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Sample records for dural puncture headache

  1. [Post-dural puncture headache].

    PubMed

    Radke, K; Radke, O C

    2013-02-01

    Headache following dural puncture is a typical complication of neuraxial analgesia and can impair the ability to perform activities of daily living up to incapacitation. The use of thin, atraumatic needles and special puncture techniques (e.g. reinsertion of the stylet) can prevent the majority of post-dural puncture headaches (PDPH). One of the most effective measures to prevent headache after accidental dural puncture is the intrathecal or epidural administration of morphine. When the diagnosis of PDPH is confirmed after excluding relevant differential diagnoses, some of which are potentially life-threatening, caffeine, theophylline and non-opioid analgesics are effective agents to reduce the severity of the symptoms. Traditional measures, such as strict bed rest and hyperhydration can no longer be recommended. If invasive treatment of the headache is warranted an epidural blood patch is still the method of choice with a high rate of success. PMID:23400710

  2. Differentiating the headache of cerebral venous thrombosis from post-dural puncture: A headache for anaesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Sherfudeen, Khaja Mohideen; Ramasamy, Gurumoorthi; Kaliannan, Senthil Kumar; Dammalapati, Pavan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare complication of lumbar puncture. Occasionally, the clinical picture of CVT may mimic post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) resulting in delayed diagnosis. A case of PDPH progressing to CVT is presented and the pathophysiology, diagnostic challenges and management options discussed in this article. PMID:27212724

  3. Does preoperative gabapentin affects the characteristics of post-dural puncture headache in parturients undergoing cesarean section with spinal anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Walid Hamed; Mahmoud, Mohamed Sidky; Al Alim, Azza Atef Abd

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gabapentin is effective for treating different types of headache including post-dural puncture headache (PDPH), also used for prophylaxis against migraine. We studied the effect of pre-operative administration of gabapentin on the characteristics of PDPH in parturients undergoing cesarean section (CS) under spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Women undergoing elective cesarean section under spinal anesthesia were randomized to receive preoperative gabapentin 600 mg or placebo. Spinal anesthesia was achieved with 12.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine plus 25 μg fentanyl. Babies were followed up by Apgar scores, umbilical artery blood gases, breastfeeding difficulties, and need for NICU admission. The mothers were followed up for any side-effects of gabapentin for 24 h. Patients with PDPH were re-admitted and onset and duration of the headache were reported and severity was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) for 4 days from diagnosis. Paracetamol with caffeine and diclofenac were given for treatment, and the doses were adjusted according to VAS; also number of doses given for each group was recorded. Results: Eighty eight patients were randomized, and 2 were excluded. The incidence of headache and co-existing symptoms were similar in both groups. The onset of headache was significantly delayed in gabapentin group (P < 0.05). Also, severity and duration of headache were significantly less in gabapentin group (P < 0.05). The incidence of sedation was more in gabapentin group 11 (26.19%) versus placebo group 3 (6.81%). Neonatal outcomes were statistically insignificant between both groups. Conclusion: Pre-operative administration of gabapentin has no effect on incidence of (PDPH) but delays its onset and reduces its severity and duration in parturients undergoing cesarean section with spinal anesthesia without significant adverse effects on the mother or the baby. PMID:25191187

  4. Accidental dural puncture rates in UK obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, C M; Reynolds, F

    1998-10-01

    Headache following epidural analgesia is a common cause of complaint, but accidental dural puncture rates vary among hospitals and with techniques. We were therefore interested to discover the extent of audit of dural puncture, the dural puncture rates in those UK centres that kept reliable records, and the techniques they used for detecting the epidural space. Consultants in charge of anaesthetic services to all 257 obstetric units in the UK were sent a questionnaire requesting numbers of obstetric epidurals, techniques used to detect the epidural space and the numbers of accidental dural punctures in the years 1991-1995. Replies were received from 191 respondents (74%) of whom 104 were able to provide some information about dural puncture rates. Dural puncture rate was inversely related to the number of epidurals performed; the highest recorded rate was 3.6% in a unit with < 300 epidurals annually, and the lowest 0.19% in a unit with > 1000. Most respondents did not record the loss of resistance technique used but among those who did, the dural puncture rate using mainly saline was 0.69% and using mainly air was 1.11% (P<0.001). Since accurate patient information is crucial for informed consent, audit needs to be improved in many centres. Though the accidental dural puncture rate may be under-reported in this survey, our data are in agreement with other findings that loss of resistance to saline is safer than loss of resistance to air. PMID:15321187

  5. A new approach using high volume blood patch for prevention of post-dural puncture headache following intrathecal catheter pump exchange

    PubMed Central

    Abdulla, Susanne; Vielhaber, Stefan; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Abdulla, Walied

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an observational study, complications of intrathecal catheter pumps necessitating surgical exchange were analyzed. Also the use of a high-volume prophylactic epidural blood patch (EBP) during surgery for preventing post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) with a follow-up for 1 year is described. Materials and Methods: In 22 patients with refractory chronic pain of cancer/noncancer origin or severe spasticity, who were receiving intrathecal morphine including adjuvants or baclofen for symptom relief, catheter exchange with or without pump was performed. In patients with documented symptoms of PDPH following initial intrathecal catheter implantation, a prophylactic EBP with a high blood volume was used for PDPH prevention during surgery. Catheters were replaced using 40 mL EBP before entering dural space at a speed of 5mL/min into the epidural space. Patients were asked to quantify pain experience and functional ability. Results: From a sample of 72 patients admitted for catheter exchange with or without pump, 22 patients (33%) (12 male, 10 female) had a history of PDPH following initial implantation. Diagnostic and therapeutic measures occurring with malfunction of intrathecal catheter pump systems were described. Twenty-one patients were successfully treated with prophylactic EBP, while one patient could not be properly evaluated because of intracranial bleeding as the underlying disease. Conclusions: A new approach using a high-volume prophylactic EBP for preventing PDPH following catheter exchange is presented. The efficacy and safety of this technique for 1 year follow-up have been evaluated and was found to be safe and potentially effective. PMID:26157652

  6. Cranial nerve VI palsy after dural-arachnoid puncture.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Jennifer E; Scavone, Barbara M

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we provide a literature review of cranial nerve (CN) VI injury after dural-arachnoid puncture. CN VI injury is rare and ranges in severity from diplopia to complete lateral rectus palsy with deviated gaze. The proposed mechanism of injury is cerebrospinal fluid leakage causing intracranial hypotension and downward displacement of the brainstem. This results in traction on CN VI leading to stretch and neural demyelination. Symptoms may present 1 day to 3 weeks after dural-arachnoid puncture and typically are associated with a postdural puncture (spinal) headache. Resolution of symptoms may take weeks to months. Use of small-gauge, noncutting spinal needles may decrease the risk of intracranial hypotension and subsequent CN VI injury. When ocular symptoms are present, early administration of an epidural blood patch may decrease morbidity or prevent progression of ocular symptoms. PMID:25695579

  7. [Subdural hematoma after dural puncture: fateful complication of epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Schott, M; Gehrke, A; Gaab, M; Jantzen, J-P

    2013-05-01

    Subdural hematoma may occur as rare, although intervention- specific complications of accidental dural puncture by neuroaxial block. Bleeding may be caused by rapid cerebrospinal fluid loss related to traction on fragile intracranial bridging veins. This article reports a case of postdural puncture headache in a 43-year-old woman after accidental dural puncture during attempted placement of an epidural catheter for induction of abortion. Bed rest, analgesics, theophylline and hydration were to no avail and only a blood patch improved the headaches. The patient presented 7 weeks later with headache and left-sided hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a right frontoparietal subdural intracranial hematoma which had to be surgically evacuated. The patient recovered completely. Intracranial hematoma is a rare but serious complication of central neuroaxial block. According to current German jurisdiction this risk must be addressed when informed consent is obtained. Intracranial hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atypical headache and neurological signs (e.g. focal motor and sensory deficits and seizures) following neuroaxial block and adequate image diagnostics should be carried out without delay. PMID:23558719

  8. [Unknown intracerebral tumour presenting as brainstem compression following unintentional dural puncture].

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, J; Figueiredo-González, O; Río-Gómez, A; Carballo-Loureiro, N; Castro-Bouzas, D

    2014-01-01

    A 36-year old primigravid of 41 weeks gestation was admitted to the labour ward. Her past medical history included hyperemesis gravidarum and migraine. An accidental dural puncture occurred during labour epidural analgesia. In the postpartum period she presented with continuous headache, and was treated with oral analgesics, oral caffeine, fluid therapy, and tetracosactide. She refused an epidural blood patch. On the seventh day postpartum, the patient was re-admitted to the Emergency Department with decreased level of consciousness and signs of brainstem compression. Cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a posterior fossa tumour. An emergency craniotomy was performed with complete neurological recovery. This case emphasises the need to consider the differential diagnoses of post-dural puncture headache and to highlight the warning signs in patients who do not respond despite treatment with conventional therapy. PMID:24041454

  9. Visualization of extradural blood patch for post lumbar puncture headache by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, A G; Beards, S C; Jackson, A; Horsman, E L

    1993-02-01

    We describe a case of post lumbar puncture headache treated by extradural blood patch. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a large extradural haematoma extending over four spinal segments and extending out through the neural outlet foramina. There was significant compression of the thecal sac, supporting the theory that extradural blood patch causes tamponade at the site of dural puncture. The spread of clot was predominantly upwards from the injection site and subarachnoid extension of blood was also demonstrated. PMID:8435271

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage and headache after lumbar puncture: a prospective non-invasive imaging study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Feng; Fuh, Jong-Ling; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Chen, Shih-Pin; Hseu, Shu-Shya; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2015-06-01

    The spatial distribution and clinical correlation of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after lumbar puncture have not been determined. Adult in-patients receiving diagnostic lumbar punctures were recruited prospectively. Whole-spine heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance myelography was carried out to characterize post-lumbar puncture spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakages. Maximum rostral migration was defined as the distance between the most rostral spinal segment with cerebrospinal fluid leakage and the level of lumbar puncture. Eighty patients (51 female/29 male, mean age 49.4 ± 13.3 years) completed the study, including 23 (28.8%) with post-dural puncture headache. Overall, 63.6% of periradicular leaks and 46.9% of epidural collections were within three vertebral segments of the level of lumbar puncture (T12-S1). Post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks (length 3.0 ± 2.5 versus 0.9 ± 1.9 segments, P = 0.001; maximum rostral migration 4.3 ± 4.7 versus 0.8 ± 1.7 segments, P = 0.002) and epidural collections (length 5.3 ± 6.1 versus 1.0 ± 2.1 segments, P = 0.003; maximum rostral migration 4.7 ± 6.7 versus 0.9 ± 2.4 segments, P = 0.015). In conclusion, post-dural puncture headache was associated with more extensive and more rostral distributions of periradicular leaks and epidural collections. Further, visualization of periradicular leaks was not restricted to the level of dural defect, although two-thirds remained within the neighbouring segments. PMID:25688077

  11. Inadvertent Dural Puncture during Caudal Approach by the Introducer Needle for Epidural Adhesiolysis Caused by Anatomical Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Gon; Kim, Do Wan; Lee, Yeon Ju

    2013-01-01

    There have been reports of abnormalities in the lumbosacral region involving a lower-than-normal termination of the dural sac, which is caused by disease or anatomical variation. Inadvertent dural puncture or other unexpected complications can occur during caudal epidural block or adhesiolysis in patients with these variations, but only a small number of case reports have described this issue. We report a case of dural puncture by the introducer needle before attempting caudal epidural adhesiolysis, which occurred even though the needle was not advanced upward after penetrating the sacrococcygeal ligament. Dural puncture was caused by a morphological abnormality in the lumbosacral region, with no pathological condition; the dural sac terminal was located more distally than normal. However, dural puncture could have been prevented if we had checked for such an abnormality in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) taken before the procedure. PMID:23614088

  12. Intravenous theophylline rapidly decreases post-lumbar puncture headaches.

    PubMed

    Ergün, Ufuk; Ünal-Artık, H Aybüke; İnan, Leven E; Yoldaş, Tahir

    2016-09-01

    When managing therapy for the post-lumbar puncture headaches (PLPHs), an efficacious, fast-acting, practical and safe method is preferred. Invasive methods have known complications and oral medications might be problematic when nausea and vomiting occurs with severe headaches. The aim of this study was to highlight the brief initial time for a remarkable decrease of PLPH pain levels after the administration of IV theophylline infusion. We observed that IV theophylline infusion has a rapid and marked effect on decreasing pain in PLPHs. At 30 min of theophylline infusion, mean VAS levels were decreased by 47.1 % and at 60 min of infusion, the decrease of pain was 61.9 %. We conclude that IV theophylline infusion is a rapidly effective, noninvasive, practical and low-cost way to treat PLPHs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight both the efficacy and the speed of the effect of pain relief in PLPHs. PMID:26563407

  13. ACTIVATION OF TRPA1 ON DURAL AFFERENTS: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM OF HEADACHE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Le, Larry N.; Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Preti, Delia; Appendino, Giovanni; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Dodick, David W.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) on meningeal nerve endings has been suggested to contribute to environmental irritant-induced headache but this channel may also contribute to other forms of headache such as migraine. The preclinical studies described here examined functional expression of TRPA1 on dural afferents and investigated whether activation of TRPA1 contributes to headache-like behaviors. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed in vitro using two TRPA1 agonists, mustard oil (MO) and the environmental irritant umbellulone (UMB), on dural-projecting trigeminal ganglion neurons. Application of MO and UMB to dural afferents produced TRPA1-like currents in approximately 42% and 38% of cells, respectively. Using an established in vivo behavioral model of migraine-related allodynia, dural application of MO and UMB produced robust time-related tactile facial and hindpaw allodynia that was attenuated by pretreatment with the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Additionally, MO or UMB were applied to the dura and exploratory activity was monitored for 30 minutes using an automated open-field activity chamber. Dural MO and UMB decreased the number of vertical rearing episodes and the time spent rearing in comparison to vehicle treated animals. This change in activity was prevented in rats pretreated with HC-030031 as well as sumatriptan, a clinically effective anti-migraine agent. These data indicate that TRPA1 is expressed on a substantial fraction of dural afferents and activation of meningeal TRPA1 produces behaviors consistent with those seen in patients during migraine attacks. Further, they suggest that activation of meningeal TRPA1 via endogenous or exogenous mechanisms can lead to afferent signaling and headache. PMID:22809691

  14. Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Patients Presenting With Headache as an Initial Symptom

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Motohiro; Mori, Kentaro; Tamase, Akira; Kamide, Tomoya; Seki, Syunsuke; Iida, Yu; Kawabata, Yuichi; Nakano, Tatsu; Shima, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) patients presenting with only headache as an initial symptom are not common. Patients with CS-dAVF commonly present with symptoms related to their eyes. In all three patients, headache was the initial symptom. Other symptoms related to the eyes developed 1 - 7 months after headache. In one patient, headache was controlled by sumatriptan succinate, but not diclofenac sodium or loxoprofen sodium. In another patient, headache was controlled by loxoprofen sodium. In the third patient, headache was improved by stellate ganglion block. In all patients, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the early stage of the clinical course showed abnormal blood flow in the CS. However, reflux to the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) was not detected. As treatment, transarterial and transvenous embolizations were necessary for one patient, and transvenous embolization was performed for another patient with significant blood flow to the SOV and cortical veins. On the other hand, manual compression of the bilateral carotid arteries at the neck resulted in disappearance of the fistula in the third patient. In all patients, the symptoms improved after the disappearance of blood reflux to the CS. The refluxed blood to the CS might cause elevation of the CS pressure and stimulate the trigeminal nerve in the dural membrane, resulting in headache before developing reflux in an anterior direction. CS-dAVF could induce both migraine and common headache. In cases with blood reflux to the CS on magnetic resonance imaging and/or MRA even without eye symptoms, a differential diagnosis of CS-dAVF should be taken into consideration. PMID:26985257

  15. Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Patients Presenting With Headache as an Initial Symptom.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Motohiro; Mori, Kentaro; Tamase, Akira; Kamide, Tomoya; Seki, Syunsuke; Iida, Yu; Kawabata, Yuichi; Nakano, Tatsu; Shima, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Hiroki

    2016-04-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) patients presenting with only headache as an initial symptom are not common. Patients with CS-dAVF commonly present with symptoms related to their eyes. In all three patients, headache was the initial symptom. Other symptoms related to the eyes developed 1 - 7 months after headache. In one patient, headache was controlled by sumatriptan succinate, but not diclofenac sodium or loxoprofen sodium. In another patient, headache was controlled by loxoprofen sodium. In the third patient, headache was improved by stellate ganglion block. In all patients, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the early stage of the clinical course showed abnormal blood flow in the CS. However, reflux to the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) was not detected. As treatment, transarterial and transvenous embolizations were necessary for one patient, and transvenous embolization was performed for another patient with significant blood flow to the SOV and cortical veins. On the other hand, manual compression of the bilateral carotid arteries at the neck resulted in disappearance of the fistula in the third patient. In all patients, the symptoms improved after the disappearance of blood reflux to the CS. The refluxed blood to the CS might cause elevation of the CS pressure and stimulate the trigeminal nerve in the dural membrane, resulting in headache before developing reflux in an anterior direction. CS-dAVF could induce both migraine and common headache. In cases with blood reflux to the CS on magnetic resonance imaging and/or MRA even without eye symptoms, a differential diagnosis of CS-dAVF should be taken into consideration. PMID:26985257

  16. The "temporalis-inhibitory reflex" in post-lumbar puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Wallasch, T M; Niemann, U; Strenge, H

    1992-01-01

    Nausea and rigidity of the neck muscles, typical symptoms of post-lumbar puncture syndrome (PPS), may also be found in patients suffering from chronic headache of the tension-type. A decreased duration of the late suppression period of temporal muscle activity indicating a central disturbance of pericranial muscle control, can be observed in these patients. We have studied the temporalis-inhibitory reflex in 47 neurological inpatients requiring lumbar puncture. There were no significant differences of latencies or durations of temporalis silent periods between patients with and without PPS before, and 48 h following, lumbar puncture. PMID:1292957

  17. Acupuncture for the Management of Postdural Puncture Headache: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alexandra; Acquah, Joseph; Reddy, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a recognized complication of neuraxial anesthesia. This case report documents 1 patient who developed PDPH following epidural anesthesia for postoperative pain control. The patient declined conventional treatments, including an epidural blood patch and intravenous caffeine. This report documents successful use of adjunct acupuncture for the management of PDPH. Additional research on acupuncture as a potential adjunctive therapy for PDPH is needed, particularly for patients who are reluctant to receive more invasive treatments. PMID:26937320

  18. [Effect of the continuous epidural saline infusion for patients with postdural puncture headache after pulmonary resection].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Tatsuya; Hirai, Shinji; Hamanaka, Yoshiharu; Fukui, Takayuki; Itou, Shimon; Hatooka, Shunzou; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2011-11-01

    The dual puncture is one of the diseaseful complications at the induction of the epidural anesthesia, which causes severe symptoms of intracranial hypotension such as headache and nausea. The clinical courses of 3 patients with the dual puncture symptoms after pulmonary resections were retrospectively reviewed, and the effect of the continuous epidural saline infusion treatment (CESI) for the dual puncture was evaluated. Pneumococcal empyema developed in 1 patient who had been treated with conservative management. In contrast, the symptoms of the others who were treated with the CESI were quickly recovered or were effectively prevented. This report strongly suggested that the CESI was convenient and effective treatment for dual punctune symptoms by suppressing the cerebrospinal fluid leakage by elevation of the fluid pressure in the extradural space. PMID:22187867

  19. Failure rate and complications associated with the use of spinal catheters for the management of inadvertent dural puncture in the parturient: a retrospective comparison with re-sited epidural catheters.

    PubMed

    Tien, Michael; Peacher, Dionne F; Franz, Amber M; Jia, Shawn Y; Habib, Ashraf S

    2016-05-01

    Objective To report on the failure rate of spinal catheters placed following inadvertent dural puncture (IDP) compared with re-sited epidural catheters in the obstetric population. Research design and methods Patients who experienced IDP during epidural or combined spinal epidural placement with 17 or 18 gauge Tuohy needles for labor analgesia between 2003 and 2014 were identified using our post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) database. Patients were categorized into two groups: those who had spinal catheters inserted and those who had epidural catheters re-sited. Main outcome measure Failure rate associated with spinal or re-sited epidural catheters (defined as need for repeat block or alternative analgesic modality). Secondary outcomes were incidence of PDPH, need for epidural blood patch (EBP), and adverse events. Results A total of 109 patients were included in the final analysis; 79 ultimately had spinal catheters and 30 ultimately had re-sited epidural catheters. There were no differences between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters in failure rate (22% vs. 13%, P = 0.33), incidence of PDPH (73% vs. 60%, P = 0.24), need for EBP (42% vs. 30%, P = 0.28), number of headache days, or maximum headache scores. There was also no difference in the rate of adverse events including high block levels, hypotension, and fetal bradycardia (9% vs. 7%, P = 1.0) between the two groups. Conclusions There were no differences in failure rates, PDPH outcomes, or adverse events between spinal catheters and re-sited epidural catheters following IDP in parturients receiving labor analgesia. Limitations of the study include its single-center retrospective non-randomized design, and the uneven number of patients in the two groups with a relatively small number in the re-sited epidural catheter group. PMID:26818623

  20. [Epidural blood patch to treat severe postdural puncture headache after ambulatorysurgery].

    PubMed

    Galindo Palazuelos, M; Díaz Setién, N

    2010-04-01

    We report a case of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) after outpatient hysteroscopy under spinal anesthesia in which a 25-gauge Whitacre needle was used. Symptoms of PDPH appeared 6 hours after surgery. The headache improved with oral caffein and intravenous corticosteroids and the patient was discharged after 24 hours. Later, she was attended twice in the emergency departments of 2 hospitals, where she received conventional treatment (analgesics and corticosteroids). Eleven days after the surgical procedure, an epidural blood patch was performed. Within 12 hours the incapacitating symptoms had improved markedly and resolution was complete 2 months after surgery. PDPH worthy of blood patch treatment is a rare complication of spinal anesthesia with pencil-point needles. Clear diagnostic protocols are required if satisfactory treatment is not to be delayed and unnecessary suffering is to be prevented. PMID:20499802

  1. The prevalence of anatomical variations that can cause inadvertent dural puncture when performing caudal block in Koreans: a study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Joo, J; Kim, J; Lee, J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the anatomical abnormalities that can induce inadvertent dural puncture when performing caudal block. The anatomy of the lumbo-sacral area was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. In 2462 of the 2669 patients imaged, the dural sac terminal was located between the upper half of the 1st sacral vertebra and the lower half of the 2nd sacral vertebra. In 22 cases (0.8%), the dural sac terminal and the spinal canal were located at or below the 3rd sacral vertebra, and these were cases of simple anatomical variations. As regards pathologic conditions, there was one case of sacral meningocoele and 46 cases of sacral perineural cyst. In 21 cases (0.8%) out of the 46 perineural cyst cases, the cyst could be found at or below the 3rd sacral vertebra level. Inadvertent dural puncture may happen when performing caudal block in patients with such abnormal anatomy. PMID:19922508

  2. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and cerebrovascular constriction syndrome in the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches].

    PubMed

    Ruiz López, N; Cano Hernández, B; Balbás Álvarez, S

    2016-02-01

    Postpartum headache can be due to many causes. In a patient with previous epidural analgesia, the headache can be attributed to post-dural puncture headache, even if the symptoms are not typical of this clinical entity. We report a case of a post-partum with accidental dural tap during the insertion of an epidural catheter for labour analgesia, and who referred to headaches in the third post-partum day. Initially, a post-dural puncture headache was suspected, but the subsequent onset of seizures and visual impairment meant that the diagnosis had to be reconsidered. In this case report, the clinical and pathophysiological features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome and reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, as well as the differential diagnosis of post-partum headaches are described. PMID:26056067

  3. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension presenting as postpartum headache.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mariam; Salahuddin, Ayesha; Mathew, Namitha R; Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran

    2016-01-01

    Postpartum headache is described as headache and neck or shoulder pain during the first 6 weeks after delivery. Common causes of headache in the puerperium are migraine headache and tension headache; other causes include pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, post-dural puncture headache, cortical vein thrombosis, subarachnoid hemorrhage, posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome, brain tumor, cerebral ischemia, meningitis, and so forth. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare cause of postpartum headache. It is usually associated with papilledema, headache, and elevated intracranial pressure without any focal neurologic abnormality in an otherwise healthy person. It is more commonly seen in obese women of reproductive age group, but rare during pregnancy and postpartum. We present a case of IIH who presented to us 18 days after cesarean section with severe headache and was successfully managed. PMID:26818168

  4. Effect of venous dexamethasone, oral caffeine and acetaminophen on relative frequency and intensity of postdural puncture headache after spinal anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Masoudifar, Mehrdad; Aghadavoudi, Omid; Adib, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a relatively common complication after regional anesthesia, especially in younger people, bothersome to patients and needs prophylaxis to prevent this complication. This study was conducted aiming to determine the preventive effect of dexamethasone plus caffeine and acetaminophen on relative frequency and intensity of PDPH after spinal anesthesia. Materials and Methods: In a clinical trial study, 90 candidates for the lower extremities orthopedic elective operation were divided into two groups of 45 individuals each. Intervention group received the compound of 500 mg acetaminophen +65 mg oral caffeine +8 mg venous dexamethasone an hour before spinal blocking, and the control group received placebo tablets + a dexamethasone equivalent volume of venous normal saline. The level of postoperative headache at the time of entrance to recovery and discharge, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h postoperatively were measured based on Visual Analog Scale criterion in the two groups and then compared with each other. Results: During the study, 24 patients in the control group and 17 patients in the intervention group were afflicted with headache; however, with no significant difference (P = 0.14). Total frequency of headache incidence was 35 times in the control group and 27 times in the intervention group (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Though the taking of acetaminophen + caffeine + dexamethasone is associated with a decrease in headache intensity and duration and decrease in PDPH incidence, compared with placebo, however, no essentially and statistically significant effect was produced. PMID:27169097

  5. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... headache (not caused by another medical condition) is migraine. Migraine headaches are usually characterized by severe pain on ... Women are more likely than men to have migraine headaches. Is there any treatment? When headaches occur ...

  6. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Almost everyone has had a headache. Headache is the most common form of pain. It's a major reason people miss days at work or school or visit the doctor. The most common type of headache is a tension headache. Tension headaches are due ...

  7. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    A headache is pain or discomfort in the head, scalp, or neck. Serious causes of headaches are rare. Most ... The most common type of headache is tension headache. It is likely caused by tight muscles in your shoulders, neck, scalp, and jaw. A tension headache : May ...

  8. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... of headache is tension headache. It is likely caused by tight muscles in your shoulders, neck, scalp, and jaw. A tension headache : May be related to stress, depression, anxiety, a head injury, or holding your head ...

  9. [Headache].

    PubMed

    Godin, O

    1976-01-01

    Headache is an alarm symptom, whether there is an organic disease (lesional headache) or a perturbation of one of the various functions of the head (functional headache). Lesional headaches follow a sinusitis or an arthrosis, or accompany a "temporal arteritis of Horton". Functional headaches include several varieties. 1. Trigemellar neuralgia. 2. Vascular algia originating from the basal arteries, the large cerebral venous sinuses or the branches of the external carotid. Among these are: a) headaches due to a dilatation of the internal wall, causing "Horton headache", migrain-like psychosomatic migraine and hormonal migraines (premenstrual, menstrual, menopausal or linked to the use of contraceptive pills); b) headaches caused by an angiospasm of the arteriole, which is the case in exposure to the cold, in traumatic headaches (malfunction of temporomandibular articulation, dry alveolitis), in psychosomatic angiospastic algias and in ethmoidal artery algias previously described by the author in 1949 (Godin's disease). 3. Headaches due to psychic hypertension. 4. Postconcussional psychogenic headaches. 5. Neurotic headaches. The author gives a detailed description of the subjective symptoms in each case, including localisation, form, intensity, duration course and associated phenomenons. This facilitates greatly the differential diagnosis and the choice of complementary examinations. Necessary biological investigations should be performed (e.g. hormonal balance). One should however avoid to increase the number of complementary examinations which would only delay treatment and would expose patients to somatisation. Furthermore, in each case drug treatment, periarterial infiltration technics of the temporal, internal frontal, facial, mastoid and occipital arteries are described. The necessity of questioning the patient at length and to listen to him to enable him to verbalise conscious conflicts is emphasized. A serious medicopsychological examination and a relaxation

  10. [Headache].

    PubMed

    Godin, O

    1976-03-01

    Headache is an alarm sympton, whether there is an organic disease (lesional headache) or a perturbation of one of the various functions of the head (functional headache). Lesional headaches follow a sinusitis or an arthrosis, or accompany a "temporal arteritis of Horton". Funstional headaches include several varieties. 1. Trigemellar neuralgia. 2.Vascular algi originating from the basal arteries, the large cerebral venous sinuses or the branches of the external carotid. Among these are: a) headaches due to a dilatation of the internal wall, causing "Horton headache", migraine-like psychosomatic migraine and hormonal migraines (premenstrual, menstrual, menopausal or linked to the use of contraceptive pills); b) headaches caused by an angiospasm of the arteriole, which is the case in exposure to the cold, in traumatic headaches (malfunction of temporomandibular articulation, dry alveolitis), in psychosomatic angiospastic algias and in ethmoidal artery algias preciously described by the author in 1949 (Godin's disease).3. Headaches due to psychic hypertension. 4. Postconcussional psychogenic headaches. 5. Neurotic headaches. The author gives a detailed description of the subjective symptoms in each case, including localisation, from, intensity, duration course and associated phenomenons. This facilitates greatly the differential diagnosis and the choice of complementary examinations. Necessary biological investigations should be performed (e.g. hormonal balance). One should however avoid to increase the number of complementary examination which would only delay treatement and would expose patients to somatisation. Furthermore, in each case drug treatment, periarterial infiltration technics of the temporal, internal frontal, facial, mastoid and occipital arteries are described. The necessity of questioning the patient at lenght and to listen to him to enable him to verbalise conscious conflicts is emphasized. A serious medicopsychlogical examination and a relaxation

  11. Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep in mind that children should not take aspirin. Aspirin can ... herbal health product for headache relief, keep in mind that these products aren't tested to be ...

  12. Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress, changes in sleep patterns, or even the weather. Getting Relief Most headaches will go away if ... or she will probably want to do a physical examination and get your medical history to help figure out what might ... Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart. ...

  13. Headaches.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J E

    1983-02-01

    Although classification can be difficult, determining the type of headache, such as tension, migraine or cluster, aids in the formulation of a therapeutic approach. Treatment involves regulation rather than cure. Acute and prophylactic pharmacotherapy and control of stress through behavior modification, relaxation training and biofeedback are methods of management. PMID:6829368

  14. Marsupialization and distal obliteration of a lumbosacral dural ectasia in a nonsyndromic, adult patient.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Lozen, Andrew; Doan, Ninh; Gelsomin, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Maiman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Dural ectasia is frequently associated with connective tissue disorders or inflammatory conditions. Presentation in a patient without known risk factors is rare. Moreover, the literature regarding the treatment options for symptomatic dural ectasia is controversial, variable, and limited. A 62-year-old female presents with intractable, postural headaches for years. A lumbar puncture revealed opening pressure 3 cm of water. A computed tomography myelogram of the spine demonstrated erosion of her sacrum due to a large lumbosacral dural ectasia. An initial surgery was attempted to reduce the size of the expansile dura, and reconstruct the dorsal sacrum with a titanium plate (Depuy Synthes, Westchester, PA, USA) to prevent recurrence of thecal sac dilatation. Her symptoms initially improved, but shortly thereafter recurred. A second surgery was then undertaken to obliterate the thecal sac distal to the S2 nerve roots. This could not be accomplished through simple ligation of the thecal sac circumferentially as the ventral dura was noted to be incompetent and attempts to develop an extradural tissue plane were unsuccessful. Consequently, an abundance of fibrin glue was injected into the thecal sac distal to S2, and the dural ectasia was marsupialized rostrally, effectively obliterating the distal thecal sac while further reducing the size of the expansile dura. This approach significantly improved her symptoms at 5 months follow-up. Treatment of dural ectasia is not well-defined and has been variable based on the underlying manifestations. We report a rare patient without risk factors who presented with significant lumbosacral dural ectasia. Moreover, we present a novel method to treat postural headaches secondary to dural ectasia, where the thecal sac is obliterated distal to the S2 nerve roots using an abundance of fibrin glue followed by marsupialization of the thecal sac rostally. This method may offer an effective therapy option as it serves to limit the expansile

  15. Treatment of Refractory Postdural Puncture Headache after Intrathecal Drug Delivery System Implantation with Epidural Blood Patch Procedures: A 20-Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Bendel, Markus A; Moeschler, Susan M; Qu, Wenchun; Hanley, Eugerie; Neuman, Stephanie A; Eldrige, Jason S; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2016-01-01

    A recent publication reported the incidence of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) in conjunction with intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) implantation to be nearly 23 percent. Many patients responded to conservative measures but a percentage needed invasive treatment with an epidural blood patch (EBP). There is limited data to describe the technical details, success rates, and complications associated with EBP in this population. This study aims to provide a retrospective report of EBP for patients suffering from PDPH related to IDDS implantation. A chart review established a cohort of patients that required EBP in relation to a PDPH after IDDS implantation. This cohort was evaluated for demographic data as well as details of the EBP including technical procedural data, success rates, and complications. All patients received a trial of conservative therapy. Standard sterile technique and skin preparation were utilized with no infectious complications. The EBP was placed below the level of the IDDS catheter in 94% of procedures. Fluoroscopy was utilized in each case. The mean EBP volume was 18.6 cc and median time of EBP was day 7 after implant. There were no complications associated with EBP. EBP appears to be an effective intervention in this subset of PDPH patients. PMID:27597897

  16. Treatment of Refractory Postdural Puncture Headache after Intrathecal Drug Delivery System Implantation with Epidural Blood Patch Procedures: A 20-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moeschler, Susan M.; Qu, Wenchun; Hanley, Eugerie; Neuman, Stephanie A.; Eldrige, Jason S.; Hoelzer, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    A recent publication reported the incidence of postdural puncture headache (PDPH) in conjunction with intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) implantation to be nearly 23 percent. Many patients responded to conservative measures but a percentage needed invasive treatment with an epidural blood patch (EBP). There is limited data to describe the technical details, success rates, and complications associated with EBP in this population. This study aims to provide a retrospective report of EBP for patients suffering from PDPH related to IDDS implantation. A chart review established a cohort of patients that required EBP in relation to a PDPH after IDDS implantation. This cohort was evaluated for demographic data as well as details of the EBP including technical procedural data, success rates, and complications. All patients received a trial of conservative therapy. Standard sterile technique and skin preparation were utilized with no infectious complications. The EBP was placed below the level of the IDDS catheter in 94% of procedures. Fluoroscopy was utilized in each case. The mean EBP volume was 18.6 cc and median time of EBP was day 7 after implant. There were no complications associated with EBP. EBP appears to be an effective intervention in this subset of PDPH patients. PMID:27597897

  17. Successful treatment of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak headache with fluoroscopically guided epidural blood patch: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Salim M; Fattouh, Maher; Dews, Teresa; Kapural, Leonardo; Malak, Osama; Mekhail, Nagy

    2003-12-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a rare clinical entity that may result in disabling headaches. It occurs as a result of dural defects, and the initial symptoms resemble those of postdural puncture headache. However, the positional headache can later evolve into a persistent chronic daily headache. The diagnosis of spontaneous CSF leak can be very challenging, but increasing awareness and improved diagnostic techniques are yielding ever more cases. When conservative management fails, the pain management clinician is called upon to administer an epidural blood patch. The success of this technique is dependent upon accurate diagnosis of the site of leakage and targeted epidural administration of the blood patch to this area. In this report, we describe four consecutive cases that were referred to our pain management department over an 18-month period and were successfully treated with site-directed epidural blood patches. PMID:14750917

  18. The Wiley Spinal Catheter-Over-Needle System for Continuous Spinal Anesthesia: A Case Series of 5 Cesarean Deliveries Complicated by Paresthesias and Headaches.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Christine P; Carvalho, Brendan; Riley, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    Intrathecal catheter devices using a catheter-over-needle design and softer flexible material have been introduced to clinical practice with the aim of reducing some of the complications such as postdural puncture headaches and paresthesias seen with previous versions of intrathecal catheters. We present a case series of 5 cesarean deliveries using the Wiley Spinal intrathecal system (Epimed, Johnstown, New York), which was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. The intrathecal catheter system consists of a flexible 23-gauge intrathecal cannula over a 27-gauge pencil-point spinal needle. The placement of the intrathecal catheter was successful in all 5 cases; however, paresthesias in 3 cases and postdural puncture headaches in 2 cases complicated the placement and use of the device. Although the unique catheter-over-needle design facilitates the use of smaller-gauge spinal needles for dural puncture and larger-gauge catheters for medication administration, this case series using the Wiley Spinal suggests that paresthesias and postdural puncture headaches may still limit its widespread utilization. Future studies are needed to determine the true incidence of complications and to determine the role of continuous spinal anesthesia in the obstetric population. PMID:26909488

  19. Lumbar puncture-related cerebrospinal fluid leakage on magnetic resonance myelography: is it a clinically significant finding?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) due to excessive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a well-known complication of lumbar puncture. Although various factors, especially the type of spinal needle, have been demonstrated to be associated with PDPH, the clinical implications of CSF leakage detected on magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) images remain unclear. The objective of this case–control study was to evaluate the association between radiologically visualized CSF leakage and PDPH. Methods Clinical data including patients’ age and gender, types of spinal needle, duration of bed rest, interval between lumbar puncture procedures and MRM studies, and incidence of PDPH were compared between patients who were radiologically-positive and -negative for CSF leakage. Results Of the 22 patients with definite CSF leakage on MRM images, most were asymptomatic (86%, 19/22). The remaining three patients, who were suffering from PDPH, only complained of headaches and were treated conservatively. In a review of patients’ clinical data, there were no significant differences in any parameter including the incidence of PDPH between the 22 patients who were radiologically-positive for CSF leakage and the 31 radiologically-negative patients. Conclusion The significance of radiologically visualized CSF leakage should not be overestimated, as most such incidents are not associated with PDPH and do not require any treatment. PMID:24160550

  20. Characterization of a mouse model of headache.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongyue; Ren, Lynn; Qiu, Chang-Shen; Liu, Ping; Peterson, Jonathan; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Migraine and other primary headache disorders affect a large population and cause debilitating pain. Establishing animal models that display behavioral correlates of long-lasting and ongoing headache, the most common and disabling symptom of migraine, is vital for the elucidation of disease mechanisms and identification of drug targets. We have developed a mouse model of headache, using dural application of capsaicin along with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (IScap) to simulate the induction of a headache episode. This elicited intermittent head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Interestingly, dural application of IScap preferentially induced FOS protein expression in the excitatory but not inhibitory cervical/medullary dorsal horn neurons. The duration of IScap-induced behavior and the number of FOS-positive neurons correlated positively in individual mice; both were reduced to the control level by the pretreatment of antimigraine drug sumatriptan. Dural application of CGRP(8-37), the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, also effectively blocked IScap-induced behavior, which suggests that the release of endogenous CGRP in the dura is necessary for IScap-induced nociception. These data suggest that dural IScap-induced nocifensive behavior in mice may be mechanistically related to the ongoing headache in humans. In addition, dural application of IScap increased resting time in female mice. Taken together, we present the first detailed study using dural application of IScap in mice. This headache model can be applied to genetically modified mice to facilitate research on the mechanisms and therapeutic targets for migraine headache. PMID:27058678

  1. Effects of Voluntary Locomotion and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide on the Dynamics of Single Dural Vessels in Awake Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The dura mater is a vascularized membrane surrounding the brain and is heavily innervated by sensory nerves. Our knowledge of the dural vasculature has been limited to pathological conditions, such as headaches, but little is known about the dural blood flow regulation during behavior. To better understand the dynamics of dural vessels during behavior, we used two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) to measure the diameter changes of single dural and pial vessels in the awake mouse during voluntary locomotion. Surprisingly, we found that voluntary locomotion drove the constriction of dural vessels, and the dynamics of these constrictions could be captured with a linear convolution model. Dural vessel constrictions did not mirror the large increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) during locomotion, indicating that dural vessel constriction was not caused passively by compression. To study how behaviorally driven dynamics of dural vessels might be altered in pathological states, we injected the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which induces headache in humans. CGRP dilated dural, but not pial, vessels and significantly reduced spontaneous locomotion but did not block locomotion-induced constrictions in dural vessels. Sumatriptan, a drug commonly used to treat headaches, blocked the vascular and behavioral the effects of CGRP. These findings suggest that, in the awake animal, the diameters of dural vessels are regulated dynamically during behavior and during drug-induced pathological states. SIGNIFICANT STATEMENT The vasculature of the dura has been implicated in the pathophysiology of headaches, but how individual dural vessels respond during behavior, both under normal conditions and after treatment with the headache-inducing peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is poorly understood. To address these issues, we imaged individual dural vessels in awake mice and found that dural vessels constricted during voluntary locomotion, and

  2. The effect of Valsalva maneuver in attenuating skin puncture pain during spinal anesthesia: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Sujeet Kumar Singh; Gupta, Devendra; Agarwal, Anil; Dhirraj, Sanjay; Khuba, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background Valsalva maneuver reduces pain by activating sinoaortic baroreceptor reflex arc. We planned this study to evaluate the role of valsalva in attenuating spinal needle-puncture pain. Methods Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I and II enrolled patients undergoing elective surgery were randomized into 3 groups of 30 each. Group I (Control): didn't blow; group II (Distraction): patients blew into rubber tube; Group III (Valsalva): blew into sphygmomanometer tube and raise mercury column up to 30 mmHg for at least 20 seconds. During above procedures, spinal puncture was performed with 25-gauge spinal needle. Results Eighty-two patient data were analyzed. Incidence of spinal puncture pain was reduced to 10% (3 of 27) in Valsalva group as compared to 100% (28 of 28 in control group and 27 of 27 in Distraction group) observed in other two groups (P < 0.05). Severity of lumbar puncture pain as assessed by visual analog scale (0−10; where 0 is no pain and 10 is the worst imaginable pain) presented as Median (Interquartile range) were significantly reduced in the Valsalva group (0.0 [0.0] as compared to other 2 groups 2.0 [0.0] in the Distraction group and 3.0 [0.8] in Control group) (P < 0.05). Regarding time taken by CSF to fill spinal needle hub, there was no difference among the three groups (P > 0.05). None patient of all groups had post dural puncture headache (P > 0.05). Conclusions Valsalva can be performed routinely in ASA I and II patients undergoing spinal anesthesia as it is safe, painless and non-pharmacological method of pain attenuation. PMID:26885298

  3. [Headache disorders].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Takao; Kikui, Shoji

    2013-09-01

    Primary headache disorders such as migraine, tension-type headache, and cluster headache are prevalent and disabling neurological disorders. Although most headache disorders are largely treatable, they are under-recognized, under-diagnosed, and under-treated. Many headache sufferers in Japan do not receive appropriate and effective health care; hence, the illness, which should be relieved, persists and acts as an individual and societal burden. One of the barriers most responsible for this is poor awareness of the disorders. For lifting the burden, health care must be improved. Education is an essential way to resolve these issues at multiple levels. We have a Japanese version of the international headache classification and diagnostic criteria II (ICHD-II) and guidelines for the management of chronic headaches. Utilization of these resources is key for the improvement of headache management in our country. Not only neurologists, but also neurosurgeons and other medical specialists are participating in headache care in Japan. The Japanese Headache Society and the Japanese Society for Neurology should play major roles in health care service, education programs, as well as clinical and basic research for headache disorders. The road map for realizing our aim on headache treatment is as follows: (1) increase the number of units concerning headache in lectures for medical students, implement training programs for residents and neurologists, and offer continuous medical educations for physicians and neurologists; (2) secure more funding for headache research; (3) propagate medical care for headache in primary care settings and regional fundamental hospitals; (4) reform the health care system for headache and incentivize appropriate compensation for headache care in public health insurance; and (5) spread appropriate information on medical and socio-ethical issues related to headache for the sufferers and citizens. The authors expect that many neurologists have an

  4. Secondary Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  5. Headache (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Headaches are usually caused by either muscle tension, vascular problems, or both. Migraines are vascular in origin, ... disturbances, loss of peripheral vision, and fatigue. Most headaches can be relieved or ameliorated by over-the- ...

  6. Secondary Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients American Headache & Migraine Association Articles Patient Handouts Kids Help Patient to Patient Podcasts for Patients Videos Links Find a Healthcare Professional Other Websites & Information ...

  7. Emergency airway puncture

    MedlinePlus

    Emergency airway puncture is the placement of a hollow needle through the throat into the airway. It ... Emergency airway puncture is done in an emergency situation, when someone is choking and all other efforts ...

  8. Dural-Based Cavernoma of the Posterior Cranial Fossa Mimicking a Meningioma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aurora S; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Tubbs, R. Shane; Page, Jeni; Chamiraju, Parthasarathi; Tkachenko, Lara; Rostad, Steven; Newell, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous angiomas usually occur in the parenchyma of both the supra and infratentorial compartments. At times, they can both clinically and radiologically mimic other dural-based lesions. We present a case of a patient with chronic occipital headaches, initially thought to have a meningioma, but proven to be a cavernoma with histological analysis. PMID:27190725

  9. Headaches - danger signs

    MedlinePlus

    Migraine headache - danger signs; Tension headache - danger signs; Cluster headache - danger signs; Vascular headache - danger signs ... and bleeding in the brain can cause a headache. These problems include: Abnormal connection between the arteries ...

  10. Tension headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... headaches occur when neck and scalp muscles become tense, or contract. The muscle contractions can be a ... and practice stress management . Some people find relaxation exercises or meditation helpful. Biofeedback may help you improve ...

  11. Dural port therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, John A.; Blum, Charles L.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Dural port therapy (DPT) is a chiropractic procedure which can be used effectively with Sacro-Occipital Technique (SOT) procedures and which uses the sacrum as a lever to influence and balance the spine and cranium by way of the meningeal system. Discussion Rationale and research is presented to explain the basis behind DPT's method of affecting the craniospinal system and its relationship to the meninges. Though the procedure can be used with most conditions, DPT appears to be safe to use with osteoporotic conditions, fractured vertebrae, and other conditions where a “thrust” to the spine may be contraindicated. Basic methods of using DPT are presented along with alternative methods which can be applied when the basic methods are not sufficient. Conclusion DPT reduces sacral, spinal, and cranial dura meningeal tension, lesions, torque and stress, as well as dural sleeve vasomotor interference. The possibility that the doctor can influence the nervous system directly in such a powerful manner warrants further investigation. PMID:19674561

  12. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body released during an allergic response) or serotonin (chemical made by nerve cells). A problem in a small area at the base of the brain called the hypothalamus may be involved. More men than women are affected. The headaches can occur at any ...

  13. National Headache Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Headache War Veterans Health Resource Initiative National Headache Foundation Brochures For Professionals Learn About CAQ Get More ... 45 years, our mission at the National Headache Foundation has been to further awareness of headache and ...

  14. Allergies and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... vasoactive or neuroactive amino acids such as tyramine , dopamine, phenylethylamine or monosodium glutamate that can trigger a ... Headache Fact Sheets Tags: allergy , allergy and headache , dopamine , headache , migraine , sinus headache , tyramine More Posts ← Tension- ...

  15. Traumatic Dural Venous Sinus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Sub; Jung, Seung-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Jae-Hyoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The importance of traumatic dural venous sinus injury lies in the probability of massive blood loss at the time of trauma or emergency operation resulting in a high mortality rate during the perioperative period. We considered the appropriate methods of treatment that are most essential in the overall management of traumatic dural venous sinus injuries. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of all cases involving patients with dural venous sinus injury who presented to our hospital between January 1999 and December 2014. Results Between January 1999 and December 2014, 20 patients with a dural venous sinus injury out of the 1,200 patients with severe head injuries who had been operated upon in our clinic were reviewed retrospectively. There were 17 male and 3 female patients. In 11 out of the 13 patients with a linear skull fracture crossing the dural venous sinus, massive blood loss from the injured sinus wall could be controlled by simple digital pressure using Gelfoam. All 5 patients with a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the venous sinus developed massive sinus bleeding that could not be controlled by simple digital pressure. Conclusion When there is a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the dural venous sinus or a depressed skull fracture penetrating the sinus, the surgeon should be prepared for the possibility of potentially fatal venous sinus injury, even in the absence of a hematoma. PMID:27169076

  16. Acoustic puncture assist device: A novel technique to identify the epidural space

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mokaddam, MA; Al-Harbi, MK; El-Jandali, ST; Al-Zahrani, TA

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) is designed to detect and signal the loss of resistance during the epidural procedure. We aimed to evaluate this device in terms of successful identification of the epidural space and the incidence of accidental dural puncture. Patients and Methods: Following Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent obtained from all patients, 200 adult patients (107 males) American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III who underwent lower limb orthopedic surgery under lumbar epidural anesthesia using APAD were enrolled in the study. APAD system was connected to the epidural needle using normal saline prefilled extension tube. Numbers of successful epidural attempts and accidental dural tap were documented. Results: The mean values of the depth of epidural space and the time to perform epidural puncture were 5.8 ± 1.0 cm and 3.3 ± 1.4 min, respectively. In 63% of patients, epidural puncture was successful from the first attempt and in 1% it was successful from the fourth attempt. Epidural anesthesia by APAD was successful in 198 cases (99 %). Dural tap occurred in 2 cases (1%). Conclusions: Using APAD, the success of identifying the epidural space was high and reliable. PMID:27051369

  17. pH-evoked dural afferent signaling is mediated by ASIC3 and is sensitized by mast cell mediators

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jin; Wei, Xiaomei; Bischoff, Christina; Edelmayer, Rebecca M.; Dussor, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have shown that decreased meningeal pH activates dural afferents via opening of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) suggesting one pathophysiological mechanism for the generation of headaches. The studies described here further examined the ASIC subtype mediating pH-induced dural-afferent activation and examined whether sensitization influences pH responses. Objective Given the potential importance of meningeal mast cells to headache, the goal of this study was to evaluate dural afferent responses to pH following sensitization with mast cell mediators. Methods Cutaneous allodynia was measured in rats following stimulation of the dura with decreased pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators. Trigeminal ganglion neurons retrogradely-labeled from the dura were stained with an ASIC3 antibody using immunohistochemistry. Currents and action potentials evoked by changes in pH alone or in combination with mast cell mediators were measured in retrogradely-labeled dural afferents using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Results pH-sensitive dural afferents generated currents in response to the ASIC3 activator 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ), approximately 80% of these neurons express ASIC3 protein, and pH-evoked behavioral responses were inhibited by the ASIC3 blocker APETx2. Following exposure to mast cell mediators, dural afferents exhibited increased pH-evoked excitability and cutaneous allodynia was observed at higher pH than with pH stimuli alone. Conclusion These data indicate that the predominant ASIC subtype responding to decreased meningeal pH is ASIC3. Additionally, they demonstrate that in the presence of inflammation, dural afferents respond to even smaller decreases in pH providing further support for the ability of small pH changes within the meninges to initiate afferent input leading to headache. PMID:23808707

  18. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - tension - self- ...

  19. Managing tension headaches at home

    MedlinePlus

    Tension-type headache - self-care; Muscle contraction headache - self-care; Headache - benign - self-care; Headache - tension- self-care; Chronic headaches - tension - self-care; Rebound headaches - ...

  20. Chronic daily headaches

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Fayyaz; Parthasarathy, Rajsrinivas; Khalil, Modar

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Daily Headache is a descriptive term that includes disorders with headaches on more days than not and affects 4% of the general population. The condition has a debilitating effect on individuals and society through direct cost to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. To successfully manage chronic daily headache syndromes it is important to exclude secondary causes with comprehensive history and relevant investigations; identify risk factors that predict its development and recognise its sub-types to appropriately manage the condition. Chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache and medication overuse headache accounts for the vast majority of chronic daily headaches. The scope of this article is to review the primary headache disorders. Secondary headaches are not discussed except medication overuse headache that often accompanies primary headache disorders. The article critically reviews the literature on the current understanding of daily headache disorders focusing in particular on recent developments in the treatment of frequent headaches. PMID:23024563

  1. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension secondary to anterior thoracic osteophyte: Resolution after primary dural repair via posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Veeravagu, Anand; Gupta, Gaurav; Jiang, Bowen; Berta, Scott C.; Mindea, Stefan A.; Chang, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon syndrome widely attributed to CSF hypovolemia, typically secondary to spontaneous CSF leak. Although commonly associated with postural headache and variable neurological symptoms, one of the most severe consequences of SIH is bilateral subdural hematomas with resultant neurological deterioration. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present the case of a patient diagnosed with SIH secondary to an anteriorly positioned thoracic osteophyte with resultant dural disruption, who after multiple attempts at nonsurgical management developed bilateral subdural hematomas necessitating emergent surgical intervention. The patient underwent a unilateral posterior repair of his osteophyte with successful anterior decompression. At 36 months follow up, the patient reported completely resolved headaches with no focal neurological deficits. DISCUSSION We outline our posterior approach to repair of the dural defect and review the management algorithm for the treatment of patients with SIH. We also examine the current hypotheses as to the origin, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. CONCLUSION A posterior approach was utilized to repair the dural defect caused by an anterior thoracic osteophyte in a patient with severe SIH complicated by bilateral subdural hematomas. This approach minimizes morbidity compared to an anterior approach and allowed for removal of the osteophyte and repair of the dural defect. PMID:23108168

  2. Recurrent unilateral headache associated with SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Jun; Ouma, Shinji; Fukae, Jiro; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman was admitted with recurrent episodes of right frontal headache. Head magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed extensive thickening and enhancement of the right frontal dura, muscle and fascia, as well as abnormal signal intensity and enhancement of bone marrow at the lesions. Synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis osteomyelitis (SAPHO) syndrome was diagnosed based on the patient's 8-year history of treatment of palmoplantar pustulosis and abnormal accumulations in the right temporal, sternum, and left medial clavicula on bone scintigraphy. SAPHO syndrome may be associated with skull lesions, which can contribute to the onset of repeated headache or dural thickening, thus these symptoms should be recognized as manifestations of this syndrome. PMID:25030573

  3. Headaches (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... migraines. Migraines Often triggered by things like stress, sleep deprivation, and menstruation, migraine headaches can cause the following ... your child headache following a head injury or loss of consciousness headache accompanied by seizures visual changes ...

  4. [Headache can be caused by spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lasse Berg; Bjarkam, Carsten Reidies

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon condition associated with postural headache, nausea and dizziness. It is believed to be secondary to a dural tear with resultant cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. This is a case report of a pregnant woman (gestational age 31 weeks) who contacted an obstetric department because of severe headache. Pre-eclamp-sia was suspected, but not found. An MRI showed a CSF leak at C1-C2 level and intracranial signs of SIH. The woman was treated with an autologous blood patch and recovered quickly. Focus on subjective symptoms and MRI findings seem to be important in the diagnostic procedure of SIH. PMID:25352082

  5. Cuts and puncture wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... cuts and puncture wounds can be treated at home. Take the following steps. FOR MINOR CUTS Wash your hands with soap or antibacterial ... and scissors safely. Make sure you and your child are up to date on vaccinations . A tetanus vaccine is generally recommended every 10 ... Snake bite Minor cut - first aid Sewing a wound closed - series ...

