on undercooling the melt is simulated by introducing an additional term into the expression for the graphite liquidus surface. Preliminary results are presented which illustrate the time-dependence of the liquidus and eutectic temperatures, the concentration of carbon and silicon in the liquid, and volume changes occurring during solidification.

  13. Purifying transplutonium elements from iron, zirconium, and aluminum by extraction with D2EHPA from citrate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Kasimov, F.D.; Gordeev, Ya.N.; Kovanseva, S.N.; Kasimova, V.A.; Nikolaev, V.M.; Skobelev, N.F.; Filimonov, V.T.; Yadovin, A.A.

    1987-03-01

    A study has been made on the effects of various factors on the zirconium extraction kinetics in the system consisting of citric acid with di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid. It has been found that zirconium, iron (III), and aluminum are extracted much more slowly than the transplutonium elements (TPE). The process can be operated under nonequilibrium conditions to increase the separation factors considerably, which has been employed to improve the purification of TPE.

  14. Towards mesh independent simulation of ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Huei Eliot; Veilleux, Michael; Emery, John M.; Wellman, Gerald William; Foulk, James W., III

    2010-11-01

    Recent work at Sandia National Laboratories has focused on preparing strong predictive models for the simulation of ductile failure in metals. The focus of this talk is on the development of engineering-ready models that use a phenomenological approach to represent the ductile fracture processes. As such, an empirical tearing parameter that accounts for mean stress effects along the crack front is presented. A critical value of the tearing parameter is used in finite element calculations as the criterion for crack growth. Regularization is achieved with three different methods and the results are compared. In the first method, upon reaching the critical tearing, the stress within a solid element is decayed by uniformly shrinking the yield surface over a user specified amount of strain. This yields mesh-size dependent results. As a second method for regularization, cohesive surface elements are inserted using an automatic remeshing technique. In the third method, strain-localization elements are inserted with the automated remeshing.

  15. Weldable ductile molybdenum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Byun, Thak Sang; Schneibel, Joachim H; Miller, Michael K; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum and its alloys are attractive structural materials for high-temperature applications. However, various practical issues have limited its use. One concern relates to the loss of ductility occurring in the heat-affected weld zone caused by segregation of oxygen to grain boundaries. In this study, a series of arc melted molybdenum alloys have been produced containing controlled additions of B, C, Zr, and Al. These alloys were characterized with respect to their tensile properties, smooth bend properties, and impact energy for both the base metal and welds. These alloys were compared with a very high purity low carbon arc cast molybdenum reference. For discussion purposes the alloys produced are separated into two categories: Mo Al B alloys, and Mo Zr B alloys. The properties of Mo Zr B alloy welds containing higher carbon levels exhibited slight improvement over unalloyed molybdenum, though the base-metal properties for all Mo Zr B alloys were somewhat inconsistent with properties better, or worse, than unalloyed molybdenum. A Mo Al B alloy exhibited the best DBTT values for welds, and the base metal properties were comparable to or slightly better than unalloyed molybdenum. The Mo Al B alloy contained a low volume fraction of second-phase particles, with segregation of boron and carbon to grain boundaries believed to displace oxygen resulting in improved weld properties. The volume fractions of second-phase particles are higher for the Mo Zr B alloys, and these alloys were prone to brittle fracture. It is also noted that these Mo Zr B alloys exhibited segregation of zirconium, boron and carbon to the grain boundaries.

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to quantify the graphite particle phase in nodular ductile iron (NDI). This study provides the basis for initializing microstructure in direct numerical simulations, as part of developing microstructure-fracture response models. The work presented here is a subset of a PhD dissertation on spall fracture in NDI. NDI is an ideal material for studying the influence of microstructure on ductile fracture because it contains a readily identifiable second-phase particle population, embedded in a ductile metallic matrix, which serves as primary void nucleation sites. Nucleated voids grow and coalesce under continued tensile loading, as part of the micromechanisms of ductile fracture, and lead to macroscopic failure. For this study, we used 2D optical microscopy and quantitative metallography relationships to characterize the volume fraction, size distribution, nearest-neighbor distance, and other higher-order metrics of the graphite particle phase. We found that the volume fraction was {Phi} = 0.115, the average particle diameter was d{sub avg} = 25.9 {mu}m, the Weibull shape and scaling parameters were {beta} = 1.8 and {eta} = 29.1 {mu}m, respectively, the (first) nearest neighbor distance was L{sub nn} = 32.4 {mu}m, the exponential coefficients for volume fraction fluctuations was A{sub {Phi}} = 1.89 and B{sub {Phi}} = -0.59, respectively. Based on reaching a coefficient-of-variation (COV) of 0.01, the representative volume element (RVE) size was determined to be 8.9L{sub nn} (288 {mu}m).

  17. Ductile damage model with void coalescence

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. Underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. Implementation of the model in hydrocodes is discussed.

  18. Microstructure and Ductility-Dip Cracking Susceptibility of Circumferential Multipass Dissimilar Weld Between 20MND5 and Z2CND18-12NS with Ni-Base Filler Metal 52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; Duan, Zhaoling; He, Guo

    2013-10-01

    The large circumferential multipass dissimilar weld between 20MND5 steel and Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel welded with FM52 filler material was investigated in terms of the diluted composition, the grain boundary precipitation, and the ductility-dip cracking (DDC) susceptibility of the weld. The diluted composition of the weld is composed of 37 to 47 pct Ni, 21 to 24 pct Cr, and 28 to 40 pct Fe, which are inhomogeneous along the depth and over the width of the deep weld. The carbon content has a distribution in the region of the surface weld from a high level (~0.20 pct) in the zone near 20MND5 steel to a normal level (~0.03 pct) in the zone near Z2CND18-12NS stainless steel. The carbon distribution is corresponding to the grain boundary carbides. The minimum threshold strains for DDC occur in the temperature range of 1223 K to 1323 K (950 °C to 1050 °C), which are 0.5, 0.35, and 0.4 pct for the root weld, middle region, and the surface weld, respectively. The dissimilar weld has the largest susceptibility to the DDC compared to the filler metal 52 and the Inconel 690.

  19. A new insight into ductile fracture of ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloys

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A. Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Mao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that when coarse-grained metals undergo severe plastic deformation to be transformed into nano-grained metals, their ductility is reduced. However, there are no ductile fracture criteria developed based on grain refinement. In this paper, we propose a new relationship between ductile fracture and grain refinement during deformation, considering factors besides void nucleation and growth. Ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloy sheets were fabricated using different rolling techniques at room and cryogenic temperatures. It is proposed for the first time that features of the microstructure near the fracture surface can be used to explain the ductile fracture post necking directly. We found that as grains are refined to a nano size which approaches the theoretical minimum achievable value, the material becomes brittle at the shear band zone. This may explain the tendency for ductile fracture in metals under plastic deformation. PMID:25851228

  20. Behavior of transplutonium elements on ion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirov, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-03-01

    Systematic studies are reported on the behavior of transplutonium elements (TPE) on cation-exchange and anion-exchange materials in mixed aqueous-organic solutions of mineral acids (HClO/sub 4/, HCl, HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) as affected by solution composition, nature of acid, and nature of organic solvent. With all these acids, replacing most of the water by alcohol increases the TPE uptake on the ion exchangers, and the effect occurs for the cation exchangers at lower contents of the organic component. Optimum conditions have been identified for concentrating and separating TPE from numerous elements. The most effective system consists of anion exchanger with HNO/sub 3/ and alcohol.

  1. Recovery of transplutonium elements from aqueous and water-ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid and their separation from other actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on anion and cation exchangers in aqueous and water-ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid as a function of the various components of the solution has been investigated. It has been discovered that the presence of ethanol in sulfuric acid solutions causes an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchangers and on anion exchangers. The possibility of the use of ion exchangers for the preconcentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements which form strong complexes with sulfate ions over a broad range of concentrations of sulfuric acid has been demonstrated.

  2. Tuning ideal tensile strengths and intrinsic ductility of bcc refractory alloys.

    PubMed

    Qi, Liang; Chrzan, D C

    2014-03-21

    An important theoretical ductility criterion for group V and VI metal-based refractory alloys in body-centered cubic (bcc) lattices is the mechanical failure mode of their perfect crystals under tension along the weakest direction [100]. Pure Mo and W fail by cleavage and are deemed intrinsically brittle. However, first-principles calculations show that alloying with group IV or V transition metals can transform these materials into ones that display intrinsically ductile behavior, failing in shear under [100] tension. Remarkably, this transition can be understood as an electron filling effect with the intrinsically ductile response the manifestation of a Jahn-Teller distortion. PMID:24702389

  3. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare-earth elements on ion exchangers in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1988-05-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on anion exchangers and cation exchangers mixed with PbO/sub 2/ in solutions of sulfuric acid has been investigated. A significant difference between the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium elements and rare-earth elements, on the other hand, which has been attributed to the oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state, has been discovered. Methods for the preconcentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare-earth element son anion exchangers in 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions and on cation exchangers in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions have been proposed.

  4. Separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements on ion exchange resins in solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    Th behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, Ce, Eu, and Pr on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in a mixture with PbO/sub 2/ was investigated in sulfuric acid solutions. A substantial difference was detected in the distribution coefficients of Bk and Ce, on the one hand, and the remaining transplutonium and rare earth elements, on the other, associated with oxidation of the first two elements to the tetravalent state. Methods are proposed for the concentration and separation of Bk(IV) and Ce(IV) from the other transplutonium and rare earth elements on an anion exchange resin in solution of 0.01-0.25 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and a cation exchange resin in 0.75-1.0 M H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  5. NEMD simulations for ductile metal sliding

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, James E; Germann, Timothy C; Ravelo, Ramon J; Holian, Brad L

    2011-01-31

    We have studied the sliding behavior for a 19 M Al(110)/Al(110) defective crystal at 15 GPa as a function of relative sliding velocity. The general features are qualitatively similar to smaller scale (1.4 M) atom simulations for Al(111)/Al(110) nondefective single crystal sliding. The critical velocity, v{sub c}, is approximately the same for the defective crystal as the size scaled v{sub c}. The lower velocity tangential force is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. The critical temperature, T*, is depressed relative to the perfect crystal. These conclusions are consistent with a lower value for f{sub c} for the defective crystal. The detailed features of structural transformation and the high velocity regime remain to be mapped.

  6. Ductile extension in alpine Corsica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Dubois, Roland; Fournier, Marc; Goffé, Bruno; Michard, André; Jourdan, Claudie

    1990-10-01

    Ductile deformation in high-pressure (P)-low temperature (T) conditions due to the westward thrusting of oceanic material onto a continental basement in alpine Corsica is overprinted by a late deformation event with a reverse shear sense (eastward) that took place in less severe P-T conditions. We show that the late deformation can be linked to extension during rifting and spreading of the Liguro Provençal basin from late Oligocene to late-middle Miocene time. Major compressive thrust contacts were reactivated as ductile normal faults and, in some units, only a penetrative eastward shear can be observed. This extension following the thickening of the crust brought tectonic units which underwent very different P- T conditions during the earlier stage into close contact. The Balagne nappe, which shows neither significant ductile deformation nor metamorphism, directly overlies the high-P units. The extensional deformation is distributed through the entire thickness of the nappe stack but is more important along the major thrust contacts, which localize the strain. The geometry of the crustal extension is controlled by that of the early compressive thrusts. The latest structures are east-dipping brittle normal faults which bound the early to middle Miocene Saint Florent half graben.

  7. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S. )

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alternatives to high-tensile-strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine-tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive-contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and microhardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of ductile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricant sliding wear tests on specimens and components for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylindrical unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine-tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  8. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-01-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation. PMID:26122728

  9. Nanodomained Nickel Unite Nanocrystal Strength with Coarse-Grain Ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yuan, Fuping; Yang, Muxin; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Chuanxin; Chen, Liu; Wei, Yueguang; Ma, Evan

    2015-06-01

    Conventional metals are routinely hardened by grain refinement or by cold working with the expense of their ductility. Recent nanostructuring strategies have attempted to evade this strength versus ductility trade-off, but the paradox persists. It has never been possible to combine the strength reachable in nanocrystalline metals with the large uniform tensile elongation characteristic of coarse-grained metals. Here a defect engineering strategy on the nanoscale is architected to approach this ultimate combination. For Nickel, spread-out nanoscale domains (average 7 nm in diameter) were produced during electrodeposition, occupying only ~2.4% of the total volume. Yet the resulting Ni achieves a yield strength approaching 1.3 GPa, on par with the strength for nanocrystalline Ni with uniform grains. Simultaneously, the material exhibits a uniform elongation as large as ~30%, at the same level of ductile face-centered-cubic metals. Electron microscopy observations and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that the nanoscale domains effectively block dislocations, akin to the role of precipitates for Orowan hardening. In the meantime, the abundant domain boundaries provide dislocation sources and trapping sites of running dislocations for dislocation multiplication, and the ample space in the grain interior allows dislocation storage; a pronounced strain-hardening rate is therefore sustained to enable large uniform elongation.

  10. What drives polymer glasses ductile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Qing; Cheng, Shiwang; Li, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Panpan; Liu, Jianning

    2015-03-01

    The presentation aims to explore an important question in polymer physics: what makes polymer glasses of high molecular weight ductile? Upon deformation, load-bearing strands (LBS) emerge along the direction of the stress. Chain tension builds up in LBS due to the displacement of LBS. Segments that do not belong to LBS sequentially get activated by the LBS in the order of their proximity to LBS. If the chain network breaks down before driving the glass into a state of global plasticity, crazing and brittle fracture takes place instead of yielding and macroscopic plastic deformation. Fast deformation assures that chain pullout does not have time to materialize. Global plasticity also takes time to develop. Thus, the outcome is dictated by which process takes place first. In light of the recently proposed molecular model for yielding and brittle-ductile transition of polymer glasses, we present different examples from experiment to illustrate the importance to understand the interplay between short-ranged intersegmental interactions and long-ranged intrachain networking. NSF-DMR (EAGER- 1444859)

  11. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-01-01

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems. PMID:26554017

  12. Heterogeneous lamella structure unites ultrafine-grain strength with coarse-grain ductility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolei; Yang, Muxin; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Guilin; Wei, Yujie; Huang, Xiaoxu; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-11-24

    Grain refinement can make conventional metals several times stronger, but this comes at dramatic loss of ductility. Here we report a heterogeneous lamella structure in Ti produced by asymmetric rolling and partial recrystallization that can produce an unprecedented property combination: as strong as ultrafine-grained metal and at the same time as ductile as conventional coarse-grained metal. It also has higher strain hardening than coarse-grained Ti, which was hitherto believed impossible. The heterogeneous lamella structure is characterized with soft micrograined lamellae embedded in hard ultrafine-grained lamella matrix. The unusual high strength is obtained with the assistance of high back stress developed from heterogeneous yielding, whereas the high ductility is attributed to back-stress hardening and dislocation hardening. The process discovered here is amenable to large-scale industrial production at low cost, and might be applicable to other metal systems. PMID:26554017

  13. Separation of berkelium (IV) from trivalent transplutonium elements on ion-exchangers in solutions of phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Stepushkina, V.V.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The dependences of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf and Es behavior on anion- and cation-exchangers in solutions of 0.1-8.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ on acid concentration and oxidant content in solution (KBrO/sub 3/) or in resin (PbO/sub 2/) have been studied. Significant differences in distribution coefficients of Bk and other transplutonium elements (TPE) have been found that can be explained by Bk oxidation to the tetravalent state. A simple and effective method of Bk (IV) separation from trivalent TPE has been developed. The method was applied to the isolation of isotopes Bk-249 and Bk-250; the purification factor of Bk (IV) from other TPE is 10/sup 4/-10/sub 6/ per cycle. The possibility of Bk separation from bromate and phosphate ions by its sorption on a cation-exchanger from diluted H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ solutions with subsequent desorption by the mineral acid has been shown. 20 references, 8 figures.

  14. Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

  15. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1993-02-01

    Research has addressed the role of martensitic transformation plasticity in the enhancement of toughness in high-strength austenitic steels, and the enhancement of formability in multiphase low-alloy sheet steels. In the austenitic steels, optimal processing conditions have been established to achieve a significant increase in strength level, in order to investigate the interaction of strain-induced transformation with the microvoid nucleation and shear localization mechanisms operating at ultrahigh strength levels. The stress-state dependence of transformation and fracture mechanisms has been investigated in model alloys, comparing behavior in uniaxial tension and blunt-notch tension specimens. A numerical constitutive model for transformation plasticity has been reformulated to allow a more thorough analysis of transformation/fracture interactions. Processing of a new low alloy steel composition has been optimized to stabilize retained austenite by isothermal bainitic transformation after intercritical annealing. Preliminary results show a good correlation of uniform ductility with the austenite amount and stability.

  16. Utilization of cation exchange resins for the isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from others in aqueous and non aqueous-alcohol solutions of hydrochloric and nitric acids

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.

    1985-07-01

    The authors study the sorption of several transplutonium and fission elements on cation exchange resins in relation to the acid concentration and content of alcohol in solution. They observe a significant increase in sorption of the TPE on the cation exchanges from nitric acid solutions containing more than 50% of alcohol. On the basis of the experimental results they determine the optimum conditions for the concentration of TPE on cation exchangers with their subsequent separation from certain fission and other elements by means of hydrochloric acid and nitric acid solutions.

  17. Ductile fracture processes in 7075 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    You, C.P. ); Thompson, A.W. ); Bernstein, I.M. )

    1995-02-01

    The ductile fracture of 7075 aluminum was examined as a function of aging condition, from underaged to overaged. Notched specimens allowed the triaxiality of stress to be varied. Increasing triaxiality, which was due to increasing notch acuity, decreased ductility and increased nucleation of voids, in accord with expectations from ductile fracture models. Overaged material, which is generally resistant to environmental damage, was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement even with high triaxiality, but void sizes were increased by hydrogen. That increase suggested that void growth rates may be assisted by hydrogen in overaged 7075 aluminum.

  18. Ductile damage modeling based on void coalescence and percolation theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.

    1995-09-01

    A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included, and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. The underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. The model is intended for hydrocode based computer simulation. An experimental program is underway to validate the model.

  19. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  20. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  1. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  2. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  3. 49 CFR 192.277 - Ductile iron pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron pipe. 192.277 Section 192.277 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Ductile iron pipe. (a) Ductile iron pipe may not be joined by threaded joints. (b) Ductile iron pipe...

  4. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sizedd Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Kang

    2008-07-31

    The present research is focused on ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) alloys by adding nano-sized oxide particles to the alloy system. The research approach includes: (1) determination of microscopic mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic ductility enhancement effects through atomistic modeling of the metal-ceramic interface; (2) subsequent computer simulation-aided optimization of composition and nanoparticle size of the dispersion for improved performance; (3) synthesis and characterization of nanoparticle dispersion following the guidance from atomistic computational modeling analyses (e.g., by processing a small sample of Mo alloy for evaluation); and (4) experimental testing of the mechanical properties to determine optimal ductility enhancement.Through atomistic modeling and electronic structure analysis using full-potential linearized muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) techniques, research to date has been performed on a number of selected chromium (Cr) systems containing nitrogen (N) and/or magnesium oxide (MgO) impurities. The emphasis has been on determining the properties of the valence electrons and the characteristics of the chemical bonds they formed. It was found that the brittle/ductile behavior of this transitional metal system is controlled by the relative population of valence charges: bonds formed by s valence electrons yield metallic, ductile behavior, whereas bonds formed by d valence electrons lead to covalent, brittle behavior. The presence of valence bands from impurities also affects the metal bonding, thereby explaining the detrimental and beneficial effects induced by the inclusion of N impurities and MgO dispersions. These understandings are useful for optimizing ductility enhancement effects on the dispersion materials.

  5. Analytical prediction of the location of ductility dip cracking in the trans-varestraint test

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, I.; Kroenke, W.; Cola, M.

    1997-05-01

    Some NiCrFe weld metals exhibit decreased ductility over a temperature range known as the {open_quotes}ductility dip{close_quotes} temperature (DDT) range. Ductility dip cracking (DDT) is a phenomenon which occurs in a zone bounded by the DDT range on its sides and a threshold plastic strain on its bottom as shown in figure 1. Figure 1 illustrates how ductility varies as weld metal cools from the solidus temperature for materials with and without a ductility dip. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the ability to predict the location of the DDC in a Trans-Varestraint Test (TVT) for a specimen machined from a weld deposited EN52 plate. The DDC predictions require a combination of Trans-Varestraint testing and finite element analysis. The test provides the threshold value of externally applied nominal strain below which DDC does not occur. The analysis provides the corresponding threshold local or peak strain. The threshold local plastic strain level and the DDT range are used to predict the location of the DDC. The ultimate purpose of this work is to evaluate susceptibility of highly constrained, component welds to DDC. Test results for Trans-Varestraint Testing for a weld deposited EN52 plate are reported in reference. The ability to predict the location of the DDC in the Trans-Varestraint Test using the techniques reported herein is demonstrated by showing good comparison between the analytical results and the test data.

  6. Prospects for Ductility and Toughness Enhancement of Nial by Ductile Phase Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Ritzert, F. J.; Misra, A.; Gibala, R.

    1991-01-01

    The use of NiAl as a structural material has been hindered by the fact that this ordered intermetallic does not exhibit significant tensile ductility or toughness at room temperature. A critical review of the operative flow and fracture mechanisms in monolithic NiAl has thus established the need for ductile phase toughening in this order system. Progress in ductile phase reinforced intermetallic systems in general and specifically NiAl-based materials has been reviewed. In addition, further clarification of the primary mechanisms involved in the flow and fracture of ductile phase reinforced alloys has evolved from ongoing investigations of several model NiAl-based materials. The mechanical behavior of these model directionally-solidified alloys (Ni-30Al and Ni-30Fe-20Al) are discussed. Finally, the prospects for developing a ductile phase toughened NiAl-based alloy and the shortcomings presently inherent in these systems are analyzed.

  7. Phase-field modeling of ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, M.; Gerasimov, T.; De Lorenzis, L.

    2015-05-01

    Phase-field modeling of brittle fracture in elastic solids is a well-established framework that overcomes the limitations of the classical Griffith theory in the prediction of crack nucleation and in the identification of complicated crack paths including branching and merging. We propose a novel phase-field model for ductile fracture of elasto-plastic solids in the quasi-static kinematically linear regime. The formulation is shown to capture the entire range of behavior of a ductile material exhibiting -plasticity, encompassing plasticization, crack initiation, propagation and failure. Several examples demonstrate the ability of the model to reproduce some important phenomenological features of ductile fracture as reported in the experimental literature.

  8. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  9. Isolation and separation of transplutonium elements from other actinides on ion exchange resins from aqueous and aqueous ethanol solutions of sulfuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, L.I.; Tikhomirova, G.S.; Stepushkina, V.V.

    1987-11-01

    The behavior of Am, Cm, Bk, Cf, Es, and other actinides, as well as Zr, on an anion exchange resin and a cation exchange resin in aqueous and aqueous alcohol solutions of sulfuric acid was investigated as a function of the concentration of various components of the solution. It was found that the presence of alcohol in sulfuric acid solutions leads to an increase in the distribution coefficients both on cation exchange resins and on anion exchange resins. The possibility of using ion exchange resins for the concentration and separation of transplutonium elements from U, Np, Pu, Zr, and other elements that form strong complexes with sulfate ions in a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations was demonstrated.

  10. Extraction of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions by dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate from aqueous nitrate media

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, E.P.; Muscatello, A.C.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.

    1981-05-01

    The extraction behavior of selected transplutonium(III) and lanthanide(III) ions from nitrate solution was studied using relatively pure dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylmethylphosphonate (DHDECMP). The data obtained for Am(III) and Eu(III) using DHDECMP were compared with analogous measurements obtained with dibutyl butylphosphonate (DB(BP)) and in certain cases with dihexyl-N,N-diethylcarbamoylethylphosphonate (DHDECEP). It was found that both the nitrate and extractant concentration dependencies were third power. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) and for Eu(III) measured from low acid LiNO/sub 3/ solutions were similar for DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP), thus giving no evidence for any significant chelation effect for DHDECMP. Significant differences among DHDECMP, DHDECEP, and DB(BP) are found for the extraction of Am(III) and Eu(III) from 1 to 5 M HNO/sub 3/. These differences are explained by the ability of DHDECMP (and to a lesser extent, DHDECEP) to buffer itself against HNO/sub 3/ by protonation of the amide group. The K/sub d/'s for Am(III) through Fm(III) and for La(III) through Lu(III) measured from LiNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3/ using DHDECMP show a definite tetrad effect when plotted as a function of Z. The K/sub d/'s for the lanthanides generally decrease with Z whereas the K/sub d/'s for the transplutonium elements change very little with Z.

  11. A Study on Fracture Locus of St12 Steel And Implementation Ductile Damage Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khataei, Mohammad; Poursina, Mehrdad; Kadkhodaei, Mahmoud

    2010-06-01

    In a metal forming process, the state of stress is one of the most important parameters on forming and behavior of the material. According to ductile damage criteria, the magnitudes of fracture strain for various stress triaxiality values should be determined for prediction of the place and time of ductile fracture. In this paper, the magnitudes of fracture strain of St12 steel is measured using several tensile tests on notched samples. Johnson-Cook equation for fracture strain as a function of stress triaxiality is calibrated for St12 steel, using the obtained experimental data. The accuracy of this function is achieved by comparison of the FEM results with experimental data which are achieved during simple tension and Erichsen tests. The simulation results have shown that the ductile damage model is a suitable criterion for prediction of fracture in St12 steel. In addition, notched samples tensile tests are suitable for calibration of Johnson-Cook equation for St12 steel.

  12. Ductile aluminide alloys for high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Stiegler, J.O.

    1986-09-16

    An alloy is described consisting essentially of sufficient nickel and aluminum to form Ni/sub 3/A1, an amount of boron sufficient to promote ductility in the alloy and 0.3 to 1.5 atomic percent of an element selected from the group consisting of hafnium and zirconium. The alloy further including 6 to 12 atomic percent iron.

  13. Nanostructuring and ductility of crystals under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magomedov, M. N.

    2016-05-01

    Nanostructuring of crystals into domains under uniform compression, the ductility of a solid nanostructure under pressure, and the bimodal distribution of domain size are explained based on the dependence of the surface energy and surface pressure on the shape, size, and density of a nanocrystal.

  14. Ductility Enhancement of Molybdenum Phase by Nano-sized Oxide Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Bruce

    2008-07-18

    The objective of this research is to understand and to remedy the impurity effects for room-temperature ductility enhancement of molybdenum (Mo) based alloys by the inclusion of nano-sized metal oxide dispersions. This research combines theoretical, computational, and experimental efforts. The results will help to formulate systematic strategies in searching for better composed Mo-based alloys with optimal mechanical properties. For this project, majority of the research effort was directed to atomistic modeling to identify the mechanisms responsible for the oxygen embrittling and ductility enhancement based on fundamental electronic structure analysis. Through first principles molecular dynamics simulations, it was found that the embrittling impurity species were attracted to the metal oxide interface, consistent with previous experiments. Further investigation on the electronic structures reveals that the presence of embrittling species degrades the quality of the metallic chemical bonds in the hosting matrix in a number of ways, the latter providing the source of ductility. For example, the spatial flexibility of the bonds is reduced, and localization of the impurity states occurs to pin the dislocation flow. Rice’s criterion has been invoked to explain the connections of electronic structure and mechanical properties. It was also found that when impurity species become attracted to the metal oxide interface, some of the detrimental effects are alleviated, thus explaining the observed ductility enhancement effects. These understandings help to develop predictive capabilities to facilitate the design and optimization of Mo and other high temperature alloys (e.g. ODS alloys) for fossil energy materials applications. Based on the theoretical and computational studies, the experimental work includes the preparation of Mo powders mixed with candidate nano-sized metal oxides, which were then vacuum hot-pressed to make the Mo alloys. Several powder mixing methods

  15. Ductile mandrel and parting compound facilitate tube drawing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, W. R., Jr.; Mayfield, R. M.; Polakowski, N. H.

    1966-01-01

    Refractory tubing is warm drawn over a solid ductile mandrel with a powder parting compound packed between mandrel and the tubes inner surface. This method applies also to the coextrusion of a billet and a ductile mandrel.

  16. OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERALL VIEW OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE'S PATTERN REPAIR SHOP, SHOWING A SPANISH-MADE FORADIA BORING MACHINE IN THE FOREGROUND. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  17. On probabilistic aspects in the dynamic degradation of ductile materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Gilles; Trumel, Hervé; Hild, Francois; Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick; Denoual, Christophe

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic loadings produce high stress waves leading to the spallation of ductile materials such as aluminium, copper, magnesium or tantalum [1-3]. The main mechanism used to explain the change in the number of cavities with the stress rate is nucleation inhibition, induced by the growth of already nucleated cavities [4]. The dependence of the spall strength and critical time with the loading rate is investigated in the framework of a probabilistic model [4]. The present approach, which explains previous experimental findings on the strain rate dependence of the spall strength, is applied to analyze experimental data on tantalum [5]. [3pt] References: [1] Meyers M.A., Aimone C. T., 1983, ``Dynamic Fracture (Spalling) of Metals'', Prog. Mater. Sci., 18(1),pp. 1-96 [2] Curran D.R., Seaman L., Shockey D.A., 1987, ``Dynamic Fracture of Solids'', Phys. Rep., 147, pp. 253-388 [3] Grady D.E., 1988, ``The Spall Strength of Condensed Matter'', J. Mech. Phys. Sol., 36(3), pp. 353-384 [4] Trumel H., Hild F., Roy G., Pellegrini Y.-P., Denoual C., submitted to J. Mech. Phys. Sol., 2008. [5] Roy G., 2003, ``Vers une modelisation approfondie de l'endommagement dynamique ductile. Investigation experimentale d'une nuance de tantale et developpements theoriques'', Ph.D. Thesis, Poitiers University, France

  18. Microalloying ultrafine grained Al alloys with enhanced ductility.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Li, J K; Cheng, P M; Liu, G; Wang, R H; Chen, B A; Zhang, J Y; Sun, J; Yang, M X; Yang, G

    2014-01-01

    Bulk ultrafine grained (UFG)/nanocrystal metals possess exceptional strength but normally poor ductility and thermal stability, which hinder their practical applications especially in high-temperature environments. Through microalloying strategy that enables the control of grains and precipitations in nanostructured regime, here we design and successfully produce a highly microstructure-stable UFG Al-Cu-Sc alloy with ~275% increment in ductility and simultaneously ~50% enhancement in yield strength compared with its Sc-free counterpart. Although the precipitations in UFG alloys are usually preferentially occurred at grain boundaries even at room temperature, minor Sc addition into the UFG Al-Cu alloys is found to effectively stabilize the as-processed microstructure, strongly suppress the θ-Al2Cu phase precipitation at grain boundary, and remarkably promote the θ'-Al2Cu nanoparticles dispersed in the grain interior in artificial aging. A similar microalloying strategy is expected to be equally effective for other UFG heat-treatable alloys. PMID:24398915

  19. Microalloying Ultrafine Grained Al Alloys with Enhanced Ductility

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, L.; Li, J. K.; Cheng, P. M.; Liu, G.; Wang, R. H.; Chen, B. A.; Zhang, J. Y.; Sun, J.; Yang, M. X.; Yang, G.

    2014-01-01

    Bulk ultrafine grained (UFG)/nanocrystal metals possess exceptional strength but normally poor ductility and thermal stability, which hinder their practical applications especially in high-temperature environments. Through microalloying strategy that enables the control of grains and precipitations in nanostructured regime, here we design and successfully produce a highly microstructure-stable UFG Al-Cu-Sc alloy with ~275% increment in ductility and simultaneously ~50% enhancement in yield strength compared with its Sc-free counterpart. Although the precipitations in UFG alloys are usually preferentially occurred at grain boundaries even at room temperature, minor Sc addition into the UFG Al-Cu alloys is found to effectively stabilize the as-processed microstructure, strongly suppress the θ-Al2Cu phase precipitation at grain boundary, and remarkably promote the θ′-Al2Cu nanoparticles dispersed in the grain interior in artificial aging. A similar microalloying strategy is expected to be equally effective for other UFG heat-treatable alloys. PMID:24398915

  20. Calculation Method of Lateral Strengths and Ductility Factors of Constructions with Shear Walls of Different Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyoshi; Nakao, Masato; Murakami, Masahide; Miyazawa, Kenji

    2008-07-08

    For seismic design, ductility-related force modification factors are named R factor in Uniform Building Code of U.S, q factor in Euro Code 8 and Ds (inverse of R) factor in Japanese Building Code. These ductility-related force modification factors for each type of shear elements are appeared in those codes. Some constructions use various types of shear walls that have different ductility, especially for their retrofit or re-strengthening. In these cases, engineers puzzle the decision of force modification factors of the constructions. Solving this problem, new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories for simple shear wall systems is proposed and named 'Stiffness--Potential Energy Addition Method' in this paper. This method uses two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in damage limit state and safety limit state. Two lateral strengths of stories in both limit states are calculated from these two design lateral strengths for each type of shear walls in both limit states. Calculated strengths have the same quality as values obtained by strength addition method using many steps of load-deformation data of shear walls. The new method to calculate ductility factors is also proposed in this paper. This method is based on the new method to calculate lateral strengths of stories. This method can solve the problem to obtain ductility factors of stories with shear walls of different ductility.

  1. Metallic glass composition

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  2. Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Gschneidner; A.O. Pecharsky; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from {approx}3 to {approx}350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature (<15 K) prototype cryocooler regenerator materials HoCu{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K.

  3. Coupled thermal stress simulations of ductile tearing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Dion, Kristin

    2016-03-01

    Predictions for ductile tearing of a geometrically complex Ti-6Al-4V plate were generated using a Unified Creep Plasticity Damage model in fully coupled thermal stress simulations. Uniaxial tension and butterfly shear tests performed at displacement rates of 0.0254 and 25.4 mm/s were also simulated. Results from these simulations revealed that the material temperature increase due to plastic work can have a dramatic effect on material ductility predictions in materials that exhibit little strain hardening. Furthermore, this occurs because the temperature increase causes the apparent hardening of the material to decrease which leads to the initiation of deformation localization and subsequent ductilemore » tearing earlier in the loading process.« less

  4. A review of macroscopic ductile failure criteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo; Reedlunn, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this work was to describe several of the ductile failure criteria com- monly used to solve practical problems. The following failure models were considered: equivalent plastic strain, equivalent plastic strain in tension, maximum shear, Mohr- Coulomb, Wellman's tearing parameter, Johnson-Cook and BCJ MEM. The document presents the main characteristics of each failure model as well as sample failure predic- tions for simple proportional loading stress histories in three dimensions and in plane stress. Plasticity calculations prior to failure were conducted with a simple, linear hardening, J2 plasticity model. The resulting failure envelopes were plotted in prin- cipal stress space and plastic strain space, where the dependence on stress triaxiality and Lode angle are clearly visible. This information may help analysts select a ductile fracture model for a practical problem and help interpret analysis results.

  5. Rapid ductile afterslip from coseismic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. D.; Meade, B. J.; Savage, H. M.; Rowe, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes are typically followed by months of afterslip, the total of which is generally an order of magnitude smaller than the seismic slip. The classic model for afterslip envisions seismic slip transferring stress to adjacent regions, driving accelerated stable sliding that expands the rupture area. However, a small proportion of earthquakes exhibit unusually large and rapid afterslip in the hours immediately following rupture. Here we present a new model that bridges the transition from seismic to postseismic deformation and may explain these observations of rapid afterslip. Seismic slip produces a significant temperature rise that slowly diffuses into the surrounding material following the cessation of seismic slip. Any process with strong temperature dependence is more sensitive to this heat transient than to the ambient temperatures present during the interseismic period. Coupling the temperature evolution of a fault to a ductile flow law we model postseismic deformation during the heat transient. Our idea of coseismic heating enhancing ductile flow is supported by field observations of micro-shear zones adjacent to psuedotachylyte veins. Enhanced ductility is largely confined to the zone that deformed seismically, making our model equivalent to rapid afterslip. Combining analytic and numerical methods we solve for the total afterslip in terms of the slip rate and fault strength during seismic slip and the ductile flow parameters. Our results are sensitive to the assumed rheology and deforming zone thickness, and while total afterslip is generally small some plausible parameter ranges predict afterslip comparable to or greater than the seismic slip developing over timescales shorter than an hour. We demonstrate that rapid afterslip can drive significant frictional heating, leading to a thermal runaway instability that produces a near total postseismic stress drop. To conclude we investigate the tsunami magnitude that rapid afterslip could produce.

  6. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  7. Preparation of nanostructured materials having improved ductility

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian T.

    2010-04-20

    A method for preparing a nanostructured aluminum alloy involves heating an aluminum alloy workpiece at temperature sufficient to produce a single phase coarse grained aluminum alloy, then refining the grain size of the workpiece at a temperature at or below room temperature, and then aging the workpiece to precipitate second phase particles in the nanosized grains of the workpiece that increase the ductility without decreasing the strength of the workpiece.

  8. Weldability and hot ductility of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Ash, D.I.; Edwards, G.R. . Center for Welding and Joining Research); David, S.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The weldability of iron aluminide alloys is discussed. Although readily welded with electron beam (EB) and gas-tungsten arc (GTA) techniques, iron aluminides are sometimes susceptible to cracking during cooling when welded with the GTA welding process. Taken into account are the effects of microstructural instability (grain growth), weld heat input (cooling rate) and environment on the hot ductility of an iron aluminide alloy designated FA-129. 64 refs., 59 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Testing Bonds Between Brittle And Ductile Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Donald R.; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    Simple uniaxial strain test devised to measure intrinsic shear strength. Brittle film deposited on ductile stubstrate film, and combination stretched until brittle film cracks, then separates from substrate. Dimensions of cracked segments related in known way to tensile strength of brittle film and shear strength of bond between two films. Despite approximations and limitations of technique, tests show it yields semiquantitative measures of bond strengths, independent of mechanical properties of substrates, with results reproducible with plus or minus 6 percent.

  10. Strong, Ductile Rotor For Cryogenic Flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royals, W. T.

    1993-01-01

    Improved magnetic flowmeter rotor resists cracking at cryogenic temperatures, yet provides adequate signal to magnetic pickup outside flowmeter housing. Consists mostly of stainless-steel alloy 347, which is ductile and strong at low temperatures. Small bead of stainless-steel alloy 410 welded in groove around circumference of round bar of stainless-steel alloy 347; then rotor machined from bar. Tips of rotor blades contain small amounts of magnetic alloy, and passage of tips detected.

  11. Postweld solution annealing effects on the ductility of ni-co-cr-base alloy gas tungsten arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C.-S.; Baek, K.-K.

    1996-12-01

    The welding characteristics of a commercial wrought alloy with a nominal composition of Ni-29Co-28Cr-2.75Si were investigated. Gas tungsten arc weldments with filler metal matching the chemistry of the alloy were found to have limited room-temperature ductility in the as-welded condition. Since welding is the main fabrication method of this alloy, the welding and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) characteristics were examined to provide guidelines for fabrication in the field. Metallographic evaluation revealed that the weld metal was characterized by the distribution of a continuous eutectic phase consisting primarily of (Si,Ti)xNiy The continuous eutectic phase in the as-welded deposit, which caused poor ductility of the welds, was successfully reduced or removed with proper PWHT. The PWHT is necessary if cold forming of a weldment is required after welding or if adequate joint ductility is a design requirement. The recommended PWHT temperature is 1050 °C.

