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Sample records for dusk

  1. Dawn-dusk magnetosheath plasma asymmetries at 60 earth radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, M. A.; Freeman, J. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A study of data from the Apollo lunar surface suprathermal ion detector experiment (Side) package shows that plasma flow and energy parameters in the dusk magnetosheath are much better correlated with geomagnetic activity than those in the dawn magnetosheath. This result is in agreement with a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the magnetosheath magnetic field and in the bow shock configuration. The different orientations between the mean interplanetary magnetic field direction and the shock normal for the magnetosheaths suggest an explanation of the difference in the plasma parameters on the two sides.

  2. Dawn-dusk asymmetry in the northward IMF plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, S.; Johnson, J. R.; Newell, P. T.; Meng, C.

    2005-05-01

    During periods of northward IMF, as a result of large influx of the magnetosheath ions, the plasma sheet becomes cold and dense. During these periods, a large number of the plasma sheet ions have two components: hot (magnetospheric origin) and cold (magnetosheath origin). Based on their spectral distributions: one-component Maxwellian, two-component Maxwellian, and kappa (k), the characteristics of the plasma sheet ions were studied with DMSP satellites and a method of inferring plasma sheet ion properties from the ionospheric observations. The cold-component constituent of the two-component ions is hotter in the dawn than the dusk sector, consistent with the in situ studies that suggest that the magnetosheath ion is heated upon its entry along the plasma sheet dawn flank. This temperature asymmetry leads to a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the ion spectral distribution. The cold and hot components are closer together in temperature space, which increases the proportion of ions having (apparent) one-component distribution in the dawn flank while, in the dusk flank, the influx of the magnetosheath ions increase the density of the two-component ions. The dawn-dusk asymmetry in the cold magnetosheath ion profile should help determine the roles of various proposed magnetosheath entry mechanisms.

  3. Dawn-Dusk Asymmetries in Rapidly Rotating Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; Kivelson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Spacecraft measurements reveal perplexing dawn-dusk asymmetries of field and plasma properties in the magnetospheres of Saturn and Jupiter. Here we describe a previously unrecognized source of dawn-dusk asymmetry in a rapidly rotating magnetosphere. As plasma rotates from dawn to noon on a dipolarizing flux tube, it flows away from the equator at close to the sound speed. As plasma rotates from noon to dusk on a stretching flux tube, it is accelerated back to the equator by centrifugal acceleration at flow speeds typically smaller than the sound speed. Correspondingly, the plasma sheet remains far thicker in the afternoon than in the morning. Using two magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we analyze the forces that account for flows along and across the field in Saturn's magnetosphere and point out analogous effects at Jupiter. Different radial force balance in the morning and afternoon sectors produces net dusk to dawn flow, or equivalently, a large-scale electric field oriented from post-noon to pre-midnight.

  4. A dawn to dusk electric field in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.; Ip, W. I.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that if Io-injected plasma is lost via a planetary wind-fixed Birkeland current system may result. This is due to the fact that the azimuthal centrifugal current flows across a density gradient produced by the loss of plasma through the planetary wind in the tail. The divergent centrifugal current is connected to field-aligned Birkeland currents which flow into the ionosphere at dawn and out of it at dusk. The closure currents in the ionosphere require a dawn to dusk electric field which at the orbit of Io is estimated to have a strength of 0.2 mV/m. However, the values of crucial parameters are not well known and the field at Io's orbit may well be significantly larger. Independent estimates derived from the local time asymmetry of the torus UV emission indicate a field of 1.5 mV/m.

  5. Dawn-dusk asymmetry in the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at Mercury.

    PubMed

    Paral, Jan; Rankin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The NASA MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered orbital phase around Mercury on 18 March 2011. A surprising consistent feature in the data returned is large-scale vortices that form exclusively on the dusk side of the magnetosphere. Here we present global kinetic hybrid simulations that explain these observations. It is shown that vortices are excited by a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability near the subsolar point, which grows convectively along the dusk-side magnetopause. Virtual time series along a track approximating a flyby of the MESSENGER show correspondence with the satellite data; the data contain sawtooth oscillations in plasma density, flow and magnetic field, and exhibit the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry. It is shown that asymmetry between dawn and dusk at Mercury is controlled by the finite gyroradius of ions and by convection electric fields. Mercury's magnetosphere offers a natural laboratory for studying plasma regimes not present in other planetary magnetospheres or the laboratory. PMID:23552060

  6. Exploration of tangential discontinuity structure of the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keyser, Johan; Maes, Lukas; Maggiolo, Romain; Haaland, Stein