  6. Looking at "thunderclap headache" differently? Circa 2016.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, K

    2016-01-01

    The term "thunderclap headache" (TCH) was first coined in 1986 by Day and Raskin to describe headache that was the presenting feature of an underlying unruptured cerebral aneurysm. The term is now well established to describe the abrupt onset headache seen with many other conditions and is also now included in The International Classification of Headache Disorders 3(rd) edition beta version rubric 4.4. An essential to label an acute headache as "TCH" and differentiate it from other "sudden onset, severe headaches" is the arbitrary time frame of 1 min from onset to peak intensity for "TCH." What happens in practice, however, is that even those "sudden onset, severe headaches" that do not strictly fulfill the definition criteria are also labeled as "TCH" and investigated with the same speed and in the same sequence and managed based on the underlying cause. This article begins by questioning the validity and usefulness of this "one minute" arbitrary time frame to define "TCH," particularly since this time frame is very difficult to assess in practice and is usually done on a presumptive subjective basis. The article concludes with suggestions for modification of the current investigation protocol for this emergency headache scenario. This proposal for "a change in practice methodology" is essentially based on (1) the fact that in the last two decades, we now have evidence for many more entities other than just subarachnoid hemorrhage that can present as "TCH" or "sudden onset, severe headache" and (2) the evidence from literature which shows that advances in imaging technology using higher magnet strength, better contrast, and newer acquisition sequences will result in a better diagnostic yield. It is therefore time now, in our opinion, to discard current theoretical time frames, use self-explanatory terminologies with practical implications, and move from "lumbar puncture (LP) first" to "LP last!" PMID:27570377

  7. Headache in divers.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, W P; Ott, M C

    2001-03-01

    The increasing popularity of scuba diving has added a new category to the differential diagnosis of headache. Headache in divers, while uncommon and generally benign, can occasionally signify serious consequences of hyperbaric exposure such as arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, and otic or paranasal sinus barotrauma. Inadequate ventilation of compressed gases can lead to carbon dioxide accumulation, cerebral vasodilatation, and headache. Other types of headache encountered in divers include exertional headache, cold stimulus headache, migraine, tension-type headache, acute traumatic headache, cervicogenic headache, carbon monoxide poisoning headache, and headache associated with envenomation. Correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment require a careful history and neurologic examination as well as an understanding of the unique physiologic stresses of the subaquatic environment. PMID:11264683

  8. Headaches and exercise.

    PubMed

    McCrory, P

    2000-09-01

    Exercise-related headache is one of the most common medical problems affecting the modern-day athlete. Despite the high prevalence of headache in community populations, the epidemiology of sports-related headache is unclear. In certain collision sports, up to 50% of athletes report regular headaches as a consequence of their athletic participation. The classification of the different types of sport-related headache by the International Headache Society (IHS) and in previously published articles does not adequately encompass the clinical problem faced by team physicians. Confusion exists where terms such as 'effort headache' and 'exertional headache' may be used to describe similar entities. In this review, the specific headache entities discussed include benign exertional headache, effort headache, acute post-traumatic headache and cervicogenic headache. For the sports physician, an understanding of the variety of specific headache syndromes that occur with particular sports is necessary for everyday clinical practice. This article reviews the common exercise-related headache syndromes and attempts to provide a framework for their overall management. Team physicians also need to be cognisant that many of the standard preparations used to treat headaches may be banned drugs under International Olympic Committee (IOC) rules. PMID:10999425

  9. Tinnitus and Headache

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, Berthold; Hund, Verena; Busch, Volker; Jürgens, Tim P.; Lainez, Jose-Miguel; Landgrebe, Michael; Schecklmann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tinnitus and headache are frequent disorders. Here, we aimed to investigate whether the occurrence of headache among tinnitus patients is purely coincidental or whether tinnitus and headache are pathophysiologically linked. We investigated a large sample of patients with tinnitus and headache to estimate prevalence rates of different headache forms, to determine the relationship between tinnitus laterality and headache laterality, and to explore the relationship between tinnitus and headache over time. Method. Patients who presented at a tertiary referral center because of tinnitus and reported comorbid headache were asked to complete validated questionnaires to determine the prevalence of migraine and tension-type headache and to assess tinnitus severity. In addition, several questions about the relationship between headache and tinnitus were asked. Results. Datasets of 193 patients with tinnitus and headache were analysed. 44.6% suffered from migraine, 13% from tension-type headache, and 5.7% from both. Headache laterality was significantly related to tinnitus laterality and in the majority of patients fluctuations in symptom severity of tinnitus and headache were interrelated. Conclusion. These findings suggest a significant relationship between tinnitus and headache laterality and symptom interaction over time and argue against a purely coincidental cooccurrence of tinnitus and headache. Both disorders may be linked by common pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:26583133

  10. [Headache and migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Slomke, M A; Limmroth, V

    2007-09-01

    Headaches are one of the most common disorders and symptoms in daily medical practice. There has been dramatic progress of knowledge in the fields of epidemiology, pathophysiology, acute treatment, and preventive therapy over the past 100 years. Triptans have been the breakthrough in the treatment of acute migraine attacks. Beta blockers, calcium antagonists, and neuromodulators are available for preventive migraine therapy. Treatment for chronic tension headache is still unsatisfying. Cluster headache is part of the group of trigemino-autonomic headaches. Headache from medication overuse plays an increasingly important role. New medical care structures such as integrated headache care provide better support for patients with chronic headache disorders. PMID:17687534

  11. Sleep and primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Aguggia, Marco; Cavallini, M; Divito, N; Ferrero, M; Lentini, A; Montano, V; Tinebra, M C; Saracco, M G; Valfrè, W

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between sleep and primary headaches has been known for over a century, particularly for headaches occurring during the night or early morning. Migraine, tension-tyre headache, and cluster headache may cause sleep fragmentation, insomnia, and hypersomnia, causing considerable social and economical costs and several familial problems. By contrast, sleep disorders may themselves trigger headache attacks. Finally, headaches and sleep disorders can also be symptoms of other underlying pathologies. Despite this background, there is still no clarity about the mechanism that links these two entities and their interdependence remains to be defined. Patients with primary headache should undergo a careful assessment of sleep habits. PMID:21533713

  12. Sleep-related headaches.

    PubMed

    Rains, Jeanetta C; Poceta, J Steven

    2012-11-01

    Irrespective of diagnosis, chronic daily, morning, or "awakening" headache patterns are soft signs of a sleep disorder. Sleep apnea headache may emerge de novo or may present as an exacerbation of cluster, migraine, tension-type, or other headache. Insomnia is the most prevalent sleep disorder in chronic migraine and tension-type headache, and increases risk for depression and anxiety. Sleep disturbance (e.g., sleep loss, oversleeping, schedule shift) is an acute headache trigger for migraine and tension-type headache. Snoring and sleep disturbance are independent risk factors for progression from episodic to chronic headache. PMID:23099138

  13. Other primary headaches

    PubMed Central

    Bahra, Anish

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Other Primary Headaches’ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ‘alarm clock headache’, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review. PMID:23024566

  14. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors can antagonize neurogenic and calcitonin gene-related peptide induced dilation of dural meningeal vessels

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, S; Williamson, D J; Kaube, H; Goadsby, P J

    2002-01-01

    The detailed pathophysiology of migraine is beginning to be understood and is likely to involve activation of trigeminovascular afferents. Clinically effective anti-migraine compounds are believed to have actions that include peripheral inhibition of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from trigeminal neurones, or preventing dural vessel dilation, or both. CGRP antagonists can block both neurogenic and CGRP-induced dural vessel dilation. Nitric oxide (NO) can induce headache in migraine patients and often triggers a delayed migraine. The initial headache is thought to be caused via a direct action of the NO–cGMP pathway that causes vasodilation by vascular smooth muscle relaxation, while the delayed headache is likely to be a result of triggering trigeminovascular activation. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors are effective in the treatment of acute migraine. The present studies used intravital microscopy to examine the effects of specific NOS inhibitors on neurogenic dural vasodilation (NDV) and CGRP-induced dilation. The non-specific and neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitors were able to partially inhibit NDV, while the non-specific and endothelial NOS (eNOS) inhibitors were able to partially inhibit the CGRP induced dilation. There was no effect of the inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor. The data suggest that the delayed headache response triggered by NO donors in humans may be due, in part, to increased nNOS activity in the trigeminal system that causes CGRP release and dural vessel dilation. Further, eNOS activity in the endothelium causes NO production and smooth muscle relaxation by direct activation of the NO–cGMP pathway, and may be involved in the initial headache response. PMID:12183331

  15. Rizatriptan has central antinociceptive effects against durally evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Cumberbatch, M J; Hill, R G; Hargreaves, R J

    1997-06-01

    The 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist rizatriptan constricts intracranial, extracerebral blood vessels, inhibits neurogenic vasodilation and extravasation in the meninges and is effective clinically against migraine. The present study has investigated whether rizatriptan may also have activity at 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors within the central nervous system (CNS) that contributes to its antimigraine effects. Action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the dura-mater were recorded extracellularly from single neurones in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis in anaesthetized rats. Rizatriptan dose dependently inhibited these nociceptive dural responses by up to 63 +/- 9% after 3 mg/kg, i.v. Rizatriptan therefore has central activity which may contribute to its efficacy against migraine headache. PMID:9203565

  16. [Headache and sleep disorders].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Masayuki; Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Headache and sleep problems are both some of the most commonly reported symptoms in clinical practice. There is a clear association between chronic headache and sleep disorders, especially headaches occurring during the night or early morning. Identification of sleep problems in chronic headache patients is worthwhile because treatment of sleep disorders among chronic headache patients may be followed by improve of the headache. Morning headache has been recognised as an obstructive sleep apnoea related symptom. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure usually reduced headache, however, we often encounter obstructive sleep apnoea patients who present various characteristics of morning headache that often do not fulfil the criteria for "sleep apnoea headache" according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders: 2nd edition (ICHD-2) criteria. The pathophysiologic background for a relation between obstructive sleep apnoea and morning headache is multifactorial. We should also be noted that tension-type headache and migraine might be coexisted in obstructive sleep apnoea patients. In addition, we review the relationship between migraine and sleep disorders such as restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy and parasomnia (dream enacting behaviour) including our studies. PMID:25672689

  17. Headaches and Migraines: Understanding Headaches, From Mild to Migraine

    MedlinePlus

    ... not all headaches are the same. From mild tension headaches to crippling migraines, there are steps you ... The most common type of headache is a tension headache. These usually are due to tight muscles ...

  18. Ice Pick Headache.

    PubMed

    Chua, Abigail L; Nahas, Stephanie

    2016-05-01

    Ice pick headache, also called idiopathic or primary stabbing headache, is a unique headache type associated with ultra-brief stabs of pain, most commonly in the frontal or temporal area. It occurs predominantly in women and is estimated to affect 2-35 % of the population. Unlike other headache types of short duration, such as short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT), ice pick headache is not associated with any cranial autonomic symptoms but has been known to occur with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and dizziness. It exists in two forms: primary and secondary, with examples of secondary causes being herpes zoster meningoencephalitis, meningiomas, stroke, and multiple sclerosis. Ice pick headache is one of the "indomethacin responsive headaches," but up to 35 % of patients fail to show significant benefit with that treatment. Other treatment options include gabapentin, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, melatonin, and external hand warming. PMID:27038969

  19. American Headache Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marriott Camelback Inn READ MORE Jan 20 2017 International Headache Academy Los Angeles, CA , UCLA Meyer & Renee ... Symposium JW Marriott Camelback Inn Jan 20 2017 International Headache Academy UCLA Meyer & Renee Luskin Conference Center ...

  20. Headache Sufferers' Diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... of sensitivities (for example, people who find red wine to be a headache trigger often find chocolate ... headaches from alcohol . Others react mostly to red wine (especially Chianti), which is a sensitivity to chemicals, ...

  1. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI. PMID:26549687

  2. [Pathophysiology of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Donnet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of cluster headache is partially unknown. Three areas are involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache: the trigeminal nociceptive pathways, the autonomic system and the hypothalamus. The cluster headache attack involves activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. A dysfunction located in posterior hypothalamic gray matter is probably pivotal in the process. There is a probable association between smoke exposure, a possible genetic predisposition and the development of cluster headache. PMID:26470883

  3. New Classification of Headache

    PubMed Central

    Gawel, Marek J.

    1992-01-01

    The Headache Classification Committee of the International Headache Society has developed a new classification system for headache, cranial neuralgia, and facial pain. The value of the classification for the practising clinician is that it forces him or her to take a more careful history in order to determine the nature of the headache. This article reviews the classification system and gives examples of case histories and subsequent diagnoses. PMID:21221276

  4. Managing Chronic Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Forde, Grace; Duarte, Robert A; Rosen, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Headaches are a very common disorder, more common than asthma and diabetes combined. Migraine is the most common headache disorder, but it remains underdiagnosed and therefore undertreated. The treatment of migraines is divided into acute and prophylaxis. Patients who are experiencing 8 or more headaches a month or those who experience disability with their headaches as determined by the Migraine Disability Assistance Score or MIDAS should be placed on prophylaxis. PMID:26614723

  5. Headache management: pharmacological approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Alex J; Sturrock, Aaron; Davies, Brendan; Matharu, Manjit

    2015-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common conditions presenting to the neurology clinic, yet a significant proportion of these patients are unsatisfied by their clinic experience. Headache can be extremely disabling; effective treatment is not only essential for patients but is rewarding for the physician. In this first of two parts review of headache, we provide an overview of headache management, emerging therapeutic strategies and an accessible interpretation of clinical guidelines to assist the busy neurologist. PMID:26141299

  6. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Carratala, C.; Gea, J. G.; Aguar, M. C.; Grau, S.; Espadaler-Medina, J. M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  7. Methacholine induced headache.

    PubMed

    Carratala, C; Gea, J G; Aguar, M C; Grau, S; Espadaler-Medina, J M; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    A lung function technician developed episodes of headache, probably related to the use of methacholine. The headache disappeared with breathing 100% oxygen. Cholinergic agents are known to induce headaches but the mechanism remains unclear. Vascular factors could be implicated. PMID:7660351

  8. Primary dural non-hodgkin's lymphoma mimicking meningioma: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kudrimoti, Jyoti K; Gaikwad, Manish J; Puranik, Shaila C; Chugh, Ashish P

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old immunocompetent female presented with headache, vomiting and diminished unilateral vision. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were suggestive of high-grade meningioma. Neurological examination and routine hematological parameters were within normal limits. Craniotomy was performed; the tumor was arising from the dura mater, which was completely resected. Hematoxylin and eosin showed lesion comprising a tumor mass with monomorphic population of tumor cells arranged in sheets and small follicles. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for leukocyte common antigen and CD20 and immunonegative for glial fibrillary acid protein, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin, CD3 and CD30. Rest of the body scan was normal. A diagnosis of primary dural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was made. We report this exceedingly rare case of primary dural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which mimicked clinically and radiologically as meningioma. PMID:26458614

  9. Hijab (headscarf) headache.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Huma N; Solomon, Glen D

    2015-03-01

    Hijab (headscarf) headache is well known among wearers and is a common topic of discussion. It has never previously been reported in the medical literature. Five women described bilateral headache either prompted by or worsened by donning the hijab, or headscarf. The headache always resolved soon after removal of the headscarf. Hijab headache may also be alleviated by minimal modifications in style while allowing women to maintain their moral conviction. It likely represents an extracranial etiology of headache, and recognition may prevent unnecessary evaluation and suffering in hijab wearers. PMID:25711501

  10. Dural arteriovenous fistula discovered in patient presenting with recent head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Said, Sarmad; Nunez, Angelica; Quansah, Raphael; Khalillullah, Sayeed; Hernandez, German T.

    2013-01-01

    Patient Male, 32 Final Diagnosis: Dural arterio-venous fistula Symptoms: Eye redness • post-trauma headache • tinnitus Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Fistula embolization Specialty: Neurology Objective: Mistake in diagnosis Background: A dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), is an abnormal direct connection (fistula) between a meningeal artery and a meningeal vein or dural venous sinus. The pathogenesis of DAVF still remains unclear. Sinus thrombosis, head trauma, chronic central nervous system, hypercoagulable state, surgery, and hormonal influence are the pre-disposing factors that initiate this disease. The symptoms experienced by the patient will depend on the location of the fistula. Case Report: Thirty-two year old Hispanic male who presented one day after a rear ended motor vehicle collision (MVC) with a severe throbbing headache in the left parietal region, left eye redness but no retro-orbital pain and tinnitus in the left ear. He was initially misdiagnosed to have a carotid-cavernous fistula but upon cerebral angiogram was actually diagnosed with a dural arterio-venous fistula in the posterior fossa venous system followed by successful embolization of the fistula. Conclusions: A cerebral angiography is the gold standard for detection and characterization of a DAVF and will distinguish it from a CCF. Endovascular surgery involves a catheter-based technique for embolization of the lumen of arteries feeding the DAVF, or directly into the vein draining the DAVF. It is very important to recognize the typical findings of patients presenting with a DAVF then quickly proceeding with a cerebral angiogram to determine the exact location of the fistula and the appropriate treatment plan. By diagnosing and treating a DAVF as early as possible, the associated fatal complications can be averted. PMID:24194975

  11. Causality and headache triggers

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  12. Yom Kippur headache.

    PubMed

    Mosek, A; Korczyn, A D

    1995-11-01

    Fasting is frequently mentioned by patients and in textbooks as a trigger for headache. In this study, we attempted to define the role of fasting as a possible precipitator of headache. Headache history was documented in 370 hospital employees (60% female) before and immediately after a 25-hour fast for the 1993 Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur). The population included 211 who fasted; 39% of fasters developed headache, compared with only 7% of nonfasters (p < 0.000001). Headache was usually of a nonpulsating quality, mild to moderate in intensity, and bilateral and frontal in location. Subjects with a history of headache were more likely to develop fasting-induced headache than were those without such history (66% versus 29%, p < 0.000002). The number of headache sufferers increased in direct relation to the duration of the fast. Caffeine and nicotine withdrawal and oversleeping did not appear to have an influence on headache development. We conclude that fasting is a strong headache precipitator, especially among chronic headache sufferers. It is usually nonpulsating and nonlateralized. PMID:7501139

  13. Role of opioid receptors in neurogenic dural vasodilation and sensitization of trigeminal neurones in anaesthetized rats

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Cook, D A; Hargreaves, R J; Hill, R G; Cumberbatch, M J

    2001-01-01

    Migraine headache is thought to be caused by a distension of meningeal blood vessels, the activation of trigeminal sensory neurones and the the development of a central sensitization within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). It has been proposed that clinically effective 5-HT1B/1D agonists act peripherally to inhibit the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurogenic dural vasodilation, and to attenuate nociceptive neurotransmission within the TNC. Since opioids are also effective anti-migraine agents the present studies investigated the role of opioids within the trigemino-vascular system in anaesthetised rats. Electrical stimulation of the dura mater evoked neurogenic dural vasodilation which was significantly inhibited by morphine (1 mg kg−1) the selective μ-opioid agonist DAGO (10 μg kg−1) and the mixed agonist/antagonist butorphanol (1 mg kg−1) but not by the κ- and δ-opioid agonists (±) U50488H (100 μg kg−1) and DPDPE (1 mg kg−1). Morphine had no effect on CGRP-evoked dural vasodilation. In electrophysiological studies morphine (1 – 10 mg kg−1) significantly attenuated brainstem neuronal activity in response to electrical stimulation of the dura by 65% at 10 mg kg−1. Morphine (3 mg kg−1) also inhibited the TNC neuronal sensitization following CGRP-evoked dilation. The present studies have demonstrated that opioids block the nociceptive neurotransmission within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and in addition inhibit neurogenic dural vasodilation via an action on μ-opioid receptors located on trigeminal sensory fibres innervating dural blood vessels. These peripheral and central actions are similar to those of the ‘triptan' 5-HT1B/1D agonists and could account for the anti-migraine actions of opioids. PMID:11454653

  14. The effects of needle deformation during lumbar puncture

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Demir, Caner F.; Varol, Sefer; Arslan, Demet; Yıldız, Mustafa; Akil, Eşref

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess deformation of the tip and deflection from the axis of 22-gauge Quincke needles when they are used for diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP). Thus, it can be determined whether constructional alterations of needles are important for predicting clinical problems after diagnostic LP. Materials and Methods: The 22-gauge Quincke needles used for diagnostic LP were evaluated. A specially designed protractor was used for measurement and evaluation. Waist circumference was measured in each patient. Patients were questioned about headaches occurring after LP. Results: A total of 115 Quincke-type spinal needles used in 113 patients were evaluated. No deflection was detected in 38 (33.1%) of the needles. Deflection between 0.1° and 5° occurred in 43 (37.3%) of the needles and deflection ≥ 5.1° occurred in 34 patients (29.6%). Forty-seven (41.5%) patients experienced post lumbar puncture headache (PLPH) and 13 (11.5%) patients experienced intracranial hypotension (IH). No statistically significant correlation between the degree of deflection and headache was found (P > 0.05). Epidural blood patch was performed for three patients. Deformity in the form of bending like a hook occurred in seven needles and IH occurred in six patients using these needles. Two of the needles used in three patients requiring blood patch were found to be bent. Conclusion: Deformation of needles may increase complications after LP. Needle deformation may lead to IH. In case of deterioration in the structure of the needle, termination of the puncture procedure and the use of a new needle could reduce undesirable clinical consequences, especially IH. PMID:25883480

  15. [Electrotherapy for headaches].

    PubMed

    Lutters, B; Koehler, P J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulation is being applied increasingly for the treatment of drug resistant headache. Although these techniques are often considered high-tech, electrotherapy for headache has a long history; electric fish have been used for headache treatment since the first century CE. During the eighteenth and nineteenth century, static electricity was a treatment for a wide variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including headache. The efficacy of electrotherapy, however, has been disputed continuously, since opponents were of the opinion that the positive results could be attributed to suggestion. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the electric treatment of headache gradually disappeared. In recent years, there has been a resurgence in the use of electrotherapy, along with the efficacy debate. With this historical review we wish to emphasize the importance of placebo-controlled studies, not only in terms of electrotherapy of headache, but also for the evaluation of neuromodulation for other disorders. PMID:27353158

  16. Sexuality and headache.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, E; Conti, C; Poggioni, M; Sicuteri, F

    1982-01-01

    Ten percent of 362 headache sufferers reported sexual arousal during migraine attack. Clinical investigations on sexuality in 16 headache sufferers, according to some studies showing correlations between idiopathic headache and sexual behavior, were performed. Patients responding by questionnaire listed each sexual experience, headache attack, and number of sleeping hours every day for 1 month. In both men and women, the number of coiti, erotic dreams, and sleeping hours were similar in headache sufferers and controls, while the frequency of masturbation was significantly reduced in the former. Sexual excitement and fantasies appeared more often in female headache sufferers than in controls, while the opposite occurred in the male group. Among the clinical analogies between the crises of migraine and morphine abstinence, sexual arousal may be included. PMID:7054999

  17. High-altitude headache.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Hernandez, Pablo Bandres

    2015-05-01

    High-altitude headache is one of many neurological symptoms associated with the ascent to high altitudes. Cellular hypoxia due to decreased barometric pressure seems to be the common final pathway for headache as altitude increases. Susceptibility to high-altitude headache depends on genetic factors, history of migraine, and acclimatization, but symptoms of acute mountain sickness are universal at very high altitudes. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude headache as well as the evidence for treatment and prevention with different drugs and devices which may be useful for regular and novice mountaineers. This includes an examination of other headache disorders which may mimic high-altitude headache. PMID:25795155

  18. Pain. Part 10: Headaches.

    PubMed

    Chong, M S; Renton, Tara

    2016-06-01

    This last in a series of 10 papers aims to provide the dental and medical teams with an update in headache conditions relevant to dentistry and medicine. Headache is the most common presenting symptom for patients presenting to A&E departments. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Most of the dental team take for granted their knowledge and ability to manage acute dental pain. However, the education and preparation in managing patients with headache conditions remains poor. Dentists are in a privileged position to be able to advise their patients about common conditions including headaches. PMID:27529913

  19. Pregnancy and chronic headache.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A

    2002-04-01

    Headache patterns in women change in relation to fluctuations in oestrogen levels. Increasing oestrogen levels in early pregnancy offer a protective effect against headache, particularly for women with migraine. However, some women continue to experience troublesome headache throughout pregnancy. Headache persisting at the end of the first trimester will usually continue without improvement for the remainder of pregnancy and should be treated. Safe and effective acute care treatment options include paracetamol, opioids and anti-emetics. The use of triptans during pregnancy is controversial and not broadly recommended. Safe and effective preventive treatments include relaxation, biofeedback, beta-blockers, some antidepressants and gabapentin in early pregnancy. PMID:11934341

  20. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring ... of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine and Other Vascular Headaches—Symptoms and Diagnosis Migraine: ...

  1. Headaches and Migraines: Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Headache Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... turn Javascript on. There are several types of headache. Each has distinct symptoms and treatments. Migraine and ...

  2. Management of cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer C; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of cluster headache is 0.1% and cluster headache is often not diagnosed or misdiagnosed as migraine or sinusitis. In cluster headache there is often a considerable diagnostic delay - an average of 7 years in a population-based survey. Cluster headache is characterized by very severe or severe orbital or periorbital pain with a duration of 15-180 minutes. The cluster headache attacks are accompanied by characteristic associated unilateral symptoms such as tearing, nasal congestion and/or rhinorrhoea, eyelid oedema, miosis and/or ptosis. In addition, there is a sense of restlessness and agitation. Patients may have up to eight attacks per day. Episodic cluster headache (ECH) occurs in clusters of weeks to months duration, whereas chronic cluster headache (CCH) attacks occur for more than 1 year without remissions. Management of cluster headache is divided into acute attack treatment and prophylactic treatment. In ECH and CCH the attacks can be treated with oxygen (12 L/min) or subcutaneous sumatriptan 6 mg. For both oxygen and sumatriptan there are two randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating efficacy. In both ECH and CCH, verapamil is the prophylactic drug of choice. Verapamil 360 mg/day was found to be superior to placebo in one clinical trial. In clinical practice, daily doses of 480-720 mg are mostly used. Thus, the dose of verapamil used in cluster headache treatment may be double the dose used in cardiology, and with the higher doses the PR interval should be checked with an ECG. At the start of a cluster, transitional preventive treatment such as corticosteroids or greater occipital nerve blockade can be given. In CCH and in long-standing clusters of ECH, lithium, methysergide, topiramate, valproic acid and ergotamine tartrate can be used as add-on prophylactic treatment. In drug-resistant CCH, neuromodulation with either occipital nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation of the hypothalamus is an alternative treatment strategy

  3. Headache Hygiene -- What Is It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is it? Print Email Headache Hygiene - What is it? ACHE Newsletter Sign up for our newsletter by ... e-mail address below. Headache Hygiene - What is it? Headache hygiene is the practice of taking care ...

  4. Treatment of headache.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S; Freitag, F G

    1989-01-01

    Headache is the most common complaint encountered in clinical practice. Approximately 45 million people in the United States experience chronic headaches. The management of migraine headache involves both pharmacologic and nondrug therapy. Drug therapy for migraine involves the use of abortive and prophylactic agents. Abortive agents, such as ergotamine tartrate and ketoprofen, may be used to relieve the acute attack. Prophylactic therapy is focused on reducing the frequency and severity of the attacks. beta-Adrenergic blocking agents, such as propranolol, remain the primary agents for many migraine patients, although other drugs, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ketoprofen, or calcium-channel blocking agents, such as verapamil, may be beneficial for many patients. For cluster headache and its variants, methysergide and corticosteroids are usually the drugs of choice. Patients with chronic cluster headache may achieve good results from long-term treatment with other therapies, including lithium carbonate, verapamil, and ketoprofen. PMID:2520442

  5. Headache yesterday in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveys enquiring about burden of headache over a prior period of time (eg, 3 months) are subject to recall bias. To eliminate this as far as possible, we focused on presence and impact of headache on the preceding day (“headache yesterday”). Methods Adults (18-65 years) were surveyed from the general populations of Germany, Italy, Lithuania, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, from a work-force population in Spain and from mostly non-headache patient populations of Austria, France and UK. A study of non-responders in some countries allowed detection of potential participation bias where initial participation rates were low. Results Participation rates varied between 11% and 59% (mean 27%). Non-responder studies suggested that, because of participation bias, headache prevalence might be overestimated in initial responders by up to 2% (absolute). Across all countries, 1,422 of 8,271 participants (15-17%, depending on correction for participation bias) had headache yesterday lasting on average for 6 hours. It was bad or very bad in 56% of cases and caused absence from work or school in 6%. Among those who worked despite headache, 20% reported productivity reduced by >50%. Social activities were lost by 24%. Women (21%) were more likely than men (12%) to have headache yesterday, but impact was similar in the two genders. Conclusions With recall biases avoided, our findings indicate that headache costs at least 0.7% of working capacity in Europe. This calculation takes into account that most of those who missed work could make up for this later, which, however, means that leisure and social activities are even more influenced by headache. PMID:24884765

  6. Acute aggravation of subdural fluid collection associated with dural metastasis of malignant neoplasms: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shigeyoshi; Kotani, Akio; Takimoto, Toshiro; Yoshino, Atsuo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2014-10-01

    A 63-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with serious headache and vomiting. Five months before admission, she had undergone surgery for a primary advanced gastric cancer. Neuroradiological examinations revealed subdural fluid collection. We twice performed evacuation of the subdural fluid collection. However, aggravation of her state of consciousness progressed and she passed away. Histological examinations demonstrated that the dural veins were infiltrated by numerous tumor cells that produced mucus; however, ruptured vessels were not found. Furthermore, the subdural fluid collection increased shortly after the initial operation. We infer that the cause of the collection, which was associated with the dural metastasis of malignant tumors, was not only mucin secretion by tumor cells but also a rapid increase in perfusion pressure in the vessels of the dura mater, resulting in extravasation of plasma components into the subdural space. Our case demonstrates that the pathogenetic mechanism that is specific for subdural fluid collection caused by dural metastasis of malignant tumors differs from the mechanism of production of subdural hematoma associated with dural metastasis. PMID:24036578

  7. Mast cell degranulation activates a pain pathway underlying migraine headache

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Dan; Burstein, Rami; Kainz, Vanessa; Jakubowski, Moshe; Strassman, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Intracranial headaches such as that of migraine are generally accepted to be mediated by prolonged activation of meningeal nociceptors but the mechanisms responsible for such nociceptor activation are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that meningeal nociceptors can be activated locally through a neuroimmune interaction with resident mast cells, granulated immune cells that densely populate the dura mater. Using in vivo electrophysiological single unit recording of meningeal nociceptors in the rat we observed that degranulation of dural mast cells using intraperitoneal administration of the basic secretagogue agent compound 48/80 (2 mg/kg) induced a prolonged state of excitation in meningeal nociceptors. Such activation was accompanied by increased expression of the phosphorylated form of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), an anatomical marker for nociceptor activation. Mast cell - induced nociceptor interaction was also associated with downstream activation of the spinal trigeminal nucleus as indicated by an increase in c-fos expression. Our findings provide evidence linking dural mast cell degranulation to prolonged activation of the trigeminal pain pathway believed to underlie intracranial headaches such as that of migraine. PMID:17459586

  8. Headaches -- danger signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 398. Garza I, Schwedt TJ, Robertson CE, Smith JH. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Daroff ... commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  9. Headaches in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... include the doubling of images or words, blurred vision, fatigue, and headaches which worsen with prolonged reading. At home eye exercises, sometimes with the help of computer software, can help treat convergence insufficiency. Glasses are ...

  10. [Treatment of tension headache].

    PubMed

    Schoenen, J

    2000-01-01

    The scientific basis of tension- type headache suffers from the lack of precise pathophysiological knowledge and the heterogenecity of this disorder. Treatment of acute tension-type headache episodes is more effective with an NSAIDs (ibuprofen 400-800mg, naproxen 550-825mg, ketoprofen 50-75mg) than with aspirin or paracetamol. Caffein containing preparations of NSAIDs are slightly superior, but should not be taken frequently to avoid headache chronification. For chronic tension-type headache, relaxation therapies with EMG biofeedback and tricyclics have about the same efficacy rate of 40-50p.100. Physical therapy and acupuncture are in general less effective. There is thus clearly a need for better strategies, e.g. combination of available therapies and novel approaches. PMID:11139755

  11. A Clinical Pitfall: Optimal Management of Single Dural-based Metastatic Carcinoma of the Breast Mimicking Meningioma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chiao-Zhu; Li, Chiao-Ching; Lin, Meng-Chi; Chih-Chuan, Hsieh; Chen, Nan-Fu; Chen, Chun-Lin; Tang, Chi-Tun

    2015-11-01

    Meningioma is the most common benign brain lesion in adults. Conservative treatment is suggested if there is no obvious neurological symptom or mass effect, but cerebral metastases require aggressive therapy. Single dural-based metastatic carcinoma mimicking meningioma is uncommon. Here is a case of clinical dilemma between meningioma and metastatic carcinoma mimicking meningioma. A woman with a history of invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast presented with headache and blurred vision. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) both gave the impression of meningioma. After surgical resection of the brain lesion, histopathology revealed that it was a metastatic lesion from the breast. This report discussed the optimal management of single dural-based metastatic carcinoma mimicking meningioma. PMID:26566041

  12. Management of Headaches in Children

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, Robert H.A.

    1988-01-01

    Headache is a common complaint in children. Although in most cases it does not require medical attention, a thorough evaluation is mandatory for the child with severe, recurring, or unconventional headaches. Recurrent episodes of headache over a prolonged period with normal behaviour, intellectual function, and a negative physical examination suggest migraine or psychogenic headaches. Headache in a child may be indicative of a systemic illness or an intracranial process causing increased intracranial pressure. This review discusses the three most common types of headache in children, highlighting the characteristic symptoms, investigation, and management of migraine, organic, and psychogenic headaches. PMID:21253182

  13. Cluster headache after orbital exenteration.

    PubMed

    Evers, S; Sörös, P; Brilla, R; Gerding, H; Husstedt, I W

    1997-10-01

    A 37-year-old man developed an ipsilateral headache which fulfilled the criteria for cluster headache after orbital extenteration because of a traumatic lesion of the bulb. The headache could be treated successfully by drugs usually applied in the therapy of cluster headache. Six similar cases of cluster headache after orbital exenteration could be identified in the literature suggesting that the eye itself is not necessarily part of the pathogenesis of cluster headache. We hypothesize that orbital exenteration can cause cluster headache by lesions of sympathetic structures. Possibly, these mechanisms are similar to those of sympathetic reflex dystrophy (Sudeck-Leriche syndrome) causing pain of the limbs. PMID:9350391

  14. Medical management of adult headache.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Frederick G; Schloemer, Fallon

    2014-04-01

    We review the therapies for primary headache disorders: migraine, chronic migraine, tension-type headache, and cluster headache. Recommendations follow the evidence-based treatments so far as is possible with expert opinion to give clinical guidance. Headache has 2 levels of care: acute treatments designed to stop a headache from progressing and alleviate all symptoms associated with the headache and preventive therapies for patients whose headache frequency is such that by itself produces significant disability and impact on quality of life, or where the frequency of use of acute medications, regardless of efficacy, poses risks in terms of overuse or adverse events. PMID:24680490

  15. Abrupt-Onset Severe Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El S.; Schwedt, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    Thunderclap headache, a severe headache which is maximal in intensity at onset, is associated with numerous underlying disorders, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, unruptured intracranial aneurysm, cervical artery dissection, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, stroke, intracranial hemorrhage, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, and reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy. After exclusion of all possible causes, thunderclap headache may be considered a primary headache. This review summarizes the diagnostic considerations and clinical approach to thunderclap headache, with particular emphasis on the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes. PMID:20352589

  16. Wine and headache.

    PubMed

    Jarisch, R; Wantke, F

    1996-05-01

    Headache can be induced by histamine in wine in patients suffering from histamine intolerance, a disease characterized by impaired histamine degradation based on reduced diamine oxidase activity or a lack of the enzyme. Diamine oxidase is localized in the jejunal mucosa and is the most important enzyme metabolising histamine. It is competitively inhibited by alcohol and numerous drugs. In preliminary investigations, assessment of diamine oxidase levels gave decreased activity (0.03 nKat/l) in patients with histamine intolerance compared to healthy controls (0.07 nKat/l). In pregnancy, diamine oxidase levels are known to be about 500-fold elevated, giving mean levels of 25.0 nKat/l. Other biogenic amines such as phenylethylamine or serotonin may be causative for wine/food-induced headache. In experimental models, headache has been induced by histamine infusion as well as red wine provocation. Histamine-induced headache is a vascular headache likely to be caused by nitric oxide which probably represents a key molecule in vascular headaches. A histamine-free diet is the treatment of choice for patients with histamine intolerance and chronic headache. To start treatment, an antihistamine (H1 blocker) for 14 days as well as a histamine-free diet for at least 4 weeks are recommended. Clinical improvement to the diet as well as in vitro tests for plasma histamine and diamine oxidase in the serum as well as vitamin B6 levels have to confirm the diagnosis. As supportive treatment, a vitamin B6 (pyridoxal phosphate) substitution appears useful in histamine-intolerant patients as pyridoxal phosphate seems to be crucial for diamine oxidase activity. Histamine intolerance, based on reduced diamine oxidase activity or a lack in the enzyme is causative for wine/food-induced chronic headache. According to the localization of diamine oxidase in the jejunal mucosa, histamine intolerance is primarily a disease of intestinal origin. A histamine-free diet is the treatment of choice in

  17. [Headaches in the emergency context].

    PubMed

    Gauvrit, J-Y; Leclerc, X; Moulin, T; Oppenheim, C; Savage, J; Pruvo, J-P; Meder, J-F

    2004-09-01

    Headaches constitute one of the most frequent reason of consultation. Their causes are extremely varied. The first step consists in the analysis of the characteristics of the pain and the associated signs in order to distinguish primary and secondary headaches. Primary headaches, including migraines and tension-type headaches are the most frequent types and do not require imaging evaluation. Secondary headaches are related to an organic cause and require specific investigations. In case of suspected symptomatic or secondary headaches, brain imaging plays an important role in the etiologic work-up. The main purpose of imaging in an emergency setting is to diagnose a life-threatening disease. PMID:15545938

  18. Temporomandibular Disorders and Headache.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Abbott, Jeremy J

    2016-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and primary headaches can be perpetual and debilitating musculoskeletal and neurological disorders. The presence of both can affect up to one-sixth of the population at any one time. Initially, TMDs were thought to be predominantly musculoskeletal disorders, and migraine was thought to be solely a cerebrovascular disorder. The further understanding of their pathophysiology has helped to clarify their clinical presentation. This article focuses on the role of the trigeminal system in associating TMD and migraine. By discussing recent descriptions of prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment of headache and TMD, we will further elucidate this relationship. PMID:27475510

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Dural Arteriovenous Fistulas: Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Sang; Oh, Hyuk-Jin; Shim, Jai-Joon; Bae, Hack-Gun; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Treatment of intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) remains a challenge. However, after introduction of Onyx, transarterial approach is the preferred treatment option in many centers. We report our experience of dAVFs embolization with special emphasis on transarterial approach. Methods Seventeen embolization procedures were performed in 13 patients with dAVFs between Jan 2009 and Oct 2014. Clinical symptoms, location and type of fistulas, embolization methods, complications, radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated using charts and PACS images. Results All 13 patients had symptomatic lesions. The locations of fistulas were transverse-sigmoid sinus in 6, middle fossa dura in 4, cavernous sinus in 2, and superior sagittal sinus in 1 patient. Cognard types were as follows : I in 4, IIa in 2, IIa+IIb in 5, and IV in 2. Embolization procedures were performed ≥2 times in 3 patients. Nine patients were treated with transarterial Onyx embolization alone. One of these required direct surgical puncture of middle meningeal artery. Complete obliteration of fistulas was achieved in 11/13 (85%) patients. There were no complications except for 1 case of Onyx migration in cavernous dAVF. Modified Rankin scale score at post-operative 3 months were 0 in 11, and 3 in 2 patients. Conclusion Transarterial Onyx embolization can be a first line therapeutic option in patients with dAVFs. However, transvenous approach should be tried first in cavernous sinus dAVF because of the risk of intracranial migration of liquid embolic materials. Furthermore, combined surgical endovascular approach can be considered as a useful option in inaccessible route. PMID:26885282

  20. Causes of secondary headache (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Temporomandibular joint, or TMJ, dysfunction, can be a cause of secondary headache. Secondary headaches result from underlying disorders which produce pain as a symptom. The TMJ may become painful and dysfunctional as a result ...

  1. The patient with daily headaches.

    PubMed

    Maizels, Morris

    2004-12-15

    The term "chronic daily headache" (CDH) describes a variety of headache types, of which chronic migraine is the most common. Daily headaches often are disabling and may be challenging to diagnose and treat. Medication overuse, or drug rebound headache, is the most treatable cause of refractory daily headache. A pathologic underlying cause should be considered in patients with recent-onset daily headache, a change from a previous headache pattern, or associated neurologic or systemic symptoms. Treatment of CDH focuses on reduction of headache triggers and use of preventive medication, most commonly anti-depressants, antiepileptic drugs, and beta blockers. Medication overuse must be treated with discontinuation of symptomatic medicines, a transitional therapy, and long-term prophylaxis. Anxiety and depression are common in patients with CDH and should be identified and treated. Although the condition is challenging, appropriate treatment of patients with CDH can bring about significant improvement in the patient's quality-of-life. PMID:15617293

  2. Tension-type headaches.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Irene A

    2015-06-01

    TTH are very common in general population and may be under diagnosed. They are more common in patients suffering from migraine headaches. In general underlying psychiatric conditions, such as anxiety and depression, are prevalent in TTH sufferers. For acute therapy NSAIDs are the main treatment option. Tricyclic antidepressant, SSRI, and cognitive behavioral therapy have been proven to be effective for prophylactic purposes. PMID:25882693

  3. Medical Comorbidities in Pediatric Headache.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Howard; Singhi, Samata; Gladstein, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid conditions frequently occur in pediatric headaches and may significantly affect their management. Comorbidities that have been associated with pediatric headaches include attention-deficit or hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental disabilities, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, obesity, infantile colic, atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The goal of this article is to review these comorbidities associated with pediatric headache, thereby empowering child neurologists to identify common triggers and tailor management strategies that address headache and its comorbidities. PMID:27017024

  4. Direct transcranial puncture for Onyx embolization of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Evans, Avery J; Liu, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Intracranial hemangioblastomas are benign but hypervascular tumors, most commonly located in the cerebellum, which are difficult to resect without significant operative blood loss. While preoperative embolization may decrease the amount of operative bleeding, the vascular supply of cerebellar hemangioblastomas frequently precludes safe embolization by an endovascular route due to the risk of thromboembolic vertebrobasilar infarction. Direct puncture embolization overcomes many of the limitations of endovascular embolization but its safety and feasibility for intracranial tumors is unknown. We report a 48-year-old man who was diagnosed with a large cerebellar mass after presenting with headaches and gait ataxia. Based on diagnostic angiography, which demonstrated a highly vascular tumor supplied by the posterior inferior cerebellar and posterior meningeal arteries, we decided to embolize the tumor by a direct transcranial puncture approach. After trephinating the skull in a standard fashion, a catheter-needle construct, composed of an Echelon 10 microcatheter (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) placed into a 21-gauge spinal needle, was inserted into the tumor under biplanar angiographic guidance. Using continuous angiographic monitoring, 9cc of Onyx 34 (ev3 Endovascular) was injected through the catheter, resulting in 75% tumor devascularization without evidence of complications. The patient was taken directly to surgery where a gross total resection of the hemangioblastoma was achieved with an acceptable operative blood loss. At his 2 year follow-up, the patient was neurologically intact without neuroimaging evidence of residual tumor. We describe, to our knowledge, the first case of direct transcranial puncture for preoperative embolization of a cerebellar hemangioblastoma. PMID:24370504

  5. Headache - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Migraine - what to ask your doctor; Tension-type headache - what to ask your doctor; Cluster headache - what to ask your doctor ... How can I tell if the headache I am having is dangerous? What are ... headache ? A migraine headache ? A cluster headache ? What medical ...

  6. Headaches due to vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, John F

    2004-02-01

    The association between stroke and headache is complex, ranging from highly nonspecific, wherein headache is largely irrelevant to diagnosis and therapeutic management, to highly specific and even causative. In short, acute headache may accompany the acute stroke process, chronically complicate stroke, or, in rare instances, serve as the primary cause of stroke. With the first instance, the incidence of acute headache is highly dependent on the stroke sub-type and etiology. In this article, the headaches accompanying or causing acute stroke are addressed in some detail. PMID:15062526

  7. Primary varicella infection presenting with headache and elevated intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Oded; Shefer-Averbuch, Noa; Garty, Ben Zion

    2015-05-01

    Primary varicella infection may be associated with neurologic complications, such as cerebritis and meningoencephalitis. Several cases of varicella infection with elevated intracranial pressure have been reported. We describe a 13-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with a clinical picture of headaches and elevated intracranial pressure as the only manifestation of primary varicella zoster infection. The working diagnosis at first was pseudotumor cerebri based on complaints of headache of 2 weeks' duration, in addition to vomiting and papilledema, without fever or skin eruption. On lumbar puncture, opening pressure was 420 mmH2O, but mild pleocytosis and mildly elevated protein level ruled out the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. Our patient had no history of previous varicella infection, and she did not receive the varicella zoster vaccine. Serology tests, done on admission and repeated 2 months later, suggested primary varicella infection. The literature on varicella infection associated with pseudotumor cerebri or elevated intracranial pressure is reviewed. PMID:24846901

  8. Vestibular schwannoma surgery and headache.

    PubMed

    Levo, H; Blomstedt, G; Pyykkö, I

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate aetiological factors for postoperative headache after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery with respect to asymmetric activation of vestibular reflexes. After surgery, 27 VS patients with persistent postoperative headache, 16 VS patients without headache and 9 healthy controls were examined. The vestibular, cervicocollic and cervicospinal reflexes were evaluated to study whether asymmetric activation of vestibular reflexes could cause headache. The effect of neck muscle and occipital nerve anaesthesia and the effect of sumatriptan on headache were also evaluated. The vestibular function of VS patients with headache did not differ from that of VS patients without headache, but was abnormal when compared to that of normal controls. The cervicospinal and cervicocollic reflexes did not differ in the patient groups. Injection of lidocaine around the operation scar gave pain relief to two patients, and one of them had occipital nerve entrapment. Infiltration of lidocaine deep in the neck muscles in the vicinity of the C2 root did not alleviate headache, but caused vertigo. Nine patients with musculogenic headache got pain relief from supportive neck collars, and two patients with cervicobrachial syndrome got pain relief from manual neck traction. The study shows that asymmetric activation of cervicocollic reflexes does not seem to be the reason for headache. Headache seems to be linked to neuropathic pain, allegedly caused by trigeminal irritation of the inner ear and the posterior fossa, which has recently been linked to vascular pain. PMID:10908966

  9. Imaging of Headache in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Skliut, Maryna; Jamieson, Dara G

    2016-10-01

    Pregnant women are most likely to have primary headaches, such as migraine and tension-type headaches, which can be diagnosed and treated without brain imaging. Primary headaches may even start de novo during pregnancy, especially in the first few months. However, when the headache occurs late in pregnancy or in the peripartum period, secondary causes of headaches need to be considered and evaluated by brain and/or vascular imaging, generally using magnetic resonance techniques. There is considerable overlap between the cerebrovascular complications of pregnancy, including preeclampsia/eclampsia, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS), and both hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes; although, their imaging may be distinctive. Imaging is necessary to distinguish between arterial and venous pathology causing headache in the peripartum patient, as there can be similar presenting symptoms. Mass lesions, both neoplastic and inflammatory, can enlarge and produce headaches and neurological symptoms late in pregnancy. PMID:27562782

  10. Headache and sferics.

    PubMed

    Vaitl, D; Propson, N; Stark, R; Walter, B; Schienle, A

    2001-10-01

    Many patients with migraine believe weather is a trigger for their headaches. The objective of this study was to determine if very low frequency sferics, pulse-shaped electromagnetic fields originating from atmospheric discharges (lightning), are precipitating factors. The occurrence of sferics impulses is characterized by a daily, as well as an annual, periodicity and is thought to be associated with various pathological processes. The diaries of 37 women suffering from migraine and tension-type headaches were analyzed over a period of 6 months and correlated with daily sferics activity and other weather phenomena in the area of Giessen, Germany. From October through December (autumn), sferics activity was correlated with the occurrence of migraine (r = 0.33, P<.01); however, there was no correlation in July and August (summer), when the thunderstorm activity had been very intense. In summer, tension-type headaches were associated with other weather parameters such as temperature (r = 0.36, P<.01) and vapor pressure (r = 0.27, P<.05). PMID:11703470

  11. Solitaire FR device for treatment of dural sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Pukenas, Bryan Anthony; Kumar, Monisha; Stiefel, Michael; Smith, Michelle; Hurst, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis is a rare and potentially devastating disease. Several predisposing factors exist, including oral contraceptive therapy and colitis. First-line therapy consists of systemic anticoagulation. If first-line therapies fail, more aggressive endovascular therapies may be performed. We report our initial experience with the Solitaire FR device for treatment of refractory symptomatic dural venous sinus thrombosis. PMID:23257943

  12. [Pulmonary hemorrhage complicating transthoracic puncture].

    PubMed

    Febvre, M; de Fenoyl, O; Capron, F; Vadrot, D; Rochemaure, J

    1989-01-01

    Fine needle transthoracic aspiration (FNTA) of pulmonary opacities under guidance of computerized tomography (CT) is a simple procedure yielding conclusive results in many patients with malignant lung tumours. The small caliber of the needles utilized and the CT control make this increasingly popular procedure both accurate and safe. Yet a number of complications have occurred; most of them were benign (e.g. pneumothorax) but some were potentially dangerous (e.g. pulmonary haemorrhage), so that the pros and cons of the procedure must carefully be weighed. We report the case of a patient in whom FNTA was complicated by copious haemoptysis and a pulmonary haematoma clearly visible at CT. The literature concerning the potential complications of transthoracic puncture is reviewed. PMID:2633295

  13. Epidural insertion simulator of higher insertion resistance & drop rate after puncture.

    PubMed

    Naemura, K; Sakai, A; Hayashi, T; Saito, H

    2008-01-01

    Accidents such as dural puncture remain one of the problems of epidural anesthesia, and unskilled doctors can repeat such accidents. The purpose of the current research was to provide a new simulator for epidural insertion training. No reference data regarding the resistance force used when inserting a needle into patients have been reported. A comparative study was conducted to aid in the development of a new simulator. Pork loin (n=5) were employed as a substitute for patients. Thickness was set at 2 cm so as to improve the reproducibility. The authors took the conventional simulator apart, and picked a block as an analogue of muscle and ligamentum flavum. A new simulator was made of a melamine foam resin block and a latex rubber sheet. An epidural needle fixed on a motorized stage was inserted at the speed of 2 mm per second. The reaction force was measured while the needle was inserted into each specimen. Waveform of the pork loin exhibited two slopes of different inclines up to peaks and then falls after puncture. The conventional simulator showed a simple increase up to peak and a slow fall after puncture. In contrast, the new simulator showed two slopes up to peak and then a sudden fall after puncture. The insertion resistances were 2.5 N/s for the porcine, 0.8 N/s for the conventional and 2.1 N/s for the new simulator. The drop rates were 5 N/s for the porcine, 0.6 N/s for the conventional and 24 N/s for the new simulator. The higher insertion resistance and drop rate for the new simulator than the conventional simulator will be suitable for epidural insertion training. PMID:19163400

  14. Spontaneous closure of a dural arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Al-Afif, Shadi; Nakamura, Makoto; Götz, Friedrich; Krauss, Joachim K

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous closure of a dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) is a rare condition and only a few cases have been reported since its first description in 1976. We report delayed and progressive spontaneous closure of a dAVF after massive intracerebral hemorrhage documented by angiographic studies before and after bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the first report to document gradual closure of a dAVF by serial angiographic studies. The mechanism of spontaneous closure of dAVFs has not been fully elucidated. We suggest different factors for consideration from previously published data and show how each of these factors can influence the others. PMID:25053666

  15. Temporomandibular disorders and headaches.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B; Bassiur, Jennifer P

    2014-05-01

    Headache and temporomandibular disorders should be treated together but separately. If there is marked limitation of opening, imaging of the joint may be necessary. The treatment should then include education regarding limiting jaw function, appliance therapy, instruction in jaw posture, and stretching exercises, as well as medications to reduce inflammation and relax the muscles. The use of physical therapies, such as spray and stretch and trigger point injections, is helpful if there is myofascial pain. Tricyclic antidepressants and the new-generation antiepileptic drugs are effective in muscle pain conditions. Arthrocentesis and/or arthroscopy may help to restore range of motion. PMID:24703543

  16. Headaches prior to earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, L. L.

    1988-06-01

    In two surveys of headaches it was noted that their incidence had increased significantly within 48 h prior to earthquakes from an incidence of 17% to 58% in the first survey using correlated samples and from 20.4% to 44% in the second survey using independent samples. It is suggested that an increase in positive air ions from rock compression may trigger head pain via a decrease in brain levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. The findings are presented as preliminary, with the hope of generating further research efforts in areas more prone to earthquakes.

  17. [Neurostimulation for treatment of headaches].

    PubMed

    Diener, H C; Rabe, K; Gerwig, M; Müller, O; Sure, U; Gaul, C

    2012-08-01

    Only a small portion of patients with primary headaches are refractory to treatment concerning relief of headache episodes and prophylactic therapy of headaches. New methods of central and peripheral neurostimulation have been developed for these patients during the last few years and experience was mostly gained in small case series. The following overview gives a description of new stimulation methods, such as deep brain stimulation, occipital nerve stimulation, vagal nerve stimulation, neurostimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion and transcranial magnetic stimulation. PMID:22801664

  18. Autonomic dysregulation in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Gass, Jason J; Glaros, Alan G

    2013-12-01

    To analyze autonomic nervous system activity in headache subjects, measurements of heart rate variability (HRV), skin temperature, skin conductance, and respiration were compared to a matched control group. HRV data were recorded in time and frequency domains. Subjects also completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological distress, fatigue, and sleep dysfunction. Twenty-one headache and nineteen control subjects participated. In the time domain, the number of consecutive R-to-R intervals that varied by more than 50 ms and the standard deviation of the normalized R-to-R intervals, both indices of parasympathetic nervous system activity, were significantly lower in the headache group than the control group. Groups did not differ statistically on HRV measures in the frequency domain. Self-report measures showed significantly increased somatization, hostility, anxiety, symptom distress, fatigue, and sleep problems in the headache group. The results suggest headache subjects have increased sympathetic nervous system activity and decreased parasympathetic activity compared to non-headache control subjects. Headaches subjects also showed greater emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep problems. The results indicate an association between headaches and cardiovascular functioning suggestive of sympathetic nervous system activation in this sample of mixed migraine and tension-type headache sufferers. PMID:23912525

  19. Neurostimulation for chronic cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Kaube, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Neurostimulation techniques for the treatment of primary headache syndromes, particularly of chronic cluster headache, have received much interest in recent years. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) has yielded favourable clinical results and, despite the limited numbers of published cases, is becoming a routine treatment for refractory chronic cluster headache in specialized centres. Meanwhile, other promising techniques such as spinal cord stimulation (SCS) or sphenopalate ganglion stimulation have emerged. In this article the current state of clinical research for neurostimulation techniques for chronic cluster headache is reviewed. PMID:22590481

  20. Neuromodulation in cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Denys; Vandersteen, Clair; Magis, Delphine; Lanteri-Minet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Medically refractory chronic cluster headache (CH) is a severely disabling headache condition for which several surgical procedures have been proposed as a prophylactic treatment. None of them have been evaluated in controlled conditions, only open studies and case series being available. Destructive procedures (radiofrequency lesioning, radiosurgery, section) and microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve or the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) have induced short-term improvement which did not maintain on long term in most of the patients. They carried a high risk of complications, including severe sensory loss and neuropathic pain, and consequently should not be proposed in first intention.Deep brain stimulation (DBS), targeting the presumed CH generator in the retro-hypothalamic region or fibers connecting it, decreased the attack frequency >50 in 60 % of the 52 patients reported. Complications were infrequent: gaze disturbances, autonomic disturbances, and intracranial hemorrhage (2).Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) was efficient (decrease of attack frequency >50 %) in about 70 % of the 60 patients reported, with a low risk of complications (essentially hardware related). Considering their respective risks, ONS should be proposed first and DBS only in case of ONS failure.New on-demand chronically implanted SPG stimulation seemed to be efficient to abort CH attacks in a pilot controlled trial, but its long-term safety needs to be further studied. PMID:25411142

  1. Allergy, Rhinitis and Migraine Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... play no role in provoking attacks of migraine headache. Recent research suggests this may not be correct. Confirming allergy - ... might lead to sleep apnea that could cause headache. Third, allergy worsens symptoms ... Research shows that patients with depression compared to those ...