  12. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-02-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here.

  13. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility.

    PubMed

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here. PMID:26887444

  14. Manipulating the interfacial structure of nanomaterials to achieve a unique combination of strength and ductility

    PubMed Central

    Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein; Pan, Zhiliang; Rupert, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The control of interfaces in engineered nanostructured materials has met limited success compared with that which has evolved in natural materials, where hierarchical structures with distinct interfacial states are often found. Such interface control could mitigate common limitations of engineering nanomaterials. For example, nanostructured metals exhibit extremely high strength, but this benefit comes at the expense of other important properties like ductility. Here, we report a technique for combining nanostructuring with recent advances capable of tuning interface structure, a complementary materials design strategy that allows for unprecedented property combinations. Copper-based alloys with both grain sizes in the nanometre range and distinct grain boundary structural features are created, using segregating dopants and a processing route that favours the formation of amorphous intergranular films. The mechanical behaviour of these alloys shows that the trade-off between strength and ductility typically observed for metallic materials is successfully avoided here. PMID:26887444

  15. Ductile Titanium Alloy with Low Poisson's Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y. L.; Li, S. J.; Sun, B. B.; Sui, M. L.; Yang, R.

    2007-05-25

    We report a ductile {beta}-type titanium alloy with body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure having a low Poisson's ratio of 0.14. The almost identical ultralow bulk and shear moduli of {approx}24 GPa combined with an ultrahigh strength of {approx}0.9 GPa contribute to easy crystal distortion due to much-weakened chemical bonding of atoms in the crystal, leading to significant elastic softening in tension and elastic hardening in compression. The peculiar elastic and plastic deformation behaviors of the alloy are interpreted as a result of approaching the elastic limit of the bcc crystal under applied stress.

  16. Continuous-Discontinuous Model for Ductile Fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Seabra, Mariana R. R.; Cesar de Sa, Jose M. A.

    2010-06-15

    In this contribution, a continuum-dicontinuum model for ductile failure is presented. The degradation of material properties trough deformation is described by Continuum Damage Mechanics in a non-local integral formulation to avoid mesh dependence. In the final stage of failure, the damaged zone is replaced by a cohesive macro crack and subsequent traction-free macro crack for a more realistic representation of the phenomenon. The inclusion of the discontinuity surfaces is performed by the XFEM and Level Set Method and avoids the spurious damage growth typical of this class of models.

  17. Rapid method of separating Am(VI) from transplutonium and rare-earth elements on a cation exchanger in phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirova, G.S.; Guseva, L.I.

    1988-07-01

    Measurements have been made on cation-exchanger sorption of americium, other actinoids, and certain rare-earth elements from 0.1-2.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ when the elements have been oxidized with ammonium persulfate alone or mixed with silver phosphate. There are considerable differences in behavior between the americium and the other elements on account of its being oxidized to a higher valency state. Measurements have been made on the effects of acid and oxidant concentrations and of the oxidation and elution conditions on the americium yield when the exchanger is treated with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Optimum oxidation conditions have been chosen, and a rapid method has been devised for separating americium(VI) from other transplutonium elements and REE on Dowex 50 /times/ 8, where the eluent is 0.1-1.0 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ plus 0.05 M (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/.

  18. Phase stability in heavy f-electron metals from first-principles theory

    SciTech Connect

    Soderlind, P

    2005-11-17

    The structural phase stability of heavy f-electron metals is studied by means of density-functional theory (DFT). These include temperature-induced transitions in plutonium metal as well as pressure-induced transitions in the trans-plutonium metals Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf. The early actinides (Th-Np) display phases that could be rather well understood from the competition of a crystal-symmetry breaking mechanism (Peierls distortion) of the 5f states and electrostatic forces, while for the trans-plutonium metals (Am-Cf) the ground-state structures are governed by 6d bonding. We show in this paper that new physics is needed to understand the phases of the actinides in the volume range of about 15-30 {angstrom}{sup 3}. At these volumes one would expect, from theoretical arguments made in the past, to encounter highly complex crystal phases due to a Peierls distortion. Here we argue that the symmetry reduction associated with spin polarization can make higher symmetry phases competitive. Taking this into account, DFT is shown to describe the well-known phase diagram of plutonium and also the recently discovered complex and intriguing high-pressure phase diagrams of Am and Cm. The theory is further applied to investigate the behaviors of Bk and Cf under compression.

  19. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN OR CREATE PATTERNS USED IN THEIR MOLDS. AS A JOBBING FOUNDRY MAKING CASTINGS ON AN CONTRACTUAL-ORDER BASIS, THEIR CUSTOMERS PROVIDE, OR CONTRACT FOR PATTERN CONSTRUCTION. SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES, HOWEVER, PROVIDE REPAIR SERVICES SHOWN AS JOHNNY TIDWELL PREPARES A PLATE, FORM -FITTING TO THEIR MOLDING MACHINES, THAT A PATTERN WILL BE AFFIXED TO. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Impact testing of ductile cast iron: Tension and compression

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T.; Takata, T.; Sogabe, Y.

    1995-11-01

    Impact tension and compression tests on ferritic ductile cast iron (JIS FCD370) are conducted by means of the split Hopkinson bar technique. Reliable stress-strain relations in tension and compression for ductile cast iron are determined at strain rates of over 10{sup 3}/s. The test results indicate that ductile cast iron shows different strength characteristics in tension and compression under impact loading as well as under quasi-static loading. Microscopic examinations of the post-test specimens reveal that this mechanical behavior is attributed to the presence of spheroidal graphites in a ferritic matrix of ductile cast iron.

  1. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S.; Kingsbury, G.R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  2. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp(2) carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  3. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Martin, Heidi B.

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes. PMID:25404788

  4. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength-ductility trade-off.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind's most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength-ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy should

  5. Metastable high-entropy dual-phase alloys overcome the strength–ductility trade-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiming; Pradeep, Konda Gokuldoss; Deng, Yun; Raabe, Dierk; Tasan, Cemal Cem

    2016-06-01

    Metals have been mankind’s most essential materials for thousands of years; however, their use is affected by ecological and economical concerns. Alloys with higher strength and ductility could alleviate some of these concerns by reducing weight and improving energy efficiency. However, most metallurgical mechanisms for increasing strength lead to ductility loss, an effect referred to as the strength–ductility trade-off. Here we present a metastability-engineering strategy in which we design nanostructured, bulk high-entropy alloys with multiple compositionally equivalent high-entropy phases. High-entropy alloys were originally proposed to benefit from phase stabilization through entropy maximization. Yet here, motivated by recent work that relaxes the strict restrictions on high-entropy alloy compositions by demonstrating the weakness of this connection, the concept is overturned. We decrease phase stability to achieve two key benefits: interface hardening due to a dual-phase microstructure (resulting from reduced thermal stability of the high-temperature phase); and transformation-induced hardening (resulting from the reduced mechanical stability of the room-temperature phase). This combines the best of two worlds: extensive hardening due to the decreased phase stability known from advanced steels and massive solid-solution strengthening of high-entropy alloys. In our transformation-induced plasticity-assisted, dual-phase high-entropy alloy (TRIP-DP-HEA), these two contributions lead respectively to enhanced trans-grain and inter-grain slip resistance, and hence, increased strength. Moreover, the increased strain hardening capacity that is enabled by dislocation hardening of the stable phase and transformation-induced hardening of the metastable phase produces increased ductility. This combined increase in strength and ductility distinguishes the TRIP-DP-HEA alloy from other recently developed structural materials. This metastability-engineering strategy

  6. A diffraction based study of the deformation mechanisms in anomalously ductile B2 intermetallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulay, Rupalee Prashant

    For many decades, the brittle nature of most intermetallic compounds (e.g. NiAl) has been the limiting factor in their practical application. Many B2 (CsCl prototypical structure) intermetallics are known to exhibit slip on the <001>{110} slip mode, which provides only 3 independent slip systems and, hence, is unable to satisfy the von Mises (a.k.a. Taylor) criterion for polycrystalline ductility. As a result, inherent polycrystalline ductility is unexpected. Recent discovery of a number of ductile B2 intermetallics has raised questions about possible violation of the von Mises criterion by these alloys. These ductile intermetallic compounds are MR (metal (M) combined with a rare earth metal or group IV refractory metal (R)) alloys and are stoichiometric, ordered compounds. Single crystal slip trace analyses have only identified the presence of <100>{011} or <100>{010} slip systems. More than 100 other B2 MR compounds are known to exist and many of them have already been shown to be ductile (e.g., CuY, AgY, CuDy, CoZr, CoTi, etc.). Furthermore, these alloys exhibit a large Bauschinger effect. The present work uses several diffraction based techniques including electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and in-situ neutron diffraction; in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mechanical testing, and crystal plasticity modeling, to elucidate the reason for ductility in select B2 alloys, explore the spread of this ductility over the B2 family, and understand the Bauschinger effect in these alloys. Several possible explanations (e.g., slip of <111> dislocations, strong texture, phase transformations and twinning) for the anomalous ductility were explored. An X-ray diffraction based analysis ruled out texture, phase purity and departure from order as explanations for the anomalous ductility in MR alloys. In-situ neutron diffraction and post deformation SEM, EBSD, and TEM were unable to

  7. Enhancing tensile ductility of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC by lamination with Mg-9% Li alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1995-05-01

    A laminated metal composite has been made by press bonding alternating layers of a particulate-reinforced aluminum MMC, 6090/SiC/25p, and a Mg-9%Li alloy. The mechanical properties including tensile ductility were evaluated. The tensile ductility of the Al MMC was found to increase from 3.5% to 11.5%. In contrast to other laminates based on ultrahigh carbon, steel, the laminate of this study and other Al MMC laminates exhibited tensile yield strengths that did not follow the rule of averages. This is attributed to interlayer reaction products developed during processing of the Al MMC laminates.

  8. High velocity sliding at polycrystalline ductile metal interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerberg, J. E.; Milhans, J. L.; Ravelo, R.; Germann, T. C.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of large scale 3-dimensional NonEquilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) simulations for Al-Al and Al-Ta interfaces for sliding velocities in the range 20-4000 m/s at pressures of 15 GPa. System sizes include 8 M, 26 M and 138 M atoms for times to 40 ns. We discuss polycrystalline samples with initial grain sizes of 13 nm and 20 nm. For velocities above a size dependent critical velocity, vc, the frictional force per unit area agrees with single crystal simulations. For velocities below vc, the polycrystalline interfaces evolve to a new steady state grain size distribution characterized by very large plastic deformation with larger grain sizes, time dependent coarsening and refinement, a graded size distribution in the direction normal to the sliding interface, and significantly larger frictional forces per unit area compared to similar single crystal sliding interfaces. We also find that for the Al-Ta interface the frictional properties are determined by the weaker Al material. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. The support of the LANL ASC-PEM program is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Abrasive wear behavior of a brittle matrix (MoSi2) composite reinforced with a ductile phase (Nb)

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-10-01

    The toughness of a variety of brittle ceramic and intermetallic matrices has been improved through the incorporation of ductile metallic reinforcements. In these composites resistance to catastrophic failure of the matrix is derived through a combination of mechanisms, including matrix crack bridging, matrix crack defection and rupturing of the ductile phase. The degree to which these mechanisms operate is a function of composite microstructure. In general, the ductile phase is softer than the matrix phase. This may have unique implications when the materials are subjected to a wear environment, whether intentional or not. Hence, it is important to understand the wear behavior of these new materials. MoSi2–Nb was selected as a model composite system, in part because of the wide body of open literature regarding this system. The influences of abrasive wear environment and the composite microstructure (Nb reinforcement size, shape and volume fraction) on the wear resistance of the composites are reported.

  10. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  11. ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ALTHOUGH SOUTHERN DUCTILE DOES NOT OWN PATTERNS, THEY ARE REQUIRED TO STORE THEM AND KEEP THEM AVAILABLE FOR THEIR CUSTOMERS ORDERS. THE BARRET/DOUGLAS LIFTING TRUCK IS USED TO REACH AND TRANSPORT PATTERNS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Mold Making, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Study made of ductility limitations of aluminum-silicon alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. A.; Frederick, S. F.

    1967-01-01

    Study of the relation between microstructure and mechanical properties of aluminum-silicon alloys determines the cause of the variations in properties resulting from differences in solidification rate. It was found that variations in strength are a consequence of variations in ductility and that ductility is inversely proportional to dendrite cell size.

  13. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  14. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  15. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  16. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  17. 46 CFR 56.60-15 - Ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2). (b) Ductile iron castings conforming to ASTM A 395... 395 (incorporated by reference, see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used within the service restrictions and... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ductile iron. 56.60-15 Section 56.60-15 Shipping...

  18. Three Dimensional Forming Simulation of the Shielded Slot Plate for the MCFC Using a Ductile Fracture Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Yang, D. Y.; Lee, S. R.; Chang, I. G.; Lee, T. W.

    2011-08-01

    The shielded slot plate, which has a sheared corrugated trapezoidal pattern, is a component of the metallic bipolar plate for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the fuel cell, the unit cell of the shielded slot plate should have a relatively large upper area. Additionally, defects from the forming process should be minimized. In order to simulate the slitting process, whereby sheared corrugated patterns are formed, ductile fracture criteria based on the histories of stress and strain are employed. The user material subroutine VUMAT is employed for implementation of the material and ductile fracture criteria in the commercial FEM software ABAQUS. The variables of the ductile fracture criteria were determined by comparing the simulation results and the experimental results of the tension test and the shearing test. Parametric studies were conducted to determine the critical value of the ductile fracture criterion. Employing these ductile fracture criteria, the three dimensional forming process of the shielded slot plate was numerically simulated. The effects of the slitting process in the forming process of the shielded slot plate were analyzed through a FEM simulation and experimental studies. Finally, experiments involving microscopic and macroscopic observations were conducted to verify the numerical simulations of the 3-step forming process.

  19. Evaluation of varying ductile fracture criteria for 42CrMo steel by compressions at different temperatures and strain rates.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s(-1) are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture. PMID:24592175

  20. Post Quench Ductility Evaluation of Zircaloy-4 and Select Iron Alloys under Design Basis and Extended LOCA Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Keiser, James R; Terrani, Kurt A; Bell, Gary L; Snead, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1200 C in flowing steam with tubing specimens of Zircaloy-4, 317, 347 stainless steels, and the commercial FeCrAl alloy APMT. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior and post quench ductility of these alloys under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The parabolic rate constant for Zircaloy-4 tubing samples at 1200 were determined to be k = 2.173 107 g2/cm4/s C, in excellent agreement with the Cathcart-Pawel correlation. The APMT alloy experienced the slowest oxidation rate among all materials examined in this work. The ductility of post quenched samples was evaluated by ring compression tests at 135 C. For Zircaloy-4, the ductile to brittle transition occurs at an equivalent cladding reacted (ECR) of 19.3%. SS-347 was still ductile after being oxidized for 2400 s (CP-ECR 50%), but the maximum load was reduced significantly owing to the metal layer thickness reduction. No ductility decrease was observed for the post-quenched APMT samples oxidized up to four hours.

  1. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an innovative approach involving hot compression tests, numerical simulations, and mathematic computations provides mutual support to evaluate ductile damage cumulating process and DFC diagram along with deformation conditions, which has not been expounded by Cockcroft and Latham. The results show that the maximum damage value appears in the region of upsetting drum, while the minimal value appears in the middle region. Furthermore, DFC of 42CrMo steel at temperature range of 1123~1348 K and strain rate of 0.01~10 s−1 are not constant but change in a range of 0.160~0.226; thus, they have been defined as varying ductile fracture criteria (VDFC) and characterized by a function of temperature and strain rate. In bulk forming operations, VDFC help technicians to choose suitable process parameters and avoid the occurrence of fracture. PMID:24592175

  2. X-ray diffraction study of the phase purity, order, and texture of ductile B2 intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Mulay, Rupalee; Wollmershauser, J.A. A.; Heisel, M A; Bei, Hongbin; Russell, A M; Agnew, S R

    2010-01-01

    Representatives (AgY, CuY, AgEr, CuDy, MgY and MgCe) of the newly discovered family of ductile stoichiometric B2 intermetallic (metal-rare-earth element, MR) compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction, to determine if their anomalous ductility is related to an exceptional level of phase purity, lack of chemical ordering or a strong crystallographic texture. Brittle NiAl served as an anti-type in this study. We found that all of the rare-earth compounds, except MgY, have a significant volume fraction (-5-20vol.%) of second phases (M{sub 2}R intermetallics and R{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides), which has not been reported in previous studies of these materials. The most ductile of observed MR compounds, AgY, is highly ordered. A moderate texture was observed in AgY, which may explain its higher ductility (using polycrystal modeling) as compared to other MR compounds. However, the intrinsic polycrystalline ductility of these compounds in the randomly textured state (like that observed in CuY) still has no specific, definitive explanation.

  3. The nucleation of austenite in ferritic ductile cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, J.M.; Hon, M.H. ); Lee, J.L. )

    1992-07-01

    Austempered ductile cast iron has recently been receiving increasing attention because of its excellent combination of strength and ductility. Since the austenitization process has a significant influence on the mechanical properties of austempered ductile cast iron, several investigations on the nucleation sites of austenite and diffusion paths of carbon from spheroidal graphite have been reported in ferritic ductile cast iron. However, agreement on this subject has not ben reached. The purpose of this paper is to study the preferential nucleation sites of austenite during austenitization at two austenitizing temperatures in ferritic ductile cast iron. An attempt was made to understand the reasons which give rise to preferential austenite nucleation sites. The carbon diffusion paths from spheroidal graphite were also investigated.

  4. Causes of the hot ductility drops of steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolbasnikov, N. G.; Matveev, M. A.; Mishin, V. V.; Mishnev, P. A.; Nikonov, S. V.

    2014-09-01

    The effect of conditions of continuous casting and hot rolling of steel on the high-temperature ductility of a microalloyed pipe steel of strength class Kh42 and 17G1S-U steel is studied. A Gleeble-3800 thermomechanical facility is used to perform physical modeling of the hot ductility of steel. The temperature dependence of the hot ductility of steel is determined under various slab cooling conditions in a continuous caster and during hot rolling. The ductility drops of iron and steels is found to be mainly caused by an increase in the elastic modulus near the temperatures of the polymorphic transformation caused by first- and secondorder phase transformations (polymorphic and magnetic transformations, respectively). Structural factors, such as the grain size, excess-phase inclusions located along initial grain boundaries, and interstitial impurities, lead to an additional decrease in the ductility.

  5. Recommendations for ductile and brittle failure design criteria for ductile cast iron spent-fuel shipping containers

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.W.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents recommendations for establishing design and acceptance criteria for the ductile cast iron to be used for fabricating spent-fuel shipping casks. These recommendations address design criteria for preventing ductile failure, and acceptance criteria for preventing brittle fracture, based upon drop testing a flawed prototype cask.

  6. Hot Ductility Behavior of an 8 Pct Cr Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Sun, Shuhua; Shi, Zhongping; Wang, Bo; Fu, Wantang

    2015-04-01

    The hot ductility of an 8 pct Cr roller steel was determined between 1173 K and 1473 K (900 °C and 1200 °C) at strain rates of 0.01 to 10 s-1 through tensile testing. The fracture morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy, and the microstructure was examined through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The dependence of the hot ductility behavior on the deformation conditions, grain size, and precipitation was analyzed. The relationship between the reduction in area and the natural logarithm of the Zener-Hollomon parameter (ln Z) was found to be a second-order polynomial. When ln Z was greater than 40 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by incompatible deformation between the grains. When ln Z was between 32 and 40 s-1, the hot ductility was excellent and the main fracture mechanism was void linking. When ln Z was below 32 s-1, the hot ductility was poor and fracture was mainly caused by grain boundary sliding. A fine grain structure is beneficial for homogenous deformation and dynamic recrystallization, which induces better hot ductility. The effect of M7C3 carbide particles dispersed in the matrix on the hot ductility was small. The grain growth kinetics in the 8 pct Cr steel were obtained between 1373 K and 1473 K (1100 °C and 1200 °C). Finally, optimized preheating and forging procedures for 8 pct Cr steel rollers are provided.

  7. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, TOWARDS CUPOLA WHERE SCRAP METAL AND OTHER COMPONENTS ARE MELTED TO CREATE DUCTILE IRON. BRIGHT FLASH IN BACKGROUND RESULTS FROM MOLTEN METAL (DUCTILE IRON) BEING POURED FROM CUPOLA INTO TRANSFER LADLE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Creep deformation characteristics of ductile discontinuous fiber reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1993-10-01

    Role of material parameters and geometric parameters of ductile reinforcing phase on the creep deformation behavior of 20% discontinuously reinforced composite was numerically investigated including debonding and pull-out mechanisms. Results indicate that for rigidly bonded interfaces, the creep rate of the composite is not significantly influenced by the material properties and geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase due to development of large hydrostatic stress and constrained deformation in the reinforcement. For debonding interfaces, the geometric parameters of the reinforcing phase are important; however, event with very weak interfacial behavior low composite creep rates can be achieved by suitable selection of the geometric parameters of the ductile reinforcing phase.

  9. High-temperature ductility of electro-deposited nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Work done during the past several months on high temperature ductility of electrodeposited nickel is summarized. Data are presented which show that earlier measurements made at NASA-Langley erred on the low side, that strain rate has a marked influence on high temperature ductility, and that codeposition of a small amount of manganese helps to improve high temperature ductility. Influences of a number of other factors on nickel properties were also investigated. They included plating solution temperature, current density, agitation, and elimination of the wetting agent from the plating solution. Repair of a large nozzle section by nickel plating is described.

  10. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.C.

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  11. Experimental aspects of an investigation of macroscopic ductile failure criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Soo Hoo, M.S.; Benzley, S.E.; Priddy, T.G.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental results for the ductile failure of 7075-T651 aluminum are presented. Four separate shapes were tested to investigate the importance that macroscopic effective shear stress, hydrostatic stress, and plastic strain play in describing ductile failure of materials. The specimens used were: thin wall torsion tubes to create a state of pure shear, uniform hollow tubes to create a state of uniaxial stress; hour-glass shaped hollow tubes to create a state of biaxial stress; and notched round bars to create a state of triaxial stress. Two proposed ductile failure criteria are discussed in conjunction with the experimental results presented.

  12. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2010-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  13. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2009-12-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  14. Specimen preparation by ion beam slope cutting for characterization of ductile damage by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Besserer, Hans-Bernward; Gerstein, Gregory; Maier, Hans Jürgen; Nürnberger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    To investigate ductile damage in parts made by cold sheet-bulk metal forming a suited specimen preparation is required to observe the microstructure and defects such as voids by electron microscopy. By means of ion beam slope cutting both a targeted material removal can be applied and mechanical or thermal influences during preparation avoided. In combination with scanning electron microscopy this method allows to examine voids in the submicron range and thus to analyze early stages of ductile damage. In addition, a relief structure is formed by the selectivity of the ion bombardment, which depends on grain orientation and microstructural defects. The formation of these relief structures is studied using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction and the use of this side effect to interpret the microstructural mechanisms of voids formation by plastic deformation is discussed. A comprehensive investigation of the suitability of ion beam milling to analyze ductile damage is given at the examples of a ferritic deep drawing steel and a dual phase steel. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:321-327, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26854331

  15. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woll, K.; Bergamaschi, A.; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C.; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F.

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (±0.33) ms-1 and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material.

  16. Ru/Al Multilayers Integrate Maximum Energy Density and Ductility for Reactive Materials

    PubMed Central

    Woll, K.; Bergamaschi, A.; Avchachov, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Gier, S.; Pauly, C.; Leibenguth, P.; Wagner, C.; Nordlund, K.; Mücklich, F.

    2016-01-01

    Established and already commercialized energetic materials, such as those based on Ni/Al for joining, lack the adequate combination of high energy density and ductile reaction products. To join components, this combination is required for mechanically reliable bonds. In addition to the improvement of existing technologies, expansion into new fields of application can also be anticipated which triggers the search for improved materials. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of the key parameters that enables us to classify the Ru/Al system as new reactive material among other energetic systems. We finally found that Ru/Al exhibits the unusual integration of high energy density and ductility. For example, we measured reaction front velocities up to 10.9 (±0.33) ms−1 and peak reaction temperatures of about 2000 °C indicating the elevated energy density. To our knowledge, such high temperatures have never been reported in experiments for metallic multilayers. In situ experiments show the synthesis of a single-phase B2-RuAl microstructure ensuring improved ductility. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate the transformation behavior to RuAl. This study fundamentally characterizes a Ru/Al system and demonstrates its enhanced properties fulfilling the identification requirements of a novel nanoscaled energetic material. PMID:26822309

  17. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  18. Retention of ductility in high-strength steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. R.; Zackay, V. F.

    1969-01-01

    To produce high strength alloy steel with retention of ductility, include tempering, cooling and subsequent tempering. Five parameters for optimum results are pretempering temperature, amount of strain, strain rate, temperature during strain, and retempering temperature.

  19. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 20' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 20' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED USING PIPE PULLERS. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED FROM CASTING MACHINE - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF CASTING MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING WEIGHED ON SCALES AT CASTING MACHINE. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY CAST, AS OPERATOR WATCHES TO ENSURE QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritic particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  4. Ductile alloy and process for preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Ostenson, Jerome E.

    1983-03-29

    An alloy for the commercial production of ductile superconducting wire is prepared by melting together copper and at least 15 weight percent niobium under non-oxygen-contaminating conditions, and rapidly cooling the melt to form a ductile composite consisting of discrete, randomly distributed and orientated dendritic-shaped particles of niobium in a copper matrix. As the wire is worked, the dendritric particles are realigned parallel to the longitudinal axis and when drawn form a plurality of very fine ductile superconductors in a ductile copper matrix. The drawn wire may be tin coated and wound into magnets or the like before diffusing the tin into the wire to react with the niobium. Impurities such as aluminum or gallium may be added to improve upper critical field characteristics.

  5. Stiffness, strength, and ductility of nanoscale thin films and membranes: a combined wrinkling-cracking methodology.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun Young; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Beers, Kathryn L; Stafford, Christopher M

    2011-08-10

    We establish and validate a measurement method based on wrinkling-cracking phenomena that allows unambiguous measurements of three fundamental mechanical properties in nanoscale thin film geometries, including elastic modulus, strength, and fracture strain. In addition to polymer and metal thin films, the method is applied to the active nanolayers of a composite reverse osmosis membrane before and after chlorination, illustrating the ability to detect a ductile-to-brittle transition in these materials indicative of "embrittlement", a behavior that impairs long-term durability and is detrimental to membrane performance. PMID:21761850

  6. Ductile flow by water-assisted cataclasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Brok, Bas

    2003-04-01

    In the presence of water otherwise brittle materials may deform macroscopically ductile by water-assisted cataclastic creep. This is possible as long as (i) solubility is high enough, so that stress-corrosion can occur, and (ii) local stress is low enough, to that fracturing remains subcritical. Water-assisted cataclastic creep (WACC) may play an important role in the middle and lower continental crust where mineral solubilities are high and stresses low. WACC is a poorly understood deformation process. Experiments were performed on very soluble brittle salts (Na-chlorate; K-alum) to study microstructure development by WACC. The experiments were carried out at room temperature and atmospheric pressure in a small see-through vessel. In this way the cataclastic deformation process could be studied "in-situ" under the microscope. Crystals were loaded in the presence of saturated salt solution. It appeared that originally straight mineral surfaces were instable when kept under stress. Grooves (or channels) slowly developed in the surface by local dissolution. These grooves behave like so-called Grinfeld instabilities. They develop because the energy of a grooved surface under stress is lower than the energy of a straight surface under stress. The grooves may deepen and turn into subcritical cracks when local stress further increases. These cracks propagate slowly. They propagate parallel to sigma1 but also at an angle and even perpendicular to sigma1, often following crystallographically controlled directions. The fractures mostly change direction while propagating, locally making turns of more than 180 degrees. Irregular fracture fragments thus develop. The fractures may migrate sideways (as with grain bounday migration) probably by solution-redeposition driven by differences in stress between both sides of the fracture. Thus the shape of the fragments changes. The size of the fracture fragments seems to be controlled by the distance of the grooves, which decreases

  7. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B C; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-06-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp(3) bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the "grain size". On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures. PMID:27181833

  8. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Tang, M.; Anderson, T.L.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (J{sub c}) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often < 1-2 mm) routinely precede termination of the J-{Delta}a curve by brittle fracture. Large-scale yielding, coupled with small amounts of ductile tearing, magnifies the impact of small variations in microscale material properties on the macroscopic fracture toughness which contributes to the large amount scatter observed in measured J{sub c}-values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured J{sub c}-values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515).

  9. Welding of nickel-base superalloys having a nil-ductility range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An article made of a nickel-base superalloy having a nil-ductility range from the solidus temperature of the alloy to about 600.degree. F. below the solidus temperature is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, adjusting the temperature of the article to a welding temperature of from about 1800.degree. F. to about 2100.degree. F., welding a preselected area in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected area so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected area, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the nickel-based superalloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  10. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  11. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  12. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  13. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  14. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  15. Theory of nonequilibrium segregation in an Fe-Mn-Ni ternary alloy and a ductile-brittle-ductile transition

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, N.H.

    1996-07-01

    In an Fe-8Mn-7Ni ternary alloy, age-hardened by coherently formed face-centered tetragonal MnNi intermetallic compounds within the matrix, a modeling based on a regular solution model is performed to formulate the nonequilibrium grain boundary segregation behaviors of the alloying elements, followed by a ductile-brittle-ductile transition in the alloy. An equation is derived representing the segregation kinetics. It is confirmed from the calculations that the segregation behaviors of the elements are directly controlled by the precipitation reaction in the matrix. The nonequilibrium segregation behaviors are characterized by time-temperature diagrams, which show maximum segregation levels of the elements in an intermediate aging time and temperature range. The calculated results explain theoretically and semiquantitatively the relationship between the nonequilibrium segregation of the elements and the ductile-brittle-ductile transition.

  16. Ductile iron data base: correlations between microstructure and fracture toughness: Background document for draft ASTM ductile iron specification

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, P.; Lombrozo, P.

    1987-02-01

    A computer data base was generated to relate ductile iron fracture toughness with microstructural parameters, chemistry, and mechanical properties. Such relationships are considered necessary before a ductile iron material specification can be generated for spent nuclear fuel containers. Although scatter exists in the available data and more data are desirable, tentative conclusions can be drawn. In particular, ductile iron with high ferrite content (>80%) and spherical graphite nodules shows relatively high fracture toughness values suggesting its suitability for use in spent nuclear fuel casks. A material specification based upon nodule count (or the inversely related nodule spacing) may ensure a minimum fracture toughness in ductile iron. Increasing nodule spacing (decreasing count) increases the fracture toughness. Other relationships between mechanical properties and microstructure/chemistry are evaluated.

  17. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  18. Improvement in Abrasion Wear Resistance and Microstructural Changes with Deep Cryogenic Treatment of Austempered Ductile Cast Iron (ADI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolić, Sanja; Godec, Matjaž; Schauperl, Zdravko; Donik, Črtomir

    2016-07-01

    The application of a deep cryogenic treatment during the heat-treatment processes for different types of steels has demonstrated a significant influence on their mechanical and tribological properties. A great deal of research was conducted on steels, as well as on other kinds of materials, such as hard metal, gray cast iron, aluminum, aluminum alloys, etc., but not on austempered ductile iron (ADI). In this research the influence of a deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of austempered ductile iron was investigated. The ductile cast iron was austempered at the upper ausferritic temperature, deep cryogenically treated, and afterwards tempered at two different temperatures. The abrasion wear resistance was tested using the standard ASTM G65 method. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction in order to define the microstructural changes that influenced the properties of the ADI. The obtained results show that the deep cryogenic treatment, in combination with different tempering temperatures, affects the matrix microstructure of the austempered ductile iron, which leads to an increase in both the abrasion wear resistance and the hardness.

  19. Mechanical Characterization of Nodular Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K

    2012-01-03

    The objective of this study is to characterize the strength and fracture response of nodular ductile iron (NDI) and its underlying ferritic matrix phase. Quasistatic and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) compression tests were performed on NDI and a model material for the NDI matrix phase (Fe-Si alloy). Smooth and notch round bar (NRB) samples were loaded in tension until fracture to determine strain-at-failure with varying stress triaxiality. Multiple tests were performed on each small and large smooth bar samples to obtain fracture statistics with sample size. Fracture statistics are important for initializing simulations of fragmentation events. Johnson-Cook strength models were developed for the NDI and the Fe-Si alloy. NDI strength model parameters are: A = 525 MPa, B = 650 MPa, n = 0.6, and C = 0.0205. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2312/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. Fe-Si alloy strength model parameters are: A=560 MPa, B = 625 MPa, n = 0.5, and C = 0.02. The average SHPB experimental strain-rate of 2850/s was used for the reference strain-rate in this model. A Johnson-Cook failure model was developed for NDI with model parameters: D{sub 1} = 0.029, D{sub 2} = 0.44, D{sub 3} = -1.5, and D{sub 4} = D{sub 5} = 0. An exponential relationship was developed for the elongation-at-failure statistics as a function of length-scale with model parameters: S{sub f1} = 0.108, S{sub f2} = -0.00169, and L{sub m} = 32.4 {mu}m. NDI strength and failure models, including failure statistics, will be used in continuum-scale simulations of explosively-driven ring fragmentation. The Fe-Si alloy strength model will be used in mesoscale simulations of spall fracture in NDI, where the NDI matrix phase is captured explicitly.

  20. Group separation of transplutonium and rare-earth elements by liquid chromatography with a free stationary phase using 2,4,6-Tris[ditolylphosphoryl]-1,3,5-triazine

    SciTech Connect

    Chmutova, M.K.; Ivanova, L.A.; Bodrin, G.B.

    1995-03-01

    Methods are developed for group separation of trace quantities of transplutonium (TPE) and weighable amounts of rare-earth elements (REE) by liquid chromatography with a free stationary phase in systems based on bifunctional neutral organophosphorus compounds. Using a stationary phase of 2,4,6-tris(ditolylphosphoryl)-1,3,5-triazine in CHCl{sub 3}, REE are first eluted by 0.5 M NH{sub 4}SCN-1 M HCl and then TPE by 0.025 M hydroxyethylidenediphosphonic acid in H{sub 2}O. The fractions contained {approximately} 100% of one of the groups without an impurity of the other. Use of the same eluents and a CHCl{sub 3} solution of tetraphenyl-methylenediphosphine dioxide as the stationary phase gave 95.4% pure REE and 97.5% pure TPE.

  1. From brittle to ductile: a structure dependent ductility of diamond nanothread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Haifei; Zhang, Gang; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Cheng, Yuan; Bell, John M.; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Gu, Yuantong

    2016-05-01

    As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different mechanical responses than other 1D carbon allotropes. Analogously, the SW defects behave like a grain boundary that interrupts the consistency of the poly-benzene sections. For a DNT with a fixed length, the yield strength fluctuates in the vicinity of a certain value and is independent of the ``grain size''. On the other hand, both yield strength and yield strain show a clear dependence on the total length of DNT, which is due to the fact that the failure of the DNT is dominated by the SW defects. Its highly tunable ductility together with its ultra-light density and high Young's modulus makes diamond nanothread ideal for the creation of extremely strong three-dimensional nano-architectures.As a potential building block for the next generation of devices/multifunctional materials that are spreading in almost every technology sector, one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanomaterial has received intensive research interests. Recently, a new ultra-thin diamond nanothread (DNT) has joined this palette, which is a 1D structure with poly-benzene sections connected by Stone-Wales (SW) transformation defects. Using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we found that this sp3 bonded DNT can transition from brittle to ductile behaviour by varying the length of the poly-benzene sections, suggesting that DNT possesses entirely different

  2. Radiation-Induced Helium Nanobubbles Enhance Ductility in Submicron-Sized Single-Crystalline Copper.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming-Shuai; Du, Jun-Ping; Wan, Liang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Tian, Lin; Ma, Evan; Han, Wei-Zhong; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-07-13

    The workability and ductility of metals usually degrade with exposure to irradiation, hence the phrase "radiation damage". Here, we found that helium (He) radiation can actually enhance the room-temperature deformability of submicron-sized copper. In particular, Cu single crystals with diameter of 100-300 nm and containing numerous pressurized sub-10 nm He bubbles become stronger, more stable in plastic flow and ductile in tension, compared to fully dense samples of the same dimensions that tend to display plastic instability (strain bursts). The sub-10 nm He bubbles are seen to be dislocation sources as well as shearable obstacles, which promote dislocation storage and reduce dislocation mean free path, thus contributing to more homogeneous and stable plasticity. Failure happens abruptly only after significant bubble coalescence. The current findings can be explained in light of Weibull statistics of failure and the beneficial effects of bubbles on plasticity. These results shed light on plasticity and damage developments in metals and could open new avenues for making mechanically robust nano- and microstructures by ion beam processing and He bubble engineering. PMID:27249672

  3. Prevention of ductility loss in hydrogen-charged steel by gamma-ray irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, T.; Ikeya, M.; Touge, M.

    1984-11-01

    Hydrogen is known as a constituent which degrades the mechanical properties of metals and alloys, particularly their ductility. The degradation of mechanical properties, called hydrogen embrittlement, is a serious problem in metals and alloys under a hydrogen environment, e.g., pickling, welding, plating, etc. Although many researches have been made to clarify the nature and the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement in steels (1), little has been reported on the method of prevention of hydrogen embrittlement except for works by Pressouyre and Bernstein (2,3). They showed that the susceptibility of ferrous alloys to hydrogen embrittlement is reduced by addition of titanium. Recently, we found that hydrogen in stainless steels is outgassed upon exposure to ionizing radiation (4-7). Therefore, hydrogen embrittlement in steels is expected to be influenced by ionizing radiation. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of prevension of hydrogen embrittlement by examining the effect of gammairradiation on the ductility in a low carbon steel electrolytically charged with hydrogen.

  4. An investigation of the mechanical damping of ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, S.H.; Stuch, T.E.; Salzbrenner, R.

    1995-11-01

    Ductile iron has been suggested as a candidate material for a number of practical applications, including turbine casings, automotive components, and transportation and storage casks for hazardous and radioactive materials. The applications require the enhanced ductility resulting from the presence of spherical graphite nodules in the ductile ferrite iron matrix. Proper design of such components requires a knowledge of the mechanical properties, including how energy is absorbed and dissipated (mechanical damping) by the test material. This article is a study of the mechanical damping of a series of well-characterized ductile iron materials (four separate materials) as a function of strain amplitude, temperature over the range of {minus}100 C to + 100 C, and magnetic field. The major sources of damping were found to be dislocation motion in the graphite phase and magnetomechanical damping in the ferrite phase. The magnitude of the magnetomechanical damping was much larger than that due to dislocation motion. An additional goal of the investigation was to determine if any correlation existed between the measured mechanical damping and the fracture toughness of the ductile iron materials; no correlation was found.