    2015-04-01

    This contribution explores the tangential discontinuity configurations that are possible at the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause. The motivation for this study is the recent finding that the magnetopause current layer seems to be on average slightly thicker at the dawn flank than at dusk. The study is carried out by considering typical magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasma properties adjacent to the magnetopause and finding out which internal magnetopause structure is compatible with the given properties, if any. This is done by repeatedly running a kinetic model that self-consistently computes the internal structure of the tangential discontinuity magnetopause. The conclusions of this study support the viewpoint that, apart from dawn-dusk differences in the magnetosheath and/or magnetospheric conditions, one also has to consider an intrinsic asymmetry. For low magnetic shear in particular, the vxB electric field, with v the magnetosheath flow and B the geomagnetic field, points outward at dawn and inward at dusk. This convection electric field combines with the Chapman-Ferraro electric field that stems from the charge separation between the ions and electrons inside the magnetopause. Due to their different gyroradii, ions and electrons respond differently to a change of sign of the convection electric field, thus leading to dawn-dusk asymmetry of the internal structure of the magnetopause.

  7. Structure of the ionized lunar sodium and potassium exosphere: Dawn-dusk asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Shoichiro; Tanaka, Takaaki; Saito, Yoshifumi; Asamura, Kazushi; Nishino, Masaki N.; Fujimoto, Masaki; Tsunakawa, Hideo; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Takahashi, Futoshi

    2014-04-01

    We present latitude and longitude distributions of Na+ and K+ fluxes from the Moon derived from Kaguya low-energy ion data. Although the latitude distribution agrees with previous ground-based telescope observations, dawn-dusk asymmetry has been determined in the longitude distribution. Our model of the lunar surface abundance and yield of Na and K demonstrates that the abundance decreases to approximately 50% at dusk compared with that at dawn due to the emission of the exospheric particles assuming the ion fluxes observed by Kaguya are proportional to the yield. It is also implied that the surface abundance of Na and K need to be supplied during the night to explain the observed lunar exosphere with dawn-dusk asymmetry. We argue that the interplanetary dust as well as grain diffusion and migration/recycling of the exospheric particles may be major suppliers.

  8. Temporal variations in the dawn and dusk midlatitude trough position-modeled and measured (Ariel 3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Tulunay, Y. K.; Chen, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The temporal development of the latitudinal position of the 600 km midlatitude electron density trough at dawn and dusk during the period 25-27 May 1967, which encompassed a large magnetic storm, was measured by the RF capacitive probe on the polar orbiting Ariel 3 satellite. The substorm-related changes in the L coordinate of the trough minimum and the point of most rapid change of density gradient on the low latitude side of the trough are similar. Oscillations of the trough position at dusk are in phase with substorm activity whereas movement of the trough at dawn is only apparent with the onset of the large storm. Near dusk there is evidence of structure in the form of a tail-like extension of the plasmasphere at the peak of the storm. Detailed model calculations assuming a spatially invariant equatorial convection E field which varies in step with K sub p index reproduces much of the observed behavior, particularly at dusk, and shows that more than one plasmapause-type transition may be identifiable in the trough region.

  9. Dawn-dusk asymmetries in rotating magnetospheres: Lessons from modeling Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xianzhe; Kivelson, Margaret G.

    2016-02-01

    Spacecraft measurements reveal perplexing dawn-dusk asymmetries of field and plasma properties in the magnetospheres of Saturn and Jupiter. Here we describe a previously unrecognized source of dawn-dusk asymmetry in a rapidly rotating magnetosphere. We analyze two magnetohydrodynamic simulations, focusing on how flows along and across the field vary with local time in Saturn's dayside magnetosphere. As plasma rotates from dawn to noon on a dipolarizing flux tube, it flows away from the equator along the flux tube at roughly half of the sound speed (Cs), the maximum speed at which a bulk plasma can flow along a flux tube into a lower pressure region. As plasma rotates from noon to dusk on a stretching flux tube, the field-aligned component of its centripetal acceleration decreases and it flows back toward the equator at speeds typically smaller than 1/2 Cs. Correspondingly, the plasma sheet remains far thicker and the field less stretched in the afternoon than in the morning. Different radial force balance in the morning and afternoon sectors produce asymmetry in the plasma sheet thickness and a net dusk-to-dawn flow inside of L = 15 or equivalently, a large-scale electric field (E) oriented from postnoon to premidnight, as reported from observations. Morning-afternoon asymmetry analogous to that found at Saturn has been observed at Jupiter, and a noon-midnight component of E cannot be ruled out.