  2. What Are Nerve Blocks for Headache?

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve blocks for headache? Print Email What are nerve blocks for headache? ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. What are nerve blocks for headache? A nerve block is the ...

  3. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mountain Sickness, and Headache Print Email Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... entering your e-mail address below. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness, and Headache David W. Dodick, MD, FAHS, ...

  4. Management of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Graves, Barbara W

    2006-01-01

    With 17% to 18% of women suffering from migraine headaches, clinicians will often be asked by their patients to prescribe medication. Migraine is an episodic chronic disease that is best managed with an overall treatment plan, rather than treated as an acute illness that is managed with sporadic medications. Realistic goals for the long-term management of migraine are based on patient education and an ongoing discussion between patient and provider. This article reviews the clinical presentation of migraine and recommendations for both acute and preventive treatment, including complementary therapies. "Red flags" that could be signs of more serious neurologic illness are presented. The management of migraine in pregnancy is also reviewed. PMID:16647669

  5. Headaches in patients with shunts.

    PubMed

    Rekate, Harold L; Kranz, Dory

    2009-03-01

    Headache is one of the most common afflictions suffered by humans. Headache in patients with a shunt triggers a series of events that includes utilization of expensive technologies and often potentially dangerous surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of headaches in patients with shunts and, hopefully, the relationship of those headache disorders to the treatment of hydrocephalus. The Hydrocephalus Association maintains a self-reporting database recorded from individuals treated for hydrocephalus and their families. This database was mined to determine the incidence of severe headaches requiring treatment and interfering with normal life in patients who have been treated for hydrocephalus. There were 1,242 responders between the ages of 19 months and 45 years of age. Of these, 1,233 answered the question, "Do you or your family member suffer from (does your child complain of) frequent or chronic headaches?" This subset forms the basis of this study. Three groups were defined by age: children (19 months-12 years), adolescents (13 years-19 years), and young adults (20 years-45 years). Most respondents were initially treated during infancy (before 18 months of age); 84% of children and 69% of both adolescents and young adults were treated very early in life. Severe headaches became a more frequent problem as the age of the population treated for hydrocephalus increased. In terms of frequency and severity of headaches, direct comparisons with epidemiologic studies of normal populations are difficult because of the limitations of data available in the database. However, it is likely that this population has a higher incidence of severe headaches than normal populations. The cost of management of headaches in this population is very high, and the patients are at risk throughout life. Early treatment decisions have a significant effect on later quality of life. Strategies that lead to normalization of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

  6. Probing the puncture for black hole simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. David

    2009-10-15

    With the puncture method for black hole simulations, the second infinity of a wormhole geometry is compactified to a single 'puncture point' on the computational grid. The region surrounding the puncture quickly evolves to a trumpet geometry. The computational grid covers only a portion of the trumpet throat. It ends at a boundary whose location depends on resolution. This raises the possibility that perturbations in the trumpet geometry could propagate down the trumpet throat, reflect from the puncture boundary, and return to the black hole exterior with a resolution-dependent time delay. Such pathological behavior is not observed. This is explained by the observation that some perturbative modes propagate in the conformal geometry, others propagate in the physical geometry. The puncture boundary exists only in the physical geometry. The modes that propagate in the physical geometry are always directed away from the computational domain at the puncture boundary. The finite difference stencils ensure that these modes are advected through the boundary with no coupling to the modes that propagate in the conformal geometry. These results are supported by numerical experiments with a code that evolves spherically symmetric gravitational fields with standard Cartesian finite difference stencils. The code uses the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation of Einstein's equations with 1+log slicing and gamma-driver shift conditions.

  7. Repair of spinal dural defects. An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Keller, J T; Ongkiko, C M; Saunders, M C; Mayfield, F H; Dunsker, S B

    1984-05-01

    The search for an ideal substance for duraplasty has stimulated clinical and experimental investigations. To date a large number of materials have been employed for dural repair, although there is as yet no unanimity regarding the ideal material. Most of these studies have been concerned with cranial dura, and spinal duraplasty has received less attention. This study was designed to examine the repair of spinal dural defects in the dog. The materials chosen for this experiment were autologous fat, a polyester fiber mesh (Mersilene) and silicone-coated Dacron (Dura Film). Nineteen dogs were used in this study. Following lumbar laminectomy and the excision of elliptical pieces of dura (1.0 X 0.5 cm) at three noncontiguous levels, each of the defects was repaired using one of the three materials. Groups of animals were sacrificed at each of 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after dural repair. The lumbar region was removed en bloc and prepared for histological examination. Repair of the dural opening was achieved in all cases. The polyester fiber mesh was quite effective for dural repair, serving as a scaffold through which a neomembrane grew and united the dural edges. The results with autologous fat were similarly favorable. On the other hand, results with silicone-coated Dacron showed encapsulation by connective tissue, with the ventral aspect of the graft frequently compressing the underlying cord. PMID:6232352

  8. Headaches related to sexual activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lance, J W

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-one patients experienced headache related to sexual activity. Two varieties of headache could be distinguished from the clinical histories. The first, developing as sexual excitement mount, had the characteristics of muscle contraction headache. The second, severe, throbbing or 'explosive' in character, occurring at the time of orgasm, was presumably of vascular origin associated with a hyperdynamic circulatory state. Two of the patients with the latter type of headache had each experienced episodes of cerebral vascular insufficiency on one occasion which subsequently resolved. A third patient in this category had a past history of drop attacks. No evidence of any structural lesion was obtained on clinical examination or investigation, including cerebral angiography in seven patients. Eighteen patients have been followed up for periods of two to seven years without any serious intracranial disorder becoming apparent. While the possibility of intracranial vascular or other lesions must always be borne in mind, there appears to be a syndrome of headache associated with sexual excitement where no organic change can be demonstrated, analogous to benign cough headache and benign exertional headache. PMID:1011034

  9. [Clinical characteristics of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Jelencsik, I; Kovács, K; Csanda, E

    1989-05-28

    The authors describe in detail the clinical characteristics of 48 patients suffering from cluster headache. They investigate the question of nomenclature and survey the clinical forms of diagnosis. They deal with differential diagnosis comparing migraine, trigeminal neuralgia and headaches origin from systemic illness. They point out that the clinical characteristics of their patients co-responding to the data in the literature. They emphasize that the precise anamnesis can result the diagnosis of this type of headache which is the basis of the treatment. PMID:2503799

  10. A boy with sudden headache.

    PubMed

    Norbedo, Stefania; Naviglio, Samuele; Murru, Flora Maria; Cavallin, Roberta; Giurici, Nagua; Rabusin, Marco; Barbi, Egidio

    2014-03-01

    Headache is a common presenting complaint in pediatric emergency departments. The goal of emergent evaluation is to identify those children with potentially life-threatening conditions. We present the case of an adolescent boy presenting with headache and hypertension who was diagnosed with a catecholamine-secreting abdominal paraganglioma. Genetic testing eventually led to the diagnosis of SDHB-related hereditary paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma syndrome. Alarm features ("red flags") in children presenting with headache are reviewed, as well as the main features of paragangliomas and the indications for genetic testing. PMID:24589807

  11. Aerosol can puncture device operational test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-05-03

    Puncturing of aerosol cans is performed in the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 1 (WRAP 1) process as a requirement of the waste disposal acceptance criteria for both transuranic (TRU) waste and low-level waste (LLW). These cans have contained such things as paints, lubricating oils, paint removers, insecticides, and cleaning supplies which were used in radioactive facilities. Due to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Fire Protection concerns of the baseline system`s fire/explosion proof characteristics, a study was undertaken to compare the baseline system`s design to commercially available puncturing devices. While the study found no areas which might indicate a risk of fire or explosion, WHC Fire Protection determined that the puncturing system must have a demonstrated record of safe operation. This could be obtained either by testing the baseline design by an independent laboratory, or by substituting a commercially available device. As a result of these efforts, the commercially available Aerosolv can puncturing device was chosen to replace the baseline design. Two concerns were raised with the system. Premature blinding of the coalescing/carbon filter, due to its proximity to the puncture and draining operation; and overpressurization of the collection bottle due to its small volume and by blinding of the filter assembly. As a result of these concerns, testing was deemed necessary. The objective of this report is to outline test procedures for the Aerosolv.

  12. Headaches and Complementary Health Approaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... training of investigators in the basic and clinical neurosciences, and seeks better understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention ... type headache in adults: are they beneficial? CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics. 2009;15(2):183–205. Vickers AJ, ...

  13. [Cluster headache and brain imagery].

    PubMed

    Giraud, Pierric; Demarquay, Geneviève

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is defined on clinical international criteria developed by International Headache Society (IHS, 2013). The realization of a brain MRI with arterial angio-MRI is required according to the French recommendations (Donnet et al., 2014) based on recent the literature. Numerous causes or diseases can mimic typical or atypical AVF (Edvardsson, 2014). Identification of these causes allows an appropriate treatment in addition with symptomatic treatment. PMID:26585270

  14. A standard optometric headache history.

    PubMed

    Kairys, D J; Tibbetts, C; Saliba, K

    1983-02-01

    Many optometric patients present with headache as their chief complaint, or as an ancillary symptom. Since most cases of head pain are associated with few or inconstant physical signs, the key to an accurate diagnosis lies largely in a careful, systematic history. This article provides a scheme by which the busy optometric clinician can expeditiously obtain an incisive and relevant profile of every headache patient, and thereby determine the appropriate mode of management, and referral. PMID:6341437

  15. Higher-dimensional puncture initial data

    SciTech Connect

    Zilhao, Miguel; Ansorg, Marcus; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos; Sperhake, Ulrich; Witek, Helvi

    2011-10-15

    We calculate puncture initial data, corresponding to single and binary black holes with linear momenta, which solve the constraint equations of D-dimensional vacuum gravity. The data are generated by a modification of the pseudospectral code presented in [M. Ansorg, B. Bruegmann, and W. Tichy, Phys. Rev. D 70, 064011 (2004).] and made available as the TwoPunctures thorn inside the Cactus computational toolkit. As examples, we exhibit convergence plots, the violation of the Hamiltonian constraint as well as the initial data for D=4,5,6,7. These initial data are the starting point to perform high-energy collisions of black holes in D dimensions.

  16. PUNCTURE TEST CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    An experiment was conducted to determine the puncture resistance of 15 gloves that are used or proposed for use in the Tritium Facility at Savannah River Site (SRS). These data will serve as a baseline for characterization and may be incorporated into the glove procurement specification. The testing was conducted in agreement with ASTM D120 and all of the gloves met or exceeded the minimum requirements. Butyl gloves exhibited puncture resistance nearly 2.5 times the minimum requirements at SRS while Polyurethane was nearly 7.5x the minimum.

  17. [Endovascular treatment for dural arteriovenous fistula].

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Shigeru

    2008-08-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are acquired abnormal epidural arteriovenous shunts, particularly at the sinus wall. Most of the DAVFs are associated with progressive sinus occlusion. They are located in the cavernous sinus, lateral (transverse-sigmoid) sinus, superior-sagittal sinus, anterior condylar confluence, tentorial sinus, craniocervical junction, and anterior skull base (ethmoidal sinus). The treatment strategy differs based on the etiology and drainage pattern of DAVFs. The most effective treatment for DAVFs at the sinus wall is transvenous embolization (TVE) with coils. The target coil packing is effective if the sinus point is identified. Certain cases that are difficult to approach transvenously are treated with transarterial embolization (TAE) by using liquid materials like such glue. In particular cases with sinus occlusive lesion sinus reconstruction with sinoplasty is effective. The cases with failed or impossible endovascular approach should be treated with surgical interruption of shunts or by radiosurgery. The most frequent complication of TAE is brain and nerve ischemia due to the overembolization or migration, and that in TVE is the bleeding due to obstruction of the drainage route and nerve compression due to overpacking of coils. PMID:18717194

  18. Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: A Review.

    PubMed

    Maimon, Shimon; Luckman, Yehudit; Strauss, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is a rare disease, the etiology of which is not entirely clear. It is the most common vascular malformation of the spinal cord, comprising 60-80 % of the cases. The clinical presentation and imaging findings may be nonspecific and misleading, often mistaking it for other entities like demyelinating or degenerative diseases of the spine.This chapter describes the imaging findings, clinical signs, and symptoms of this disease and also the available treatment options according to the current literature.Angiography is still considered the gold standard for diagnosis; however, MRI/MRA is increasingly used as a screening tool. Modern endovascular techniques are becoming increasingly more effective in treating SDAVF offering a less invasive treatment option; however, they still lag behind surgical success rates which approach 100 %. The outcome of both treatment options is similar if complete obliteration of the fistula is obtained and depends mainly on the severity of neurological dysfunction before treatment.Heightened awareness by radiologists and clinicians to this rare entity is essential to make a timely diagnosis of this treatable disease. A multidisciplinary treatment approach is required in order to make appropriate treatment decisions. PMID:26508408

  19. Dural opening/removal for combined petrosal approach: technical note.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Shunsuke; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Taku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru

    2011-03-01

    Detailed descriptions of stepwise dural opening/removal for combined petrosal approach are presented. Following maximum bone work, the first dural incision was made along the undersurface of the temporal lobe parallel to the superior petrosal sinus. Posterior extension of the dural incision was made in a curved fashion, keeping away from the transverse-sigmoid junction and taking care to preserve the vein of Labbé. A second incision was made perpendicular to the first incision. After sectioning the superior petrosal sinus around the porus trigeminus, the incision was extended toward the posterior fossa dura in the middle fossa region. The tentorium was incised toward the incisura at a point just posterior to the entrance of the trochlear nerve. A third incision was made longitudinally between the superior petrosal sinus and the jugular bulb. A final incision was initiated perpendicular to the third incision in the presigmoid region and extended parallel to the superior petrosal sinus connecting the second incision. The dural complex consisting of the temporal lobe dura, the posterior fossa dura, and the freed tentorium could then be removed. In addition to extensive bone resection, our strategic cranial base dural opening/removal can yield true advantages for the combined petrosal approach. PMID:22451813

  20. Dural Opening/Removal for Combined Petrosal Approach: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, Shunsuke; Asaoka, Katsuyuki; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Taku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    Detailed descriptions of stepwise dural opening/removal for combined petrosal approach are presented. Following maximum bone work, the first dural incision was made along the undersurface of the temporal lobe parallel to the superior petrosal sinus. Posterior extension of the dural incision was made in a curved fashion, keeping away from the transverse-sigmoid junction and taking care to preserve the vein of Labbé. A second incision was made perpendicular to the first incision. After sectioning the superior petrosal sinus around the porus trigeminus, the incision was extended toward the posterior fossa dura in the middle fossa region. The tentorium was incised toward the incisura at a point just posterior to the entrance of the trochlear nerve. A third incision was made longitudinally between the superior petrosal sinus and the jugular bulb. A final incision was initiated perpendicular to the third incision in the presigmoid region and extended parallel to the superior petrosal sinus connecting the second incision. The dural complex consisting of the temporal lobe dura, the posterior fossa dura, and the freed tentorium could then be removed. In addition to extensive bone resection, our strategic cranial base dural opening/removal can yield true advantages for the combined petrosal approach. PMID:22451813

  1. A hundred years of lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Dugacki, V

    1992-01-01

    In the years 1991 and 1992 the 100th anniversary of the announcement of the lumbar puncture method (1891) and 150th anniversary of the birth of its inventor Heinrich Irenaeus Quincke (1842) are celebrated. In the article a short review is given of the development of this method. PMID:1463808

  2. Headache and sleep disorders: review and clinical implications for headache management.

    PubMed

    Rains, Jeanetta C; Poceta, J Steven

    2006-10-01

    Review of epidemiological and clinical studies suggests that sleep disorders are disproportionately observed in specific headache diagnoses (eg, migraine, tension-type, cluster) and other nonspecific headache patterns (ie, chronic daily headache, "awakening" or morning headache). Interestingly, the sleep disorders associated with headache are of varied types, including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), periodic limb movement disorder, circadian rhythm disorder, insomnia, and hypersomnia. Headache, particularly morning headache and chronic headache, may be consequent to, or aggravated by, a sleep disorder, and management of the sleep disorder may improve or resolve the headache. Sleep-disordered breathing is the best example of this relationship. Insomnia is the sleep disorder most often cited by clinical headache populations. Depression and anxiety are comorbid with both headache and sleep disorders (especially insomnia) and consideration of the full headache-sleep-affective symptom constellation may yield opportunities to maximize treatment. This paper reviews the comorbidity of headache and sleep disorders (including coexisting psychiatric symptoms where available). Clinical implications for headache evaluation are presented. Sleep screening strategies conducive to headache practice are described. Consideration of the spectrum of sleep-disordered breathing is encouraged in the headache population, including awareness of potential upper airway resistance syndrome in headache patients lacking traditional risk factors for OSA. Pharmacologic and behavioral sleep regulation strategies are offered that are also compatible with treatment of primary headache. PMID:17040332

  3. European Headache Federation consensus on technical investigation for primary headache disorders.

    PubMed

    Mitsikostas, D D; Ashina, M; Craven, A; Diener, H C; Goadsby, P J; Ferrari, M D; Lampl, C; Paemeleire, K; Pascual, J; Siva, A; Olesen, J; Osipova, V; Martelletti, P

    2015-12-01

    The diagnosis of primary headache disorders is clinical and based on the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society (ICHD-3-beta). However several brain conditions may mimic primary headache disorders and laboratory investigation may be needed. This necessity occurs when the treating physician doubts for the primary origin of headache. Features that represent a warning for a possible underlying disorder causing the headache are new onset headache, change in previously stable headache pattern, headache that abruptly reaches the peak level, headache that changes with posture, headache awakening the patient, or precipitated by physical activity or Valsalva manoeuvre, first onset of headache ≥50 years of age, neurological symptoms or signs, trauma, fever, seizures, history of malignancy, history of HIV or active infections, and prior history of stroke or intracranial bleeding. All national headache societies and the European Headache Alliance invited to review and comment the consensus before the final draft. The consensus recommends brain MRI for the case of migraine with aura that persists on one side or in brainstem aura. Persistent aura without infarction and migrainous infarction require brain MRI, MRA and MRV. Brain MRI with detailed study of the pituitary area and cavernous sinus, is recommended for all TACs. For primary cough headache, exercise headache, headache associated with sexual activity, thunderclap headache and hypnic headache apart from brain MRI additional tests may be required. Because there is little and no good evidence the committee constructed a consensus based on the opinion of experts, and should be treated as imperfect. PMID:26857820

  4. [The secondary headache in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nagaoki; Shimohira, Masayuki

    2005-10-01

    This report summarizes the secondary headache attributed to dental disease. Among a lot of dental diseases, the temporomandibular disorder(TMD) is the most important for understanding the mechanism of this type of headache. Our recent study showed that TMD patients had the following symptoms: dysdiadochokinesia, abnormal induced-rigidity in forearms, abnormal circadian rhythm, tension-type headache and mental torment. All these abnormal symptoms were relieved by the improvement of the patient's sleep-quality. The brain monoaminergic systems are known to be related to muscle tonus, sleep problems and mental symptoms. Our studies of a serotonin transporter(5-HTT) gene promoter polymorphism showed that the L and XL alleles were more frequent and S allele was less frequent in the TMD compared to the controls. We speculate the brain monoaminergic systems play the important pathophysiological roles on the TMD. PMID:16218390

  5. Dural lucent line: characteristic sign of hyperostosing meningioma en plaque

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.S.; Rogers, L.F.; Lee, C.

    1983-12-01

    Hyperostosis of the skull associated with en plaque form of meningioma may present a diagnostic challenge, since the intracranial part of the tumor is not visualized by skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), or other neuroradiologic methods. The authors report four cases of hyperostosing meningioma en plaque demonstrating a characteristic feature: a subdural layer of ossification along the hyperostotic bone with a dural lucent interface. Polytomography or high-resolution CT at bone window settings is necessary to identify the dural lucent line. The absence of this sign does not exclude meningioma en plaque.

  6. Brain Herniations into the Dural Venous Sinuses or Calvarium: MRI of a Recently Recognized Entity

    PubMed Central

    Battal, Bilal; Castillo, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Brain herniations into dural venous sinuses (DVS) are rare findings recently described and their etiology and clinical significance are controversial. We describe five patients with brain herniations into the DVS or calvarium identified on MRI, and discuss their imaging findings, possible causes, and relationship to the patient's symptoms. All patients were examined with MRI including high resolution pre- and post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted sequences. With respect to brain herniations we documented their locations, signal intensities in different sequences, and size. We then reviewed clinical records in an attempt to establish if any symptoms were related to the presence of these herniations. Three males and two females were examined (age range, 11-68 years). Three patients had unilateral temporal lobe herniations into transverse sinuses, one had a cerebellar herniation into the skull, and one had bilateral temporal lobe herniations into the transverse sinuses as well as a cerebellar herniation into the sigmoid sinus. In all, the herniated brain and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) had normal signal intensity on all MRI sequences. When correlated with clinical symptoms, brain herniations were thought to be incidental and asymptomatic in three patients and two patients had histories of headaches. Brain herniations with surrounding CSF into the DVS/skull should be considered potential sources of filling defects in the DVS. We believe that they are probably incidental findings that may be more common than previously recognized and should be not confused with the more common arachnoid granulations, clots, or tumors. Two patients had headaches, but their relation to the presence of herniated brain was uncertain. PMID:24571834

  7. Fatal progression of posttraumatic dural arteriovenous fistulas refractory to multimodal therapy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Friedman, J A; Meyer, F B; Nichols, D A; Coffey, R J; Hopkins, L N; Maher, C O; Meissner, I D; Pollock, B E

    2001-05-01

    The authors report the case of a man who suffered from progressive, disseminated posttraumatic dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) resulting in death, despite aggressive endovascular, surgical, and radiosurgical treatment. This 31-year-old man was struck on the head while playing basketball. Two weeks later a soft, pulsatile mass developed at his vertex, and the man began to experience pulsatile tinnitus and progressive headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent angiography revealed multiple AVFs in the scalp, calvaria, and dura, with drainage into the superior sagittal sinus. The patient was treated initially with transarterial embolization in five stages, followed by vertex craniotomy and surgical resection of the AVFs. However, multiple additional DAVFs developed over the bilateral convexities, the falx, and the tentorium. Subsequent treatment entailed 15 stages of transarterial embolization; seven stages of transvenous embolization, including complete occlusion of the sagittal sinus and partial occlusion of the straight sinus; three stages of stereotactic radiosurgery; and a second craniotomy with aggressive disconnection of the DAVFs. Unfortunately, the fistulas continued to progress, resulting in diffuse venous hypertension, multiple intracerebral hemorrhages in both hemispheres, and, ultimately, death nearly 5 years after the initial trauma. Endovascular, surgical, and radiosurgical treatments are successful in curing most patients with DAVFs. The failure of multimodal therapy and the fulminant progression and disseminated nature of this patient's disease are unique. PMID:11354419

  8. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Headaches and Migraines Migraine 101 Quiz Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... the facts when it comes to headaches and migraines? Test your knowledge with this quick quiz. True/ ...

  9. Altitude, Acute Mountain Sickness and Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  10. Acute treatment of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2010-04-01

    Optimum acute treatment of migraine requires prevention of headache as a top priority. Recognition of the multitude of migraine presentations, the frequency of total headache attacks, and number of days of headache disability are critical. Successful treatment requires excellent patient-clinician communication enhancing confidence and mutual trust based on patient needs and preferences. Optimum management of acute migraine nearly always requires pharmacologic treatment for rapid resolution. Migraine-specific triptans, dihydroergotamine, and several antiinflammatories have substantial empirical clinical efficacy. Older nonspecific drugs, particularly butalbital and opioids, contribute to medication overuse headache and are to be avoided. Clinicians should utilize evidence-based acute migraine-specific therapy stressing the imperative acute treatment goal of early intervention, but not too often with the correct drug, formulation, and dose. This therapy needs to provide cost-effective fast results, meaningful to the patient while minimizing the need for additional drugs. Migraine-ACT evaluates 2-hour pain freedom with return to normal function, comfort with treatment, and consistency of response. Employ a thoroughly educated patient, formulary, testimonials, stratification, and rational cotherapy against the race to central sensitization for optimum outcomes. PMID:20352584

  11. [Therapeutic neuromodulation in primary headaches].

    PubMed

    May, A; Jürgens, T P

    2011-06-01

    Neuromodulatory techniques have developed rapidly in the therapeutic management of refractory headaches. Invasive procedures comprise peripheral nerve stimulation (particularly occipital nerve stimulation), vagus nerve stimulation, cervical spinal cord stimulation and hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation are noninvasive variants. Based on current neuroimaging, neurophysiological and clinical studies occipital nerve stimulation and hypothalamic deep brain stimulation are recommended for patients with chronic cluster headache. Less convincing evidence can be found for their use in other refractory headaches such as chronic migraine. No clear recommendation can be given for the other neuromodulatory techniques. The emerging concept of intermittent stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion is nonetheless promising. Robust randomized and sham-controlled multicenter studies are needed before these therapeutic approaches are widely implemented. Due to the experimental nature all patients should be treated in clinical studies. It is essential to confirm the correct headache diagnosis and the refractory nature before an invasive approach is considered. Patients should generally be referred to specialized interdisciplinary outpatient departments which closely collaborate with neurosurgeons who are experienced in the implantation of neuromodulatory devices. It is crucial to ensure a competent postoperative follow-up with optimization of stimulation parameters and adjustment of medication. PMID:20972665

  12. Persistent unilateral mydriasis and headache

    PubMed Central

    Alkhalil, Mohammad; Lewis, Simon; Hawker, Matthew; Dick, David

    2009-01-01

    A 50-year-old white Caucasian woman with previously diagnosed migraine was admitted with unilateral headache and anisocoria. An initial assessment revealed no cause for this abnormality and she was thought to have mydriasis in the context of migraine. However, failure of her symptoms and signs to resolve prompted further investigation and demonstrated the diagnosis of intermittent angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:21686386

  13. Higher-dimensional puncture initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilhão, Miguel; Ansorg, Marcus; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Herdeiro, Carlos; Sperhake, Ulrich; Witek, Helvi

    2011-10-01

    We calculate puncture initial data, corresponding to single and binary black holes with linear momenta, which solve the constraint equations of D-dimensional vacuum gravity. The data are generated by a modification of the pseudospectral code presented in [M. Ansorg, B. Bruegmann, and W. Tichy, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 70, 064011 (2004).10.1103/PhysRevD.70.064011] and made available as the TwoPunctures thorn inside the Cactus computational toolkit. As examples, we exhibit convergence plots, the violation of the Hamiltonian constraint as well as the initial data for D=4,5,6,7. These initial data are the starting point to perform high-energy collisions of black holes in D dimensions.

  14. Dural diverticulum with a symptomatic cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Nicholas; Williamson, Clinton; Williamson, Natalie; Fortes, Manuel; Tjauw, Iwan; Vij, Vikas; Trojan, Ryan

    2016-03-01

    A case report of a 63-year-old female patient with a cervical spinal dural diverticulum and intracranial hypotension secondary to a symptomatic CSF leak after minor trauma. The patient responded well after the cervical approach epidural blood patch procedure. PMID:26973722

  15. Psychiatric Symptoms in Children with Primary Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anttila, Pirjo; Sourander, Andre; Metsahonkala, Liisa; Aromaa, Minna; Helenius, Hans; Sillanpaa, Matti

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association of psychiatric symptoms with migraine and tension-type headache in children. Method: A questionnaire completed by 1,135 Finnish children in the sixth grade identified 154 children with migraine, 138 with tension-type headache, and 407 children who were headache-free. Seventy children were randomly selected…

  16. [The problems of migraine headache treatment].

    PubMed

    Vilionskis, Aleksandras; Vaitkus, Antanas

    2002-01-01

    The acute treatment and prophylaxis of migraine headache are discussed in this article. The medications for acute treatment, their doses, indications, contraindications and adverse effects are compared. The special attention for migraine headache prophylaxis is paid. The migraine diagnostic criteria and triggers of migraine headache are noted. PMID:12474651

  17. Headache - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Headaches (Arabic) الصداع - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Headaches 头痛 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Headaches 頭痛 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) ...

  18. Use of an Intrathecal Catheter for Analgesia, Anesthesia, and Therapy in an Obstetric Patient with Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gragasin, Ferrante S; Chiarella, Angelo B

    2016-03-15

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is a rare disorder chiefly observed in obese women of childbearing age. We describe a case of a parturient with PTCS managed successfully with an intrathecal catheter, after inadvertent dural puncture, for labor analgesia, surgical anesthesia, and treatment of headache because of intracranial hypertension during the peripartum period. Prolonged placement of the intrathecal catheter (i.e., >24 hours) may have contributed to the absence of postdural puncture headache symptoms and an uneventful postpartum period. Intrathecal catheter placement may therefore be a viable option in patients with PTCS should inadvertent dural puncture occur. PMID:26825990

  19. Tension-type headache: one or more headaches?

    PubMed

    Sjaastad, Ottar

    2011-01-01

    In this context, the focus will be on the homogeneity of tension-type headache (T-TH): is it a disease? Or: is it more likely to be a syndrome? A multiplicity of disorders from as drastically different fields of medicine as disorders caused by environmental gases, intra-psychic conflicts, and nuchal/cervical disorders can putatively fake T-TH. T-TH is in all probability a conglomerate of disorders and not one solid, homogeneous disorder. PMID:22152438

  20. Tension-type headache: one or more headaches?

    PubMed Central

    Sjaastad, Ottar

    Summary In this context, the focus will be on the homogeneity of tension-type headache (T-TH): is it a disease? Or: is it more likely to be a syndrome? A multiplicity of disorders from as drastically different fields of medicine as disorders caused by environmental gases, intra-psychic conflicts, and nuchal/cervical disorders can putatively fake T-TH. T-TH is in all probability a conglomerate of disorders and not one solid, homogeneous disorder. PMID:22152438

  1. Posttraumatic headaches in civilians, soldiers, and athletes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2014-05-01

    Posttraumatic headaches are one of the most common and controversial secondary headache types. After mild head injury, more than 50% of people develop a postconcussion syndrome which has been controversial for more than 150 years. Headache is estimated as present in 30% to 90% of patients after mild head injury. Most headaches are of the tension type, although migraines can increase in frequency or occur acutely or chronically de novo. A review is provided of headaches in civilians, soldiers after blast trauma, athletes, and post-craniotomy including pathogenesis. The treatments are the same as for the primary phenotypes. PMID:24703532

  2. Cough, exertional, and other miscellaneous headaches.

    PubMed

    Sands, G H; Newman, L; Lipton, R

    1991-05-01

    We have discussed several miscellaneous headache disorders not associated with structural brain disease. The first group included those headaches provoked by "exertional" triggers in various forms. These include benign cough headache, BEH, and headache associated with sexual activity. The IHS diagnostic criteria were discussed. Benign exertional headache and cough headache were discussed together because of their substantial similarities. In general, BEH is characterized by severe, short-lived pain after coughing, sneezing, lifting a burden, sexual activity, or other similar brief effort. Structural disease of the brain or skull was the most important differential diagnosis for these disorders, with posterior fossa mass lesions being identified as the most common organic etiology. Magnetic resonance imaging with special attention to the posterior fossa and foramen magnum is the preferred method for evaluating these patients. Indomethacin is the treatment of choice. The headache associated with sexual activity is dull in the early phases of sexual excitement and becomes intense at orgasm. This headache is unpredictable in occurrence. Like BEH, the headache associated with sexual activity can be a manifestation of structural disease. Subarachnoid hemorrhage must be excluded, by CT scanning and CSF examination, in patients with the sexual headache. Benign headache associated with sexual activity has been successfully treated with indomethacin and beta-blockers. The second miscellaneous group of headache disorders includes those provoked by eating something cold or food additives, and by environmental stimuli. Idiopathic stabbing headache does not have a known trigger and appears frequently in migraineurs. Its occurrence may also herald the termination of an attack of cluster headache. Indomethacin treatment provides significant relief. Three headaches triggered by substances that are eaten were reviewed: ingestion of a cold stimulus, nitrate/nitrite-induced headache

  3. Recurrent paroxysmal headache associated with facial ecchymosis.

    PubMed

    Comabella, M; Titus, F; Huguet, P

    1996-08-01

    The case of a 58-year-old man with chronic paroxysmal headache and facial ecchymosis is described. The headache was pulsating, of short duration, without nausea or vomiting, and occasionally associated with flashing lights. Ecchymoses were mainly located in the middle forehead region and their appearance was associated with a reduction in intensity of the headache. Blood coagulation tests were within normal limits, and a skin biopsy of the ecchymotic lesion ruled out an underlying vasculitis. These attacks were difficult to include in any particular type of headache, although some aspects were similar to migraine headache. The possible mechanism of hemorrhages is discussed. PMID:8869770

  4. Sunrise-related headache: case report.

    PubMed

    Ulas, U H; Korkmaz, A; Karadas, O; Odabasi, Z; Reiter, R J

    2010-01-01

    A male, 34 years of age, suffers from headaches, red and watery eyes. The headaches began in childhood; the frequency of headaches has increased over the years and in the last decade headaches have occurred on a daily basis. If he wakes up before sunrise he feels much better and free of a headache; however, once he continues to sleep during and after sunrise, he suffers from tiredness, headache and nervousness. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), benign neuroepithelial cysts or a chronic infarct area was reported at the junction of the left medio-lateral zone of hypothalamus. After repeated MRI examinations, it was decided that the lesion on the left medio-lateral zone of hypothalamus may have disrupted the pineal gland and changed melatonin secretion. It was decided to treat him with 3 mg melatonin daily before going to bed. After a week of treatment, the patient reported that he felt very fresh and was virtually free of headaches. PMID:19473198

  5. Post-traumatic headaches: a clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; D'Onofrio, F; Conte, F; Petretta, V; Tedeschi, G; Tessitore, A

    2014-05-01

    Headache attributed to head and/or neck trauma or injury, the so-called post-traumatic headache (PTH), is the most common secondary headache disorder and one of the most controversial clinical entities in the headache field, due to its unclear pathophysiological mechanisms and the unsolved role of associated psychological and medico-legal aspects. PTH, as a significant cause of morbidity after traumatic brain injury, may occur as an isolated symptom or as one of a constellation of symptoms known as post-concussive syndrome. However, in many cases, PTH might also represent an accentuation of non-disabling, remote or infrequent pre-existing primary headaches rather than a new onset headache strictly related to the trauma. Recently, the International Classification of Headache Disorders attempted to classify PTH; however, many unsolved issues are still to be clarified. In this brief review, we will focus on PTH clinical aspects and diagnostic criteria. PMID:24867854

  6. [Tension headache--a review].

    PubMed

    Pfaffenrath, V; Wermuth, A; Pöllmann, W

    1988-12-01

    Tension headache (TH) is an ill-defined headache syndrome, characterized by bilateral, daily headaches with fronto-occipital localisation. TH is often accompanied by a migraine and an abuse of analgesics and/or ergotamine. In the etiology of TH vascular, muscular and psychogenic factors are assumed. Floating transitions to common migraine are discussed. The increased muscle tension is not specific for TH, but more probably a consequence of TH. In addition a decrease of the pain threshold with a deficiency of the antinociceptive system is supposed. The efficacy of tricyclic antidepressives in TH is based on potentiation of serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms and - besides their analgetic potencies - upon an increase of the pain threshold. TH prophylaxis is indicated if patients suffer from TH more than ten times per month. Medication are tricyclic antidepressives of the amitriptyline-type. Prophylaxis of TH can only be successful if a simultaneous abuse of analgesics and/or ergotamine is discontinued. In addition, EMG-biofeedback, as well as relaxation - and vasoconstriction training might be helpful in specific cases. PMID:3069680

  7. [Genetics of primary headache syndromes].

    PubMed

    Freilinger, T

    2014-08-01

    Migraine has an important genetic component. The prototypic monogenic form of migraine is hemiplegic migraine, a rare subtype of migraine with aura, for which three causative genes have been identified. Studies of transgenic animal models have substantially improved our understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of this monogenic model disease as well as of migraine in general. Beyond this, there are other (rarer) monogenic forms of migraine, e.g., in the context of hereditary mostly vascular syndromes such as CADASIL. By contrast, the common types of migraine with and without aura are genetically complex. With the identification of the first robust genetic risk variants in large genome-wide association studies, our knowledge in this still dynamically expanding field has substantially increased. This review summarizes the current status of migraine genetics, with a special focus on hemiplegic migraine as well as the most recent findings in complex migraine genetics. In addition, the first preliminary findings on the genetics of other types of primary headache disorders (cluster headache, tension-type headache) are briefly reviewed. PMID:25012921

  8. Hybrid surgery for dural arteriovenous fistula in the neurosurgical hybrid operating suite

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shih-Chieh; Tsuei, Yuang-Seng; Chen, Wen-Hsien; Shen, Chiung-Chyi

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF), which is difficult to access by either the surgical or endovascular approach, is challenging. A hybrid technique, combining a microsurgical approach and endovascular embolization, can provide less invasive management of dural AVFs in a modern neurosurgical hybrid operating suite. We present a case of intracerebral hemorrhage in the left cerebellum secondary to dural AVF, Cognard type IV with numerous tiny feeders from the ascending pharyngeal artery branches. No adequate arterial or venous route for endovascular embolization was found by neuroangiography. The hybrid technique, combining keyhole pterional craniotomy and embolization with n-butyl cyanoacrylate glue injection via direct cannulation of the periclival venous plexus, succeeded in obliterating the dural AVF. Intraoperative angiography showed successful embolization of the dural AVF without any complication. This report illustrates the usefulness of the neurosurgical hybrid operating suite for the treatment of difficult dural AVFs. PMID:24459222

  9. Intracranial Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting with Intractable Headache after Cervical Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myungsoo; Park, Ki-Su

    2015-08-01

    Postdural punctural headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia is due to intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, and it is occasionally accompanied by an intracranial hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, an intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) presenting with an intractable headache after a cervical epidural steroid injection (ESI) has not been reported. A 39-year-old woman without any history of trauma underwent a cervical ESI for a herniated nucleus pulposus at the C5-6 level. One month later, she presented with a severe headache that was not relieved by analgesic medication, which changed in character from being positional to non-positional during the preceding month. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed a CSDH along the left convexity. Emergency burr-hole drainage was performed and the headache abated. This report indicates that an intracranial CSDH should be considered a possible complication after ESI. In addition, the event of an intractable and changing PDPH after ESI suggests further evaluation for diagnosis of an intracranial hematoma. PMID:26361532

  10. Direct puncture angiography in congenital venous malformations

    SciTech Connect

    Boxt, L.M.; Levin, D.C.; Fellows, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Angiodysplasia of the extremities is a broad group of vascular lesions of arterial, capillary, and venous origin. They are generally detected initially during late childhood or early adulthood. Although they may cause swelling and pain, they are often asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on physical examination performed for other reasons. One of the most troublesome diagnostic aspects of these lesions is the fact that while they consist of enlarged venous channels, standard venographic techniques may fail to demonstrate them. Three cases are described in which the diagnosis of venous angioma was made by direct needle puncture and contrast material injection, after arteriographic and/or venographic examination was either negative or nondiagnostic.

  11. Endovascular treatment of posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Maus, Volker; Söderman, Michael; Rodesch, Georges; Kabbasch, Christoph; Mpotsaris, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistulas (PCC DAVFs) are rare lesions that may present with pulse-synchronous bruit. In cases with venous reflux there is a risk of haemorrhage or even dementia. Diagnosis and endovascular treatment require a profound knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the craniocervical junction and comprehensive neurovascular imaging. We describe the clinical presentation, angiographic imaging and endovascular treatment of a PCC DAVF in a female patient with pulse-synchronous bruit as the presenting symptom. The fistula drained almost exclusively into the sigmoid sinus and internal jugular vein. There was no intracranial reflux. The PCC DAVF was treated with transvenous coil occlusion of the fistulous pouch in the condylar canal. Symptoms resolved immediately after intervention and the patient recovered quickly without any neurological deficits. MR angiography confirmed occlusion of the DAVF. The dural sinus was patent with normal blood flow. PMID:27247204

  12. Primary dural lymphoma: Complete remission after treatment with radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremy; Gupta, Arjun; Naina, Harris

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in sarcoidosis is rare and typically occurs in 5-10% of patients. Neurological symptoms in a patient with known sarcoidosis can be attributed to neurosarcoidosis without thorough evaluation. Primary Dural Lymphoma (PDL) is an extremely rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Although PDL is technically a subtype of primary CNS lymphoma, the two entities vary markedly in their histological grade, clinical course, prognosis and treatment. The most common dural- based lesion found on CNS imaging is meningioma. It shares many imaging, clinical and epidemiologic features of PDL which often leads to misdiagnosis of PDL as meningioma. We present a case where a PDL was diagnosed after CNS symptoms failed to resolve after steroid therapy for presumed neurosarcoidosis. PMID:26237359

  13. C6 plate puncture testing report.

    SciTech Connect

    Vangoethem, Douglas J.; Cordova, Theresa Elena; Reu, Phillip L.

    2013-04-01

    There are numerous scenarios where critical systems could be subject to penetration by projectiles or fixed objects (e.g., collision, natural disaster, act of terrorism, etc.). It is desired to use computational models to examine these scenarios and make risk-informed decisions; however, modeling of material failure is an active area of research, and new models must be validated with experimental data. The purpose of this report is to document the experimental work performed from FY07 through FY08 on the Campaign Six Plate Puncture project. The goal of this project was to acquire experimental data on the puncture and penetration of metal plates for use in model validation. Of particular interest is the PLH failure model also known as the multilinear line segment model. A significant amount of data that will be useful for the verification and validation of computational models of ductile failure were collected during this project were collected and documented herein; however, much more work remains to be performed, collecting additional experimental data that will further the task of model verification.

  14. Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain and spinal cord, or intracranial hemorrhage, bleeding inside the brain. EMERGENCY See your doctor or go ... relieve pain. You can also rest in a dark room and apply ice packs and gentle pressure ...

  15. Headache

    MedlinePlus

    ... decisions about when and where they should receive healthcare. Unfortunately, most people lack the medical knowledge needed to make these decisions safely. FreeMD.com is powered by a computer program that performs symptom triage. The goal of ...

  16. Analysis of Internet sites for headache.

    PubMed

    Peroutka, S J

    2001-02-01

    The Internet is capable of providing an unprecedented amount of information to both physicians and patients interested in headache. To assess the status of headache information on the Internet (as of January 2000), a search for 'headache' was performed using 10 leading Internet search engines. The number of web pages identified ranged from 4419 (WebCrawler) to 506 426 (Northern Light). The 'average' search yielded nearly 150 000 web page listings for 'headache'. The content was then reviewed of the top 10 listed web pages for each search (i.e. a total of 100 page listings). The results demonstrate that, at the present time, Internet-based information on headache is extensive but poorly organized. Editorial review of this potential valuable resource is required in order to maximize its utility in headache education and management. PMID:11298659

  17. Acetate Causes Alcohol Hangover Headache in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Christina R.; Spangenberg, Rebecca Jay; Hoek, Jan B.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Oshinsky, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanism of veisalgia cephalgia or hangover headache is unknown. Despite a lack of mechanistic studies, there are a number of theories positing congeners, dehydration, or the ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde as causes of hangover headache. Methods We used a chronic headache model to examine how pure ethanol produces increased sensitivity for nociceptive behaviors in normally hydrated rats. Results Ethanol initially decreased sensitivity to mechanical stimuli on the face (analgesia), followed 4 to 6 hours later by inflammatory pain. Inhibiting alcohol dehydrogenase extended the analgesia whereas inhibiting aldehyde dehydrogenase decreased analgesia. Neither treatment had nociceptive effects. Direct administration of acetate increased nociceptive behaviors suggesting that acetate, not acetaldehyde, accumulation results in hangover-like hypersensitivity in our model. Since adenosine accumulation is a result of acetate formation, we administered an adenosine antagonist that blocked hypersensitivity. Discussion Our study shows that acetate contributes to hangover headache. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of hangover headache and the mechanism of headache induction. PMID:21209842

  18. Cerebral venous thrombosis in post-lumbar puncture intracranial hypotension: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kate, Mahesh P.

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of presentation of intracranial hypotension is clinically perplexing. We report a case of 31-year-old post-partum woman who underwent an uneventful caesarean section under spinal anesthesia. From the second day of surgery she developed postural headache, the headache lost its postural character after few days. She then developed seizures and ataxic hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features of severe intracranial hypotension in the brain and the spinal cord, and magnetic resonance venography showed cortical vein and partial superior sagittal sinus thrombosis. Prothrombotic (etiological) work-up showed Protein C and S deficiency. She responded to anticoagulation therapy and recovered completely. On review of literature two distinct groups could be identified obstetric and non-obstetric. The non-obstetric group included patients who underwent diagnostic lumbar puncture, intrathecal injection of medications and epidural anesthesia for non-obstetric surgeries. Poor outcome and mortality was noted in non-obstetric group, while obstetric group had an excellent recovery. PMID:24627803

  19. [Orofacial pain and secondary headaches].

    PubMed

    Bodéré, C; Pionchon, P

    2005-07-01

    Recent studies have improved our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying orofacial pain. This review presents the most relevant aspects of such mechanisms according to the different clinical features of the various entities in orofacial pain: odontogenic pain, atypical facial pain and other idiopathic orofacial pain conditions and musculoskeletal pain characterized by pain in the temporomandibular joint and/or the associated muscles of mastication. The link between the muscular temporomandibular disorders and tension type headache is particularly considered in the light of the different possible mechanisms. PMID:16141969

  20. [Headache. Current status of research and treatment].

    PubMed

    Straube, A; Gaul, C

    2015-10-01

    The starting point for German headache research and clinical education was the engagement of D. Soyka in the 1970s, which enabled the foundation of the German Headache Society (DMKG) on 28 June 1979 and, some years later, the founding congress of the International Headache Society (IHS) in Munich 1982. As a result of these activities, in 1988 the first international classification of headache disorders was published. This classification was one of the major milestones in the development of basic as well as clinical headache research. In the following years, epidemiological studies all over the world showed a 1-year prevalence for headache of approximately 60%, making headaches one of the most frequent medical complaints. Basic research showed an involvement of serotonergic mechanisms in migraine pain and triptans were one of the first drugs designed to influence these mechanisms. Functional brain imaging studies in migraine patients further showed a cyclic modulation of the activity of brainstem areas independent of the current pain state. Various research groups were involved in the clarification of the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in migraine and cluster headache. A specific development in the German headache scene is the establishment of integrated headache centers and reflects the primarily multimodal treatment approach in Germany which contrasts with the settings in other countries. These successful developments are increasingly being undermined by the fact that the low financial support of headache research, for example, by the German science council is causing a decreasing interest in headache research, with the consequence that the clinical education of students as well as young medical doctors shows increasing deficits. The consequence for the future will be a deficit in the clinical care of the population. PMID:26264901

  1. Headache and facial pain in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, William P

    2004-08-01

    Headache occasionally occurs during or after scuba diving. Although its significance often is benign, headache may signal a serious neurological disorder in some circumstances. In addition to the usual causes of headache, the diagnostic evaluation should consider otic and paranasal sinus barotrauma, arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, carbon dioxide retention, carbon monoxide toxicity, hyperbaric-triggered migraine, cervical and temporomandibular joint strain, supraorbital neuralgia, carotid artery dissection, and exertional and cold stimulus headache syndromes. Focal neurologic symptoms, even in the migraineur, should not be ignored, but rather treated with 100% oxygen acutely and referred without delay to a facility with a hyperbaric chamber. PMID:15228893

  2. Injection Therapy for Headache and Facial Pain.

    PubMed

    Kleen, Jonathan K; Levin, Morris

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral nerve blocks are an increasingly viable treatment option for selected groups of headache patients, particularly those with intractable headache or facial pain. Greater occipital nerve block, the most widely used local anesthetic procedure in headache conditions, is particularly effective, safe, and easy to perform in the office. Adverse effects are few and infrequent. These procedures can result in rapid relief of pain and allodynia, and effects last for several weeks or months. Use of nerve block procedures and potentially onabotulinum toxin therapy should be expanded for patients with intractable headache disorders who may benefit, although more studies are needed for efficacy and clinical safety. PMID:27475516

  3. Flat plate puncture test convergence study.

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer; Ammerman, Douglas James; Molitoris, David; Tso, Chi-Fung; Yaksh, Mike

    2010-10-01

    The ASME Task Group on Computational Mechanics for Explicit Dynamics is investigating the types of finite element models needed to accurately solve various problems that occur frequently in cask design. One type of problem is the 1-meter impact onto a puncture spike. The work described in this paper considers this impact for a relatively thin-walled shell, represented as a flat plate. The effects of mesh refinement, friction coefficient, material models, and finite element code will be discussed. The actual punch, as defined in the transport regulations, is 15 cm in diameter with a corner radius of no more than 6 mm. The punch used in the initial part of this study has the same diameter, but has a corner radius of 25 mm. This more rounded punch was used to allow convergence of the solution with a coarser mesh. A future task will be to investigate the effect of having a punch with a smaller corner radius. The 25-cm thick type 304 stainless steel plate that represents the cask wall is 1 meter in diameter and has added mass on the edge to represent the remainder of the cask. The amount of added mass to use was calculated using Nelm's equation, an empirically derived relationship between weight, wall thickness, and ultimate strength that prevents punch through. The outer edge of the plate is restrained so that it can only move in the direction parallel to the axis of the punch. Results that are compared include the deflection at the edge of the plate, the deflection at the center of the plate, the plastic strains at radius r=50 cm and r=100 cm , and qualitatively, the distribution of plastic strains. The strains of interest are those on the surface of the plate, not the integration point strains. Because cask designers are using analyses of this type to determine if shell will puncture, a failure theory, including the effect of the tri-axial nature of the stress state, is also discussed. The results of this study will help to determine what constitutes an adequate

  4. Clinical aspects of perimenstrual headaches.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Frederick R

    2009-02-01

    Menstrual migraine (MM) is either pure, if attacks are limited solely during the perimenstrual window (PMW), or menstrually related (MRM), if two of three PMWs are associated with attacks with additional migraine events outside the PMW. Acute migraine specific therapy is equally effective in MM and non-MM. Although the International Classification of Headache Disorders-II classifies MM without aura, data suggest this needs revision. The studies on extended-cycle oral contraceptives suggest benefits for headache-prone individuals. Triptan mini-prophylaxis outcomes are positive, but a conclusion of "minimal net benefit compared to placebo" is not entirely unwarranted. In a 2008 evidence-based review, grade B recommendations exist for sumatriptan (50 and 100 mg), mefenamic acid (500 mg), and riza-triptan (10 mg) for the acute treatment of MRM. For the preventive mini-prophylactic treatment of MRM, grade B recommendations are provided for transcutaneous estrogen (1.5 mg), frovatriptan (2.5 mg twice daily), and naratriptan (1 mg twice daily). PMID:19126376

  5. Delay in hospital admission of patients with cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Lopes, M G; Rosas, M J; Fontes, J

    2005-01-01

    Factors influencing early hospital admission have been described for several stroke types but not for cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT). CVT is more difficult to diagnose than arterial stroke; delay in hospital admission may postpone CVT treatment. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe the delay between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission of patients with CVT, and (2) to identify the variables that influence that delay. We registered the interval (days) between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission in 91 consecutive patients admitted to 20 Portuguese hospitals between June 1995 and June 1998. We also studied the impact of admission delay on treatments (prescription of anticoagulants and the number of days elapsed between the onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation and admission). Median admission delay was 4 days. Twenty-two (25%) patients were admitted within 24 h. Two thirds of the patients were admitted within 7 days and 75% within 13 days. In multiple logistic regression analysis, admission within 24 h was positively associated with mental status disorder (delirium or abulia; OR = 4.59; 95% CI = 1.41-14.89) and negatively associated with headache (OR = 0.03; 95% CI = 0.00-0.32). Presentation as isolated intracranial hypertension was associated with admission delay of more than 4 days (OR = 2.63; 95% CI = 0.97-7.14). Papilloedema was associated with an admission delay of more than 13 days (OR = 4.69; 95% CI = 1.61-13.61). There was no association between admission delay and the proportion of anticoagulated patients. The interval between onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation was shorter in patients admitted earlier (p = 0.0001, for either admission within 24 h, 4 or 13 days). There is a considerable delay until the clinical picture associated with CVT is recognised as justifying hospital admission, especially when patients present with symptoms identical to isolated intracranial hypertension syndrome. PMID

  6. Sport and exercise headache: Part 2. Diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S J; Nukada, H

    1994-01-01

    A group of 129 subjects (67 men and 62 women) experiencing sports headache was established using a questionnaire. A wide range of information was gathered, focusing on the mode of onset, time course, characteristic features and associated symptoms of sports-related headache. Criteria for the varieties of sports headaches were established using head trauma and then migraine to divide subgroups of sports headaches. Cases were classified into four categories: effort migraine, trauma-triggered migraine, effort-exertion headache, and post-traumatic headache. The percentages of each sports-related headache found were: effort migraine 9%, trauma-triggered migraine 6%, effort-exertion headache 60%, post-traumatic headache 22% and miscellaneous 3%. Sports migraine accounted for 15% of the total sports headache sample. Effort-exertion headache was the most common type of sports headache. Although effort-exertion headache could be separated into subjects who had an acute severe headache induced by anaerobic exercise (exertion headache) from those having a substantial headache lasting hours initiated by aerobic exercise (effort headache), most subjects with effort-exertion headache in this study appeared not to fall into any discrete subgroups. Trauma-related headaches were experienced mainly by men in contact sports, while women more commonly had non-trauma-related headache in running and jogging. PMID:7921916

  7. [Management of transient radicular pain after receiving an epidural blood patch for headaches due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Melo, M C; Revuelta, M E; Santeularia, T; Genové, M; Català, E

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache is an uncommon disease that resolves spontaneously in most of the cases and in a short period of time. The initial treatment should be symptomatic. In some patients the symptomatology is extremely disabling, and in these cases both the diagnosis and treatment may be performed by an epidural blood patch. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman, with no previous record of epidural or intrathecal puncture, consulted in the Emergency Department complaining of a 9-day history of frontal headache and diplopia, along with nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. Considering the symptomatology and the uncontrolled pain, the Pain Unit of our hospital performed an epidural blood patch. In the first 24h the patient reported a remarkable relief of both headache and diplopia but developed a left lumbar radiculopathy that was treated successfully with supportive measures. Transient lumbar radiculopathy is a common and acceptable event secondary to the use of epidural blood patch as a treatment for spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. PMID:25698607

  8. [Consensus paper of the German Migraine and Headache Society on the structure of headache care facilities in Germany].