  5. Ductile electroactive biodegradable hyperbranched polylactide copolymers enhancing myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Y Eugene; Ma, Peter X

    2015-12-01

    Myotube formation is crucial to restoring muscular functions, and biomaterials that enhance the myoblast differentiation into myotubes are highly desirable for muscular repair. Here, we report the synthesis of electroactive, ductile, and degradable copolymers and their application in enhancing the differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes. A hyperbranched ductile polylactide (HPLA) was synthesized and then copolymerized with aniline tetramer (AT) to produce a series of electroactive, ductile and degradable copolymers (HPLAAT). The HPLA and HPLAAT showed excellent ductility with strain to failure from 158.9% to 42.7% and modulus from 265.2 to 758.2 MPa. The high electroactivity of the HPLAAT was confirmed by UV spectrometer and cyclic voltammogram measurements. These HPLAAT polymers also showed improved thermal stability and controlled biodegradation rate compared to HPLA. Importantly, when applying these polymers for myotube formation, the HPLAAT significantly improved the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts in vitro compared to HPLA. Furthermore, these polymers greatly promoted myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells as measured by quantitative analysis of myotube number, length, diameter, maturation index, and gene expression of MyoD and TNNT. Together, our study shows that these electroactive, ductile and degradable HPLAAT copolymers represent significantly improved biomaterials for muscle tissue engineering compared to HPLA. PMID:26335860

  6. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Chris; Auton, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the high-pressure injection of fluid into the bulk of the rock. The goal is to initiate and propagate fractures that will provide hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir, enabling gas or oil to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We first consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We use this model to show that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. We then complement these results with laboratory experiments in an analogue system, and with numerical simulations based on the discrete element method (DEM), both of which suggest that ductile failure can indeed dramatically change the resulting deformation pattern. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from models that assume purely elastic mechanical behavior.

  7. TEM investigation of ductile iron alloyed with vanadium.

    PubMed

    Dymek, S; Blicharski, M; Morgiel, J; Fraś, E

    2010-03-01

    This article presents results of the processing and microstructure evolution of ductile cast iron, modified by an addition of vanadium. The ductile iron was austenitized closed to the solidus (1095 degrees C) for 100 h, cooled down to 640 degrees C and held on at this temperature for 16 h. The heat treatment led to the dissolution of primary vanadium-rich carbides and their subsequent re-precipitation in a more dispersed form. The result of mechanical tests indicated that addition of vanadium and an appropriate heat treatment makes age hardening of ductile iron feasible. The precipitation processes as well as the effect of Si content on the alloy microstructure were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that adjacent to uniformly spread out vanadium-rich carbides with an average size of 50 nm, a dispersoid composed of extremely small approximately 1 nm precipitates was also revealed. PMID:20500418

  8. Hot Ductility of the 17-4 PH Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera Lara, V.; Guerra Fuentes, L.; Covarrubias Alvarado, O.; Salinas Rodriguez, A.; Garcia Sanchez, E.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms of loss of hot ductility and the mechanical behavior of 17-4 PH alloys were investigated using hot tensile testing at temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C and strain rates of 10-4, 10-2, and 10-1 s-1. Scanning electron microscopy was used in conjunction with the results of the tensile tests to find the temperature region of loss of ductility and correlate it with cracking observed during processing by hot upsetting prior to ring rolling. It is reported that 17-4 PH alloys lose ductility in a temperature range around 900 °C near to the duplex austenite + ferrite phase field. Furthermore, it is found that niobium carbides precipitated at austenite/ferrite interfaces and grain boundaries have a pronounced effect on the mechanical behavior of the alloy during high-temperature deformation.

  9. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in this impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.

  10. Representing ductile damage with the dual domain material point method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Long, C. C.; Zhang, D. Z.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.

    2015-12-14

    In this study, we incorporate a ductile damage material model into a computational framework based on the Dual Domain Material Point (DDMP) method. As an example, simulations of a flyer plate experiment involving ductile void growth and material failure are performed. The results are compared with experiments performed on high purity tantalum. We also compare the numerical results obtained from the DDMP method with those obtained from the traditional Material Point Method (MPM). Effects of an overstress model, artificial viscosity, and physical viscosity are investigated. Our results show that a physical bulk viscosity and overstress model are important in thismore » impact and failure problem, while physical shear viscosity and artificial shock viscosity have negligible effects. A simple numerical procedure with guaranteed convergence is introduced to solve for the equilibrium plastic state from the ductile damage model.« less

  11. Meshfree simulations of thermo-mechanical ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkins, D. C.; Li, S.

    2006-08-01

    In this work, a meshfree method is used to simulate thermo-mechanical ductile fracture under finite deformation. A Galerkin meshfree formulation incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model is implemented in numerical computations. We are interested in the simulation of thermo-mechanical effects on ductile fracture under large scale yielding. A rate form adiabatic split is proposed in the constitutive update. Meshfree techniques, such as the visibility criterion, are used to modify the particle connectivity based on evolving crack surface morphology. The numerical results have shown that the proposed meshfree algorithm works well, the meshfree crack adaptivity and re-interpolation procedure is versatile in numerical simulations, and it enables us to predict thermo-mechanical effects on ductile fracture.

  12. Brittle to Ductile Transition in Densified Silica Glass

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fenglin; Huang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of the brittleness of glass is limited by our poor understanding and control over the microscopic structure. In this study, we used a pressure quenching route to tune the structure of silica glass in a controllable manner, and observed a systematic increase in ductility in samples quenched under increasingly higher pressure. The brittle to ductile transition in densified silica glass can be attributed to the critical role of 5-fold Si coordination defects (bonded to 5 O neighbors) in facilitating shear deformation and in dissipating energy by converting back to the 4-fold coordination state during deformation. As an archetypal glass former and one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crest, a fundamental understanding of the microscopic structure underpinning the ductility of silica glass will not only pave the way toward rational design of strong glasses, but also advance our knowledge of the geological processes in the Earth's interior. PMID:24849328

  13. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daub, E.G.; Shelly, D.R.; Guyer, R.A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Ductile Faults Control Seismogenic Movement on Oceanic Transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, G. S.; Tkalcic, H.; Forster, M. A.; McClusky, S.

    2014-12-01

    Structural Geology is about 3D geometry and the symphony of kinematically-coordinated movement. In this case we discuss patterns of violent relative displacement inferred from focal plane data for earthquakes. Systematic stereographic analysis of centroid moment tensor data often shows well-defined orientation groups in scatterplots of fault plane normals and associated slip line vectors. These allow important geodynamic inferences, e.g., we can show that ductile faults control the geometry of oceanic transforms, and that normal fault earthquakes on spreading ridges are usually skewed with respect to adjacent transform faults. To explain this asymmetry requires finite rock strength, but it also means that it is not brittle failure that controls the orientation of oceanic transforms. This asymmetry also requires formation of tilt block geometries reminiscent of Basin-and-Range-style continental extension, systematic offset of earthquake hypocentres from the spreading ridge, and a general complexity in magma-fault interactions that is far beyond what might be expected if ocean-floor spreading is the result of dilating tension-mode fractures in dyke swarms. The role of ductile faulting should be given special mention because mostly it is argued that brittle faults are responsible for earthquakes. Yet many other examples of ductile faults in operation can be inferred, e.g., ductile faults associated with slab drop-off, where slab boudinage leads to extensional ductile faults and seismic activity driven by the pulling away of a relict slab, e.g., beneath the Hindu Kush. Another example might be found by close examination of the tectonic significance of the lowermost of the double (or paired) seismic zones such as can be seen in cross-sections of the subducting slab beneath Japan. The lowermost of the paired seismic zones may mark the locus of aseismic ductile shears or detachments formed by slumping of gigantic sheets of rock attempting to slide down the face of

  15. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moumeni, E.; Tutum, C. C.; Tiedje, N. S.; Hattel, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis, metallographic investigation and thermal analysis of the specimens have been carried out. A numerical model has been implemented and the results (i.e. cooling curve, cooling rate, nodule count and solid fraction) have shown a good agreement with experimental studies; following this, inoculation parameters in the model have been studied and discussed.

  16. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR OF SOUTHERN DUCTILE CASTING COMPANY, CENTERVILLE FOUNDRY SHOWING MOLD MAKING WITH PNEWMATIC JOLT SQUEEZE COPE AND DRAG MOLDING MACHINES THAT INDIVIDUALLY MADE EITHER A COPE OR DRAG AND A SMALL WHEELED MATCHPLATE JOLT-SQUEEZE MACHINE THAT COMPRESSED AN ENTIRE MOLD AT A SINGLE TIME USING A DOUBLE-SIDED PATTERN (MATCHPLATE). ALSO SHOWN ARE RAILED PALLET CAR CONVEYORS THAT CARRIED COMPLETED MOLDS FROM MOLDING MACHINES TO POURING AREAS WHERE WORKERS USED SMALL OVERHEAD CRANE TO LIFT JACKETS AND WEIGHTS ONTO THE MOLDS TO HOLD THEM TOGETHER WHILE POURING. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Centerville Foundry, 101 Airport Road, Centreville, Bibb County, AL

  17. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others. PMID:25652998

  18. Brittle intermetallic compound makes ultrastrong low-density steel with large ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Hansoo; Kim, Nack J.

    2015-02-01

    Although steel has been the workhorse of the automotive industry since the 1920s, the share by weight of steel and iron in an average light vehicle is now gradually decreasing, from 68.1 per cent in 1995 to 60.1 per cent in 2011 (refs 1, 2). This has been driven by the low strength-to-weight ratio (specific strength) of iron and steel, and the desire to improve such mechanical properties with other materials. Recently, high-aluminium low-density steels have been actively studied as a means of increasing the specific strength of an alloy by reducing its density. But with increasing aluminium content a problem is encountered: brittle intermetallic compounds can form in the resulting alloys, leading to poor ductility. Here we show that an FeAl-type brittle but hard intermetallic compound (B2) can be effectively used as a strengthening second phase in high-aluminium low-density steel, while alleviating its harmful effect on ductility by controlling its morphology and dispersion. The specific tensile strength and ductility of the developed steel improve on those of the lightest and strongest metallic materials known, titanium alloys. We found that alloying of nickel catalyses the precipitation of nanometre-sized B2 particles in the face-centred cubic matrix of high-aluminium low-density steel during heat treatment of cold-rolled sheet steel. Our results demonstrate how intermetallic compounds can be harnessed in the alloy design of lightweight steels for structural applications and others.

  19. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.R.

    1987-04-21

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80 C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5--5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150 C to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2 [times] 10[sup 5] gave improved ductility modulus effect. 5 figs.

  20. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Carciello, Neal R.

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80.degree. C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5-5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150.degree. C. to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2.times.10.sup.5 gave improved ductility modulus effect.

  1. Defect assessment procedure based on ductile tearing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yang

    1987-11-01

    Strain hardening, crack growth resistance and nonuniform load distribution have significant effects on the ductile tearing process. A defect assessment procedure incorporating with the above features is proposed in the present paper, with the final appearance of “design curves” to facilitate engineering applications.

  2. How plasticizer makes a ductile polymer glass brittle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Li, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Shi-Qing

    During uniaxial extension, a polymer glass of high molecular weight is ductile at high temperatures (still below Tg) and turns brittle when the temperature is sufficiently lowered. Incorporation of small-molecular additives to polymer glasses can speed up segmental relaxation considerably. The effect of such plasticization should be to make the polymers more ductile. We examined the effect of blending a few weight percent of either triphenyl phosphate (TPP) or a mineral oil to a commercial-grade PS and PMMA. Our Instron tests show that the plasticized PS is less ductile. Specifically, at 70 oC, the original PS is ductile at an extensional rate of 0.02 s-1 whereas the PS with 4 wt. % TPP turns brittle. Mechanical spectroscopic measurements show that the alpha relaxation time is shortened by more than two orders of magnitude with 4 wt. % TPP. On the other hand, such anomalous behavior did not occur in PMMA. We need to go beyond the conventional description to rationalize these results This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859).

  3. Wear Performance of Cu-Alloyed Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Uma; Batra, Nimish; Sharma, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of structural and mechanical properties on wear behavior of austempered ductile iron (ADI). Ductile iron (DI) samples were austenitized at 900 °C for 60 min and subsequently austempered for 60 min at three temperatures: 270, 330, and 380 °C. Microstructures of the as-cast DI and ADIs were characterized using optical and scanning microscopy, respectively. The structural parameters, volume fraction of austenite, carbon content of austenite, and ferrite particle size were determined using x-ray diffraction technique. Mechanical properties including Vicker's hardness, 0.2% proof strength, ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and strain hardening coefficient were determined. Wear tests were carried out under dry sliding conditions using pin-on-disk machine with a linear speed of 2.4 m/s. Normal load and sliding distance were 45 N and 1.7 × 104 m, respectively. ADI developed at higher austempering temperature has large amounts of austenite, which contribute toward improvement in the wear resistance through stress-induced martensitic transformation, and strain hardening of austenite. Wear rate was found to depend on 0.2% proof strength, ductility, austenite content, and its carbon content. Study of worn surfaces and nature of wear debris revealed that the fine ausferrite structure in ADIs undergoes oxidational wear, but the coarse ausferrite structure undergoes adhesion, delamination, and mild abrasion too.

  4. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  5. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES, LADLE TRANSFER CRANE ON FAR LEFT. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Thermo-Mechanical Processing and Properties of a Ductile Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, R.R.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-07-14

    Thermo-mechanical processing of ductile irons is a potential method for enhancing their mechanical properties. A ductile cast iron containing 3.6% C, 2.6% Si and 0.045% Mg was continuously hot-and-warm rolled or one-step press-forged from a temperature in the austenite range (900{degrees}C-1100{degrees}C) to a temperature below the A, temperature. Various amounts of reduction were used (from 60% to more than 90%) followed by a short heat ent at 600`C. The heat ent lead to a structure of fine graphite in a matrix of ferrite and carbides. The hot-and- warm worked materials developed a pearlitic microstructure while the press-forged material developed a spheroidite-like carbide microstructure in the matrix. Cementite-denuded ferrite zones were developed around graphite stringers in the hot-and-warm worked materials, but such zones were absent in the press-forged material. Tensile properties including tensile strength and total elongation were measured along the direction parallel and transverse to the rolling direction and along the direction transverse to the press-forging direction. The tensile ductility and strength both increased with a decrease in the amount of hot-and-warm working. The press- forged materials showed higher strength (645 MPa) than the hot-and-warrn worked materials (575 MPa) when compared at the same ductility level (22% elongation).

  7. Improving the low temperature ductility of NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guha, Sumit; Munroe, Paul R.; Baker, Ian

    1989-01-01

    As part of a study aimed at developing a ductile NiAl-based alloy, ingots of Ni-Fe-Al alloys were cast and hot extruded to rods. The purpose of the iron additions was two-fold viz; to produce a change in the slip vector from 001 to 111 line and, in one alloy, to add a L1(2)-structured ductile second phase. Extruded Ni-20Al-30Fe was two-phase, containing a pro-eutectic B2 phase in a fine lamellar structure of B2+L1(2) phases. Room temperature tensile testing of both single extruded and double extruded alloys resulted in 8-percent and 22-percent plastic elongation and yield stresses of 850 and 760 MPa, respectively. Fracture in both cases occurred by ductile tearing of the eutectic and transgranular cleavage of the proeutectic phase at 1350 MPa. The ductility in double extruded condition is higher than that reported earlier in rapidly solidified wires by Inoue et al. (1984). By comparison, extruded single-phase B2-structured Ni-30Al-20Fe exhibited a fracture strength of 780 MPa, no plasticity, and a mixture of intergranular fracture and transgranular cleavage. This is contrast to earlier work by Inoue et al. where a yield stress of 400 MPa, 5 percent plastic strain, and a mixture of dimple and intergranular fracture was reported.

  8. Ductile-regime turning of germanium and silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter N.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    1989-01-01

    Single-point diamond turning of silicon and germanium was investigated in order to clarify the role of cutting depth in coaxing a ductile chip formation in normally brittle substances. Experiments based on the rapid withdrawal of the tool from the workpiece have shown that microfracture damage is a function of the effective depth of cut (as opposed to the nominal cutting depth). In essence, damage created by the leading edge of the tool is removed several revolutions later by lower sections of the tool edge, where the effective cutting depth is less. It appears that a truly ductile cutting response can be achieved only when the effective cutting depth, or critical chip thickness, is less than about 20 nm. Factors such as tool rake angle are significant in that they will affect the actual value of the critical chip thickness for transition from brittle to ductile response. It is concluded that the critical chip thickness is an excellent parameter for measuring the effects of machining conditions on the ductility of the cut and for designing tool-workpiece geometry in both turning and grinding.

  9. Impact of ductility on hydraulic fracturing in shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auton, Lucy; MacMinn, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a method for extracting natural gas and oil from low-permeability rocks such as shale via the injection of fluid at high pressure. This creates fractures in the rock, providing hydraulic access deeper into the reservoir and enabling gas to be collected from a larger region of the rock. Fracture is the tensile failure of a brittle material upon reaching a threshold tensile stress, but some shales have a high clay content and may yield plastically before fracturing. Plastic deformation is the shear failure of a ductile material, during which stress relaxes through irreversible rearrangements of the particles of the material. Here, we investigate the impact of the ductility of shales on hydraulic fracturing. We consider a simple, axisymmetric model for radially outward fluid injection from a wellbore into a ductile porous rock. We solve the model semi-analytically at steady state, and numerically in general. We find that plastic deformation greatly reduces the maximum tensile stress, and that this maximum stress does not always occur at the wellbore. These results imply that hydraulic fracturing may fail in ductile rocks, or that the required injection rate for fracking may be much larger than the rate predicted from purely elastic models.

  10. Ductility of a dental Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    PubMed

    Syverud, M; Herø, H

    1984-02-01

    A silver-palladium type of dental alloy for fixed restorations has been investigated with regard to the ability of the material to be plastically deformed in uniaxial tensile testing after two different age-hardening treatments. A certain degree of ductility is required for the burnishing of the margins. Aged to peak hardness at 350 degrees C after solid-solution annealing at 900 degrees C, the material was found to be brittle owing to a reaction zone along the grain boundaries, promoting an intergranular fracture. When the age-hardening temperature was lowered to 275 degrees C, a less pronounced reaction zone along the grain boundaries could be observed. The accompanying mechanical properties after precipitation hardening at 275 degrees C are probably an acceptable compromise between mechanical strength and ductility. Small particles along grain boundaries and brittleness were also found after solid-solution annealing at 900 degrees C and quenching. It is suggested that the improved ductility after subsequent aging at 275 degrees C is due to a coarsening of these small particles. In the as-cast condition the alloy was softer and more ductile than in the age-hardened state. PMID:6585123

  11. Heat treatment procedure to increase ductility of degraded nickel alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Tests demonstrate the room temperature ductility of degraded Rene 41 can be increased to acceptable values by solution heat treatment at a temperature of 2050 degrees to 2150 degrees F /1 to 2 hours/ and cooling through a controlled temperature range followed by normal aging in air /16 hours at 1400 degrees F/.

  12. Displacement–length scaling of brittle faults in ductile shear

    PubMed Central

    Grasemann, Bernhard; Exner, Ulrike; Tschegg, Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    Within a low-grade ductile shear zone, we investigated exceptionally well exposed brittle faults, which accumulated antithetic slip and rotated into the shearing direction. The foliation planes of the mylonitic host rock intersect the faults approximately at their centre and exhibit ductile reverse drag. Three types of brittle faults can be distinguished: (i) Faults developing on pre-existing K-feldspar/mica veins that are oblique to the shear direction. These faults have triclinic flanking structures. (ii) Wing cracks opening as mode I fractures at the tips of the triclinic flanking structures, perpendicular to the shear direction. These cracks are reactivated as faults with antithetic shear, extend from the parent K-feldspar/mica veins and form a complex linked flanking structure system. (iii) Joints forming perpendicular to the shearing direction are deformed to form monoclinic flanking structures. Triclinic and monoclinic flanking structures record elliptical displacement–distance profiles with steep displacement gradients at the fault tips by ductile flow in the host rocks, resulting in reverse drag of the foliation planes. These structures record one of the greatest maximum displacement/length ratios reported from natural fault structures. These exceptionally high ratios can be explained by localized antithetic displacement along brittle slip surfaces, which did not propagate during their rotation during surrounding ductile flow. PMID:26806996

  13. DUCTILE URANIUM FUEL FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS AND METHOD OF MAKING

    DOEpatents

    Zegler, S.T.

    1963-11-01

    The fabrication process for a ductile nuclear fuel alloy consisting of uranium, fissium, and from 0.25 to 1.0 wt% of silicon or aluminum or from 0.25 to 2 wt% of titanium or yttrium is presented. (AEC)

  14. Micromechanics based simulation of ductile fracture in structural steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellavajjala, Ravi Kiran

    The broader aim of this research is to develop fundamental understanding of ductile fracture process in structural steels, propose robust computational models to quantify the associated damage, and provide numerical tools to simplify the implementation of these computational models into general finite element framework. Mechanical testing on different geometries of test specimens made of ASTM A992 steels is conducted to experimentally characterize the ductile fracture at different stress states under monotonic and ultra-low cycle fatigue (ULCF) loading. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the fractured surfaces is conducted to decipher the underlying microscopic damage mechanisms that cause fracture in ASTM A992 steels. Detailed micromechanical analyses for monotonic and cyclic loading are conducted to understand the influence of stress triaxiality and Lode parameter on the void growth phase of ductile fracture. Based on monotonic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanical void growth model is proposed to predict ductile fracture. This model is then incorporated in to finite element program as a weakly coupled model to simulate the loss of load carrying capacity in the post microvoid coalescence regime for high triaxialities. Based on the cyclic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanics based cyclic void growth model is developed to predict the ULCF life of ASTM A992 steels subjected to high stress triaxialities. Furthermore, a computational fracture locus for ASTM A992 steels is developed and incorporated in to finite element program as an uncoupled ductile fracture model. This model can be used to predict the ductile fracture initiation under monotonic loading in a wide range of triaxiality and Lode parameters. Finally, a coupled microvoid elongation and dilation based continuum damage model is proposed, implemented, calibrated and validated. This model is capable of simulating the local softening caused by the various phases of ductile fracture process under

  15. Thermomechanical coupling and dynamic strain ageing in ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delafosse, David

    1995-01-01

    This work is concerned with plastic deformation at the tip of a ductile tearing crack during propagation. Two kinds of effects are investigated: the thermomechanical coupling at the tip of a mobile ductile crack, and the influence of Dynamic Strain Aging (DSA) on ductile fracture. Three alloys are studied: a nickel based superalloy (N18), a soft carbon steel, and an Al-Li light alloy (2091). The experimental study of the thermo mechanical coupling effects by means of infrared thermography stresses the importance of plastic dissipation in the energy balance of ductile fracture. Numerical simulations involving plastic deformation as the only dissipation mechanism account for the main part of the measured heating. The effects of DSA on ductile tearing are investigated in the 2091 Al-Li alloy. Based on the strain rate/temperature dependence predicted by the standard model of DSA, an experimental procedure is set up for this purpose. Three main effects are evidenced. A maximum in tearing resistance is shown to be associated with the minimum of strain rate sensitivity. Through a simple model, this peak in tearing resistance is attributed to an increase in plastic dissipation as the strain rate sensitivity is decreased. Heterogenous plastic deformation is observed in the crack tip plastic zone. Comparison with uniaxial testing allows us to identify the observed strain heterogeneities as Portevin-Le Chatelier instabilities in the crack tip plastic zone. We perform a simplified numerical analysis of the effect of strain localization on crack tip screening. Finally, small crack propagation instabilities appear at temperatures slightly above that of the tearing resistance peak. These are interpreted as resulting from a positive feed-back between the local heating at the tip of a moving crack and the decrease in tearing resistance with increasing temperature.

  16. Gradient twinned 304 stainless steels for high strength and high ductility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Aiying; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Lu, Jian; Wang, Y. Morris

    2016-04-23

    Gradient materials often have attractive mechanical properties that outperform uniform microstructure counterparts. It remains a difficult task to investigate and compare the performance of various gradient microstructures due to the difficulty of fabrication, the wide range of length scales involved, and their respective volume percentage variations. We have investigated four types of gradient microstructures in 304 stainless steels that utilize submicrotwins, nanotwins, nanocrystalline-, ultrafine- and coarse-grains as building blocks. Tensile tests reveal that the gradient microstructure consisting of submicrotwins and nanotwins has a persistent and stable work hardening rate and yields an impressive combination of high strength and high ductility,more » leading to a toughness that is nearly 50% higher than that of the coarse-grained counterpart. Ex- and in-situ transmission electron microscopy indicates that nanoscale and submicroscale twins help to suppress and limit martensitic phase transformation via the confinement of martensite within the twin lamellar. Twinning and detwinning remain active during tensile deformation and contribute to the work hardening behavior. We discuss the advantageous properties of using submicrotwins as the main load carrier and nanotwins as the strengthening layers over those coarse and nanocrystalline grains. Furthermore, our work uncovers a new gradient design strategy to help metals and alloys achieve high strength and high ductility.« less

  17. Element-wise algorithm for modeling ductile fracture with the Rousselier yield function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areias, P.; Dias-da-Costa, D.; Sargado, J. M.; Rabczuk, T.

    2013-12-01

    Within the theme of ductile fracture in metals, we propose an algorithm for FEM-based computational fracture based on edge rotations and smoothing of complementarity conditions. Rotation axes are the crack front nodes in surface discretizations and each rotated edge affects the position of only one or two nodes. Modified edge positions correspond to the predicted crack path. To represent softening, porous plasticity in the form of the Rousselier yield function is used. The finite strain integration algorithm makes use of a consistent updated Lagrangian formulation which makes use of polar decomposition between each increment. Constitutive updating is based on the implicit integration of a regularized non-smooth problem. The proposed alternative is advantageous when compared with enriched elements that can be significantly different than classical FEM elements and still pose challenges for ductile fracture or large amplitude sliding. For history-dependent materials, there are still some transfer of relevant quantities between meshes. However, diffusion of results is more limited than with tip or full remeshing. To illustrate the advantages of our approach, fracture examples making use of the Rousselier yield function are presented. The Ma-Sutton crack path criterion is employed. Traditional fracture benchmarks and newly proposed verification tests are solved. These were found to be very good in terms of crack path and load/displacement accuracy.

  18. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  19. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  20. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  1. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  2. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  3. Ductile-brittle-ductile transition and grain boundary segregation of Mn and Ni in an Fe-6Mn-12Ni alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, N.H.

    1996-05-15

    Recently, Heo and Lee reported a ductile-brittle-ductile (DBD) transition in an Fe-8Mn-7Ni ternary alloy, which was caused by manganese segregation to the grain boundaries and its desegregation into the matrix. More recently Heo theoretically analyzed the nonequilibrium segregation behaviors of the elements in the Fe-8Mn-7Ni alloy. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether other Fe-6Mn-12Ni ternary alloy also shows the ductile-brittle-ductile transition, and is additionally to ascertain whether calculated results are consistent with experimental data. The study encompasses experimental procedures and a modeling based on the previous research. A general discussion will show that such an approach allows a comprehensive understanding of the ductile-brittle-ductile transition in the Fe-Mn-Ni ternary alloys.

  4. Production and investigation of thin films of metal actinides (Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, Cf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, V. M.; Ryabinin, M. A.; Stupin, V. A.

    2010-03-01

    Under limited availability of transplutonium metals some special techniques and methods of their production have been developed that combine the process of metal reduction from a chemical compound and preparation of a sample for examination. In this situation the evaporation and condensation of metal onto a substrate becomes the only possible technology. Thin film samples of metallic 244Cm, 248Cm and 249Bk were produced by thermal reduction of oxides with thorium followed by deposition of the metals in the form of thin layers on tantalum substrates. For the production of 249Cf metal in the form of a thin layer the method of thermal reduction of oxide with lanthanum was used. 238Pu and 239Pu samples in the form of films were prepared by direct high temperature evaporation and condensation of the metal onto a substrate. For the production of 241Am films a gram sample of plutonium-241 metal was used containing about 18 % of americium at the time of production. Thermal decomposition of Pt5Am intermetallics in vacuum was used to produce americium metal with about 80% yield. Resistivity of the metallic 249Cf film samples was found to decrease exponentially with increasing temperature. The 249Cf metal demonstrated a tendency to form preferably a DHCP structure with the sample mass increasing. An effect of high specific activity on the crystal structure of 238Pu nuclide thin layers was studied either.

  5. On the brittle-ductile behavior of iron meteorites - New experimental constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsui, T.; Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    Impact trials were performed at the NASA vertical gun range to study low-temperature brittle-ductile transitions in meteoritic, steel and iron targets. The trials were performed to enhance the data base underlying the concept of formation of planetesimals in collisional coagulation. Impact velocities of 1.6-5.5 km/sec were used, as were temperatures from 100-300 K. Spallation was observed in the tests with meteorite samples, even at room temperature, and brittleness was enhanced at temperature below 200 C. Net mass losses were induced at the higher impact velocities. It is suggested that iron meteorite agglomerations could form in the inner solar region during nebular condensation, but would not form in farther-out regions such as the asteroid belt. The protoplanets could have an iron core, with metallicity decreasing with radius from the core, which may have happened with the earth.

  6. Bulk evaluation of ductile damage development using high resolution tomography and laminography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Eric; Morgeneyer, Thilo; Landron, Caroline; Adrien, Jerome; Helfen, Lukas

    2012-04-01

    Ductile fracture of metals is accompanied at the microscopic scale with the appearance of damage, in the form of small cavities. Damage progress is divided into three distinct and consecutive phases: initiation, growth and coalescence. This article illustrates the use of three-dimensional nondestructive imaging to study this damage development. Two techniques, mainly based on the attenuation of X-rays are now used for this type of studies at high resolution: tomography and laminography. The interest of laminography is that samples with larger dimensions (in the form of sheets) than the conventional tomography ones can be used. Examples of images obtained with the two techniques, as well as quantification using X-ray tomography, are presented.

  7. A nonlinear CDM model for ductile failure analysis of steel bridge columns under cyclic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong; Lee, Chin-Hyung; Chang, Kyong-Ho

    2014-06-01

    A nonlinear cyclic plasticity damage model for ductile metals, which is able to take large deformation effects into consideration, has been developed using a new damage dissipation potential formulation in order to predict the cyclic inelastic behavior of steel bridge piers. The cyclic constitutive equations that employ the combined isotropic-kinematic hardening rule for plastic deformation is incorporated into the damage mechanics in conjunction with the large strain formulation. The damage growth law is based on the experimental observations that the evolution of microvoids results in nonlinear damage accumulation with plastic deformation. The damage model parameters and the procedure for their identification are presented. The proposed model has been validated and successfully applied to thin-walled steel bridge tubular columns subjected to alternating lateral displacements to evaluate the seismic performance.

  8. 49 CFR 178.705 - Standards for metal IBCs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Definitions for metal IBCs: (1) Metal IBC means an IBC with a metal body, together with appropriate service and structural equipment. (2) Protected means providing the IBC body with additional external... follows: (1) Body. The body must be made of ductile metal materials. Welds must be made so as to...

  9. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  10. Prediction of Microstructure in High-Strength Ductile Forging Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, M.; Back, A.; Hirt, G.; Keul, C.; Bleck, W.

    2010-06-15

    Governmental, environmental and economic demands call for lighter, stiffer and at the same time cheaper products in the vehicle industry. Especially safety relevant parts have to be stiff and at the same time ductile. The strategy of this project was to improve the mechanical properties of forging steel alloys by employing a high-strength and ductile bainitic microstructure in the parts while maintaining cost effective process chains to reach these goals for high stressed forged parts. Therefore, a new steel alloy combined with an optimized process chain has been developed. To optimize the process chain with a minimum of expensive experiments, a numerical approach was developed to predict the microstructure of the steel alloy after the process chain based on FEM simulations of the forging and cooling combined with deformation-time-temperature-transformation-diagrams.

  11. Influence of microstructure on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.P.; Putatunda, S.K.

    1997-07-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the influence of microstructure on the plane strain fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron. Austempered ductile iron (ADI) alloyed with nickel, copper, and molybdenum was austenitized and subsequently austempered over a range of temperatures to produce different microstructures. The microstructures were characterized through optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Plane strain fracture toughness of all these materials was determined and was correlated with the microstructure. The results of the present investigation indicate that the lower bainitic microstructure results in higher fracture toughness than upper bainitic microstructure. Both volume fraction of retained austenite and its carbon content influence the fracture toughness. The retained austenite content of 25 vol pct was found to provide the optimum fracture toughness. It was further concluded that the carbon content of the retained austenite should be as high as possible to improve fracture toughness.

  12. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2001-10-01

    The automotive industry is seeking to replace current car parts made of aluminum and iron castings with thin wall (down to 2 mm) iron castings to reduce the cost and weight of automobiles. The mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings are affected strongly by the thickness of the castings. The thinner castings cool at a faster rate, and microstructural features that form during solidification, and subsequently, transform in the solid state, are strongly dependent on a geometrical parameter related to the ratio of surface area-to-volume of the casting. As this ratio becomes larger, castings cool faster. As a result, the nodule count on the observation plane of the specimens increases dramatically (>2000 nodules/mm2 in most specimens), i.e. as the thickness of castings decreases. Also, the matrix of the thin walled ductile iron castings becomes more ferritic as the ratio of surface area-to-volume decreases.

  13. The effect of yield strength and ductility to fatigue damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The cumulative damage of aluminium alloys with different yield strength and various ductility due to seismic loads was studied. The responses of an idealized beam with a centered mass at one end and fixed at the other end to El Centro's and Taft's earthquakes are computed by assuming that the alloys are perfectly elastoplastic materials and by using numerical technique. Consequently, the corresponding residual plastic strain can be obtained from the stress-strain relationship. The revised Palmgren-Miner cumulative damage theorem is utilized to calculate the fatigue damage. The numerical results show that in certain cases, the high ductility materials are more resistant to seismic loads than the high yield strength materials. The results also show that if a structure collapse during the earthquake, the collapse always occurs in the very early stage.

  14. A Study of Solder Alloy Ductility for Cryogenic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Shapiro, A. A.; Suh, J-O.; Minor, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    For aerospace applications it is important to understand the mechanical performance of components at the extreme temperature conditions seen in service. For solder alloys used in microelectronics, cryogenic temperatures can prove problematic. At low temperatures Sn-based solders undergo a ductile to brittle transition that leads to brittle cracks, which can result in catastrophic failure of electronic components, assemblies and spacecraft payloads. As industrial processes begin to move away from Pb-Sn solder, it is even more critical to characterize the behavior of alternative Sn-based solders. Here we report on initial investigations using a modified Charpy test apparatus to characterize the ductile to brittle transformation temperature of nine different solder systems.

  15. Ductile mode electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining for glassy carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Eunseok; Lee, Chan-Young; Jun, Martin B. G.; Min, Byung-Kwon

    2015-04-01

    Recently, a new mechanical machining process using electrochemical oxidation was reported. Electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining was applied to the machining of glassy carbon. The material removal process of the electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining consists of repeated cycles of oxidation followed by removal of the oxide layer. In this paper, we experimentally investigate and compare the critical chip thickness for ductile mode cutting in mechanical machining and electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining of glassy carbon. The theoretical critical chip thickness is calculated for mechanical machining of glassy carbon and experimentally verified. The effect of electrochemical oxidation on the critical chip thickness for ductile mode micromachining is also studied for glassy carbon. It is found that the critical chip thickness is increased for the electrochemical oxidation assisted micromachining.

  16. Microstructural evolution and ductile phase toughening in brazed joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Noah Robinson

    In typical brazed joints, melting point depressants degrade the structural robustness by concentrating as brittle phases into continuous seams along the centerline. The objective of this dissertation is to sufficiently understand the mechanisms governing the microstructure of a typical braze that approaches for modifying the fabrication to eliminate brittleness can be identified and demonstrated. A characterization of a quaternary braze (Nicrobraze 31) used for stainless steel bonds, containing P and Si melting point depressants, reveals that the thermochemical interactions governing the microstructure include dissolution/reprecipitation, solid-state diffusion, and solidification. It is shown that the Si can be incorporated into a solid solution gamma-Ni(Fe, Si) phase that forms by reprecipitation. A fracture toughness test for intermediate toughness materials is developed to quantify the performance of brazed joints. The test configuration is a wedge driven DCB (Double Cantilever Beam), with design guided by analytical solutions for the energy release rate and compliance. The fracture resistance of a typical braze joint is found to be significantly greater than that for the intermetallic constituents. Approximately half of the toughening is attributed to plastic stretch of the ductile phase within the eutectic. The remainder is attributed to dissipation within a plastic zone that forms in the primary gamma-Ni(Fe, Si) regions. Heat treatments are presented that use ductile phase toughening to mitigate the effect of brittle intermetallics in a Ni-based braze alloy. The development of this beneficial microstructure is based on an understanding of the transient dissolution and isothermal solidification phenomena. By rapid cooling after a short brazing time, gamma-Ni(Fe, Si) is redistributed to the midline where it disrupts the intermetallics and forms a network of ductile ligaments upon fracture. Reinforcement by the modified ductile phase nearly doubles the toughness

  17. Numerical modelling of the solidification of ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Elliott, R.

    1998-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented describing the solidification of a ductile iron based on the Stefanescu macroscopic heat transfer-microscopic solidification kinetic model but using a different kinetic model than that used by Stefanescu. The results show that the kinetic model used influences the recalescence behaviour predicted by the modelling. Cooling curves calculated with the present model show reasonable agreement with experimentally measured cooling curves for four different cooling rates.

  18. Fluid-Assisted Shear Failure Within a Ductile Shear Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Compton, K.; Holk, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Exhumed shear zones often contain folded and/or dynamically recrystallized structures such as veins and pseudotachylytes that record contemporaneous brittle and ductile deformation representing mixed bulk rheology. Here, we constrain the conditions that promote the transitions between ductile and brittle deformation by investigating quartz veins with shear offsets in the Saddlebag Lake shear zone in the central Sierra Nevada, California. Mesozoic metasedimentary rocks within the shear zone contain transposed bedding, strong cleavage, dextrally rotated porphyroclasts, and a steep mineral lineation, which together suggest an overall transpressive kinematic regime for the ductile deformation. Foliation sub-parallel veins are one subset of the veins in the shear zone. They have observed horizontal trace lengths of up to around 5 meters, though most are obscured by limited exposure, and displacements range from ~3-30 mm, with 1-5 mm of opening. Foliation sub-parallel veins are folded with the foliation and quartz microstructures and fluid inclusion thermobarometry measurements from vein samples indicate temperatures during vein formation by fracture were between 300-680°C. Quartz δ18O values (+5.9 to +16.5) suggest extended fluid-rock interaction that involved magmatic (δ18O ~ +8 to +10) and meteoric (δ18O down to -1) fluids. Foliation sub-parallel veins are most abundant in relatively massive, quartz-rich rocks where they are boudinaged, indicating they were rigid inclusions after formation. Based on the orientation and spatial distribution of the veins, we infer that they formed under high differential stress with pore pressures sufficiently high for the rocks to be critically stressed for shear failure along mechanically weak foliation planes. These observations suggest high pore pressures and mechanical heterogeneity at a variety of scales are necessary conditions for nucleation of shear fractures within ductile shear zones.