  10. Simultaneous measurements of the thermospheric wind profile at three separate positions in the dusk auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, I. S.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Larsen, M. F.; Kelley, M. C.; Vickrey, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the present three-dimensional wind field observations in the dusk auroral oval, the F region winds appear to be at the transition from a clockwise vortex centered at dusk to an antisunward flow at the nightside of the polar cap, while the E region winds seem to be part of a gravity wave with a wind amplitude of 125 m/sec. The wave period is found to be close to three hours, on the basis of the ratio of the magnitude of the wind component normal to the direction of wave propagation to the magnitude parallel to the direction of propagation. The observations show that significant energy resides in the divergent motions that are part of the transient response in the E region, at least in this case.

  11. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter - Part 1: Dawn-dusk brightness asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfond, B.; Gustin, J.; Gérard, J.-C.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.; Palmaerts, B.; Badman, S. V.; Khurana, K. K.; Tao, C.

    2015-10-01

    The main auroral emission at Jupiter generally appears as a quasi-closed curtain centered around the magnetic pole. This auroral feature, which accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range, is related to corotation enforcement currents in the middle magnetosphere. Early models for these currents assumed axisymmetry, but significant local time variability is obvious on any image of the Jovian aurorae. Here we use far-UV images from the Hubble Space Telescope to further characterize these variations on a statistical basis. We show that the dusk side sector is ~ 3 times brighter than the dawn side in the southern hemisphere and ~ 1.1 brighter in the northern hemisphere, where the magnetic anomaly complicates the interpretation of the measurements. We suggest that such an asymmetry between the dawn and the dusk sectors could be the result of a partial ring current in the nightside magnetosphere.

  12. Magnetosheath dawn-dusk asymmetries and their impact on solar wind - magnetosphere coupling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, Andrew; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Nykyri, Katariina

    2016-07-01

    Through simulated and experimental investigations it is well established that from a statistical standpoint, the majority of plasma properties in the magnetosheath are asymmetric between the dawn (quasi-parallel) and dusk (quasi-perpendicular) flanks. To investigate this, we have compiled a 5 year database comprising of THEMIS magnetosheath measurements which are adjusted for boundary motion, planetary aberration, and changes in the upstream solar wind state. We quantify numerous asymmetries, determine their dependency on solar wind parameters, and show that coupling to solar wind properties vary between different asymmetries. In addition, using a combination our statistical data and local Hall MHD simulations, we show that magnetosheath dawn-dusk asymmetries play a role in the efficiency of the Kelvin Helmholtz Instability and its associated plasma transport. We also discuss the global impact from magnetosheath asymmetries on magnetospheric plasma conditions such as asymmetries reported in the cold dense plasma sheet.

  13. A dawn-to-dusk electric field in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Goertz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that if Io-injected plasma is lost via a planetary wind a sun-fixed Birkeland current system may result. This is due to the fact that a current flows across a density gradient produced by the loss of plasma through the planetary wind in the tail. The divergent current is connected to field-aligned Birkeland currents which flow into the ionosphere at dawn and out of it at dusk. The closure currents in the ionosphere require a dawn-to-dusk electric field which at the orbit of Io is estimated to have a strength of a few mV/m. Independent estimates derived from the local time asymmetry of the torus u.v. emission indicate a field of 1.5 mV/m.

  14. Light pollution alters the phenology of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, Arnaud; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Artificial night lighting is expanding globally, but its ecological consequences remain little understood. Animals often use changes in day length as a cue to time seasonal behaviour. Artificial night lighting may influence the perception of day length, and may thus affect both circadian and circannual rhythms. Over a 3.5 month period, from winter to breeding, we recorded daily singing activity of six common songbird species in 12 woodland sites, half of which were affected by street lighting. We previously reported on analyses suggesting that artificial night lighting affects the daily timing of singing in five species. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of artificial night lighting is also associated with the seasonal occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. We found that in four species dawn and dusk singing developed earlier in the year at sites exposed to light pollution. We also examined the effects of weather conditions and found that rain and low temperatures negatively affected the occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. Our results support the hypothesis that artificial night lighting alters natural seasonal rhythms, independently of other effects of urbanization. The fitness consequences of the observed changes in seasonal timing of behaviour remain unknown. PMID:25780238

  15. Light pollution alters the phenology of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Arnaud; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-05-01