    PubMed

    Marziniak, M; Malzacher, V; Förderreuther, S; Jürgens, T; Kropp, P; May, A; Straube, A

    2014-04-01

    This consensus paper introduces a classification of headache care facilities on behalf of the German Migraine and Headache Society. This classification is based on the recommendations of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) and the European Headache Federation (EHF) and was adapted to reflect the specific situation of headache care in Germany. It defines three levels of headache care: headache practitioner (level 1), headache outpatient clinic (level 2) and headache centers (level 3). The objective of the publication is to define and establish reliable criteria in the field of headache care in Germany. PMID:24718744

  9. Athletes' Headaches: Not Necessarily 'Little' Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Headaches experienced by athletes are categorized (exertional, effort, and trauma-triggered migraines), and treatment methods related. Consequences of misdiagnosis, lack of reporting, and poor monitoring are discussed as well as categories of athletes most likely to suffer sports-related headaches. (IAH)

  10. Post-epileptic headache and migraine.

    PubMed Central

    Schon, F; Blau, J N

    1987-01-01

    One hundred epileptic patients were questioned about their headaches. Post-ictal headaches occurred in 51 of these patients and most commonly lasted 6-72 hours. Major seizures were more often associated with post-epileptic headaches than minor attacks. Nine patients in this series of 100 also had migraine: in eight of these nine a typical, albeit a mild, migraine attack was provoked by fits. The post-ictal headache in the 40 epileptics who did not have migraine was accompanied by vomiting in 11 cases, photophobia in 14 cases and vomiting with photophobia in 4 cases. Furthermore, post-epileptic headache was accentuated by coughing, bending and sudden head movements and relieved by sleep. It is, therefore, clear that seizures provoke a syndrome similar to the headache phase of migraine in 50% of epileptics. It is proposed that post-epileptic headache arises intracranially and is related to the vasodilatation known to follow seizures. The relationship of post-epileptic headache to migraine is discussed in the light of current ideas on migraine pathogenesis, in particular the vasodilation which accompanies Leao's spreading cortical depression. PMID:3117978

  11. Interventional Treatment for Post-traumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Conidi, Francis X

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache (migraine) is the most common symptom of concussion and traumatic brain injury. An expert opinion-based review along with a literature review (PubMed) was conducted looking at known interventional procedures for post-traumatic headache using the keywords post-traumatic headache, post-traumatic migraine headache, concussion, mild traumatic brain injury, and traumatic brain injury and the following categories: mechanism, pathophysiology, treatment, physical therapy, neurostimulation, Botox@/Onabotulinum toxin, and surgical intervention. The results returned a total of 181 articles of which 52 were selected. None of the articles included randomized placebo-controlled studies, and most were either prospective or retrospective case analysis and/or review articles or consensus opinion papers, with most studies yielding positive results. Despite a lack of hard evidence, interventional procedures, alone or in combination, appear to be an effective treatment for post-traumatic headaches. PMID:27130542

  12. Harry Potter and the curse of headache.

    PubMed

    Sheftell, Fred; Steiner, Timothy J; Thomas, Hallie

    2007-06-01

    Headache disorders are common in children and adolescents. Even young male Wizards are disabled by them. In this article we review Harry Potter's headaches as described in the biographical series by JK Rowling. Moreover, we attempt to classify them. Regrettably we are not privy to the Wizard system of classifying headache disorders and are therefore limited to the Muggle method, the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition (ICHD-II). Harry's headaches are recurrent. Although conforming to a basic stereotype, and constant in location, throughout the 6 years of his adolescence so far described they have shown a tendency to progression. Later descriptions include a range of accompanying symptoms. Despite some quite unusual features, they meet all but one of the ICHD-II criteria for migraine, so allowing the diagnosis of 1.6 Probable migraine. PMID:17578544

  13. Cluster headache management and beyond.

    PubMed

    Martelletti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic management of cluster headache is based on a very stable triad of drugs. Acute treatment has, in subcutaneous sumatriptan, its gold standard if compared to pure oxygen or indomethacin. Preventative treatment is based on verapamil at high doses (≥ 360 mg) and is a gold standard if compared to lithium carbonate or topiramate. Transitional treatments, based on the short-term use of corticosteroids with either systemic or local administration (GON), can be useful for the suppression of most resistant cluster periods, but with a well-known carry-over phenomenon related to the length of the cluster period itself. The role of invasive or noninvasive neuromodulation approaches must still be determined on a large scale; therefore, its use is not recommended as of yet. Lifestyle changes, including alcohol avoidance during the active phase of the disease, sleep hygiene and use of vasodilation drugs, should be carefully considered and the patients should be fully informed. PMID:26027515

  14. Cluster headache in childhood: case series from a pediatric headache center.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Rosanna; Capuano, Alessandro; Torriero, Roberto; Tarantino, Samuela; Properzi, Enrico; Vigevano, Federico; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Childhood-onset cluster headache is an excruciatingly painful and distressing condition. A retrospective study was conducted on charts of patients referring to our Headache Center. Those diagnosed as cluster headache were selected. We identified 11 children (6 males and 5 females). The mean age of cluster headache onset was 10 years (range: 5-16). All children had episodic cluster headache. All children had unilateral orbital pain; 7 patients had throbbing pain, whereas 4 children complained stabbing pain. The mean duration of the attack was 86 minutes (ranging from 30 to 180 minutes). The frequency of episodes was between 1 and 4 per day. All children had the typical cluster headache autonomic features, such as lacrimation, conjunctival injection, ptosis, and nostril rhinorrhea. Steroids showed a good clinical efficacy in interrupting cluster headache recurrence. As symptomatic drugs, acetaminophen as well as ibuprofen were ineffective; indomethacin was effective in 1 case. PMID:23307881

  15. [Idiopathic headache in childhood and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Karwautz, A; Wöber-Bingöl, C; Wöber, C

    1993-12-01

    This review of the literature covers classification, epidemiology and clinical aspects of idiopathic headache in childhood and adolescence. In addition, pathogenetic models taking into account the complex involvement of organic, psychological and psychosocial factors are critically reviewed. A general pathogenetic model of migraine may be characterized by a given predisposition, various co-factors which enhance the tendency, and finally, trigger mechanisms which induce an attack. No generally accepted model exists for tension-type headache. In assessing the importance of various factors thought to be related to idiopathic headache, it is necessary to differentiate between causal relation, unspecific association, and coincidence. The aim of this review is to present potential factors influencing headache in childhood and adolescence and to discuss these factors critically with regard to their etiopathogenetic importance. Organic factors seem to be most important in migraine, whereas psychological and (psycho)social factors may influence any type of headache. Briefly, migraine in childhood and adolescence seems to be definitively associated with vegetative dysfunction, abdominal symptoms and hormonal factors and possibly with allergic reactions, whereas a relation to epilepsy can be excluded. There is absolutely no evidence for a typical personality of migraine patients. Various psychic reactions, however, are important in all types of headache. Depression and anxiety in young headache patients seem to be related generally to pain, but not specifically to headache. However, school problems, learning disabilities and stress coping behaviour seem to be related directly to recurrent headache. Additionally, there is evidence that the prevalence of headache is associated with low economic status. PMID:8114976

  16. [Headache, general malaise and left-side ptosis].

    PubMed

    Kissling, S; Nützi, E; Magun, J G; Frauchiger, B

    1998-08-26

    A 82-year-old female was admitted to hospital because of deteriorated general condition, severe diffuse headache and complete left-sided ptosis. A computed tomography scan of the head revealed no subarachnoid haemorrhage. Based on the hypothesis that the symptoms resulted from an infarction in the brain stem, the previous medication with Aspirin was continued. After repeated vomitus hypotensive dehydration developed and was adequately treated. Because of confusion, elevated white blood counts and signs of meningism, a spinal puncture was performed. Only the serology for Borrelia-IgG was positive, therefore the patient received Rocephin. During treatment only the ptosis persisted, therefore the substitution with sodium and the medication with Prednisone were stopped. Afterwards the symptoms reappeared and the laboratory results showed insufficiency of the pituitary. A magnetic resonance scan showed a microadenoma of the pituitary with local bleeding. Nine months after pituitary apoplexy, with hormonal substitution only a divergent strabism on the left side persisted. Clinical findings, course and therapy of pituitary apoplexy are discussed. PMID:9782750

  17. Anti-migraine action of triptans is preceded by transient aggravation of headache caused by activation of meningeal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Burstein, Rami; Jakubowski, Moshe; Levy, Dan

    2005-05-01

    Consistent with previous accounts, some of the patients visiting our pain clinic during the course of a migraine attack have indicated-without solicitation-that sumatriptan injection initially intensified their headache before they were able to appreciate any pain relief. In this study, those patients who came forward complaining about pain exacerbation were asked to rate their headache intensity every 5 min. Within 5-15 min of sumatriptan injection, 17 of the 31 patients studied (55%) reported that their migraine pain intensified for 10-15 min before they started to notice any pain relief. Similar pattern of pain exacerbation was also observed in migraine attacks treated with oral formulation of almotriptan, eletriptan, rizatriptan, and zolmitriptan. To investigate the possible mechanism underlying this transient exacerbation of pain, we examined whether intravenous administration of sumatriptan can alter the response properties of C- and Adelta-meningeal nociceptors in the rat. Five to twenty minutes after intravenous administration of 300 microg/kg sumatriptan, 8/10 C-units and 2/8 Adelta-units increased their firing rate, and 6/10 C-units and 7/8 Adelta-units developed mechanical hyper-responsiveness to dural indentation. The minimal effective dose for activation and sensitization of meningeal nociceptors by sumatriptan was 3 microg/kg, suggesting that relatively low levels of triptans entering the circulation shortly after their administration can alter the physiological properties of meningeal nociceptors and produce a transient exacerbation of headache. PMID:15836966

  18. Endovascular Management of Anterior Cranial Fossa Dural Arteriovenous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mack, W.J; Gonzalez, N.R.; Jahan, R.; Vinuela, F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) of the anterior cranial fossa have traditionally been treated by open surgical disconnection. Safe navigation through the ophthalmic artery or fragile cortical veins has historically provided a barrier to effective endovascular occlusion of these lesions. Using current microcatheter technology and embolic materials, safe positioning within the distal ophthalmic artery, beyond the origin of the central retinal artery, is achievable. We describe two cases in which anterior cranial fossa dAVFs were treated by exclusively endovascular strategies, and highlight the pertinent technical and anatomic considerations. We discuss the clinical symptoms resulting from the differing venous drainage patterns. PMID:21561565

  19. Facial palsy following embolization of a dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Ozluoglu, Levent N; Koycu, A; Jafarov, S; Hizal, E; Boyvat, F

    2016-09-01

    Intracranial arteriovenous malformations are infrequent. Advances in endovascular treatment techniques have promoted the use of endovascular embolization in management of intracranial arteriovenous malformations. Transvenous or transarterial embolization procedures are effective options in the treatment of the arteriovenous fistulas. However, complications such as cranial nerve palsies may occur. Here, we present a case of right-sided lower motor neuron facial paralysis due to embolization of an intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula that have presented with clinical findings on the left eye. Facial functions of the patient improved from total weakness to House-Brackmann grade II, following facial nerve decompression surgery. PMID:26329900

  20. Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula of the medial tentorial artery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Syrone; Lee, Dane C; Tanoura, Tad

    2016-09-01

    The medial tentorial artery arises from the meningohypophyseal trunk, a branch of the cavernous internal carotid artery, and it is poorly visualized on angiography in the absence of pathologically increased blood flow. We present the case of a 38-year-old man with intraventricular hemorrhage from a tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) singularly supplied by a robust medial tentorial artery. Tentorial DAVFs comprise a rare but high-risk subset of DAVFs. The diagnosis was suggested by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings and confirmed with digital subtraction angiography. PMID:27594958

  1. Rare dural arteriovenous fistula of the lesser sphenoid wing sinus.

    PubMed

    Khadavi, Nicole M; Mancini, Ronald; Nakra, Tanuj; Tsirbas, Angelo C; Douglas, Raymond S; Goldberg, Robert A; Duckwiler, Gary R

    2009-01-01

    A fistula of the lesser sphenoid wing sinus is a rare dural arteriovenous fistula resulting from a connection between the middle meningeal artery and recipient vein in the sinus of the lesser sphenoid wing. In this report, MRI/magnetic resonance angiography of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden-onset glaucoma and proptosis revealed a fistula in this anatomic location. Drainage patterns here may account for the absence of serious complications and optimistic prognosis following embolization. Care in diagnosis is required to avoid superfluous procedures, because classic signs of the more common carotid-cavernous fistula are absent. PMID:19966661

  2. Cavernous Sinus Dural Fistula Treated by Transvenous Facial Vein Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, V.; Cizek, V.; Kacirova, R.

    2004-01-01

    Summary We report on the endovascular treatment of the spontaneous indirect dural carotid cavernous sinus type D fistula in a 60-year-old woman, in whom ipsilateral facial, angular and superior ophthalmic veins catheterization was performed to get access to the fistula site for embolization treatment. Approach via the facial vein is helpful after inferior petrosal sinus treatment failure. Although this technique requires caution in the angular vein region it allows a safe and effective treatment of these lesions. 3D rotational digital angiography can obtain more information of the angioarchitecture of the cavernous plexus and venous outflow for the catheter navigation. PMID:20587267

  3. Novalis Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is rare, presenting with progressive, insidious symptoms, and inducing spinal cord ischemia and myelopathy, resulting in severe neurological deficits. If physicians have accurate and enough information about vascular anatomy and hemodynamics, they achieve the good results though the surgery or endovascular embolization. However, when selective spinal angiography is unsuccessful due to neurological deficits, surgery and endovascular embolization might be failed because of inadequate information. We describe a patient with a history of vasospasm during spinal angiography, who was successfully treated by spinal stereotactic radiosurgery using Novalis system. PMID:27446527

  4. Medication-overuse headache: a review

    PubMed Central

    Kristoffersen, Espen Saxhaug; Lundqvist, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a worldwide health problem with a prevalence of 1%–2%. It is a severe form of headache where the patients often have a long history of headache and of unsuccessful treatments. MOH is characterized by chronic headache and overuse of different headache medications. Through the years, withdrawal of the overused medication has been recognized as the treatment of choice. However, currently, there is no clear consensus regarding the optimal strategy for management of MOH. Treatment approaches are based on expert opinion rather than scientific evidence. This review focuses on aspects of epidemiology, diagnosis, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of MOH. We suggest that information and education about the risk of MOH is important since the condition is preventable. Most patients experience reduction of headache days and intensity after successful treatment. The first step in the treatment of MOH should be carried out in primary care and focus primarily on withdrawal, leaving prophylactic medication to those who do not manage primary detoxification. For most patients, a general practitioner can perform the follow-up after detoxification. More complicated cases should be referred to neurologists and headache clinics. Patients suffering with MOH have much to gain by an earlier treatment-focused approach, since the condition is both preventable and treatable. PMID:25061336

  5. Iatrogenic brainstem injury during cerebellomedullary cistern puncture.

    PubMed

    Luján Feliu-Pascual, Alejandro; Garosi, Laurent; Dennis, Ruth; Platt, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid collection is fundamental to the investigation of central nervous system disorders although it carries potential risks. Herein we report the clinical signs and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings associated with needle injury to the brainstem during cerebellomedullary cistern puncture in four dogs. Three dogs were nonambulatory tetraparetic with cranial nerve deficits and one dog had unexplained left thoracic limb paresis. In MR images, there were conspicuous T2 hyperintensities in the myelencephalon in all dogs. In T2* gradient echo images, the lesions were hypointense in two dogs with multiple cranial nerve deficits, and hyperintense in another dog. One dog was euthanized due to sudden neurologic deterioration 12 days later, one died shortly after MR imaging, and a third was euthanized due to concurrent cervical spondylomyelopathy. The fourth dog recovered gradually. Diagnosis was confirmed histopathologically in one dog and was presumptive based on clinical signs and MR findings in three dogs. None of the dogs with cranial nerve deficits recovered, only the one dog with left thoracic limb paresis and concurrent syringomyelia. PMID:18833957

  6. Lumbar puncture refusal in febrile convulsion.

    PubMed

    Ling, S G; Boey, C C

    2000-10-01

    A descriptive study was carried out on patients admitted for febrile convulsion over a two-year period to determine rate of lumbar puncture (LP) refusal, factors associated with LP refusal and outcome of such patients. From 77 patients indicated and requested for LP, 19 (25%) patients refused the procedure. Refusal of LP was significantly more common among the Malay ethnic group (p = 0.01) but not significantly associated with age,gender or whether the patient was admitted for a first or recurrent febrile convulsion. Half of the patients who refused LP had to be started empirically on antibiotics for meningitis. Patients who refused LP were also 8.5 times more likely to discharge themselves "at own risk" (AOR), compared to other patients with febrile convulsion (p = 0.004). In conclusion, LP refusal is a common problem in the local setting and is a hindrance to the proper management of patients with fever and seizure. Appropriate measures must be carried out to educate the public, particularly those from the Malay ethnic group on the safety and usefulness of the procedure. Reasons for patients discharging AOR following LP refusal also need to be addressed and problems rectified. PMID:11281439

  7. Direct access to the middle meningeal artery for embolization of complex dural arteriovenous fistula: a hybrid treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ning; Brouillard, Adam M; Mokin, Maxim; Natarajan, Sabareesh K; Snyder, Kenneth V; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular embolization has become increasingly favored over microsurgical resection for treatment of complex dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs). However, endovascular treatment can be restricted by tortuous transarterial access and a transvenous approach is not always feasible. We present a Borden III DAVF treated by direct access to the middle meningeal artery (MMA) and Onyx embolization performed in a hybrid operating room–angiography suite. A middle-aged patient with pulsatile headaches was found to have left transverse sinus occlusion and DAVF with retrograde cortical venous drainage fed by multiple external carotid artery (ECA) feeders. Endovascular attempts via conventional transvenous and transarterial routes were unsuccessful, and the major MMA feeder was accessed directly after temporal craniotomy was performed under neuronavigation. Onyx embolization was performed; complete occlusion of the fistula was achieved. Three-month follow-up angiography showed no residual filling; the patient remains complication-free. A combined surgical–endovascular technique in a hybrid operating room–angiography suite can be an effective treatment for DAVFs complicated by inaccessible arterial and transvenous approaches. PMID:24903968

  8. Websites offer helpful information concerning consultation with headache specialists.

    PubMed

    Imai, N; Yagi, N; Konishi, T; Serizawa, M; Kobari, M

    2010-04-01

    Patients with severe primary headache may benefit from consultation with headache specialists, but doctor attendance rates in Japan are very low. More headache patients might consult headache specialists if these specialists were more widely recognized by the public. To determine what information prompted patients to seek consultation with a headache specialist, we questioned 256 primary headache patients about the source of the helpful information concerning consultation with headache specialists. From 191 patients, a total of 235 responses to the questionnaire were obtained. The most common response was 'websites' (33.2%), followed by 'professionals' (23.8%), 'acquaintances' (20.9%), 'print media' (6.8%) and 'TV/radio' (3.4%). Patients who indicated websites showed the most severe pain and highest impact of headache, and accounted for 52.4% of those with cluster headaches. Development of websites concerning headache specialists would seem likely to increase doctor attendance rates for patients with primary headache. PMID:19515123

  9. Primary Headache Disorders: Focus on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Migraine is the most common disabling headache disorder. Most patients with disabling tension-type headache are likely to have migraine and accordingly respond to treatments efficacious in migraine. Individuals are genetically predisposed to experiencing recurrent migraine. Evidence supports migraine to be a primarily neural and not vascular mediated disorder. 1–2% of the population have chronic daily headache associated with acute-relief medication overuse; the majority are migraineurs. The presence of acute-relief medication overuse renders preventative medication less adequately efficacious. PMID:26525886

  10. Migraine headache and labor market outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rees, Daniel I; Sabia, Joseph J

    2015-06-01

    While migraine headache can be physically debilitating, no study has attempted to estimate its effects on labor market outcomes. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the effect of being diagnosed with migraine headache on labor force participation, hours worked, and wages. Ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates suggest that migraines are associated with reduced labor force participation and lower wages among females. A negative association between migraine headache and the wages of female respondents is also obtained using an instrumental variables (IV) approach, although the IV estimates are imprecise relative to the OLS estimates. PMID:24711105

  11. Foramen magnum dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pop, Raoul; Manisor, Monica; Aloraini, Ziad; Chibarro, Salvatore; Proust, Francois; Quenardelle, Véronique; Wolff, Valérie; Beaujeux, Rémy

    2015-12-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVFs) with perimedullary drainage represent a rare subtype of intracranial dAVF. Patients usually experience slowly progressive ascending myelopathy and/or lower brainstem signs. We present a case of foramen magnum dural arteriovenous fistula with an atypical clinical presentation. The patient initially presented with a generalised tonic-clonic seizure and no signs of myelopathy, followed one month later by rapidly progressive tetraplegia and respiratory insufficiency. The venous drainage of the fistula was directed both to the left temporal lobe and to the perimedullary veins (type III + V), causing venous congestion and oedema in these areas and explaining this unusual combination of symptoms. Rotational angiography and overlays with magnetic resonance imaging volumes were helpful in delineating the complex anatomy of the fistula. After endovascular embolisation, there was complete remission of venous congestion on imaging and significant clinical improvement. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a craniocervical junction fistula presenting with epilepsy. PMID:26472637

  12. Lumbar puncture in patients using anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan; Bruniera, Gustavo; Brunale, Fernando; Mangueira, Cristóvão; Senne, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents has largely increased. Diagnostic lumbar puncture in patients taking these drugs represents a challenge considering the opposing risks of bleeding and thrombotic complications. To date there are no controlled trials, specific guidelines, nor clear recommendations in this area. In the present review we make some recommendations about lumbar puncture in patients using these drugs. Our recommendations take into consideration the pharmacology of these drugs, the thrombotic risk according to the underlying disease, and the urgency in cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Evaluating such information and a rigorous monitoring of neurological symptoms after lumbar puncture are crucial to minimize the risk of hemorrhage associated neurological deficits. An individualized patient decision-making and an effective communication between the assistant physician and the responsible for conducting the lumbar puncture are essential to minimize potential risks. PMID:27556380

  13. Evolving a Puncture Black Hole with Fixed Mesh Refinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbiriba, Breno; Baker, John; Choi, Dae-II; Centrella, Joan; Fiske. David R.; Brown, J. David; vanMeter, James R.; Olson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of mesh refinement boundaries on the convergence and stability of simulations of black hole spacetimes. We find no technical problems. In our applications of this technique to the evolution of puncture initial data, we demonstrate that it is possible to simulaneously maintain second order convergence near the puncture and extend the outer boundary beyond 100M, thereby approaching the asymptotically flat region in which boundary condition problems are less difficult.

  14. The pipeline in headache therapy.

    PubMed

    Vollbracht, Sarah; Rapoport, Alan M

    2013-09-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, neurovascular disorder characterized by episodic attacks of head pain and associated disability plus systemic autonomic and neurologic symptoms. The advent of the triptan class of medication in the 1990s revolutionized the acute treatment of migraine, but many migraineurs do not respond optimally or at all to triptans, have intolerable adverse effects, or have contraindications to their use. Preventive pharmacotherapy has advanced mostly through serendipity, with new drugs being found effective while being used for other indications. There remains a significant need for new medications and devices that can provide effective, rapid, and sustained pain relief without adverse effects or recurrence. Several new acute and preventive therapies for the treatment of migraine and cluster headaches have shown promise and are currently under investigation. This article covers innovative delivery mechanisms, calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists, antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor, 5-HT1F receptor agonists, transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor modulators, orexin receptor antagonists, glial cell modulators, and neurostimulation. PMID:23839594

  15. The novel anti-migraine agent rizatriptan inhibits neurogenic dural vasodilation and extravasation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, D J; Shepheard, S L; Hill, R G; Hargreaves, R J

    1997-06-01

    These studies in anaesthetised rats showed, using intravital microscopy, that the novel anti-migraine agent, rizatriptan, significantly reduced electrically stimulated dural vasodilation but had no effect on increases in dural vessel diameter produced by exogenous substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Rizatriptan also significantly inhibited dural plasma protein extravasation produced by high intensity electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion. We suggest that rizatriptan inhibits the release of sensory neuropeptides from perivascular trigeminal nerves to prevent neurogenic vasodilation and extravasation in the dura mater. These prejunctional inhibitory effects may be involved in the anti-migraine action of rizatriptan. PMID:9203569

  16. Response of cotton squares to various boll weevil oviposition puncture types

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an earlier laboratory study, estimates for boll weevil oviposition in unsealed punctures, punctures sealed with frass (frass-sealed), punctures sealed with a wax film (wax-sealed), and punctures sealed with a wax film plus frass (wax-sealed plus frass) were determined. However, the traditional p...

  17. What Are Nerve Blocks for Headache?

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Matthew S. Robbins, MD, ... is an assistant professor of neurology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and the current chair of ...

  18. Neurostimulation for neck pain and headache.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jennifer; Ball, Perry A; Fanciullo, Gilbert J

    2014-03-01

    Patients with medically refractory headache disorders are a rare and challenging-to-treat group. The introduction of peripheral neurostimulation (PNS) has offered a new avenue of treatment for patients who are appropriate surgical candidates. The utility of PNS for headache management is actively debated. Preliminary reports suggested that 60-80% of patients with chronic headache who have failed maximum medical therapy respond to PNS. However, complications rates for PNS are high. Recent publication of 2 large randomized clinical trials with conflicting results has underscored the need for further research and careful patient counseling. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for PNS in treatment of chronic migraine, trigeminal autonomic cephalagias and occipital neuralgia, and other secondary headache disorders. PMID:24527699

  19. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis and dural arteriovenous fistula in a 75-year-old man primarily presenting with repeated transient visual obscurations.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeo; Matsuno, Hiromasa; Omoto, Shusaku; Sakuta, Kenichi; Terasawa, Yuka; Iguchi, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-28

    A 75-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of repeated transient visual obscurations of greying vision. The transient visual obscurations were caused by rotating his neck or the Valsalva manoeuver, and they recovered in about 30 seconds. A few weeks later, pulsatile tinnitus of the right ear and a dull headache developed. Both ocular fundi showed papilledema, and there was significant intracranial hypertension on cerebrospinal fluid examination. He was diagnosed as having right sigmoid sinus thrombosis and a dural arteriovenous fistula with a rapid arteriovenous shunt from the right ascending pharyngeal artery and the right occipital artery to the right transverse sinus. Anticoagulant therapy was started, and coil embolization was performed. The transient visual obscurations, headache, and tinnitus improved dramatically after the procedure. We hypothesized that the transient visual obscurations were triggered by rotating the neck or performing the Valsalva manoeuver as they both increase the pressure of cerebrospinal fluid, inducing transient optic nerve ischemia and visual obscurations under mild intracranial hypertension. Transient visual obscurations are an important initial symptom of intracranial hypertension. PMID:27010097

  20. Regional cerebral blood flow in childhood headache

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, E.S.; Stump, D.A.

    1989-06-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in 16 cranial regions in 23 children and adolescents with frequent headaches using the non-invasive Xenon-133 inhalation technique. Blood flow response to 5% carbon dioxide (CO2) was also determined in 21 patients, while response to 50% oxygen was measured in the two patients with hemoglobinopathy. Included were 10 patients with a clinical diagnosis of migraine, 4 with musculoskeletal headaches, and 3 with features of both types. Also studied were 2 patients with primary thrombocythemia, 2 patients with hemoglobinopathy and headaches, 1 patient with polycythemia, and 1 with headaches following trauma. With two exceptions, rCBF determinations were done during an asymptomatic period. Baseline rCBF values tended to be higher in these young patients than in young adults done in our laboratory. Localized reduction in the expected blood flow surge after CO2 inhalation, most often noted posteriorly, was seen in 8 of the 13 vascular headaches, but in none of the musculoskeletal headache group. Both patients with primary thrombocythemia had normal baseline flow values and altered responsiveness to CO2 similar to that seen in migraineurs; thus, the frequently reported headache and transient neurologic signs with primary thrombocythemia are probably not due to microvascular obstruction as previously suggested. These data support the concept of pediatric migraine as a disorder of vasomotor function and also add to our knowledge of normal rCBF values in younger patients. Demonstration of altered vasomotor reactivity to CO2 could prove helpful in children whose headache is atypical.

  1. Weekly headache periodicity and the effect of weather changes on headache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, P. O.; Lövstrand, K. G.; Lundberg, P. O.; Lundquist, S.; Muhr, C.

    1981-03-01

    A weekly periodicity in the occurrence of headache was found in 53 patients with migraine and in 20 with tension headache during an observation period of four weeks. In the migraine group the frequency was highest on Thursday and on Saturday and lowest on Sunday Monday, and in patients with tension headache it was lowest on Sunday Tuesday and highest on Friday. During the observation period several climatic factors were recorded. After correction for the weekly periodicity a highly significant correlation was found in the migraine group between headache frequency, on the one hand, and atmospheric pressure and outdoor temperature recorded 1 3 days later, on the other.

  2. Stabbing headache in an 8-year-old girl: primary or drug induced headache?

    PubMed

    Biedroł, Agnieszka; Kaciłski, Marek; Skowronek-Bała, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The occurrence of stabbing headaches in children requires a thorough diagnostic approach that excludes secondary headaches. The organic background should be taken into consideration when alarming symptoms occur, such as a purely 1-sided location, a change in the character of the headache, or possibly a link to physical activity. The current study describes the case of an 8-year-old girl who suffered short-lasting stabbing headache attacks. The headaches with increasing intensity and frequency started 1 month before her hospitalization and were usually preceded by physical activity (dancing, running). The pain, which was located in the right supraorbital region, lasted 1 second and occurred several times during the day. No associated symptoms were observed. In addition, the girl suffered from allergic rhinitis and was on antiallergic treatment (levocetirizine, fluticasone nasal spray). On admission she was in good general condition, and a pediatric and neurologic examination revealed no abnormalities. Her brain MRI was normal. The initial diagnosis was that the patient was suffering from primary stabbing headaches. However, during a follow-up visit 4 months later, a relationship was observed between the cessation of the headache attacks and the discontinuation of an antihistaminic drug. Six months later, the girl remained headache free. In cases involving differential diagnoses of stabbing headaches, it is important to consider the adverse reactions of the drugs used. PMID:24664098

  3. Sphenopalatine Ganglion Stimulation in Neurovascular Headaches.

    PubMed

    Schoenen, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The interest for the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) in neurovascular headaches dates back to 1908 when Sluder presented his work on the role of the SPG in 'nasal headaches', which are now part of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and cluster headache (ICHD-III-beta). Since then various interventions with blocking or lesional properties have targeted the SPG (transnasal injection of lidocaine and other agents, alcohol or steroid injections, radiofrequency lesions, or even ganglionectomy); success rates vary, but benefit is usually transient. Here we briefly review some anatomophysiological characteristics of the SPG and hypotheses about its pathophysiological role in neurovascular headaches before describing recent therapeutic results obtained with electrical stimulation of the SPG. Based on results of a prospective randomized controlled study, SPG stimulation appears to be an effective treatment option for patients with chronic cluster headaches; efficacy data indicate that acute electrical stimulation of the SPG provides significant attack pain relief and in many cases pain freedom compared to sham stimulation. Moreover, in some patients SPG stimulation has been associated with a significant and clinically meaningful reduction in cluster headache attack frequency; this preventive effect of SPG stimulation warrants further investigation. For migraine attacks, the outcome of a proof-of-concept study using a temporary electrode implanted in the pterygopalatine fossa was less encouraging; however, an ongoing multicenter trial is evaluating the efficacy of long-term SPG stimulation against sham stimulation for acute and preventive treatment in patients with frequent migraine. PMID:26394372

  4. Fasting headache, weight loss, and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Mosek, A; Korczyn, A D

    1999-03-01

    Recently, we showed that fasting is a strong headache precipitator unrelated to coffee, tea, or smoking withdrawal or to oversleeping. In the current study, we evaluated the role of dehydration as a possible precipitator of fasting headache. The effects of a 25-hour fast of the Jewish Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) were studied in women who participated in our previous Yom Kippur study. We asked the subjects to weigh themselves at the beginning and at the end of the Yom Kippur fast, assuming that the weight loss would largely reflect dehydration. In all but 1 of the 56 participants, the fast resulted in weight loss but only 28 (50%) reported headache. The average weight loss was 1.4 +/- 0.8 kg in those who developed headache and 1.2 +/- 0.5 kg in those who did not. This small difference was not statistically significant. We conclude that dehydration, as reflected by acute weight loss, is an unlikely cause of headache during a single day of fasting. The mechanism of fasting headache remains unclear. PMID:15613218

  5. Diagnosis and management of migraine headaches.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Elizabeth C

    2004-11-01

    Migraine headaches afflict approximately 6% of men and 18% of women in the United States, and cost billions of dollars each year in lost productivity, absenteeism, and direct medical expendi tures. Despite its prevalence and the availability of therapeutic op tions, many patients do not seek treatment, and among those who do, a significant portion are misdiagnosed. Correct diagnosis can be made by identifying the historic and physical examination finding that distinguish primary headache disorders from secondary head ache disorders, as well as the key clinical features that distinguis migraine headaches from other types. Once diagnosis is made, im proper or inadequate management of headache pain, related symp toms such as nausea, and the possible aggravating side-effects of pharmacologic therapies represent further obstacles to effective ther apy. Dissatisfaction with migraine therapy on the basis of these factors is common. Among abortive therapy options there are de livery methods available which may avoid aggravating symptom such as nausea. Recommended pharmacologic agents include non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intranasal butorphanol, ergota mine and its derivatives, and the triptans. Indications for prophylac tic in addition to abortive therapy include the occurrence o headaches that require abortive therapy more than twice a week, tha do not respond well to abortive therapy, and which are particularly severe. Research is ongoing in the pathophysiology of migraines evaluation of nonpharmacologic treatment modalities, assessment of new drug therapies, and validation of headache guidelines. PMID:15586597

  6. Functioning of Women with Migraine Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Zgorzalewicz-Stachowiak, Małgorzata; Czajkowska, Agrypina; Hudaś, Karolina

    2014-01-01

    Background. Migraines are one of the most commonly occurring ailments affecting the nervous system. The aim of this research paper was to evaluate the effect migraines have on the everyday functioning of women. Method. The study involved women with diagnosed migraine headaches (IHS-2004) undergoing treatment at a neurological clinic. In order to evaluate the influence of headaches on the everyday functioning of women, a MSQ v.2 questionnaire was used, whereas pain severity was assessed on a linear VAS scale. Results. Among the clinical factors, the most influential was the frequency of headaches. Headache duration was particularly significant for women below the age of 40. Pain severity cited at 8–10 pts on the VAS significantly disrupted and limited everyday functioning. On the emotional function subscale, the most influential factors were age, education, and the frequency of headaches. Conclusions. On account of headache frequency emerging as the most significant influencing factor, it is of the utmost importance to inform patients of the value of taking prophylactic measures. Central to this is the identification of factors that trigger the onset of migraines. This approach would greatly aid the individual in choosing the appropriate treatment, either pharmacological or others. PMID:25133238

  7. [Pharmacotherapy of headache apart from self-medication].

    PubMed

    Evers, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    The pharmacotherapy of headache differentiates between self-medication and prescribed medication. Furthermore, pharmacotherapy has to consider the different headache disorders. In this article, the evidence-based treatment recommendations of the German Migraine and Headache Society for the different idiopathic headache disorders including trigeminal neuralgia are described. In addition, for most headache disorders acute and preventive medication has to be differentiated. It has to be noted that acute mediation against headache should not be taken too frequently and that in chronic headache disorders most often only a multimodal treatment results in a sufficient pain reduction. PMID:26742211

  8. A Practical Approach to Autonomic Dysfunction in Patients with Headache.

    PubMed

    Ailani, Jessica

    2016-05-01

    The presence of autonomic symptoms can make the diagnosis of headache challenging. While commonly seen with the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, autonomic dysfunction can also be present in patients with migraine, or with a variety of secondary headaches. The pathophysiology of cranial autonomic symptoms in headache is based between the trigeminal system and the hypothalamus. This article will review the pathophysiology and presence of autonomic dysfunction in headache and will provide techniques to help in headache diagnosis in patients with autonomic dysfunction. PMID:27021770

  9. Headache and Chiari I Malformation in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Victorio, M Cristina; Khoury, Chaouki K

    2016-02-01

    Headache is a common problem in children and adolescents. Its recurrent and disabling nature may lead to use of neuroimaging to exclude secondary causes of headache such as Chiari I malformation (CM I). CM I has a variety of presentation with headache being the most common symptom. CM I can be asymptomatic and is also often found incidentally in neuroimaging done for conditions other than headache. This article reviews the spectrum of headache in patients with CM I. PMID:27017020

  10. [Relationship between lupus headache and headache due to internal injury in traditional Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Shen, Si-yu; Fu, Xiao-dong; Zhang, Yong-wen; Dong, Xiao-lei; Zhao, Ling-jie; Cai, Hui

    2009-05-01

    In 1999, the nomenclature and case definitions for neuropsychiatric lupus syndromes were published by American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and the cognition of neuropsychiatric damage of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was gradually unified and standardized. Lupus headache is an intractable problem in SLE, especially in SLE patients complicated with multiple organ injury. In general, vascular headache is common in most SLE patients, and a small number of SLE patients complicated with nervous headache are found in clinic. Moreover, its pathophysiological mechanism is far from being understood. Although early diagnosis is essential for good outcomes, the diagnosis method is rather confused in the world. There still exist some limitations in the proposal of clinical classification of headache from ACR and International Headache Society (IHS), and the proposal does not mention the classification of headache related to psychiatric damage. Current therapeutic regimens are almost exclusively based on empirical evidence. Treatment approaches include symptomatic treatment, immunosuppressive, anticoagulant and anti-aggregant therapies. It provides enormous and hopeful space in research of combined therapy strategy, especially in the field of traditional Chinese medicine. The authors discussed the relationship between lupus headache and headache due to internal injury in the view of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine, and suggested that the treatment strategy for lupus headache should be made in argument with the headache due to internal injury. Syndrome differentiation treatment according to deficiency in the root and excess in the branch and the therapy for activating blood to dredge collaterals maybe have great advantages in treatment of the headache in SLE. PMID:19435552

  11. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage from dural metastasis of breast cancer mimicking meningioma.

    PubMed

    Seki, Syunsuke; Kamide, Tomoya; Tamase, Akira; Mori, Kentaro; Yanagimoto, Kunio; Nomura, Motohiro

    2016-06-01

    Intraparenchymal hemorrhage from dural metastasis of breast cancer is rare. A 54-year-old woman without a significant medical history showed altered consciousness and left hemiparesis. Radiological examination revealed an extra-axial mass in the right middle fossa with intraparenchymal hemorrhage and another mass invading the skull in the right parietal region. The pre-operative diagnosis was a sphenoid ridge meningioma presenting with intraparenchymal hemorrhage and another meningioma in the convexity. The tumors and hematoma were removed. Pathological findings of the tumors were compatible with adenocarcinoma. Systemic examination revealed breast cancer with metastasis to the spine. Although the radiological findings were similar to those of meningioma, a differential diagnosis of metastatic brain tumor with intraparenchymal hemorrhage should be taken into consideration. PMID:26975475

  12. Spinal dural AV fistula: an unusual cause of chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Bioh, Gabriel; Bogle, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A 22 -year-old man presented with 6 months of sudden onset, incapacitating, left-sided chest pain occurring 1–2 times a week. The severity of the pain caused loss of consciousness several times leading to multiple fractures. Investigation with echocardiogram, exercise tolerance test, Holter monitor, chest X-ray and V/Q scan revealed no abnormality as did EEG and 48 h video telemetry. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine showed a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) at the level of T6, confirmed on angiogram. The patient underwent division of the left T6 AV fistula. Following the operation, the patient has been completely pain free. Our patient, presenting in his early 20s does not fit the usual age demographic for SDAVF. A second atypical feature is his presentation with chest pain alone and no neurological symptoms. This case represents a rare presentation of SDAVF. PMID:24532234

  13. Bilateral ethmoidal dural arteriovenous fistula: unexpected surgical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ros de San Pedro, Javier; Pérez, Claudio J Piqueras; Parra, Joaquín Zamarro; López-Guerrero, Antonio López; Sánchez, Juan F Martínez-Lage

    2010-12-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) are infrequent lesions, the most common locations of which are the cavernous, sigmoid and transverse sinuses. The cribiform plate is one of the less frequent sites for DAVFs, where they entail a high hemorrhage risk. Feeding arteries for ethmoidal DAVFs can be uni- or bilateral. However, the draining fistulous system has classically been described as unilateral. The authors report the second case in literature of bilateral ethmoidal DAVF, which is defined as that with bilateral draining veins. The present case was diagnosed only after surgical exploration of both cribiform plates. No preoperative radiological test could detect the presence of a bilateral venous draining system from the ethmoidal DAVF. Possible reasons for that lack of presurgical diagnosis are discussed. Bilateral surgical exploration of the anterior cranial fossa is recommended when dealing with ethmoidal DAVFs, even when they seem to be unilateral on preoperative studies. PMID:20727670

  14. Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: Imaging Features and Its Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Ying; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Huang, Yen-Lin; Chen, Chi-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is the most common spinal vascular malformation, however it is still rare and underdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging findings such as spinal cord edema and dilated and tortuous perimedullary veins play a pivotal role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. However, spinal angiography remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDAVF. Classic angiographic findings of SDAVF are early filling of radicular veins, delayed venous return, and an extensive network of dilated perimedullary venous plexus. A series of angiograms of SDAVF at different locations along the spinal column, and mimics of serpentine perimedullary venous plexus on MR images, are demonstrated. Thorough knowledge of SDAVF aids correct diagnosis and prevents irreversible complications. PMID:26357504

  15. Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula: Imaging Features and Its Mimics.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Ying; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Huang, Yen-Lin; Chen, Chi-Jen; Tseng, Ying-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is the most common spinal vascular malformation, however it is still rare and underdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging findings such as spinal cord edema and dilated and tortuous perimedullary veins play a pivotal role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. However, spinal angiography remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDAVF. Classic angiographic findings of SDAVF are early filling of radicular veins, delayed venous return, and an extensive network of dilated perimedullary venous plexus. A series of angiograms of SDAVF at different locations along the spinal column, and mimics of serpentine perimedullary venous plexus on MR images, are demonstrated. Thorough knowledge of SDAVF aids correct diagnosis and prevents irreversible complications. PMID:26357504

  16. Dural and Arachnoid Membraneous Protection of the Abducens Nerve at the Petroclival Region

    PubMed Central

    Ozveren, M. Faik; Uchida, Koichi; Tekdemir, Ibrahim; Cobanoglu, Bengu; Akdemir, Ismail; Kawase, Takeshi; Deda, Haluk

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the membranous protection of the abducens nerve in the petroclival region. The petroclival portion of the abducens nerve was studied in ten dissections from five cadaveric head specimens. One of the heads was used for histological sections. Four heads were injected with colored latex for microsurgical dissections. The histological sections were prepared from petroclival dura mater, embedded in paraffin blocks, stained, sectioned in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes, and evaluated by light microscopy. The abducens nerve was covered by a dural sleeve and arachnoidal membrane during its course within the petroclival area. Following the petrous apex, the abducens nerve was fixed by a sympathetic plexus and connective tissue extensions to the lateral wall of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery and to the medial wall of Meckel's cave. Fibrous trabeculations inside the venous space were attached to the dural sleeve. The lateral clival artery accompanied the dural sleeve of the abducens nerve and supplied the petroclival dura mater. The arterioles accompanying the abducens nerve through the subarachnoid space supplied the nerve within the dural sleeve. The arachnoid membrane covered the abducens nerve within the dural sleeve to the petrous apex, and arachnoid granulations found on the dural sleeve protruded into the venous space. The extension of the arachnoid membrane to the petrous apex and the presence of arachnoid granulations on the dural sleeve suggest that the subarachnoid space continues in the dural sleeve. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:17167676

  17. Neuromodulation of chronic headaches: position statement from the European Headache Federation.

    PubMed

    Martelletti, Paolo; Jensen, Rigmor H; Antal, Andrea; Arcioni, Roberto; Brighina, Filippo; de Tommaso, Marina; Franzini, Angelo; Fontaine, Denys; Heiland, Max; Jürgens, Tim P; Leone, Massimo; Magis, Delphine; Paemeleire, Koen; Palmisani, Stefano; Paulus, Walter; May, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The medical treatment of patients with chronic primary headache syndromes (chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, chronic cluster headache, hemicrania continua) is challenging as serious side effects frequently complicate the course of medical treatment and some patients may be even medically intractable. When a definitive lack of responsiveness to conservative treatments is ascertained and medication overuse headache is excluded, neuromodulation options can be considered in selected cases. Here, the various invasive and non-invasive approaches, such as hypothalamic deep brain stimulation, occipital nerve stimulation, stimulation of sphenopalatine ganglion, cervical spinal cord stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation are extensively published although proper RCT-based evidence is limited. The European Headache Federation herewith provides a consensus statement on the clinical use of neuromodulation in headache, based on theoretical background, clinical data, and side effect of each method. This international consensus further gives recommendations for future studies on these new approaches. In spite of a growing field of stimulation devices in headaches treatment, further controlled studies to validate, strengthen and disseminate the use of neurostimulation are clearly warranted. Consequently, until these data are available any neurostimulation device should only be used in patients with medically intractable syndromes from tertiary headache centers either as part of a valid study or have shown to be effective in such controlled studies with an acceptable side effect profile. PMID:24144382

  18. Ice cream headache in students and family history of headache: a cross-sectional epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Zierz, Antonia Maria; Mehl, Theresa; Kraya, Torsten; Wienke, Andreas; Zierz, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Headache attributed to ingestion of a cold stimulus (ICHD-3 beta 4.5.1) is also known as ice cream headache (ICH). This cross-sectional epidemiological study included 283 students (10-14-year-olds) attending a grammar school in Germany, their parents (n = 401), and 41 teachers. A self-administered questionnaire was used to analyze the prevalence and characteristics of ICH based on the ICHD classification. Additionally, the association between ICH and other headaches was investigated in students and parents. Prevalence of ICH in students was 62 % without gender difference. In adults, only 36 % of females and 22 % of males reported ICH. There was an increased risk for ICH in students when mother (OR 10.7) or father (OR 8.4) had ICH. Other headaches in parents had no influence on the prevalence of ICH in students. However, in the groups of students and parents itself there was a highly significant association between ICH and other headaches (students: OR 2.4, mothers: OR 2.9, fathers: OR 6.8). There was a decreased risk for ICH when parents and students had no headache at all (OR < 0.4). ICH in students clearly shows a familial disposition by both father and mother. There was also an association between ICH and other headaches within the student and adult groups. The absence of headache history seems to be a protective factor for ICH. PMID:27039390

  19. Hypnic headache - a rare primary headache disorder with very good response to indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Dolezil, David; Mavrokordatos, Charis

    2012-01-01

    Hypnic headache (HH) is considered as a disorder of the circadian rhythm, mostly affecting the elderly and generally considered a benign disorder, but the pathophysiology of hypnic hedache remains unclear. Various treatments have been suggested for hypnic headache, especially lithium and indomethacin. We report the case of HH fulfilling The International Classification Headache Disorders, 2nd edition criteria (ICHD-II). A 64-year-old woman, who suffered from dull headaches strictly during the night for a period of 5 months. Attacks of headache lasted from 30 to 150 minutes, with a frequency usually 4 times per week. The patient was started on indomethacin 50 mg twice a day (BID). From day 25 on she was free of hypnic headache. On day 31 we tapered the daily dose of indomethacin to 50mg at bedtime, the patient was still without headache. On day 60 the treatment was stopped. 30 months after day 60, the patient was still headache free. We reported the first Czech patient with HH with very good therapeutic response to indomethacin. The effect of therapy with indomethacin 50mg BID was very fast and stable. PMID:23160225

  20. Development of a sutureless dural substitute from Bombyx mori silk fibroin.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Kelly E; Tien, Lee W; Elia, Roberto; Wu, Julian; Kaplan, David

    2015-04-01

    Silk solvent casting, electrospinning, and electrogelation techniques were used to create a biodegradable, biocompatible silk fibroin dural substitute. The all-silk system was designed and produced to improve on currently available materials, grafts and tissue sealants used for dural closure in neurosurgery. The silk biomaterial was successfully fabricated as a dual layer adhesive system designed to seal durotomies while also functioning as a dural regeneration scaffold. The mechanical characteristics, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and hydrodynamic sealing capability of the material were evaluated. Results showed that the biomaterial was biocompatible with neural cells and fibroblasts, had mechanical properties mimicking the natural dura, was biodegradable with controllable degradation, and was able to seal against a hydrodynamic pressure of 205 mmHg, which greatly exceeds the maximum cerebrospinal fluid pressure seen in both cranial and spinal dural closures of 50 mmHg. Based on its design and experimental results, the adhesive silk dual layer composite biomaterial shows potential as a sutureless dural repair system that would improve on current dural closure techniques. PMID:24919581

  1. Evaluation of Non-Watertight Dural Reconstruction with Collagen Matrix Onlay Graft in Posterior Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Bjorn; Lim, Joshua; Sade, Burak; Oya, Soichi; Lee, Joung H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many surgeons advocate for watertight dural reconstruction after posterior fossa surgery given the significant risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Little evidence exists for posterior fossa dural reconstruction utilizing monolayer collagen matrix onlay graft in a non-watertight fashion. Our objective was to report the results of using collagen matrix in a non-watertight fashion for posterior fossa dural reconstruction. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of operations performed by the senior author from 2004–2011 identified collagen matrix (DuraGen) use in 84 posterior fossa operations. Wound complications such as CSF leak, infection, pseudomeningocele, and aseptic meningitis were noted. Fisher's exact test was performed to assess risk factor association with specific complications. Results Incisional CSF leak rate was 8.3% and non-incisional CSF leak rate was 3.6%. Incidence of aseptic meningitis was 7.1% and all cases resolved with steroids alone. Incidence of palpable and symptomatic pseudomeningocele in follow-up was 10.7% and 3.6% respectively. Postoperative infection rate was 4.8%. Previous surgery was associated with pseudomeningocele development (p<0.05). Conclusion When primary dural closure after posterior fossa surgery is undesirable or not feasible, non-watertight dural reconstruction with collagen matrix resulted in incisional CSF leak in 8.3%. Incidence of pseudomeningocele, aseptic meningitis, and wound infection were within acceptable range. Data from this study may be used to compare alternative methods of dural reconstruction in posterior fossa surgery. PMID:26885286

  2. Blunt atrial transseptal puncture using excimer laser in swine

    PubMed Central

    Elagha, Abdalla A.; Kim, Ann H.; Kocaturk, Ozgur; Lederman, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We describe a new approach that may enhance safety of atrial transseptal puncture, using a commercially available laser catheter that is capable of perforation only when energized. We test this approach in swine. Background Despite wide application, conventional needle transseptal puncture continues to risk inadvertent non-target perforation and its consequences. Methods We used a commercial excimer laser catheter (0.9mm Clirpath, Spectranetics). Perforation force was compared in vitro with a conventional Brockenbrough needle. Eight swine underwent laser transseptal puncture under X-ray fluoroscopy steered using a variety of delivery catheters. Results The 0.9mm laser catheter traversed in vitro targets with reduced force compared with a Brockenbrough needle. In vitro, the laser catheter created holes that were 25–30% larger than the Brockenbrough needle. Laser puncture of the atrial septum was successful and accurate in all animals, evidenced by oximetry, pressure, angiography, and necropsy. The laser catheter was steered effectively using a modified Mullins introducer sheath and using two different deflectable guiding catheters. The mean procedure time was 15 ± 6 minutes, with an average 3.0 ± 0.8 seconds of laser activation. There were no adverse sequelae after prolonged observation. Necropsy revealed discrete 0.9mm holes in all septae. Conclusion Laser puncture of the interatrial septum is feasible and safe in swine, using a blunt laser catheter that perforates tissues in a controlled fashion. PMID:17896413

  3. Relativistic hydrodynamics in the presence of puncture black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, Joshua A.; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Taniguchi, Keisuke; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2007-11-15

    Many of the recent numerical simulations of binary black holes in vacuum adopt the moving puncture approach. This successful approach avoids the need to impose numerical excision of the black hole interior and is easy to implement. Here we wish to explore how well the same approach can be applied to moving black hole punctures in the presence of relativistic hydrodynamic matter. First, we evolve single black hole punctures in vacuum to calibrate our Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura implementation and to confirm that the numerical solution for the exterior spacetime is invariant to any junk (i.e., constraint-violating) initial data employed in the black hole interior. Then we focus on relativistic Bondi accretion onto a moving puncture Schwarzschild black hole as a numerical test bed for our high-resolution shock-capturing relativistic hydrodynamics scheme. We find that the hydrodynamical equations can be evolved successfully in the interior without imposing numerical excision. These results help motivate the adoption of the moving puncture approach to treat the binary black hole-neutron star problem using conformal thin-sandwich initial data.