  19. Modeling the strength and ductility of magnesium alloys containing nanotwins

    SciTech Connect

    Gorti, Sarma B; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been receiving much attention recently as potential lightweight alternatives to steel for automotive and other applications, but the poor formability of these alloys at low temperatures has limited their widespread adoption for automotive applications. Recent work with face centered cubic (FCC) materials has shown that introduction of twins at the nanometer scale in ultra-fine grained FCC polycrystals can provide significant increase in strength with a simultaneous improvement in ductility. This objective of this work is to explore the feasibility of extending this concept to hexagonal close packed (HCP) materials, with particular focus on using this approach to increase both strength and ductility of magnesium alloys. A crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) model is used to study the effect of varying the crystallographic texture and the spacing between the nanoscale twins on the strength and ductility of HCP polycrystals. Deformation of the material is assumed to occur by crystallographic slip, and in addition to the basal and prismatic slip systems, slip is also assumed to occur on the {1 0 -1 1} planes that are associated with compression twins in these materials. The slip system strength of the pyramidal systems containing the nanotwins is assumed to be much lower than the strength of the other systems, which is assumed to scale with the spacing between the nanotwins. The CPFE model is used to compute the stress-strain response for different microstrucrutral parameters, and a criterion based on a critical slip system shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to compute the limiting strength and ductility, with the ultimate goal of identifying the texture and nanotwin spacing that can lead to the optimum values for these parameters.

  20. WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ELECTRIC FURNACE AFTER ADDING A CHEMICAL COAGULANT TO FORCE IT TO THE SURFACE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  1. Nano-modification to improve the ductility of cementitious composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yeşilmen, Seda; Al-Najjar, Yazin; Balav, Mohammad Hatam; Şahmaran, Mustafa; Yıldırım, Gürkan; Lachemi, Mohamed

    2015-10-15

    Effect of nano-sized mineral additions on ductility of engineered cementitious composites (ECC) containing high volumes of fly ash was investigated at different hydration degrees. Various properties of ECC mixtures with different mineral additions were compared in terms of microstructural properties of matrix, fiber-matrix interface, and fiber surface to assess improvements in ductility. Microstructural characterization was made by measuring pore size distributions through mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). Hydration characteristics were assessed using thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA), and fiber-matrix interface and fiber surface characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) through a period of 90 days. Moreover, compressive and flexural strength developments were monitored for the same period. Test results confirmed that mineral additions could significantly improve both flexural strength and ductility of ECC, especially at early ages. Cheaper Nano-CaCO{sub 3} was more effective compared to nano-silica. However, the crystal structure of CaCO{sub 3} played a very important role in the range of expected improvements.

  2. Constrained molecular dynamics for quantifying intrinsic ductility versus brittleness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguy, D.

    2007-10-01

    Evaluating the critical load levels for intrinsic ductility and brittle propagation is a first, but necessary, step for modeling semibrittle crack propagation. In the most general case, the calculations have to be fully atomistic because the details of the crack tip structure cannot be captured by continuum mechanics. In this paper, we present a method to explore ductile and brittle configurations, within the same force field, giving a quantitative estimate of the proximity of a transition from intrinsic ductility to brittleness. The shear localization is characterized by a centrosymmetry criterion evaluated on each atom in the vicinity of the crack tip. This provides an efficient order parameter to track the nucleation and propagation of dislocations. We show that it can be used as a holonomic constraint within molecular dynamics simulations, giving a precise control over plasticity during crack propagation. The equations of motion are derived and applied to crack propagation in the [112¯] direction of an fcc crystal loaded in mode I along [111]. The critical loads for dislocation emission and for brittle propagation are computed. The key point is that the generalized forces of constraint are not dissipative. Therefore, they do not spoil the critical elastic energy release rates (the Griffith criterion is preserved). As an example of the possibilities of the method, the response of blunted tips is investigated for three configurations: a slab of vacancies, an elliptical hole, and a circular hole. Brittle propagation by an alternative mechanism to cleavage, called “vacancy injection,” is reported.

  3. The development and validation of a ductile fracture analysis model

    SciTech Connect

    Kanninen, M.F.; Morrow, T.B.; Grant, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is a user-oriented methodology that can be used by gas transmission company engineers for assessing the risk of ductile fracture propagation in the full range of design and operating conditions anticipated for their gas transmission pipeline system. A thoroughly validated procedure is therefore required that encompasses the full range of pipe diameters, operating pressures, pipe steels and rich gas compositions (RGCs) used by North American gas transmission companies. The final result could be incorporated into a user friendly PC-based code that would allow engineering assessment of safety margins for pipeline design and operation to be determined. Towards this objective, this report describes two specific tasks that were undertaken to advance the model development. Parametric calculations of crack tip pressure vs. wave speed were completed that bound the full range of (RGCs) decompression. The results were used in parametric ductile fracture computations, conducted to proclude an interpolating formula for the computation of the upper bound crack driving force for RGCs, supplementing the formula developed previously for methane. The results of the research completed to date can be used for a new pipeline design; or to calculate the critical pressure for an existing pipeline above which any rupture could lead to long propagating fracture. For either application, the ductile fracture resistance of candidate or existing line pipe steel can be determined using the procedures given in App. B.

  4. Superior austempered ductile iron (ADI) properties achieved by prior hot isostatic pressing (HIP)

    SciTech Connect

    LaGoy, J.L.; Widmer, R.; Zick, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ductile iron obtained from different foundries and cast by dissimilar methods has been successfully hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) before austempering to achieve substantially higher ductilities, without significant detriment to other properties, than those reached by austempering along. HIP was attempted to solve different mechanical deficiencies in austempered ductile iron (ADI) such as the lack of ductility in higher strength grades, inconsistent mechanical properties, and service life limitations. A variety of HIP temperatures were analyzed from near the austenitizing region up to within 56 C (100 F) of the melting point of ductile iron. Microporosity was eliminated by HIP at all temperatures, and subsequent austempering revealed a uniform ADI microstructure. HIP proved successful with both unencapsulated castings and those enclosed within steel canisters. Additional benefits caused by HIP processing of ductile iron castings without the austempering treatment include a significant decrease in mechanical property data scatter, high hardness at reasonable ductility levels, and a substantially reduced scrap rate.

  5. The effect of directionally solidified microstructures on ductility of Fe-6.5wt%Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y. F.; Zheng, Z. L.; Lin, J. P.; Ye, F.; Chen, G. L.

    2009-01-01

    Fe-6.5wt%Si high silicon steel has superior magenitic properties. However, such high Si content results inroom-temperature embrittlement and poor workability due to the formation of ordered intermetallic phases. Zone Melting Liquid Metal Cooling directional solidification technique was employed to produce the Fe-6.5wt%Si alloy with columnar-grained structures. The cooling rate of directional solidificationplays a critical role in maintaining the grain growth, and the rate around 3 K/s is an optimum conditionto form columnar-grained structure and to improve its ductility.

  6. Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

    1984-09-14

    This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  7. Predictive Process Optimization for Fracture Ductility in Automotive TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong

    In light of the emerging challenges in the automotive industry of meeting new energy-saving and environment-friendly requirements imposed by both the government and the society, the auto makers have been working relentlessly to reduce the weight of automobiles. While steel makers pushed out a variety of novel Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) to serve this market with new needs, TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels is one of the most promising materials for auto-body due to its exceptional combination of strength and formability. However, current commercial automotive TRIP steels demonstrate relatively low hole-expansion (HE) capability, which is critical in stretch forming of various auto parts. This shortcoming on ductility has been causing fracture issues in the forming process and limits the wider applications of this steel. The kinetic theory of martensitic transformations and associated transformation plasticity is applied to the optimization of transformation stability for enhanced mechanical properties in a class of high strength galvannealed TRIP steel. This research leverages newly developed characterization and simulation capabilities, supporting computational design of high-performance steels exploiting optimized transformation plasticity for desired mechanical behaviors, especially for the hole-expansion ductility. The microstructure of the automotive TRIP sheet steels was investigated, using advanced tomographic characterization including nanoscale Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP) microanalysis. The microstructural basis of austenite stability, the austenite carbon concentration in particular, was quantified and correlated with measured fracture ductility through transformation plasticity constitutive laws. Plastic flow stability for enhanced local fracture ductility at high strength is sought to maintain high hole-expansion ductility, through quantifying the optimal stability and the heat-treatment process to achieve it. An additional

  8. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  9. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  10. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  11. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  12. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  13. Response and representation of ductile damage under varying shock loading conditions in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, G. T.; Addessio, F. L.; Livescu, V.; Bourne, N. K.; McDonald, S. A.; Withers, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    The response of polycrystalline metals, which possess adequate mechanisms for plastic deformation under extreme loading conditions, is often accompanied by the formation of pores within the structure of the material. This large deformation process is broadly identified as progressive with nucleation, growth, coalescence, and failure the physical path taken over very short periods of time. These are well known to be complex processes strongly influenced by microstructure, loading path, and the loading profile, which remains a significant challenge to represent and predict numerically. In the current study, the influence of loading path on the damage evolution in high-purity tantalum is presented. Tantalum samples were shock loaded to three different peak shock stresses using both symmetric impact, and two different composite flyer plate configurations such that upon unloading the three samples displayed nearly identical "pull-back" signals as measured via rear-surface velocimetry. While the "pull-back" signals observed were found to be similar in magnitude, the sample loaded to the highest peak stress nucleated a connected field of ductile fracture which resulted in complete separation, while the two lower peak stresses resulted in incipient damage. The damage evolution in the "soft" recovered tantalum samples was quantified using optical metallography, electron-back-scatter diffraction, and tomography. These experiments are examined numerically through the use of a model for shock-induced porosity evolution during damage. The model is shown to describe the response of the tantalum reasonably well under strongly loaded conditions but less well in the nucleation dominated regime. Numerical results are also presented as a function of computational mesh density and discussed in the context of improved representation of the influence of material structure upon macro-scale models of ductile damage.

  14. Chemical composition and structural identification of eutectic carbide in 1 pct Mn ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadabadi, M. Nili; Niyama, E.; Tanino, M.; Abe, T.; Ohide, T.

    1994-05-01

    Manganese, which may be used in ductile cast iron as a potent hardenability promoter, segregates in the intercellular region. This segregation becomes more severe as a consequence of poor inoculation, low cooling rate, or increasing of nominal Mn content in the alloy. In severely Mn-segregated regions, Mn eutectic carbide may be formed, which has a deteriorating effect on the mechanical properties of casting. In this study, a 1 Pct Mn ductile iron was used to investigate the chemical composition and crystal structure of the Mn eutectic carbide by electron microscopy (scanning and transmission), X-ray, and an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray studies show that the crystal structure of carbide is orthorhombic with lattice parameters of a = 14.825, b = 11.415, and c = 8.880 (Å). The concentrations of Mn, Si, and Cr in carbide, analyzed by scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (TEM-EDX), were 5.0 to 7.0, 0.5 to 2.8 and 1.5 to 2.2 (wt Pct), respectively. The ratio of Fe plus other metal atoms to C was calculated from EPMA experiments to be 2.5-2.9. It was shown that by diminishing Mn segregation, precipitated eutectic carbide can be reduced. It is expected that this can be achieved by reducing nominal content of Mn or by increasing nodule count.

  15. Response and representation of ductile damage under varying shock loading conditions in tantalum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bronkhorst, C. A.; Gray, III, G. T.; Addessio, F. L.; Livescu, V.; Bourne, N. K.; MacDonald, S. A.; Withers, P. J.

    2016-02-28

    The response of polycrystalline metals, which possess adequate mechanisms for plastic deformation under extreme loading conditions, is often accompanied by the formation of pores within the structure of the material. This large deformation process is broadly identified as progressive with nucleation, growth, coalescence, and failure the physical path taken over very short periods of time. These are well known to be complex processes strongly influenced by microstructure, loading path, and the loading profile, which remains a significant challenge to represent and predict numerically. In the current study, the influence of loading path on the damage evolution in high-purity tantalum ismore » presented. Tantalum samples were shock loaded to three different peak shock stresses using both symmetric impact, and two different composite flyer plate configurations such that upon unloading the three samples displayed nearly identical “pull-back” signals as measured via rear-surface velocimetry. While the “pull-back” signals observed were found to be similar in magnitude, the sample loaded to the highest peak stress nucleated a connected field of ductile fracture which resulted in complete separation, while the two lower peak stresses resulted in incipient damage. The damage evolution in the “soft” recovered tantalum samples was quantified using optical metallography, electron-back-scatter diffraction, and tomography. These experiments are examined numerically through the use of a model for shock-induced porosity evolution during damage. The model is shown to describe the response of the tantalum reasonably well under strongly loaded conditions but less well in the nucleation dominated regime. As a result, numerical results are also presented as a function of computational mesh density and discussed in the context of improved representation of the influence of material structure upon macro-scale models of ductile damage.« less

  16. Validity assessment of ductile fracture criteria in cold forming

    SciTech Connect

    Shabara, M.A.; El-Domiaty, A.A.; Kandil, A.

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the assessment of various empirical and semiempirical ductile fracture criteria to determine their ability to predict the occurrence of fracture in metalforming processes. The criteria assessed are reformulated such that each is expressed in terms of mostly nondimensional material-dependent quantities and constants. The constants in each criterion are determined using data from published experimental results on cold upsetting of aluminum and steel specimens. The limit strain or the forming limit corresponding to each criterion is then determined and compared with the experimental data. There is clearly good agreement between theory and experiment for several criteria, but the predictions of other criteria fall far from experimental results.

  17. Microstructure and fracture of alloyed austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Eric, Olivera; Rajnovic, Dragan; Zec, Slavica; Sidjanin, Leposava; Jovanovic, Milan T. . E-mail: tmsj@ptt.yu

    2006-12-15

    An investigation has been conducted on two austempered ductile irons alloyed with Cu and Cu + Ni, austenitized at 900 deg. C and austempered at 350 deg. C. The microstructure and fracture mode developed through these treatments have been identified by means of light and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Impact energy measurements were performed on un-notched Charpy specimens. The maximum value of retained austenite volume fraction observed in the material alloyed with Cu + Ni was higher than in that alloyed with Cu austenitized and austempered under the same conditions. This led to the material alloyed with Cu + Ni having higher impact energy and substantial plastic deformation.

  18. A model for the graphite formation in ductile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaland, T.; Grong, Ø.; Grong, T.

    1993-10-01

    In the present investigation, mathematical models have been developed to quantify the extent of carbon diffusion occurring in ductile cast iron during cooling from the eutectic temperature. Computer calculations show that small variations in the cooling conditions may significantly alter the number density and size distribution of graphite nodules in the iron matrix, in agreement with experimental observations. This makes it difficult to compare microstructure data from various section size materials without allowing for differences in the kinetic strength of the thermal cycles with respect to carbon diffusion.

  19. Modeling ductile dynamic fracture with ABAQUS/explicit

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.; Turner, C.

    1996-05-01

    This paper illustrates the use of advanced constitutive models in ABAQUS/Explicit together with highly focused finite element meshes to simulate the propagation of a fracture in a ductile medium. A double edge-cracked specimen under far field dynamic tensile loading is analyzed, and shows both rectilinear motion or unstable oscillatory motion of the crack depending on the material property constraints. Results are also presented for a simulation of ASTM`s standard fracture test E399. Comparisons of ABAQUS/Explicit results with experiments or other analytical/numerical results are made.

  20. Using ductile iron pipe for penstocks: A new option

    SciTech Connect

    Hurless, R.C.

    1996-04-01

    When choosing the type of material for the penstock at a new project or when repairing or replacing pipe at existing plants, it may pay off to take a look at ductile iron pipe. This type of pipe was used at the Wailuku River hydro project, resulting in a more corrosion resistant, durable, and cost-effective penstock. This article reviews the planning and decision-making that went into this effort, including: (1) material properties, (2) testing, (3) performance under negative pressure conditions, (4) pressure rating, (5) corrosion resistance, (6) seismic effects, (7) installation problems, and (8) economic considerations.

  1. Reformation Capability of Short-Range Order and Their Medium-Range Connections Regulates Deformability of Bulk Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Li, Congling; Wei, Yujie; Shi, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) typically have high yield strength while low ductility, and the latter is commonly considered as the Achilles' heel of MGs. Elucidate the mechanism for such low ductility becomes the research focus of this field. With molecular level simulations, we show the degree of short-range order (SRO) of atomic structure for brittle Fe-based glass decreases dramatically during the stretch, while mild change occurs in ductile Zr-based glass. The reformation capability for SRO and their medium-range connections is found to be the primary characteristics to differentiate the deformability between the two metallic glasses. We suspect that, in addition to the strength of networks formed by SRO structure, the reformation capability to reform SRO networks also plays the key role in regulating the ductility in metallic glasses. Our study provides important insights into the understanding about the mechanisms accounting for ductility or brittleness of bulk metallic glasses. PMID:26178316

  2. Reformation Capability of Short-Range Order and Their Medium-Range Connections Regulates Deformability of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Congling; Wei, Yujie; Shi, Xinghua

    2015-07-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) typically have high yield strength while low ductility, and the latter is commonly considered as the Achilles’ heel of MGs. Elucidate the mechanism for such low ductility becomes the research focus of this field. With molecular level simulations, we show the degree of short-range order (SRO) of atomic structure for brittle Fe-based glass decreases dramatically during the stretch, while mild change occurs in ductile Zr-based glass. The reformation capability for SRO and their medium-range connections is found to be the primary characteristics to differentiate the deformability between the two metallic glasses. We suspect that, in addition to the strength of networks formed by SRO structure, the reformation capability to reform SRO networks also plays the key role in regulating the ductility in metallic glasses. Our study provides important insights into the understanding about the mechanisms accounting for ductility or brittleness of bulk metallic glasses.

  3. Reformation Capability of Short-Range Order and Their Medium-Range Connections Regulates Deformability of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Congling; Wei, Yujie; Shi, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) typically have high yield strength while low ductility, and the latter is commonly considered as the Achilles’ heel of MGs. Elucidate the mechanism for such low ductility becomes the research focus of this field. With molecular level simulations, we show the degree of short-range order (SRO) of atomic structure for brittle Fe-based glass decreases dramatically during the stretch, while mild change occurs in ductile Zr-based glass. The reformation capability for SRO and their medium-range connections is found to be the primary characteristics to differentiate the deformability between the two metallic glasses. We suspect that, in addition to the strength of networks formed by SRO structure, the reformation capability to reform SRO networks also plays the key role in regulating the ductility in metallic glasses. Our study provides important insights into the understanding about the mechanisms accounting for ductility or brittleness of bulk metallic glasses. PMID:26178316

  4. Comparative Study on Failure Prediction in Warm Forming Processes of Mg Alloy Sheet by the FEM and Ductile Fracture Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Young-Seon

    2014-04-01

    An important concern in metal forming is whether the desired deformation can be accomplished without any failure of the material, even at elevated temperatures. This paper describes the utilization of ductile fracture criteria in conjunction with the finite element (FE) method for predicting the onset of fracture in warm metal working processes of magnesium alloy sheets. The uniaxial tensile tests of AZ31 alloy sheets with a thickness of 3 mm and FE simulations were performed to calculate the critical damage values for three kinds of ductile fracture criteria. The critical damage values for each criterion were expressed as the function of strain rate at various temperatures. In order to find out the best criterion for failure prediction, Erichsen cupping tests under isothermal conditions were carried out at various temperatures and punch velocities. Based on the plastic deformation histories obtained from FE analysis of the Erichsen cupping tests and the critical damage value curves, the initiation time and location of fracture were predicted under bi-axial tensile conditions. As a result, Cockcroft-Latham's criterion showed good agreement with the experiments.

  5. On Key Factors Influencing Ductile Fractures of Dual Phase (DP) Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-11-25

    In this paper, we examine the key factors influencing ductile failure of various grades of dual phase (DP) steels using the microstructure-based modeling approach. Various microstructure-based finite element models are generated based on the actual microstructures of DP steels with different martensite volume fractions. These models are, then, used to investigate the influence of ductility of the constituent ferrite phase and also the influence of voids introduced in the ferrite phase on the overall ductility of DP steels. It is found that with volume fraction of martensite in the microstructure less than 15%, the overall ductility of the DP steels strongly depends on the ductility of the ferrite matrix, hence pre-existing micro voids in the microstructure significantly reduce the overall ductility of the steel. When the volume fraction of martensite is above 15%, the preexisting voids in the ferrite matrix does not significantly reduce the overall ductility of the DP steels, and the overall ductility is more influenced by the mechanical property disparity between the two phases. The applicability of the phase inhomogeneity driven ductile failure of DP steels is then discussed based on the obtained computational results for various grades of DP steels, and the experimentally obtained scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures of the corresponding grades of DP steels near fracture surface are used as evidence for result validations.

  6. Nitrogen Impurity Gettering in Oxide Dispersion Ductilized Chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Anderson, Ian M; Weaver, Mark; Meyer III, Harry M; Walker, Larry R; Miller, Michael K; Larson, David James; Wright, Ian G; Sikka, Vinod K; Rar, Andrei; Pharr, George Mathews; Keiser, James R; Walls, Claudia Alexandra

    2003-01-01

    Work by Scruggs in the 1960s demonstrated that tensile ductility could be achieved at room temperature in powder metallurgically-produced Cr alloyed with MgO. During consolidation, much of the MgO converted to the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase, which was hypothesized to getter nitrogen from the Cr, rendering it ductile. We have duplicated this effect, achieving room temperature tensile elongations of 4% for hot-pressed Cr-6MgO-(0-1)Ti (wt.%) and 10% for hot-pressed and extruded Cr-6MgO-0.75Ti. Direct incorporation of nitrogen into the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase was not detected; however, impurities, particularly nitrogen and sulfur, were observed to segregate to and/or precipitate at interfaces between the MgO/MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases and the Cr matrix. Exploratory studies of other non-spinel forming oxide dispersions (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) showed a similar pattern of impurity segregation/precipitation, suggesting that there is nothing unique about spinel dispersions in Cr with regards to impurities. However, none of these other dispersions resulted in similar levels of tensile elongation.

  7. Ductile-Phase-Toughened Tungsten for Plasma-Facing Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Kevin Hawkins

    A variety of processing approaches were employed to fabricate ductile-phase-toughened (DPT) tungsten (W) composites. Mechanical testing and analytical modeling were used to guide composite development. This work provides a basis for further development of W composites to be used in structural divertor components of future fusion reactors. W wire was tested in tension, showing significant ductility and strength. Coatings of copper (Cu) or tungsten carbide (WC) were applied to the W wire via electrodeposition and carburization, respectively. Composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering (SPS) to consolidate W powders together with each type of coated W wire. DPT behavior, e.g. crack arrest and crack bridging, was not observed in three-point bend testing of the sintered composites. A laminate was fabricated by hot pressing W and Cu foils together with W wires, and subsequently tested in tension. This laminate was bonded via hot pressing to thick W plate as a reinforcing layer, and the composite was tested in three-point bending. Crack arrest was observed along with some fiber pullout, but significant transverse cracking in the W plate confounded further fracture toughness analysis. The fracture toughness of thin W plate was measured in three-point bending. W plates were brazed with Cu foils to form a laminate. Crack arrest and crack bridging were observed in three-point bend tests of the laminate, and fracture resistance curves were successfully calculated for this DPT composite. An analytical model of crack bridging was developed using the basis described by Chao in previous work by the group. The model uses the specimen geometry, matrix properties, and the stress-displacement function of a ductile reinforcement ("bridging law") to calculate the fracture resistance curve (R-curve) and load-displacement curve (P-D curve) for any test specimen geometry. The code was also implemented to estimate the bridging law of an arbitrary composite using R-curve data

  8. Significance of grain sliding mechanisms for ductile deformation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, A.; Bourcier, M.; Gaye, A.; Héripré, E.; Bornert, M.; Raphanel, J.; Ludwig, W.

    2013-12-01

    Ductile shear zones at depth present polyphase and heterogeneous rocks and multi-scale strain localization patterns. Most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit microstructural signatures of several concomitant deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (dislocation creep), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding and solution mass transfer). Because their chronology of appearance and interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology seems illusory. We have therefore characterized over a decade the rheology of synthetic lower crustal materials with different compositions and fluid contents, and for various microstructures. Non-Newtonian flow clearly related to dominant dislocation creep. Conversely, Newtonian behavior involved grain sliding mechanisms, but crystal plasticity could be identified as well. In order to clarify the respective roles of these mechanisms we underwent a multi-scale investigation of the ductile deformation of rock analog synthetic halite with controlled microstructures. The mechanical tests were combined with in-situ optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X ray computed tomography, allowing for digital image correlation (DIC) techniques and retrieval of full strain field. Crystal plasticity dominated, as evidenced by physical slip lines and DIC computed slip bands. Crystal orientation mapping allowed to identify strongly active easy glide {110} <110> systems. But, all other slip systems were observed as well, and especially near interfaces, where their activity is necessary to accommodate for the plastic strain incompatibilities between neighboring grains. We also evidenced grain boundary sliding (GBS), which clearly occurred as a secondary, but necessary, accommodation mechanism. The DIC technique allowed the quantification of the relative contribution of each mechanism. The amount of GBS clearly increased with decreasing grain size. Finite element (FE) modeling

  9. Composition effect on intrinsic plasticity or brittleness in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  10. Composition Effect on Intrinsic Plasticity or Brittleness in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan-Yun; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Liu, Jian; Shen, Baolong; Wang, Xinmin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-01-01

    The high plasticity of metallic glasses is highly desirable for a wide range of novel engineering applications. However, the physical origin of the ductile/brittle behaviour of metallic glasses with various compositions and thermal histories has not been fully clarified. Here we have found that metallic glasses with compositions at or near intermetallic compounds, in contrast to the ones at or near eutectics, are extremely ductile and also insensitive to annealing-induced embrittlement. We have also proposed a close correlation between the element distribution features and the plasticity of metallic glasses by tracing the evolutions of the element distribution rearrangement and the corresponding potential energy change within the sliding shear band. These novel results provide useful and universal guidelines to search for new ductile metallic glasses at or near the intermetallic compound compositions in a number of glass-forming alloy systems. PMID:25043428

  11. Weld bead reinforcement removal: A method of improving the strength and ductility of peaked welds in 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a study to determine the degree to which the ductility and tensile properties of peaked welds could be enhanced by removing the reinforcing bead and fairing the weld nugget into the adjacent parent metal are presented. The study employed 2219-T87 aluminum alloy plate, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, and 2319 filler wire. The study concluded that significant improvements in peak weld, ultimate strength, and ductility can be obtained through removal and fairing of the weld reinforcing bead. The specimens so treated and tested in this program exhibited ultimate strength improvements of 2 to 3 percent for peak angles of 5.8 to 10 degrees and 10 to 22 percent for welds with peak angles of 11.7 to 16.9 degrees. It was also determined that removal of the weld bead enhanced the ability of peaked welds to straighten when exposed to cyclic loading at stress levels above the yield strength.

  12. Tensile properties of austempered ductile iron under thermomechanical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Achary, J.

    2000-02-01

    A new processing method was investigated for improving the strength and elongation of austempered ductile iron (ADI) by grain refinement of parent austenite using thermomechanical treatment. The material was deformed at the austenitization temperature by single and multipass rolling before the austempering treatment. The effects of the amount of deformation, austenitization temperature, austempering temperatures, reaustenitization, and secondary deformation on the tensile properties were studied. The properties obtained using the method were compared with those of the ASTM standards. The effect of deformation on the graphite shape was also studied. Tensile strength/yield strength/elongation values were found to increase with increasing austenite deformation up to 40% and then to start decreasing. Tensile strength/yield strength and elongation values of 1,700 MPa/1,300 MPa/5% and 1,350 MPa/920 MPa/15% can be achieved with this method in the ranges of variables studied.

  13. Ductile fracture of cylindrical vessels containing a large flaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Irwin, G. R.; Ratwani, M.

    1976-01-01

    The fracture process in pressurized cylindrical vessels containing a relatively large flaw is considered. The flaw is assumed to be a part-through or through meridional crack. The flaw geometry, the yield behavior of the material, and the internal pressure are assumed to be such that in the neighborhood of the flaw the cylinder wall undergoes large-scale plastic deformations. Thus, the problem falls outside the range of applicability of conventional brittle fracture theories. To study the problem, plasticity considerations are introduced into the shell theory through the assumptions of fully-yielded net ligaments using a plastic strip model. Then a ductile fracture criterion is developed which is based on the concept of net ligament plastic instability. A limited verification is attempted by comparing the theoretical predictions with some existing experimental results.

  14. Multi-scale simulation of ductile iron casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, J.

    2015-06-01

    It has been well known that addition of rare earth elements was indispensable for production of ductile cast iron. The addition reduces solidification shrinkage. However there are still ambiguities in understanding the mechanism and predicting the casting defects. A possible explanation for the reduction of shrinkage is that the addition of rare earth promotes expansion of castings due to the graphite formation, which is related to cooling rate. In this study, the effect of rare earth addition was considered as a function of cooling rate and solidification shrinkage rate was determined by the macro-scale simulation. In the meso-scale and the micro-scale simulations, distribution of graphite nodules was compared with the experimental results. The multi-scale simulation result well reproduced the experimental results.

  15. Nondestructive characterization of ductile cast iron by magnetic adaptive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vertesy, G.; Uchimoto, T.; Tomáš, I.; Takagi, T.

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports correlation of magnetic descriptors with Brinell hardness and conductivity of ductile cast iron, aiming to develop a novel nondestructive method by magnetic adaptive testing. Four series of cast iron staircase-shaped samples were investigated by this method, where different cooling rates of samples during casting resulted in different structures of each sample. The flat samples were magnetized by an attached yoke, and sensitive descriptors were obtained from a proper evaluation, based on the measurements of series of magnetic minor hysteresis loops, without magnetic saturation of the samples. Results of the nondestructive magnetic tests were compared with destructive mechanical measurements of Brinell hardness and conductivity and good correlation was found between them.

  16. Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Jr., William B.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

  17. The Brittle-Ductile Transition - A Self-Consistent Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, B.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Ord, A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    The brittle-ductile transition (BDT) in the Earth is commonly viewed as a switch between two different constitutive behaviors, plastic and viscous, and is represented in models by various formulations. We show that thermal-mechanical coupling leads to a self consistent view where the BDT emerges naturally within one constitutive framework once a critical temperature is attained. Viscous folding occurs above this temperature and brittle fracturing below. Seismic activity is maximised at the BDT. Orogenesis emerges as a thermal-mechanical decoupling near the BDT during flexing of the lithosphere with the development of "crocodile" -like structures, fold-nappe systems and far-travelled thrust sheets. For quartz- feldspar composite materials this transition lies in a critical range of 500 K to 580 K.

  18. Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2003-01-01

    Step plate castings with section thicknesses of 1.5 mm to 6 mm and individual (single) castings with section thicknesses of 2 mm to 6 mm were produced using a ductile iron chemistry. Microstructures of these thin wall ductal iron castings were characterized quantitatively using an image analyzer. Matrix structure (amount of pearlite, ferrite, and massive carbides) and graphite structure (volume fraction, nodule size, nodule content, and nodularity) were investigated as a function of section thickness. Pearlite content, nodule count, and nodularity increased with decreasing section thickness, whereas the nodule size decreased. Nodule content exceeded 2000 nodules per mm{sup 2} at the thinnest sections. Statistical analysis was performed to investigate the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure.

  19. Bending Fatigue Strength of Austempered Ductile Iron Spur Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Masashi; Tamura, Ryo; Inoue, Katsumi; Narita, Yukihito

    This paper deals with an experimental evaluation of bending fatigue strength for austempered ductile iron (ADI) spur gears. The module is 2.5 and the number of teeth is 26 in the test gears. The material of the test gears corresponds to Japan Industrial Standard (JIS) FCAD1100-15. Some gears are processed by one of two types of fine particle bombarding (FPB). The surface roughness is slightly increased by FPB. The obtained strengths are 623 MPa for the as-austempered gears, and 1011 and 1085 MPa for the gears after FPB. The strength is expressed by the fillet stress level, which is calculated by FEM. The strength of a gear with the same dimensions made of carburized SCr420H alloy steel is 1205 MPa, and the strength of the ADI gear is approximately half that of the carburized steel gear. The FPB process has a significant effect on the ADI gear, improving its strength by 62-74%.

  20. Microstructural evolution in the HAZ of Inconel 718 and correlation with the hot ductility test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.; Genculu, S.

    1983-01-01

    The nickel-base alloy 718 was evaluated to study the role of preweld heat treatment in reducing or eliminating heat-affected zone hot cracking. Three heat treatments were studied using the Gleeble hot ductility test. A modified hot ductility test was also used to follow the evolution of microstructure during simulated welding thermal cycles. The microstructural evolution was correlated with the hot ductility data in order to evaluate the mechanism of hot cracking in alloy 718. The correlation of hot ductility with microstructure showed that recrystallization, grain growth, and dissolution of precipitates did not in themselves cause any loss of ductility during cooling. Ductility loss during cooling was not initiated until the constitutional liquation of NbC particles was observed in the microstructure. Laves-type phases were found precipitated in the solidified grain boundaries but were not found to correlate with any ductility loss parameter. Mechanisms are reviewed which help to explain how heat treatment controls the hot crack susceptibility of alloy 718 as measured in the hot ductility test.

  1. Ductile Binder Phase For Use With Almgb14 And Other Hard Ceramic Materials

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Bruce A.; Russell, Alan; Harringa, Joel

    2005-07-26

    This invention relates to a ductile binder phase for use with AlMgB14 and other hard materials. The ductile binder phase, a cobalt-manganese alloy, is used in appropriate quantities to tailor good hardness and reasonable fracture toughness for hard materials so they can be used suitably in industrial machining and grinding applications.

  2. Ductility Characterization of U-6Nb and Ta-W Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T; Cervantes, O

    2006-09-15

    We have previously evaluated the ductility behaviors of U-6Nb and pure Ta. One important observation was that both alloys have very stable necking ductility independent of test conditions. In contrast, uniform ductility varied significantly depending upon strain rates and temperatures. In general, higher strain rate and lower temperature reduce the uniform ductility. Using literature data, we have developed two dynamic ductility models to predict the ductility behaviors of pure-Ta and water-quenched U-6Nb respectively under extreme conditions. In this study we further evaluate the aging effect on U-6Nb and the W-addition effect on Ta. For U-6Nb, the objective is to determine whether or not the ductility degradation by low-temperature aging mostly measured in quasi-static condition can still be observed under dynamic loading (high strain rate) condition. For Ta-W alloys, the focus is to identify the key control parameter so that the optimal condition of high-strength/high-ductility of Ta-10W can be achieved for certain defense-related applications.

  3. High post-irradiation ductility thermomechanical treatment for precipitation strengthened austenitic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Laidler, James J.; Borisch, Ronald R.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for improving the post-irradiation ductility is described which prises a solution heat treatment following which the materials are cold worked. They are included to demonstrate the beneficial effect of this treatment on the swelling resistance and the ductility of these austenitic precipitation hardenable alloys.

  4. Boudinage and folding as an energy instability in ductile deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Max; Herwegh, Marco; Paesold, Martin K.; Poulet, Thomas; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Veveakis, Manolis

    2016-05-01

    We present a theory for the onset of localization in layered rate- and temperature-sensitive rocks, in which energy-related mechanical bifurcations lead to localized dissipation patterns in the transient deformation regime. The implementation of the coupled thermomechanical 2-D finite element model comprises an elastic and rate-dependent von Mises plastic rheology. The underlying system of equations is solved in a three-layer pure shear box, for constant velocity and isothermal boundary conditions. To examine the transition from stable to localized creep, we study how material instabilities are related to energy bifurcations, which arise independently of the sign of the stress conditions imposed on opposite boundaries, whether in compression or extension. The onset of localization is controlled by a critical amount of dissipation, termed Gruntfest number, when dissipative work by temperature-sensitive creep translated into heat overcomes the diffusive capacity of the layer. Through an additional mathematical bifurcation analysis using constant stress boundary conditions, we verify that boudinage and folding develop at the same critical Gruntfest number. Since the critical material parameters and boundary conditions for both structures to develop are found to coincide, the initiation of localized deformation in strong layered media within a weaker matrix can be captured by a unified theory for localization in ductile materials. In this energy framework, neither intrinsic nor extrinsic material weaknesses are required, because the nucleation process of strain localization arises out of steady state conditions. This finding allows us to describe boudinage and folding structures as the same energy attractor of ductile deformation.

  5. Development of ductile high-strength chromium alloys, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filippi, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Strength and ductility were evaluated for chromium alloys dispersion hardened with the putative TaC, TaB, CbC, and CbB compounds. TaC and TaB proved to be the most potent strengtheners, but when combined, their effect far outweighed that produced individually. Tests at 1422 K (2100 F) on an alloy containing these two compounds at the combined level of 0.5 m/o revealed a 495 MN/sq m (70 ksi) tensile strength for wrought material, and a 100 hour rupture strength of 208 MN/sq m (30 ksi) when solution annealed and aged to maximize creep resistance. These levels of high temperature strength greatly exceed that reported for any other chromium-base alloy. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the two phase strengthened alloy occurred at approximately 588 K (600 F) when heat treated to optimize creep strength and was not improved by fabrication to produce a wrought and recovered microstructure. The lowest DBTT measured on any of the alloys investigated was 422 K (300 F). Strengthening phases actually formed in Cr-Ta-B and Cr-Cb-B compositions are probable M2CrB2 (M=Ta or Cb) compounds of tetragonal crystal structure. The likely habit relationship between these compounds and chromium is postulated. Cube habit coherency was identified for TaC precipitation in chromium by electron microscopy. In another study, the maximum solubility of carbon in chromium was indicated to lie between 3/4 and 1 a/o and that of boron to be 1/2 a/o.

  6. Highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites with boron nitride nanospheres as fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuqiao; Huang, Yan; Meng, Wenjun; Wang, Zifeng; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-03-01

    Polymer composites with enhanced mechanical, thermal or optical performance usually suffer from poor ductility induced by confined mobility of polymer chains. Herein, highly ductile UV-shielding polymer composites are successfully fabricated. Boron nitride (BN) materials, with a wide band gap of around ∼6.0 eV, are used as fillers to achieve the remarkably improved UV-shielding performance of a polymer matrix. In addition, it is found that spherical morphology BN as a filler can keep the excellent ductility of the composites. For a comparison, it is demonstrated that traditional fillers, including conventional BN powders can achieve the similar UV-shielding performance but dramatically decrease the composite ductility. The mechanism behind this phenomenon is believed to be lubricant effects of BN nanospheres for sliding of polymer chains, which is in consistent with the thermal analyses. This study provides a new design to fabricate UV-shielding composite films with well-preserved ductility.