    Artificial night lighting is expanding globally, but its ecological consequences remain little understood. Animals often use changes in day length as a cue to time seasonal behaviour. Artificial night lighting may influence the perception of day length, and may thus affect both circadian and circannual rhythms. Over a 3.5 month period, from winter to breeding, we recorded daily singing activity of six common songbird species in 12 woodland sites, half of which were affected by street lighting. We previously reported on analyses suggesting that artificial night lighting affects the daily timing of singing in five species. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of artificial night lighting is also associated with the seasonal occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. We found that in four species dawn and dusk singing developed earlier in the year at sites exposed to light pollution. We also examined the effects of weather conditions and found that rain and low temperatures negatively affected the occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. Our results support the hypothesis that artificial night lighting alters natural seasonal rhythms, independently of other effects of urbanization. The fitness consequences of the observed changes in seasonal timing of behaviour remain unknown. PMID:25780238

  16. The effects of selection for early (day) and late (dusk) mating lines of hybrids of Bactrocera tryoni and Bactrocera neohumeralis.

    PubMed

    Meats, A; Pike, N; An, X; Raphael, K; Wang, W Y S

    2003-11-01

    Bactrocera neohumeralis and Bactrocera tryoni are closely related tephritid fruit fly species. B. neohumeralis mates throughout the day (in bright light) and B. tryoni mates at dusk. The two species can also be distinguished by the colour of their calli (prothoracic sclerites) which are brown and yellow, respectively. The F1 hybrids can mate both in bright light just before dusk and during dusk and have calli that are partly brown and partly yellow. The F2 hybrids have a wider range of callus patterns and mating occurs more widely in the day as well as at dusk. We directly selected hybrid stocks for mating time, creating 'early' (day-mating) and 'late' (dusk-mating) lines. As an apparently inadvertent consequence, the two types of line respectively had predominantly brown and predominantly yellow calli and thus came to closely resemble the original two species in both behaviour and appearance. Lines that were evenly selected (half for day and half for dusk) essentially retained the mating pattern of F2 hybrids. Selection for callus colour alone also affected the distribution of mating times in a predictable way. We propose a genetical model to account for the results and discuss them in the light of the apparent maintenance of species integrity in nature. PMID:14686607

  17. Dawn-dusk asymmetry and adiabatic dynamic of the radiation belt electrons during magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazutin, Leonid L.

    2016-09-01

    The changes of the latitudinal profiles of outer belt energetic electrons during magnetic storms are mostly explained by the precipitation into the loss cone caused by VLF and EMIC waves or by the scattering into the magnetopause. In present work, energetic electron dynamics during magnetic storm of August 29-30, 2004 we attributed at most to the adiabatic transformation of the magnetic drift trajectories and Dst effect. This conclusion was based on the analysis of dawn-dusk asymmetry of the electron latitudinal profiles measured by low altitude polar orbiter SERVIS-1 and on the coincidence of pre-storm and after-storm profiles of radiation belt electrons and protons.

  18. Dominance of toroidal oscillations in dawn/dusk sectors: A consequence of solar wind pressure variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A. K.; Rajaram, R.

    2003-02-01

    The pressure variations in the solar wind produce the oscillations in surface currents at the magnetopause boundary in order to nullify the pressure imbalance. These currents introduce compressional variations in the magnetic field within the magnetosphere. The response of transverse field line oscillations to such changes in the magnetic field has been brought out in perfectly reflecting ionospheric conditions. The analysis clearly shows that the fundamental toroidal modes are dominant in the dawn and the dusk sectors as revealed by the statistical studies of pulsations observed by the satellite AMPTE/CCE (Anderson et al., 1990). It is traditionally believed that such oscillations are mainly driven by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability (Anderson et al., 1990). Our analysis shows that the dominance of fundamental toroidal modes in the dawn and dusk sectors can also be explained in terms of response to impressed pressure impulses without invoking K-H instability. The analysis also shows that poloidal modes do not exhibit any longitudinal structures. These results are consistent with the observations (Anderson et al., 1990).

  19. Coherent HF radar backscatter from small-scale irregularities in the dusk sector of the subauroral ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Villain, J.-P.; Baker, K. B.; Newell, P. T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the characteristics of backscatter from decameter-scale ionospheric plasma density irregualarities, observed with an impressive regularity by the Goose Bay (Labrador) high-frequency (HF) radar in the dusk sector of the winter ionosphere, and discusses the relation of the scatter to the midlatitude trough. It is shown that this dusk scatter can be readily distinguished from other types of late afternoon/early evening scatter by the extreme equatorward position of its source region and by the low values of its associated radar Doppler velocities (not above 200 m/s) and spectral widths (not more than 200 m/s). A comparison of the radar observations with nearly simultaneous particle precipitation data obtained with the DMSP F6 satellite demonstrated that the source region of the backscatter lies within the subauroral ionosphere. It is shown that the characteristics of dusk scatter are compatible with the Spiro et al. (1978) model of the electrodynamics of the midlatitude trough.