  4. Impairment in episodic and chronic cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Tim P; Gaul, Charly; Lindwurm, Andrea; Dresler, Thomas; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Lürding, Ralf; Henkel, Karsten; Leinisch, Elke

    2011-04-01

    Despite being an excruciating headache, little is known about the burden of cluster headache (CH) regarding its various subtypes. In a multicentre, prospective study, patients with chronic CH (n = 27), with episodic CH in the active (n = 26) and outside the active period (n = 22), migraine patients (n = 24) and healthy controls (n = 31) were included. Epidemiological data, the German version of the Headache Disability Inventory (HDI) and a screening for psychiatric complaints were applied. About 25% of chronic CH patients in our study received invalidity allowance due to CH. HDI scores (total and subscales emotion and function) indicated a severe headache-specific disability (one-way ANOVA: P < 0.01). Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were significantly more affected than patients with inactive CH and migraine. Healthy volunteers were significantly less affected than all headache patients. Symptoms suggestive of psychiatric co-morbidity were found predominantly in chronic CH: depressive symptoms (56%), signs of agoraphobia (33%) and suicidal tendencies (25%) were frequently reported. Patients with chronic and active episodic CH were severely impaired in non-economic and economic domains such as disability, working life and psychiatric complaints. Remarkably, psychiatric co-morbidity was highest in chronic CH. Thus, especially chronic CH warrants special medical and further supportive care. PMID:21123629

  5. BIOFEEDBACK TRAINING AND TENSION-TYPE HEADACHE.

    PubMed

    Šecić, Ana; Cvjeticanin, Timon; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2016-03-01

    Biofeedback is a training method, which connects physiological and psychological processes in a person for the purposes of improving his/her physical, emotional, mental and spiritual health. In biofeedback treatment, an active role of the patient is stressed for him/her to be able to actively control the physiological and emotional processes. The aim of biofeedback is to improve the conscious control of the individual's involuntary physiological activity. Research has shown that biofeedback, either applied alone or in combination with other behavioral therapies (techniques), is an effective treatment for various medical and psychological disorders, from headache and hypertension to temporomandibular and attention deficit disorders. More than 90% of adults experience headache once a year, which makes headache one of the most common symptoms and diagnoses in medicine. Tension-type headaches occur in at least 40% of the population and their impact on the health insurance costs and diminished productivity is significant. Studies have shown that clinical biofeedback training is effective in treating headaches. Moreover, the authors stress the need for additional research and further development of methodology for this kind of research. PMID:27333731

  6. The Incidence and Management of Dural Tears and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage during Corrective Osteotomy for Ankylosing Spondylitis with Kyphotic Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Dae-Jean; Kim, Ki-Tack; Lee, Sang-Hun; Cho, Myung-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present the incidence and management of dural tears and cerebrospinal fluid leakage during corrective osteotomy [Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy (PSO) or Smith-Petersen Osteotomy (SPO)] for ankylosing spondylitis with kyphotic deformity. Methods A retrospective study was performed for ankylosing spondylitis patients with fixed sagittal imbalance, who had undergone corrective osteotomy (PSO or SPO) at lumbar level. 87 patients were included in this study. 55 patients underwent PSO, 32 patients underwent SPO. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 41.7 years (21-70 years). Of the 87 patients, 15 patients had intraoperative dural tears. Results The overall incidence of dural tears was 17.2%. The incidence of dural tears during PSO was 20.0%, SPO was 12.5%. There was significant difference in the incidence of dural tears based on surgical procedures (PSO vs. SPO) (p<0.05). The dural tears ranged in size from 12 to 221 mm2. A nine of 15 patients had the relatively small dural tears, underwent direct repair via watertight closure. The remaining 6 patients had the large dural tears, consequently direct repair was impossible. The large dural tears were repaired with an on-lay graft of muscle, fascia or fat harvested from the adjacent operation site. All patients had a successful repair with no patient requiring reoperation for the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion The overall incidence of dural tears during PSO or SPO for ankylosing spondylitis with kyphotic deformity was 17.2%. The risk factor of dural tears was complexity of surgery. All dural tears were repaired primarily using direct suture, muscle, fascia or fat graft. PMID:26279815

  7. Post-Traumatic Headache Therapy in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Tad

    2016-06-01

    Post-traumatic headache can occur after any traumatic brain injury, regardless of severity. Headache is consistently the most common symptom following concussion and occurs in over 90 % of athletes with sports-related concussion. Despite this prevalence, the complaint of headache after a possible concussive injury is often dismissed. Even when sports-related concussion is accurately diagnosed, many athletes fall victim to mismanagement of this associated symptom by clinicians who are not well-versed in headache treatment. Furthermore, benign headaches may also occur incidentally in the context of head trauma. This complex, and often non-specific, nature of headaches provides a significant challenge in return to play decision-making. Post-traumatic headaches are generally categorized according to primary headache disorders in an attempt to guide treatment; however, there is minimal medical literature on headache management in the concussed athlete. There is clearly a continued need for prospective studies of existing treatments and new approaches. PMID:27184059

  8. Strategies for diagnosing and managing medication-induced headache.

    PubMed Central

    Edmeads, J. G.; Gawel, M. J.; Vickers, J.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM ADDRESSED: Headache is a common clinical disorder. Nearly 50% of patients with headaches use prescription medications, and 90% regularly use nonprescription drugs. Medication-induced headaches (MIH) are chronic daily headaches caused by overuse of medicine. OBJECTIVES: To summarize the diagnostic criteria for MIH, to determine the investigations necessary to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other possible diagnoses, and to establish recommendations for managing MIH. MAIN FINDINGS: Diagnosis of MIH is based on patient's history and the clinical characteristics of the headache. Treatment includes patient education and support, withdrawal of offending medications, relief of withdrawal symptoms, and specific treatment of residual headache. When migraine and other causes of headache are adequately addressed, patients will not seek additional pain relief. CONCLUSION: Medication-induced headache is preventable. The key to prevention is appropriate drug therapy to relieve the primary headache. All patients with MIH can be treated and most cured. PMID:9241463

  9. Protective materials with real-time puncture detection capability

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, R.E.; Stampfer, J.F.; Valdez-Boyle, L.S.; Ramsey, D.R.

    1996-08-01

    The protection of workers from chemical, biological, or radiological hazards requires the use of protective materials that can maintain their integrity during use. An accidental puncture in the protective material can result in a significant exposure to the worker. A five ply material has been developed that incorporates two layers of an electrically conductive polymer sandwiched between three layers of a nonconductive polymer. A normally open circuit that is connected between the conductive layers will be closed by puncturing the material with either a conductive or nonconductive object. This can be used to activate an audible alarm or visual beacon to warn the worker of a breach in the integrity of the material. The worker is not connected to the circuit, and the puncture can be detected in real-time, even when caused by a nonconductor.

  10. Non-Invasive Neuromodulation for Headache Disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuhan; Marmura, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Migraine and other chronic headache disorders are common and if inadequately treated, can lead to significant disability. The effectiveness of medications can be limited by side effects, drug interactions, and comorbid diseases necessitating alternative methods. Technological developments in the past 5 years have made it possible to use non-invasive methods of neuromodulation to treat primary headache disorders. This field includes technologies such as supraorbital transcutaneous stimulation (STS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and non-invasive vagal nerve stimulation (nVNS). Existing trials show these modalities are safe and well tolerated and can be combined with standard pharmacotherapy. We review the technologies, biological rationales, and trials involving non-invasive neuromodulation for the treatment of primary headache disorders. PMID:26750126

  11. What happens to the old headache medicines?

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Alan M

    2012-04-01

    Old headache medicines never die; they either fade away or come back in disguise. The disguise is often a new route of administration, which may work better, faster, more completely, with fewer adverse events, and/or have certain other advantages. The clinical aspects of 3 of the oldest headache medicines (ergotamine tartrate, dihydroergotamine, and methysergide) will be discussed here. Sumatriptan will then be discussed as the prototype of the newest category of acute care therapy (triptans) for migraine. It will be compared with the older medications, and the new forms being developed will be briefly discussed. Diclofenac potassium for oral solution will be mentioned as the newest drug approved for migraine by the Food and Drug Administration, and a possible alternative to triptans in patients with frequent headaches or those with contraindications to vasoconstrictors. PMID:22486742

  12. Blood mixtures: impact of puncture site on blood parameters.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, X; El Hassani, M S; Lecq, S; Michel, C L; El Mouden, E H; Michaud, B; Slimani, T

    2016-08-01

    Various puncture routes, veins, arteries, heart, are used to take blood in animals. For anatomical reasons, differences in blood composition are expected among puncture sites. However, this issue has been rarely assessed and contrasted results have been reported: strong effects of puncture site versus a lack of effect. We captured free-ranging freshwater turtles from different locations to compare the mean concentrations of 12 blood parameters (metabolites, hormone, ions, and enzyme) among three puncture sites: (1) a lateral branch of the jugular vein, (2) a dorsal subcarapacial cervical plexus (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'cervical sinus' in the literature), and (3) a caudal plexus site (sometimes incorrectly referred as the 'caudal sinus'). Because we used very small syringes (27-30G), we were able to separate lymph, blood, or blood-lymph mixtures. Our results show very strong effects of puncture site and of mixture level (mean maximal difference between sites was 250 %). We also found strong sex and geographical effects. Typically, there were differences in concentrations of blood solutes sampled from the lateral jugular vein and subcarapacial plexus, mainly due to sampling a mixture of blood and lymph from the 'blood' at the subcarapacial site and pure blood from the lateral jugular site, and likewise, samples from the caudal site were highly variable due to often sampling a mixture of blood and lymph. These results have technical and fundamental implications, especially when performing comparative analyses. Further, by selecting precise puncture sites, physiological differences between lymph and blood compartments could be investigated. PMID:27146147

  13. 14th International Headache Congress: basic science highlights.

    PubMed

    Schwedt, Todd J; Goadsby, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    During the 14th International Headache Congress the results of several innovative studies that contribute to our understanding of headache pathophysiology and treatment were presented. Here we summarize work expected to contribute substantially to understanding headache mechanisms, while an accompanying manuscript summarizes presentations regarding the treatment of headache. This manuscript highlights research on mechanisms of photophobia and phonophobia, pharmacologic inhibition of cortical spreading depression, a proposed mechanism by which oxygen effectively treats cluster headache, identification of functional and structural aberrations in people with hypnic headache, and research on functional imaging markers of a migraine attack. PMID:20456146

  14. Oral habits in common between tension headache and non-headache populations.

    PubMed

    Moss, R A; Lombardo, T W; Hodgson, J M; O'Carroll, K

    1989-01-01

    Previous research has suggested a relationship between migraine pain and oral habits. The present study was designed as a replication of a prior study that found self-reported higher frequencies of certain oral habits in migraine as opposed to tension headache and non-headache groups. Three groups of subjects (common migraine, tension headache and non-headache) were given a single questionnaire in which five oral habits (i.e. teeth clenching, jaw jutting, cupping the chin in the hand, and resting the right and left side of the face on the hand) were rated on a 0 (not at all) to 10 (almost always) scale. Significant main effects were obtained for groups and oral habits in a 3 (groups) X5 (oral habits) ANOVA. Post hoc Tukey tests revealed the common migraine group reported significantly more frequent oral habits than did the tension headache group. The non-headache control group did not differ significantly from either headache group. Discussion focuses on the need for continued research in this area. PMID:2746407

  15. Correlation between headaches and affective symptoms in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hye; Joo, Eun Yeon; Seo, Dae-Won; Hong, Seung Bong

    2016-07-01

    Headaches are a neglected entity in patients with epilepsy (PWE), although PWE have a high chance of suffering from seizure-related as well as seizure-unrelated headaches. We aimed to identify the prevalence and characteristics of headaches and investigate the correlation between headaches and affective symptoms in PWE. Consecutive PWE who visited our tertiary outpatient clinic were interviewed about headaches and epilepsy. Affective symptoms were evaluated using the Korean version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and suicidality portion of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. We classified headaches as interictal or seizure-related headaches (SRHs; pre- and postictal). Tension-type headache and migraine were defined based on International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. From the initial cohort of 177 patients (92 men, mean age: 37.1years), 73 (41.2%) reported suffering from interictal (N=34, 19.2%), preictal (N=3, 1.7%), and postictal (N=48, 27.1%) headaches. Univariate analysis revealed significantly higher BDI and BAI scores in the headache group. Tension-type headaches were the most frequent, and half of the interictal headaches and most of the SRHs were untreated. Spearman's partial correlation analyses showed that headaches overall were significantly related with depression and anxiety. Interictal headaches were correlated with depression only, and postictal headaches were correlated with depression as well as suicidality, separately. These results show that investigating and controlling headaches may relieve affective symptoms and ultimately improve the quality of life of PWE. PMID:27236023

  16. [Chronic daily headache--history, epidemiology, clinic and future].

    PubMed

    Katarzyńska, Aleksandra; Domitrz, Izabela

    2009-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is not a diagnosis but a category that contains many disorders representing primary and secondary headaches. CDH is defined as headaches which occur more often than 15 days per month for at least 3 months. Approximately 3 to 5 percent of the population worldwide has daily or near-daily headaches. Primary CDH of long duration includes transformed migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. Transformed migraine and medication-overuse headaches are among the most common and challenging of the CDH disorders. Treatment of CDH focuses on reduction of headache triggers and use of preventive medications such as antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs and beta-blockers. Antidepressants are the most common preventive medications for all types of CDH, which suggests that central serotoninergic neurotransmission can be an important factor in the pathophysiology of chronic pain syndromes. PMID:19484693

  17. Headache and Tremor: Co-occurrences and Possible Associations

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, Mathys; Hendrikx, Suzan; Koehler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tremor and headache are two of the most prevalent neurological conditions. This review addresses possible associations between various types of tremor and headache, and provides a differential diagnosis for patients presenting with both tremor and headache. Methods Data were identified by searching MEDLINE in February 2015, with the terms “tremor” and terms representing the primary headache syndromes. Results Evidence for an association between migraine and essential tremor is conflicting. Other primary headaches are not associated with tremor. Conditions that may present with both tremor and headache include cervical dystonia, infectious diseases, hydrocephalus, spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks, space-occupying lesions, and metabolic disease. Furthermore, both can be seen as a side effect of medication and in the use of recreational drugs. Discussion No clear association between primary headaches and tremor has been found. Many conditions may feature both headache and tremor, but rarely as core clinical symptoms at presentation. PMID:26175954

  18. Neural Plasticity in Common Forms of Chronic Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Protsenko, Ekaterina; Cheng, Yu-Chen; Loggia, Marco L.; Coppola, Gianluca; Chen, Wei-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Headaches are universal experiences and among the most common disorders. While headache may be physiological in the acute setting, it can become a pathological and persistent condition. The mechanisms underlying the transition from episodic to chronic pain have been the subject of intense study. Using physiological and imaging methods, researchers have identified a number of different forms of neural plasticity associated with migraine and other headaches, including peripheral and central sensitization, and alterations in the endogenous mechanisms of pain modulation. While these changes have been proposed to contribute to headache and pain chronification, some findings are likely the results of repetitive noxious stimulation, such as atrophy of brain areas involved in pain perception and modulation. In this review, we provide a narrative overview of recent advances on the neuroimaging, electrophysiological and genetic aspects of neural plasticity associated with the most common forms of chronic headaches, including migraine, cluster headache, tension-type headache, and medication overuse headache. PMID:26366304

  19. Migraine Headache Treatment & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a variety of drugs for these treatment methods. Headache drug use should be monitored by a physician, ... new treatments or perhaps ways to block debilitating headache pain. Studies by other investigators are adding insight ...

  20. Headache - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Headache - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French ( ...

  1. Psychosocial Precursors and Correlates of Migraine Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levor, Robert M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Tested the interactions of migraine headache cycles and sufferers' daily experiences of stressful events, emotional arousal, and physical activity. Results support a model of migraine characterized by parallel physiological and psychosocial instability during a 4-day cycle and by an interaction of personality and behavioral (self-reported stress)…

  2. Neuroimaging in childhood headache: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, George A; Argyropoulou, Maria I

    2013-07-01

    Headache is a common complaint in children, one that gives rise to considerable parental concern and fear of the presence of a space-occupying lesion. The evaluation and diagnosis of headache is very challenging for paediatricians, and neuroimaging by means of CT or MRI is often requested as part of the investigation. CT exposes children to radiation, while MRI is costly and sometimes requires sedation or general anaesthesia, especially in children younger than 6 years. This review of the literature on the value of neuroimaging in children with headache showed that the rate of pathological findings is generally low. Imaging findings that led to a change in patient management were in almost all cases reported in children with abnormal signs on neurological examination. Neuroimaging should be limited to children with a suspicious clinical history, abnormal neurological findings or other physical signs suggestive of intracranial pathology. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to better define the clinical findings that warrant neuroimaging in children with headache. PMID:23700196

  3. Migraine headache. Working for the best outcome.

    PubMed

    Diamond, S; Freitag, F G; Solomon, G D; Millstein, E

    1987-06-01

    Migraine is a common hereditary disorder manifested by episodic headache, irritability, and gastrointestinal upset. The condition may be triggered by dietary, environmental, psychological, or pharmacologic factors. With proper diagnosis and judicious use of abortive and prophylactic therapy, patients often obtain excellent results. PMID:3588460

  4. Recurrent Pediatric Headaches: Behavioral Concepts and Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Keith D.

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent pediatric headaches are increasingly understood to be a function of both respondent and operant processes. In particular, the environment is thought to elicit internal autonomic instability and to evoke external maladaptive pain behavior. While medical interventions often provide an appropriate first line treatment, behavioral…

  5. Psychological Treatment of Benign Headache Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Edward B.

    1992-01-01

    Presents a selective summarization and critique of research on the psychological treatment of headache, with the primary focus on research appearing since 1980. Examines research on relaxation training, biofeedback, cognitive, and cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches. Includes suggestions for future research directions and methodological…

  6. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... begins with a visual disturbance called an aura (spots, dots or even zig zag lines). * True/False: All migraines involve only one side of the head. True/False: There is a cure for migraine headaches. Dietary triggers for migraines include: Chocolate Cheese Food additives such as MSG Alcohol A, B, ...

  7. Intravitreal Injection-Induced Migraine Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Lerebours, Valerie C; Nguyen, Thanh-Giao; Sarup, Vimal; Rossi, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    A case of migraine headache triggered by intravitreal injection, and aborted by retrobulbar injection, is reported. To date, migraine and related cephalgia have not been reported after intravitreal injection. Ophthalmologists and neurologists should be aware of this potential sequela of a very common procedure.  PMID:27190726

  8. Behavioral Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric Headache

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrasik, Frank; Schwartz, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    Headaches are quite common in children and adolescents, and they appear to persist into adulthood in a sizable number of individuals. Assessment approaches (interview, pain diaries, and general and specific questionnaires) and behavioral treatment interventions (contingency management, relaxation, biofeedback, and cognitive behavior therapy) are…

  9. Acupuncture laser in treating headache pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smesny, Dunja B.

    1990-09-01

    Cervicoocipital headache observed in 112 patient were treated, half of them with acupuncture, and other 50% with He-e laser (con tinuous emission- lo mW, 633nm: IEC). With this treatment was also combined an exercise program ne cesary for the mobilisation of functionaly blocked vertebral segment.

  10. Bilateral Horner's syndrome in cluster type headaches.

    PubMed

    Khurana, R K

    1993-09-01

    A patient with cluster type headaches demonstrated bilateral and alternating ocular sympathetic dysfunction during a spontaneous as well as a nitroglycerin-induced attack. Biochemical evaluation revealed postganglionic pupillary dysfunction on the symptomatic side and preganglionic pupillary dysfunction contralaterally. These findings defy a simple explanation regarding a central or peripheral origin of the oculocephalic sympathetic dysfunction. PMID:8262788

  11. Recent Advances in Thermoplastic Puncture-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogert, Philip B.; Working, Dennis C.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Smith, Janice Y.; Topping, Crystal C.; Britton, Sean M.; Bagby, Paul R.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2010-01-01

    The motivation for this work is to develop self-healing polymeric materials to enable damage tolerant systems, and to tailor puncture healing for use temperatures and applications. This will be a benefit in environments and conditions where access for manual repair is limited or impossible, or where damage may not be detected.

  12. Welded repairs of punctured thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    Punctures in thin-walled aluminum pressure vessels are repaired by plugging the hole with an interference-fit disc and welding the unit. The repaired vessels withstood test pressures in excess of vessel ultimate design values for 2-, 4-, and 6-inch holes in 0.202-inch-thick aluminum alloy parent material.

  13. Continuity of healthcare for headache patients: a problem of communication between headache specialists and general practitioners.

    PubMed

    La Pegna, Giovanni Battista; Brighina, Filippo; Saporito, Vincenzo; Aloisio, Antonina; Morreale, Calgero; D'Agati, Alfio

    2005-09-01

    The continuous care of headache patients, from headache centres to general practice, is a managerial problem that is still unsolved in Italy. In fact, if on the one hand patients do not usually go to headache centres because of poor information, on the other hand, if they do, they do not find their general practitioner (GP) sufficiently prepared to continue the management. In Sicily we have formed a dense network of headache centres that we will try to link on the Internet to deal with the problem of poor patients information and poor specialist consultation. We also have faced the problem of the continuous care, trying to overcome "the difficulties of communication between specialists, GPs and patients" and "the difficulties of GPs in diagnostic work", by simple instruments like the Italian version of ID-Migraine, a simple three-item questionnaire. PMID:16362696

  14. Teratogenic effects of amniotic sac puncture: a mouse model.

    PubMed Central

    MacIntyre, D J; Chang, H H; Kaufman, M H

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of an association between chorionic villus sampling (cvs) and limb abnormalities has prompted a review of the relevant experimental data. Although a vascular aetiology is favoured by many at present, the possibility exists that a proportion of cases may be caused by oligohydramnios secondary to inadvertent amniotic sac puncture. A mouse model of amniotic puncture syndrome has been developed to study the craniofacial and limb abnormalities produced by this procedure. Pregnant mice were anaesthetised and a laparotomy performed. One uterine horn was exteriorised, and the amniotic sacs punctured through the wall of the uterus with either a 21 gauge or a 25 gauge needle. The conceptuses in the contralateral uterine horn acted as controls. The mice were all killed on d 19 of pregnancy (day of finding a vaginal plug = d 1 of pregnancy) by cervical dislocation, and the morphological features of the embryos examined in detail. In a preliminary study, amniotic sac puncture was carried out on d 12, 13, 14, 15 or 16 of pregnancy, with either a 21 or a 25 gauge needle. Since the highest rates of palatal defects and limb deformities were observed following amniotic sac puncture using a 21 gauge needle, when this procedure was carried out on either d 13 or 14 of pregnancy, the main study was undertaken using a 21 gauge needle on these two days of pregnancy. Of 102 embryos in which amniotic sac puncture was carried out on d 13, 53% survived to d 19. Of the latter, 35% had a cleft palate, 61% had one or more morphologically abnormal limbs, and 43% had an abnormal tail. When amniotic sac puncture was carried out on d 14 of pregnancy, of 83 embryos subjected to this procedure, 81% survived to d 19. Of the latter, 27% had a cleft palate, 39% had one or more morphologically abnormal limbs, and 19% had an abnormal tail. In the controls, of 86 and 61 embryos isolated respectively from the d 13 and 14 mice, the survival rates were 97 and 90%, respectively. Palatal, limb

  15. Performing lumbar punctures for suspected CNS infections: experience and practice of trainee doctors.

    PubMed

    Defres, Sylviane; Mayer, Josephine; Backman, Ruth; Kneen, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Lumbar punctures are essential in the management of suspected CNS infections. However, despite clear guidelines their use can be haphazard. This survey investigated the training, knowledge and experience of UK doctors in training in relation to lumbar punctures. PMID:26551497

  16. Headache disorders: differentiating and managing the common subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Headache is an extremely common symptom and collectively headache disorders are among the most common of the nervous system disorders, with a prevalence of 48.9% in the general population.1 Headache affects people of all ages, races and socioeconomic status and is more common in women. Some headaches are extremely debilitating and have significant impact on an individual’s quality of life, imposing huge costs to healthcare and indirectly to the economy in general. Only a small proportion of headache disorders require specialist input. The vast majority can be effectively treated by a primary care physician or generalist with correct clinical diagnosis that requires no special investigation. Primary headache disorders – migraine, tension headache and cluster headache – constitute nearly 98% of all headaches; however, secondary headaches are important to recognise as they are serious and may be life threatening. This article provides an overview of the most common headache disorders and discusses the red flag symptoms that help identify serious causes that merit urgent specialist referral. The current pathway of headache care in the UK is discussed with a view to proposing a model that might fit well in the financially constrained National Health Service (NHS) and with new NHS reforms. The role of the national society, the British Association for the Study of Headache, and the patient organisations such as Migraine Trust in headache education to the professionals and the general public in shaping headache care in the UK is described. The article concludes by summarising evidence-based management of common headache diagnoses. PMID:26516483

  17. Transarterial and Transvenous Embolization for Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We report on the safety and efficacy of transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization in the treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) of the cavernous sinus. We reviewed the findings from a retrospectively database for 22 patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs who were treated with either transarterial Onyx embolization alone (n = 8) or transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization (n = 14) over a four year period. The mean follow-up period after endovascular treatment was 21.6 months (range 3-42 mths). Total number of embolizations was 27 for 22 patients. Two patients were treated transvenously after transarterial embolization. All 22 patients (100%) experienced improvement of their clinical symptoms. All 22 patients (100%) experienced total obliteration of their DAVFs, as documented by angiography performed at a mean follow-up of 5.8 months after the last treatment. No patient experienced a recurrence of symptoms after angiography showed DAVF obliteration. One patient exhibited temporary deterioration of ocular symptoms secondary to venous hypertension after near total obliteration; one had transient V cranial nerve deficit related to transarterial embolization, and two patients exhibited transient III and VI cranial nerve weakness related to transvenous embolization. Two patients experienced recurrent symptoms after incomplete transarterial embolization and underwent transvenous embolization at three and four months. Both patients achieved clinical and angiographic cures. Transarterial and transvenous embolization with Onyx, whenever possible, proved to be a safe and effective management for patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs. PMID:20977859

  18. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  19. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  20. Dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with progressive dementia and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Hiroki; Nagano, Yoshito; Hosomi, Naohisa; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of progressive parkinsonism and cognitive dysfunction due to dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). A 69-year-old man, with a history of hypertension and diabetes, was admitted to our hospital because of parkinsonism and dementia. Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) revealed a thrombus in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) and marked dilation of the medullary vein suggestive of the presence of comorbid DAVF. A single-photon emission CT (SPECT) showed widespread hypoperfusion in the bilateral frontal lobes. Selective cerebral angiography revealed a DAVF in SSS. These symptoms were significantly ameliorated following transvenous embolisation of the venous sinus at the shunting point. Reversible parkinsonism and dementia after embolisation was correlated with decreased dilation of medullary vein on SWI and improved cerebral blood flow on SPECT in the frontal lobes. Differentiation of parkinsonian and dementia symptoms due to DAVF from those associated with neurodegenerative disease is of great importance because DAVF-associated deficits may be reversed by endovascular therapy. PMID:24891481

  1. Superficial siderosis due to dural defect with thoracic spinal cord herniation.

    PubMed

    Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Ballabio, Elena; Erbetta, Alessandra; Prada, Francesco; Savoiardo, Mario; Parati, Eugenio A

    2012-01-15

    Superficial siderosis (SS) of the central nervous system is a rare disorder caused by chronic or recurrent hemorrhages into the subarachnoid space with hemosiderin and ferritin deposition, which leads to neuronal damage. The source of bleeding remains unknown in 50% of cases. Recently, attention has been focused on fluid-filled collection in the spinal canal, suggesting the presence of a dural defect which may be the bleeding point. We present a patient with SS and spinal extradural fluid collection due to midthoracic dural defect with spinal cord herniation. The reduction of the spinal cord herniation and the repair of the dural defect resulted in the disappearance of the fluid collection and cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities. The case here reported is, to our knowledge, the first case of spinal cord herniation presenting with SS and confirms the key role played by dural lacerations in the pathogenesis of both SS and spinal cord herniation. The search for dural lacerations should be one of the primary aims in patients with SS. PMID:21868040

  2. Bacterial cellulose membranes used as artificial substitutes for dural defection in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Ma, Xia; Chen, Shiwen; Tao, Meifeng; Yuan, Lutao; Jing, Yao

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals. PMID:24937688

  3. Cauda Equina Syndrome Associated with Dural Ectasia in Chronic Anlylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang-woo

    2014-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) associated with dural ectasia is a rare neurologic complication in patients with longstanding ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We report a 68-year-old male with a 30-year history of AS who presented a typical symptom and signs of progressive CES, urinary incontinence and neuropathic pain of the lumbosacral radiculopathy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings showed the unique appearances of dural ectasia, multiple dural diverticula, erosion of posterior element of the lumbar spine, tethering of the conus medullaris and adhesion of the lumbosacral nerve roots to the posterior aspect of the dural ectasia. Considering the progressive worsening of the clinical signs, detethering of the conus medullaris through resection of the filum terminale was performed through a limited laminectomy. However, the urinary incontinence did not improve and there was a partial relief of the neuropathic leg pain only. The possible pathogenetic mechanism of CES-AS and the dural ectasia in this patient with longstanding AS are discussed with a literature review. PMID:25628815

  4. Ossification of the Posterior Petroclinoid Dural Fold: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance.

    PubMed

    Kimball, David; Kimball, Heather; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, A Aaron

    2015-08-01

    Objectives The roof of the porus trigeminus, composed of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold, is an important landmark to the skull base surgeon. Ossification of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold is an anatomical variation rarely mentioned in the literature. Such ossification results in the trigeminal nerve traversing a bony foramen as it enters Meckel cave. The authors performed this study to better elucidate this anatomical variation. Design Fifteen adult cadaveric head halves were subjected to dissection of the middle cranial fossa. Microdissection techniques were used to examine the posterior petroclinoid dural folds. Skull base osteology was also studied in 71 dry human skulls with attention paid to the attachment point of the posterior petroclinoid dural folds at the trigeminal protuberances. Setting Cadaver laboratory Main Outcome Measures Measurements were made using a microcaliper. Digital images were made of the dissections. Results Completely ossified posterior petroclinoid folds were present in 20% of the specimens. Of the 142 dry skull sides examined, 9% had large trigeminal protuberances. Conclusions Based on this study, the posterior petroclinoid dural fold may completely ossify in adults that may lead to narrowing of the porus trigeminus and potential compression of the trigeminal nerve at the entrance to Meckel cave. PMID:26225315

  5. Bacterial Cellulose Membranes Used as Artificial Substitutes for Dural Defection in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Ma, Xia; Chen, Shiwen; Tao, Meifeng; Yuan, Lutao; Jing, Yao

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficacy and safety of dural repair in neurosurgical procedures, a new dural material derived from bacterial cellulose (BC) was evaluated in a rabbit model with dural defects. We prepared artificial dura mater using bacterial cellulose which was incubated and fermented from Acetobacter xylinum. The dural defects of the rabbit model were repaired with BC membranes. All surgeries were performed under sodium pentobarbital anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering. All animals were humanely euthanized by intravenous injection of phenobarbitone, at each time point, after the operation. Then, the histocompatibility and inflammatory effects of BC were examined by histological examination, real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western Blot. BC membranes evenly covered the surface of brain without adhesion. There were seldom inflammatory cells surrounding the membrane during the early postoperative period. The expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α as well as iNOS and COX-2 were lower in the BC group compared to the control group at 7, 14 and 21 days after implantation. BC can repair dural defects in rabbit and has a decreased inflammatory response compared to traditional materials. However, the long-term effects need to be validated in larger animals. PMID:24937688

  6. Puncture mechanics of cnidarian cnidocysts: a natural actuator

    PubMed Central

    Oppegard, Shawn C; Anderson, Peter A; Eddington, David T

    2009-01-01

    Background Cnidocysts isolated from cnidarian organisms are attractive as a drug-delivery platform due to their fast, efficient delivery of toxins. The cnidocyst could be utilized as the means to deliver therapeutics in a wearable drug-delivery patch. Cnidocysts have been previously shown to discharge upon stimulation via electrical, mechanical, and chemical pathways. Cnidocysts isolated from the Portuguese Man O' War jellyfish (Physalia physalis) are attractive for this purpose because they possess relatively long threads, are capable of puncturing through hard fish scales, and are stable for years. Results As a first step in using cnidocysts as a functional component of a drug delivery system, the puncture mechanics of the thread were characterized. Tentacle-contained cnidocysts were used as a best-case scenario due to physical immobilization of the cnidocysts within the tentacle. Ex vivo tentacle-contained cnidocysts from Physalia possessed an elastic modulus puncture threshold of approximately 1-2 MPa, based on puncture tests of materials with a gamut of hardness. Also, a method for inducing discharge of isolated cnidocysts was found, utilizing water as the stimulant. Preliminary lectin-binding experiments were performed using fluorophore-conjugated lectins as a possible means to immobilize the isolated cnidocyst capsule, and prevent reorientation upon triggering. Lectins bound homogeneously to the surface of the capsule, suggesting the lectins could be used for cnidocyst immobilization but not orientation. Conclusion Cnidocysts were found to puncture materials up to 1 MPa in hardness, can be discharged in a dry state using water as a stimulant, and bind homogeneously to lectins, a potential means of immobilization. The information gained from this preliminary work will aid in determining the materials and design of the patch that could be used for drug delivery. PMID:19785761

  7. Headache in the presentation of noncephalic acute illness

    PubMed Central

    Tzadok, Tomer; Toledano, Ronen; Fuchs, Lior; Bartal, Carmi; Novack, Victor; Ifergane, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Headache is a frequent symptom of many systemic diseases that do not involve cranial structures. In this observational study, we assessed factors associated with headache in the acute presentation of systemic conditions in a nonsurgical emergency department (ED). Methods: Consecutive patients, admitted to Soroka University Medical Center ED due to noncephalic illness, were prospectively surveyed using a structured questionnaire focused on the prevalence and characteristics of headache symptoms. Medical data were extracted from the patient's charts. Results: Between 1 and 6/2012, 194 patients aged 64.69 ± 19.52 years, were evaluated. Headache was reported by 83 (42.7%) patients and was more common among patients with febrile illness (77.5% vs. 22.5%, P < 0.001). Respiratory illness and level of O2 saturation were not associated with headache. Headache in the presentation of a noncephalic illness was associated with younger age (58 vs. 69, P < 0.001) and with suffering from a primary headache disorder (48.2% vs. 10.8%, P < 0.001). Headache was also associated with higher body temperature and lower platelets count. Conclusions: Headache is a common symptom in acute noncephalic conditions and was found to be associated with younger age and febrile disease on presentation. Patients who present with primary headache disorders are more prone to have headache during acute illness. Acute obstructive respiratory disease, hypercarbia or hypoxemia were not associated with headache. PMID:26752891

  8. Why Does Eating Ice Cream Give Me a Headache?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Ice Cream Headaches KidsHealth > For Kids > Ice Cream Headaches Print A A A Text Size ... a bad headache . But don't blame the ice cream — it's not acting alone. The roof of ...

  9. Chronic Daily Headache and Medication Overuse Headache in First-Visit Headache Patients in Korea: A Multicenter Clinic-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Myoung-Jin; Moon, Heui-Soo; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Kim, Byung-Su; Song, Tae-Jin; Kim, Jae-Moon; Park, Jeong Wook; Park, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; Kim, Byung-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chronic daily headache (CDH) is defined as a headache disorder in which headaches occur on a daily or near-daily basis (at least 15 days/month) for more than 3 months. Chronic migraine (CM) and medication overuse headache (MOH) are very disabling headaches that remain underdiagnosed. The aim of this study was to establish the frequency of CDH and its various subtypes, and examine the associations with MOH among first-visit headache patients presenting at neurology outpatient clinics in Korea. Methods Eleven neurologists enrolled first-visit patients with complaints of headaches into outpatient clinics for further assessment. Headache disorders were classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorder (third edition beta version) by each investigator. Results Primary CDH was present in 248 (15.2%) of the 1,627 included patients, comprising CM (143, 8.8%), chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) (98, 6%), and definite new daily persistent headache (NDPH) (7, 0.4%). MOH was associated with headache in 81 patients (5%). The association with MOH was stronger among CM patients (34.5%) than patients with CTTH (13.3%) or NDPH (14.3%) (p=0.001). The frequency of CDH did not differ between secondary and tertiary referral hospitals. Conclusions The frequencies of CDH and MOH diagnoses were 15.2% and 5%, respectively in first-visit headache patients presented at secondary or tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. CM was the most common subtype of CDH and was most frequently associated with MOH. PMID:27449912

  10. 49 CFR 179.16 - Tank-head puncture-resistance systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tank-head puncture-resistance systems. 179.16... CARS General Design Requirements § 179.16 Tank-head puncture-resistance systems. (a) Performance standard. When the regulations in this subchapter require a tank-head puncture-resistance system,...

  11. 49 CFR 179.16 - Tank-head puncture-resistance systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tank-head puncture-resistance systems. 179.16... CARS General Design Requirements § 179.16 Tank-head puncture-resistance systems. (a) Performance standard. When the regulations in this subchapter require a tank-head puncture-resistance system,...

  12. Headache at high school: clinical characteristics and impact.

    PubMed

    Tonini, M C; Frediani, F

    2012-05-01

    Although migraine (MH) and tension type headache (TTH) are the most common and important causes of recurrent headache in adolescents, they are poorly understood and not recognized by parents and teachers, delaying the first physician evaluation for correct diagnosis and management. The purpose of this study is to assess the knowledge about headache impact among the students of a Communication Private High School in Rimini city, and to evaluate the main different types of headaches interfering with school and social day activities. A self-administered questionnaire interview was given to students of the last 2 years of high school; ten items assessed the headache experience during the prior 12 months, especially during school time: the features and diagnosis of headaches types (based on the 2004 IHS criteria), precipitating factors, disability measured using the migraine disability assessment (MIDAS); therapeutic intervention. Out of the 60 students, 84 % experienced recurrent headache during the last 12 months. 79 % were females, aged 17-20 years; a family history was present in 74 % of headache students, in the maternal line; 45 % of subjects were identified as having MH and 27 % TTH; 25 % had morning headache and 20 % in the afternoon; fatigue, emotional stress and lack of sleep were the main trigger factors for headache, respectively in 86, 50 and 50 % of students; 92 % of headache students could not follow the lessons, could not participate in exercises and physical activity because of the headache; none had consulted a medical doctor and the 90 % of all students had never read, listened or watched television about headache. This study remarks on the need to promote headache educational programs, starting from high school, to increase communication between teachers-family-physician and patient-adolescents, with the goal to have an early appropriate therapeutic intervention, improvement of the quality of life and to prevent long-term headache disease in the

  13. Posterior Trans-Dural Repair of Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Herniation after Resection of Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong-Ki; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic spinal cord herniation is a rare complication following spinal surgery. We introduce a posterior trans-dural repair technique used in a case of thoracic spinal cord herniation through a ventral dural defect following resection of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervicothoracic spine. A 51-year-old female was suffering from paraplegia after laminectomy alone for cervicothoracic OPLL. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a severely compressed spinal cord with pseudomeningocele identified postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak and iatrogenic spinal cord herniation persisted despite several operations with duroplasty and sealing agent. Finally, the problems were treated by repair of the ventral dural defect with posterior trans-dural duroplasty. Several months after surgery, the patient could walk independently. This surgical technique can be applied to treat ventral dural defect and spinal cord herniation. PMID:27114779

  14. Recent Advances in Thermoplastic Puncture-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, K. L.; Working, D. C.; Wise, K. E.; Bogert, P. B.; Britton, S. M.; Topping, C.C.; Smith, J. Y.; Siochi, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Self-healing materials provide a route for enhanced damage tolerance in materials for aerospace applications. In particular, puncture-healing upon impact has the potential to mitigate significant damage caused by high velocity micrometeoroid impacts. This type of material also has the potential to improve damage tolerance in load bearing structures to enhance vehicle health and aircraft durability. The materials being studied are those capable of instantaneous puncture healing, providing a mechanism for mechanical property retention in lightweight structures. These systems have demonstrated healing capability following penetration of fast moving projectiles -- velocities that range from 9 mm bullets shot from a gun (approx.330 m/sec) to close to micrometeoroid debris velocities of 4800 m/sec. In this presentation, we report on a suite of polymeric materials possessing this characteristic. Figure 1 illustrates the puncture healing concept. Puncture healing in these materials is dependent upon how the combination of a polymer's viscoelastic properties responds to the energy input resulting from the puncture event. Projectile penetration increases the temperature in the vicinity of the impact. Self-healing behavior occurs following puncture, whereby energy must be transferred to the material during impact both elastically and inelastically, thus establishing two requirements for puncture healing to occur: a.) The need for the puncture event to produce a local melt state in the polymer material and b.) The molten material has to have sufficient melt elasticity to snap back and close the hole. 1,2 Previous ballistic testing studies revealed that Surlyn materials warmed up to a temperature approx.98 C during projectile puncture (3 C higher than it s melting temperature). 1,2 The temperature increase produces a localized flow state and the melt elasticity to snap back thus sealing the hole. Table 1 lists the commercially polymers studied here, together with their physical

  15. Preclinical characterization and safety of a novel hydrogel for augmenting dural repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Michael J.; Carnahan, Michael A.; D'Alessio, Keith; Butlin, Jared D. G.; Butt, Mark T.; Asher, Anthony L.

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is a potentially serious complication in surgical procedures involving opening of the dura mater. Although several materials have been developed to help achieve watertight dural closures, CSF leakages persist. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel hydrogel designed to provide augmentation to standard methods of dural repair. Performance measures such as polymerization time, dimensional swelling, burst strength, and elasticity were examined in laboratory situations. Additionally, biocompatibility in an in vivo rat model was examined. The results demonstrate that this novel hydrogel has superior mechanical strength and tissue adherence with enhanced flexibility, reduced swelling, and quicker set time compared with existing hydrogel dural sealants approved for intra-cranial use. Furthermore, biocompatibility studies demonstrate that this compound is both non-toxic and non-immunogenic.

  16. Migraine headache confounding the diagnosis of acute mountain sickness.

    PubMed

    Karle, Francis J; Auerbach, Paul S

    2014-03-01

    A 36-year-old man with a history of migraine headache attempted to hike from Lukla, Nepal, to Mount Everest Base Camp. On the sixth day of hiking, he had a migraine headache. After achieving resolution with typical therapies and rest, he ascended higher. Another headache developed that was interpreted to be a migraine. The headache was treated, and he ascended higher, after which severe symptoms of acute mountain sickness developed, necessitating his evacuation by helicopter. Persons with headaches in daily life may present challenges to diagnosis when traveling to high altitude. Careful evaluation and decision making are needed to achieve proper diagnosis and treatment of acute mountain sickness. PMID:24462763

  17. Needle puncture in rabbit functional spinal units alters rotational biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Robert A.; Bell, Kevin M.; Quan, Bichun; Nuzhao, Yao; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Kang, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design An in vitro biomechanical study for rabbit lumbar functional spinal units (FSUs) using a robot-based spine testing system. Objective To elucidate the effect of annular puncture with a 16G needle on mechanical properties in flexion/extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Summary of Background Data Needle puncture of the intervertebral disc has been shown to alter mechanical properties of the disc in compression, torsion, and bending. The effect of needle puncture in FSUs, where intact spinal ligaments and facet joints may mitigate or amplify these changes in the disc, on spinal motion segment stability subject to physiological rotations remains unknown. Methods Rabbit FSUs were tested using a robot testing system whose force/moment and position precision were assessed to demonstrate system capability. Flexibility testing methods were developed by load-to-failure testing in flexion/extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Subsequent testing methods were used to examine a 16G needle disc puncture and No. 11 blade disc stab (positive control for mechanical disruption). Flexibility testing was used to assess segmental range-of-motion (°), neutral zone stiffness (Nm/°) and width (° and Nm), and elastic zone stiffness before and after annular injury. Results The robot-based system was capable of performing flexibility testing on FSUs—mean precision of force/moment measurements and robot system movements were less than 3% and 1%, respectively, of moment-rotation target values. Flexibility moment targets were 0.3 Nm for flexion and axial rotation and 0.15 Nm for extension and lateral bending. Needle puncture caused significant (p<0.05) changes only in flexion/extension range-of-motion and neutral zone stiffness and width (Nm) compared to pre-intervention. No.11 blade-stab significantly increased range-of-motion in all motions, decreased neutral zone stiffness and width (Nm) in flexion/extension, and increased elastic zone stiffness in

  18. Computed tomographic epidurography: an aid to understanding deformation of the lumbar dural sac by epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Kano, T; Sano, T; Irie, M

    1999-09-01

    Local anaesthetics injected into the epidural space may deform the dural sac to a variable degree, thereby contributing to variability in the extent of the block. We investigated deformation of the lumbar dural sac after injection into the lumbar epidural space. The subjects were 26 patients with low-back pain who underwent lumbar epidurography and computed tomographic (CT) epidurography, of whom seven also underwent myelography and computed tomographic myelography. The epidural space was entered via the sacral hiatus in 24 patients and through the L5/S1 interspace in two patients. Ten millilitres of local anaesthetic was then injected into the epidural space followed by 20 mL of contrast medium. Computed tomographic epidurography was undertaken approximately 30-min after the epidural injection at the mid-vertebral and mid-discal levels from the first lumbar through to the first sacral vertebrae. The dural sac usually showed an oval or hexagonal shape on the transverse views at the first and second lumbar vertebral levels, and the shape of an inverted triangle below the level of the third lumbar vertebra. A median line of translucency was also observed on the posteroanterior epidurographic view in 25 of the 26 patients. This line was though to be a manifestation of the dural deformation to the inverted triangle. Dural sac deformation usually shows a specific pattern, although there are individual variations. Dural deformability is an important consideration in any analysis of the spread of epidural block or of the changes of epidural pressure after epidural injection of local anaesthetics. PMID:10549463

  19. Alcohol-induced headaches: Evidence for a central mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Panconesi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic drinks (ADs) have been reported as a migraine trigger in about one-third of the migraine patients in retrospective studies. Some studies found that ADs trigger also other primary headaches. The studies concerning the role of ADs in triggering various types of primary headaches published after the International Headache Society classification criteria of 1988 were reviewed, and the pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. Many studies show that ADs are a trigger of migraine without aura (MO), migraine with aura (MA), cluster headache (CH), and tension-type headache (TH). While data on MO and CH are well delineated, those in MA and TH are discordant. There are sparse reports that ADs are also triggers of less frequent types of primary headache such as familial hemiplegic migraine, hemicrania continua, and paroxysmal hemicrania. However, in some countries, the occurrence of alcohol as headache trigger is negligible, perhaps determined by alcohol habits. The frequency estimates vary widely based on the study approach and population. In fact, prospective studies report a limited importance of ADs as migraine trigger. If ADs are capable of triggering practically all primary headaches, they should act at a common pathogenetic level. The mechanisms of alcohol-provoking headache were discussed in relationship to the principal pathogenetic theories of primary headaches. The conclusion was that vasodilatation is hardly compatible with ADs trigger activity of all primary headaches and a common pathogenetic mechanism at cortical, or more likely at subcortical/brainstem, level is more plausible. PMID:27114660

  20. Secondary chronic cluster headache due to trigeminal nerve root compression.

    PubMed

    Mjåset, Christer; Russell, M B; Russell, M Bjørn

    2010-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman had a gradual onset of chronic headache located in the right temporal region and a burning sensation in the root of the tongue which over a year evolved into chronic cluster headache with a milder chronic headache in-between the severe cluster headache attacks. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve root on the pain side. Neurosurgery microvascular decompression relieved the patient's chronic cluster headache, the chronic intermittent headache and the burning tongue sensation. The effect was persistent at a 1 year follow-up. Patients with atypical symptoms of cluster headache should be examined with cerebral MRI angiography of arteries and veins to exclude symptomatic causes. PMID:20384588

  1. Sildenafil can induce the onset of a cluster headache bout

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guan-Yu; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2014-01-01

    About 25% of patients who are prescribed sildenafil, the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor, for erectile dysfunction (ED) experience headaches. These migraine effects are well-described, including cluster headaches. We report the case of a man who experienced a cluster headache attack following each of 2 sildenafil doses. His symptoms were resolved by adding naproxen to his treatment regimen and changing his ED treatment from 50 mg of sildenafil to 5 mg of vardenafil. To our knowledge, no study has reported cluster headaches triggered by the less commonly used PDE-5 inhibitors, namely vardenafil and tadalafil. Urologists should be cautious in prescribing sildenafil to patients with ED and with a history of cluster headaches. In these patients, they should consider prescribing low-dose vardenafil or tadalafil instead. Failure to recognize sildenafil risks could result in unnecessary headache bouts in patients with a history of cluster headaches. PMID:24940471

  2. Epidemiology of headache in the Republic of San Marino.

    PubMed Central

    D'Alessandro, R; Benassi, G; Lenzi, P L; Gamberini, G; Sacquegna, T; De Carolis, P; Lugaresi, E

    1988-01-01

    An epidemiological survey on headache was performed in the Republic of San Marino, which is the smallest independent State in the world, located near the Adriatic Coast, within Italy. Among a random sample of 1500 inhabitants over 7 years of age the frequency of headache, severe headache and migraine in the previous year was 35.3%, 12.2%, 9.3% respectively for men, and 46.2%, 20.6%, 18% for women. The most common factors reported to provoke headache were emotional stress, physical strain, lack of sleep, particular foods or drinks and for women menstruation. Migraine patients differed from people without headache in that they had a higher consumption of coffee, more frequently reported bad sleep, allergic disease and previous appendectomy. Furthermore, migraine patients and severe headache sufferers had a higher diastolic blood pressure than non headache subjects. PMID:3258357

  3. Dural arteriovenous fistula at the foramen magnum: Report of a case and clinical-anatomical review.

    PubMed

    Llácer, José L; Suay, Guillermo; Piquer, José; Vazquez, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Arterial supply and venous drainage at the foramen magnum is variable. Two main forms of clinical presentation, intracranial and spinal, can be differentiated when a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is found at this level. We describe a case of a 68-year-old patient with a progressive paraparesis, diagnosed of dural arteriovenous fistula located at the posterior lip of foramen magnum. We review, in this setting, the vascular radiological anatomy of those fistulas and its important correlation with neurologic clinical symptoms. PMID:26949168

  4. Rosai Dorfman disease: case with extensive dural involvement and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Jitender, Saini; Anantaram, Gudipati; Santosh, Vani

    2012-03-15

    We report a young adult man who presented with chronic raised intracranial tension features and unusually progressive bilateral visual and hearing impairment of 18 months duration. MR imaging showed extensive dural involvement and contiguous orbital and spinal disease. Cerebrospinal fluid demonstrated persistent high lymphocytic pleocytosis. Dural biopsy obtained from posterior cervical approach with C1 arch excision and meningeal biopsy revealed features of classical of Rosai-Dorfman disease. Histiocytes were strongly positive for CD-68 and S-100 proteins. The illness relentlessly progressed with patient developing total deafness and near total blindness at last follow-up. PMID:22029938

  5. Dural Reduction Surgery: A Treatment Option for Frontotemporal Brain Sagging Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Emily; Schievink, Wouter I; Sim, Valerie L

    2016-07-01

    Frontotemporal brain sagging syndrome is a dementia associated with hypersomnolence, personality changes, and features of intracranial hypotension on magnetic resonance imaging. The literature is sparse with respect to treatment options; many patients simply worsen. We present a case in which this syndrome responded to lumbar dural reduction surgery. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging indicated normalization of brain sagging and lumbar intrathecal pressure. Although no evidence of cerebrospinal leak was found, extremely thin dura was noted intraoperatively, suggesting that a thin and incompetent dura could result in this low-pressure syndrome. Clinicians who encounter this syndrome should consider dural reduction surgery as a treatment strategy. PMID:26972054

  6. Neuromodulation in treatment of refractory headaches.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Angelo; Leone, Massimo; Messina, Giuseppe; Cordella, Roberto; Marras, Carlo; Bussone, Gennaro; Broggi, Giovanni

    2008-05-01

    The field of neuromodulation is emerging as a promising and alternative therapeutical option for many drug-resistant clinical conditions, including painful syndromes such as refractory chronic cluster headache (CCH) and trigeminal neuralgia. We here report a series of patients who have undergone Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of Posterior Hypothalamus for chronic cluster headache, trigeminal neuralgia and atypical facial pain, matching their corresponding clinical results and also suggesting a role for Great Occipital Nerve Stimulation (which is a much less invasive procedure) in the treatment of CCH. According to us, the refinement of surgical techniques and of metabolic and functional brain neuroradiological investigations will lead to a refinement of the therapeutical strategies in such patients. PMID:18545901

  7. Natural history and treatment of craniocervical junction dural arteriovenous fistulas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joanna Y; Molenda, Joseph; Bydon, Ali; Colby, Geoffrey P; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J; Huang, Judy

    2015-11-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) located at the craniocervical junction are rare vascular malformations with distinctive features, and their natural history and the optimal treatment strategy remains unclear. We retrospectively reviewed eight patients with craniocervical junction DAVF who were evaluated at our institution between 2009 and 2012. We also conducted a MEDLINE search for all reports of craniocervical junction DAVF between 1970 and 2013, and reviewed 119 patients from 56 studies. From a total of 127 patients, 46 (37.1%) presented with myelopathy, 53 (43.1%) with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and four (3.3%) with brainstem dysfunction. SAH was typically mild, most often Hunt and Hess Grade I or II (83.3%), and associated with ascending venous drainage via the intracranial veins (p<0.001). Higher rates of obliteration were observed after microsurgery compared to embolization. Overall, younger age (odds ratio [OR] 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.12; p=0.011), hemorrhagic presentation (OR 0.17; 95% CI 0.06-0.50; p=0.001), and microsurgery (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08-0.6; p=0.004) were independently predictive of good outcome at the last follow-up. Microsurgery was the only independent predictor of overall improvement at the last follow-up (OR 4.35; 95% CI 1.44-13.2; p=0.009). Prompt diagnosis and microsurgical management, offering a greater chance of immediate obliteration, may optimize the outcomes for patients with craniocervical junction DAVF. Endovascular treatment is often not feasible due to lesion angioarchitecture, and is associated with a higher risk of lesion recanalization or recurrence. However, long term studies with newer embolic agents such as Onyx (ev3 Endovascular, Plymouth, MN, USA) are yet to be performed. PMID:26195333

  8. Headache and comorbidity in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Headache is one of the most common neurological symptom reported in childhood and adolescence, leading to high levels of school absences and being associated with several comorbid conditions, particularly in neurological, psychiatric and cardiovascular systems. Neurological and psychiatric disorders, that are associated with migraine, are mainly depression, anxiety disorders, epilepsy and sleep disorders, ADHD and Tourette syndrome. It also has been shown an association with atopic disease and cardiovascular disease, especially ischemic stroke and patent foramen ovale (PFO). PMID:24063537

  9. Critical path case management: the headache clinic.

    PubMed

    Sobkowski, D A; Maquera, V

    1996-01-01

    A practical application of a neurology case management healthcare delivery mode results in increased access to specialty providers, shorter follow-up periods, and improved continuity of medical care. The program described in the following sections was developed at a naval hospital for the ongoing evaluation of therapeutic schemes to optimize headache therapy and, 1 year after implementation, shows improvement in patient outcomes and resource use. PMID:9192570

  10. [Update on Current Care Guideline: Headache (children)].

    PubMed

    HämäläInen, Mirja; Katri, Laimi; Laukkala, Tanja; Nokelainen, Pekka; Raisio, Mikael; Rantala, Heikki; Aanttila, Pirjo; Sätilä, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The majority of children with recurrent headaches can be effectively treated in the primary health care. Paracetamol and ibuprofen are the recommended first-line pain medications. Limited evidence is available on the effectiveness of triptans in children and adolescents. However, nasal sumatriptan and possibly oral rizatriptan and nasal zolmitriptan can be considered for children and adolescents, as well as oral almotriptan for adolescents. Propranolol is the first-line prophylactic medication for migraine. PMID:26939493

  11. Clinical aspects of medication overuse headaches.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Arnaldo Neves; Lake, Alvin E

    2014-01-01

    Medication overuse headache (MOH) is a subset of chronic daily headache, occurring from overuse of 1 or more classes of migraine abortive medication. Acetaminophen, combination analgesics (caffeine combinations), opioids, barbiturates (butalbital), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and triptans are the main classes of drugs implicated in the genesis of MOH. Migraine seems to be the most common diagnosis leading to MOH. The development of MOH is associated with both frequency of use of medication and behavioral predispositions. MOH is not a unitary concept. The distinction between simple (type 1) vs complex (type 2) forms is based on both the class of overused medication and behavioral factors, including psychopathology and psychological drug dependence. MOH is a challenging disorder causing decline in the quality of life and causing physical symptoms, such as daily and incapacitating headaches, insomnia, and non-restorative sleep, as well as psychological distress and reduced functioning. MOH is associated with biochemical, structural, and functional brain changes. Relapse after detoxification is a challenge, but can be addressed if the patient is followed over a prolonged period of time with a combination of prophylactic pharmacotherapy, use of abortive medication with minimal risk of MOH, withholding previously overused medication, and providing psychological (cognitive-behavioral) therapy. PMID:24116964

  12. Puncture Initial Data for Highly Spinning Black-Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchlin, Ian; Healy, James; Lousto, Carlos; Zlochower, Yosef

    2015-04-01

    Accretion arguments suggest that some astrophysical black-holes will possess nearly extremal spins. It is expected that gravitational wave signals from orbiting and merging black-hole binaries will be detected by Advanced LIGO in the next few years. Accurate waveform models are needed to interpret detector data. We solve the Hamiltonian and momentum constraints of General Relativity representing two black-holes with nearly extremal spins and ultra-relativistic boosts in the puncture formalism using spectral methods in the Cactus/Einstein Toolkit framework. We use a non-conformally-flat ansatz with an attenuated superposition of two conformally rescaled Lorentz-boosted-Kerr 3-metrics and their corresponding conformal extrinsic curvatures. The initial data are evolved in time using moving punctures in the BSSN and Z4 formalisms. We compare with the standard Bowen-York conformally-flat ansatz, finding an order of magnitude smaller burst of spurious radiation.

  13. Similarity relation upon the puncture of a thin sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, N. O.; Chernatkin, S. E.; Kuz'ko, E. I.; Shtremel', M. A.