  7. Ductile-to-brittle transition of oxidised Zircaloy-4 and E110 claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hózer, Zoltán; Győri, Csaba; Matus, Lajos; Horváth, Márta

    2008-02-01

    The ductile-to-brittle transition of the claddings of PWR and VVER nuclear fuel rods has been investigated in ring compression tests performed at room temperature with Zircaloy-4 and E110 samples oxidised in high temperature steam. These experiments were evaluated on the basis of the form of load-displacement curves. The ductile samples were characterised by a horizontal ductile plateau after the elastic deformation, while in the case of the brittle samples the ductile plateau was missing. The ductility limits of both alloys were expressed in terms of oxidation time and cladding temperature. From this, a numerical procedure was derived for the simulation of Zr cladding embrittlement during loss-of-coolant accidents. The results indicated a faster embrittlement of the E110 alloy than that of the Zircaloy-4 under identical conditions. The new approach is proposed as an alternative of the 17% ECR criterion to evaluate cladding embrittlement in design basis accident (DBA) scenarios.

  8. Kinetic Ductility and Force-Spike Resistance of Proteins from Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cossio, Pilar; Hummer, Gerhard; Szabo, Attila

    2016-08-23

    Ductile materials can absorb spikes in mechanical force, whereas brittle ones fail catastrophically. Here we develop a theory to quantify the kinetic ductility of single molecules from force spectroscopy experiments, relating force-spike resistance to the differential responses of the intact protein and the unfolding transition state to an applied mechanical force. We introduce a class of unistable one-dimensional potential surfaces that encompass previous models as special cases and continuously cover the entire range from ductile to brittle. Compact analytic expressions for force-dependent rates and rupture-force distributions allow us to analyze force-clamp and force-ramp pulling experiments. We find that the force-transmitting protein domains of filamin and titin are kinetically ductile when pulled from their two termini, making them resistant to force spikes. For the mechanostable muscle protein titin, a highly ductile model reconciles data over 10 orders of magnitude in force loading rate from experiment and simulation. PMID:27558726

  9. Thermal activation of crack-tip plasticity: The brittle or ductile response of a stationary crack loaded to failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmaier, Alexander; Gumbsch, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Metals with a body centered cubic crystal structure, like tungsten, exhibit a pronounced semibrittle regime at intermediate temperatures. In this regime their fracture toughness strongly depends on loading rate and temperature. Crack-tip plasticity has been studied with two-dimensional numerical simulations on different length scales. The method of discrete dislocation dynamics has been employed to test various assumptions made on the deformation mechanisms and the origin of the strong loading rate and temperature dependence of fracture toughness in this regime. A continuum elasticity-viscoplasticity model capable of describing larger plastic deformations yields complementary information with respect to the discrete dislocation method. Despite of their fundamental differences, both simulations consistently show that crack-tip plasticity can be described as a time-dependent microplastic deformation with well-defined activation energy and that the blunting of the crack tip plays an important role for the transition from semibrittle to ductile behavior. Based on general findings of the numerical simulations an Arrheniuslike relation between loading rate and temperature at points of constant fracture toughness is derived. This scaling relation shows the dominance of dislocation mobility as the rate limiting factor for fracture toughness and for the brittle-to-ductile transition itself. The results of our simulations are also consistent with experimental data gathered on tungsten single crystals. Thus, the proposed scaling relation can be used to predict fracture toughnesses in a wide range of temperatures and loading rates, based on only a small number of experiments.

  10. Fracture prediction in hydraulic bulging of AISI 304 austenitic steel sheets based on a modified ductile fracture criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Song, H. W.; Zhang, S. H.; Cheng, M.

    2011-08-01

    The demand for weight reduction in modern vehicle construction has resulted in an increase in the application of hydroforming processes for the manufacture of automotive lightweight components. This trend led to the research of evaluation on formability of the sheet or tube hydroforming to be noted, particularly the prediction of fracture. In this study, a new proposed approach based on damage theory for fracture prediction considering the deformation history was introduced. And the modified ductile fracture criterion was applied to predict the failure for hydraulic bulging of AISI 304 austenitic steel sheets. The material parameters in terms of the function of strain rate in the failure criterion were determined from the equivalent fracture strains corresponding tensile tests under different stress conditions. Then, in the finite element simulation the effect of strain rates and their distribution as well during practical sheet metal forming process was considered. The hydraulic bulging tests were carried out to identify the fracture behavior predicted from FE analysis. A comparison between the prediction and experimental results showed that the proposed approach with a modified ductile fracture criteria can give better fracture predictions than traditional ways.

  11. Ductile polyelectrolyte macromolecule-complexed zinc phosphate conversion crystal pre-coatings and topcoatings embodying a laminate

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.R.

    1985-11-05

    This invention relates to a precoat, laminate, and method for ductile coatings on steel and non-ferrous metals which comprises applying a zinc phosphating coating solution modified by a solid polyelectrolyte selected from polyacrylic acid (PAA), polymethacrylic acid (PMA), polyitaconic acid (PIA), and poly-L-glutamic acid. The contacting of the resin with the phosphating solution is made for a period of up to 20 hours at about 80/sup 0/C. The polyelectrolyte or the precoat is present in about 0.5 to 5.0% by weight of the total precoat composition and after application, the precoat base is dried for up to 5 hours at about 150/sup 0/C to desiccate. Also, a laminate may be formed where polyurethane (PU) is applied as an elastomeric topcoating or polyfuran resin is applied as a glassy topcoating. It has been found that the use of PAA at a molecular weight of about 2 x 10/sup 5/ gave improved ductility modulus effect.

  12. The second Sandia Fracture Challenge. Predictions of ductile failure under quasi-static and moderate-rate dynamic loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boyce, B. L.; Kramer, S. L. B.; Bosiljevac, T. R.; Corona, E.; Moore, J. A.; Elkhodary, K.; Simha, C. H. M.; Williams, B. W.; Cerrone, A. R.; Nonn, A.; et al

    2016-03-14

    Ductile failure of structural metals is relevant to a wide range of engineering scenarios. Computational methods are employed to anticipate the critical conditions of failure, yet they sometimes provide inaccurate and misleading predictions. Challenge scenarios, such as the one presented in the current work, provide an opportunity to assess the blind, quantitative predictive ability of simulation methods against a previously unseen failure problem. Instead of evaluating the predictions of a single simulation approach, the Sandia Fracture Challenge relied on numerous volunteer teams with expertise in computational mechanics to apply a broad range of computational methods, numerical algorithms, and constitutive modelsmore » to the challenge. This exercise is intended to evaluate the state of health of technologies available for failure prediction. In the first Sandia Fracture Challenge, a wide range of issues were raised in ductile failure modeling, including a lack of consistency in failure models, the importance of shear calibration data, and difficulties in quantifying the uncertainty of prediction [see Boyce et al. (Int J Fract 186:5–68, 2014) for details of these observations]. This second Sandia Fracture Challenge investigated the ductile rupture of a Ti–6Al–4V sheet under both quasi-static and modest-rate dynamic loading (failure in ~ 0.1 s). Like the previous challenge, the sheet had an unusual arrangement of notches and holes that added geometric complexity and fostered a competition between tensile- and shear-dominated failure modes. The teams were asked to predict the fracture path and quantitative far-field failure metrics such as the peak force and displacement to cause crack initiation. Fourteen teams contributed blind predictions, and the experimental outcomes were quantified in three independent test labs. In addition, shortcomings were revealed in this second challenge such as inconsistency in the application of appropriate boundary

  13. Determination of critical stress triaxiality along yield locus of isotropic ductile materials under plane strain condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadauria, S. S.; Pathak, K. K.; Hora, M. S.

    2012-09-01

    It is widely accepted that failure due to plastic deformation in metals greatly depends on the stress triaxiality factor (TF). This article investigates the variation of stress triaxiality along the yield locus of ductile materials. Von Mises yield criteria and triaxiality factor have been used to determine the critical limits of stress triaxiality for the materials under plane strain condition. A generalized mathematical model for triaxiality factor has been formulated and a constrained optimization has been carried out using genetic algorithm. Finite element analysis of a two dimensional square plate has been carried out to verify the results obtained by the mathematical model. It is found that the set of values of the first and the second principal stresses on the yield locus, which results in maximum stress triaxiality, can be used to determine the location at which crack initiation may occur. Thus, the results indicate that while designing a certain component, such combination of stresses which leads the stress triaxiality to its critical value, should be avoided.

  14. Ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames under earthquake loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Larry A.; Sause, Richard; Ricles, James M.; Lu, Le-Wu

    2003-12-01

    Accurate estimates of ductility demands on buckling-restrained braced frames (BRBFs) are crucial to performance-based design of BRBFs. An analytical study on the seismic behavior of BRBFs has been conducted at the ATLSS Center, Lehigh University to prepare for an upcoming experimental program. The analysis program DRAIN-2DX was used to model a one-bay, four-story prototype BRBF including material and geometric nonlinearities. The buckling-restrained brace (BRB) model incorporates both isotropic and kinematic hardening. Nonlinear static pushover and time-history analyses were performed on the prototype BRBF. Performance objectives for the BRBs were defined and used to evaluate the time-history analysis results. Particular emphasis was placed on global ductility demands and ductility demands on the BRBs. These demands were compared with anticipated ductility capacities. The analysis results, along with results from similar previous studies, are used to evaluate the BRBF design provisions that have been recommended for codification in the United States. The results show that BRB maximum ductility demands can be as high as 20 to 25. These demands significantly exceed those anticipated by the BRBF recommended provisions. Results from the static pushover and time-history analyses are used to demonstrate why the ductility demands exceed those anticipated by the recommended provisions. The BRB qualification testing protocol contained in the BRBF recommended provisions is shown to be inadequate because it requires only a maximum ductility demand of at most 7.5. Modifications to the testing protocol are recommended.

  15. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found

  16. Hot Ductility Behavior of Boron Containing Microalloyed Steels with Varying Manganese Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, Tobias; Senk, Dieter; Walpot, Raphael; Steenken, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The hot ductility is measured for six different steel grades with different microalloying elements and with varying manganese contents using the hot tensile test machine with melting/solidification unit at the Department of Ferrous Metallurgy RWTH Aachen University. To identify the influence of manganese on hot ductility, tests are performed with varying the manganese content from 0.7 to 18.2 wt pct, a high manganese steel. Additionally, the effect of different cooling and strain rates is analyzed by changing the particular rate for selected samples in the minima. To investigate and detect the cause of cracking during testing, the fracture surfaces in the ductility minima are considered with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermodynamic modeling is conducted on basis of the commercial software ThermoCalc©. A sharp decrease of the hot ductility is recognizable at 1398 K (1125 °C), at only 0.7 wt pct manganese because of the low manganese to sulfur ratio. The grades with a Mn content up to 1.9 wt pct show a good ductility with minimal ductility loss. In comparison, the steel grade with 18.2 wt pct has a poor hot ductility. Because of the formation of complex precipitates, where several alloying elements are involved, the influence of boron on hot ductility is not fully clarified. By increasing the cooling rate, the reduction of area values are shifted to smaller values. For high test temperatures, these measured values are decreased for lower strain rates. Thereby, an early drop of the ductility is noticeable for the high temperatures around 1373 K (1100 °C).

  17. Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) for Development of EGS Reservoirs in Ductile Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, H.; Muraoka, H.; Tsuchiya, N.; Ito, H.

    2012-12-01

    EGS (Enhanced Geothermal System) geothermal has been identified as a most promising method of geothermal development because of its potential applicability to a much wider range of sites, many of which have previously been considered to be unsuitable for geothermal development. Meanwhile, some critical problems with EGS technologies have been experimentally identified, such as low recovery of injected water, difficulties in establishing universal design/development methodologies, and the occurrence of induced seismicity, suggesting that there may be limitations in realizing EGS in earthquake-prone compression tectonic zones. We propose a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile basement. This potentially has a number of advantages including: (a) simpler design and control of the reservoir, (b) nearly full recovery of injected water, (c) sustainable production, (d) lower cost when developed in relatively shallower ductile zones in compression tectonic settings, (e) large potential quantities of energy extraction from widely distributed ductile zones, (f) the establishment of a universal design/development methodology, and (g) suppression of felt earthquakes from/around the reservoirs. To further assess the potential of EGS reservoir development in ductile zones we have initiated the "Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP)". It is intended that the first few years of the JBBP will be spent in basic scientific investigation and necessary technology development, including studies on rock mechanics in the brittle/ductile regime, characterization of ductile rock masses, development of modeling methodologies/technologies, and investigations of induced/triggered earthquakes. We expect to drill a deep experimental borehole that will penetrate the ductile zone in northeast Japan after basic studies are completed. The feasibility of EGS reservoir development in the ductile zone will then be assessed through observations and

  18. Quantification of damage evolution for a micromechanical model of ductile fracture in spallation of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.; Tonks, D.L.; Hixon, R.; Addessio, F.

    1997-05-01

    The authors present quantification of micromechanical features such as voids that comprise the ductile fracture obtained under uniaxial strain condition in a spall test of commercial purity tantalum. Two evolutionary parameters of ductile fracture void formation are quantified: (i) the void volume fraction (porosity) and its distribution with respect to the distance from the main spall fracture plane, and (ii) void diameter distribution. The results complement the discussion of the implications of void clustering and linking for micromechanical modeling of ductile fracture as presented in a paper by D. L. Tonks et al. in this volume.

  19. Integrated modeling and heat treatment simulation of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, E.; Hurevich, V.; Schäfer, W.

    2012-07-01

    The integrated modeling and simulation of the casting and heat treatment processes for producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) castings is presented. The focus is on describing different models to simulate the austenitization, quenching and austempering steps during ADI heat treatment. The starting point for the heat treatment simulation is the simulated microstructure after solidification and cooling. The austenitization model considers the transformation of the initial ferrite-pearlite matrix into austenite as well as the dissolution of graphite in austenite to attain a uniform carbon distribution. The quenching model is based on measured CCT diagrams. Measurements have been carried out to obtain these diagrams for different alloys with varying Cu, Ni and Mo contents. The austempering model includes nucleation and growth kinetics of the ADI matrix. The model of ADI nucleation is based on experimental measurements made for varied Cu, Ni, Mo contents and austempering temperatures. The ADI kinetic model uses a diffusion controlled approach to model the growth. The models have been integrated in a tool for casting process simulation. Results are shown for the optimization of the heat treatment process of a planetary carrier casting.

  20. Wear behavior of bainite ductile cast iron under impact load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ting; Song, Ren-bo; Yang, Fu-qiang; Wu, Chun-jing

    2014-09-01

    The dry impact wear behavior of bainite ductile cast iron was evaluated under three different impact loads for 30000 cycles. The strain-hardening effects beneath the contact surfaces were analyzed according to the surfaces' micro-hardness profiles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to observe the worn surfaces. The results indicated that the material with the highest hardness was the one continuously cooled at 20°C, which exhibited the lowest wear rate under each set of test conditions. The hardness of the worn surface and the thickness of the hardened layer increased with the increases in impact load and in the number of test cycles. The better wear performance of the sample cooled at 20°C is attributed to its finer microstructure and superior mechanical properties. All the samples underwent the transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) phenomenon after impact wear, as revealed by the fact that small amounts of retained austenite were detected by XRD.

  1. An analysis of ductile rupture modes at a crack tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needleman, A.; Tvergaard, V.

    A N ELASTIC-VISCOPLASTIC model of a ductile, porous solid is used to study the influence of the nucleation and growth of micro-voids in the material near the tip of a crack. Conditions of small scale yielding are assumed, and the numerical analyses of the stress and strain fields are based on finite strain theory, so that crack tip blunting is fully accounted for. An array of large inclusions or inclusion colonies, with a relatively low strength, results in large voids near the crack tip at a rather early stage, whereas small second phase particles in the matrix material between the inclusions require large strains before cavities nucleate. Various distributions of the large inclusions, and various critical strains for nucleation of the small scale voids between the inclusions, are considered. Localization of plastic flow plays an important role in determining the failure path between the crack tip and the nearest larger void, and the path is strongly sensitive to the distribution of the large inclusions. Values of the J-integral and the crack opening displacement at fracture initiation are estimated, together with values of the tearing modulus during crack growth, and these values are related to experimental results.

  2. Neutron Diffraction Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Irons

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is a powerful tool that can be used to identify the phases present and to measure the spacing of the atomic planes in a material. Thus, the residual stresses can be determined within a component and/or the phases present. New intercritically austempered irons rely on the unique properties of the austenite phase present in their microstructures. If these materials are to see widespread use, methods to verify the quality (behavior consistency) of these materials and to provide guidance for further optimization will be needed. Neutron diffraction studies were performed at the second generation neutron residual stress facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on a variety of intercritically austempered irons. For similar materials, such as TRIP steels, the strengthening mechanism involves the transformation of metastable austenite to martensite during deformation. For the intercritically austempered ductile irons two different deformation/strengthening mechanisms, phase transformation and slip, dependent upon the iron chemistry, were observed. Lattice strain and phase fraction data as a function of applied stress are presented.

  3. Thermoelastic-plastic flow and ductile fracture in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    The main aim of these lectures is to develop the theory of elastic-plastic flow in solids, with application to a particular class of processes, namely those in which the dissipation of plastic work cannot be neglected. Examples of such processes are highspeed impact phenomena and cratering, shock compression, often shock release as well, and explosive deformation and welding. An important part of the development is to include the anisotropic elastic properties of a solid, and for this reason the theory applies to solids in general. On the other hand, it is possible that some of the results will have limited validity for nonmetals. The secondary aim of the lectures is to develop a general framework for ductile fracture, and describe the current practice in the field. Our theory is incremental in nature and suitable for integrating along a process in small timesteps as is done in ''hydrodynamic'' computer programs. A notational conflict arose, because in continuum mechanics the extensive quantities are taken per unit mass, while in thermodynamics they are usually per unit volume. The continuum mechanics normalization, i.e., per unit mass, is used throughout, with the result that uncommon factors of density show up in the thermodynamic equations.

  4. Quantifying Damage Accumulation During Ductile Plastic Deformation Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, Robert M.; Rollett, Anthony D.

    2015-08-15

    Under this grant, we have developed and demonstrated the ability of near-field High Energy Diffraction Microscopy (nf-HEDM) to map crystal orientation fields over three dimensions in deformed polycrystalline materials. Experimental work was performed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at beamline 1-ID. Applications of this new capability to ductile deformation of copper and zirconium samples were demonstrated as was the comparison of the experimental observations to computational plasticity models using a fast Fourier transform based algorithm that is able to handle the large experimental data sets. No such spatially resolved, direct comparison between measured and computed microstructure evolutions had previously been possible. The impact of this work is reflected in numerous publications and presentations as well as in the investments by DOE and DOD laboratories of millions of dollars in applying the technique, developing sophisticated new hardware that allows the technique to be applied to a wide variety of materials and materials problems, and in the use of the technique by other researchers. In essence, the grant facilitated the development of a new form of three dimensional microscopy and its application to technologically critical states of polycrystalline materials that are used throughout the U.S. and world economies. On-going collaborative work is further optimizing experimental and computational facilities at the APS and is pursuing expanded facilities.

  5. Review on symmetric structures in ductile shear zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Soumyajit

    2016-07-01

    Symmetric structures in ductile shear zones range widely in shapes and geneses. Matrix rheology, its flow pattern, its competency contrast with the clast, degree of slip of the clast, shear intensity and its variation across shear zone and deformation temperature, and degree of confinement of clast in shear zones affects (independently) the degree of symmetry of objects. Kinematic vorticity number is one of the parameters that govern tail geometry across clasts. For example, symmetric and nearly straight tails develop if the clast-matrix system underwent dominantly a pure shear/compression. Prolonged deformation and concomitant recrystallization can significantly change the degree of symmetry of clasts. Angular relation between two shear zones or between a shear zone and anisotropy determines fundamentally the degree of symmetry of lozenges. Symmetry of boudinaged clasts too depends on competency contrast between the matrix and clast in some cases, and on the degrees of slip of inter-boudin surfaces and pure shear. Parasitic folds and post-tectonic veins are usually symmetric.

  6. Thermomechanical Fatigue of Ductile Cast Iron and Its Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Sloss, Clayton

    2015-06-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) behaviors of ductile cast iron (DCI) were investigated under out-of-phase (OP), in-phase (IP), and constrained strain-control conditions with temperature hold in various temperature ranges: 573 K to 1073 K, 723 K to 1073 K, and 433 K to 873 K (300 °C to 800 °C, 450 °C to 800 °C, and 160 °C to 600 °C). The integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) model was incorporated into the finite element method to simulate the hysteresis behavior and predict the TMF life of DCI under those test conditions. With the consideration of four deformation/damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement, (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation, as revealed from the previous study on low cycle fatigue of the material, the model delineates the contributions of these physical mechanisms in the asymmetrical hysteresis behavior and the damage accumulation process leading to final TMF failure. This study shows that the ICFT model can simulate the stress-strain response and life of DCI under complex TMF loading profiles (OP and IP, and constrained with temperature hold).

  7. 49 CFR 178.920 - Standards for metal Large Packagings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Large Packaging types are designated: (1) 50A steel (2) 50B aluminum (3) 50N metal (other than steel or aluminum) (b) Each Large Packaging must be made of suitable ductile metal materials. Welds must be made so as to maintain design type integrity of the receptacle under conditions normally incident...

  8. Onset of Ultrasonic Oscillation at Impulse Processing of Metal Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaburova, N. A.

    2016-02-01

    Processing of metal melts powerful electromagnetic impulses - a new and effective way to change the structure and properties of metal. Numerous experiments on ferrous and non-ferrous metals have shown that such processing usually allows both increase in strength and ductility. A theoretical explanation is given to the impact mechanism of powerful electromagnetic impulses on ferrous and non-ferrous metal melts. The possibility to convert electromagnetic impulses to sound waves is shown.

  9. Ductility enhancement in NiAl (B2)-base alloys by microstructural control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, K.; Kainuma, R.; Ueno, N.; Nishizawa, T.

    1991-02-01

    An attempt to improve ductility of NiAl (B2)-base alloys has been made by the addition of alloying elements and the control of microstructure. It has been found that a small amount of fcc γ phase formed by the addition of Fe, Co, and Cr has a drastic effect not only on the hot workability but also on the tensile ductility at room temperature. The enhancement in ductility is mainly due to the modification of Β-phase grains by the coexistence of γ phase. The effect of alloying elements on the hot forming ability is strongly related to the phase equilibria and partition behavior among γ, γ' (L12 structure), and Β phases in the Ni-Al-X alloy systems. The ductility-enhancement method shows promise for expanding the practical application of nickel aluminide.

  10. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1992-01-28

    This patent describes a method for improving the room temperature ductility and high temperature strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. It comprises: thermomechanically working of the alloys ; heating the alloys; and rapidly cooling the alloys.

  11. Ductile electroless Ni-P coating onto flexible printed circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenchang; Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Yurong; Mitsuzak, Naotoshi; Chen, Zhidong

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a ductile electroless Ni-P coating on the flexible printed circuit board (FPCB) was prepared in an acidic nickel plating bath. The addition of dipropylamine (DPA) in electroless plating not only improves the ductility of the Ni-P coating, but also enhances the corrosion resistance. The further analysis reveals that the ductility improvement and enhancement of corrosion resistance for the Ni-P coating may be due to the fact that the addition of DPA significantly refines the volume of columnar nodule and reduce the porosity, thus leading to the released internal stress. In addition, it was found that the nodule within the Ni-P coating grew into a columnar structure, which may be also contribute to the improvement of ductility.

  12. Grain-boundary contamination and ductility loss in boron-doped Ni3Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeyama, M.; Liu, C. T.

    1989-10-01

    The effect of heat treatment on ductility loss in a boron-doped Ni3Al was studied by tensile tests of alloy specimens exposed to contaminated environments. Specimens heat-treated extensively in evacuated quartz capsules at 1323 K exhibit only 3.3 pct ductility at 1033 K, whereas a previous study reported a tensile ductility of about 24 pet for specimens heat-treated in a high vacuum system. Aluminum oxide and silicon-contaminated regions were observed at and near external surfaces of capsule-annealed specimens. The reactions occurring during heat treatment are interpreted in terms of thermodynamics. An Auger electron spectroscopy study revealed oxygen penetration along grain boundaries during capsule annealing. Although the surface oxide layer and silicon contamination both contribute to some reductions in ductility, the major cause for embrittlement comes from oxygen penetration along grain boundaries.

  13. Numerical simulations of interfacial debonding in ductile-phase reinforced intermetallic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Zywicz, E.; Strum, M.J.

    1993-08-10

    The fracture toughness of brittle intermetallic compounds can be improved by ductile-phase reinforcements. Effectiveness of the ductile phase in bridging cracks, and therefore increasing, the composite toughness, is known qualitatively to depend upon the extent of debonding, between the two phases. Numerical crack-growth simulations are used here to provide semi-quantitative predictions of the influence of interfacial debonding on the macroscopic stress-displacement behavior and, hence, the fracture toughness of an idealized Pb/glass composite. The interfacial toughness required to cause debonding, characterized by a constant critical energy release rate, is varied parametrically. As expected, higher interfacial toughness results in less interphase debonding, higher composite strength, and greater ductile-phase constraint. Consequently, the increase in ductile-phase triaxiality can potentially accelerate internal void formation and growth or facilitate cleavage fracture, either of which would likely decrease the toughness of the composite.

  14. Atomistic Simulation of Brittle to Ductile Transition in GaN Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2006-12-11

    Molecular dynamics methods with a Stillinger-Weber potential have been used to investigate the mechanical properties of wurtzite-type single crystalline GaN nanotubes under applied tensile stresses. At lower temperatures, the nanotubes show brittle properties; whereas at higher temperatures, they behave as ductile materials. The brittle to ductile transition (BDT) is systemically investigated, and the corresponding transition temperatures have been determined in GaN. The BDT temperature generally increases with increasing thickness of nanotubes and strain rate.

  15. Modeling Shear Instabilities With Block Sliders: Brittle and Ductile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.

    2003-12-01

    Block slider-type models have been succesfully used for almost 35 years to describe the spatio-temporal development of shear instabilities in the brittle crust (Burridge & Knopoff, 1967; Olami et al., 1992). More recently, increasing attention is paid on the extension of the classical Burridge-Knopoff model (based on a pure Mohr-Coulomb rheology) with a viscous component, either to include depth-dependent properties into the model or aiming at a more accurate description of fore- and aftershock sequences of a main earthquake event (e.g. Hainzl et al., 1999). On the other hand, viscous feedback mechanisms of various types have become an increasingly attractive mechanism for the generation of intermediate-depth and deep-focus earthquakes in the ductile mantle lithosphere (e.g. Wiens & Snider, 2001). Heat generated during viscous deformation provides a positive feedback to creep and eventually faulting under high pressure (Karato et al., 2001, Bercovici & Karato, 2003). The present paper discusses the specific properties of block slider-type models that are extended with a viscous component and compare their behaviour with the pure brittle ("classical") case. Block slider-type models for ductile instabilities are numerically much less demanding than solutions based on the corresponding, thermal-mechanically coupled, continuum equations. They allow for the inclusion of possible non-equilibrium effects associated with mineral phase transformations in a subducting slab (kinetic overshoot, grainsize reduction, latent heat release) in a straightforward manner. They may therefore serve as an effective tool to study the coupling of viscous heating, temperature-dependent viscosity and brittle stress transfer that are thought to cause the specific spatial-temporal clustering of intermediate-depth and deep-focus eartquakes. References D. Bercovici and S. Karato "Theoretical Analysis of Shear Localization in the Lithosphere", in: Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry 51, eds. S

  16. The effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and properties of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B.Y.; Chen, E.T.; Lei, T.S.

    1995-05-01

    Ductile cast iron has already demonstrated excellent mechanical properties. If given proper austempering, it can exhibit even more outstanding characteristics. The process of austempering for ductile cast iron is similar to steel, and requires an adequate completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitizing temperature allowing the matrix of ductile iron to be austenitized completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitized ductile iron down to 300 C--400 C. Caution is required to prevent austenite from transforming into proeutectoid ferrite or pearlite. Finally, the ductile iron must be kept in an isothermal condition for a proper length of time. Many kinds of experimental techniques such as quantitative metallography, magnetic change, dilatometry, X-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity change etc., may be used to measure the phase transformation during the austempering of ductile irons. However, the method of measuring the change of electrical resistivity, not only provides continuous and complete data, but also the time to start and to finish for both stages of the reaction can be significantly determined. In this paper, the effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and property of ADI was investigated. First, the specimens containing Mn, Cu, Ni and Mo were made separately, then a PC-controlled vacuum heat treating system was used for the heat treatments.

  17. Effects of Pore Distributions on Ductility of Thin-Walled High Pressure Die-Cast Magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Li, Dongsheng; Sun, Xin; Li, Mei; Allison, John

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a microstructure-based three-dimensional (3D) finite element modeling method is adopted to investigate the effects of porosity in thin-walled high pressure die-cast (HPDC) Magnesium alloys on their ductility. For this purpose, the cross-sections of AM60 casting samples are first examined using optical microscope and X-ray tomography to obtain the general information on the pore distribution features. The experimentally observed pore distribution features are then used to generate a series of synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element models with different pore volume fractions and pore distribution features. Shear and ductile damage models are adopted in the finite element analyses to induce the fracture by element removal, leading to the prediction of ductility. The results in this study show that the ductility monotonically decreases as the pore volume fraction increases and that the effect of ‘skin region’ on the ductility is noticeable under the condition of same local pore volume fraction in the center region of the sample and its existence can be beneficial for the improvement of ductility. The further synthetic microstructure-based 3D finite element analyses are planned to investigate the effects of pore size and pore size distribution.

  18. Pin-On-Disc Characterization of Brass/Ferritic and Pearlitic Ductile Iron Rubbing Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetin, Melik

    2011-04-01

    Wear behaviour of special brass produced through two different methods (centrifugal and sand casting) was investigated. The wear tests were carried out at sliding velocities of 0.2 ms-1, 0.3 ms-1, 0.4 ms-1 and 0.5 ms-1 and under 10 N, 20 N, and 40 N variable loads. The sliding distance was 600 m for all the tests. A pin-on-disc device with round specimen inserts was used to conduct friction and wear tests in which the friction coefficient, the contact temperature and the linear wear of the tribo-pairs were continuously recorded against sliding distance. Two different materials were used as the counterparts, namely ferritic ductile iron equivalent to GGG40 and pearlitic ductile iron equivalent to GGG60. The microstructures and wear scars of the brass specimens were examined by optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray microanalyses by EDAX. A correlation between hardness and wear volume rate was established for the investigated centrifugally cast and sand cast brass specimens. The volume rate of specimens produced by sand casting method was generally found to be higher than those of centrifugally cast specimens. Ferritic ductile counterpart led to higher wear volume rate than pearlitic ductile counterpart for the both specimens. Severe abrasive wear scars were observed for the sand cast specimens/ferritic ductile iron pair. However, severe adhesive wear took place for the centrifugally cast specimen/pearlitic ductile iron pair.

  19. Seismic Rheological Model and Reflection Coefficients of the Brittle-Ductile Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcione, José M.; Poletto, Flavio

    2013-12-01

    It is well established that the upper—cooler—part of the crust is brittle, while deeper zones present ductile behaviour. In some cases, this brittle-ductile transition is a single seismic reflector with an associated reflection coefficient. We first develop a stress-strain relation including the effects of crust anisotropy, seismic attenuation and ductility in which deformation takes place by shear plastic flow. Viscoelastic anisotropy is based on the eigenstrain model and the Zener and Burgers mechanical models are used to model the effects of seismic attenuation, velocity dispersion, and steady-state creep flow, respectively. The stiffness components of the brittle and ductile media depend on stress and temperature through the shear viscosity, which is obtained by the Arrhenius equation and the octahedral stress criterion. The P- and S-wave velocities decrease as depth and temperature increase due to the geothermal gradient, an effect which is more pronounced for shear waves. We then obtain the reflection and transmission coefficients of a single brittle-ductile interface and of a ductile thin layer. The PP scattering coefficient has a Brewster angle (a sign change) in both cases, and there is substantial PS conversion at intermediate angles. The PP coefficient is sensitive to the layer thickness, unlike the SS coefficient. Thick layers have a well-defined Brewster angle and show higher reflection amplitudes. Finally, we compute synthetic seismograms in a homogeneous medium as a function of temperature.

  20. Effect of foundation flexibility on ductility reduction factors for R/C stack-like structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halabian, Amir M.; Kabiri, Shabnam

    2011-06-01

    The most important parameter used to determine force reduction factors in force-based design procedures adopted in the current seismic codes is the structural ductility. For a structure supported on a flexible foundation, the ductility factor could be affected by foundation compliances. The ductility factors given in the current codes are mostly assigned ignoring the effect of SSI and therefore the objective of this research is to assess the significance of SSI phenomenon on ductility factors of stack-like structures. The deformed configuration of stack-like structures is idealized as an assemblage of beam elements considering nonlinear moment-curvature relations, while a linear sway-rocking model was implemented to model the supporting soil. Using a set of artificial records, repeated linear and nonlinear analyses were performed by gradually increasing the intensity of acceleration to a level where the first yielding of steel in linear and nonlinear analyses is observed and a level corresponding to the stack collapse in the nonlinear analysis. The difference between inelastic and elastic resistance in terms of displacement ductility factors has been quantified. The results indicate that foundation flexibility can decrease the ductility of the system and neglecting this phenomenon may lead to erroneous conclusions in the prediction of the seismic performance of flexibly-supported R/C stack-like structures.

  1. Unified Viscoplastic Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Robinson, D. N.; Bartolotta, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The need for unified constitutive models was recognized more than a decade ago in the results of phenomenological tests on monolithic metals that exhibited strong creep-plasticity interaction. Recently, metallic alloys have been combined to form high-temperature ductile/ductile composite materials, raising the natural question of whether these metallic composites exhibit the same phenomenological features as their monolithic constituents. This question is addressed in the context of a limited, yet definite (to illustrate creep/plasticity interaction) set of experimental data on the model metal matrix composite (MMC) system W/Kanthal. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a unified viscoplastic representation, extended for unidirectional composites and correlated to W/Kanthal, can accurately predict the observed longitudinal composite creep/plasticity interaction response and strain rate dependency. Finally, the predicted influence of fiber orientation on the creep response of W/Kanthal is illustrated.

  2. Comparison of High-Temperature Properties and Thermal Shock Resistance of Austempered Ductile Irons (ADI) with Those of Pearlitic Ductile Cast Irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajabshiri, Mehrdad; Sharafi, Shahriar; Moeini, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    High-temperature strength and thermal shock resistance of austempered ductile iron (ADI) in high temperatures because of instability of ausferrite phase has been less interest. The aim of this study is to investigate the tensile properties of ADI and pearlitic ductile cast iron by using the short-time tensile test in high temperatures. Tensile test was conducted in temperatures of 298 K, 673 K, 873 K, and 1073 K (25 °C, 400 °C, 600 °C, and 800 °C). Thermal shock test also was conducted by using the molten lead bath at 1273 K (1000 °C). In this experiment, samples of pearlitic ductile cast iron and ADI were divided in two groups; that after immersing in the molten lead bath for 25 seconds, one group was cooled in the air and other one was quenched in the water. Results showed that strength and thermal shock resistance of ADI samples are higher than those of the pearlitic ductile cast iron.

  3. Nonequilibrium grain-boundary segregation and ductile-brittle-ductile transition in Fe-Mn-Ni-Ti age-hardening alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, N.H.

    1996-10-01

    Nonequilibrium segregation kinetics of alloying elements and a ductile-brittle-ductile transition behavior have been investigated in an Fe-8.4Mn-7.4Ni-1.7Ti alloy. The alloy experienced a ductile-brittle-ductile (DBD) transition during isothermal aging. In the brittle region, the alloy showed a decrease in intergranular fracture strength and a subsequent increase with aging time. This is due to the segregation of titanium to the grain boundaries and its desegregation into the matrix. The intergranular fracture strength was higher on the zero tensile elongation finish curve than on the start curve. This is because the grain-boundary segregation level of titanium is relatively lower on the finish curve. The lowest intergranular fracture strength increased with increasing aging temperature, which was attributed to a lower grain-boundary segregation level of titanium at higher temperature. Manganese caused an overall reduction in intergranular fracture strength and, as a result, the delayed occurrence of the zero tensile elongation (ZTE) finish curve in a temperature and long-time plot.

  4. Ductile-to-brittle transition temperature for high-burnup cladding alloys exposed to simulated drying-storage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billone, M. C.; Burtseva, T. A.; Einziger, R. E.

    2013-02-01

    Structural analyses of dry casks containing high-burnup fuel require cladding mechanical properties and failure limits to assess fuel behavior. Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage subject cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to in-reactor operation and pool storage. Under these conditions, radial hydrides may precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). A test procedure was developed to simulate the effects of drying-storage temperature histories. Following drying-storage simulation, samples were subjected to ring-compression test (RCT) loading, which was used as a ductility screening test and to simulate pinch-type loading that may occur during cask transport. RCT samples with <2% offset strain prior to >50% wall cracking were assessed as brittle. Prior to testing high-burnup cladding, many tests were conducted with pre-hydrided Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) and ZIRLO™ to determine target 400 °C hoop stresses for high-burnup rodlets. Zry-4 cladding segments, from a 67-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 520-620 wppm hydrogen and ZIRLO™ cladding segments from a 70-GWd/MTU fuel rod, with 350-650 wppm hydrogen were defueled and tested. Following drying-storage simulation, the extent of radial-hydride precipitation was characterized by the radial-hydride continuity factor. It was found that the DBTT was dependent on: cladding material, irradiation conditions, and drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature). High-burnup ZIRLO™ exhibited higher susceptible to radial-hydride formation and embrittlement than high-burnup Zry-4. It was also observed that uniformly pre-hydrided, non-irradiated cladding was not a good surrogate for high-burnup cladding because of the high density of circumferential hydrides across the wall and the high metal-matrix ductility for

  5. Possible transient creep events in a brittle-ductile continental crust: observations, experiments and potential models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavier, Luc

    2016-04-01

    In a given tectonic province and over thousands to millions of years, slip on faults is believed to be constant and approximately equal to the local tectonic rate in agreement with rigid plate tectonic theory. In this model the ductile lower crust flows in response to this steady plate motion. Moreover brittle and ductile behaviors interact only at a sharp boundary defined as the brittle ductile transition (BDT). However in the continental lithosphere brittle and ductile behavior may coexist over a large range of pressure and temperature conditions for different mineral compositions. This generates heterogeneities in the brittle and ductile crust that are often ignored in models of shear zones. We hypothesize that the interaction between brittle (elastic) and ductile (viscous) behavior may cause deviations from steady-state slip and generates transient creep events on shear zones that release many meters of creep over years to thousands of years marked by a single period of tectonic activity followed by quiescence. We present a set of numerical and analytical models, analogue experiments as well as some observations in nature that may support this hypothesis. In this presentation we extend an analytic formulation to model creep events within shear zones at the transition between brittle and ductile behavior in the crust. We assume that creep events are triggered by a set of interconnected fractures modeled as propagating dislocations. The amount of connectivity controls the nature and the intensity of the transient creep events. The shear zone behaves as a forced damped oscillator that can release strain accumulated during jammed/locked periods. The creep can be over-, critically-, or under-damped. The time scale of the events may vary between seconds to thousands of years depending on the viscous, elastic and plastic (fractures) properties of the shear zone.