  20. F region dusk ion temperature spikes at the equatorward edge of the high-latitude convection pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, L.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.; Richards, P.; Nicolls, M.; Hairston, M.

    2014-01-01

    Using Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar data from the International Polar Year, we observed unexpected short-lived enhancements of a few 100 K in the F region ion temperature, or "Ti spikes", in conjunction with sharp F region plasma density drops near the dusk plasmapause. The geomagnetic conditions were moderately to weakly disturbed and the dusk spikes were often the largest Ti values recorded within the day. Taking various other observations into consideration, we conclude that the radar observed ion frictional heating events driven by large ion-neutral relative drifts caused by temporary intensifications in the convection pattern. The heating rate was enhanced through an increase in the size of the convection pattern, causing the neutrals just poleward of the dusk plasmapause to be moving antisunward while ions were moving sunward.

  1. The Dusk Chorus from an Owl Perspective: Eagle Owls Vocalize When Their White Throat Badge Contrasts Most

    PubMed Central

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, Maria del Mar

    2009-01-01

    Background An impressive number of studies have investigated bird vocal displays, and many of them have tried to explain the widespread phenomenon of the so-called dawn and dusk chorus, the sunrise and sunset peaks in bird song output. As many as twelve non-exclusive hypotheses have been proposed to explain why twilight peaks in vocal display might be advantageous; but, even after more than two decades of study, the basis underlying the dusk and dawn chorus is still unclear. Moreover, to date, the majority of studies on this topic have focused on songbirds. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigate here a novel hypothesis on why nocturnal birds with patches of white feathers call at twilight. We propose that white plumage patches and the timing of visual signaling have co-evolved to maximize the effectiveness of social communication such as the dusk chorus. This hypothesis centers on the recent discovery that eagle owls can adopt specific forms of visual signaling and is supported by the observation that adult eagle owls possess a white throat badge that is only visible during vocal displays. By monitoring the calling of eagle owls at dusk, a peak time for bird call output, we found that white throat badges contrasted most with the surrounding background during the owls' twilight chorusing. Conclusions/Significance Crepuscular and nocturnal species appear to have evolved white patches that, shown in association with vocal displays, allow them to communicate in dark surroundings. The evolution of a white badge that operates jointly with call displays at dawn and dusk may be relevant to the eagle owls' social dynamics. Our explanation for the dusk chorus may possibly represent an overlooked but common pattern of signaling among crepuscular and nocturnal birds that combine patches of white feathers with twilight displays. Furthermore, our findings could be relevant to songbirds that breed in dark forest habitats and have contrasting white badges, as well as birds

  2. Possible Signatures Of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves On The Dusk Flank Of The Kronian Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Jack; Masters, Adam; Dougherty, Michele; Lucek, Elizabeth; Kanani, Sheila

    2010-05-01

    A comprehensive survey of crossings of both Saturn's magnetopause and bow shock on the dusk side between January 2007 and December 2007 was compiled, using data from the Cassini fluxgate magnetometer and the Cassini electron spectrometer. Bow shock and magnetopause crossings were determined by the criteria discussed in Masters et al., 2008 and Masters et al., 2009 [1] respectively. 396 magnetopause crossings and 165 bow shock crossings were identified with large spatial variation; the high temporal frequency of crossings combined with the large radial variation was indicative of highly dynamic boundaries. A set of magnetopause crossings occurring near the nose of the magnetopause on the 30th June and 1st July 2007 were then analysed using minimum variance analysis (MVA) of the magnetic field vectors over the crossing interval to determine the direction of the boundary normal at each crossing. Using MVA analysis again to calculate the maximum variance direction of the magnetopause normals, I found a clear preferred direction of variance of the normals. The normals were found to deviate by an average of 30° about the average normal direction in the plane of maximum variance, but only by 12° in the perpendicular plane. The observed oscillation of dawn side crossing normals (Masters et al., 2009) was not present throughout the whole dusk set, but was present for subsets, which is suggestive of wave activity. Considering the orientation between the magnetospheric magnetic field and the direction of maximum variance of the normals, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability is the likely driving force of these boundary perturbations. Current work involves analyzing two further magnetopause crossing sets, one further dusk-ward and one closer to noon (SLT), to identify whether K-H waves are also present at these locations. [1] Masters, A.; McAndrews, H. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.; Billingham, L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Sergis, N