    2009-08-01

    Puncture is a break in a membrane (clamped on a distant peripheral outline) caused by pressing an indenter whose diameter is much less than the diameter of the membrane. Based on the measurements of the force P required for puncturing an aluminum foil over a wide range of relationships between its thickness h and the indenter radius R (for h/R = 0.12-7.00, i.e., from a blunt-indenter-thin-foil to a sharp-indenter-thick-foil case), we found a common nonlinear dependence of the dimensionless force P/ EhR ˜ ( h/2 R) n on the deformation of plastic bend in the contact h/2 R.

  14. On Rate-Compatible Punctured Turbo Codes Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, Fulvio; Montorsi, Guido; Vatta, Francesca

    2005-12-01

    We propose and compare some design criteria for the search of good systematic rate-compatible punctured turbo code (RCPTC) families. The considerations presented by S. Benedetto et al. (1998) to find the "best" component encoders for turbo code construction are extended to find good rate-compatible puncturing patterns for a given interleaver length[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]. This approach is shown to lead to codes that improve over previous ones, both in the maximum-likelihood sense (using transfer function bounds) and in the iterative decoding sense (through simulation results). To find simulation and analytical results, the coded bits are transmitted over an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel using an antipodal binary modulation. The two main applications of this technique are its use in hybrid incremental ARQ/FEC schemes and its use to achieve unequal error protection of an information sequence.

  15. A new multiple noncontinuous puncture (pointage) technique for corneal tattooing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hyoung; Um, Taewoong; Kim, Myoung Joon; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Jae Yong

    2015-01-01

    AIM To assess the safety and cosmetic efficacy of a new multiple noncontinuous transepithelial puncture technique for tattooing a decompensated cornea. METHODS It was a non-comparative clinical case series study. The study examines 33 eyes in 33 patients with total corneal opacity due to corneal decompensation, which developed following intraocular surgery. Corneal tattooing was performed using the multiple noncontinuous transepithelial puncture technique (i.e. pointage). The safety of this new surgical strategy was assessed by occurrence of adverse events for the follow-up period. The cosmetic efficacy was determined by the patient's cosmetic satisfaction and independent observer's opinion about patient appearance. RESULTS Seven women and 26 men were included in the study. The mean age was 46.4±17.5y (range: 7-67). In total, 30 of 33 patients (91%) reported cosmetic satisfaction within the follow-up period. Only 3 patients (9%) required additional tattooing due to cosmetic unsatisfaction. Cosmetic outcomes were analyzed and classified as excellent or good in 13 (39%) and 17 (52%) patients, respectively. No serious adverse events developed, except delayed epithelial healing in 3 cases. CONCLUSION The cosmetic outcomes of the multiple noncontinuous transepithelial puncture technique for corneal tattooing were good. The safety of this method is higher than conventional procedures. This new procedure also provides improved cost-effectiveness and safety over current corneal tattooing techniques. PMID:26558203

  16. Puncture Self-Healing Polymers for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L.; Penner, Ronald K.; Bogert, Phil B.; Yost, W. T.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2011-01-01

    Space exploration launch costs on the order of $10K per pound provide ample incentive to seek innovative, cost-effective ways to reduce structural mass without sacrificing safety and reliability. Damage-tolerant structural systems can provide a route to avoiding weight penalty while enhancing vehicle safety and reliability. Self-healing polymers capable of spontaneous puncture repair show great promise to mitigate potentially catastrophic damage from events such as micrometeoroid penetration. Effective self-repair requires these materials to heal instantaneously following projectile penetration while retaining structural integrity. Poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) (EMMA), also known as Surlyn is an ionomer-based copolymer that undergoes puncture reversal (self-healing) following high impact puncture at high velocities. However EMMA is not a structural engineering polymer, and will not meet the demands of aerospace applications requiring self-healing engineering materials. Current efforts to identify candidate self-healing polymer materials for structural engineering systems are reported. Rheology, high speed thermography, and high speed video for self-healing semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers will be reported.

  17. Characteristics of Headache at Altitude among Trekkers; A comparison between Acute Mountain Sickness and Non-Acute Mountain Sickness Headache

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Reza; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghsaeifard, Ziba; Mehrabi, Farzad; Ahmadinejad, Taha

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Headache at altitudes has had an incidence of 25-62% through many related studies. Many reasons are identified concerning headache at altitudes such as acute mountain sickness (AMS), sinus headache, migraine, tension type headache, and frontal tension headache. This study tried to compare different types of headache among trekkers on Mount Damavand, a 5671m mountain, Iran, to find their incidence and related symptoms and signs. Methods Through a cross-sectional study, we evaluated headache incidence and its correlation to AMS among people who climbed Mount Damavand. Lake Louise Score, a self-report questionnaire, was applied to make AMS diagnosis through three separate stages of trekking programs. Chi-square test was employed as the main mean of analysis. Results Totally, 459 between 13-71 year olds participated in the study among which females were 148 (32.1%) and males 311 (67.8%). Headache was found in 398 (86.7%) among whom 279 (70%) were proved as AMS. Investigating the types of headache in the cases of AMS showed 64.5% to be of steady, 31% throbbing and 4.5% stabbing characters which had significant differences with a P value = 0.003. The majority of headaches were stated as frontal (38.9%) and the least prevalence belonged to the parietal area (4.4%), while global headache was reported in 27%. Conclusions This study specifies the exact location of headaches at altitude in cases of AMS and non-AMS headaches. Many cases of high altitude non-AMS headache are resulted by tension and light reflection at altitude. PMID:22942999

  18. Headache and inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    La Mantia, L; Erbetta, A

    2004-10-01

    The subcommittee of the International Headache Society for headache classification (ICHD-II) has recently recognised that secondary headaches may occur in patients affected by inflammatory diseases (ID) of the central nervous system (CNS), classifying them among the headaches attributed to non-vascular intracranial disorders. The aim of the study was to verify the association between headache and inflammatory non-infectious diseases of the CNS, by a review of the literature data on the topic, integrated by personal cases and data. Secondary headaches may occur in four main disorders: neurosarcoidosis (sec 7.3.1), aseptic (non-infectious) meningitis (7.3.2), other non-infectious ID (7.3.3) and lymphocytic hypophysitis (7.3.4). Headache and/or primary headaches are frequently reported in patients with neurosarcoidosis (30%), Behcet's syndrome (BS) (55%) and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (45-58%). Recent data show a high incidence of headache also in multiple sclerosis (MS) (58%) (not mentioned in ICHD-II). The association between headache and inflammatory dysimmune diseases of the CNS, in particular BS and MS, might suggest a pathogenetic relationship. PMID:15549526

  19. Sturge-weber syndrome: a case report with persistent headache.

    PubMed

    Balkuv, Ece; Isik, Nihal; Canturk, Ilknur Aydin; Isik, Nejat; Basaran, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by a facial vascular nevus associated with an ipsilateral leptomeningeal angioma. Headache is a rare component of SWS and when it occurs it usually occurs as a migraine-like headache. We aimed to present a SWS patient with episodic tension type headache and to draw attention in different types of headaches that can be seen in SWS. A 21 year old female patient with the diagnosis of SWS was suffering from severe headaches. At her physical examination a facial nevus -occurred due to choroid angioma- was observed. On her neurological examination a mild asymmetry of upper extremities was visible. She had a 2 year history of frequent non-pulsating headaches. There was no nausea or aura like symptoms accompanying the headache. Headaches were lasting for hours. The pain was bilateral and pressing in quality. SWS are a very rare and challenging disease for both the patients and their families. Usually migraine type headache is seen in SWS but it should not be forgotten that more generalized headaches like tension type may also be seen. PMID:25400854

  20. Types of headache and those remedies in traditional persian medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M.; Petramfar, Peyman; Firoozabadi, Ali; Moein, Mahmood Reza; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    The history of headache, as a common neurological complication, goes back to almost 9000 years ago. Many ancient civilizations present references to headaches and the coherent treatment strategies. Accordingly, several documents comprising headache complications embodying precise medical information stem from Traditional Persian Medicine (TPM) that can provide useful opportunities for more comprehensive treatment. We conducted a survey on headache through original important pharmacopeias and other important medical manuscripts of TPM which were written during 9th to 19th centuries and have derived all headache categories and herbal remedies. An extensive search of scientific data banks, such as Medline and Scopus, has also been exercised to find results relating to the anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive, and analgesic effects of denoted medicinal herbs. The concept of headache and treatments in TPM covers over 20 various types of headache and more than 160 different medicinal plants administered for oral, topical, and nasal application according to 1000 years of the subject documents. Nearly, 60% of remarked medicinal herbs have related anti-inflammatory or analgesic effects and some current headache types have similarities and conformities to those of traditional types. Beside historical approaches, there are many possible and available strategies that can lead to development of new and effective headache treatment from medicinal plants so that this study can provide beneficial information on clinical remedies based on centuries of experience in the field of headache which can stand as a new candidate for further investigations. PMID:23922452

  1. Sturge-weber syndrome: a case report with persistent headache

    PubMed Central

    Balkuv, Ece; Isik, Nihal; Canturk, Ilknur Aydin; Isik, Nejat; Basaran, Recep

    2014-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by a facial vascular nevus associated with an ipsilateral leptomeningeal angioma. Headache is a rare component of SWS and when it occurs it usually occurs as a migraine-like headache. We aimed to present a SWS patient with episodic tension type headache and to draw attention in different types of headaches that can be seen in SWS. A 21 year old female patient with the diagnosis of SWS was suffering from severe headaches. At her physical examination a facial nevus -occurred due to choroid angioma- was observed. On her neurological examination a mild asymmetry of upper extremities was visible. She had a 2 year history of frequent non-pulsating headaches. There was no nausea or aura like symptoms accompanying the headache. Headaches were lasting for hours. The pain was bilateral and pressing in quality. SWS are a very rare and challenging disease for both the patients and their families. Usually migraine type headache is seen in SWS but it should not be forgotten that more generalized headaches like tension type may also be seen. PMID:25400854

  2. [Iatrogenic spinal epidermoid tumors. A late complication of spinal puncture].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; López-García, A; Dittmann, M; de Andrés, J A; Blázquez, M G

    1996-04-01

    INTRODUCTION. Epidermoid tumors in the spinal canal are rare. Whether congenitally or iatrogenically caused, they form as the result of epidermal cells implanted within the spinal channel. Such implantation can occur during a variety of procedures and events such as bullet wounds, surgery, myelography or punctures for diagnosis, anesthesia or treatment. Although this complication is not discussed in books or journals on anesthesiology, we have found it mentioned in over 100 published cases reporting iatrogenically caused spinal epidermoid tumors. ETIOPATHOGENESIS. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine derive from the implantation of epidermal tissue transported inside the spinal canal during lumbar punctures without guidance or with inadequate guidance. There is ample evidence that such tumors are iatrogenic. All cases occur in patients with a history of lumbar puncture. They are rarely associated with congenital anomalies. They are extramedullary. They tend to develop near sites of earlier lumbar puncture, usually near the conus medullaris and the cauda equina. Iatrogenic epidermoid tumors of the spine have been reproduced experimentally in two studies in which autologous skin fragments were implanted in the spinal canal. CLINICAL SIGNS. These tumors are well tolerated by patients for extended periods of time, ranging from 2 to 10 years. At the cauda equinus, tumors can grow slowly for long periods without signs of nerve compression. Symptoms are directly related to tumor size and site. All patients with tumors at the cauda equinus report severe pain radiating toward the roots of compressed nerves. Nuclear magnetic resonance makes it possible to detect the tumor without administration of intrathecal contrast. At present gadolinium-DTPA improves the image so that these tumors can be distinguished from other types. The prognosis for epidermoid tumors of the spine is good, as they are histologically benign. Treatment is always surgical. CONCLUSION. Although the

  3. A Kinect™ camera based navigation system for percutaneous abdominal puncture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Deqiang; Luo, Huoling; Jia, Fucang; Zhang, Yanfang; Li, Yong; Guo, Xuejun; Cai, Wei; Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang; Zheng, Huimin; Hu, Qingmao

    2016-08-01

    Percutaneous abdominal puncture is a popular interventional method for the management of abdominal tumors. Image-guided puncture can help interventional radiologists improve targeting accuracy. The second generation of Kinect™ was released recently, we developed an optical navigation system to investigate its feasibility for guiding percutaneous abdominal puncture, and compare its performance on needle insertion guidance with that of the first-generation Kinect™. For physical-to-image registration in this system, two surfaces extracted from preoperative CT and intraoperative Kinect™ depth images were matched using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. A 2D shape image-based correspondence searching algorithm was proposed for generating a close initial position before ICP matching. Evaluation experiments were conducted on an abdominal phantom and six beagles in vivo. For phantom study, a two-factor experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of the operator’s skill and trajectory on target positioning error (TPE). A total of 36 needle punctures were tested on a Kinect™ for Windows version 2 (Kinect™ V2). The target registration error (TRE), user error, and TPE are 4.26  ±  1.94 mm, 2.92  ±  1.67 mm, and 5.23  ±  2.29 mm, respectively. No statistically significant differences in TPE regarding operator’s skill and trajectory are observed. Additionally, a Kinect™ for Windows version 1 (Kinect™ V1) was tested with 12 insertions, and the TRE evaluated with the Kinect™ V1 is statistically significantly larger than that with the Kinect™ V2. For the animal experiment, fifteen artificial liver tumors were inserted guided by the navigation system. The TPE was evaluated as 6.40  ±  2.72 mm, and its lateral and longitudinal component were 4.30  ±  2.51 mm and 3.80  ±  3.11 mm, respectively. This study demonstrates that the navigation accuracy of the proposed system is acceptable

  4. Weather and headache onset: a large-scale study of headache medicine purchases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, Kayoko; Noda, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Mieko; Ojima, Toshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    It is widely recognized that weather changes can trigger headache onset. Most people who develop headaches choose to self-medicate rather than visit a hospital or clinic. We investigated the association between weather and headache onset using large-sample sales of the headache medicine, loxoprofen. We collected daily sales figures of loxoprofen and over-the-counter drugs over a 1-year period from a drugstore chain in western Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. To adjust for changes in daily sales of loxoprofen due to social environmental factors, we calculated a proportion of loxoprofen daily sales to over-the-counter drug daily sales. At the same time, we obtained weather data for the study region from the website of the Japan Meteorological Agency. We performed linear regression analysis to ascertain the association between weather conditions and the loxoprofen daily sales proportion. We also conducted a separate questionnaire survey at the same drugstores to determine the reason why people purchased loxoprofen. Over the study period, we surveyed the sale of hundreds of thousands of loxoprofen tablets. Most people purchased loxoprofen because they had a headache. We found that the sales proportion of loxoprofen increased when average barometric pressure decreased, and that precipitation, average humidity, and minimum humidity increased on loxoprofen purchase days compared to the previous day of purchases. This study, performed using a large dataset that was easy-to-collect and representative of the general population, revealed that sales of loxoprofen, which can represent the onset and aggravation of headache, significantly increased with worsening weather conditions.

  5. N-Butyl 2-Cyanoacrylate Embolization of Spinal Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, B.J.; Kim, T.-K.; Seo, S.I.; Kyung, J.B.; Seol, H.Y.; Han, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Summary We report an unusual case of spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) presenting with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Cure was achieved with endovascular treatment with n-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA). A review of the literature revealed five cases of cervical SDAVF that presented with SAH. None of these cases were treated with NBCA. PMID:20584439

  6. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-06-29

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease. PMID:26077718

  7. Dural tear and myelomalacia caused by an airgun pellet in a cat

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sònia

    2013-01-01

    An 8-year-old cat was presented with severe neurological deficits secondary to a traumatic cervical spinal cord injury caused by an airgun pellet. This report describes, for the first time, the myelographic findings of a dural rupture in a cat and also describes a bilateral Horner’s syndrome in a cat. PMID:24155462

  8. Dural tear and myelomalacia caused by an airgun pellet in a cat.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cristian; Ródenas, Sergio; Pumarola, Martí; Añor, Sònia

    2013-07-01

    An 8-year-old cat was presented with severe neurological deficits secondary to a traumatic cervical spinal cord injury caused by an airgun pellet. This report describes, for the first time, the myelographic findings of a dural rupture in a cat and also describes a bilateral Horner's syndrome in a cat. PMID:24155462

  9. [Safe and Effective Analgesia with Bilateral Continuous TAP Block for a Patient with Marfan Syndrome after Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair].

    PubMed

    Katakura, Yumi; Sakurai, Asako; Endo, Masaru; Hamada, Takako; Nomoto, Mayuko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeda, Koji

    2016-06-01

    A patient with Marfan syndrome underwent emergency open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. She was referred to our department for postoperative analgesia. Taking the risk of possible dural ectasia into consideration, we avoided epidural block. Alternatively, we performed bilateral continuous transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with sufficient analgesia. Lumbosacral dural ectasia is frequently observed in patients with Marfan syndrome. A few reports described that their fragile dura may contribute to an increased risk of dural puncture and postdural puncture headache (PDPH). Thus, in planning neuraxial block for a patient with Marfan syndrome, the possible consequences of lumbosacral dural ectasia should be considered. A case we herein present shows bilateral continuous TAP block could be a safe and effective alternative to epidural block. PMID:27483660

  10. Scientific advances in headache research: an update on neurostimulation.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jan; Magis, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiological understanding of migraine and other primary headaches has been substantially improved over the last 20 years. A milestone that paved the way for successful research was the development of the International Classification of Headache Disorders published by the International Headache Society in 1988. The classification facilitated a clear clinical diagnosis of headache disorders and allowed research efforts to be focused on clearly defined syndromes. Recent advances in the understanding of headache disorders have been driven by the availability of new research tools, such as advanced imaging techniques, genetic tools, pharmaceutical compounds and devices for electrical or magnetic stimulation. The latest scientific and clinical advances were presented at the recent European Headache and Migraine Trust International Congress (EHMTIC) in London (UK). PMID:23253387

  11. Headache and Facial Pain in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Vgontzas, Angeliki; Charleston, Larry; Robbins, Matthew S

    2016-03-01

    Children and adolescents with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a high prevalence of recurrent headaches (24.0-43.9 %). Acute presentation with headache can be diagnostically challenging, as the clinician must consider evaluation of several potentially devastating conditions including vascular diseases (stroke, hemorrhage, venous sinus thrombosis, moyamoya, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome), facial and orbital bone infarcts, dental pain, and osteomyelitis. Patients with SCD and primary headache disorders may benefit from comprehensive headache treatment plans that include abortive therapy, prophylactic therapy, and non-pharmacological modalities. Although there is limited data in adults, those with SCD are at risk for medication overuse headache secondary to frequent opioid use. Addressing headache in patients with SCD may help to reduce their use of opioids and disability and improve pain and quality of life. PMID:26879878

  12. Access to care - an unmet need in headache management?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Access to care for headache sufferers is not always simple. A survey conducted in a large number of members of lay associations point to the existence of multiple barriers to care for headache in several European countries. Patients usually discover the existence of specialized structures with a delay of several years after the onset of their headache. Furthermore, a relevant portion of them are not satisfied with the management of their disease, partly because of the poor efficacy of treatments and partly because of the difficulty to get in touch with the specialist. Headache disorders, and primary headaches in particular, represent an important issue in public health, because they are common, disabling and treatable. A joint effort is required from the relevant stakeholders (scientists, lay organizations, decision-makers, healthcare policymakers, and others) to improve the access to care for headache sufferers. PMID:24742114

  13. Acupuncture for episodic cluster headache: a trigeminal approach.

    PubMed

    Hayhoe, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Following evidence that acupuncture is clinically feasible and cost-effective in the treatment of headache, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends acupuncture as prophylactic treatment for migraine and tension headache. There has thus been expectation that other forms of headache should benefit also. Unfortunately, acupuncture has not generally been successful for cluster headache. This may be due to acupuncturists approaching the problem as one of severe migraine. In fact, cluster headache is classed as a trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. In this case report, episodic cluster headache is treated in the same way as has been shown effective for trigeminal neuralgia. Acupuncture is applied to the contralateral side at points appropriate for stimulating branches of the trigeminal nerve. Thus, ST2 is used for the infraorbital nerve, BL2 and Yuyao for the supratrochlear and supraorbital nerves, and Taiyang for the temporal branch of the zygomatic nerve. PMID:26846705

  14. [A retrospective study of infant headache].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Precioso, S; García-Cantó, E; Villaescusa, O; Barbero, P; Moreno, J A; Mulas, F

    1995-01-01

    Headache either as an isolated syndrome or as part of a symptomatic grouping is a frequent reason for medical consultation or hospitalization during childhood and adolescence. We review 94 clinical histories of patients between three and thirteen years of age. Headache was the reason for being hospitalized in all cases. Our aim was to assess its incidence rate, epidemiology, clinical characteristics and etiology in addition to evaluating as to whether complementary examinations carried out during hospitalization were worthwhile. Among the most significant results were the following: age (73 patients were over seven years old, 77.6%), time elapsed for symptomatology to evolve (exactly or less than one week in 45% of cases); family history of migraine in 55 cases (58.5%). The most frequent accompanying symptoms were vomiting (38.2%), nausea (22.3%) and abdominal pain (19.1%). Physical exam was normal in 63 cases (67%) while sixteen patients (17%) had neurological focal signs and/or signs of endocranial hypertension (ECHT). Electroencephalography was performed on 94.6% of the patients and proved pathological in 22 cases (25%). Brain computerized tomography (CT) scan was carried out on 92.5% of the patients with space occupying lesions in 3.2% of the cases. The most frequent final diagnosis (52% of patients) was one of migraine. We did not find any patients with intracranial expansionary processes not showing signs of ECHT and/or neurological focalization, for which reason we doubt the profitability of the almost routine practice of carrying out brain CT scan on patients when severe headache is the sole symptom and where there are no specific findings during physical examination.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7497236

  15. Electrophysiological Properties of Dural Afferents in the Absence and Presence of Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Harriott, Andrea M.; Gold, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    Migraine is a debilitating condition characterized by recurrent severe head pain. Although mechanisms underlying a migraine attack remain controversial, one proposal is that inflammatory mediator (IM)–induced activation and sensitization of dural afferents contribute to the initiation of migraine pain. We and others have shown that the electrophysiological properties of afferents, both in the absence and the presence of IM, vary as a function of target of innervation. These differences may account for unique aspects of pain syndromes associated with specific body regions. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the electrophysiological properties of dural afferents differ from those innervating the temporalis muscle (TM), a structure in close proximity to the dura but that is not associated with pain syndromes at all similar to migraine. Acutely dissociated retrograde labeled primary afferents innervating the dura and TM were examined with whole cell current-clamp recordings. Passive and active electrophysiological properties were determined before and after the application of IM: (in μM) prostaglandin E2 (1), bradykinin (10), and histamine (1). In the absence of IM, there were significant differences between the two populations, particularly with respect to the response to suprathreshold stimulation where dural afferents were more excitable than TM afferents. Importantly, although both populations of afferents were sensitized by IM, the pattern of passive and active electrophysiological changes associated with IM-induced sensitization of these two populations of afferents suggested that there were both similarities and marked differences between the two with respect to underlying mechanisms of sensitization. If the differences between dural and TM afferents are due to a differential pattern of ion channel expression rather than differences in the relative density/biophysical properties of the same ion channels, it may be

  16. Partial glossectomy and floor of mouth (FOM) defect repair with biological dural graft: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Khalid B.; Bakhsh, Zainab A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oral carcinoma can cause significant defects that would necessitate a challenging reconstructive surgery. These techniques include biological or synthetic dressings, grafts, regional flaps, and free-vascularized flaps. Among these, the dural graft has demonstrated promising results in repairing the skull-base defects. Our aim is to report a new, innovative technique for partial glossectomy and floor of mouth defect repair using a biological dural graft dressing when primary repair was not feasible and the patient did not consent to dermal graft or flap interventions. Presentation of case This article reports the outcomes from a novel intervention of partial glossectomy repair using a biological dural dressing derived from bovine type-I collagen in a 57-year-old female patient with recurrent T1N1M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the left-sided tongue during the 12 month period of follow-up. Discussion The best option for large tongue defects is a free flap, while for a moderate defect is a regional oral flap. The biological graft, as an acellular dermal graft has been well known to facilitate secondary healing in the tongue as an alternative to the split-thickness skin graft. In the current study, the dural dressing in tongue reconstruction was likewise shown to be an effective biological dressing; hence, the collagen membrane is biologically acceptable to the oral mucosa and an excellent wound graft material. However, it is absolutely contraindicated in bovine hypersensitive patients. Conclusion The biological dural graft dressing appears to be an effective method for tongue reconstruction, as it promotes adequate wound healing and it preserves function. PMID:25942748

  17. Outcomes after suboccipital decompression without dural opening in children with Chiari malformation Type I

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Benjamin C.; Kelly, Kathleen M.; Phan, Michelle Q.; Bruce, Samuel S.; McDowell, Michael M.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Feldstein, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Object Symptomatic pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) is most often treated with posterior fossa decompression (PFD), but controversy exists over whether the dura needs to be opened during PFD. While dural opening as a part of PFD has been suggested to result in a higher rate of resolution of CM symptoms, it has also been shown to lead to more frequent complications. In this paper, the authors present the largest reported series of outcomes after PFD without dural opening surgery, as well as identify risk factors for recurrence. Methods The authors performed a retrospective review of 156 consecutive pediatric patients in whom the senior authors performed PFD without dural opening from 2003 to 2013. Patient demographics, clinical symptoms and signs, radiographic findings, intraoperative ultrasound results, and neuromonitoring findings were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine risk factors for recurrence of symptoms and the need for reoperation. Results Over 90% of patients had a good clinical outcome, with improvement or resolution of their symptoms at last follow-up (mean 32 months). There were no major complications. The mean length of hospital stay was 2.0 days. In a multivariate regression model, partial C-2 laminectomy was an independent risk factor associated with reoperation (p = 0.037). Motor weakness on presentation was also associated with reoperation but only with trend-level significance (p = 0.075). No patient with < 8 mm of tonsillar herniation required reoperation. Conclusions The vast majority (> 90%) of children with symptomatic CM-I will have improvement or resolution of symptoms after a PFD without dural opening. A non–dural opening approach avoids major complications. While no patient with tonsillar herniation < 8 mm required reoperation, children with tonsillar herniation at or below C-2 have a higher risk for failure when this approach is used. PMID:25932779

  18. Payroll: A Headache You Can Cure!

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita J; Mattern, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Payroll is not only an expense for your practice; it can be a headache for you or your practice manager. Payroll is also a major scope of audit procedures. Don't rely on the word of anyone else that your taxes were processed and remitted. Demand to see proof. By outsourcing your human resources and payroll functions to one company, you can free up valuable time to concentrate on your area of expertise, leaving the administrative hassles to the staffing firm. PMID:26856025

  19. [Thrombocyte function in vasomotor and migraine headaches].

    PubMed

    Grotemeyer, K H; Viand, R; Beykirch, K

    1983-05-20

    The number of circulating platelet aggregates was assessed using a modification of the method of Wu and Hoak. The index for the number of circulating aggregates was 1.04 +/- 0.12 for 35 healthy probands aged 35 +/- 11 years and was different from the index of 25 patients with vasomotor headache aged 37 +/- 14 years of 1.1 +/- 0.14 (P less than 0.1). The number of circulating platelet aggregates with an index of 1.38 +/- 0.24 was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) in 48 migraine patients aged 36 +/- 12 years. PMID:6840009

  20. Pediatric febrile seizures and childhood headaches in primary care.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, J; Bentti, A L

    2000-03-01

    Febrile seizures and migraine headaches in children are two of the most common neurological diagnoses seen by primary care practitioners. It is essential that a knowledge base be developed to better care for this population. This article reviews pediatric febrile seizures, including management and treatment recommendations and childhood headaches, with an emphasis on migraine headaches. Diagnosis, management, and referral criteria are also reviewed. PMID:10673570

  1. SUNCT headaches after ipsilateral ophthalmic-distribution zoster.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Maria A; Burns, Ted M; Gilden, Don

    2016-07-15

    Nine days after left ophthalmic-distribution zoster, a 47-year-old man developed SUNCT headaches (short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing). In contrast to two prior cases of SUNCT that developed after varicella zoster virus (VZV) meningoencephalitis without rash, this case describes an association of SUNCT with overt zoster, thus adding to the spectrum of headache and facial pain syndromes caused by VZV reactivation. PMID:27288808

  2. Medication Overuse Headache Due to Butalbital, Acetaminophen, and Caffeine Tablets.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. Medication overuse headache is a relatively common cause for chronic daily headache in the migraine patient. In reply to a question, medication overuse headache is reviewed, acute and preventive medications are discussed, and quality of life is considered. PMID:27159186

  3. The relationship of headache occurrence to barometric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Jane; Leviton, A.; Slack, W.; Porter, D.; Graham, J. R.

    1980-09-01

    A total of 75 people residing in the metropolitan Boston area who had frequently recurring headaches kept a headache diary for one month beginning March 1975. Data were also collected about barometric pressure during this time. We found that the probability of headache severity on any day was independent of the effects of time. An inference of this, supported by other findings in this study, is that headache occurrence is minimally affected by time-related phenomena such as barometric pressure readings or changes..

  4. Headache research and medical practice in Brazil: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Valença, Marcelo Moraes; da Silva, Amanda Araújo; Bordini, Carlos Alberto

    2015-02-01

    Since the creation of the Brazilian Headache Society in 1978, substantial developments have taken place in both research and clinical practice in the field of headache medicine in Brazil. The Society now has almost 300 members throughout the country, actively working to improve the health of the general population and, in particular, diagnose and treat headache disorders. In addition, in a few large cities, such as São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Recife, Ribeirão Preto, Curitiba, and Porto Alegre, headache specialists have come together to promote research projects and increase knowledge in the field through MSc, PhD, and postdoctoral programs. Furthermore, scientific journals have emerged and books have been published to record and disseminate Brazilian scientific production in headache medicine. In this narrative review, we will briefly describe some important aspects of headache medicine in Brazil from prehistoric times to the present day, discuss the origin of headache medicine as a specialty in Brazil, the principal publications dealing with headache disorders, the use of plants and other unconventional forms of treatment used by faith healers, the main training centers, and the research produced to date by Brazilians. In conclusion, in recent years enormous progress has been made in headache medicine in Brazil stimulating us to review and expand our role in an increasingly international scenario. PMID:25659588

  5. Reversible Cerebral Vasoconstriction Syndrome Without Typical Thunderclap Headache.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Ducros, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by severe headache and diffuse segmental intracranial arterial constriction that resolve within three months. Stroke, which is the major complication of RCVS, can result in persistent neurological disability, and rarely causes death. Diagnosis of RCVS early in the clinical course might improve outcomes. Although recurrent thunderclap headache is the clinical hallmark of RCVS, the absence of such a pattern should not lead to discard the diagnosis. Our literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe headache episode, a mild or a progressive headache. Moreover, a subset of patients with severe RCVS presents without any headache, but frequently with seizures, focal neurological deficits, confusion or coma, in the setting of stroke or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. These patients may be aphasic or in comatose state, explaining their inability to give their own medical history. They may have forgotten the headache they had a few days before more dramatic symptoms, or may have a variant of the classical RCVS. By consequence, an RCVS should be suspected in patients with any unusual headache, whether thunderclap or not, and in patients with cryptogenic stroke or convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage, whether the patient also has headache or not. Diagnosis in such cases relies on the demonstration of reversible multifocal intracranial arterial stenosis and the exclusion of other causes. PMID:27016378

  6. Imaging: Do I Need an Imaging Study for My Headache?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patients American Headache & Migraine Association Articles Patient Handouts Kids Help Patient to Patient Podcasts for Patients Videos Links Find a Healthcare Professional Other Websites & Information ...

  7. Risk factors of chronic daily headache or chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soo-Jin; Chu, Min Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a common neurological condition that affects 1-4 % of the general population. Most individuals with CDH originally suffered from episodic headaches, but over time, this developed into CDH. Although the pathophysiology of CDH is not fully understood, recent clinical and epidemiological studies suggest some risk factors that are associated with an increased risk of transformation from episodic headaches. If risk factors can be identified, they could provide a base for aggressive preventive intervention and thus decrease the transformation from episodic headaches to eventual CDH. In this article, we review and summarize the current data on risk factors for CDH. PMID:25416458

  8. Chiropractic management of a patient with persistent headache

    PubMed Central

    West, Jason; Phillips, Reed B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe chiropractic care of a patient with persistent headache treated using chiropractic manipulative therapy and adjunct treatments. Clinical features A 54-year-old multiparous woman had chronic debilitating headaches for 11 months. Previous care from a variety of specialties had brought no appreciable relief. Intervention and outcome The patient was managed with chiropractic manipulative therapy, injections, and electromagnetic therapy. Five treatments over 6 weeks brought resolution of the headaches. Conclusion This patient with persistent headache responded favorably to a course of chiropractic and adjunctive care. PMID:24396331

  9. Headaches and myofascial temporomandibular disorders: overlapping entities, separate managements?

    PubMed

    Conti, P C R; Costa, Y M; Gonçalves, D A; Svensson, P

    2016-09-01

    There are relevant clinical overlaps between some of the painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and headache conditions that may hamper the diagnostic process and treatment. A non-systematic search for studies on the relationship between TMD and headaches was carried out in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase. Important pain mechanisms contributing to the close association and complex relationship between TMD and headache disorders are as follows: processes of peripheral and central sensitisation which take place in similar anatomical areas, the possible impairment of the descending modulatory pain pathways and the processes of referred pain. In addition, the clinical examination does not always provide distinguishing information to differentiate between headaches and TMD. So, considering the pathophysiology and the clinical presentation of some types of headache and myofascial TMD, such overlap can be considered not only a matter of comorbid relationship, but rather a question of disorders where the distinction lines are sometimes hard to identify. These concerns are certainly reflected in the current classification systems of both TMD and headache where the clinical consequences of diagnosis such as headache attributed to or associated with TMD are uncertain. There are several similarities in terms of therapeutic strategies used to manage myofascial TMD and headaches. Considering all these possible levels of interaction, we reinforce the recommendation for multidisciplinary approaches, by a team of oro-facial pain specialists and a neurologist (headache specialist), to attain the most precise differential diagnosis and initiate the best and most efficient treatment. PMID:27191928

  10. Atraumatic needle reduces the incidence of post-lumbar puncture syndrome.

    PubMed

    Müller, B; Adelt, K; Reichmann, H; Toyka, K

    1994-05-01

    We investigated the occurrence of the post-lumbar syndrome (PPS) in relation to the puncture technique used, in a prospective randomised double-blind study comprising 100 patients. A new atraumatic 22-gauge cannula was compared with a 20-gauge cannula with a Quincke bevel. The atraumatic cannula is a needle with a tip shaped like a closed circular cone with a lateral opening, usually used with an outer cannula (introducer). The study showed that both the frequency of PPS and of acute complaints during lumbar puncture can be dramatically reduced with the atraumatic puncture technique. A marked PPS occurred after lumbar puncture with the 20-gauge cannula in 31% of patients, whereas only 5% of patients reported marked post-puncture symptoms after lumbar puncture with the atraumatic cannula. PMID:7931432

  11. In vivo force during arterial interventional radiology needle puncture procedures.

    PubMed

    Healey, Andrew E; Evans, Jonathan C; Murphy, Micheal G; Powell, Steven; How, Thien V; Groves, David; Hatfield, Fraser; Diaz, Bernard M; Gould, Derek A

    2005-01-01

    To adequately simulate the forces generated during interventional radiological (IR) procedures, non intrusive in-vivo methods must be used. Using finger tip mounted, non intrusive capacitance force sensor pads (PPS, Los Angeles, California) we have been able to measure the forces involved in interventional radiology without a change in procedure technique. Data acquired during the process of calibration of the capacitance pads in conjunction with extensive in-vitro needle puncture force measurement using a commercially available tensile tester (Nene Industries, UK) are presented here. PMID:15718723

  12. Trumpet solution from spherical gravitational collapse with puncture gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Thierfelder, Marcus; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Hilditch, David; Bruegmann, Bernd; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the stationary end state obtained by evolving a collapsing spherical star with the gauges routinely adopted to study puncture black holes. We compare the end state of the collapse with the trumpet solution found in the evolution of a single wormhole slice and show that the two solutions closely agree. We demonstrate that the agreement is caused by the use of the Gamma-driver shift condition, which allows the matter to fall inwards into a region of spacetime that is not resolved by the numerical grid, and which simultaneously finds the stationary coordinates of the trumpet outside the matter.

  13. Trumpet-puncture initial data for black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Immerman, Jason D.; Baumgarte, Thomas W.

    2009-09-15

    We propose a new approach, based on the puncture method, to construct black hole initial data in the so-called trumpet geometry, i.e. on slices that asymptote to a limiting surface of nonzero areal radius. Our approach is easy to implement numerically and, at least for nonspinning black holes, does not require any internal boundary conditions. We present numerical results, obtained with a uniform-grid finite-difference code, for boosted black holes and binary black holes. We also comment on generalizations of this method for spinning black holes.

  14. Medication-overuse headache: a perspective review

    PubMed Central

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2016-01-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a debilitating condition in which frequent and prolonged use of medication for the acute treatment of pain results in the worsening of the headache. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature on MOH and discuss future avenues for research. MOH accounts for a substantial share of the global burden of disease. Prevalence is often reported as 1–2% but can be as high as 7% overall, with higher proportions among women and in those with a low socioeconomic position. Management consists of withdrawing pain medication, focusing on prophylactic and nonmedical treatments, and limiting acute symptomatic medication. Stress reduction and lifestyle interventions may support the change towards rational pain medication use. Support, follow up, and education are needed to help patients through the detoxification period. There is fertile ground for research in MOH epidemiology, pathophysiology, and neuroimaging. Randomized and long-term follow-up studies on MOH treatment protocols are needed. Further focused research could be of major importance for global health. PMID:27493718

  15. Medication-overuse headache: a perspective review.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Munksgaard, Signe Bruun; Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor Højland

    2016-08-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is a debilitating condition in which frequent and prolonged use of medication for the acute treatment of pain results in the worsening of the headache. The purpose of this paper is to review the most recent literature on MOH and discuss future avenues for research. MOH accounts for a substantial share of the global burden of disease. Prevalence is often reported as 1-2% but can be as high as 7% overall, with higher proportions among women and in those with a low socioeconomic position. Management consists of withdrawing pain medication, focusing on prophylactic and nonmedical treatments, and limiting acute symptomatic medication. Stress reduction and lifestyle interventions may support the change towards rational pain medication use. Support, follow up, and education are needed to help patients through the detoxification period. There is fertile ground for research in MOH epidemiology, pathophysiology, and neuroimaging. Randomized and long-term follow-up studies on MOH treatment protocols are needed. Further focused research could be of major importance for global health. PMID:27493718

  16. Headache in children: young age at onset does not imply a harmful etiology or predict a harsh headache disability.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Sarit; Gordon, Shirie; Schiff, Aharon; Shahar, Eli

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare headache etiology, type, and burden and the learning and behavioral profile in children with early-onset (under 6 years) and late-onset (8-12 years) headaches. The study included 133 patients, 35 in the early-onset group and 98 in the late-onset group. Headache diagnosis was based on International Classification of Headache Disorders -II (ICHD-II) criteria. Learning profile and behavioral problems were assessed by parental reports. Tension headache was the most common diagnosis in the early-onset headache group (51.4%). No significant differences were found between the age groups with regard to headache etiology, disability, abnormal neuroimaging results, school performance, or attention problems. Nevertheless, the early-onset group patients had a significantly higher prevalence of behavioral problems: 25.7% versus 11.2% (P < .02). The authors suggest that early age of headache onset does not imply a harmful etiology or a relentless headache disability or burden. PMID:22914375

  17. Alterations in brain temperatures as a possible cause of migraine headache.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Csilla

    2014-05-01

    serotonin content, and dural "inflammation" including vasodilation and brainstem activation. The hypothesis postulates that a migraine attack serves to restore the brain temperature. Abnormally low temperatures in the brain can also result in headache. Surprisingly, no systematic examination of brain temperature changes in migraineurs has been published. Certain case reports support the present hypothesis. Various noninvasive technologies (e.g. MR) capable of monitoring brain temperature are available. If a systematic examination of local brain temperature revealed abnormalities in structures presumed to be involved in migraine, that would increase our understanding of the disease and trigger the development of improved treatment. PMID:24581675

  18. Psychological predictors of headache remission in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Carasco, Marcel; Kröner-Herwig, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Objective Longitudinal studies on headaches often focus on the identification of risk factors for headache occurrence or “chronification”. This study in particular examines psychological variables as potential predictors of headache remission in children and adolescents. Methods Data on biological, social, and psychological variables were gathered by questionnaire as part of a large population-based study (N=5,474). Children aged 9 to 15 years who suffered from weekly headaches were selected for this study sample, N=509. A logistic regression analysis was conducted with remission as the dependent variable. In the first step sex, age, headache type, and parental headache history were entered as the control variables as some data already existed showing their predictive power. Psychological factors (dysfunctional coping strategies, internalizing symptoms, externalizing symptoms, anxiety sensitivity, somatosensory amplification) were entered in the second step to evaluate their additional predictive value. Results Highly dysfunctional coping strategies reduced the relative probability of headache remission. All other selected psychological variables reached no significance, ie, did not contribute additionally to the explanation of variance of the basic model containing sex and headache type. Surprisingly, parental headache and age were not predictive. The model explained only a small proportion of the variance regarding headache remission (R2=0.09 [Nagelkerke]). Conclusion Successful coping with stress in general contributed to remission of pediatric headache after 2 years in children aged between 9 and 15 years. Psychological characteristics in general had only small predictive value. The issue of remission definitely needs more scientific attention in empirical studies. PMID:27186149

  19. Percutaneous puncture of renal calyxes guided by a novel device coupled with ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chen Jen; Srougi, Victor; Tanno, Fabio Yoshiaki; Jordão, Ricardo Duarte; Srougi, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of a novel device coupled with ultrassound for renal percutaneous puncture. Materials and Methods: After establishing hydronephrosis, ten pigs had three calyxes of each kidney punctured by the same urology resident, with and without the new device (“Punctiometer”). Time for procedure completion, number of attempts to reach the calyx, puncture precision and puncture complications were recorded in both groups and compared. Results: Puncture success on the first attempt was achieved in 25 punctures (83%) with the Punctiometer and in 13 punctures (43%) without the Punctiometer (p=0.011). The mean time required to perform three punctures in each kidney was 14.5 minutes with the Punctiometer and 22.4 minutes without the Punctiometer (p=0.025). The only complications noted were renal hematomas. In the Punctiometer group, all kidneys had small hematomas. In the no Punctiometer group 80% had small hematomas, 10% had a medium hematoma and 10% had a big hematoma. There was no difference in complications between both groups. Conclusions: The Punctiometer is an effective device to increase the likelihood of an accurate renal calyx puncture during PCNL, with a shorter time required to perform the procedure. PMID:26689521

  20. Binary black hole evolutions of approximate puncture initial data

    SciTech Connect

    Bode, Tanja; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre M.; Hinder, Ian; Herrmann, Frank; Vaishnav, Birjoo

    2009-07-15

    Approximate solutions to the Einstein field equations are valuable tools to investigate gravitational phenomena. An important aspect of any approximation is to investigate and quantify its regime of validity. We present a study that evaluates the effects that approximate puncture initial data, based on skeleton solutions to the Einstein constraints as proposed by [G. Faye, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schaefer, Phys. Rev. D 69, 124029 (2004).], have on numerical evolutions. Using data analysis tools, we assess the effectiveness of these constraint-violating initial data for both initial and advanced LIGO and show that the matches of waveforms from skeleton data with the corresponding waveforms from constraint-satisfying initial data are > or approx. 0.97 when the total mass of the binary is > or approx. 40M{sub {center_dot}}. In addition, we demonstrate that the differences between the skeleton and the constraint-satisfying initial data evolutions, and thus waveforms, are due to negative Hamiltonian constraint violations present in the skeleton initial data located in the vicinity of the punctures. During the evolution, the skeleton data develops both Hamiltonian and momentum constraint violations that decay with time, with the binary system relaxing to a constraint-satisfying solution with black holes of smaller mass and thus different dynamics.

  1. Puncture evaluation of radiological gloves to assess use performance

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W. P. , Jr.; Mittelstet, R. P.; Castro, J. M.; Smith, M. E.

    2002-01-01

    Tensile testing of gloves is an accepted method for the qualification of a new glove material or the qualification of a production run. Most often these tests are performed in accordance to ASTM standards, i.e. - D412-98a Standard Test Methods (STM) for Vulcanized Rubber and Thermoplastic Rubbers and Thermoplastic Elastomers-Tension, Unfortunately for elastomers such protocols do not exist for puncture testing. There are however several test methods for the puncture resistance of Protective Clothing [F1342-91(1996)e2], Barrier FiIms and Laminates[F1306-90(1998)], and Coated Fabrics [D751-001]. Each of these standards uses different probe geometries and testing rates. Initial testing of the gloves has been performed using the standard one inch ball burst fixture as supplied by Instron. Samples tested using this fixture usually did not burst within the travel of the test fixture, except for lead lined hypalon. Three fixtures were fabricated in accordance to the aforementioned ASTM standards. Results for these fixtures for several materials will be reported along with the observed rate dependence.

  2. Single puncture percutaneous nephrolithomy for management of complex renal stones

    PubMed Central

    Shalaby, Mahmoud M; Abdalla, Medhat A; Aboul-Ella, Hassan A; El-haggagy, Abdel-Monem A; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this report is to assess the safety and efficacy of single lower pole access for multiple and branched renal calculi. A prospective non randomized clinical study included 26 patients with complex renal stones (9 patients had branched renal stones and the other 17 had multiple renal stones) in the period from May 2003 to May 2004. Mean patient age was 42 years ± 13.2 (range 18 to 67 years). All patients underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) via a single lower calyceal puncture. Small stones were intactly extracted by a range of stone graspers while large stones (smallest diameter more than 1 cm) were disintegrated using either the pneumatic EMS Swiss lithoclast or Holmium YAG laser. Flexible nephroscope was used for stones inaccessible by the rigid instruments. Findings Overall stone-free rate was 74.8%. Patients with residual stones were managed by one session of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). Mean operative time was (80 minutes ± 27.4) for branched stones and (49.1 minutes ± 15.9) for multiple stones. No significant blood loss reported. Perforation of pelvicalyceal system occurred in 2 patients (11.5%) with no serious sequelae. Only 1 patient developed secondary hemorrhage which necessitated blood transfusion and selective angio-embolization. Conclusion In our hands, the efficacy and safety of single lower calyceal puncture PCNL in management of complex renal stones are comparable to those of the general procedure stated in literature. PMID:19379503

  3. The Effect of Migraine Headache on Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Daniel I.; Sabia, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that migraine headaches are common and debilitating, little is known about their effect on educational attainment. Using data drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the relationship between migraine headache and three outcomes: high school grade point average, the probability of graduating…

  4. Headache associated with airplane travel: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Ajith; Mathew, Mini; Iype, Thomas; Sandeep, P; Jabeen, Afshan; Ayyappan, K

    2013-01-01

    Airplane travel headache is rare and has recently been described as a new form of headache associated with a specific situation. Of the 1,208 patients with primary headaches attending a tertiary care neurology hospital, two (0.16%) patients satisfied the criteria for headache related to airplane travel. Both the patients fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for airplane travel headache. This unique headache had a mean duration of 24 minutes, localized to the medial supraorbital region described as having an intense jabbing or stabbing character that occurred exclusively and maximally during aircraft landing or take-off, following which pain intensity subsided . This rare headache felt on aircraft descent is probably due to the squeeze effect on the frontal sinus wall, when air trapped inside it contracts producing a negative pressure leading to mucosal edema, transudation and intense pain. Use of nasal decongestants either alone or in combination with naproxen sodium prior to ascent and descent abated the headache episodes. Awareness about this unique entity is essential to provide proper treatment and avoid patient suffering. PMID:23644317

  5. A study of headache in North American primary care

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Headache is a common symptom in primary care about which surprisingly little is known. Over a 14-month period 3847 patients making 4940 consecutive visits for headache to 38 primary care practices in the USA and Canada were studied. The clinical characteristics of patients, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies employed by their doctors, were examined. Visits for headache represented 1.5% of all visits during this period. Most patients (72.0%) made only one visit, and nearly half of the headaches reported were new. Only a small number of patients (3.0%) received a computerized tomographic scan; other investigations were used sparingly, as were referrals to consultants (5.0%) and hospitalizations (2.2%). Drugs (75.2%) and advice (64.5%) were commonly employed, although formal psychotherapy was recommended infrequently (4.5%). It is concluded from this large series that most patients with headache visit primary care practitioners only once; their headaches frequently defy usual diagnostic categorization and often change in character from visit to visit. Moreover, headaches in this series were frequently associated with a variety of causes not often included in discussions of headache aetiology. These findings suggest that the strategies which doctors in primary care devise to diagnose, investigate and manage this common symptom, require further study. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:3450866

  6. Migraine headache is present in the aura phase

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Jakob M.; Lipton, Richard B.; Dodick, David W.; Silberstein, Stephen D.; Saper, Joel R.; Aurora, Sheena K.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: Migraine aura is commonly considered to be a distinct phase of a migraine attack that precedes headache. The objective of the study was to examine a large number of prospectively recorded attacks of migraine with aura and determine the timing of headache and other migraine symptoms relative to aura. Methods: As part of a clinical trial we collected prospective data on the time course of headache and other symptoms relative to the aura. Patients (n = 267) were enrolled from 16 centers, and asked to keep a headache diary for 1 month (phase I). They were asked to record headache symptoms as soon as possible after aura began and always within 1 hour of aura onset. A total of 456 attacks were reported during phase I by 201 patients. These patients were then randomized and included in phase II, during which a total of 405 attacks were reported in 164 patients. In total, we present data from 861 attacks of migraine with aura from 201 patients. Results: During the aura phase, the majority of attacks (73%) were associated with headache. Other migraine symptoms were also frequently reported during the aura: nausea (51%), photophobia (88%), and photophobia (73%). During the first 15 minutes within the onset of aura, 54% of patients reported headache fulfilling the criteria for migraine. Conclusion: Our results indicate that headaches as well as associated migraine symptoms are present early, during the aura phase of the migraine attack in the majority of patients. PMID:23115208

  7. The methodology of population surveys of headache prevalence, burden and cost: Principles and recommendations from the Global Campaign against Headache

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The global burden of headache is very large, but knowledge of it is far from complete and needs still to be gathered. Published population-based studies have used variable methodology, which has influenced findings and made comparisons difficult. Among the initiatives of the Global Campaign against Headache to improve and standardize methods in use for cross-sectional studies, the most important is the production of consensus-based methodological guidelines. This report describes the development of detailed principles and recommendations. For this purpose we brought together an expert consensus group to include experience and competence in headache epidemiology and/or epidemiology in general and drawn from all six WHO world regions. The recommendations presented are for anyone, of whatever background, with interests in designing, performing, understanding or assessing studies that measure or describe the burden of headache in populations. While aimed principally at researchers whose main interests are in the field of headache, they should also be useful, at least in parts, to those who are expert in public health or epidemiology and wish to extend their interest into the field of headache disorders. Most of all, these recommendations seek to encourage collaborations between specialists in headache disorders and epidemiologists. The focus is on migraine, tension-type headache and medication-overuse headache, but they are not intended to be exclusive to these. The burdens arising from secondary headaches are, in the majority of cases, more correctly attributed to the underlying disorders. Nevertheless, the principles outlined here are relevant for epidemiological studies on secondary headaches, provided that adequate definitions can be not only given but also applied in questionnaires or other survey instruments. PMID:24467862

  8. Chronic unremitting headache associated with Lyme disease-like illness.

    PubMed

    Kowacs, Pedro André; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Piovesan, Elcio Juliato; Pinto, Maria Cristina Araujo; Yoshinari, Natalino Hagime

    2013-07-01

    The Brazilian Lyme-disease-like illness (BLDLI) or Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome is a unique zoonosis found in Brazil. It reproduces all the clinical symptoms of Lyme disease except for the high frequencies of relapse and the presence of autoimmune manifestations. Two cases of borreliosis manifesting with unremitting headache, which is a symptom associated with late-stage BLDLI, were presented. Clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of the BLDLI and its associated headaches were showed and discussed in this article. BLDLI diagnosis requires additional attention by physicians, since the disease has a tendency to progress to the late, recurrent stage or the chronic form, and the associated headache can be confused with chronic primary headache or with analgesic-overuse one. Special attention should be paid to patients with headaches who have traveled to endemic areas. PMID:23857618

  9. The Internet and migraine: headache resources for patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Genzen, J R

    1998-04-01

    The Internet enables distribution of headache-related resources to patients and physicians in a manner never before possible. While these opportunities for communication and education open many doors to an increased awareness of migraine, there are also dangers in the free flow of non-peer-reviewed information on the Internet. The practicing physician or headache specialist needs to be aware of what headache-related resources are available on the Internet, both to recommend information to patients and to know what false information is being spread to headache sufferers. The purpose of this article is twofold: (1) to outline the types of headache-related information available on the Internet, including actual examples that the astute physician can view as time permits, and (2) to present examples of how such information can be biased, inaccurate, and potentially problematic for the curious patient or physician. PMID:9595873

  10. A guide to children with acute and chronic headaches.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, R K; Fisher, P G

    2001-01-01

    Children with acute and chronic headaches are often seen by primary care providers. A complete, elaborate history, obtained from both the parents and child, is key in diagnosing and managing the child who presents with a headache. A thorough social and educational history may reveal significant school or family stresses. Historic features of concern must be explored immediately. A thorough physical examination with a focused neurologic examination must be done Focal neurologic findings may indicate serious organic problems. A comprehensive approach to the management of headaches in children consisting of reassurance, education, pharmacologic interventions, and nonpharmacologic interventions is presented. A two-tiered management plan is used in conjunction with medications. The aim of this article is to provide the novice or experienced practitioner with a comprehensive review of acute and chronic headache pathogenesis, assessment, and management. This review includes migraines and other nonmigraine types of headaches. PMID:11562640

  11. Intracranial metallic foreign bodies in a man with a headache.

    PubMed

    Pelin, Zerrin; Kaner, Tuncay

    2012-10-01

    We report the case of a 22-year old man with intracranial metallic foreign bodies who presented complaining of a headache. His history of headaches had begun when he was five years old and continued with increasing severity. Six months before hospital admission, nausea and vomiting began to accompany his headache. Computed tomography scan revealed that 2 metallic foreign bodies were located adjacent to the vertex and another was next to the ambient cistern. The location and position of foreign bodies suggested that they were introduced in infancy through the anterior fontanelle before its closure in an unsuccessful homicide attempt. This case is one of the few reported cases combining headache and intracranial foreign bodies and we discuss the relationship between headache and these metallic materials. PMID:23355931

  12. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch. PMID:26119259

  13. Evidence-based treatments for cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Gooriah, Rubesh; Buture, Alina; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2015-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH), one of the most painful syndromes known to man, is managed with acute and preventive medications. The brief duration and severity of the attacks command the use of rapid-acting pain relievers. Inhalation of oxygen and subcutaneous sumatriptan are the two most effective acute therapeutic options for sufferers of CH. Several preventive medications are available, the most effective of which is verapamil. However, most of these agents are not backed by strong clinical evidence. In some patients, these options can be ineffective, especially in those who develop chronic CH. Surgical procedures for the chronic refractory form of the disorder should then be contemplated, the most promising of which is hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. We hereby review the pathogenesis of CH and the evidence behind the treatment options for this debilitating condition. PMID:26635477

  14. MTBE: The headache of cleaner air

    SciTech Connect

    Kneiss, J.