  6. Two brittle ductile transitions in subduction wedges, as revealed by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction wedges contain two brittle ductile transitions. One transition occurs within the wedge interior, and a second transition occurs along the decollement. The decollement typically has faster strain rates, which suggests that the brittle ductile transition along the decollement will be more rearward (deeper) than the transition within the interior. However, the presence of distinct rheologies or other factors such as pore fluid pressure along the decollement may reverse the order of the brittle-ductile transitions. We adopt a solution by Williams et al., (1994) to invert for these brittle ductile transitions using the wedge surface topography. At present, this model does not include an s point or sediment loading atop the wedge. The Hellenic wedge, however, as exposed in Crete presents an ideal setting to test these ideas. We find that the broad high of the Mediterranean ridge represents the coulomb frictional part of the Hellenic wedge. The rollover in topography north of the ridge results from curvature of the down going plate, creating a negative alpha depression in the vicinity of the Strabo, Pliny, and Ionian 'troughs' south of Crete. A steep topographic rise out of these troughs and subsequent flattening reflects the brittle ductile transition at depth in both the decollement and the wedge interior. Crete exposes the high-pressure viscous core of the wedge, and pressure solution textures provide additional evidence for viscous deformation in the rearward part of the wedge. The location of the decollement brittle ductile transition has been previously poorly constrained, and Crete has never experienced a subduction zone earthquake in recorded history. Williams, C. A., et al., (1994). Effect of the brittle ductile transition on the topography of compressive mountain belts on Earth and Venus. Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth

  7. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of a Wear-Resistant Alloyed Ductile Iron Austempered at Various Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Junjun; Chen, Liqing

    2015-08-01

    To further improve the mechanical performance of a new type of alloyed bainitic wear-resistant ductile iron, the effects of the various austempering temperatures have been investigated on microstructure and mechanical behaviors of alloyed ductile iron Fe-3.50C-1.95Si-3.58Ni-0.71Cu-0.92Mo-0.65Cr-0.36Mn (in weight percent). This alloyed ductile iron were firstly austenitized at 1123 K (850 °C) for 1 hour and then austempered in a salt bath at 548 K, 573 K, and 598 K (275 °C, 300 °C, and 325 °C) for 2 hours according to time-temperature-transformation diagram calculated by JMatPro software. The microstructures of austempered wear-resistant ductile irons consist of matrix of dark needle-like ferrite plus bright etching austenite and some amount of martensite and some dispersed graphite nodules. With increasing the austempering temperature, the amount of ferrite decreases in austempered ductile iron, while the amount of austenite and carbon content of austenite increases. There is a gradual decrease in hardness and increase in compressive strength with increasing austempering temperature. The increased austenite content and coarsened austenite and ferrite can lead to a hardness decrease as austempering temperature is increased. The increased compressive strength can be attributed to a decreased amount of martensitic transformation. The alloyed ductile iron behaves rather well wear resistance when the austempering is carried out at 598 K (325 °C) for 2 hours. Under the condition of wear test by dry sand/rubber wheel, the wear mechanisms of austempered ductile irons are both micro-cutting and plastic deformation.

  8. Hot Ductility Characterization of Sanicro-28 Super-Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzaei, A.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Abedi, H. R.

    2016-05-01

    The hot ductility behavior of a super-austenitic stainless steel has been studied using tensile testing method in the temperature range from 1073 K to 1373 K (800 °C to 1100 °C) under the strain rates of 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 s-1. The hot compression tests were also performed at the same deformation condition to identify the activated restoration mechanisms. At lower temperatures [ i.e., 1073 K and 1173 K (800 °C and 900 °C)], the serration of initial grain boundaries confirms the occurrence of dynamic recovery as the predominant restoration process. However, in the course of applied deformation, the initial microstructure is recrystallized at higher temperatures [ i.e., 1273 K and 1373 K (1000 °C and 1100 °C)]. In this respect, annealing the twin boundaries could well stimulate the recrystallization kinetic through initiation new annealing twins on prior annealing twin boundaries. The hot tensile results show that there is a general trend of increasing ductility by temperature. However, two regions of ductility drop are recognized at 1273 K and 1373 K (1000°C)/0.1s-1 and (1100°C)/0.01s-1. The ductility variations at different conditions of temperature and strain rate are discussed in terms of simultaneous activation of grain boundary sliding and restoration processes. The observed ductility troughs are attributed to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding and the resulting R-type and W-type cracks. The occurrence of dynamic recrystallization is also considered as the main factor increasing the ductility at higher temperatures. The enhanced ductility is primarily originated from the post-uniform elongation behavior, which is directly associated with the strain rate sensitivity of the experimental material.

  9. Effects of weld metal strength and defects on the ductility of HSLA-100 plates

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, R.J.; Ferrell, M.

    1995-12-31

    Wide-plate tension tests were performed on high-strength low-alloy steel, minimum yield strength of 690 MPa, with various controlled intentional defects in both undermatched and overmatched welds. Lack-of-fusion areas on the sidewall comprising about 10 percent of the cross-section resulted in full net-section strength. Weld undercut to a depth of 12 percent of the thickness resulted in gross-section yielding and good elongation. Misalignment (offset) of 3 mm slightly reduced the elongation relative to plates within tolerances. There was no consistent difference between the results of the undermatched welds and the overmatched welds.

  10. Scanning-electron-microscope study of normal-impingement erosion of ductile metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the erosion of annealed copper and aluminum surfaces produced by both single- and multiple-particle impacts. Macroscopic 3.2 mm diameter steel balls and microscopic, brittle erodant particles were projected by a gas gun system so as to impact at normal incidence at speeds up to 140 m/sec. During the impacts by the brittle erodant particles, at lower speeds the erosion behavior was similar to that observed for the larger steel balls. At higher velocities, particle fragmentation and the subsequent cutting by the radial wash of debris created a marked change in the erosion mechanism.

  11. Ductile-to-brittle transition in tensile failure of particle-reinforced metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauert, Aude; Rossoll, Andreas; Mortensen, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    We present an analytical micromechanical model designed to simulate the tensile stress-strain behaviour and failure of damaging composites containing a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. One internal damage micromechanism is considered, namely particle fracture, which is assumed to obey a Weibull distribution. Final composite tensile failure occurs when one of two possible failure criteria is reached, given by (i) the onset of tensile instability, or (ii) an "avalanche-like" propagation of particle breaks to neighbouring particles. We show that an experimentally observed transition from failure by tensile instability to abrupt failure resulting from an increase of matrix strength can be mimicked by the model because local load-sharing (i.e. load transfer from a broken particle to its immediate neighbours) is accounted for.

  12. Microtopography for Ductile Fracture Process Characterization - Part 1: Theory and Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, Wilson Randolph

    2003-02-01

    The mechanics of ductile fracture is receiving increased focus as the importance of integrity of structures constructed from ductile materials is increasing. The non-linear, irreversible mechanical response of ductile materials makes generalized models of ductile cracking very difficult to develop. Therefore, research and testing of ductile fracture have taken a path leading to deformation-based parameters such as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) and crack tip opening angle (CTOA). Constrained by conventional test techniques and instrumentation, physical values (e.g. crack mouth opening displacement, CMOD, and CTOA angles) are measured on the test specimen exterior and a single through-thickness "average" interior value is inferred. Because of three-dimensional issues such as crack curvature, constraint variation, and material inhomogeneity, inference of average parameter values may introduce errors. The microtopography methodology described here measures and maps three-dimensional fracture surfaces. The analyses of these data provide direct extraction of the parameters of interest at any location within the specimen interior, and at any desired increment of crack opening or extension. A single test specimen can provide all necessary information for the analysis of a particular material and geometry combination.

  13. Ductile grinding of silicon carbide as a production method for reflective optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, W.K.

    1993-11-01

    Ductile regime grinding or shear-mode grinding is an enabling technology that is finding application in the optics manufacturing industry. By definition, ductile removal occurs when the scale of machining is conducted below a material-dependent critical dimension or chip size. Much of the interest in ductile grinding resides in manufacturing glass optics, which experience brittle-ductile transition at {approximately}10 nm. Silicon carbide has a critical dimension that is on the order of 100--200 nm, making it a more attractive candidate for the technology. Preliminary results from an on-axis chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC sphere (f/14) indicate 317 {Angstrom} surface roughness and 0.96 wave P-V figure were achieved with this manufacturing method. Surface finish, interferometric measured figure and BRDF scatter results are presented from ductile regime grinding of 40 and 75 mm flats of CVD silicon carbide, bare reaction bonded SiC (RBSiC) and uniaxial hot-pressed SiC (HPSiC).

  14. Influence of testing environment on the room temperature ductility of FeAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaydosh, D. J.; Nathal, M. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of testing atmospheres (air, O2, N2, and vacuum) on the room-temperature ductility of Fe-40Al, Fe-40Al-0.5B, and Fe-50Al alloys were investigated. The results confirmed the decrease in room-temperature ductility of Fe-rich FeAl alloys by the interaction of the aluminide with water vapor, reported previously by Liu et al. (1989). The highest ductilities were measured in the atmosphere with the lowest moisture levels, i.e., in vacuum. It was found that significant ductility is still restricted to Fe-rich alloys (Fe-40Al), as the Fe-50Al alloy remained brittle under all testing conditions. It was also found that slow cooling after annealing was beneficial, and the effect was additive to the environmental effect. The highest ductility measurements in this study were 9 percent elongation in furnace-cooled Fe-40Al and in Fe-40Al-0.5B, when tested in vacuum.

  15. Effect of Boron Precipitation Behavior on the Hot Ductility of Boron Containing Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kyung Chul; Mun, Dong Jun; Kim, Jin Young; Park, Joong Kil; Lee, Jae Sang; Koo, Yang Mo

    2010-04-01

    The effect of boron (B) precipitation behavior on the hot ductility of B containing steel was investigated. Hot ductility of B containing steel was sensitive to the cooling rate (CR) in the range of 1 to 20 K/s (1 to 20 °C/s), whereas that of B-free steel showed little change with CR. Increased CR causes deepening and widening of the ductility trough in B containing steel. Particle tracking autoradiography (PTA) analysis and transmission electron microscope (TEM) image of the samples show that boron nitride (BN) particles form along prior austenite grain boundaries, and that as CR increases, these particles become smaller and more numerous. This increase in the number of small BN precipitates may promote intergranular fracture, leading to a decrease in hot ductility in the lower austenite temperature region (1173 to 1273 K (900 to 1000 °C)). Furthermore, the formation of filmlike ferrite at ~1123 K (850 °C) causes a decrease in the hot ductility of this steel regardless of B addition and CR.

  16. Influence of cerium additions on high-temperature-impact ductility and fracture behavior of iridium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A.N.; Zee, R.H.; George, E.P.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1997-10-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), used for supplying electric power to interplanetary space missions, utilize the energy liberated due to decay of the radioisotope fuel. The material used for cladding the fuel pellets is an iridium-based alloy developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which contains nominally 0.3 wt pct W, 60 wppm Th, and 50 wppm Al, generally known as DOP-26. High-temperature tensile impact testing was carried out on Ir + 0.3 wt pct W alloys doped with cerium and thorium individually, and with cerium and thorium together. Impact ductility was evaluated as a function of grain size and test temperature. Cerium by itself was not as effective as thorium in improving the grain boundary cohesion, even though it segregated more strongly than thorium to the grain boundaries. This lower grain boundary cohesion was responsible for lower impact ductility and higher brittle-to-ductile transition temperature of cerium-doped alloys compared to those of the thorium- or thorium plus cerium-doped alloys. Reduction in thorium content by a factor of 5 (from 50 to 10 appm) in the bulk did not result in any significant reduction in high-temperature impact ductility or an increase in the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature as long as sufficient cerium was added to provide grain refinement. Grain boundary strengths of thorium- and thorium plus cerium-doped alloys were almost identical.

  17. Evading the strength–ductility trade-off dilemma in steel through gradient hierarchical nanotwins

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yujie; Li, Yongqiang; Zhu, Lianchun; Liu, Yao; Lei, Xianqi; Wang, Gang; Wu, Yanxin; Mi, Zhenli; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    The strength–ductility trade-off has been a long-standing dilemma in materials science. This has limited the potential of many structural materials, steels in particular. Here we report a way of enhancing the strength of twinning-induced plasticity steel at no ductility trade-off. After applying torsion to cylindrical twinning-induced plasticity steel samples to generate a gradient nanotwinned structure along the radial direction, we find that the yielding strength of the material can be doubled at no reduction in ductility. It is shown that this evasion of strength–ductility trade-off is due to the formation of a gradient hierarchical nanotwinned structure during pre-torsion and subsequent tensile deformation. A series of finite element simulations based on crystal plasticity are performed to understand why the gradient twin structure can cause strengthening and ductility retention, and how sequential torsion and tension lead to the observed hierarchical nanotwinned structure through activation of different twinning systems. PMID:24686581

  18. Ductility improvement of direct-cast gamma TiAl-based alloy sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Hanamura, Toshihiro; Hashimoto, Keizo

    1997-12-31

    For improving the room temperature tensile ductility of direct-cast gamma TiAl sheets without affecting their high-temperature strength, direct sheet casting with TiB{sub 2} particle dispersion is employed and conducted. The TiB{sub 2} addition and rapid cooling results in the formation of a fine equiaxed grain microstructure with an average grain size of {approximately}10{micro}m, contributing to the increase in the room temperature ductility to 2.1% with the high-temperature tensile strength kept at about 200 MPa. This improvement of room-temperature ductility is attributable to the following fact. The high oxygen content of this material, about 2,500 wt.ppm, is not harmful to the tensile ductility when the oxygen is in the solid solution of the {alpha}{sub 2} lamellar phase or in oxide particles, which are fine enough not to cause brittleness to the matrix. From these findings, a principle is proposed that oxygen is not harmful to the ductility of gamma TiAl when its microstructure containing oxygen is fine enough.

  19. Metals Fact Sheet: Gadolinium GD

    SciTech Connect

    1992-10-01

    Gadolinium is a silvery-white, malleable, ductile metallic element used to improve the high-temperature characteristics of iron, chromium, and related metallic alloys. It was named after the French chemist, Gadolin, discoverer of yttrium. This article discusses sources of the element, the world supply and demand, and also a number of applications. With the largest thermal neutron absorption cross section of any element, one of these applications is as a burnable poison in reactors and as neutron absorbers in other nuclear devices.

  20. Metallization and insulization during impact

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-10-01

    It is pointed out that the large strains produced by hypervelocity impacts can be expected to produce dramatic changes in the chemical bonding (electronic structures) of materials. This will change the mechanical behavior towards increased ductility when a semiconductor is compressed until it becomes metallic; and towards increased brittleness when a transition metal is expanded so as to localize its d-band electrons. Both isotropic compression (expansion) and shear strains can cause these transformations. Critical deformation criteria are given based on the observed cubic to tetragonal transformations in compressed semiconductors.

  1. METHOD OF PRODUCING NIOBIUM METAL

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Stevens, E.R.

    1960-05-24

    A process is given for preparing ductile niobium metal by the reduction of niobium pentoxide with carbon. The invention resides in the addition, to the reaction mass, of from 0.05 to 0.4 atom of titanium (in the form of metallic titanium, titanium carbide, and/or titanium oxide) per one mole of niobium pentoxide. The mixture is heated under subatmospheric pressure to above 1300 deg C but below the melting point of niobium, and the carbon- and oxygen-free niobium sponge obtained is cooled under reduced pressure.

  2. Effect of porosity on ductility variation in investment cast 17-4PH.

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Robert D.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grant, Richard P.; Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Susan, Donald Francis

    2005-02-01

    The stainless steel alloy 17-4PH contains a martensitic microstructure and second phase delta ({delta}) ferrite. Strengthening of 17-4PH is attributed to Cu-rich precipitates produced during age hardening treatments at 900-1150 F (H900-H1150). For wrought 17-4PH, the effects of heat treatment and microstructure on mechanical properties are well-documented [for example, Ref. 1]. Fewer studies are available on cast 17-4PH, although it has been a popular casting alloy for high strength applications where moderate corrosion resistance is needed. Microstructural features and defects particular to castings may have adverse effects on properties, especially when the alloy is heat treated to high strength. The objective of this work was to outline the effects of microstructural features specific to castings, such as shrinkage/solidification porosity, on the mechanical behavior of investment cast 17-4PH. Besides heat treatment effects, the results of metallography and SEM studies showed that the largest effect on mechanical properties is from shrinkage/solidification porosity. Figure 1a shows stress-strain curves obtained from samples machined from castings in the H925 condition. The strength levels were fairly similar but the ductility varied significantly. Figure 1b shows an example of porosity on a fracture surface from a room-temperature, quasi-static tensile test. The rounded features represent the surfaces of dendrites which did not fuse or only partially fused together during solidification. Some evidence of local areas of fracture is found on some dendrite surfaces. The shrinkage pores are due to inadequate backfilling of liquid metal and simultaneous solidification shrinkage during casting. A summary of percent elongation results is displayed in Figure 2a. It was found that higher amounts of porosity generally result in lower ductility. Note that the porosity content was measured on the fracture surfaces. The results are qualitatively similar to those found by

  3. Modeling of ductile deformation in anisotropic rocks with slip surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin

    2013-04-01

    Flanking structures and sheath folds can develop in layered rocks due to flow perturbation around slip surfaces in shear zones (Exner and Dabrowski, 2010; Reber et al., submitted). Mechanical anisotropy of the host rock has been shown to play a major role in determining the slip rate and the flow pattern around it (Kocher and Mancktelow, 2006; Fletcher, 2011). In addition, anisotropic fluids such as ductile foliated rocks have a 'memory' of deformation due to evolving microstructure. For example, the rotation of a rigid circular inclusion embedded in a layered host in layer-parallel shear results in the structural reorganization around it, which leads to the modification of the flow pattern in the host and in consequence to a massive reduction of the inclusion rotation rate (Dabrowski and Schmid, 2011). Willis (1964) derived an analytical elastic solution for an elliptical inclusion in a homogeneous anisotropic matrix subject to a uniform load in the far field. The solution can be reduced to the case of an incompressible viscous medium. The case of an arbitrarily oriented inviscid slit under shear parallel to the principal axis of anisotropy can be obtained by reducing it even further. Although derived for the initial state of homogeneous planar anisotropy, the solution provides useful insights into the large deformation behavior of the system. In this study, I will use different models and numerical modeling techniques to assess the impact of mechanical anisotropy and structural development on the perturbing flow around an inviscid slit (slip surface) embedded in a host comprising discrete isotropic layers in layer-parallel simple shear. In the limit of thin layers (the number of layers intercepting the slit tends to infinity), the host is modeled as an anisotropic fluid. The anisotropic viscosity is determined by the bulk anisotropic viscosity of the layered system. The layering is initially planar or equivalently the anisotropy is initially homogeneous. Both non

  4. Evaluation of the environmentally induced fracture resistance of ductile nickel aluminide. Technical report number 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ricker, R.E.; Bertocci, U.; Fink, J.L.; Stoudt, M.R.

    1991-07-01

    Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and electrochemical experiments were performed in different aqueous solutions on ductile nickel aluminide, Ni{sub 3}Al+B, in order to evaluate the possibility of environmentally induced fracture of this material in neutral pH solutions as a result of hydrogen absorption. Two different processes were postulated that could lead to hydrogen absorption and embrittlement: (1) local acidification due to hydrolysis of the corrosion reaction products and (2) hydrogen reduction during the potential transient that accompanies film rupture and repair. Experiments were designed to evaluate each of these possibilities. First, slow strain rate tests were conducted in solutions with varying concentrations of metal ions and pH to determine the critical metal ion concentration and pH that result in hydrogen absorption and embrittlement of this material. Second, the potential transient that follows the mechanical rupture of the protective surface film in different solutions was measured and the minimum potential during the transient was compared to the potential that results in a hydrogen fugacity large enough to cause cracking. The results indicate that hydrogen reduction, absorption, and embrittlement are not to be expected in neutral solutions as a result of local acidification during crevice corrosion or film rupture during crack propagation or cyclic loading.

  5. Ductile tungsten-nickel-alloy and method for manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile elongation of a tungsten-nickel-iron alloy containing essentially 95 weight percent reprocessed tungsten, 3.5 weight percent nickel, and 1.5 weight percent iron is increased from a value of less than about 1 percent up to about 23 percent by the addition of less than 0.5 weight percent of a reactive metal consisting of niobium and zirconium.

  6. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  7. Ductility and impact resistance of P/M molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Leichtfried, Gerhard; Schneibel, Joachim H; Heilmaier, M.

    2006-01-01

    Mo-Re alloys containing between 5 and 47.5 wt pct Re were fabricated from Mo and Mo-Re powders by sintering and hot radial forging. The mechanical properties of as-forged, stress-relieved, and recrystallized specimens were examined. Up to a concentration of 41 wt pct Re, the Charpy ductile-to-brittle transition temperature decreased monotonically with increasing rhenium concentration. Consistent with this, bend angles for fracture at T = -100 C increased monotonically with increasing rhenium concentration. Between 10 and 41 wt pct rhenium, the room-temperature tensile ductility of recrystallized Mo-Re remained nearly constant with values on the order of 35 to 45 pct. This result differs from the low ductility values observed previously by Lundberg (1997) for compositions on either side of Mo-13 wt pct Re.

  8. Texture Modification and Ductility Enhancement in Mg Alloy Through Friction Stir Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhenzhen; Feng, Zhili; Choo, Hahn; Vogel, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The correlation between friction stir processing parameters, i.e., rotation and travel rates of the processing tool, the texture modification and ductility enhancement of an Mg alloy AZ31B was investigated. With the systematic changes in processing parameters as represented by a Zener-Hollomon parameter input, a transition of different crystallographic texture was observed through neutron diffraction measurement, which correlated well with the changes in deformation and recrystallization mechanism activated during the FSP. The variation in the texture leads to dramatic changes in the strength and ductility in the stir zone of the processed Mg plate. A maximum of three-fold increase in the ductility was achieved in the Mg alloy through FSP when the Zener-Hollomon parameter exceeds a critical value, which is associated with low rotation speed and high travel speed processing conditions.

  9. A coupled ductile fracture phase-field model for crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Padilla, Carlos Alberto; Markert, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Nowadays crack initiation and evolution play a key role in the design of mechanical components. In the past few decades, several numerical approaches have been developed with the objective to predict these phenomena. The objective of this work is to present a simplified, nonetheless representative phenomenological model to predict the crack evolution of ductile fracture in single crystals. The proposed numerical approach is carried out by merging a conventional elasto-plastic crystal plasticity model and a phase-field model modified to predict ductile fracture. A two-dimensional initial boundary value problem of ductile fracture is introduced considering a single-crystal setup and Nickel-base superalloy material properties. The model is implemented into the finite element context subjected to a quasi-static uniaxial tension test. The results are then qualitatively analyzed and briefly compared to current benchmark results in the literature.

  10. Transition temperature and fracture mode of as-castand austempered ductile iron.

    PubMed

    Rajnovic, D; Eric, O; Sidjanin, L

    2008-12-01

    The ductile to brittle transition temperature is a very important criterion that is used for selection of materials in some applications, especially in low-temperature conditions. For that reason, in this paper transition temperature of as-cast and austempered copper and copper-nickel alloyed ductile iron (DI) in the temperature interval from -196 to +150 degrees C have been investigated. The microstructures of DIs and ADIs were examined by light microscope, whereas the fractured surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope. The ADI materials have higher impact energies compared with DIs in an as-cast condition. In addition, the transition curves for ADIs are shifted towards lower temperatures. The fracture mode of Dls is influenced by a dominantly pearlitic matrix, exhibiting mostly brittle fracture through all temperatures of testing. By contrast, with decrease of temperature, the fracture mode for ADI materials changes gradually from fully ductile to fully brittle. PMID:19094047

  11. Studying the Enhanced Ductility of Bimodal Nanocrystalline Copper Using a Coarse-Grained Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie Jason; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu

    Viewing a bimodal configuration of nanocrystalline copper as composed of soft grains containing stiff cores, we proposed a coarse-grained model with systematically tunable stiffness of grains to study the enhanced ductility of bimodal nanocrystalline copper [Y. Wang, M. Chen, F. Zhou, and E. Ma, Nature 419 (2002) 912]. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we shear our model quasistatically. Our results not only qualitatively confirms that a bimodal configuration could behave more ductile than a monomodal one but also predicts there exists a range of ratio of soft/stiff domains that best minimizes shear localization. Moreover, our model indicates that a bimodal configuration could sometimes exacerbate shear localization and therefore jeopardize ductility if the ratio of soft/stiff domains is not properly chosen. This may explain why some experimental results are hard to be reproduced.

  12. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  13. Strength and ductility improvement of ultrafine-grained tungsten produced by equal-channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, T.; Fan, Z. Q.; Zhang, T.; Luo, G. N.; Wang, X. P.; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) was employed to refine the grain size of tungsten at relatively low temperatures. The small punch (SP) test results show that the ultrafine-grained tungsten appears an evident improvement in both strength and ductility compared with primary coarse-grained tungsten. The analysis results from SP test data indicate that the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of the ultrafine-grained tungsten decrease to 386 °C and 322 °C due to the ECAP processing at 800 °C and 950 °C, respectively. The reason of the improvement in both strength and ductility of the ultrafine-grained tungsten produced by ECAP is discussed.

  14. Strength, fracture, and fatigue behavior of advanced high-temperature intermetallics reinforced with ductile phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soboyejo, W. O.; Rao, K. T. Venkateswara; Sastry, S. M. L.; Ritchie, R. O.

    1993-03-01

    The results of recent studies on the fatigue and fracture behavior of extruded Ti-48A1 + 20 vol pct TiNb and hot-isostatically pressed (“hipped”) MoSi2 + 20 vol pct Nb are presented (compositions in atomic percent unless stated otherwise). The effects of ductile phase reinforcement of Ti-48A1 and MoSi2 on the micromechanisms of fracture under monotonie and cyclic loading are elucidated. Micromechanics models are applied to the prediction of crack-tip shielding components, and the effects of temperature on tensile/compressive/flexure strengths are discussed. Ductile phase toughening under monotonie loading conditions is shown to be associated with lower fatigue crack growth resistance. The lower fatigue resistance is attributed to the absence of crack-tip shielding, higher crack opening displacements, and the effects of inelastic strains that are developed in ductile phase-reinforced composites under cyclic loading conditions.

  15. Metallurgical evaluation of factors influencing the ductility of aged T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The metallurgical factors influencing the ductility of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) alloy following long-time exposures of GTA welds and tubing in the temperature range 982 C (1800 F) through 1316 C (2400 F) were evaluated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron emission spectroscopy, and optical metallographic procedures. No classical aging response occurs in the alloy over the temperature range studied. The ductility impairment implied by previous investigations is not the result of microstructural response of the alloy to thermal exposures. Intergranular failure in the GTA sheet welds appears the result of random contamination by silicon, potassium, and/or fluorine at the grain boundaries of the fusion zones. Exposure to lithium at high temperatures had no adverse effects on the ductility of T-111 tubing. These materials were, however, sensitive to post-age handling and testing procedures.

  16. Ductility and strength reduction factors for degrading structures considering cumulative damage.

    PubMed

    Bojórquez, Edén; Ruiz, Sonia E; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cumulative damage on the strength requirements of degrading structures is assessed through the evaluation of the target ductility and corresponding strength reduction factors of simple degrading structures. While the reduction on ductility is established through the use of Park and Ang index, the suggestions given by Bojórquez and Rivera are used to model the degradation of the structural properties of the simple systems. Target ductilities and their corresponding reduced strength reduction factors are established for five sets of ground motions; most of them are recorded in California. The results given in this paper provide insight into all relevant parameters that should be considered during seismic design of earthquake-resistant structures. Finally, some recommendations to evaluate the effect of cumulative damage on seismic design are suggested. PMID:24883410

  17. Ductility and Strength Reduction Factors for Degrading Structures Considering Cumulative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bojórquez, Edén; Ruiz, Sonia E.; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Bojórquez, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of cumulative damage on the strength requirements of degrading structures is assessed through the evaluation of the target ductility and corresponding strength reduction factors of simple degrading structures. While the reduction on ductility is established through the use of Park and Ang index, the suggestions given by Bojórquez and Rivera are used to model the degradation of the structural properties of the simple systems. Target ductilities and their corresponding reduced strength reduction factors are established for five sets of ground motions; most of them are recorded in California. The results given in this paper provide insight into all relevant parameters that should be considered during seismic design of earthquake-resistant structures. Finally, some recommendations to evaluate the effect of cumulative damage on seismic design are suggested. PMID:24883410

  18. The Nature of the Tensile Fracture in Austempered Ductile Iron with Dual Matrix Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicli, Volkan; Erdogan, Mehmet

    2010-02-01

    The tensile fracture characteristics of austempered ductile irons with dual matrix structures and different ausferrite volume fractions have been studied for an unalloyed ductile cast iron containing (in wt.%) 3.50 C, 2.63 Si, 0.318 Mn, and 0.047 Mg. Specimens were intercritically austenitized (partially austenitized) in two phase region (α + γ) at various temperatures for 20 min and then quenched into a salt bath held at austempering temperature of 365 °C for various times and then air cooled to room temperature to obtain various ausferrite volume fractions. Conventionally austempered specimens with fully ausferritic matrix and unalloyed as-cast specimens having fully ferritic structures were also tested for comparison. In dual matrix structures, results showed that the volume fraction of proeutectoid ferrite, new (epitaxial) ferrite, and ausferrite [bainitic ferrite + high-carbon austenite (stabilized or transformed austenite)] can be controlled to influence the strength and ductility. Generally, microvoids nucleation is initiated at the interface between the graphite nodules and the surrounding ferritic structure and at the grain boundary junctions in the fully ferritic microstructure. Debonding of the graphite nodules from the surrounding matrix structure was evident. The continuity of the ausferritic structure along the intercellular boundaries plays an important role in determining the fracture behavior of austempered ductile iron with different ausferrite volume fractions. The different fracture mechanisms correspond to the different levels of ausferrite volume fractions. With increasing continuity of the ausferritic structure, fracture pattern changed from ductile to moderate ductile nature. On the other hand, in the conventionally austempered samples with a fully ausferritic structure, the fracture mode was a mixture of quasi-cleavage and a dimple pattern. Microvoid coalescence was the dominant form of fracture in all structures.

  19. The Pennsbury-Concord shear zone: A deformed ductile thrust, central Appalachian Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Solar, G.S.; Hill, M.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The contact between the Baltimore Gneiss and the Wissahickon Group in southeastern Pennsylvania is a ductile shear zone. The contact extends from just west of Pennsbury to just east of Concord, Pennsylvania. The strike of the shear zone contact varies along its length from a general orientation of N60--65E in the west to N75--80E near Concord and then to N30E adjacent to the Rosemont Shear Zone. Microstructural analysis reveals deformation in units on both sides of the contact that is characterized by plastic deformation mechanisms associated with depths below the brittle-ductile transition. Retrograde metamorphism and grain-size reduction as well as continuity across the zone indicate that this deformation was later than the metamorphism of the individual units. The contact has experienced at least two phases of deformation. The early phase was ductile thrusting juxtaposing the Wissahickon Group gneiss on top of the Precambrian Baltimore Gneiss and producing a high temperature pervasive planar and linear fabric. This fabric is most preserved in the west where foliation is shallowly dipping with a lineation trending S54E and plunging 35[degree] to the SE. The later phase was characterized by transposition of the ductile thrust fabric to a more strike-parallel orientation. Along the contact zone to the east, strike of the foliation gradually changes 10--15[degree], dip becomes steeper and the orientation of lineation changes to S85E with plunge of 17[degree] to the east. The deformation of the contact therefore confirms that the ductile thrusting is earlier than the major transcurrent shearing of the Appalachian Piedmont. Named the Pennsbury-Concord Zone, this deformed ductile thrust could be a root zone of brittle thrust faulting to the west in the fold-and-thrust-belt of central PA.

  20. How melt stretching affect the brittle-ductile transition temperature of polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2013-03-01

    Upon increasing temperature a brittle polymer glass can turn ductile. PMMA is a good example. For a while this brittle-ductile transition (BDT) was thought to be determined by the emergence of a secondary relaxation....1-3 On the other hand, it has been known for a long time...4-6 that predeformation in the melt state (e.g., melt stretching) can also make brittle glasses behave in a ductile manner. This transformation has recently received a satisfactory explanation based on a picture of structural hybrid for polymer glasses....7 It appears that BDT is dictated by the relative mechanical characteristics of the primary structure (due to the van der Waals bonds) and the chain network. The present work, based on conventional Instron tensile extension tests and DMA tests, shows that melt stretching does not alter the secondary relaxation behavior of PMMA and PC yet can turn them the brittle PMMA ductile and the ductile PC brittle. Moreover, sufficient melt stretching makes the brittle PS ductile although it does not produce any secondary relaxation process..1. Monnerie, L.; Laupretre, F.; Halary, J. L. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 35-213. 2. Monnerie, L.; Halary, J. L.; Kausch, H. Adv. Polym. Sci2005, 187, 215-364. 3. Wu, S. J. Appl. Polym. Sci.1992, 46, (4), 619-624. 4. Vincent, P. I. Polymer1960, 1, (0), 425-444. 5. Harris, J. S.; Ward, I. M. J. Mater. Sci.1970, 5, (7), 573-579. 6. Ender, D. H.; Andrews, R. D. J. Appl. Phys.1965, 36, (10), 3057-3062. 7. Zartman, G. D.; Cheng, S.; Li, X.; Lin, F.; Becker, M. L.; Wang, S.-Q. Macromolecules2012, 45, (16), 6719-6732.

  1. Ultrafine-grained titanium of high interstitial contents with a good combination of strength and ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Wu, X.; Sadedin, D.; Wellwood, G.; Xia, K.

    2008-01-01

    A dehydrided Ti powder of very high oxygen content was successfully consolidated using back pressure equal channel angular processing into a fully dense bulk ultrafine-grained Ti showing apparent compressive ductility as well as high true yield and ultimate strengths of 1350 and 1780MPa, respectively. Interstitial solid solution strengthening contributed to the majority of the increase in strength with additional contribution from ultrafine grains. Significantly, the material also exhibited much improved ductility for such a high interstitial content, thanks probably to the nonequilibrium grain boundaries and bimodal grain structure introduced during severe plastic deformation.

  2. Percolation, wave propagation, and void link up effects in ductile fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D.L.

    1994-02-01

    This work investigates the time evolution and spatial morphology of ductile damage based on void growth and coalecence. The size enhancement of damage cluster growth, as well as wave speed limiting of growth, are treated microscopically. Simplified 2D plane strain simulations using individual voids are done with uniaxial stress and explained with a probabilistic theory. At low strain rate, fracture occurs by long, localized cracks. At high strain rates, widespread, random damage breaks the system. The Voronoi tessellation of voids can be used to map out the spatial network of still solid material in 3D ductile fracture. Using it, the spallation porosity is calculated based on percolation theory.

  3. Influence of hydrostatic pressure on the ductility of copper as a function of its initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure in the interval 0-250 MPa on the deformation properties of copper versus its initial state is studied. After liquid nitrogen storage, the torsion strain to fracture is found to increase when the pressure rises to 200 MPa. As the pressure rises further and reaches 250 MPa, the torsion strain to fracture drops. Preliminary torsion to a strain of 5% in opposition to torsion under pressure makes the pressure dependence of the ultimate strain linear. If the prestrain equals 25%, a rise in the pressure to 150MPa increases the ductility of the material. A further increase in the pressure to 250 MPa changes the ductility insignificantly.

  4. Ordered iron aluminide alloys having an improved room-temperature ductility and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1992-01-01

    A process is disclosed for improving the room temperature ductility and strength of iron aluminide intermetallic alloys. The process involves thermomechanically working an iron aluminide alloy by means which produce an elongated grain structure. The worked alloy is then heated at a temperature in the range of about 650.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. to produce a B2-type crystal structure. The alloy is rapidly cooled in a moisture free atmosphere to retain the B2-type crystal structure at room temperature, thus providing an alloy having improved room temperature ductility and strength.

  5. Theoretical investigation on improving the ductility of Rh3V by ternary addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjula, M.; Sundareswari, M.; Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Viswanathan, E.

    2015-06-01

    The band structure calculations are performed on the intermetallic compounds Rh3V and Rh3Vx(Al)1-x by Full Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave(FP-LAPW) method. Total energies are calculated as a function of volume and fitted to Birch-Murnaughan equation of state to find the lattice parameter and the other ground state properties. The ductility of these compounds has been analyzed using Cauchy's Pressure, Pugh Rule and Poisson's ratio. From this study we observed that Rh3V is brittle while its alloy Rh3V0.875Al0.125 is ductile. Electron density plots are illustrated and compared.

  6. Transformation plasticity in ductile solids. Final report, August 1, 1988--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, G.B.

    1996-09-01

    Throughout history, the development of stronger materials has enabled the realization of countless technological advances. Unfortunately, any increase in strength is rarely achieved without concomitant decreases in toughness and ductility: a fact which severely limits the utility of materials such as ultrahigh-strength alloy steels. Typical precipitation-strengthened stainless steels have very little toughness at high strength levels. In the last decade, however, several investigators have reported exceptionally large fracture toughness values in high-strength precipitation-hardened metastable austenitic steels. This remarkable achievement is directly attributable to the process of transformation toughening. This report describes studies on tranformations and enhancement of plane-strain ductility in high strength steels.

  7. Ductile film delamination from compliant substrates using hard overlayers

    PubMed Central

    Cordill, M.J.; Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible electronic devices call for copper and gold metal films to adhere well to polymer substrates. Measuring the interfacial adhesion of these material systems is often challenging, requiring the formulation of different techniques and models. Presented here is a strategy to induce well defined areas of delamination to measure the adhesion of copper films on polyimide substrates. The technique utilizes a stressed overlayer and tensile straining to cause buckle formation. The described method allows one to examine the effects of thin adhesion layers used to improve the adhesion of flexible systems. PMID:25641995

  8. Spectroscopy of trans-plutonium elements

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, E.F.; Conway, J.G.; Blaise, J.

    1993-12-31

    Investigations of the emission spectra of the neutral and singly ionized atoms of the heavy actinides have been in progress since the early 1960`s in an association that used instrumentation and heavy element facilities from five laboratories. The level analyses have led to considerable understanding of the electronic structure of the elements Am to Es. When combined with the structure of the lighter actinides, a picture of the 5f{sup n}7s{sup 2} configuration increased stability as the series is ascended arises when the lowest level of known electronic configurations is plotted versus atomic number. A similar plot including the lanthanides shows how the actinides become more lanthanide in nature before the center of the series. Actinide chemical and physical properties have shown this before spectroscopic determination of the electronic configurations relative energies was accomplished. L. Brewer has used this knowledge to estimate relative energies of electronic configurations where spectroscopic values were not available.