  3. Vertical velocities and momentum fluxes derived from wind measurements in the dusk auroral oval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.; Mikkelsen, I. S.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on a chemical release experiment carried out on March 20, 1985 in connection with NASA's Cooperative Observations of Polar Electrodynamics I campaign. Simultaneous neutral wind measurements in E region were carried out at three separate locations over a triangular region with sides of about 150 km in the dusk auroral oval, and the three wind profiles were used to calculate values of divergence and vorticity over the area. The vertical velocity over the hight range was calculated using the mass continuity equation, and the instantaneous vertical momentum fluxes in the E region were derived using the combination of horizontal-wind measurements and calculated vertical velocities. Results show that there is strong coupling between layers in the E region and that the momentum-flux-induced accelerations are at least comparable in magnitude to the pressure gradient and Coriolis force accelerations.

  4. Neutral winds and electric fields in the dusk auroral oval. I - Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelsen, I. S.; Jorgensen, T. S.; Kelley, M. C.; Larsen, M. F.; Pereira, E.; Vickrey, J.

    1981-01-01

    Two rockets carrying an upleg and downleg trimethyl aluminum chemical trail release and three barium cannisters were launched from Poker Flat, Alaska on Feb. 28, 1978 and Mar. 2, 1978 in order to study neutral winds and electric fields in the dusk auroral oval. Electric field measurements were also made with a radar system to supplement the barium cloud data. The barium cloud drifts on both days showed intense poleward electric fields in the subauroral region. The drifts were nearly latitude-independent and were equivalent to electric fields of 60 mV/m of February 2 and 40 mV/m on March 2. The data indicate that the Lorentz force and Joule heating had a strong influence on the observed neutral winds.

  5. Weak auroral emissions and particle precipitations in the dusk auroral oval

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T.; Hirasawa, T. ); Ching-I. Meng )

    1989-09-01

    Faint auroral displays in the low-latitude region of the duskside auroral oval were examined by using 5577 A, 6300 A, and 4861 A auroral images from three monochromatic all-sky television cameras at Syowa Station, Antarctica, and simultaneous precipitating auroral particle data obtained by the U.S. Air Force/Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (USAF/DMSP) F6 satellite. In the low-latitude region of the duskside auroral oval, we found three types of auroral displays with weak optical intensity: (1) proton auroras, (2) pulsating auroras, and (3) faint discrete auroral arcs distinct only in the 6300 A emission. In usual cases, the energy input into this region is mostly carried y proton precipitations to produce proton auroras mainly at wavelengths of 4861 A and 5577 A. Pulsating features are sometimes observed in the diffuse auroral region in the dusk sector. Comparing auroral images with the nearly simultaneous data of precipitating auroral particles, we confirmed that the pulsating auroras are associated with the intensification of precipitating electron flux from the central plasma sheet. Furthermore, electrons are the main contributors to the energy input into the duskside auroral oval in this case. We also found that discrete auroras sometimes appeared in the 6300 A images, but not in images at other wavelengths. They appear in the equatorial part of the dusk auroral oval. These 6300 A discrete auroras correspond to weak precipitation spikes of low-energy electrons simultaneously measured by DMSP satellites. The flux and average energy of these electron spikes are about 10{sup 8}/(cm{sup 2} sr s) and 100 eV, respectively. They are intense enough to excite 6300 A emissions but not 5577 A emissions, as detected from the ground observations. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  6. Dawn and Dusk Set States of the Circadian Oscillator in Sprouting Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Weiwei; Clausen, Jenni; Boden, Scott; Oliver, Sandra N.; Casao, M. Cristina; Ford, Brett; Anderssen, Robert S.; Trevaskis, Ben

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock is an internal timekeeper that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the external environment. The transcript levels of clock genes, which oscillate to control circadian outputs, were examined during early seedling development in barley (Hordeum vulgare), a model for temperate cereal crops. Oscillations of clock gene transcript levels do not occur in barley seedlings grown in darkness or constant light but were observed with day-night cycles. A dark-to-light transition influenced transcript levels of some clock genes but triggered only weak oscillations of gene expression, whereas a light-to-dark transition triggered robust oscillations. Single light pulses of 6, 12 or 18 hours induced robust oscillations. The light-to-dark transition was the primary determinant of the timing of subsequent peaks of clock gene expression. After the light-to-dark transition the timing of peak transcript levels of clock gene also varied depending on the length of the preceding light pulse. Thus, a single photoperiod can trigger initiation of photoperiod-dependent circadian rhythms in barley seedlings. Photoperiod-specific rhythms of clock gene expression were observed in two week old barley plants. Changing the timing of dusk altered clock gene expression patterns within a single day, showing that alteration of circadian oscillator behaviour is amongst the most rapid molecular responses to changing photoperiod in barley. A barley EARLY FLOWERING3 mutant, which exhibits rapid photoperiod–insensitive flowering behaviour, does not establish clock rhythms in response to a single photoperiod. The data presented show that dawn and dusk cues are important signals for setting the state of the circadian oscillator during early development of barley and that the circadian oscillator of barley exhibits photoperiod-dependent oscillation states. PMID:26068005