    1995-07-01

    Gasoline with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) has been sold in the United States since 1979, when it was added to fuels as an octane enhancer after lead was phased out of motor fuels. Recently it has been introduced as a means of reducing carbon monoxide emissions during the winter months in targeted US cities. However, there is concern over health complaints including headaches, dizziness and nausea from residents of some areas. These reports have launched an era of assidious research by scientists and public health officials across the country to learn more about MTBE`s short-term and long-term, and possibly carcinogenic, health effects. New research should help weigh the risk of MTBE as a possible carcinogen and the effectiveness of MTBE-blended fuels in reducing carbon monoxide levels. The question is whether, in minimizing one risk, is another risk - however small - being introduced?

  15. Prospective Study of Elective Bilateral Versus Unilateral Femoral Arterial Puncture for Uterine Artery Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Bratby, M. J.; Ramachandran, N.; Sheppard, N.; Kyriou, J.; Munneke, G. M.; Belli, A.-M.

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of elective bilateral femoral arterial punctures for uterine artery embolization (UAE) of symptomatic fibroids on fluoroscopy and procedural time, patient dose, and ease of procedure. We conducted a prospective study of UAE with either the intention to catheterize both uterine arteries using a single femoral puncture (n = 12) or elective bilateral arterial punctures from the outset (n = 12). The same two operators undertook each case. Main outcome measures were total procedure time, fluoroscopy time, dose-area product (DAP), and total skin dose. A simulation was then performed on an anthropomorphic phantom using the mean in vivo fluoroscopy parameters to estimate the ovarian dose. Bilateral UAE was achieved in all patients. None of the patients with initial unilateral arterial puncture required further contralateral arterial puncture. The mean fluoroscopy time in the group with elective bilateral punctures was 12.8 min, compared with a mean of 16.6 min in patients with unilateral puncture (p = 0.046). There was no significant difference in overall procedure time (p = 0.68). No puncture-site complications were found. Additional catheters were required only following unilateral puncture. The simulated dose was 25% higher with unilateral puncture. Although there was no significant difference in measured in vivo patient dose between the two groups (DAP, p = 0.32), this is likely to reflect the wide variation in other patient characteristics. Allowing for the small study size, our results show that the use of elective bilateral arterial punctures reduces fluoroscopy time, requires less catheter manipulation, and, according to the simulation model, has the potential to reduce patient dose. The overall procedure time, however, is not significantly reduced.

  16. Modified Valsalva test differentiates primary from secondary cough headache

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current definition of cough headache includes provocation of the symptom by Valsalva manoeuvre, and it is generally believed that all cough headache results from a sudden increase in intracranial pressure. We sought to question that presumption and to determine whether the Valsalva test might distinguish primary from secondary cough headache. Methods We examined 16 consecutive cough headache patients using a modified Valsalva test (exhalation into the connecting tube of a standard anaeroid sphygmomanometer to 60 mm Hg for 10 seconds). A positive response was recorded if the manoeuvre provoked headache. All patients subsequently underwent brain MRI. Results None of the patients had neurological signs. Eleven had positive modified Valsalva tests. Ten were found subsequently to have posterior fossa pathologies (secondary cough headache: 8 Chiari Type 1 malformations, 2 posterior fossa meningiomas). The cough headache was relieved following surgery in all cases. One patient with a positive Valsalva test had an apparently normal brain MRI but measurements of hindbrain and posterior fossa dimensions were consistent with ‘posterior fossa crowdedness’. The remaining 5 patients had negative (4 patients) or equivocal (1 patient) Valsalva tests and normal MRI scans (primary cough headache). Conclusions These findings suggest that secondary cough headache results from a transient increase in intracranial CSF pressure during exertion in the presence of obstruction to normal cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. The modified Valsalva test can also determine whether tonsillar herniation found on brain MRI is symptomatic. Primary cough headache appears to be caused by a different mechanism, possibly through congestion of the orbital venous plexus in the presence of jugular venous incompetence and a reduced threshold for trigeminal sensory activation. PMID:23565708

  17. Persistent orthostatic headache without intracranial hypotension: which treatment?

    PubMed

    Curone, M; Cecchini, A Proietti; Chiapparini, L; D'Amico, D

    2015-05-01

    Orthostatic headache can be the leading symptom of intracranial hypotension, however, not all orthostatic headaches are due to cerebrospinal fluid leaks and these forms can be a clinical problem, especially for treatment. Aim of this study was to review patients with persistent orthostatic headache in whom a detailed head and spinal MRI follow-up did not reveal any sign of intracranial hypotension and to evaluate which treatment can be considered the first choice. Patients admitted to our headache center for evaluation of persistent orthostatic headache and followed after first admission with clinical and neuroradiological controls were systematically reviewed. 11 patients (7 M, 4 F) followed in a period lasted from 10 months up to 2 years were studied. Six patients (54, 5 %) reported a MRI performed previously elsewhere with a suspect diagnosis of intracranial hypotension which was not confirmed at MRI at our hospital such as during the radiological follow-up. Three patients (27.2 %) had developed orthostatic headache short after a neck or head trauma with no evidence of neuroradiological pathological signs and two patients (18 %) had a previous history of psychiatric disorder. We administrated antidepressants in five patients, atypical neuroleptic in three patients, association of antidepressant and antipsychotic in one patient and muscle relaxants in two cases. All patients showed a certain improvement of headache in the weeks after introduction of the pharmacological treatment; six (54, 5 %) had pain relief during the follow-up and five (45, 5 %) were pain free at the last clinical control. We found out that patients with the best outcome were the ones treated with antidepressants. Persistent orthostatic headache without any neuroradiological sign of intracranial hypotension is a challenging problem for clinicians. Although the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta version) criteria suggests the possibility of epidural blood patch in

  18. Nanofibrous Synthetic Dural Patch for Skull Base Defects: Preliminary Experience for Reconstruction after Extended Endonasal Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Zenga, Francesco; Tardivo, Valentina; Pacca, Paolo; Garzaro, Massimiliano; Garbossa, Diego; Ducati, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Setting One of the consequences of the widespread use of endoscopic endonasal approaches (EEA) to skull base pathologies is the management of complex skull base defects. Nowadays, the gold standard is a multilayer closure that reproduces the physiological tissue barriers. Several techniques have been described in the literature; however, skull base reconstruction after EEA still represents a matter of debate, especially after extended EEA. A watertight closure is paramount to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis. Design Regarding this issue, we present our experience with a new synthetic dural patch, ReDura (Medprin Biotech, La Mirada, California, United States), as a subdural inlay in three patients who underwent endoscopic endonasal removal of sellar and suprasellar lesions. Conclusions ReDura patch showed the same versatility of autologous iliotibial tract. A dural patch that easily adapts to all defects, revealed to be a useful tool for performing watertight closure, possibly in a short operative time, after endoscopic approaches. PMID:26937335

  19. Acute subarachnoid hemorrhage in posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula: imaging features with endovascular management

    PubMed Central

    Mondel, Prabath Kumar; Saraf, Rashmi; Limaye, Uday S

    2014-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. He was investigated and found to have a rare posterior condylar canal dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). DAVFs of the posterior condylar canal are rare. Venous drainage of the DAVF was through a long, tortuous, and aneurysmal bridging vein. We describe the clinical presentation, cross sectional imaging, angiographic features, and endovascular management of this patient. The patient was treated by transarterial embolization of the fistula through the ascending pharyngeal artery. This is the first report of an acutely bled posterior condylar canal DAVF treated by transarterial Onyx embolization with balloon protection in the vertebral artery. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit and had an excellent outcome. On 6 month follow-up angiogram, there was stable occlusion of the dural fistula. PMID:24990846

  20. Trigeminal Cardiac Reflex Caused by Onyx Embolization of Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Wu, Huan-Cheng; Wang, Wei-Wei; Zhao, Hong-Sen; Dao, Ri-Na; Liu, Wei-Min; Zhou, Dong-Zhe; Wang, Hui-Yu; DU, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) is a reflexive response of bradycardia, hypotension and gastric hypermotility which is observed upon mechanical stimulation in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Previous articles have described TCR during intracranial operations, ophthalmic surgery, microcompression of the trigeminal ganglion and radiofrequency lesioning of the trigeminal ganglion. TCR may occur during transarterial embolization of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) with Onyx, leading to a significant decrease in heart rate under a standard anesthetic protocol. TCR may also occur due to chemical stimulus of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in transvenous Onyx embolization of dural cavernous sinus fistula. Slow rate of injection may give DMSO enough time to dissipate in the blood stream which is important for the prevention of toxicity. This report confirms that the reflex was blunted by the anticholinergic effects of atropine and there was no harm to patients if stopped immediately. PMID:27161455

  1. Dural-based infantile hemangioma of the posterior fossa: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Hakeem J.; McBride, Paul; Reynolds, Renée M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The authors present the unique case of a dural-based, infantile hemangioma located in the posterior fossa of a 15-day-old infant. Case Description: The patient presented with hydrocephalus. The lesion was identified by magnetic resonance imaging and was subsequently resected. Diagnosis of the lesion was confirmed with immunohistochemistry staining. The patient's hospital course was complicated by transverse sinus thrombosis and a cerebrospinal fluid leak that were treated with anticoagulation therapy and ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, respectively. Conclusion: Although hemangiomas are benign entities, our patient's lesion was in the posterior fossa causing compression and hydrocephalus that necessitated resection. We encourage others to consider the possibility of hemangioma in the differential diagnosis of dural-based posterior fossa lesions in infants. PMID:27213106

  2. Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Draining into Spinal Perimedullary Veins: A Rare Cause of Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Atamaz, Funda; Oran, Ismail; Durmaz, Berrin

    2006-01-01

    We report a rare case of progressive myelopathy caused by intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula with venous drainage into the spinal perimedullary veins. A 45-yr-old man developed urinary and fecal incontinence and muscle weakness in the lower limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed brainstem edema and dilated veins of the brainstem and spinal cord. Cerebral angiography showed a dural arteriovenous fistula fed by the neuromeningeal branch of the left ascending pharyngeal artery. Occlusion of the fistula could be achieved by embolization after a diagnostic and subsequent therapeutic delay. There was no improvement in clinical condition. For the neurologic outcome of these patients it is important that fistula must be treated before ischemic and gliotic changes become irreversible. PMID:17043439

  3. Preservation of Frontal Sinus Anatomy and Outflow Tract Following Frontal Trauma with Dural Defect

    PubMed Central

    Chin, David Chao Wu; Loh, Ian Chi Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Our case report describes a young male mechanic who was hit in his face by a spring while repairing a car, resulting in traumatic injury to the frontal sinus, with fractures of both the anterior and the posterior tables with dural defect and cerebrospinal fluid leak. Current guidelines recommend that comminuted and/or displaced fractures of the posterior table of the frontal sinus with dural defects should be either cranialized or obliterated. In this patient, instead of cranializing or obliterating the frontal sinus, we managed to preserve the frontal sinus anatomy and its outflow tract using a combined open bicoronal and nasoendoscopic approach. This avoids the long-term complications associated with cranialization or obliteration including mucocele formation and frontocutaneous fistula. PMID:25750839

  4. Primary headache in children and adolescents: update on pharmacotherapy of migraine and tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Bonfert, Michaela; Straube, Andreas; Schroeder, Andreas Sebastian; Reilich, Peter; Ebinger, Friedrich; Heinen, Florian

    2013-02-01

    Primary headache disorders are frequently encountered in the pediatric population. The therapeutic approach consists of a multimodal program, including lifestyle modification, psychotherapeutic intervention, pharmacotherapy, and complementary measures. This systematic review focuses on the pharmacotherapy of pediatric migraine and tension-type headache (TTH). In addition to the general treatment principles, the results of 33 clinical reports published on the topic since 2008 are outlined in detail. Furthermore, a tabular summary of previously investigated agents not studied since 2008 is given, as is an overview of promising pharmacologic approaches so far only evaluated in adults. A variety of pharmacologic options is available, but high-quality evidence is limited to single agents. At this time, approval is restricted to four triptans and flupirtine for the symptomatic treatment of pediatric acute migraine and TTH, respectively. No agent has been approved for the prevention of pediatric primary headaches. This review does not grade the drugs hierarchically because the complex profiles of many agents differ only slightly or even overlap. However, a detailed expert opinion is provided. On the basis of the outlined facts, the team of physician, patient, and parents has to decide on the most appropriate regimen for the individual situation in the sense of personalized medicine. PMID:23303551

  5. A novel equine-derived pericardium membrane for dural repair: A preliminary, short-term investigation

    PubMed Central

    Centonze, Roberto; Agostini, Emiliano; Massaccesi, Samantha; Toninelli, Stefano; Morabito, Letterio

    2016-01-01

    Background: A large variety of biological and artificial materials are employed in dural repair, each of them with major limitations. Autologous grafts have limited availability and require an additional incision and surgical time. Cadaveric preparations and heterologous materials entail the risk of iatrogenic transmission of prions, whereas synthetic substitutes have been reported to cause inflammatory reactions and graft rejection. An equine-derived pericardium membrane has been developed (Heart®, Bioteck, Vicenza, Italy) with mechanical and safety-related features that could make it suitable for neurosurgical application. Aims: This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the short-term safety and efficacy of the Heart® membrane in dural repair procedures following meningioma surgeries. Subjects and Methods: Medical records of patients who were surgically treated for an intracranial meningioma and underwent duraplasty with the Heart® membrane were reviewed retrospectively. The occurrence of any graft-related complications such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, postoperative hematoma, wound infection, meningitis, and neurological symptoms was analyzed. Results: Eight patients were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. A watertight closure was achieved in all of them. Postoperatively, no patients exhibited CSF leak, cerebral contusion, hemorrhage, or wound infection. The 1-month radiological follow-up revealed no evidence of pseudomeningocele, wound breakdown, or meningitis. Neurologic complications were observed in three patients but not directly imputable to the dural substitute or its application. Conclusions: In all the patients, the pericardium membrane enabled achievement of a watertight dural closure without graft-related adverse events. Further investigations should be performed to assess medium- and long-term clinical outcomes in a larger set of patients. PMID:27366245

  6. Ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI differentiation of meningioma from dural metastases: a pilot study with immunohistochemical observations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bronwyn E; Woltjer, Randall L; Prola-Netto, Joao; Nesbit, Gary M; Gahramanov, Seymur; Pham, Thao; Wagner, Jaime; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2016-09-01

    Malignant dural neoplasms are not reliably distinguished from benign dural neoplasms with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI enhancement in central nervous system (CNS) diseases imaged with ferumoxytol has been attributed to intracellular uptake in macrophages rather than vascular leakage. We compared imaging to histopathology and immunohistochemistry in meningiomas and dural metastases having ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI (FeMRI) and gadolinium-enhanced MRI (GdMRI) in order to correlate enhancement patterns to macrophage presence and vascular state. All patients having extraaxial CNS tumors were retrospectively selected from one of two ongoing FeMRI studies. Enhancement was compared between GdMRI and FeMRI. Diagnoses were confirmed histologically and/or by characteristic imaging. Tumor and vascular histology was reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining for CD68 (a macrophage marker), Connexin-43 (Cx43) (a marker of normal gap junctions), and smooth muscle actin (SMA) as a marker of vascularity, was performed in seven study cases with available tissue. Immunohistochemistry was performed on archival material from 33 subjects outside of the current study as controls: 20 WHO grade I cases of meningioma and 13 metastatic tumors. Metastases displayed marked delayed enhancement on FeMRI, similar to GdMRI. Four patients with dural metastases and one patient with meningioma showed similar enhancement on FeMRI and GdMRI. Five meningiomas with typical enhancement on GdMRI lacked enhancement on FeMRI. Enhancement on FeMRI was better associated with decreased Cx43 expression than intralesional macrophages. These pilot data suggest that FeMRI may better differentiate metastatic disease from meningiomas than GdMRI, and that differences in tumor vasculature rather than macrophage presence could underlie differences in contrast enhancement. PMID:27393348

  7. Puncture-Healing Properties of Carbon Nanotube-Filled Ionomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Thomas C.

    2003-01-01

    Ionomers are polymers that contain ionic groups in relatively low concentrations along the polymer backbone. These ionic groups, in the presence of oppositely charged ions, form aggregates that lead to novel physical properties of the polymer. React-A-Seal(trademark) and Surlyn(trademark) are poly(ethylene-co-methacrylic acid) (EMAA) ionomer-based materials and Nucrel(trademark) is the EMAA acid copolymer neutralized to produce Surlyn(trademark). React-A-Seal(trademark), Surlyn(trademark), and Nucrel(trademark) recover into their original shapes following a high impact puncture at velocities ranging from 300 to 1200 ft/s ('self-healing'). This self-healing process may be of great benefit in space applications where structures are exposed to matter impacts. A thermal IR camera indicated a temperature increase to 98 C for Nucrel(trademark) 925, Surlyn(trademark) 8940, React-A-Seal(trademark), and Surlyn(trademark) 8920 after initial penetration. To understand and generalize the observed phenomena, questions concerning the mechanism of the puncture resealing must be answered. One suggestion is that the elastic character of the melt created by the puncture drives the self-healing. This inference is based on the observed temperature rise of approx. 3 C above the melting temperature of the samples (approx. 95 C) during the impact. With the expectation of gaining additional insight into the self-healing phenomenon, a thermodynamic and viscoelastic investigation was conducted using primarily DSC and DMA. Surlyn(trademark) and React-A-Seal(trademark) showed the characteristic order-disorder transition at approx. 52 C that has been reported in literature. Master curves were constructed from the creep isotherms for the four EMAA samples. An aging study was performed to investigate the irreproducibility and "tailing effect" observed in the creep data. The aging study indicated that, with increased aging time and temperature, changes in the polyethylene matrix lead to

  8. Primary headache in yemen: prevalence and common medications used.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Salah A; Amood Al-Kamarany, Mohammed; Alzoubi, Karem H; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Al-Baidani, Abdulrhman H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective. Primary headaches is a major medical concern in certain Arabic countries, for example Oman, Jordan, and Qatar. This study was aimed at increasing understanding of the prevalence of headache in Arabic countries and identifying common medications used for treatment because of the lack of research done in this field in Yemen. Methods. This is a cross-sectional observational study conducted by recruiting case-series of adults and elderly who have primary headache within the age group from 18 to 85 years. 12640 subjects received a simple explanation for the aim of the study as ethical issue. The subjects were allowed to complete a self-conducted screening questionnaire. The data were diagnosed according to the International Headache Society's diagnostic criteria (2004). Results. The results showed that 76.5% of the primary headache is prevalent at least once per year, 27.1% of the tension type headache (TTH) was the maximum percentage of type of headache, and 14.48% of the migraine headache (MH) was the minimum percentage. On the other hand, the relationship between the primary headache and age of subjects was statistically significant (P < 0.05), while between primary headache and sex was not (P > 0.05). In addition, 70.15% of the subjects said that headache attacks affected their activity of daily livings (ADL). 62.26% of the subjects used the medications without medical advice regarding their headache. 37.73% of the subjects relied on medical professionals (physicians and pharmacist) regarding analgesics use. The most common agent used among the medications was paracetamol (38.4%). Others included ibuprofen, aspirin, diclofenac sodium, naproxen, mefenamic acid, ergotamine and (11.45%) were unknown agents. Conclusion. We concluded that absence of health attention from the Yemeni Community and education from the health system in the country regarding analgesics use and their potential risk led to abuse of such medications and could be a reason

  9. Dural repair using autologous fat: Our experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Del Maestro, Mattia; Ricci, Alessandro; Dechordi, Soheila Raysi; Marzi, Sara; Millimaggi, Daniele F.; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various materials have been proposed to obliterate dead spaces and to reconstruct dural defects during a neurosurgical approach. This study describes our technique of using the abdominal autologous fat graft and evaluates the complications and characteristics related to the use of this tissue during cranial procedures. Methods: Autologous fat grafts were used in 296 patients with basicranial and convexity extraaxial tumors from April 2005 to January 2015. The adipose tissue was removed from the paraumbilical abdominal region and was transformed into a thin foil. When possible, a watertight suture was made between the dural or bone edge with a fat graft. We always used fibrin glue to reinforce the dural closure. Results: Complications occurred between 2 days and 1 year following procedure. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks were found in 11 cases. No case of mortality, pseudomeningoceles, fistula, infections, bacterial meningitides, or lipoid meningitides was reported. No patient required removal of the graft. No adhesion was observed between the brain and the autologous fat. Other fat-related complications observed were 2 cases of fat necrosis in the abdomen and 2 cases of abdominal hemorrhage. Conclusion: The technique of harvesting and applying fat grafts is fairly simple, although it must be performed meticulously to be effective. Our experience has led us to believe that the use of fat grafts presents low morbidity and mortality. However, a neurosurgeon should never forget the possible late or early complications related to the use of fat grafts. PMID:27500007

  10. Watertight dural closure constructed with DuraSeal TM for bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kengo; Kimura, Toshikazu; Morita, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis is a common procedure for the treatment of cerebral ischemia and is useful for cerebral aneurysms and tumors. The STA has to pass through the dura and the dura cannot be sutured tightly around the STA to prevent vessel narrowing, so subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection is common. This study analyzed the feasibility of using a synthetic dural sealant in the STA-MCA anastomosis to establish watertight closure. Twenty-four patients underwent STA-MCA anastomosis for cerebral ischemia or cerebral aneurysm. After creation of a standard STA-MCA anastomosis, the dura was reapproximated closely, leaving a small defect around the STA. Then, DuraSeal(TM) was sprayed over the dural defect, and a negative-pressure drain was positioned before closing the skin. Only two patients developed subcutaneous CSF collection, which was managed conservatively. The patency of the anastomosis was proven by magnetic resonance angiography in all cases, and no ischemic complication suggesting chemical spasm of the STA due to the sealant occurred. With DuraSeal(TM), watertight dural closure can be obtained easily and safely in bypass surgery. PMID:22850505

  11. Hypoxia facilitates neurogenic dural plasma protein extravasation in mice: a novel animal model for migraine pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Hunfeld, Anika; Segelcke, Daniel; Bäcker, Ingo; Mecheri, Badreddine; Hemmer, Kathrin; Dlugosch, Elisabeth; Andriske, Michael; Paris, Frank; Zhu, Xinran; Lübbert, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Migraine animal models generally mimic the onset of attacks and acute treatment processes. A guinea pig model used the application of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) to trigger immediate dural plasma protein extravasation (PPE) mediated by 5-HT2B receptors. This model has predictive value for antimigraine drugs but cannot explain the delayed onset of efficacy of 5-HT2B receptor antagonists when clinically used for migraine prophylaxis. We found that mCPP failed to induce dural PPE in mice. Considering the role 5-HT2B receptors play in hypoxia-induced pulmonary vessel muscularization, we were encouraged to keep mice under hypoxic conditions and tested whether this treatment will render them susceptible to mCPP-induced dural PPE. Following four-week of hypoxia, PPE, associated with increased transendothelial transport, was induced by mCPP. The effect was blocked by sumatriptan. Chronic application of 5-HT2B receptor or nitric oxide synthase blockers during hypoxia prevented the development of susceptibility. Here we present a migraine model that distinguishes between a migraine-like state (hypoxic mice) and normal, normoxic mice and mimics processes that are related to chronic activation of 5-HT2B receptors under hypoxia. It seems striking, that chronic endogenous activation of 5-HT2B receptors is crucial for the sensitization since 5-HT2B receptor antagonists have strong, albeit delayed migraine prophylactic efficacy. PMID:26644235

  12. A New Absorbable Synthetic Substitute With Biomimetic Design for Dural Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhidong; Xu, Tao; Yuan, Yuyu; Deng, Kunxue; Liu, Man; Ke, Yiquan; Luo, Chengyi; Yuan, Tun; Ayyad, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Dural repair products are evolving from animal tissue-derived materials to synthetic materials as well as from inert to absorbable features; most of them lack functional and structural characteristics compared with the natural dura mater. In the present study, we evaluated the properties and tissue repair performance of a new dural repair product with biomimetic design. The biomimetic patch exhibits unique three-dimensional nonwoven microfiber structure with good mechanical strength and biocompatibility. The animal study showed that the biomimetic patch and commercially synthetic material group presented new subdural regeneration at 90 days, with low level inflammatory response and minimal to no adhesion formation detected at each stage. In the biological material group, no new subdural regeneration was observed and severe adhesion between the implant and the cortex occurred at each stage. In clinical case study, there was no cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and all the postoperation observations were normal. The biomimetic structure and proper rate of degradation of the new absorbable dura substitute can guide the meaningful reconstruction of the dura mater, which may provide a novel approach for dural defect repair. PMID:26526152

  13. The empty delta sign: frequency and significance in 76 cases of dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Virapongse, C; Cazenave, C; Quisling, R; Sarwar, M; Hunter, S

    1987-03-01

    The presence of the empty delta sign on contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans of the brain is considered pathognomonic of sagittal sinus thrombosis (SST); however, a valid explanation for its appearance is lacking, despite several hypotheses. To determine the frequency of the sign and its prognostic significance, 76 reported cases (112 CT manifestations) of SST and SST-related intracranial sinovenous occlusive disease were reviewed. Ten CT signs related to both disease processes were reported; the empty delta sign was the most frequently reported sign (28.6%) of SST. Patients with hemorrhagic infarction and/or the empty delta sign on CT scans had the poorest prognosis. A case illustrative of the empty delta sign is described in which there was engorgement of endothelial- and nonendothelial-lined spaces in the dura mater with hemorrhagic rupture into the dural leaf. The empty delta sign can probably be explained on the basis of the rich dural venous collateral circulation, consisting primarily of lateral lacunae, a vascular mesh (dural cavernous spaces), and meningeal venous tributaries. PMID:3809494

  14. Radially Aligned, Electrospun Nanofibers as Dural Substitutes for Wound Closure and Tissue Regeneration Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jingwei; MacEwan, Matthew R.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Liu, Wenying; Siewe, Daku Y.; Xia, Younan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of scaffolds consisting of radially aligned poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibers by utilizing a collector comprised of a central point electrode and a peripheral ring electrode. This novel class of scaffolds was able to present nanoscale topographic cues to cultured cells, directing and enhancing their migration from the periphery to the center. We also established that such scaffolds could induce faster cellular migration and population than nonwoven mats consisting of random nanofibers. Dural fibroblast cells cultured on these two types of scaffolds were found to express type I collagen, the main extracellular matrix component in dural mater. The type I collagen exhibited a high degree of organization on the scaffolds of radially aligned fibers and a haphazard distribution on the scaffolds of random fibers. Taken together, the scaffolds based on radially aligned, electrospun nanofibers show great potential as artificial dural substitutes and may be particularly useful as biomedical patches or grafts to induce wound closure and/or tissue regeneration. PMID:20695478

  15. Repair of Inaccessible Ventral Dural Defect in Thoracic Spine: Double Layered Duraplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Park, Jeong-Ill; Park, Ki-Su; Cho, Dae-Chul; Sung, Joo-Kyung

    2016-06-01

    We propose a double layered (intradural and epidural patch) duraplasty that utilizes Lyoplant and Duraseal. We examined a 47-year-old woman after decompression for thoracic ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament was performed in another hospital. On postoperative day 7, she complained of weakness in both legs. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection with cord compression. In the operative field, we found 2 large dural defects on the ventral dura mater. We performed a conventional fat graft with fibrin glue. However, the patient exhibited neurologic deterioration, and a postoperative MRI again showed CSF collection. We performed dorsal midline durotomy and inserted a intradural and epidural Lyoplant patch. She immediately experienced diminishing back pain postoperatively. Her visual analog scale and motor power improved markedly. Postoperative MRIs performed at 2 and 16 months showed no spinal cord compression or CSF leakage to the epidural space. We describe a new technique for double layered duraplasty. Although we do not recommend this technique for all dural repairs, double-layered duraplasty may be useful for repairing large inaccessible dural tears in cases of persistent CSF leakage refractory to conventional management. PMID:27437022

  16. Repair of Inaccessible Ventral Dural Defect in Thoracic Spine: Double Layered Duraplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Ill; Park, Ki-Su; Cho, Dae-Chul; Sung, Joo-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We propose a double layered (intradural and epidural patch) duraplasty that utilizes Lyoplant and Duraseal. We examined a 47-year-old woman after decompression for thoracic ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament was performed in another hospital. On postoperative day 7, she complained of weakness in both legs. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection with cord compression. In the operative field, we found 2 large dural defects on the ventral dura mater. We performed a conventional fat graft with fibrin glue. However, the patient exhibited neurologic deterioration, and a postoperative MRI again showed CSF collection. We performed dorsal midline durotomy and inserted a intradural and epidural Lyoplant patch. She immediately experienced diminishing back pain postoperatively. Her visual analog scale and motor power improved markedly. Postoperative MRIs performed at 2 and 16 months showed no spinal cord compression or CSF leakage to the epidural space. We describe a new technique for double layered duraplasty. Although we do not recommend this technique for all dural repairs, double-layered duraplasty may be useful for repairing large inaccessible dural tears in cases of persistent CSF leakage refractory to conventional management. PMID:27437022

  17. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... A Appendix A to Part 179 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Pt. 179, App. A Appendix A to Part 179—Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance... of 29 km/hour (18 mph). Tank-head puncture-resistance is a function of one or more of the...

  18. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Pt. 179, App. A Appendix A to Part 179—Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance...-resistance systems and to test for system survivability after coupler-to-tank-head impacts at relative...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Pt. 179, App. A Appendix A to Part 179—Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance...-resistance systems and to test for system survivability after coupler-to-tank-head impacts at relative...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Pt. 179, App. A Appendix A to Part 179—Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance...-resistance systems and to test for system survivability after coupler-to-tank-head impacts at relative...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 179 - Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Pt. 179, App. A Appendix A to Part 179—Procedures for Tank-Head Puncture-Resistance Test 1. This test procedure is designed to verify the integrity of new or untried tank-head...

  2. A systematic review of causes of sudden and severe headache (Thunderclap Headache): should lists be evidence based?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are many potential causes of sudden and severe headache (thunderclap headache), the most important of which is aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. Published academic reviews report a wide range of causes. We sought to create a definitive list of causes, other than aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage, using a systematic review. Methods Systematic Review of EMBASE and MEDLINE databases using pre-defined search criteria up to September 2009. We extracted data from any original research paper or case report describing a case of someone presenting with a sudden and severe headache, and summarized the published causes. Results Our search identified over 21,000 titles, of which 1224 articles were scrutinized in full. 213 articles described 2345 people with sudden and severe headache, and we identified 6 English language academic review articles. A total of 119 causes were identified, of which 46 (38%) were not mentioned in published academic review articles. Using capture-recapture analysis, we estimate that our search was 98% complete. There is only one population-based estimate of the incidence of sudden and severe headache at 43 cases per 100,000. In cohort studies, the most common causes identified were primary headaches or headaches of uncertain cause. Vasoconstriction syndromes are commonly mentioned in case reports or case series. The most common cause not mentioned in academic reviews was pneumocephalus. 70 non-English language articles were identified but these did not contain additional causes. Conclusions There are over 100 different published causes of sudden and severe headache, other than aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage. We have now made a definitive list of causes for future reference which we intend to maintain. There is a need for an up to date population based description of cause of sudden and severe headache as the modern epidemiology of thunderclap headache may require updating in the light of research on cerebral

  3. Direct Puncture and Sclerotherapy with Sotradecol®

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, P.A.; Wikholm, G.; Rodriguez, M.; Enoksson, P.; Frisén, L.; Strömland, K.; Seregard, S.

    2001-01-01

    Summary We evaluated sclerotherapy in the treatment of orbital lymphatic malformations. Six consecutive patients with unilateral orbital cystic masses and recurrent episodes of orbital swelling were included in this retrospective study. All have been treated with percutaneous puncture and injection of Sotradecol (sodium tetredecyl sulphate) under radiographic guidance, on one or more occasions. Reduction of orbital mass volume was documented clinically and radiologically within a few weeks in all cases. There was total regression of proptosis in three instances. There were no immediate complications. One subject suffered a presumably coincidental orbital hemorrhage two weeks after treatment. Follow-up times ranged between six months and four years. Sotradecol sclerotherapy appears to be a useful adjunct to the therapeutic arsenal for orbital lymphatic malformations. PMID:20663348

  4. Tonsillar Herniation After Lumbar Puncture in Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Borire, Adeniyi A; Hughes, Andrew R; Lueck, Christian J

    2015-09-01

    A 30-year-old woman with coexisting renal tubular acidosis and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), treated with acetazolamide, experienced coning (cerebellar tonsillar herniation) after a lumbar puncture (LP). Brain magnetic resonance imaging at initial diagnosis of IIH showed minor tonsillar descent and computed tomographic venography revealed hypoplasia of the left transverse sinus. The patient previously had three uneventful LPs, all of which showed high opening pressures and normal cerebrospinal fluid composition. In retrospect, it was noted that her serum bicarbonate had fallen to 9 mmol/L (normal: 22-28 mm/L) 1 week before the LP. We hypothesize that the combination of cerebral edema (due to worsening metabolic acidosis), poor venous drainage, and preexisting minor tonsillar descent contributed to her post-LP coning. PMID:25786203

  5. Laparotomized Direct Puncture for Embolization of a Retroperitoneal Arteriovenous Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Inagawa, Shoichi; Unno, Naoki; Yamashita, Shuhei; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sakahara, Harumi

    2010-02-15

    A 28-year-old woman was referred to our institution with hope for another child after having an abortion several months previously to avoid a potential risk of catastrophic hemorrhage from a retroperitoneal arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with enlarged and twisted draining veins in the pelvis. Multiple branches coming from the right lumbar arteries and the right iliac arteries fed fistulae converging on an enlarged venous pouch anterior to the psoas major muscle in the right retroperitoneal space. It seemed impossible to achieve complete occlusion of the lesion in a single session by either transarterial or transvenous approach. A laparotomy and direct puncture of the enlarged draining vein immediately downstream of the venous pouch was performed and embolization was done with n-butyl cyanoacrylate and the aid of coils. Complete occlusion of the retroperitoneal AVF was achieved and confirmed in control angiography 5 months later.

  6. [Local vascular complications after iatrogenic femoral artery puncture].

    PubMed

    Fruhwirth, J; Pascher, O; Hauser, H; Amann, W

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years 81 vascular complications after 15,460 catheterizations of the femoral artery for diagnostic (n = 11,883) or therapeutic (n = 3577) procedures were registered. The following complications were observed in declining frequency: 1. False aneurysm (n = 65), 2. arterial occlusion (dissection, embolia, thrombosis) (n = 8), 3. vascular lesion causing profuse bleeding (n = 7), 4. AV-fistula (n = 1). The total complication rate was 0.52%. The complication rate was significantly higher in therapeutical procedures (1,03%) than in diagnostic investigations (0.37%). Pseudoaneurysms were complicated by thrombosis of the femoral vein (n = 3), lymphatic fistula (n = 3) and deep wound infection (n = 9); secondary complication rate 18.5%. Risk factors for local vascular complications are old age, female gender, high grade arteriosclerosis at the puncture site, overweight, manifest arterial hypertension and medication with cumarin, acetylsalicylic acid or heparin. Further complicating factors are connected with technical risks such as duration of the procedure. French size of the catheter, the catheter sheath and multiple punctures. Vascular repair was performed by simple angiography in most cases, but in 14.8% more extensive surgical procedures were required. In patients with signs of occlusive vascular disease the external iliac artery was replaced by a PTFE-vascular access graft in 4 cases and an arterioplasty of the deep femoral artery was performed in 2 patients. 36% of the operations were undertaken as emergencies. Reintervention was necessary for a postoperative bleeding complication in 1 case (surgical complication rate 1.2%). A female patient suffering from aortic valve stenosis died during emergency operation due to massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization (mortality rate 1.2%). Over a median follow-up period of 37 months no late complications of the intervention were recorded, nor recurrences of peripheral arterial occlusive

  7. Relationships between food, wine, and beer-precipitated migrainous headaches.

    PubMed

    Peatfield, R C

    1995-06-01

    Five hundred seventy-seven consecutive patients attending the Princess Margaret Migraine Clinic from 1989 to 1991 have been questioned about dietary precipitants of their headaches. Four hundred twenty-nine patients had migraine, of which 16.5% reported that headaches could be precipitated by cheese or chocolate, and nearly always both. Of the migraine patients, 18.4% reported sensitivity to all alcoholic drinks, while another 11.8% were sensitive to red wine but not to white wine; 28% of the migrainous patients reported that beer would precipitate headaches. There was a definite statistical association between sensitivity to cheese/chocolate and to red wine (P < 0.001) and also to beer (P < 0.001), but none between diet sensitivity and sensitivity to alcoholic drinks in general. None of 40 patients with tension headache (diagnosed by International Headache Society criteria) reported sensitivity to foods, and only one was sensitive to alcoholic drinks. The prevalence of sensitivity among 46 patients with some migrainous features was intermediate between the migraine and tension headache categories. It is concluded that cheese/chocolate and red wine sensitivity, in particular, have closely related mechanisms, in some way related more to migraine than to more chronic tension-type headache, while quite separate mechanisms play a major role in sensitivity to alcoholic drinks in general. PMID:7635722

  8. Headache attributed to temporomandibular disorders and masticatory myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuhiko; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Matsukawa, Yumiko; Dezawa, Ko; Nakaya, Yuka; Chen, Jui-Yen; Noma, Noboru; Oka, Shunichi; Iwata, Koichi; Imamura, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the temporal association between temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-related symptoms and headache during TMD treatment for patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to TMD (HATMD) specified in the Diagnostic criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) and International classification of headache disorders (ICHD)-3 beta. The study enrolled 34 patients with HATMD induced by masticatory myofascial pain but not by temporomandibular arthralgia. Facial pain intensity, the pressure pain threshold of pericranial muscles, and maximum unassisted opening of the jaw were assessed at an initial examination and before and after physical therapy. The intensity and frequency of headache episodes and tooth contact ratio were also recorded before and after the intervention. Headache intensity and frequency significantly decreased, and these reductions were temporally related to improvements in facial pain intensity, maximum unassisted opening, and pressure pain threshold during TMD treatment. Linear regression analysis showed significant correlations between facial pain intensity and headache intensity and between tooth contact ratio and pressure pain threshold. Among patients who fulfilled the DC/TMD and ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for HATMD, headache improved during TMD treatment, and the improvement was temporally related to amelioration of TMD symptoms. These findings suggest that sensitization in the central and peripheral nervous systems is responsible for HATMD. (J Oral Sci 58, 195-204, 2016). PMID:27349540

  9. Headache management in concussion and mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sylvia

    2011-10-01

    Headache is one of the most common symptoms after traumatic brain injury (TBI), and posttraumatic headache (PTH) may be part of a constellation of symptoms that is seen in the postconcussive syndrome. PTH has no defining clinical features; currently it is classified as a secondary headache based on its close temporal relationship to the injury. A growing number of studies are characterizing PTH by using primary headache classifications. Moderate to severe PTH that is often disabling may be classified as migraine or probable migraine and is found in substantial numbers of individuals. Recent data from civilian adult, pediatric, and military populations all find that PTH may be more of a chronic problem than previously thought, with a prevalence of close to half of the injured population. In addition, if PTH definitions are strictly adhered to, then many cases of PTH may be missed, thus underestimating the scope of the problem. New headaches may be reported well after the 7 days required for diagnosis of PTH by the guidelines of the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition. A history of headache before a head injury occurs and female gender are possible risk factors for headache after TBI. Treatment of PTH may be acute or preventive, and recommendations are made for the use of migraine-specific acute therapy when indicated. Preventive therapy may be considered when PTH is frequent, disabling, or refractory to acute therapies. Comorbid conditions should be considered when choosing an appropriate preventive therapy. The symptom of headache as a "return to play" or "return to duty" barrier must be viewed in the context of other symptoms of mild TBI. PMID:22035683

  10. Sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for the treatment of cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Puche, Miguel; Garcia, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Cluster headache is a severe, debilitating disorder with pain that ranks among the most severe known to humans. Patients with cluster headaches have few therapeutic options and further, 10–20% develop drug-resistant attacks. The often brief duration of cluster attacks makes abortive therapy a challenge, and preventive medications are almost always provided to patients, but the side effects of these preventive medications can be significant. The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is believed to play a role in headache pain and cranial autonomic symptoms associated with cluster headache, which is a result of activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex. For over 100 years, the SPG has been a clinical target to treat primary headache disorders using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods. Radiofrequency lesioning and nerve-resection therapies, while initially beneficial, are irreversible procedures, and the use of neurostimulation provides one method of interfacing with the neural pathways without causing permanent damage to neural tissue. SPG neurostimulation is both reversible and adjustable, and has recently been tested in both proof-of-concept work and in a randomized, sham-controlled trial for the treatment of cluster headache. A randomized, sham-controlled study of 32 patients was performed to evaluate further the use of SPG stimulation for the acute treatment of chronic cluster headache. Of the 32 patients, 28 completed the randomized experimental period. Overall, 68% of patients experienced an acute response, a frequency response, or both. In this study the majority of adverse events were related to the implantation procedure, which typically resolved or remained mild in nature at 3 months following the implant procedure. This and other studies highlight the promise of using SPG stimulation to treat the pain-associated cluster headache. SPG stimulation could be a safe and effective option for chronic cluster headache. PMID:24790646

  11. Assessment of dietary risk factors in chronic headache.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, P; Radnitz, C L; Blanchard, E B

    1990-03-01

    An investigation of the awareness level and potential impact of dietary risk factors on chronic headache patients revealed that (1) approximately 75% of the 130 patients in this study stated they were aware of possible food-intake/headache connections, (2) less than half reported being informed of this relationship by medical professionals, and (3) the awareness of this nutritional information did not prompt changes in subjects' dietary practices. The comparison of food-intake patterns of the headache patients and nonheadache control group revealed a significant difference only on red wine consumption. PMID:2361144

  12. Headache in the writings of Elizabeth Gaskell (1810-1865).

    PubMed

    Larner, A J

    2015-11-01

    Mrs Elizabeth Gaskell was a celebrated author of the Victorian era, a friend of both Charles Dickens and Charlotte Brontë and the latter's first biographer. References to headache in Mrs Gaskell's six major novels, published between 1848 and 1866 as well as some of her shorter fiction, have been collated. These multiple references suggest that Elizabeth Gaskell used headache as a narrative device, possibly based on her own experience of headache and that of female acquaintances, most notably Charlotte Brontë. PMID:24585607

  13. Heart Attack Causes Head-Ache – Cardiac Cephalalgia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Liao, Pen-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is the typical symptom of myocardial infarction (MI), and there are many atypical manifestations such as stomachache or dyspnea. Headache is a rare presentation of MI, which has specifically been termed “cardiac cephalalgia” or “cardiac cephalgia”. In this article, we have reported a case of sudden onset headache and neck pain, of whom MI was confirmed by electrocardiography, cardiac markers, and coronary angiogram. The patient’s headache subsided dramatically after coronary angioplasty, and it had not recurred in the following one year. Additionally, diagnostic clues and possible mechanisms of cardiac cephalalgia are discussed as well. PMID:27122955

  14. Antiepileptic Drug Therapy in Migraine Headache.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Steve D.

    2002-09-01

    Severe migraine affects more than 28 million Americans. It is associated with episodic as well as long-term disability and suffering, yet it is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Acute treatments have advanced considerably, ignited by sumatriptan and the subsequent triptans; unfortunately migraine prevention has lagged far behind. There are no great migraine preventives! No migraine preventive agent studied in good randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trials proved to be 50% better than placebo. Migraine trials typically focus on episodic migraine, a milder, gentler type of migraine that is selected for low frequency, lack of daily headaches, no preventive need, and previous failure to no more than a few preventive agents. These features are not typical of the usual migraine patient seen in most neurologic practices, thus the results of clinical trials may not carryover to real world situations. Treatment of frequent, chronic, or pervasive migraine is inadequate, and never has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Traditional migraine preventives, eg, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and tricyclic antidepressants, are often ineffective in difficult or complicated populations. The antiepileptic drugs represent a category of pharmaceutics that target the neuronal instability and central hyperexcitability of migraine, and, through these actions, may be more effective than traditional preventives. Episodic migraine attacks are associated with peripheral and central sensitization; however, if attacks are frequent, severe, or long lasting, this sensitization may increase the risk of developing daily headaches. If antiepileptic drugs have an effect on central sensitization, perhaps mediated via glutamate inhibition or gamma-aminobutyric acid potentiation, it is appropriate to use these agents early in migraine treatment, particularly in the highly comorbid patient, possibly in conjunction with agents that antagonize the 5HT2 receptor. This report

  15. [Vasculitis as a reason of chronic headache].

    PubMed

    Ataia, I; Casaulta, C; von Vigier, R O; Pfammatter, J P; Brekenfeld, C; Sauvain, M J; Steinlin, M

    2008-03-19

    A 13-year-old girl presented to our emergency with a one week history of fever and skin rash and new onset of chorea for the last three days. There was a long standing history of right predominant headache; followed by personality change, fatigue, arthralgia and weight loss over the last few months. Previous investigations by head CT and ophthalmological examination did not explain the symptoms. Further investigations revealed peri- and pancarditis with aortic insufficiency, a renal involvement with elevated creatinin, protein- and hematuria and a hemolytic anemia. Diagnosis of lupus eythematodes was confirmed by high ANA, anti-dsDNS and Anticardiolipin antibodies. Within the first 48 hours after admission there was significant deterioration with reduced vigilance and dysarthria. MRI of the brain and dopplersonography of cerebral vessels showed a complete thrombosis of the right medial cerebral artery with a small net of collaterals, irregularities of the left cerebral artery due to vasculitis and several subacute leftsided ischemias. Immunosuppressive therapy with high-dose corticosteroids and cyclophosphamid together with antithrombotic therapy induced an improvement of neurologic, renal and cardiac function. PMID:18548940

  16. Granulomatous hypophysitis: a case of severe headache.

    PubMed

    Wan Muhamad Hatta, Sharifah Faradila; Hamdan, M Farhan; Md Ali, Siti Aishah; Abdul Ghani, Rohana

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic granulomatous hypophysitis (GH) is an uncommon inflammatory disease of the pituitary with impairment of pituitary gland function due to infiltration by lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with worsening of headaches for 1 month and blurring of vision over 5 days. An MRI revealed a homogeneous supra-sellar mass evoking a pituitary tumour with bulky pituitary stalk extending into the left and right cavernous sinuses. Hormonal investigations showed anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies; meanwhile histopathological examination revealed an aspect of hypophysitis. Clinical and radiological remission occurred immediately postglucocorticoid therapy with the addition of a steroid-sparing agent later in view of recurrence of symptoms on glucocorticoid dose reduction. GH has important diagnostic and therapeutic implications, as clinical and radiological features ameliorate via medical treatment. With further understanding and recognition of the disease, we hope to highlight a case of GH, in which signs and symptoms improved after initiation of corticosteroids. PMID:27613264

  17. Headache arising from idiopathic changes in CSF pressure.

    PubMed

    Ducros, Anne; Biousse, Valérie

    2015-06-01

    New onset of sudden or progressive headache can have various causes, including disorders of intracranial pressure (ICP). Headache is the most common-and often the presenting-symptom of both intracranial hypertension and intracranial hypotension syndromes, which can be symptomatic or idiopathic. Despite the widespread availability of diagnostic tests, including ocular ophthalmoscopy, neuroimaging, and measurement of CSF pressure, delays in diagnosis or misdiagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension remain common. If left untreated, idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension produce highly disabling headaches, and threaten vision, hearing, and in rare cases, brain function and life. To improve the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension, changes in the overall diagnostic strategy for headaches will be necessary in most care centres. Improved understanding of CSF physiology and the mechanisms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and spontaneous intracranial hypotension will guide the development of new treatments. PMID:25987284

  18. Enucleation and development of cluster headache: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Sörös, Peter; Vo, Oanh; Gerding, Heinrich; Husstedt, Ingo W; Evers, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Background Cluster headache (CH) is a neurovascular, primary headache disorder. There are, however, several case reports about patients whose CH started shortly after a structural brain disease or trauma. Motivated by a patient who developed CH 3 weeks after the removal of an eye and by similar case reports, we tested the hypothesis that the removal of an eye is a risk factor for CH. Methods A detailed headache questionnaire was filled out by 112 patients on average 8 years after enucleation or evisceration of an eye. Results While 21 % of these patients experienced previously unknown headaches after the removal of an eye, no patient fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for CH. Conclusion Our data does not suggest that the removal of an eye is a major risk factor for the development of CH. PMID:15784136

  19. Headaches in antiquity and during the early scientific era.

    PubMed

    Magiorkinis, Emmanouil; Diamantis, Aristidis; Mitsikostas, Dimos-Dimitrios; Androutsos, George

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the evolution of ideas on headache symptoms from antiquity through the 19th century. A thorough study of texts, medical books and reports along with a review of the available literature in PubMed was undertaken: observations on headaches date back nearly 4,000 years to the ritual texts of Mesopotamia. Nicolaes Tulp, Thomas Willis and Gerhard van Swieten also made important contributions on various forms of headaches in the 17th and 18th centuries. Edward Liveing and William Gowers made the major contributions to the field in the late 19th century. Overall, observations on headaches span a timeline of nearly 9,000 years. The work of the physicians during the 18th and 19th century, however, set the basis for scientific research. PMID:19288044

  20. Headache associated with airplane travel: report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Berilgen, M S; Müngen, B

    2006-06-01

    This study presents six cases of headache that appeared only during flights and was not associated with other headache forms. The cases had severe headache attacks during some flights, when the plane was landing and taking off, with a unilateral and generally orbital and/or supraorbital localization. The attacks lasted between 15 and 20 min on average and recovered spontaneously, without any accompanying sign. We think that barotrauma caused by pressure changes in the cabin during take-off and landing could affect ethmoidal nerves (branching from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve) that carry the senses of the mucosa on the inner surface of the paranasal sinuses, and/or nociceptors in ethmoidal arteries, thereby activating the trigeminovascular system and leading to headache. PMID:16686910

  1. Dural ectasia in individuals with Marfan-like features but exclusion of mutations in the genes FBN1, TGFBR1 and TGFBR2.

    PubMed

    Sheikhzadeh, S; Rybczynski, M; Habermann, C R; Bernhardt, A M J; Arslan-Kirchner, M; Keyser, B; Kaemmerer, H; Mir, T S; Staebler, A; Oezdal, N; Robinson, P N; Berger, J; Meinertz, T; von Kodolitsch, Y

    2011-06-01

    Mutations in the genes FBN1, TGFBR1, and TGFBR2 can result in heritable connective tissue disorders comprising the Marfan syndrome and the Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Dural ectasia is a characteristic manifestation of both syndromes. However, dural ectasia has not yet been investigated in connective tissue disorders that are unrelated to mutations in the FBN1, TGFBR1 or TGFBR2 genes. Here, we assessed dural ectasia in 33 individuals both with typical manifestations of heritable connective tissue disease and in whom mutations in all three genes had been excluded. We identified 19 individuals with dural ectasia (58%), who exhibited major skeletal manifestations of the Marfan syndrome more frequently than the remaining 14 persons without dural ectasia (p = 0.06). Moreover, only persons with dural ectasia fulfilled clinical criteria of the Marfan syndrome (p = 0.01). Conversely, aortic aneurysm (12 patients; p = 0.8), aortic dissection (five patients; p = 0.1), spontaneous dissection of the carotid arteries (five patients; p = 1), and mitral valve prolapse (13 patients; p = 0.4) were similarly frequent irrespective of dural ectasia. We conclude that dural ectasia is a marker for connective tissue disease which coincides with skeletal rather than with cardiovascular manifestations, and which may involve currently uncharacterized pathogenetic mechanisms and syndromes. PMID:20662850

  2. A Fuzzy Method for Medical Diagnosis of Headache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeong-Yong; Mun, Kill-Sung; Kim, Young-Hyun; Oh, Sun-Young; Han, Beom-Soo

    In this note we propose a fuzzy diagnosis of headache. The method is based on the relations between symptoms and diseases. For this purpose, we suggest a new diagnosis measure using the occurrence information of patient's symptoms and develop an improved interview chart with fuzzy degrees assigned according to the relation among symptoms and three labels of headache. The proposed method is illustrated by two examples.

  3. 15th International Headache Congress: basic science highlights.

    PubMed

    Cutrer, F Michael; Smith, Jonathan H

    2012-05-01

    The 15th Congress of the International Headache Society was held in Berlin from June 23rd to 26th of 2011. Interesting new data from several areas of the basic sciences of headache were presented. This is a review of some of the most exciting platform and poster presentations of the meeting. Research addressing 3 general areas of interest is presented in this review: pathophysiology, pharmacology, and genetics. PMID:22486216

  4. Successful Treatment of Occipital Radiating Headache Using Pulsed Radiofrequency Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Yeul; Jang, Dae Il; Noh, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease involving multiple joints. The cervical spine is often affected, and cases involving atlantoaxial joint can lead to instability. Anterior atlantoaxial subluxation in RA patients can lead to posterior neck pain or occipital headache because of compression of the C2 ganglion or nerve. Here, we report the successful treatment of a RA patient with occipital radiating headache using pulsed radiofrequency therapy at the C2 dorsal root ganglion. PMID:26279821

  5. How to investigate and treat: headache and hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Usai, Susanna; Moschiano, Franca

    2012-08-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is a condition characterised by an increase of prolactin blood levels (more than 100-200 ng/ml). It is the most common endocrine disorder of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The clinical characteristics of the headache-hyperprolactinemia-hypophyseal-adenoma association are discussed, the various diagnostic and treatment possibilities are explored and the etiology of the headache is considered in the light of several pathogenetic possibilities. We present two cases. (1) A 35-year-old woman suffering from chronic tension-type headache interspersed with occasional episodes of migraine without aura (as defined by the International Headache Society criteria). She had also suffered menstrual cycle alterations since the age of 16. At the age of 30 she developed amenorrhea with hyperprolactinemia. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans revealed a median-left intrasellar mass. Treatment with cabergoline resulted in complete resolution of both types of headache and the menstrual cycle and prolactin levels returned to normal. The therapy also reduced the volume of the tumour. (2) The second case relates to a 47-year-old man who had been suffering from tension-type headaches for almost 3 months. The patient had never previously suffered from headaches. CT and MRI scans showed a large sellar and suprasellar lesion with raised serum prolactin levels. Treatment with cabergoline had significantly reduced the prolactin levels and had also improved the patient's headaches. High-resolution CT, with and without contrast, or MRI is necessary to visualise microprolactinomas (and other sellar lesions) and confirm the diagnosis. PMID:22639180

  6. The Prevalence of Headache Among Athletic University Students

    PubMed Central

    Jahani, Pegah; Salesi, Mohsen; Marzban, Maral; Abdollahifard, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Headache is certainly one of the most common medical complaints of general population and one of the important causes of consumption of drugs. Despite its high overall prevalence, the epidemiology of exertional headache is not clear enough. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of headache in athletic and non-athletic university students and also estimating its variation between different sports fields including concussion prone sports. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised 739 subjects (367 athletes and 372 non-athletes). The present study was carried out on athletic and non-athletic university students aging between 18 to 28 years. An athlete was defined as a person who had at least one year of experience in sports including football, volleyball, basketball, wrestling, boxing, martial arts, track and field, chess, handball and swimming for three sessions a week each lasting at least 2 hours. The random selection of these participants was done by an independent statistical consultant. A questionnaire was used for data collection which was then analyzed by statistical methods. Results: Our study comprised 739 subjects (367 athletes and 372 non-athletes). Among athletic university students, 152 (41.2%) participants complained of headache. Such a complaint was present in 217 (58.3%) non-athletic university students. This lower prevalence of headache in athletes was statistically significant (P value < 0.001). Among ten different sports fields, the prevalence of headache among wrestlers was significantly higher than others (P value < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of headache is seemingly lower in athletic university students than non-athletic ones. In addition, among athletes, those who are participating in concussion prone sports especially wrestling experience headache more than athletes of other fields. PMID:27231525

  7. Pain relief for headaches. Is self-medication a problem?

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Recent survey results show that 3.2 million Canadians suffer from migraine attacks. Among those responding to the survey, 36% were currently consulting physicians for their headaches, 45% had discontinued consulting physicians, and 19% had never sought medical help. About 90% of these migraine sufferers used over-the-counter drugs. Risks associated with improper use of OTC medications include addiction, gastric irritation, liver toxicity, and rebound headache syndrome. PMID:8495144

  8. [Therapeuetic aspects of cluster headache in the practical clinical site].