  9. Prompt neutron multiplicities for the transplutonium nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The direct determination of the average prompt neutron emission values is reviewed, and a method of comparing different sites of neutron emission multiplicity distribution values is described. Measured and recommended values are tabulated for these nuclides: /sup 241/Am, /sup 242/Am, /sup 242/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, /sup 248/Cm, /sup 250/Cm, /sup 245/Cm, /sup 249/Bk, /sup 246/Cf, /sup 249/Cf, /sup 250/Cf, /sup 252/Cf, /sup 254/Cf, /sup 251/Cf, /sup 253/Es, /sup 254/Es, /sup 244/Fm, /sup 246/Fm, /sup 255/Fm, /sup 252/No, /sup 254/Fm, /sup 256/Fm, /sup 257/Fm. 59 refs., 24 tabs. (LEW)

  10. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  11. Acoustic Emission Patterns and the Transition to Ductility in Sub-Micron Scale Laboratory Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Xia, K.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    We report observation of a transition from the brittle to ductile regime in precursor events from different rock materials (Granite, Sandstone, Basalt, and Gypsum) and Polymers (PMMA, PTFE and CR-39). Acoustic emission patterns associated with sub-micron scale laboratory earthquakes are mapped into network parameter spaces (functional damage networks). The sub-classes hold nearly constant timescales, indicating dependency of the sub-phases on the mechanism governing the previous evolutionary phase, i.e., deformation and failure of asperities. Based on our findings, we propose that the signature of the non-linear elastic zone around a crack tip is mapped into the details of the evolutionary phases, supporting the formation of a strongly weak zone in the vicinity of crack tips. Moreover, we recognize sub-micron to micron ruptures with signatures of 'stiffening' in the deformation phase of acoustic-waveforms. We propose that the latter rupture fronts carry critical rupture extensions, including possible dislocations faster than the shear wave speed. Using 'template super-shear waveforms' and their network characteristics, we show that the acoustic emission signals are possible super-shear or intersonic events. Ref. [1] Ghaffari, H. O., and R. P. Young. "Acoustic-Friction Networks and the Evolution of Precursor Rupture Fronts in Laboratory Earthquakes." Nature Scientific reports 3 (2013). [2] Xia, Kaiwen, Ares J. Rosakis, and Hiroo Kanamori. "Laboratory earthquakes: The sub-Rayleigh-to-supershear rupture transition." Science 303.5665 (2004): 1859-1861. [3] Mello, M., et al. "Identifying the unique ground motion signatures of supershear earthquakes: Theory and experiments." Tectonophysics 493.3 (2010): 297-326. [4] Gumbsch, Peter, and Huajian Gao. "Dislocations faster than the speed of sound." Science 283.5404 (1999): 965-968. [5] Livne, Ariel, et al. "The near-tip fields of fast cracks." Science 327.5971 (2010): 1359-1363. [6] Rycroft, Chris H., and Eran Bouchbinder

  12. International Conference on Rapidly Quenched Metals, 2nd, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., November 17-19, 1975, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The range of topics covered by the papers includes: rapid quenching (and specifically splat quenching) of metals, spin quenching, levitation melting, rapid quenching from liquid state; amorphous metal phases and metastable phases, metallic glasses, ribbons, splats, films, metal ribbon reinforced resins; crystallization of metallic glasses, and ferromagnetic amorphous alloys. Structural models for amorphous metals, splat-quenching equipment, and measurements of the properties of amorphous and noncrystalline metals and metallic glasses are also discussed, in addition to: fatigue events (crack propagation) in amorphous metals, fracture behavior in rapidly quenched metals, ductile superconducting Cu-Nb-Sn alloys, and semiconducting amorphous V205 alloy. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  13. Investigation into the mechanism of ductility of thin amorphous Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films

    SciTech Connect

    Rizkalla, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    Thin films (300-800 A) of tantalum metal were successfully sputter deposited on uniformly deformable fluoropolymer and polyimide substrates in stress free form. The crystal structure of the deposited Ta films depends mainly on the sputtering parameters. These films were later anodized into amorphous Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ which is a non-porous (barrier-type) oxide with excellent corrosion resistant properties. Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films were also obtained by direct electron beam evaporation (EBE) of Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ on different metallic and polymeric substrates, XPS and AES studies were carried out on Ta, anodic and EBE Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films to determine the chemical composition and oxidation states of elements. Thin Ta and Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films on fluoropolymer substrates contained fluorine as an impurity while similar films on polyimide contained no fluorine and, in general, fewer impurities. EBE Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films gave a stoichiometric O/Ta ratio all through the film thickness while the presence of suboxides and adsorbed OH group in anodic films was suggested by XPS and confirmed by FTIR absorption characteristics. Both thin Ta film and the corresponding anodic oxides, when deformed at room temperature to 10% strain, exhibied the ductile behavior of metals where slip bands were observed in the electron microscope. On the other hand, EBE Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ films failed in a brittle manner when deformed beyond 1% tensile strain at room temperature.

  14. Bulk metallic glasses and their composites: Composition optimization, thermal stability, and microstructural tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Hesham Ezzat

    A design protocol utilizing common elements for bulk metallic glass formation has been employed to develop novel, low cost Fe-, and Ti- based bulk metallic glasses. A critical obstacle that was successfully overcome in this work is the omission of beryllium in these alloys. Beryllium is of vital importance in many bulk metallic glass forming systems, but it is expensive and poses considerable health risks. Bulk metallic glasses in these novel Fe-, and Ti-based systems exhibit extremely high mechanical strength and excellent thermal stability. Devitrification and cooling rate experiments were used to identify crystalline phase formation and assess activation energy for crystallization, as well as to explore and develop ductile BMG composites. To better control microstructure in these BMG composites, a novel processing technique, called semi-solid forging was developed, wherein the alloy melt is heated to above the melt temperature of the glass, but below the melt temperature of the ductile crystalline phase. Such an approach permits the maintenance of a glassy, or nanocrystalline matrix phase, while simultaneously coarsening and homogenizing the ductile, secondary phase. This processing approach leads to enhanced ductility in the alloys, which, to this point, has not been observed using conventional casting methods. The combination of novel, low-cost, alloy compositions with semi-solid forging has been successfully utilized to develop new high strength structural materials with enhanced ductility and toughness. Microstrutural and mechanical properties of these novel, toughened, BMG composites are presented. A comprehensive analysis of the relationship between deformation mechanisms and microstructure reveals that enhanced ductility is predicated on matching fundamental mechanical and microstructural length scales in a Ti-Ni-Si-Mo BMG composite. Under optimized microstructural conditions, a maximum compressive strength exceeding 2400 MPa with ˜ 30% total strain to

  15. Effects of Sample Geometry and Loading Rate onTensile Ductility of TRIP800 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Guzman, O.; Chen, Weinong W.

    2012-04-15

    The effects of sample geometry and loading rate on the tensile ductility of a commercial grade Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel are examined in this paper. Quasistatic tensile tests were performed for the 1.2mm gauge TRIP800 steel sheets with two geometries: sub-sized ASTM E-8 and a custom designed miniature tensile sample. Sample geometry effects on post-uniform elongation are discussed together with other experimental data reported in the open literature. Further discussions on the effects of sample geometry are cast in the context of mesh-size dependent ductility in finite element-based engineering simulations. The quasi-static tensile curve for the miniature sample is then compared with the split Hopkinson bar results at the loading rates of 1700-S-1 and 2650-S-1 with the same sample design. In contrary to the typical strain rate sensitivity results for mild steel where the dynamic strength increase at high strain rate usually occurs at the price of ductility reduction, our results show that the TRIP800 under examination has positive strain rate sensitivity on both strength and ductility. Images of the deformation process captured by high speed camera together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) near the fracture zone are also used to elucidate the different deformation modes at different loading rates.

  16. Local Plastic-Strain Heterogeneities and Their Impact on the Ductility of Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Guilhem; Sinclair, Chad W.; Poole, Warren J.; Azizi-Alizamini, Hamid

    2015-08-01

    Microscale plastic strain heterogeneity can arise in polycrystalline Mg and its alloys in a variety of different ways. In this article, we illustrate how microscale digital image correction based on scanning electron microscope images can reveal this plastic heterogeneity in commercially pure polycrystalline Mg and how such observations provide insight into plasticity, damage, and ductility.

  17. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thin-Walled Ductile Iron Castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górny, Marcin; Tyrała, Edward

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the effect of cooling rate on microstructure and mechanical properties as determined by changing molding media and section size. The research was conducted for thin-walled iron castings with 2-5-mm wall thickness and for the reference casting with 13-mm wall thickness, using different molding materials (silica sand and insulating sand "LDASC") to achieve various cooling rates. Thermal analysis was performed to determine the real cooling rate at the beginning of the graphite eutectic solidification. In general, it was found that the predictions based on theoretical analysis of the solidification process of ductile iron are in good agreement with the experimental outcomes. Finally, the present study provides insights into the effect of cooling rate on the graphite nodule count, the ferrite fraction and mechanical properties of thin-walled ductile iron castings. The study shows that the cooling rate of thin-walled castings varies in a wide range (80-15 °C/s) when changing the wall thickness from 2 to 5 mm, accompanied by significantly changing the mechanical properties of ductile iron. The cooling rate can be effectively reduced by applying an insulating sand to obtain the desired properties of thin-walled castings practically in the whole range of ductile iron grades in accordance with the ASTM Standard.

  18. The Mechanism of High Ductility for Novel High-Carbon Quenching-Partitioning-Tempering Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Wang, Ying; Chen, Nailu; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was applied to treat Fe-0.6C-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.6Cr-0.05Nb hot-rolled high-carbon steel and the microstructures including retained austenite fraction and the average dislocation densities in both martensite and retained austenite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The Q-P-T steel exhibits high strength (1950 MPa) and elongation (12.4 pct). Comparing with the steel treated by traditional quenching and tempering (Q&T) process, the mechanism of high ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T steel is revealed as follows. Much more retained austenite existing in Q-P-T steel than in Q&T one remarkably enhances the ductility by the following two effects: the dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect and the transformation-induced plasticity effect. Besides, lower dislocation density in martensite matrix produced by Q-P-T process plays an important role in the improvement of ductility. However, some thin plates of twin-type martensite embedded in dislocation-type martensite matrix in high-carbon Q-P-T steel affect the further improvement of ductility.

  19. Statistical analysis of the mechanical properties of thin walled ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Druschitz, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    Ductile iron castings have long been used in the automotive market. Ductile iron is inexpensive to produce and has desirable fracture resistance and mechanical properties. However, the weight of ductile iron is driving an effort to reduce wall thickness in order to increase fuel economy. Traditionally, cast iron has been cast into thick, bulky shapes. Reducing the section size of cast iron can be done, but pushes foundry practice into new areas. A consortium of foundries, foundry suppliers, and automotive manufacturers has been pursuing the use of thin walled ductile cast iron. This paper investigates the mechanical behavior of three experimental heats of thin-wall castings in order to evaluate property trends and limits. Castings as thin as 1.7 mm (0.07 in) have been successfully cast. The study was designed to investigate the effects of thickness and different casting heats on the dependent variables of ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation-to-failure, reduction in area, and hardness. The ultimate tensile strength of the castings is found to increase as the casting thickness decreases. Conversely, the elongation-to-failure is found to decrease as the casting thickness decreases. Heat-to-heat differences were found, but they were usually within the scatter of the data.

  20. Atomistic aspects of ductile responses of cubic silicon carbide during nanometric cutting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cubic silicon carbide (SiC) is an extremely hard and brittle material having unique blend of material properties which makes it suitable candidate for microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems applications. Although, SiC can be machined in ductile regime at nanoscale through single-point diamond turning process, the root cause of the ductile response of SiC has not been understood yet which impedes significant exploitation of this ceramic material. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to investigate the atomistic aspects of ductile response of SiC during nanometric cutting process. Simulation results show that cubic SiC undergoes sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in the formation of SiC-graphene-like substance with a growth rate dependent on the cutting conditions. The disorder transition of SiC causes the ductile response during its nanometric cutting operations. It was further found out that the continuous abrasive action between the diamond tool and SiC causes simultaneous sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition of diamond tool which results in graphitization of diamond and consequent tool wear. PMID:22078069

  1. A meshfree continuous-discontinuous approach for the ductile fracture modeling in explicit dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ma, N.; Takada, K.; Okada, H.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a combined continuous-discontinuous modeling technique for the dynamic ductile fracture analysis using an interactive particle enrichment algorithm and a strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method. The strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree method is a nodel-integrated meshfree method which was recently proposed for the analysis of elastic-damage induced strain localization problems. In this paper, the strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree formulation is extended to the elastic-plastic-damage materials for the ductile fracture analysis. When the ductile material is fully degraded, the interactive particle enrichment scheme is introduced in the strain-morphed nonlocal meshfree formulation that permits a continuous-to-discontinuous failure modeling. The essence of the interactive particle enrichment algorithm is a particle insertion-deletion scheme that produces a visibility criterion for the description of a traction-free crack and leads to a better presentation of the ductile fracture process. Several numerical benchmarks are examined using the explicit dynamics analysis to demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method.

  2. Significantly Increasing the Ductility of High Performance Polymer Semiconductors through Polymer Blending.

    PubMed

    Scott, Joshua I; Xue, Xiao; Wang, Ming; Kline, R Joseph; Hoffman, Benjamin C; Dougherty, Daniel; Zhou, Chuanzhen; Bazan, Guillermo; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2016-06-01

    Polymer semiconductors based on donor-acceptor monomers have recently resulted in significant gains in field effect mobility in organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). These polymers incorporate fused aromatic rings and have been designed to have stiff planar backbones, resulting in strong intermolecular interactions, which subsequently result in stiff and brittle films. The complex synthesis typically required for these materials may also result in increased production costs. Thus, the development of methods to improve mechanical plasticity while lowering material consumption during fabrication will significantly improve opportunities for adoption in flexible and stretchable electronics. To achieve these goals, we consider blending a brittle donor-acceptor polymer, poly[4-(4,4-dihexadecyl-4H-cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophen-2-yl)-alt-[1,2,5]thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine] (PCDTPT), with ductile poly(3-hexylthiophene). We found that the ductility of the blend films is significantly improved compared to that of neat PCDTPT films, and when the blend film is employed in an OTFT, the performance is largely maintained. The ability to maintain charge transport character is due to vertical segregation within the blend, while the improved ductility is due to intermixing of the polymers throughout the film thickness. Importantly, the application of large strains to the ductile films is shown to orient both polymers, which further increases charge carrier mobility. These results highlight a processing approach to achieve high performance polymer OTFTs that are electrically and mechanically optimized. PMID:27200458

  3. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  4. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  5. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  6. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  7. 49 CFR 192.369 - Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Connections to cast iron or ductile iron mains. 192.369 Section 192.369 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... Customer Meters, Service Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.369 Service lines: Connections to cast iron...

  8. Brittle versus ductile deformation as the main control of the deep fluid circulation in continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violay, Marie; Madonna, Claudio; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Japan Beyond-Brittle Project (JBBP) and the Taupo Volcanic Zone-Deep geothermal drilling project in New Zealand (TVZ-DGDP) proposed a new concept of engineered geothermal development where reservoirs are created in ductile rocks. This system has several advantages including (1) a simpler design and control of the reservoir due to homogeneous rock properties and stress states in the ductile domain ,(2) possible extraction of supercritical fluids (3) less probability for induced earthquakes. However, it is at present unknwon what and how porosity and permeability can be engineered in such environments. It has been proposed that the magmatic chamber is surrounded by a hot and ductile carapace through which heat transfer is conductive because the plastic behaviour of the rock will close possible fluid pathways. Further outward, as temperature declines, the rock will encounter the brittle-ductile transition with a concomitant increase in porosity and permeability. The thickness of the conduction-dominated, ductile boundary zone between the magmatic chamber and the convecting geothermal fluid directly determines the rate of heat transfer. To examine the brittle to ductile transition in the context of the Japanese crust, we conducted deformation experiments on very-fine-grain granite in conventional servocontrolled, gas-medium triaxial apparatus (from Paterson instrument). Temperature ranged from 600° C to 1100° C and effective confining pressure from 100 to 150 MPa. Dilatancy was measured during deformation. The method consisted in monitoring the volume of pore fluid that flows into or out of the sample at constant pore pressure. Permeability was measured under static conditions by transient pressure pulse method. Mechanical and micro-structural observations at experimental constant strain rate of 10‑5 s‑1 indicated that the granite was brittle and dilatant up to 900 ° C. At higher temperatures the deformation mode becomes macroscopically ductile, i

  9. Slip transfer across fault discontinuities within granitic rock at the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevitt, J. M.; Pollard, D. D.; Warren, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Fault mechanics are strongly influenced by discontinuities in fault geometry and constitutive differences between the brittle and ductile regions of the lithosphere. This project uses field observations, laboratory analysis and numerical modeling to investigate deformational processes within a contractional step at the brittle-ductile transition, and in particular, how slip is transferred between faults via ductile deformation across the step. The Bear Creek field area (central Sierra Nevada, CA) is comprised of late Cretaceous biotite-hornblende granodiorite and experienced a period of faulting at the brittle-ductile transition. Abundant echelon faults in Bear Creek, some of which were seismically active, provide many textbook examples of contractional steps, which are characterized by well-developed ductile fabrics. The occurrence of hydrothermal alteration halos and hydrothermal minerals in fracture fill documents the presence of water, which we suggest played a weakening role in the constitutive behavior of the granodiorite. Furthermore, the mechanism that accomplishes slip transfer in contractional steps appears to be related to water-enhanced ductile deformation. We focus our investigation on Outcrop SG10, which features a 10cm thick aplite dike that is offset 0.45m through a contractional step between two sub-parallel left-lateral faults. Within the step, the aplite undergoes dramatic thinning (stretch ~1/10) and the granodiorite is characterized by a well-developed mylonitic foliation, in which quartz and biotite plastically flow around larger grains of feldspars, hornblende and opaque minerals. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis gives a more quantitative depiction of the active micromechanics and reveals how slip is accommodated at the crystal scale throughout the step. We use Abaqus, a commercial finite element software, to test several constitutive laws that may account for the deformation observed both macro- and microscopically throughout

  10. Ductility contrast induced by silicification in pelitic schist of the Ryoke metamorphic belt, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateen, Tayyaba; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Rehman, Hafiz Ur; Terabayashi, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    Contrasting ductility is recognized in the rocks of Cretaceous Ryoke metamorphic belt in Iwakuni area, southwest Japan. Pelitic schist is ubiquitous in the region and differences in mineral assemblages mark increase in metamorphic grade. The area has been graded as chlorite-biotite zone in the north progressing into biotite- and muscovite-cordierite zones in the south. Pelitic schist near the boundary between the biotite- and muscovite-cordierite zones has undergone partial silicification to form whitish silicified schist layers which contain two types of quartz veins: those parallel to foliation in the host rock are called schistosity-concordant veins, and those inclined to host rock foliation, schistosity-discordant veins. In this study we examined the quartz structure in the silicified schist and in both types of veins to understand the ductility contrast induced by the silicification process. Crystallographic orientations of quartz in the veins and silicified schist rocks were studied using the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) based Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) technique. Quartz c-axis orientations in the silicified schist are nearly random, demonstrating an absence of post-silicification ductile deformation. Quartz grains in the schistosity-concordant veins have preferred c-axis orientations perpendicular to the schistosity indicating ductile shortening. In contrast, schistosity-discordant veins display distinct quartz c-axis fabric than that found in the schistosity-concordant veins. This is because the two types of host rocks exhibit a difference in ductility during deformation. The presence of deformed quartz veins in the undeformed silicified schist indicates transformation of the ductile pelitic schist into the brittle silicified schist at mid-crustal levels where these rocks originate, hence forming contrasting rock layers. Schistosity-concordant veins in the biotite-rich pelitic schist deformed with its host rock in a ductile manner while

  11. INTERIOR VIEW WITH STORAGE BINS FOR COLLECTING METAL SHAVINGS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH STORAGE BINS FOR COLLECTING METAL SHAVINGS FROM THE TAPPING MACHINES AS THEY CUT SCREW THREADS INTO PIPE FITTINGS. SHAVINGS TRAVEL ON CONVEYORS UNDER THE PLATFORM, ARE THEN ELEVATED TO SMALL LEVER-RELEASED BINS, WHICH HOLD SCRAP WHILE THE LARGER BINS ARE BEING EMPTIED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Ductile Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Armor of cermet with metal therein increasing with depth

    DOEpatents

    Wilkins, M.L.; Holt, A.C.; Cline, C.F.; Foreschner, K.E.

    1973-07-01

    The system described consists of a ceramic matrix having a gradient of fine ductile metallic particles dispersed therein in an amount of from 0.0%, commencing at the front or impact surface of the armor, to about 2 to 15% by volume along the interface to the back of the system. (auth)

  13. Mechanical behavior and brittle-ductile transition of high-chromium martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odnobokova, M. V.; Kipelova, A. Yu.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents data on the static tensile tests and dynamic impact-toughness tests of a highchromium martensitic 10Kh9V1M1FBR steel (0.12 wt % C, 9.8 wt % Cr, 0.93 wt % W, 1.01 wt % Mo, 0.2 wt % V, 0.05 wt % Nb, 0.05 wt % N, 0.003 wt % B, 0.36 wt % Mn, 0.2 wt % Ni, 0.06 wt % Si, 0.01 wt % P, 0.008 wt % S, 0.02 wt % Cu, 0.1 wt % Co, 0.015 wt % Al, and the remainder is Fe) in the temperature range from 20 to-196°C. In the case of static loading, a reduction in the temperature leads to an increase in the strength characteristics; upon a drop in the temperature from 20 to-100°C, the plasticity also increases. This is connected with the fact that the ductile fracture remains the basic mechanism down to cryogenic temperatures. The brittle-ductile transition related to the transition from ductile intragranular fracture to quasibrittle one is observed at-45°C. The steel exhibits high impact toughness to the temperature of-60°C ( KCV -60 = 95 J/cm2), at which the fraction of the ductile component in fracture is equal to 20%. At 80°C, the impact toughness decreases down to critical values (30 J/cm2), which correlates with the decrease in the fraction of the ductile component on the fracture surface down to 1%. The further decrease in the impact toughness down to 10 J/cm2 at-196°C is related to the transition from intragranular to intergranular brittle fracture.

  14. Evaluation of static and dynamic fracture toughness in ductile cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yamada, Shinya . Dept. of Production Systems Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Ductile cast irons have been explored as a cask (container for spent nuclear fuel) material because of their low cost and good formability. The cask, which is a huge casting with 400-mm thickness and 100-Mg weight, envelops the nuclear material. Therefore, the fracture toughness of cask must be evaluated not only under the static loading condition but also under the dynamic loading condition to ensure its safety against an accident during the transport. In this article, crack extension behavior and fracture toughness of ductile cast iron were examined by three-point bend tests, where various detection methods of crack initiation under static and dynamic loading conditions were adopted. Loading on the specimens was interrupted at various displacement points, and the final fracture surfaces of the specimen were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) obtained under the dynamic loading conditions was smaller than that under the static loading condition in ferritic ductile cast iron, and CTOD additionally decreased with increasing pearlite content in the matrix. The relationship between J([Delta]C) obtained by the compliance changing rate method and J(R) established by the intersection of the crack extension resistance curve and the theoretical blunting line varied with pearlite content. The average value of J([Delta]C) and J(R), that is J(mid), was proposed to define the fracture toughness of ductile cast iron; J(mid) was considered to be a reasonable measure for the fracture toughness of ductile cast iron, irrespective of loading condition and the pearlite content in the matrix.

  15. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  16. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  17. In vivo evaluation of a high-strength, high-ductility stainless steel for use in surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Syrett, B C; Davis, E E

    1979-07-01

    A high-strength, high-ductility, austenitic stainless steel has been evaluated for use in surgical implants by performing in vivo tests in rats, rabbits, dogs, and rhesus monkeys. This stainless steel, a TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steel containing about 4% Mo, was compared with two alloys in current clinical use: Type 316L stainless steel and cast Vitallium. Compared with the other two alloys, cast Vitallium generally had higher resistance to corrosion and superior biocompatibility in all animals. The tests in rats and dogs indicated that the corrosion resistances of the TRIP steel and the Type 316L stainless steel were similar and that the tissue reactions caused by these alloys were also similar. However, in rhesus monkeys, the TRIP steel was shown to be susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking and much more susceptible to crevice corrosion than Type 316L stainless steel. Limited tests in rabbits supported the observation that the TRIP steel is susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking. These inconsistencies in the in vivo tests underline the need for a reevaluation of the popular test techniques and of the animals commonly chosen for assessing the suitability of candidate implant materials. The "worst case" results from the rhesus monkey tests were entirely consistent with previous results obtained from in vitro studies. However, further work must be performed before the behavior of metals in humans, rhesus monkeys, or any other animal, can be predicted with confidence from an in vitro test program. PMID:110810

  18. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  19. Progressive deformation structures associated with ductile thrusts in the Moine Nappe, Sutherland, N. Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Robert E.

    In the deeper parts of mountain belts, polyphase structural sequences observed at outcrop-scale can arise due either to overprinting of regionally distinct deformation phases (e.g. reworking, changes in orogenic boundary conditions), or to localized controls that bring about transient changes in the patterns of ductile flow. These are unlikely to be mutually exclusive processes, and examples from Scotland demonstrate that, once regionally separate events are delimited using radiometric evidence, it is possible to isolate complex deformation sequences arising due to local controls. In the western Moine Nappe of Sutherland, the dominant structures were formed during Caledonian ductile thrusting towards the WNW, whilst earlier (?Precambrian) phases are relatively minor in importance. Two groups of Caledonian folds and fabrics are recognized in many exposures: main phase ( D2) structures which are broadly contemporaneous with ductile thrust fabrics, and later secondary phase ( F3) folds. The latter can be divided into two geometric groups: sheath-fold types which formed initially as WNW-overturned buckles subsequently modified by ductile shearing; and asymmetric types, which are commonly open folds apparently formed with axes close or sub-parallel to the thrust transport direction. Secondary structures show a close spatial association with high strain zones along ductile thrusts, and can be shown to have formed during the later stages of thrusting in certain critical exposures. I propose that they may form due to strain perturbations resulting from variations in the relative rates of ductile flow within the mylonites. Where differential shearing occurs due to flow-normal perturbations, wrench-related asymmetric fold types may form. In contrast, secondary sheath-fold structures may result from localized compression phases caused by flow-parallel perturbations. Local flow-perturbation models may be appropriate in situations where the distribution of later structures is

  20. Assessment of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior of Localized Microstructural Regions in a Friction-Stir Welded X80 Pipeline Steel with Miniaturized Charpy V-Notch Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Julian A.; Lucon, Enrico; Sowards, Jeffrey; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2016-04-01

    Friction-stir welding (FSW) is an alternative welding process for pipelines. This technology offers sound welds, good repeatability, and excellent mechanical properties. However, it is of paramount importance to determine the toughness of the welds at low temperatures in order to establish the limits of this technology. Ductile-to-brittle transition curves were generated in the present study by using a small-scale instrumented Charpy machine and miniaturized V-notch specimens (Kleinstprobe, KLST); notches were located in base metal, heat-affected, stirred, and hard zones within a FSW joint of API-5L X80 Pipeline Steel. Specimens were tested at temperatures between 77 K (-196 °C) and 298 K (25 °C). Based on the results obtained, the transition temperatures for the base material and heat-affected zone were below 173 K (-100 °C); conversely, for the stirred and hard zones, it was located around 213 K (-60 °C). Fracture surfaces were characterized and showed a ductile fracture mechanism at high impact energies and a mixture of ductile and brittle mechanisms at low impact energies.

  1. Assessment of Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Behavior of Localized Microstructural Regions in a Friction-Stir Welded X80 Pipeline Steel with Miniaturized Charpy V-Notch Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Julian A.; Lucon, Enrico; Sowards, Jeffrey; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio J.

    2016-06-01

    Friction-stir welding (FSW) is an alternative welding process for pipelines. This technology offers sound welds, good repeatability, and excellent mechanical properties. However, it is of paramount importance to determine the toughness of the welds at low temperatures in order to establish the limits of this technology. Ductile-to-brittle transition curves were generated in the present study by using a small-scale instrumented Charpy machine and miniaturized V-notch specimens (Kleinstprobe, KLST); notches were located in base metal, heat-affected, stirred, and hard zones within a FSW joint of API-5L X80 Pipeline Steel. Specimens were tested at temperatures between 77 K (-196 °C) and 298 K (25 °C). Based on the results obtained, the transition temperatures for the base material and heat-affected zone were below 173 K (-100 °C); conversely, for the stirred and hard zones, it was located around 213 K (-60 °C). Fracture surfaces were characterized and showed a ductile fracture mechanism at high impact energies and a mixture of ductile and brittle mechanisms at low impact energies.

  2. Antiformal closure in ductile and brittle-ductile in fold-and-thrust belt tranverse zones, Moine Thrust Belt, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, G.; Krabbendam, M.

    2009-04-01

    Abrupt lateral changes in thrust geometry occur in many mountain-building fold-and-thrust belts. Such changes in architecture are referred to as so-called transverse zones, and are commonly thought to be related to kinematic responses to irregularities generated across pre-existing, sometimes re-activated, basement faults. In many cases however the causative structure is concealed, either by distal parts of the thrust belt or the foreland basin. Sharp lateral changes in the structural geometry of ductile thrust stacks are less widely studied and reported. In NW Scotland, the classic Caledonian WNW-vergent Moine Thrust Belt exposes excellent examples of the structural architecture in such transverse zones, both in kilometre-scale thick monolithic (meta-)sandstone packages subject to ductile deformation, and in much thinner heterolithic packages subject to brittle-ductile deformation. In both cases the amplitude of the antiformal disturbance associated with the transverse zone is much greater than amplitude of any irregularity identified in the basement below. In Neoproterozoic Moine rocks in the hanging wall of the Moine Thrust, a large-scale lateral culmination wall forms a component part of the Oykel Transverse Zone (OTZ), a kilometre-scale thick constrictional ductile shear zone striking sub-parallel to the WNW-directed thrust transport direction. The OTZ forms the SW limit of the Cassley Culmination. ESE-plunging mullions are an integral part of the fabric of the transverse zone and were generated by constriction sub-parallel to the WNW-directed thrust transport direction. Main folds and fabrics in the transverse zone hanging-wall are folded by main folds and fabrics in the footwall, demonstrating the overall foreland-propagating record of ductile deformation as the Cassley Culmination grew. Constriction and mullion development are attributed to differential, transtensional movement across the transverse zone during the later stages of culmination development

  3. Implications of radiation-induced reductions in ductility to the design of austenitic stainless steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, G.E.; Billone, M.; Pawel, J.E.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1995-12-31

    In the dose and temperature range anticipated for ITER, austenitic stainless steels exhibit significant hardening with a concomitant loss in work hardening and uniform elongation. However, significant post-necking ductility may still be retained. When uniform elongation (e{sub u}) is well defined in terms of a plastic instability criterion, e{sub u} is found to sustain reasonably high values out to about 7 dpa in the temperature range 250-350 C, beyond which it decreases to about 0.3% for 316LN. This loss of ductility has significant implications to fracture toughness and the onset of new failure modes associated with hear instability. However, the retention of a significant reduction in area at failure following irradiation indicates a less severe degradation of low-cycle fatigue life in agreement with a limited amount of data obtained to date. Suggestions are made for incorporating these results into design criteria and future testing programs.

  4. The potential for ductility enhancement from surface and interface dislocation sources in NiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Kim, J. T.; Larsen, M.; Gibala, R.

    1990-01-01

    Limited ductility and toughness of NiAl and related aluminides near room temperature pose major problems in their potential application as structural materials. An analysis of these problems is presented as part of a review of the flow and fracture behavior of binary NiAl. Following this discussion is a demonstration that conditions of elastic and plastic constraint associated with phase boundaries afforded by surface films, internal lamellae, or precipitates may introduce sufficient densities of mobile dislocations to enhance the ductility of NiAl-based materials by significant amounts. Examples of this behavior are presented for several model materials, including 001- and 123-oriented single crystals of oxide-coated NiAl, directionally solidified beta-gamma-prime (Ni70Al30) and beta-gamma (Ni50Fe30Al20) in situ composites, and several NiAl/precipitate systems. The nature of the resulting dislocation substructures and the effects of several materials variables are described.

  5. Effect of alloying on electronic structure, strength and ductility characteristics of nickel aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, A. I.; Barskaya, R. A.; Wainstein, D. L.

    2003-06-01

    The possibility of production of alloyed NiAl intermetallic compound having satisfactory processing ductility at room temperature has been investigated. The samples were made by extrusion of sintered powder blanks. The effect of Fe, Cr, Co, Mo, B and La doping on mechanical properties of nickel aluminide was investigated. Alloying has a beneficial effect on decrease of the ductile-brittle transition temperature and micro-mechanism of fracture. The doping of nickel aluminide by Fe (2 at.%), Mo (2 at.%) and Co(2 at.%) was studied by valence band XPS and plasmon losses electron spectroscopy. The shift of the Fermi level ( EF) and variation of density of conduction electrons - neff were found in doped NiAl. The results show good correlation between EFneff and micro-hardness of alloyed NiAl intermetallic.

  6. Smart fiber-reinforced polymer rods featuring improved ductility and health monitoring capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Watkins, Steve E.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Corra, Josh; Konz, Bethany

    2001-06-01

    The strain-measuring capability of fiber optic strain gages in fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) rebars was investigated for failure-inducing loads. Fiber optic interferometric sensors were embedded in a pultruded carbon fiber core and then another layer of carbon fibers were filament wound around the core to form a shell. Pultrusion and filament winding techniques protect the fiber optic strain gages from the concrete environment while providing a secure bond to the core and additional ductility to the overall FRP rebar. Tests of coupon FRP rebar and of FRP-rebar-reinforced concrete beams show that the fiber optic strain gages can read internal strain through failure and can duplicate data from conventional linear variable differential transformers and electrical resistance strain gages. Also, the shell of the FRP rebar inside the concrete beams failed before the rebar core providing pseudo-ductility.

  7. Numerical simulation of damage evolution for ductile materials and mechanical properties study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amri, A.; Hanafi, I.; Haddou, M. E. Y.; Khamlichi, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of a numerical modelling of ductile fracture and failure of elements made of 5182H111 aluminium alloys subjected to dynamic traction. The analysis was performed using Johnson-Cook model based on ABAQUS software. The modelling difficulty related to prediction of ductile fracture mainly arises because there is a tremendous span of length scales from the structural problem to the micro-mechanics problem governing the material separation process. This study has been used the experimental results to calibrate a simple crack propagation criteria for shell elements of which one has often been used in practical analyses. The performance of the proposed model is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations.

  8. Multi-Response Optimization of Carbidic Austempered Ductile Iron Production Parameters using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapal, P.; Mohamed Nazirudeen, S. S.; Chandrasekar, A.

    2012-04-01

    Carbide Austempered Ductile Iron (CADI) is the family of ductile iron containing wear resistance alloy carbides in the ausferrite matrix. This CADI is manufactured by selecting and characterizing the proper material composition through the melting route done. In an effort to arrive the optimal production parameters of multi responses, Taguchi method and Grey relational analysis have been applied. To analyze the effect of production parameters on the mechanical properties signal-to-noise ratio and Grey relational grade have been calculated based on the design of experiments. An analysis of variance was calculated to find the amount of contribution of factors on mechanical properties and their significance. The analytical results of Taguchi method were compared with the experimental values, and it shows that both are identical.

  9. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: Heliumisotope trends

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, B. Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2007-10-07

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range province, western North America increase systematically from low, crustal values in the east to high, mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active trans-tensional deformation indicates a deformation enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere in regions even where there is no significant magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high-{sup 3}He/{sup 4}He anomalies signifying hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development.

  10. Linking Nanoscales and Dislocation Shielding to the Ductile-Brittle Transition of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsala, Eric; Teresi, Claire; Gerberich, William W.

    2016-06-01

    The ductile-brittle transition of nano/microscale silicon is explored at low-temperature, high stress conditions. A pathway to eventual mechanism maps describing this ductile-brittle transition behavior using sample size, strain rate, and temperature is outlined. First, a discussion of variables controlling the BDT in silicon is given and discussed in the context of development of eventual modeling that could simultaneously incorporate all their effects. For description of energy dissipation by dislocation nucleation from a crack tip, three critical input parameters are identified: the effective stress, activation volume, and activation energy for dislocation motion. These are discussed individually relating to the controlling variables for the BDT. Lastly, possibilities for measuring these parameters experimentally are also described.

  11. Influence of casting size and graphite nodule refinement on fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Hsu, C.H.; Chang, C.C.; Feng, H.P.

    1998-10-01

    Casting size affects the solidification cooling rate and microstructure of casting materials. Graphite nodules existing in the structure of ductile iron are an inherent and inert second phase that cannot be modified in subsequent heat-treatment processing. The matrix and the fineness of the second phase undoubtedly have some impact on the fracture toughness of the as-cast material, as does the subsequent heat treatment, as it alters the microstructure. This research applied austempering heat treatment to ductile iron of different section sizes and graphite nodule finenesses. The influence of these variables on the plane strain fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) of the castings so treated was compared to that of the as-cast state. Metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed to correlate the properties attained to the microstructural observation.

  12. The morphology of solidification of thin-section ductile iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.F.; Zhao, H.; Lee, W.B.

    1998-04-01

    The morphology of solidified structures of thin-section ductile iron castings has been investigated by color metallographic techniques. Primary austenitic dendrites were observed to be formed over the whole section of castings when the wall thickness was less than 14mm. The dendrites were thin and long, and the length and the number of dendrites depended on the solidification rate or the wall thickness of the casting. Growth of the dendritic arms was directional, being perpendicular to the surface of castings and along the wall thickness. Interdendrite segregation of Si and Mn is found to occur in thin-section ductile iron castings, as revealed by both color metallography and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The segregation is more pronounced toward the center of castings.

  13. Theoretical investigation on improving the ductility of Rh{sub 3}V by ternary addition

    SciTech Connect

    Manjula, M.; Sundareswari, M. Jayalakshmi, D. S.; Viswanathan, E.

    2015-06-24

    The band structure calculations are performed on the intermetallic compounds Rh{sub 3}V and Rh{sub 3}V{sub x}(Al){sub 1-x} by Full Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave(FP-LAPW) method. Total energies are calculated as a function of volume and fitted to Birch-Murnaughan equation of state to find the lattice parameter and the other ground state properties. The ductility of these compounds has been analyzed using Cauchy’s Pressure, Pugh Rule and Poisson’s ratio. From this study we observed that Rh{sub 3}V is brittle while its alloy Rh{sub 3}V{sub 0.875}Al{sub 0.125} is ductile. Electron density plots are illustrated and compared.

  14. Production and Machining of Thin Wall Gray and Ductile Cast Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischman, E.H.; Li, H.; Griffin, R.; Bates, C.E.; Eleftheriou, E.

    2000-11-03

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham, in cooperation with the American Foundry Society, companies across North America, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a project to develop an understanding of the factors that control the machinability of cast gray and ductile iron. Differences of as much as 500% have been found in machinability have been observed at the same strength. The most machinable irons were those with a high cell counts and few carbonitride inclusions. Additions of tin and copper can be added to both gray and ductile iron to stabilize the pearlite, but excessive additions (above those required to produce the desired pearlite content) degrade the machinability.

  15. The abrasion and impact-abrasion behavior of austempered ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Lerner, Y.S.