  7. MMS Observations of magnetospheric fast ion flows and magnetic dipolarization near the dusk-meridian flank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Craig; Chen, Li-Jen; Wang, Shan; Torbert, Roy; Russell, Christopher; Reiff, Patricia; Giles, Barbara; Burch, James

    2016-04-01

    The concept of a magnetic dipolarization front propagating earthward through Earth's magnetotail and accompanied by fast earthward ion flows, both as consequences of magnetic reconnection occurring tail-ward of an observation point, is well known. Examples of this phenomenology have recently been referred to as reconnection fronts. It is less common to imagine similar signature sets in contexts other than the imagined noon-midnight magnetotail configuration. Nevertheless, signatures of 800 km/s earthward ion flows were observed contemporaneously with distinct but temporary increases in the GSE-z component of the magnetic field at a geocentric distance of the order of 10 RE, in the vicinity (but somewhat tail-ward) of Earth's equatorial dusk terminator on August 12, 2015. These observations were obtained using the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) and the Fields electric fields experiment on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. Several interesting questions arise as to the nature of the observed plasma and field signatures and their drivers in cases such as this. To what degree are they analogous to the magnetotail reconnection fronts previously alluded to? And, to the degree that they are, what kind of reconnection geometry can we envision as giving rise to these signatures at such a location? We will present sample observations and discuss their significance from this point of view.

  8. Sunbeams from mirrors in dawn-dusk orbit for earth solar power fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.

    2013-09-01

    There are two problems limiting solar electric power. The amount of sunlight is limited and there is no sunlight during peak demand in the evening hours. These problems can be addressed by placing light weight mirror satellite constellations in sun synchronous dawn to dusk low earth orbits in space at an altitude of 1000 km. These satellites can deflect sunbeams down to an array of solar power stations distributed near major population centers around the earth. These solar PV earth stations are already being built. The additional solar energy provided in the early morning and evening hours can potentially reduce the cost of solar electricity at the ground sites to less than 6 cents per kWh. Herein, a specific mirror satellite design concept is proposed with the idea that if one practical mirror satellite can be built, it then can be replicated as many times as required for a specific mission. The proposed mirror satellite is comprised of a lightweight thin aluminized mirror membrane stretched flat by three radial spokes telescoping out from a central body. Control moment gyros similar to those used in the International Space Station (ISS) are mounted inside the central body of the mirror satellite for attitude control and sunbeam pointing. The three spokes collapse and the mirror membrane is folded such that several of these mirror satellites can potentially be stowed inside the fairing of today's available rockets for launch and deployment.

  9. A DE-1/whistler study of the thermal plasma structure and dynamics in the dusk bulge sector of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain new understanding of the thermal plasma structure and dynamics of the plasmasphere bulge region of the magnetosphere, with special emphasis on the erosion process that results in a reduction in plasmasphere size and on the manner in which erosion leads to the presence of patches of dense plasma in the middle and outer afternoon-dusk magnetosphere. Case studies involving data from the DE 1, GEOS 2, and ISEE 1 satellites and from ground whistler stations Siple, Halley, and Kerguelen were used. A copy of the published paper entitled 'A case study of plasma structure in the dusk sector associated with enhanced magnetospheric convection,' is included.