    PubMed

    Owada, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic procedures of cluster headache begin from the precise diagnose. Because cluster headache is usually accompanied with teeth pain and/or neck pain, some patients aren't able to consult adequate medical institutions. In this lecture I showed the some male and female patients as examples. The female patient was suffered from menstruation related migraine in her period of cluster headache. From the view point of treatment, preventive medicines are essential. They not just reduce severity and also improve the length of headache-period. Suitable preventive medicines may avoid the whole severe attacks. We reported therapeutic experiences of valproate, gabapentin and amitriptyline with verapamil in 2010 at general meeting of Societas Neurologica Japonica. Steroids are not indispensable. As for triptans rapid-type one are usually used. If the attacks are severe, sumatriptan subcutaneous injection kit (SSI) needs to be introduced. The expert nurses who are skilled in the procedures of SSI improve both patients' adherence and therapeutic efficiency. We held a first educational meeting of SSI in Tokyo 2012. Because cluster headache is formidable, the integrated therapy which is composed of precise diagnosis, preventive medicine and adequate medicines for headache attacks is essential and needed. PMID:24291904

  9. Diagnosis and management of headache attributed to airplane travel.

    PubMed

    Mainardi, Federico; Maggioni, Ferdinando; Lisotto, Carlo; Zanchin, Giorgio

    2013-03-01

    The headache attributed to airplane travel, also named "airplane headache", is characterized by the sudden onset of a severe head pain exclusively in relation to airplane flights, mainly during the landing phase. Secondary causes, such as upper respiratory tract infections or acute sinusitis, must be ruled out. Although its cause is not thoroughly understood, sinus barotrauma should be reasonably involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms. Furthermore, in the current International Classification of Headache Disorders, rapid descent from high altitude is not considered as a possible cause of headache, although the onset of such pain in airplane travellers or aviators has been well known since the beginning of the aviation era. On the basis of a survey we conducted with the courteous cooperation of people who had experienced this type of headache, we proposed diagnostic criteria to be added to the forthcoming revision of the International Classification of Headache Disorders. Their formal validation would favour further studies aimed at improving knowledge of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and at implementing preventative measures. PMID:23335028

  10. Headaches as Somatoform Disorders in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Emich-Widera, Ewa; Szwed-Białożyt, Barbara; Kopyta, Ilona; Kostorz, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Somatoform disorders are often the main cause for seeking professional advice and performing a number of specialist checks. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of somatoform disorders in the form of headaches in children and adolescents neurologically diagnosed and the risk factors thereof. Analysis of the biological and situational risk factors were established. Somatoform disorders were diagnosed in 27 out of 276 children with headaches. We concluded that in the differential diagnosis of headaches, somatoform headaches should not be omitted as every 10th patient in the developmental age diagnosed on the neurological ward because of headache shows signs of somatoform headaches. In diagnostically difficult cases it is recommended that analysis of biological and situational risk factors be performed with special attention paid to chronic disease of the patient and/or in his immediate family, the patient’s psychological disorders and dysfunctional or low social status families. The creation of separate criteria for somatoform disorders of the developmental age should be considered. PMID:25478111

  11. Behavioral management of headache in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Faedda, Noemi; Cerutti, Rita; Verdecchia, Paola; Migliorini, Daniele; Arruda, Marco; Guidetti, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Headache is the most frequent neurological symptom and the most prevalent pain in children and adolescents, and constitutes a serious health problem that may lead to impairment in several areas. Psychosocial factors, social environment, life events, school and family stressors are all closely related to headaches. A multidisciplinary strategy is fundamental in addressing headache in children and adolescents. Applying such a strategy can lead to reductions in frequency and severity of the pain, improving significantly the quality of life of these children.It has been demonstrated that behavioral intervention is highly effective, especially in the treatment of paediatric headache, and can enhance or replace pharmacotherapy, with the advantage of eliminating dangerous side effects and or reducing costs. Behavioral interventions appear to maximize long-term therapeutic benefits and improve compliance with pharmacological treatment, which has proven a significant problem with child and adolescent with headache.The goal of this review is to examine the existing literature on behavioral therapies used to treat headache in children and adolescents, and so provide an up-to-date picture of what behavioral therapy is and what its effectiveness is. PMID:27596923

  12. Percutaneous Direct Puncture Embolization with N-butyl-cyanoacrylate for High-flow Priapism.

    PubMed

    Tokue, Hiroyuki; Shibuya, Kei; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Tokue, Azusa; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2016-09-01

    There are many treatment options in high-flow priapism. Those mentioned most often are watchful waiting, Doppler-guided compression, endovascular highly selective embolization, and surgery. We present a case of high-flow priapism in a 57-year-old man treated by percutaneous direct puncture embolization of a post-traumatic left cavernosal arteriovenous fistula using N-butyl-cyanoacrylate. Erectile function was preserved during a 12-month follow-up. No patients with percutaneous direct puncture embolization for high-flow priapism have been reported previously. Percutaneous direct puncture embolization is a potentially useful and safe method for management of high-flow priapism. PMID:27164971

  13. [A case of vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation with a newly developed dural arteriovenous fistula after successful embolization].

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Yoshida, Daisuke; Cho, Kazutoshi; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Saito, Shinji

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) with a newly developed dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) subsequent to successful embolization. A male neonate diagnosed as VGAM with prenatal ultrasonography and MRI presented severe cardiac and respiratory failure soon after birth. Five sessions of transarterial embolization using NBCA were performed during the first 6 months of his life. The shunt flow was effectively reduced and heart failure was resolved after the treatment. Follow-up angiography performed 2.5 years after the last embolization revealed complete obliteration of VGAM and newly developed small dural AVF on the wall of the thrombosed falcorial sinus. We believe that the dural AVF in this case was caused by local venous hypertension or induction of angiogenic factor during the thrombosing process of VGAM. PMID:22647511

  14. In situ precise electrospinning of medical glue fibers as nonsuture dural repair with high sealing capability and flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Fu-Yan; Dong, Rui-Hua; Li, Zhao-Jian; Qin, Chong-Chong; Yan, Xu; He, Xiao-Xiao; Zhou, Yu; Yan, Shi-Ying; Long, Yun-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this work, we propose an in situ precise electrospinning of medical glue fibers onto dural wound for improving sealing capability, avoiding tissue adhesion, and saving time in dural repair. Methods N-octyl-2-cyanoacrylate, a commercial tissue adhesive (medical glue), can be electrospun into ultrathin fibrous film with precise and homogeneous deposition by a gas-assisted electrospinning device. Results The self-assembled N-octyl-2-cyanoacrylate film shows high compactness and flexibility owing to its fibrous structure. Simulation experiments on egg membranes and goat meninges demonstrated that this technology can repair small membrane defects quickly and efficiently. Conclusion This method may have potential application in dural repair, for example, working as an effective supplementary technique for conventional dura suture. PMID:27621616

  15. [Metabolic syndrome and prevention of migraine headache].

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Takao

    2009-10-01

    headaches. PMID:19882941

  16. The Headache of Carbon Dioxide Exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), a natural product of human metabolism, accumulates quickly in sealed environments when humans are present, and can induce headaches, among other symptoms. Major resources are expended to control CO2 levels to concentrations that are tolerable to the crews of spacecraft and submersible craft. It is not practical to control CO2 levels to those found in the ambient environment on earth. As NASA looks ahead to long-duration missions conducted far from earth, difficult issues arise related to the management and effects of human exposure to CO2. One is the problem of pockets of CO2 in the habitat caused by excess generation of the gas in one location without a mechanism to purge the area with fresh air. This results in the crew rebreathing CO2 from their exhaled breath, exposing them to a much higher concentration of CO2 than whole-module measurements would suggest. Another issue is the potential increased sensitivity to CO2 in microgravity. For example, based on anecdotal information, it appears that space crews may be more susceptible than submarine crews to some of the subtle, yet adverse effects of CO2 exposure. Another issue, not unique to spaceflight, is the possibility of inter-individual differences in the susceptibility of crewmembers to CO2 exposure. Again, anecdotal reports from the International Space Station (ISS) crews suggest that certain individuals may experience a greater susceptibility. The implications associated with these issues are extremely important as NASA sets CO2 exposure limits that protect the crew from this compound s subtle adverse effects, without causing an unwarranted expenditure of resources to scrub CO2 from the habitat atmosphere.

  17. "BABY, BABY I'VE GOT HEADACHE".

    PubMed

    Kaiksow, F A; Bhatnagar, D

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman with no prior medical history presented post-partum with altered mental status. She had no complications during pregnancy and had a spontaneous vaginal delivery at term one week prior. On post-partum day five, she began complaining of headaches, initially responsive to ibuprofen but eventually worsened with no relief. On the evening of admission, her boyfriend noted strange behavior and movements consistent with a tonic-clonic seizure. On the way to the hospital, she had two more similar seizures witnessed by emergency medical serevices (EMS). EMS reported her blood pressures in route to be 200/100s. She was given 5 mg of magnesium by EMS due to concern for postpartum eclampsia. Upon arrival at the emergency room, she was somnolent but arousable although unable to answer any questions. She was mildly tachycardic at 106 beats per minute and had a temperature of 38.2°C. Her blood pressure was elevated at 165/95 mm Hg. On exam, dried blood was noted on her lips and her tongue was swollen. On auscultation, she was tachycardic with clear lung sounds. Her abdomen was soft and non-tender and there was no vaginal bleeding or other discharge. Laboratory values revealed a sodium of 142, potassium of 3.3, chloride of 110, bicarbonate of 16, creatinine of 1.1, magnesium of 3.9, and white blood cell count of 12.3 x103/mm3 with 88% neutrophils and no bands. A toxicology panel was negative for opiates, benzodiazepines, or other illicit drugs. Urine was remarkable for large blood, 448 red blood cells, protein, moderate leukocyte esterase, and 73 white blood cells. Chest x-ray and CT scan of the head were both normal. She was admitted to the medical intensive care unit for close monitoring, neurological checks, and continued magnesium administration. By hospital day two, her mental status had improved significantly. PMID:27159471

  18. Dural neurogenic inflammation induced by neuropathic pain is specific to cranial region.

    PubMed

    Filipović, B; Matak, I; Lacković, Z

    2014-05-01

    Up to now, dural neurogenic inflammation (DNI) has been studied primarily as a part of migraine pain pathophysiology. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated the occurrence of DNI in response to peripheral trigeminal nerve injury. In this report, we characterize the occurrence of DNI after different peripheral nerve injuries in and outside of the trigeminal region. We have used the infraorbital nerve constriction injury model (IoNC) as a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Greater occipital nerve constriction injury (GoNC), partial transection of the sciatic nerve (ScNT) and sciatic nerve constriction injury (SCI) were employed to characterize the occurrence of DNI in response to nerve injury outside of the trigeminal region. DNI was measured as colorimetric absorbance of Evans blue plasma protein complexes. In addition, cellular inflammatory response in dural tissue was histologically examined in IoNC and SCI models. In comparison to the strong DNI evoked by IoNC, a smaller but significant DNI has been observed following the GoNC. However, DNI has not been observed either in cranial or in lumbar dura following ScNT and SCI. Histological evidence has demonstrated a dural proinflammatory cell infiltration in the IoNC model, which is in contrast to the SCI model. Inflammatory cell types (lymphocytes, plasma cells, and monocytes) have indicated the presence of sterile cellular inflammatory response in the IoNC model. To our knowledge, this is the first observation that the DNI evoked by peripheral neuropathic pain is specific to the trigeminal area and the adjacent occipital area. DNI after peripheral nerve injury consists of both plasma protein extravasation and proinflammatory cell infiltration. PMID:24366531

  19. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis and bilateral lateral rectus palsy as an uncommon complication of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Anusha; Mohamad, Irfan; Sidek, Dinsuhaimi

    2013-01-01

    Dural venous sinus thrombosis, especially of the sigmoid sinus, is a known but uncommon intracranial extradural complication of chronic suppurative otitis media. Even rarer is the simultaneous occurrence of bilateral abducens palsy in the same patient. We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure, diplopia and bilateral lateral rectus palsy associated with a history of left ear discharge and neck swelling. Extensive dural sinus thrombosis extending right up to the left internal jugular vein was confirmed on CT imaging. The patient was successfully treated with thrombolytic agents and antibiotic therapy. The pathophysiology of the concurrent complications is discussed. PMID:23355565

  20. Metachronous Multiplicity of Spinal Cord Arteriovenous Fistula and Spinal Dural AVF in a Patient with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Ling, J.C.M.; Agid, R.; Nakano, S.; Souza, M.P.S.; Reintamm, G.; TerBrugge, K.G.

    2005-01-01

    Summary HHT (Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia or Rendu Osler Weber disease) is a known autosomal dominant dysplasia. The first clinical presentation of HHT in a child may be a cerebral or spinal AVM. We present the case of a young boy with HHT who had a previous spinal cord AVF treated by surgical obliteration and then presented with a spinal dural AVF nine months later. This patient had surgical obliteration of a spinal cord perimedullary AVF and subsequently developed a new spinal dural AVF at a different level. The diagnosis was made by spinal MR imaging and spinal angiography PMID:20584440

  1. Dural arteriovenous fistula and spontaneous choroidal detachment: new cause of an old disease.

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, J W; Guerry, D; Wiesinger, H

    1978-01-01

    A case is presented in which bilateral spontaneous choroidal detachments appear to be the direce result of bilateral dural arteriovenous fistula of the cavernous sinus region. Rapid resolution of the clinical signs followed bilateral orbital decompression via the transfrontal approach. Similarities in clinical presentation of both entities are reviewed and a premise for their cause-and-effect relationship elaborated. A literature search for similar unrecognised cases is discussed. The paper suggests that this association may be more frequent than published reports would imply. Images PMID:678504

  2. Numerical method for computing Maass cusp forms on triply punctured two-sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, K. T.; Kamari, H. M.; Zainuddin, H.

    2014-03-05

    A quantum mechanical system on a punctured surface modeled on hyperbolic space has always been an important subject of research in mathematics and physics. This corresponding quantum system is governed by the Schrödinger equation whose solutions are the Maass waveforms. Spectral studies on these Maass waveforms are known to contain both continuous and discrete eigenvalues. The discrete eigenfunctions are usually called the Maass Cusp Forms (MCF) where their discrete eigenvalues are not known analytically. We introduce a numerical method based on Hejhal and Then algorithm using GridMathematica for computing MCF on a punctured surface with three cusps namely the triply punctured two-sphere. We also report on a pullback algorithm for the punctured surface and a point locater algorithm to facilitate the complete pullback which are essential parts of the main algorithm.

  3. Closure Using a Surgical Closure Device of Inadvertent Subclavian Artery Punctures During Central Venous Catheter Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Berlet, Matthew H.; Steffen, Diana; Shaughness, George; Hanner, James

    2001-03-15

    Severe complications can and do occur when central venous catheters are inadvertently placed into subclavian arteries. Two cases are discussed that describe how these inadvertent arterial punctures can be closed using the Perclose device (Abbott Laboratories, Redwood City, CA, USA)

  4. Modelling headache and migraine and its pharmacological manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Erdener, S E; Dalkara, T

    2014-01-01

    Similarities between laboratory animals and humans in anatomy and physiology of the cephalic nociceptive pathways have allowed scientists to create successful models that have significantly contributed to our understanding of headache. They have also been instrumental in the development of novel anti-migraine drugs different from classical pain killers. Nevertheless, modelling the mechanisms underlying primary headache disorders like migraine has been challenging due to limitations in testing the postulated hypotheses in humans. Recent developments in imaging techniques have begun to fill this translational gap. The unambiguous demonstration of cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) during migraine aura in patients has reawakened interest in studying CSD in animals as a noxious brain event that can activate the trigeminovascular system. CSD-based models, including transgenics and optogenetics, may more realistically simulate pain generation in migraine, which is thought to originate within the brain. The realization that behavioural correlates of headache and migrainous symptoms like photophobia can be assessed quantitatively in laboratory animals, has created an opportunity to directly study the headache in intact animals without the confounding effects of anaesthetics. Headache and migraine-like episodes induced by administration of glyceryltrinitrate and CGRP to humans and parallel behavioural and biological changes observed in rodents create interesting possibilities for translational research. Not unexpectedly, species differences and model-specific observations have also led to controversies as well as disappointments in clinical trials, which, in return, has helped us improve the models and advance our understanding of headache. Here, we review commonly used headache and migraine models with an emphasis on recent developments. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Animal Models in Psychiatry Research. To view the other articles in this

  5. Modelling headache and migraine and its pharmacological manipulation.

    PubMed

    Erdener, S E; Dalkara, T

    2014-10-01

    Similarities between laboratory animals and humans in anatomy and physiology of the cephalic nociceptive pathways have allowed scientists to create successful models that have significantly contributed to our understanding of headache. They have also been instrumental in the development of novel anti-migraine drugs different from classical pain killers. Nevertheless, modelling the mechanisms underlying primary headache disorders like migraine has been challenging due to limitations in testing the postulated hypotheses in humans. Recent developments in imaging techniques have begun to fill this translational gap. The unambiguous demonstration of cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) during migraine aura in patients has reawakened interest in studying CSD in animals as a noxious brain event that can activate the trigeminovascular system. CSD-based models, including transgenics and optogenetics, may more realistically simulate pain generation in migraine, which is thought to originate within the brain. The realization that behavioural correlates of headache and migrainous symptoms like photophobia can be assessed quantitatively in laboratory animals, has created an opportunity to directly study the headache in intact animals without the confounding effects of anaesthetics. Headache and migraine-like episodes induced by administration of glyceryltrinitrate and CGRP to humans and parallel behavioural and biological changes observed in rodents create interesting possibilities for translational research. Not unexpectedly, species differences and model-specific observations have also led to controversies as well as disappointments in clinical trials, which, in return, has helped us improve the models and advance our understanding of headache. Here, we review commonly used headache and migraine models with an emphasis on recent developments. PMID:24611635

  6. Suitability of Exoseal Vascular Closure Device for Antegrade Femoral Artery Puncture Site Closure

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelter, Christopher Liebl, Andrea; Poullos, Nektarios; Ruppert, Volker; Vorwerk, Dierk

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To assess the efficacy and safety of the Exoseal vascular closure device for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. Methods. In a prospective study from February 2011 to January 2012, a total of 93 consecutive patients received a total of 100 interventional procedures via an antegrade puncture of the femoral artery. An Exoseal vascular closure device (6F) was used for closure in all cases. Puncture technique, duration of manual compression, and use of compression bandages were documented. All patients were monitored by vascular ultrasound and color-coded duplex sonography of their respective femoral artery puncture site within 12 to 36 h after angiography to check for vascular complications. Results. In 100 antegrade interventional procedures, the Exoseal vascular closure device was applied successfully for closure of the femoral artery puncture site in 96 cases (96 of 100, 96.0 %). The vascular closure device could not be deployed in one case as a result of kinking of the vascular sheath introducer and in three cases because the bioabsorbable plug was not properly delivered to the extravascular space adjacent to the arterial puncture site, but instead fully removed with the delivery system (4.0 %). Twelve to 36 h after the procedure, vascular ultrasound revealed no complications at the femoral artery puncture site in 93 cases (93.0 %). Minor vascular complications were found in seven cases (7.0 %), with four cases (4.0 %) of pseudoaneurysm and three cases (3.0 %) of significant late bleeding, none of which required surgery. Conclusion. The Exoseal vascular closure device was safely used for antegrade puncture of the femoral artery, with a high rate of procedural success (96.0 %), a low rate of minor vascular complications (7.0 %), and no major adverse events.

  7. Clinical value of a self-designed training model for pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Quan; He, Shu; Shen, Yun-Xia; Qian, Cheng

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVES. A training model was designed for learners and young physicians to polish their skills in clinical practices of pinpointing and puncturing trigeminal ganglion. METHODS. A head model, on both cheeks of which the deep soft tissue was replaced by stuffed organosilicone and sponge while the superficial soft tissue, skin and the trigeminal ganglion were made of organic silicon rubber for an appearance of real human being, was made from a dried skull specimen and epoxy resin. Two physicians who had experiences in puncturing foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion were selected to test the model, mainly for its appearance, X-ray permeability, handling of the puncture, and closure of the puncture sites. Four inexperienced physicians were selected afterwards to be trained combining Hartel's anterior facial approach with the new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale studied by us. RESULTS. Both appearance and texture of the model were extremely close to those of a real human. The fact that the skin, superficial soft tissue, deep muscles of the cheeks, and the trigeminal ganglion made of organic silicon rubber all had great elasticity resulted in quick closure and sealing of the puncture sites. The head model made of epoxy resin had similar X-ray permeability to a human skull specimen under fluoroscopy. The soft tissue was made of radiolucent material so that the training can be conducted with X-ray guidance. After repeated training, all the four young physicians were able to smoothly and successfully accomplish the puncture. CONCLUSION. This self-made model can substitute for cadaver specimen in training learners and young physicians on foramen ovale and trigeminal ganglion puncture. It is very helpful for fast learning and mastering this interventional operation skill, and the puncture accuracy can be improved significantly with our new method of real-time observation on foramen ovale. PMID:24628215

  8. Chronic Neck Pain and Cervicogenic Headaches.

    PubMed

    Feng, Frank L.; Schofferman, Jerome

    2003-11-01

    Chronic axial neck pain and cervicogenic headache are common problems, and there have been significant advances in the understanding of the etiology and treatment of each. The severity and duration of pain drives the process. For patients who have had slight to moderate pain that has been present for less than 6 months and have no significant motor loss, strength training of anterior, posterior, and interscapular muscle groups coupled with body mechanics training is prescribed. After 8 weeks, if the patient is better, exercises are continued at home or in a gym. If the patient is not better, physical therapy is continued for up to 8 more weeks. In patients with motor loss or severe pain, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) should be ordered at the initial visit. In patients with slight to moderate pain who are not better by 4 to 6 months, plain radiographs of the neck and MRI should be ordered. Based on the results, a spinal injection is usually prescribed. If MRI reveals spinal stenosis of the central or lateral canal, or a disc herniation, an epidural corticosteroid injection should be ordered. If the epidural provides good relief, the patient can be referred for more aggressive physical therapy and repeat the epidural as needed up to a maximum of three times. If there is no pathology within the canal, medial branch blocks and intra-articular steroid injections can be ordered based on the joints that are most tender or where disc space narrowing is greatest, or MRI or radiographs are recommended. If there is excellent relief from the medial branch block and joint injections, repeat when the steroids wear off. If there is good relief again, but pain recurs, medial branch radiofrequency neurotomy is recommended. For patients with one or two level disc degeneration that has not responded, a psychologic evaluation and discography is recommended. If there are no significant psychologic abnormalities, and one or two (rarely three) painful discs, surgical

  9. Effect of system compliance and indenter geometry on puncture mechanics of soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattan, Shruti; Fakhouri, Sami; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Puncture mechanics in soft materials is critical for the development of new surgical instruments as well as new materials used in personal protective equipment. However, fundamental knowledge of how geometry and material properties control the nucleation of a crack, i.e. puncture, at large deformations in a soft material is currently limited. We describe a simple experimental method to study the resistive forces and failure of a soft gel being indented and punctured with a small needle. We show that puncture stresses can reach two orders of magnitude greater than the material modulus and that the force-deformation response is insensitive to the geometry of indenter at large indentation depths. We determine a transition between stress-limited and energy-limited failure modes, which is governed by the indenter size and the balance between fracture energy and cohesive stress. In addition, we examine the influence of system compliance on puncture of soft gels. It is well-known that system compliance influences the peak force in adhesion and traditional fracture experiments; however, its effect on crack nucleation is unresolved. We find that as the system becomes more compliant lower peak puncture forces were measured, which is associated with increased energy available for fracture.

  10. Point of impact: the effect of size and speed on puncture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P S L; LaCosse, J; Pankow, M

    2016-06-01

    The use of high-speed puncture mechanics for prey capture has been documented across a wide range of organisms, including vertebrates, arthropods, molluscs and cnidarians. These examples span four phyla and seven orders of magnitude difference in size. The commonality of these puncture systems offers an opportunity to explore how organisms at different scales and with different materials, morphologies and kinematics perform the same basic function. However, there is currently no framework for combining kinematic performance with cutting mechanics in biological puncture systems. Our aim here is to establish this framework by examining the effects of size and velocity in a series of controlled ballistic puncture experiments. Arrows of identical shape but varying in mass and speed were shot into cubes of ballistic gelatine. Results from high-speed videography show that projectile velocity can alter how the target gel responds to cutting. Mixed models comparing kinematic variables and puncture patterns indicate that the kinetic energy of a projectile is a better predictor of penetration than either momentum or velocity. These results form a foundation for studying the effects of impact on biological puncture, opening the door for future work to explore the influence of morphology and material organization on high-speed cutting dynamics. PMID:27274801

  11. Medication overuse headache: history, features, prevention and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Saper, Joel R; Da Silva, Arnaldo Neves

    2013-11-01

    Medication overuse headache (MOH) is a daily, or almost daily, headache form that arises from overuse of one or more classes of migraine-abortive or analgesic medication. The main classes of drugs that cause MOH are opioids, butalbital-containing mixed analgesics, triptans, ergotamine tartrate derivatives, simple analgesics (except for plain aspirin), and perhaps non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. MOH can be debilitating and results from biochemical and functional brain changes induced by certain medications taken too frequently. At this time, migraine and other primary headache disorders in which migraine or migraine-like elements occur seem exclusively vulnerable to the development of MOH. Other primary headache disorders are not currently believed to be vulnerable. The treatment of MOH consists of discontinuation of the offending drug(s), acute treatment of the withdrawal symptoms and escalating pain, establishing a preventive treatment when necessary, and the implementation of educational and behavioral programs to prevent recidivism. In most patients, MOH can be treated in the outpatient setting but, for the most difficult cases, including those with opioid or butalbital overuse, or in patients with serious medical or behavioral disturbances, effective treatment requires a multidisciplinary, comprehensive headache program, either day-hospital with infusion or an inpatient hospital setting. PMID:23925669

  12. Pet ownership and prophylaxis of headache and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, A R; Whitman, B W

    1994-10-01

    The belief that having household pets promotes good health is ubiquitous among Americans. Recent studies support this belief where certain medical conditions are concerned. To investigate the advantages of pet ownership in the prophylaxis of headache and other chronic pain conditions, we queried 62 patients suffering from such diseases about whether they owned pets and whether children and other adults shared their households. We similarly queried a control group of 38 patients with various conditions not involving headache or chronic pain. We found that statistically, the experimental group and the control group were not significantly different in their household compositions. In fact, those with headaches and chronic pain, on average, owned slightly more pets and had slightly more children and other adults sharing their households than did those without headache or chronic pain conditions. Thus, contrary to our expectations, pet ownership apparently conferred no analgesic benefits, nor did the presence of children or of other adults in the household confer any benefit to headache and other chronic pain sufferers. PMID:8002331

  13. Galeata: chronic migraine independently considered in a medieval headache classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic migraine is a quite recent concept. However, there are descriptions suggestive of episodic migraine since the beginning of scientific medicine. We aim to review main headache classifications during Classical antiquity and compared them with that proposed in the 11th century by Constantine the African in his Liber Pantegni, one of the most influential texts in medieval medicine. Method We have carried out a descriptive review of Henricum Petrum's Latin edition, year 1539. Results Headache classifications proposed by Aretaeus of Cappadocia, Galen of Pergamun and Alexander of Tralles, all of them classifying headaches into three main types, considered an entity (called Heterocrania or Hemicrania), comparable to contemporary episodic migraine. In ninth book of Liber Pantegni, headaches were also classified into three types and one of them, Galeata, consisted on a chronic pain of mild intensity with occasional superimposed exacerbations. Conclusion In Liber Pantegni we have firstly identified, as a separate entity, a headache comparable to that we currently define as chronic migraine: Galeata. PMID:24655582

  14. Childhood Adversities and Adult Headache in Poland and Germany

    PubMed Central

    Reuchlein, Bettina; Henn, Lea; Brian, Tamara; Schier, Katarzyna; Hardt, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Various childhood adversities have been found to be associated with chronic pain in adulthood. However, associations were moderate in most studies, i.e. odds ratios (OR) were between one and two. Method An internet survey was performed in 508 Polish and 500 German subjects. A total of 19 childhood adversities were selected and their associations with headaches explored. Age, gender and country were included as potential confounders, as well as their two-way interaction with the risk factors. Results Two strong risk factors were identified. (1) A combined score for physical and emotional neglect showed an odds ratio (OR) of 2.78 (p < .002) to the frequency of headache in adulthood as a main effect. (2) Father having had chronic pain showed an OR of 4.36 (p < .001) with headache in adulthood for women, but not for men (OR = 0.86, p < .556). The majority of the examined childhood adversities were not associated with adult headache, neither when tested individually nor as a sum score. Conclusion This study confirms results from previous ones that childhood adversities may play a role in the development of adult headache, but it is a rather minor one. Contrary to other studies, neglect turned out to be one of the strongest predictors. PMID:26859500

  15. Medication-overuse headache: epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lundqvist, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    Medication-overuse headache (MOH) is one of the most common chronic headache disorders and a public health problem with a worldwide prevalence of 1–2%. It is a condition characterized by chronic headache and overuse of different headache medications, and withdrawal of the overused medication is recognised as the treatment of choice. However, the strategy for achieving withdrawal is, at present, based on expert opinion rather than scientific evidence, partly due to the lack of randomised controlled studies. This narrative review investigates different aspects of epidemiology, diagnosis, risk factors and pathogenesis as well as management for MOH. We suggest that the first step in the treatment of MOH should be carried out in general practice and should focus primarily on detoxification. For most patients, both prevention and follow up after detoxification can also be performed in general practice, thus freeing resources for referral of more complicated cases to headache clinics and neurologists. These suffering patients have much to gain by an earlier treatment-focused approach lower down on the treatment ladder. PMID:25083264

  16. Improving the safety and efficiency of outpatient lumbar puncture service.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam; Hadden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar puncture (LP) is a commonly performed procedure in diagnosis and management of neurological conditions. LP is generally safe, however there are a number of potentially serious complications, including epidural haematoma and cerebral herniation. The risks of these should be considered and minimised prior to undertaking LP. Our regional neuroscience centre provides an outpatient LP service for patients throughout southeast England. Referrals from distant hospitals meant there was frequently no access to important clinical information, including indication for LP, past medical history, or medication history until the day of the procedure, and no access to results of investigations such as coagulation profile, platelet count, or intracranial imaging. Furthermore, there was limited capacity or time available in the day ward to perform these tests prior to LP. As a result, patients were either having LPs cancelled on the day of the procedure, were delayed by several hours on the day of the procedure for investigations, or were subject to the risk of having the LP performed without the knowledge of these key safety indicators. To address this issue we implemented an LP safety checklist to be completed by referring neurologists, providing details of the patient's medical history and results of investigations performed locally. In doing this, we increased the proportion of patients with an available platelet count prior to LP from 25% to 89%, and available coagulation profile from 18% to 82%. In addition, we saw a qualitative increase in the confidence of junior doctors in the safety of the LP clinic, as measured by a survey taken before and after the implementation of this system. This simple intervention made a rapid and remarkable difference to the safety and efficiency of this outpatient LP clinic. We would encourage other units to adopt this approach to address similar problems in a variety of outpatient settings. PMID:27493745

  17. Improving the safety and efficiency of outpatient lumbar puncture service

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Mark; Al-Diwani, Adam; Hadden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar puncture (LP) is a commonly performed procedure in diagnosis and management of neurological conditions. LP is generally safe, however there are a number of potentially serious complications, including epidural haematoma and cerebral herniation. The risks of these should be considered and minimised prior to undertaking LP. Our regional neuroscience centre provides an outpatient LP service for patients throughout southeast England. Referrals from distant hospitals meant there was frequently no access to important clinical information, including indication for LP, past medical history, or medication history until the day of the procedure, and no access to results of investigations such as coagulation profile, platelet count, or intracranial imaging. Furthermore, there was limited capacity or time available in the day ward to perform these tests prior to LP. As a result, patients were either having LPs cancelled on the day of the procedure, were delayed by several hours on the day of the procedure for investigations, or were subject to the risk of having the LP performed without the knowledge of these key safety indicators. To address this issue we implemented an LP safety checklist to be completed by referring neurologists, providing details of the patient's medical history and results of investigations performed locally. In doing this, we increased the proportion of patients with an available platelet count prior to LP from 25% to 89%, and available coagulation profile from 18% to 82%. In addition, we saw a qualitative increase in the confidence of junior doctors in the safety of the LP clinic, as measured by a survey taken before and after the implementation of this system. This simple intervention made a rapid and remarkable difference to the safety and efficiency of this outpatient LP clinic. We would encourage other units to adopt this approach to address similar problems in a variety of outpatient settings. PMID:27493745

  18. Iatrogenic Dural Arteriovenous Fistula after Superficial Temporal Artery to Middle Cerebral Artery Anastomosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seng-Won; Shim, Jae-Hyon; Rho, Seung-Jin; Choi, Hak-Ki; Park, Hwa-Seung

    2015-01-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are uncommon, representing only 10% to 15% of all intracranial AVFs. Here we present the case of a patient with cerebral infarction who experienced a dural AVF after craniotomy for superficial temporal artery (STA) to middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass surgery. A 48-year-old man presented with dysarthria and right side hemiparesis. A brain magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed multiple acute infarctions and severe stenosis of the left MCA. Therefore, STA-MCA bypass surgery was performed. A follow-up angiography performed 2 weeks after the surgery showed an abnormal vascular channel from the left middle meningeal artery (MMA) to the middle meningeal vein (MMV) just anterior to the border of the craniotomy margin. This fistula originated from a screw used for cranial fixation. The screw injured the MMA and MMV, and this resulted in the formation of a fistula. The fistula was successfully treated with transarterial embolization. Surgeons should be careful when fixing bones with screws and plates as fistulas can develop if vessels are injured. PMID:27169083

  19. Use of porcine dermis as a dural substitute in 72 patients.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P; Booth, A E

    1984-08-01

    Experience over a 2-year period with the use of porcine dermis as a dural substitute is reported. In this series, porcine dermis was used for dural repair in a total of 72 patients. In a further 28 patients, one of the authors (A.E.B.) used porcine dermis to wrap lumbar nerve roots at the time of surgery for either prolapsed intervertebral disc or extradural lumbar nerve root adhesions. The authors report the advantages of this material which include ready availability and low cost. It is extremely pliable, easy to handle, and can be applied to relatively inaccessible areas. It appears to become rapidly adherent so that suture fixation is frequently not required. No evidence of a foreign-body inflammatory response has been found. No untoward result has been encountered in the 28 patients in whom porcine dermis was used to wrap lumbar nerve roots but it remains too early to show whether this will reduce the incidence of postoperative extradural adhesions. PMID:6737060

  20. Dural incision in the petrosal approach with preservation of the superior petrosal vein.

    PubMed

    Haq, Irwan Barlian Immadoel; Susilo, Rahadian Indarto; Goto, Takeo; Ohata, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    The petrosal approach has been applied for the treatment of many lesions in the posterior fossa, but the location and preservation of the superior petrosal veins (SPVs) during this approach are usually not particularly considered. The authors developed a technique of dural incision with special consideration of the location of the SPVto preserve venous flow during the petrosal approach. The authors describe technical details on how to cut the dura mater and superior petrosal sinus, with special attention to the location of SPV, so that the normal flow of the SPV to the lateral sinus can be preserved. Between July 2007 and March 2014, this technique was used in 45 patients, and no major complications were reported. The SPVs should be considered critical structures in the petrosal approach. Preoperative evaluation of the SPV anatomy should be performed in patients undergoing such surgical treatment, and the dural opening must be performed with special attention to the SPVto avoid intraoperative injury and postoperative complications. PMID:26339848

  1. A potential mechanism of dural ossification in ossification of ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Guo, Shigong; Qiu, Guixing; Li, Wenjing; Liu, Yongsheng; Zhao, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) mostly occurs in the thoracic spine, leading to thoracic spinal stenosis. Surgical treatment is considered as the best option for OLF patients. When the dura mater ossifies, the difficulty of surgery and the risk of complications significantly increase. The cause of dural ossification (DO) is still unknown. Based on the existing research and clinical studies, we propose a potential mechanism of DO in OLF. Firstly, with the progression of OLF, it will compress the dura mater and even the spinal cord. Then, with flexion and extension of spine, relative movement (friction) between the ossified ligamentum flavum and compressed dura mater will lead to local inflammation, subsequently causing dural adhesion. Finally, the adhesion tissue can serve as a pathway for the transportation of osteogenic cytokines (BMP for example) from the ossified ligamentum flavum to the compressed dura mater. Dura will ossify under exposure of these osteogenic cytokines. If this hypothesis is confirmed, it will contribute to the prevention and management of DO. For progressive OLF patients, early surgical treatment before DO should be recommended. PMID:27241243

  2. Rapidly progressive cognitive impairment, ataxia, and myoclonus: an unusual presentation of a dural arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Geraldes, Ruth; Albuquerque, Luisa; Ferro, José Manuel; Sousa, Rita; Sequeira, Paulo; Campos, Jorge

    2012-10-01

    Dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) have a wide range of clinical presentations, including dementia associated with white matter changes (WMCs). We report a case of DAVF presenting as a rapid progressive dementia and myoclonus without WMCs. A 64-year-old hypertensive and diabetic man was admitted because of a 3-month history of progressive cognitive decline, extrapyramidal and cerebellar signs, and myoclonus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain showed dilated cerebellar veins and T2WI hypersignal in the basal ganglia without WMCs. After admission, he suffered sequential bilateral deep intracerebral hemorrhages. A repeated angioMRI disclosed thrombosis of the distal sagittal and the proximal lateral sinuses. Angiography revealed a torcullar region DAVF. Embolization of the dural fistula was performed. On follow-up, the patients' cognitive deficits improved and myoclonus disappeared. The clinical picture may be explained by venous hypertension in the deep venous system, producing bilateral basal ganglia/thalamic dysfunction and in the posterior fossa. This case shows that DAVFs can produce subcortical dementia without involvement of the deep white matter. PMID:21376630

  3. Recurrent headache in a five year old boy.

    PubMed

    Saini, Lokesh; Kumar, Ranjith M; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Gulati, Sheffali

    2016-01-01

    Headache is infrequent in early childhood. Headache and neurological deficits associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis (HaNDL), a variant of migraine, is a rare disorder. A 5-year-old boy presented with recurrent episodes of headache for 6 months. Each episode lasted for a week and in the current episode, he was symptomatic for 3 days. All the episodes were associated with paresthesias and CSF lymplocytosis with normal protein and sugar. There was history of migraine in his family. His magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain with contrast with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and venography were normal. Work-up for relevant causes of infection and vasculitis were negative. His symptoms subsided on oral antimigraine prophylaxis and he has been on remission for last 8 months. HaNDL should be considered in relevant clinical scenarios, as it prevents unnecessary investigations, therapy, and hospitalization. PMID:27011651

  4. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  5. Managing migraine and other headache syndromes in those over 50.

    PubMed

    Dees, Brett; Coleman-Jackson, Rhonda; Hershey, Linda A

    2013-11-01

    Migraine in an older person may appear with sensory or motor phenomena ("late-life migraine accompaniments"), so that it may be confused with transient ischemic attack or stroke. An older patient may have cervicogenic headache in addition to migraine. Medication overuse headache is just as much of a problem in older patients as it is in younger ones. Abdominal migraine without headache can be seen in older adults as a migraine equivalent, just as it can occur in children. The most effective drugs for migraine prophylaxis in young people (divalproex, topiramate, metoprolol and propranolol) are similarly effective for those who are over the age of 50. Oral rescue drugs, including naproxen and hydroxyzine, are also useful in older adults. We need to remind older adults about the dangers of excessive use of caffeine in coffee, tea and energy drinks, since these substances can lead to daily HA and migraine equivalents. PMID:23759429

  6. Supratrochlear and Supraorbital Nerve Stimulation for Chronic Headache: a Review.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Stephanie Wrobel; Nahas, Stephanie J

    2015-07-01

    Chronic daily headache accounts for a significant socioeconomic burden due to decreased productivity, work absenteeism, multiple office and ER visits, and hospital admissions for pain control. Associated comorbidities add to this cost. Current traditional medical therapies may fail to provide adequate relief leading to the search for and use of other therapeutic modalities such as innovative medical devices. It is in this setting of the urgent demand for better pain control and to assimilate chronic headache sufferers back into society that a variety of neuromodulatory approaches have been emerging. This review aims to familiarize the reader with current literature regarding supraorbital and supratrochlear nerve stimulation for chronic headache, point out the advantages of this approach, address unanswered questions about this subject, and highlight future directions. PMID:26049769

  7. High cervical epidural neurostimulation for post-traumatic headache management.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Headache following head injuries has been reported for centuries. The majority of post-traumatic headache (PTH) patients will report resolution of their complaints within a few months from the time of the initial injury. PTHs can contribute to disability, lost productivity, and health care costs. In this article we discuss a 40-year-old male with a history of motor vehicle accident and basal skull fracture. The patient had no headache history prior to the accident. He presented with more than 3 years persistent daily headache. The patient described constant throbbing and stabbing quality headaches predominantly on the left hemicranium with constant facial pain. He denies having aura, nausea, or vomiting, but reported occasional neck tightness. An extensive workup was carried out under the direction of the patient's primary neurologist. Secondary to persistent intractable pain, the patient was referred to the pain clinic for further evaluation. As his headaches were resistant to all trialed strategies, we decided to turn our therapeutic focus toward electrical neuromodulation along with continuing multimodal medications and multidisciplinary approach. During 7 days of high cervical dorsal column electrical nerve stimulation trial, he reported almost 90% pain reduction and significant improvement on his quality of life. On 12 months follow-up after he underwent a permanent implant of high cervical dorsal column electrical nerve stimulation, he reported the same level of pain reduction along with 100% satisfaction rate. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no publications to date concerning the application of high cervical nerve stimulation for PTH. PMID:25054404

  8. Headache secondary to sleep-related bruxism: A case with polysomnographic findings

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sourav; Gupta, Ravi; Dhyani, Mohan; Goel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Sleep-related bruxism may present with headache. However, in clinical practice it may be difficult to differentiate from other causes of headache, especially in subjects with substance abuse. We are presenting a case of sleep-related bruxism that presented with headache and sleep-related symptoms in the presence of substance abuse. Polysomnography was used to ascertain cause of headache. How the other possible causes of headache ruled out is also discussed in report. In short, Sleep-related bruxism can cause headache that is worse in the morning. It is associated with poor quality sleep. PMID:25883492

  9. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis with Migraine-Like Headache and the Trigeminovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fábio A.; Sória, Marília Grando; Rizelio, Vanessa; Kowacs, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis- (CVT-) associated headache is considered a secondary headache, commonly presenting as intracranial hypertension headache in association with seizures and/or neurological signs. However, it can occasionally mimic migraine. We report a patient presenting with a migraine-like, CVT-related headache refractory to several medications but intravenous dihydroergotamine (DHE). The response to DHE, which is considered to be an antimigraine medication, in addition to the neurovascular nature of migraine, points out to a probable similarity between CVT-headache and migraine. Based on experimental studies, we discuss this similarity and hypothesize a trigeminovascular role in the genesis of CVT-associated headache. PMID:26989532

  10. Butalbital and pediatric headache: stay off the downward path.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Alessandra; Lazdowsky, Lori; Rabner, Jonathan; Haberman, Jason; LeBel, Alyssa

    2015-02-01

    Despite limited evidence from the literature surrounding safety or efficacy, butalbital-containing medicines (BCMs) have maintained their rank as "go-to" prescribed migraine and headache relief drugs in the United States, despite bans on these barbiturates in Germany and other European countries. Providers at the Pediatric Headache Program at Boston Children's Hospital recommend that clinicians prescribe triptan-based medications instead of BCMs, given the known negative side effects of BCMs on the general population, and the uncertain longitudinal trajectory of BCMs on developing brains. PMID:25532552

  11. Psychological Therapy in Adolescents with Chronic Daily Headache.

    PubMed

    Chiappedi, Matteo; Mensi, Martina Maria; Termine, Cristiano; Balottin, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache is a serious disease, causing significant problems in terms of reduced quality of life and disability, with pain localized to the head (headache) occurring 15 or more days per month for more than 3 months (>180 days per year). Drugs, both used as preventive medications or as pain-killers, are insufficient for the management of these patients; a more global approach has been advocated. This paper reviews existing data concerning different psychological approaches, with a focus on adolescence. This leads to evidence still unanswered questions but also the importance to include psychological treatments in the management of this potentially disabling condition. PMID:26695063

  12. Imaging for headache: what the otolaryngologist looks for.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Raza; Soleja, Rafay Qamer; Ijaz, Mohammad Nadir

    2014-04-01

    Diagnosing a rhinogenic cause of headache or facial pain outside of the classic definitions of chronic, acute, and subacute sinusitis can be challenging for the practicing otolaryngologist. Contact-point headaches have been clinically characterized as causing facial pain secondary to abutting mucosal contact from the lateral nasal wall to the septum. Imaging landmarks may help identify these potential contact points radiographically through revealing anatomic variants such as septal spurs and abnormally large lateral nasal structures. However, other potential rhinologic sources, such as barosinusitis, recurrent barotrauma, or recurrent acute sinusitis occurring between active episodes, are challenging to identify through hallmark imaging findings. PMID:24680488

  13. Anterior stromal puncture for treatment of contact lens-intolerant keratoconus patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su Yeon; Park, Young Kee; Song, Jong-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To report the results and effectiveness of anterior stromal puncture for contact lens-intolerant keratoconus patients with subepithelial fibrotic nodules. Methods Nine eyes of nine keratoconus patients who were rigid gas-permeable contact lenses (RGP)-intolerant due to subepithelial nodular scars were included in this study. The nine patients were enrolled in the study between March 2008 and December 2008. After confirming nodular elevation from slit-lamp biomicroscopy, the area where the epithelium of nodular scars had sloughed was punctured by anterior stromal puncture using a 26-gauge needle attached to a 1-ml syringe under slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The RGPs of all patients were refitted around 4 weeks after the puncture. Results Five of the nine patients were male, and the average patient age was 29.6 years (SD ± 5.22 years). Mean follow-up time was 13.7 months (SD ± 4.8 months), and the epithelial defect healed in 1.4 days on average. After the puncture, four of nine patients presented with a recurrent erosion of the nodule during follow-up and needed a second puncture. All the patients showed good contact lens tolerance and satisfactory contact lens fit. No complications such as corneal perforation or keratitis developed. Conclusions Anterior stromal puncture using a 26-gauge needle can be a successful and effective method to induce corneal epithelium and Bowman’s layer reattachment. It can be used as an outpatient procedure to improve RGP tolerance in patients with keratoconus with elevated subepithelial nodules. PMID:20625761

  14. Overlap between Headache, Depression, and Anxiety in General Neurological Clinics: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cui-Bai; Jia, Jian-Ping; Wang, Fen; Zhou, Ai-Hong; Zuo, Xiu-Mei; Chu, Chang-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have reported that depression and anxiety have bidirectional relationship with headache. However, few researches investigated the roles of depression or anxiety in patients with headache. We surveyed the prevalence of depression and anxiety as a complication or cause of headache among outpatients with a chief complaint of headache at neurology clinics in general hospitals. Additional risk factors for depression and anxiety were also analyzed. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at 11 general neurological clinics. All consecutive patients with a chief complaint of headache were enrolled. Diagnoses of depression and anxiety were made using the Chinese version of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and those for headache were made according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd Edition. The headache impact test and an 11-point verbal rating scale were applied to assess headache severity and intensity. Logistic regression was used to analyze risk factors of patients with headache for depression or anxiety. Results: A total of 749 outpatients with headache were included. Among them, 148 (19.7%) were diagnosed with depression and 103 (13.7%) with anxiety. Further analysis showed that 114 (15.2%) patients complaining headache due to somatic symptoms of psychiatric disorders and 82 (10.9%) had a depression or anxiety comorbidity with headache. Most patients with depression or anxiety manifested mild to moderate headaches. Poor sleep and severe headache-related disabilities were predictors for either depression or anxiety. Conclusion: Clinicians must identify the etiology of headache and recognize the effects of depression or anxiety on headache to develop specific treatments. PMID:27270532

  15. The relationship between primary headache and constipation in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mi-Na; Choi, Min-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Many patients presenting with headache also complain of constipation; the relationship between these two symptoms has not been explored in detail. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between primary headache and constipation. Methods This retrospective study included all children who attended the Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital complaining of headache, and who had been followed up for at least 100 days. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A, in whom the headache improved after treatment for constipation, and group B, in whom headache was not associated with constipation. Results Of the 96 patients with primary headache, 24 (25.0%) also had constipation (group A). All 24 received treatment for constipation. Follow-up revealed an improvement in both headache and constipation in all patients. Group B contained the remaining 72 children. Comparison of groups A and B indicated a significant difference in sex ratio (P=0.009, chi-square test). Patients with probable tension-type headache were more likely to be in Group A (P=0.006, chi-square test). Conclusion Resolution of constipation improves headache in many patients diagnosed with primary headache, especially those with probable tension-type headache. We suggest that either constipation plays a key role in triggering headache, or that both constipation and headache share a common pathophysiology. PMID:25774197

  16. Headache under simulated microgravity is related to endocrine, fluid distribution, and tight junction changes.

    PubMed

    Feuerecker, Matthias; van Oosterhout, Willebrordus P J; Feuerecker, Benedikt; Matzel, Sandra; Schelling, Gustav; Rehm, Markus; Vein, Alla A; Choukèr, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Head-down-tilted bed rest (HDTBR) induces headaches similar to headaches during space flights. The objective of this investigation was to study hematological, endocrinological, fluid changes and tight junctions in HDTBR-induced headaches as a proxy for space headache. The randomized crossover HDTBR design by the European Space Agency included 12 healthy, nonheadache male subjects. Before, during, and after confined HDTBR periods, epinephrine (urine), cortisol (saliva), hematological, endothelium markers, and fluid distribution parameters were measured. Headaches were assessed with a validated headache questionnaire. Compared with baseline, HDTBR in all subjects was associated with higher hematocrit, hemoglobin, and epinephrine levels, higher erythrocyte counts, and lower relative plasma volumes (all P < 0.05). In total, 26 headache episodes occurred. In subjects with headaches during HDTBR, epinephrine levels were exaggerated (vs headache-free subjects; HDTBR day 3; 5.1 ± 1.7 vs 3.4 ± 2.4; P = 0.023), cortisol levels were decreased (vs headache-free subjects; HDTBR day 1; 0.37 ± 0.16 vs 0.50 ± 0.20; P < 0.001) and the tight junction marker zonulin was elevated (vs headache-free subjects in HDTBR days 1, 3, 5; P < 0.05). HDTBR induces hemoconcentration and fluid redistribution in all subjects. During headache episodes, endocrinological changes, fluid distribution, and tight junctions were more pronounced, suggesting an additional role in headache pathophysiology. PMID:26761382

  17. Isolated sixth nerve palsy secondary to spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Khemka, S; Mearza, A A

    2006-11-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented with an isolated left sixth nerve palsy in association with postural headache. Magnetic resonance imaging showed dural enhancement with downward displacement of the brainstem. This, in association with the signs, symptoms and findings on lumbar puncture, confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Treatment was successful with epidural blood patching. The case is discussed and the relevant literature reviewed. PMID:17038044

  18. Simulation and training of lumbar punctures using haptic volume rendering and a 6DOF haptic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Färber, Matthias; Heller, Julika; Handels, Heinz

    2007-03-01

    The lumbar puncture is performed by inserting a needle into the spinal chord of the patient to inject medicaments or to extract liquor. The training of this procedure is usually done on the patient guided by experienced supervisors. A virtual reality lumbar puncture simulator has been developed in order to minimize the training costs and the patient's risk. We use a haptic device with six degrees of freedom (6DOF) to feedback forces that resist needle insertion and rotation. An improved haptic volume rendering approach is used to calculate the forces. This approach makes use of label data of relevant structures like skin, bone, muscles or fat and original CT data that contributes information about image structures that can not be segmented. A real-time 3D visualization with optional stereo view shows the punctured region. 2D visualizations of orthogonal slices enable a detailed impression of the anatomical context. The input data consisting of CT and label data and surface models of relevant structures is defined in an XML file together with haptic rendering and visualization parameters. In a first evaluation the visible human male data has been used to generate a virtual training body. Several users with different medical experience tested the lumbar puncture trainer. The simulator gives a good haptic and visual impression of the needle insertion and the haptic volume rendering technique enables the feeling of unsegmented structures. Especially, the restriction of transversal needle movement together with rotation constraints enabled by the 6DOF device facilitate a realistic puncture simulation.

  19. Improved Gauge Conditions and Evolution Techniques for Puncture Black Hole Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah; Baker, John; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart; Kelly, Bernard

    2014-03-01

    Robust spacetime gauge conditions are critically important to the stability and accuracy of numerical relativity (NR) simulations involving puncture black holes. Most of the NR community continues to use the highly-robust--though nearly decade-old--``moving-puncture gauge conditions'' for such simulations. We present improved gauge conditions and evolution techniques that reduce constraint violations by more than an order of magnitude on adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR) grids. It has been found that high-frequency waves propagating away from puncture black holes (e.g., in binary systems) cross progressively lower levels of refinement until they become under-resolved and reflect off an AMR boundary, leading to noisy gravitational waveforms. Such noise does not converge away cleanly with increasing resolution, effectively setting a hard upper limit on waveform accuracy using puncture techniques at computationally feasible resolutions. We demonstrate that our improved puncture gauge conditions reduce this noise by nearly an order of magnitude, and point to possible directions for future improvements.

  20. [Lumbar puncture training using simulation-based educational strategies: Experience in a clinical pediatric residency].

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Juan C; Gouguenheim, Bárbara; Ghiglione, Analía; Bravo, Nélida; Prudencio, Carla I; Villois, Florencia; Abadie, Yamila; Zubieta, Ana; Golini, Carol; Villar, Victoria; Rodríguez, Susana P

    2015-12-01

    Pediatricians should acquire multiple skills during their professional training, including procedural skills. Skill acquisition requires knowledge on theoretical bases, direct observation and, lastly, supervised repetitive practice. Training using simulators allows to learn procedures in a controlled setting, ensuring patients' safety, integrating this as a learning stage prior to the actual contact with patients. Here we report on the teaching experience of a simulated lumbar puncture procedure. Training was provided to 112 first year pediatric residents who entered Hospital Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan in the 2013-2014 period. Educational contents included communication with parents regarding the procedure, material preparation, compliance with biosafety standards, sepsis and general patient care, puncture and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid collection, and specimen collection. Strategies included, in a sequential order, the introduction of theoretical aspects using the bibliography and audiovisual resources available at the hospital's online campus and subsequent practice of lumbar puncture in a 3-month-old infant phantom on a lateral recumbent position that allowed to make a puncture and collect cerebrospinal fluid. At each training session, the level of confidence was measured before and after the procedure, and a checklist was developed to verify an adequate compliance with each step of the procedure. The simulated lumbar puncture training model has been introduced as an educational strategy of our Pediatric Residency Program. PMID:26593801