    1998-01-01

    Austempering of ductile irons has led to a new class of irons, Austempered Ductile Irons (ADIs), with improved mechanical strength and fracture toughness lacking in gray cast irons. Laboratory wear tests have been used to evaluate the abrasive and impact-abrasive wear behavior of a suite of ADIs. The use of high-stress, two-body abrasion, low-stress, three-body abrasion, and impact-abrasion tests provides a clear picture of the abrasive wear behavior of the ADIs and the mechanisms of material removal. When combined with hardness measurements, fracture toughness and a knowledge of the microstructure of the ADIs, the overall performance can be assessed relative to more wear resistant materials such as martensitic steels and high-chromium white cast irons

  16. Flow of mantle fluids through the ductile lower crust: helium isotope trends.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B Mack; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2007-11-30

    Heat and mass are injected into the shallow crust when mantle fluids are able to flow through the ductile lower crust. Minimum 3He/4He ratios in surface fluids from the northern Basin and Range Province, western North America, increase systematically from low crustal values in the east to high mantle values in the west, a regional trend that correlates with the rates of active crustal deformation. The highest ratios occur where the extension and shear strain rates are greatest. The correspondence of helium isotope ratios and active transtensional deformation indicates a deformation-enhanced permeability and that mantle fluids can penetrate the ductile lithosphere, even in regions where there is no substantial magmatism. Superimposed on the regional trend are local, high 3He/4He anomalies indicating hidden magmatic activity and/or deep fluid production with locally enhanced permeability, identifying zones with high resource potential, particularly for geothermal energy development. PMID:18048684

  17. Cumulative-strain-damage model of ductile fracture: simulation and prediction of engineering fracture tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M.L.; Streit, R.D.; Reaugh, J.E.

    1980-10-03

    A cumulative-strain-damage criterion is used to predict the initiation and propagation of fracture in ductile materials. The model is consistent with a model of ductile rupture that involves void growth and coalescence. Two- and three-dimensional finite difference computer codes, which use incremental-plasticity theory to describe large strains with rotation, are used to trace the history of damage in a material due to external forces. Fracture begins when the damage exceeds a critical value over a critical distance and proceeds as the critical-damage state is reached elsewhere. This unified approach to failure prediction can be applied to an arbitrary geometry if the material behavior has been adequately characterized. The damage function must be calibrated for a particular material using various material property tests. The fracture toughness of 6061-T651 aluminum is predicted.

  18. A Unified Cohesive Zone Approach to Model Ductile Brittle Transition in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; S. Bulent Biner

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a unified cohesive zone model has been proposed to predict, Ductile to Brittle Transition, DBT, in Reactor Pressure Vessel, RPV, steels. A general procedure is described to obtain the Cohesive Zone Model, CZM, parameters for the different temperatures and fracture probabilities. In order to establish the full master-curve, the procedure requires three calibration points with one at the upper-shelf for ductile fracture and two for the fracture probabilities, Pf, of 5% and 95% at the lower-shelf. In the current study, these calibrations were carried out by utilizing the experimental fracture toughness values and flow curves. After the calibration procedure, the simulations of fracture behavior (ranging from completely unstable to stable crack extension behavior) in one inch thick compact tension specimens at different temperatures yielded values that were comparable to the experimental fracture toughness values, indicating the viability of such unified modeling approach.

  19. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF DUCTILE-PHASE TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Setyawan, Wahyu; Wagner, Karla B.; Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Kevin; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-09-30

    A promising approach to increasing fracture toughness and decreasing the DBTT of a W-alloy is by ductile-phase toughening (DPT) [1-3]. In this method, a ductile phase is included in a brittle matrix to prevent fracture propagation by crack bridging. To examine the prospect of DPT, W-Cu three-point bend samples were deformed at several strain rates and temperatures. Data from these tests is used for the calibration of a dynamic crack-bridging model that can effectively predict elevated temperature crack growth in W-composites. The development and initial testing of a Cu-ligament bridging model based on a micromechanical flow stress model of Cu is discussed. Good agreement with the 3-point bend testing data is demonstrated along with future plans to improve the model.

  20. Strength and ductility with {10͞11} - {10͞12} double twinning in a magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Lentz, M; Risse, M; Schaefer, N; Reimers, W; Beyerlein, I J

    2016-01-01

    Based on their high specific strength and stiffness, magnesium alloys are attractive for lightweight applications in aerospace and transportation, where weight saving is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. Unfortunately, the ductility of magnesium alloys is usually limited. It is thought that one reason for the lack of ductility is that the development of - double twins (DTW) cause premature failure of magnesium alloys. Here we show with a magnesium alloy containing 4 wt% lithium, that the same impressively large compression failure strains can be achieved with DTWs as without. The DTWs form stably across the microstructure and continuously throughout straining, forming three-dimensional intra-granular networks, a potential strengthening mechanism. We rationalize that relatively easier slip characteristic of this alloy plastically relaxed the localized stress concentrations that DTWs can generate. This result may provide key insight and an alternative perspective towards designing formable and strong magnesium alloys. PMID:27040648

  1. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haoran; Chew, Huck Beng; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of Li{sub x}Si electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si–Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si–Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li–Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the Li{sub x}Si alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  2. Effect of prestraining on the brittle-to-ductile transition of NiAl single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, S.; Ebrahimi, F.

    1997-12-31

    The brittle-to-ductile transition (BDT) has been established for NiAl single crystals as evaluated by fracture toughness testing and also the effects of prestraining on the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature (BDTT) have been investigated. Specimens were prestrained to a 10% plastic strain level at 200 C under tension prior to toughness testing. The BDT of the prestrained specimens was compared to that of the as homogenized specimens. The results have revealed the occurrence of two competing effects upon prestraining: (1) an increase in dislocation sources causing a difficulty in micro-crack initiation and resulting in an increase in toughness at low temperatures, and (2) an increase in the flow stress resulting in an increase in BDT temperature. The crack initiation and propagation mechanisms were also analyzed and have been discussed.

  3. Ductile-brittle transition behavior of tungsten under shock loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Gray, G.T. III

    1993-02-01

    In an effort to characterize the ductile-brittle transition behavior of warm forged tungsten under shock loading conditions, we have performed shock/soft-recovery experiments at 22 and 4000 C. Results at 22 C indicate that shock (19 GPa) induced strains appear to be accommodated by fracture processes, i.e. there were no indications of shock induced plastic deformation and the test sample was reduced to rubble. At 400 C, the test sample was recovered intact and the shock induced plasticity caused deformation banding and an increase in the dislocation density of the material. For reasons unclear, almost no change in the post shock mechanical behavior was observed, despite the significant changes in the microstructure. The results of these experiments demonstrate the principal of a ductile-brittle transition behavior of tungsten under uniaxial shock loading conditions and indicate that explosively driven deformation of tungsten of this material will result in pulverization due to shock loading.

  4. Ductile fracture of pipes and cylindrical containers with a circumferential flaw

    SciTech Connect

    Erdogan, F.; Delale, F.

    1981-05-01

    The problem of ductile fracture of a pipe or cylindrical container having a relatively long and deep circumferential part-through crack or through a crack and subjected to a uniform axial membrane load in the crack region is discussed. After describing the evolution of the ductile fracture process, first the results of the elasticity solution for the circumferentially cracked cylindrical shell based on the Reissner's Transverse Shear Theory are presented. The elastic-plastic part-through crack problem then is considered. In the analysis the plastic deformations are approximated by a perfectly plastic layer similar to the conventional Dugdale model. The load carrying capacity of the cylinder is estimated in various ways by using the crack opening stretch along the leading edge of the crack as the critical load factor. 20 references.

  5. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman; Chew, Huck Beng

    2015-09-14

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of LixSi electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ∼ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si-Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si-Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li-Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the LixSi alloys leads to significant strain recovery. PMID:26374052

  6. Brittle-to-ductile transition of lithiated silicon electrodes: Crazing to stable nanopore growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xueju; Xia, Shuman; Chew, Huck Beng

    2015-09-01

    Using first principle calculations, we uncover the underlying mechanisms explaining the brittle-to-ductile transition of LixSi electrodes in lithium ion batteries with increasing Li content. We show that plasticity initiates at x = ˜ 0.5 with the formation of a craze-like network of nanopores separated by Si-Si bonds, while subsequent failure is still brittle-like with the breaking of Si-Si bonds. Transition to ductile behavior occurs at x ⩾ 1 due to the increased density of highly stretchable Li-Li bonds, which delays nanopore formation and stabilizes nanopore growth. Collapse of the nanopores during unloading of the LixSi alloys leads to significant strain recovery.

  7. On the limit of surface integrity of alumina by ductile-mode grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Zarudi, I.; Zhang, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates both experimentally and theoretically the subsurface damage in alumina by ductile-mode grinding. It was found that the distribution of the fractured area on a ground mirror surface, with the Rms roughness in the range from 30 nm to 90 nm, depends on not only the grinding conditions but also the pores in the bulk material. Surface pit formation is the result of interaction of abrasive grains of the grinding wheel with pores. Thus the surface quality achievable by ductile-mode grinding is limited by the initial microstructure of a material. The investigation shows that median and radial cracks do not appear and hence are not the cause of fracture as usually thought.

  8. Bifurcation and neck formation as a precursor to ductile fracture during high rate extension

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, L.B.; Soerensen, N.J.

    1997-12-31

    A block of ductile material, typically a segment of a plate or shell, being deformed homogeneously in simple plane strain extension commonly undergoes a bifurcation in deformation mode to nonuniform straining in the advanced stages of plastic flow. The focus here is on the influence of material inertia on the bifurcation process, particularly on the formation of diffuse necks as precursors to dynamic ductile fracture. The issue is considered from two points of view, first within the context of the theory of bifurcation of rate-independent, incrementally linear materials and then in terms of the complete numerical solution of a boundary value problem for an elastic-viscoplastic material. It is found that inertia favors the formation of relatively short wavelength necks as observed in shaped charge break-up and dynamic fragmentation.

  9. Numerical and experimental study of the ductile failure of 7075-T651 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Benzley, S.E.; Soo Hoo, M.S.; Priddy, T.G.

    1981-05-01

    A combined experimental/numerical analysis has been performed on the nonlinear response and ductile failure of 7075-T651 aluminum. The different specimen shapes which were tested and analyzed produced: (1) pure shear; (2) uniaxial; (3) biaxial; and (4) triaxial states of stress in an axisymmetric geometry. Experiments performed on these specimens were subsequently analyzed with large strain finite element calculations. The calculations closely modelled experimental behavior. The calculated stresses and strains were then used to study ductile multiaxial failure criteria for monotonic loading configurations. This study concludes that the strain at which 7075-T651 aluminum fails is dependent upon the existing triaxial stress field, the higher the triaxiality, the smaller the effective plastic strain at failure. The relationship between strain at failure and the degree of triaxiality is given by the failure criteria.

  10. In-Situ Studies of Intercritically Austempered Ductile Iron Using Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Druschitz, Alan; Aristizabal, Ricardo; Druschitz, Edward; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R; Walker, Larry R; Ostrander, M

    2012-01-01

    Intercritically austempered ductile irons hold promise for applications requiring fatigue durability, excellent castability, low production energy requirements, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and excellent machinability. In the present study, four different ductile iron alloys, containing manganese and nickel as the primary austenite-stabilizing elements, were heat treated to obtain different quantities of austenite in the final microstructure. This paper reports the microstructures and phases present in these alloys. Further, lattice strains and diffraction elastic constants in various crystallographic directions and the transformation characteristics of the austenite as a function of applied stress were determined using in-situ loading with neutron diffraction at the second generation Neutron Residual Stress Facility (NRSF2) at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  11. Effect of low temperatures on charpy impact toughness of austempered ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riabov, Mikhail V.; Lerner, Yury S.; Fahmy, Mohammed F.

    2002-10-01

    Impact properties of standard American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) grades of austempered ductile iron (ADI) were evaluated at subzero temperatures in unnotched and V-notched conditions and compared with ferritic and pearlitic grades of ductile irons (DIs). It was determined that there is a decrease in impact toughness for all ADI grades when there is a decrease in content of retained austenite and a decrease in test temperature, from room temperature (RT) to -60 °C. However, the difference in impact toughness values was not so noticeable for low retained austenite containing grade 5 ADI at both room and subzero temperatures as it was for ADI grade 1. Furthermore, the difference in impact toughness values of V-notched specimens of ADI grades 1 and 5 tested at -40 °C was minimal. The impact behaviors of ADI grade 5 and ferritic DI were found to be more stable than those of ADI grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 and pearlitic DI when the testing temperature was decreased. The impact toughness of ferritic DI was higher than that of ADI grades 1 and 2 at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The impact properties of ADI grades 4 and 5 were found to be higher than that of pearlitic DI at both -40 °C and -60 °C. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of fracture surfaces revealed mixed ductile and quasicleavage rupture morphology types in all ADI samples tested at both -40 °C and -60 °C. With decreasing content of retained austenite and ductility, the number of quasicleavage facets increased from ADI grade 1-5. It was also found that fracture morphology of ADI did not experience significant changes when the testing temperature decreased. Evaluation of the bending angle was used to support impact-testing data. Designers and users of ADI castings may use the data developed in this research as a reference.

  12. Evidence for fluid flow in ductile shear zones, Granite Wash Mountains, Maria fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Marin, B.A.; Mosher, S. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Synkinematic fluids that accompanied Mesozoic (D2) deformation in the Granite Wash Mountains, eastern Maria fold and thrust belt, had profound effects on the metamorphic mineralogy and deformation mechanisms of Paleozoic metsedimentary rocks. The D2 thrusts are discrete brittle faults that commonly bound highly sheared, ductilely deformed rocks. These low-angle faults cross cut a vertical section of Paleozoic and Mesozoic supracrustal rocks that were multiply repeated and upturned by earlier Mesozoic deformation, D1. Kinematic analysis of a series of these ductile shear zones has confirmed that the dominant sense of motion during thrusting was to the SW, however, some isolated kinematic indicators and indicators along the lowest zone suggest NE-thrusting. Microstructures in samples collected both within D2 ductile shear zones and outside D2 zones show fluids played an important role in D2 deformation. The abundant evidence for fluids along D2 ductile shear zones includes: quartz veins in the Kaibab Fm (a dolomitic marble), zones of metasomatic alteration ( bleached'' zones) within D2 zones, an increase in the abundance of metamorphic minerals within D2 zones, and the presence of synkinematic wollastonite in silicones limestones of the Redwall Fm. The most dramatic and significant effect of synkinematic fluids in on the style of deformation mechanisms operating during thrusting. Evidence for intracrystalline plastic deformation and rotational recrystallization is not well-developed: instead, microstructures are dominated by migrational recrystallization fabrics. In some samples, quartz grain boundaries have migrated over a preexisting foliation defined by aligned micas, indicating that grain boundaries were highly mobile. Fluid-enhanced grain boundary mobility has allowed internally deformed grains or parts of grains to be consumed rapidly with no or little record of the deformation left behind.

  13. A study of stress-rupture and ductility properties of thin laminae composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, C. A.; Weeton, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that, by rolling, tungsten-tantalum laminar composites can be reduced in thickness as much as 90 to 1, with a resulting improvement in strength of nearly 66%. Further reductions in laminar thickness are believed to be possible with further increases in the strength of the composite material. The rolled tungsten-tantalum laminar material shows also a remarkable low-temperature ductility, sustaining a 3-T bend at room temperature without incurring macrodamage.

  14. The relationship between constraint and ductile fracture initiation as defined by micromechanical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Panontin, T.L.; Sheppard, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of this study is to provide a proven methodology to allow the transfer of ductile fracture initiation properties measured in standard laboratory specimens to large, complex, flawed structures. A significant part of this work involved specifically addressing the effects of constrain on transferability under large scale yielding conditions. The approach taken was to quantify constrain effects through micromechanical fracture models coupled with finite element generated crack tip stress-strain fields to identify the local condition corresponding to fracture initiation. Detailed finite element models predicted the influence of specimen geometry, loading mode, and material flow properties on the crack tip fields. The ability of two local, ductile fracture models (the Rice and Tracey void growth model (VGM) and the stress-modified, critical strain (SMCS) criterion of Mackenzie et al. and Hancock and Cowling) to predict fracture initiation were investigated. Predictions were made using experimentally verified, two- and three-dimensional, finite strain, large deformation, finite element analyses. Two, high toughness pressure vessel steels were investigated: A516 Gr70, a ferritic, carbon-manganese mild steel demonstrating high hardening behavior, and HY-80, a martensitic, high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel possessing medium hardening ability. Experimental verification of the ductile fracture initiation predictions was performed in a variety of crack geometries possessing a range of a/w ratios from 0.15 to 0.70 and experiencing a range of load conditions from three point bending to nearly pure tension. The predicted constrain dependence of global ductile fracture parameters in the two materials is shown.

  15. Experiments on buoyancy-driven crack around the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, Ikuro; Ota, Yukari

    2011-04-01

    We report the results of laboratory experiments exploring how a buoyancy-driven liquid-filled crack migrates within a viscoelastic medium whose rheology is around the brittle-ductile transition. To model such medium, we use a low concentration agar, which has a small yield stress and a large yield strain (deformation) when it fractures. We find that around the transition, the fluid migrates as a hybrid of a diapir (head) and a dyke (tail). Here the diapir is a bulged crack in which fracturing occurs at its tip and closes at its tail to form a dyke. A small amount of fluid is left along its trail and the fluid decelerates with time. We study how the shape and velocity of a constant volume fluid change as two control parameters are varied; the agar concentration ( C) and the density difference Δρ between the fluid and the agar. Under a fixed Δρ, as C decreases the medium becomes ductile, and the trajectory and shape of the fluid changes from a linearly migrating dyke to a meandering or a bifurcating dyke, and finally to a diapir-dyke hybrid. In this transition, the shape of the crack tip viewed from above, changes from blade-like to a cusped-ellipse. A similar transition is also observed when Δρ increases under a fixed C, which can be interpreted using a force balance between the buoyancy and the yield stress. Our experiments indicate that cracks around the brittle-ductile transition deviates from those in an elastic medium by several ways, such as the relaxation of the crack bulge, slower deceleration rate, and velocity becoming insensitive to medium rheology. Our experiments suggest that the fluid migrates as a diapir-dyke hybrid around the brittle-ductile transition and that fluid migration of various styles can coexist at the same depth, if they have different buoyancy.

  16. Machinable, Thin-Walled, Gray and Ductile Iron Casting Production, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Bates; Hanjun Li; Robin Griffin

    2003-12-08

    This report presents the results of research conducted to determine the effects of normal and abnormal processing and compositional variations on machinability (tool wear rate) of gray and ductile iron. The procedures developed allow precise tool wear measurements to be made and interpreted in terms of microstructures and compositions. Accurate data allows the most efficient ways for improving machinability to be determined without sacrificing properties of the irons.

  17. Multi-Objective Optimization of a Wrought Magnesium Alloy for High Strength and Ductility

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Patton, Robert M; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2013-01-01

    An optimization technique is coupled with crystal plasticity based finite element (CPFE) computations to aid the microstructural design of a wrought magnesium alloy for improved strength and ductility. The initial microstructure consists of a collection of sub-micron sized grains containing deformation twins. The variables used in the simulations are crystallographic texture, and twin spacing within the grains. It is assumed that plastic deformation occurs mainly by dislocation slip on two sets of slip systems classified as hard and soft modes. The hard modes are those slip systems that are inclined to the twin planes and the soft mode consists of dislocation glide along the twin plane. The CPFE code calculates the stress-strain response of the microstructure as a function of the microstructural parameters and the length-scale of the features. A failure criterion based on a critical shear strain and a critical hydrostatic stress is used to define ductility. The optimization is based on the sequential generation of an initial population defined by the texture and twin spacing variables. The CPFE code and the optimizer are coupled in parallel so that new generations are created and analyzed dynamically. In each successive generation, microstructures that satisfy at least 90% of the mean strength and mean ductility in the current generation are retained. Multiple generation runs based on the above procedure are carried out in order to obtain maximum strength-ductility combinations. The implications of the computations for the design of a wrought magnesium alloy are discussed. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  18. Effect of grain orientation on ductility in a nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hongqi; Misra, Amit; Liaw, Peter K; Choo, Hahn

    2008-01-01

    The influence of columnar grain geometry on mechanical property was studied in an electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni-Fe alloy. The compressive results show that the strength is independent of grain orientation. However, the plastic strain increased remarkably when the loading axis is parallel to the direction of grain columns, which is due to the enhanced grain boundary and dislocation activities. The significance of the current study is that a new strategy was developed to improve the ductility of nanocrystalline materials.

  19. The influence of strain rate and hydrogen on the plane-strain ductility of Zircaloy cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Link, T.M.; Motta, A.T.; Koss, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The authors studied the ductility of unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding under loading conditions prototypical of those found in reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), i.e.: near plane-strain deformation in the hoop direction (transverse to the cladding axis) at room temperature and 300 C and high strain rates. To conduct these studies, they developed a specimen configuration in which near plane-strain deformation is achieved in the gage section, and a testing methodology that allows one to determine both the limit strain at the onset of localized necking and the fracture strain. The experiments indicate that there is little effect of strain rate (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) on the ductility of unhydrided Zircaloy tubing deformed under near plane-strain conditions at either room temperature or 300 C. Preliminary experiments on cladding containing 190 ppm hydrogen show only a small loss of fracture strain but no clear effect on limit strain. The experiments also indicate that there is a significant loss of Zircaloy ductility when surface flaws are present in the form of thickness imperfections.

  20. Predicting Ductility and Failure Modes of TRIP Steels under Different Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-06-12

    We study the ultimate ductility and failure modes of a TRIP (TRansformation-Induced Plasticity) 800 steel under different loading conditions with an advanced micromechanics-based finite element analysis. The representative volume element (RVE) for the TRIP800 under examination is developed based on an actual microstructure obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The evolution of retained austenite during deformation process and the mechanical properties of the constituent phases of the TRIP800 steel are obtained from the synchrotron-based in-situ high-energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD) experiments and a self-consistent (SC) model. The ductile failure of the TRIP800 under different loading conditions is predicted in the form of plastic strain localization without any prescribed failure criteria for the individual phases. Comparisons of the computational results with experimental measurements suggest that the microstructure-based finite element analysis can well capture the overall macroscopic behavior of the TRIP800 steel under different loading conditions. The methodology described in this study may be extended for studying the ultimate ductile failure mechanisms of TRIP steels as well as the effects of the various processing parameters on the macroscopic behaviors of TRIP steels.

  1. Experimental investigation of stress and strain fields in a ductile matrix surrounding an elastic inclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, E.E.; Calhoun, R.B.; Mortensen, A.

    2000-04-19

    A method for measuring stress and strain distributions within a ductile material deforming by dislocational slip is developed. The method exploits the transparency and room-temperature ductility of silver chloride, and combines the techniques of photoelasticity and marker tracking. This method is used to investigate the deformation of an elasto-plastic ductile matrix surrounding an isolated stiff fiber, the grain size of the material being slightly smaller than the fiber length. The data are compared to predictions of finite element calculations which take the matrix to be an isotropic elasto-plastic von Mises continuum. It is found that this model does not fully capture all of the features of the experimental data. Data suggest that the cause for observed discrepancies is the strong influence exerted by grain boundaries and grain orientation on the distribution of stress and strain within the matrix. A comparison is also made between the data and predictions of the Eshelby equivalent inclusion calculation, to show that a far higher level of discrepancy results than with the finite element calculations; this is caused by the fact that the Eshelby equivalent inclusion calculation is essentially elastic and thus allows significant stress concentrations.

  2. Towards an analysis of leak-before-break assessments in the ductile tearing regime

    SciTech Connect

    Parfitt, V.R.

    1991-12-31

    This paper presents the elastic-plastic fracture analysis of a typical semi-elliptical axial surface flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw and assessing the leak-before break situation in a pressure vessel subject to pressure. The paper first discusses the semi-elliptical flaw J-integral solution and the thru-thickness flaw solution as modified herein. Then a review is presented of the three ductile tearing stability fracture analysis methods based on the fully plastic J-integral solution; (1) the crack driving force diagram, (2) the tearing modulus diagram, and (3) the failure assessment diagram. These methods are then used to determine the factors of safety to initiation of ductile tearing as the crack grows. Factors of safety based on either pressure alone or crack size alone are illustrated. An illustration is given of a leak-before-break solution discussing the semi-elliptical flaw growing to a thru-thickness flaw in the vessel. The paper concludes with a discussion of additional effort needed to better characterize leak-before-break solutions in the ductile tearing regime.

  3. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening. PMID:27406685

  4. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-07-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  5. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening. PMID:27406685

  6. A cross-shear deformation for optimizing the strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Kotiba; Ko, Young Gun

    2016-07-01

    Magnesium alloys have recently attracted great interest due their lightweight and high specific strength. However, because of their hexagonal close-packed structure, they have few active slip systems, resulting in poor ductility and high mechanical anisotropy at room temperature. In the present work, we used a cross-shear deformation imposed by a differential speed rolling (DSR) technique to improve the room temperature strength and ductility of AZ31 magnesium alloy sheets. To introduce the cross-shear deformation, the sheets were rotated 180° around their longitudinal axis between the adjacent passes of DSR. The sheets of the AZ31 alloy subjected to the cross-shear deformation showed a uniform fine microstructure (1.2 ± 0.1 μm) with weak basal textures. The fabricated sheets showed a simultaneous high ultimate tensile strength and elongation-to-failure, i.e., ~333 MPa and ~21%, respectively. These were explained based on the structural features evolved due to the cross-shear deformation by DSR. The high strength was attributed to the uniform fine microstructure, whereas the high ductility was explained based on the basal texture weakening.

  7. Effect of matrix structure on the impact properties of an alloyed ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Toktas, Guelcan . E-mail: gzeytin@balikesir.edu.tr; Tayanc, Mustafa; Toktas, Alaaddin

    2006-12-15

    An investigation was performed to examine the influence of the matrix structure on the impact properties of a 1.03% Cu, 1.25% Ni and 0.18% Mo pearlitic ductile iron. Specimens were first homogenized at 925 deg. C for 7 h and a fully ferritic structure was obtained in all ductile iron samples. Then, various heat treatments were applied to the homogenized specimens in order to obtain pearlitic/ferritic, pearlitic, tempered martensitic, lower and upper ausferritic matrix structures. The unnotched charpy impact specimens were tested at temperatures between - 80 deg. C and + 100 deg. C; the tensile properties (ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% yield strength and elongation) and the hardnesses of the matrix structures were investigated at room temperature. The microstructures and the fracture surfaces of the impact specimens tested at room temperature were also investigated by optical and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the best impact properties were obtained for the ferritic matrix structure that had the lowest hardness, yield and tensile strength. Ductile iron with a lower ausferritic matrix had the best combination of ultimate tensile strength, percent elongation and impact energies of all structures.

  8. Tempering rapidly solidified ductile cast iron by pulsed laser beam reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Bergmann, H.W. . Materials Science Dept.)

    1994-08-15

    During laser surface rapid remelting of cast irons, the melt pool solidifies rapidly and metastably (i.e. according to the metastable Fe-Fe[sub 3]C system) producing an ultra-fine ledeburite hard surface which is much more abrasion resistant than the original substrate. Previous literature mainly focused on remelting various grey and ductile irons with high power CO[sub 2] lasers for improved wear resistance and other surface properties, and on studying the physical metallurgy of laser remelted surfaces. Unfortunately, the unstable nature and rapid tempering behavior of the rapidly solidified ledeburite were generally neglected, although some publications mentioned the tempering phenomenon during successive overlap remelting. In this paper, a laser remelted ductile case iron surface was tempered by rapid pulsed laser beam reprocessing. The rapidly solidified ductile iron was found to be rapidly graphitized, as a result, a layer of Fe-base alloy containing ultra-fine graphite particles was produced. The unusual rapid graphitization phenomenon was preliminarily discussed.

  9. Ductility Enhancement of Post-Northridge Connections by Multilongitudinal Voids in the Beam Web

    PubMed Central

    Celikag, Murude; Hedayat, Amir A.

    2013-01-01

    Since the earthquakes in Northridge and Kobe in 1994 and 1995, respectively, many investigations have been carried out towards improving the strength and ductility of steel beam to column pre- and post-Northridge connections. In order to achieve these objectives, recent researches are mainly focused on three principles: reducing the beam section to improve the beam ductility, adding different kinds of slit damper to beam and column flanges to absorb and dissipate the input earthquake energy in the connection and strengthening the connection area using additional elements such as rib plates, cover plates, and flange plates to keep the plastic hinges away from the column face. This paper presents a reduced beam section approach via the introduction of multilongitudinal voids (MLV) in the beam web for various beam depths varying from 450 mm to 912 mm. ANSYS finite element program was used to simulate the three different sizes of SAC sections: SAC3, SAC5, and SAC7. Results showed an improvement in the connection ductility since the input energy was dissipated uniformly along the beam length and the total rotation of the connection was over four percent radian. PMID:24311977

  10. Effects of rolling on the ductility of 80% tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, C.A.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1992-11-01

    Relations between transverse tensile ductility and rolling and annealing schedules were investigated for solid-state sintered and annealed 80%W8%Ni-2%Fe heavy alloy rolled at 900C or 1150C with varying reductions between anneals at either 1150C or 1400C. Final anneals and a solution heat treatment were employed prior to tensile testing. Metallographic and fractographic analyses were performed to determine relations between microstructure and physical properties. Multiple 1400C intermediate anneals with a maximum 60% rolling reduction produced higher transverse tensile elongations than rolled with a higher final reduction, 86%. Tensile elongation differences were attributed to the recrystallized intra-particle W grain sizes achieved during the final anneal. Materials given a maximum of 60% reduction before final anneal had fewer intra-particle W grains and therefore higher ductilities. For materials rolled at 900C or 1150C, no differences in transverse tensile elongation were observed. 1150C intermediate anneals had consistently lower ductility. 900C rolling produced slightly higher elongations than 1150C rolling, but only when the material was annealed at 1455C. Tensile yield and ultimate strengths did not vary greatly with rolling and intermediate annealing conditions. The edge cracking correlated with observed lateral spread and the material softness.

  11. The ductile-brittle size transition of iron aluminide ligaments in an FeAl/TiC composite

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, R.; Schneibel, J.H.

    1998-08-10

    The fracture surfaces of FeAl/TiC composites containing 70 vol% TiC were investigated. Since thin iron aluminide ligaments in the composites fractured in a ductile manner, whereas thicker ones fractured by cleavage, a systematic correlation of the fracture mode to the ligament thickness was performed. The results clearly show that FeAl ligaments thicker than about 1--2 {micro}m fracture by cleavage and those smaller in size fracture predominantly in a ductile manner. The ductile failure mode is attributed to the limited dislocation pile-up distance available for very thin ligaments, which prevents high stresses from building up and eliminates cleavage fracture. It is also shown that the ductile-brittle transition size is controlled by alloying and/or heat treatment. No significant dependence of the fracture toughness on the fracture mode would be found.

  12. Ductile and Compacted Graphite Iron Casting Skin -- Evaluation, Effect on Fatigue Strength and Elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonmee, Sarum

    Compacted graphite (CG) iron features a good combination of tensile strength, impact resistance, thermal conductivity and damping capacity. This combination makes CG iron a material of choice for various applications, especially for the automobile industry. The mechanical properties of CG iron listed in the standards (i.e. ASTM) are for machined specimens. However, since most iron castings retain the original casting surface (a.k.a. casting skin), the actual performance of the part could be significantly different from that of the machined specimens. Recent studies have shown the negative effect of the casting skin, but little quantification of its effect on mechanical properties is available. Further, the understanding of its mechanism of formation is at best incomplete. In this research, the effect of the casting skin on mechanical properties in CG and ductile irons (DI) is explored. The differences in tensile and fatigue properties between as-cast and machined samples were quantified and correlated to the casting skin features. It was found that the presence of the casting skin was accountable for 9% reduction of tensile strength and up to 32% reduction of fatigue strength (for CG iron with 40% nodularity). Several mechanisms of the casting skin formation are proposed in this research. The formation of ferritic and pearlitic rims is explained by decarburizing/carburizing reactions at the mold/metal interface. Mg depletion and solidification kinetics effect were identified as the formation mechanisms of the graphite degradation. A 2-D thermal diffusion model was formulated based on Mg depletion theory. The model can be used to predict the casting skin thickness when Mg depletion is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using the asymmetric Fe-Gr phase diagram, some instances of casting skin formation were explained based on solidification kinetics theory. The experimental microstructural evidence and the theoretical progress were conducive to the development of

  13. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though

  14. Critical fictive temperature for plasticity in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Golden; Neibecker, Pascal; Liu, Yan Hui; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A long-sought goal in metallic glasses is to impart ductility without conceding their strength and elastic limit. The rational design of tough metallic glasses, however, remains challenging because of the inability of existing theories to capture the correlation between plasticity, composition and processing for a wide range of glass-forming alloys. Here we propose a phenomenological criterion based on a critical fictive temperature, Tfc, which can rationalize the effect of composition, cooling rate and annealing on room-temperature plasticity of metallic glasses. Such criterion helps in understanding the widespread mechanical behaviour of metallic glasses and reveals alloy-specific preparation conditions to circumvent brittleness. PMID:23443564

  15. Critical fictive temperature for plasticity in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Golden; Neibecker, Pascal; Liu, Yan Hui; Schroers, Jan

    2013-01-01

    A long-sought goal in metallic glasses is to impart ductility without conceding their strength and elastic limit. The rational design of tough metallic glasses, however, remains challenging because of the inability of existing theories to capture the correlation between plasticity, composition and processing for a wide range of glass-forming alloys. Here we propose a phenomenological criterion based on a critical fictive temperature, T(fc), which can rationalize the effect of composition, cooling rate and annealing on room-temperature plasticity of metallic glasses. Such criterion helps in understanding the widespread mechanical behaviour of metallic glasses and reveals alloy-specific preparation conditions to circumvent brittleness. PMID:23443564

  16. Hot Ductility and Deformation Behavior of C-Mn/Nb-Microalloyed Steel Related to Cracking During Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanjewar, H. A.; Tripathi, Pranavkumar; Singhai, M.; Patra, P. K.

    2014-10-01

    Hot ductility studies have been performed on C-Mn and C-Mn-Nb steels with an approach to simulate the effect of cooling conditions experienced by steel in secondary cooling zone during continuous casting. Thermal oscillations prior to tensile straining deteriorate hot ductility of steel by deepening and widening the hot ductility trough. C-Mn steels are found to exhibit ductility troughs in three distinct zones whereas C-Mn-Nb steel shows drop in ductility only at low temperature in the vicinity of ferrite transformation temperatures. Start of ferrite transformation in steels causes yield ratio to increase while work hardening rates and strength coefficient decrease with decrease in test temperature in presence of thermal oscillation prior to tensile testing. Inhibition of recrystallization due to build-up of AlN particles along with the presence of MnS particles in structure and low work hardening rates causes embrittlement of steel in austenitic range. Alloying elements enhancing work hardening rates in austenitic range can be promoted to improve hot ductility. The presence of low melting phase saturated with impurities along the austenitic grain boundaries causes intergranular fracture at high temperature in C-Mn steels.

  17. Role of matrix/reinforcement interfaces in the fracture toughness of brittle materials toughened by ductile reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Abbaschian, R.

    1992-10-01

    Crack interactions with ductile reinforcements, especially behavior of a crack tip at the interface, have been studied using MoSi2 composites reinforced with Nb foils. Effects of fracture energy of interfaces on toughness of the composites have also been investigated. Variation of interfacial bonding was achieved by depositing an oxide coating or by the development of a reaction prod- uct layer between the reinforcement and matrix. Toughness was measured using bend tests on chevron-notched specimens. It has been established that as a crack interacts with a ductile re- inforcement, three mechanisms compcte: interfacial debonding, multiple matrix fracture, and direct crack propagation through the reinforcement. Decohesion length at the matrix/reinforcement interface depends on the predominant mechanism. Furthermore, the results add to the evidence that the extent to which interfacial bonding is conducive to toughness of the composites depends on the criterion used to describe the toughness and that ductility of the ductile reinforcement is also an important factor in controlling toughness of the composites. Loss of ductility of the ductile reinforcement due to inappropriate processing could result in little improvement in tough- ness of the composites.

  18. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    SciTech Connect

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; Cesar Sa, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-05-17

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths.

  19. Nitrided Metallic Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Tortorelli, Peter F; Pihl, Josh A; Toops, Todd J; More, Karren Leslie; Meyer III, Harry M; Vitek, John Michael; Wang, Heli; Turner, John; Wilson, Mahlon; Garzon, Fernando; Rockward, Tommy; Connors, Dan; Rakowski, Jim; Gervasio, Don

    2008-01-01

    The objectives are: (1) Develop and optimize stainless steel alloys amenable to formation of a protective Cr-nitride surface by gas nitridation, at a sufficiently low cost to meet DOE targets and with sufficient ductility to permit manufacture by stamping. (2) Demonstrate capability of nitridation to yield high-quality stainless steel bipolar plates from thin stamped alloy foils (no significant stamped foil warping or embrittlement). (3) Demonstrate single-cell fuel cell performance of stamped and nitrided alloy foils equivalent to that of machined graphite plates of the same flow-field design ({approx}750-1,000 h, cyclic conditions, to include quantification of metal ion contamination of the membrane electrode assembly [MEA] and contact resistance increase attributable to the bipolar plates). (4) Demonstrate potential for adoption in automotive fuel cell stacks. Thin stamped metallic bipolar plates offer the potential for (1) significantly lower cost than currently-used machined graphite bipolar plates, (2) reduced weight/volume, and (3) better performance and amenability to high volume manufacture than developmental polymer/carbon fiber and graphite composite bipolar plates. However, most metals exhibit inadequate corrosion resistance in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) environments. This behavior leads to high electrical resistance due to the formation of surface oxides and/or contamination of the MEA by metallic ions, both of which can significantly degrade fuel cell performance. Metal nitrides offer electrical conductivities up to an order of magnitude greater than that of graphite and are highly corrosion resistant. Unfortunately, most conventional coating methods (for metal nitrides) are too expensive for PEMFC stack commercialization or tend to leave pinhole defects, which result in accelerated local corrosion and unacceptable performance.

  20. Adhesion, friction, and wear behavior of clean metal-ceramic couples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1995-01-01

    When a clean metal is brought into contact with a clean, harder ceramic in ultrahigh vacuum, strong bonds form between the two materials. The interfacial bond strength between the metal and ceramic surfaces in sliding contact is generally greater than the cohesive bond strength in the metal. Thus, fracture of the cohesive bonds in the metal results when shearing occurs. These strong interfacial bonds and the shearing fracture in the metal are the main causes of the observed wear behavior and the transfer of the metal to the ceramic. In the literature, the surface energy (bond energy) per unit area of the metal is shown to be related to the degree of interfacial bond strength per unit area. Because the two materials of a metal-ceramic couple have markedly different ductilities, contact can cause considerable plastic deformation of the softer metal. It is the ductility of the metal, then, that determines the real area of contact. In general, the less ductile the metal, the smaller the real area of contact. The coefficient of friction for clean surfaces of metal-ceramic couples correlates with the metals total surface energy in the real area of contact gamma A (which is the product of the surface energy per unit area of the metal gamma and the real area of contact (A)). The coefficient of friction increases as gamma A increases. Furthermore, gamma A is associated with the wear and transfer of the metal at the metal-ceramic interface: the higher the value of gamma A, the greater the wear and transfer of the metal.