  10. Dawn-dusk asymmetry of the appearance of low-latitude mantle plasma in the magnetotail observed by ARTEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle plasma sometimes appears at low latitudes in the magnetotail and at times is mixed with the plasma sheet boundary layer plasma. Because of its density is substantially higher than the lobe plasma, the low-latitude mantle provides more particles into the tail plasma sheet than do the lobes. To investigate where and when the low-latitude mantle plasma appears, we have identified its appearance using the two ARTEMIS satellites from Oct 2010 to Dec 2012 in the magnetotail from X ~ -40 to -80 Re. The mantle plasma flows tailward along magnetic field lines with speed from ~50 to 200 km/s, and at the same time drift toward midnight and toward the equator. Its density is similar to that in the plasma sheet but its temperature is about an order of magnitude lower. Its occurrence rate can be up to 50% near the flanks and it decreases with decreasing |Y| to nearly 0% at midnight. The appearance shows a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry that depends on the IMF By direction. In the region above (below) the current sheet, it appears dominantly in the post-midnight (pre-midnight) sector when IMF By is positive (negative). The occurrence rates and the dawn-dusk asymmetries are similar for both northward and southward IMF conditions. The BATS-R-US simulations for N IMF show that the magnetopause reconnection locations and the magnetopause shape in the magnetotail change significantly with the IMF clock angles. As IMF By becomes positively larger, the magnetopause reconnection site above (below) the current sheet moves toward lower latitudes to the dawn (dusk) side. Also the magnetopause shape becomes flatter with the Z distance from the magnetopause to the current sheet becomes smaller. As a result, the plasma mantles move to lower latitudes and become closer to the plasma sheet, and the appearance of the mantle plasma becomes more dawn-dusk asymmetric.

  11. SAR arc observation as the mapping of plasmasphere dusk-bulge during a magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor; Parnikov, Stanislav

    2016-07-01

    The stable auroral red (SAR) arcs are the consequence of interaction of the outer plasmasphere (plasmapause) with energetic ions of the ring current. In this work we analyze the observation of aurorae and SAR arc with the all-sky imager (ASI) at the Yakutsk meridian (130ºE; 200ºE, geom.) during the magnetic storm main phase on March 17, 2015. ASI registers the SAR arc with a maximum of its intensity and the latitude on the westward horizon of station from the start of observations at ~1116 UT during the decrease of magnetic activity after the main phase onset of magnetic storm at ~0630 UT. The measurements of the thermal ion fluxes with ECT HOPE Instrument aboard the Van Allen Probes B satellite at ~1230 UT testify to a plasmapause location on L ~ 3.5 at the meridian ~1825 MLT. The inner boundary of the energetic H+ and O+ ions flux has been registered by the satellite on L ~ 2.8-3.3 at the meridian ~ 1800 MLT at 1210-1220 UT. At this time ASI observes SAR arc up to a meridian 1840 MLT on the westward horizon of station. Further the dynamics of aurorae in the 557.7, 630.0, 470.9 and 486.1 (Hβ) nm emissions owing to sharp changes in the solar wind and during three substorms is observed. We consider differences in the precipitation dynamics of energetic protons and electrons during substorms. It is shown that the SAR arc registered with ASI maps the ring current overlap with the region of plasmasphere dusk-bulge or plume. The research is supported by RFBR grant No 15-05-02372 a.

  12. Dusk-to-nighttime enhancement of mid-latitude NmF2 in local summer: inter-hemispheric asymmetry and solar activity dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Liu, L.; Le, H.; Wan, W.; Zhang, H.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper ionosonde observations in the East Asia-Australia sector were collected to investigate dusk-to-nighttime enhancement of mid-latitude summer NmF2 (maximum electron density of the F2 layer) within the framework of NmF2 diurnal variation. NmF2 were normalized to two solar activity levels to investigate the dependence of the dusk-to-nighttime enhancement on solar activity. The dusk-to-nighttime enhancement of NmF2 is more evident at Northern Hemisphere stations than at Southern Hemisphere stations, with a remarkable latitudinal dependence. The dusk-to-nighttime enhancement shows both increasing and declining trends with solar activity increasing, which is somewhat different from previous conclusions. The difference in the dusk-to-nighttime enhancement between Southern Hemisphere and Northern Hemisphere stations is possibly related to the offset of the geomagnetic axis from the geographic axis. hmF2 (peak height of the F2 layer) diurnal variations show that daytime hmF2 begins to increase much earlier at low solar activity level than at high solar activity level at northern Akita and Wakkanai stations where the dusk-to-nighttime enhancement is more prominent at low solar activity level than at high solar activity level. That implies neutral wind phase is possibly also important for nighttime enhancement.

  13. The dawn-dusk asymmetry of ion density in the dayside magnetosheath and its annual variability measured by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, Andrew P.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.; Osmane, Adnane; Nykyri, Katariina

    2016-05-01

    The local and global plasma properties in the magnetosheath play a fundamental role in regulating solar wind-magnetosphere coupling processes. However, the magnetosheath is a complex region to characterise as it has been shown theoretically, observationally and through simulations that plasma properties are inhomogeneous, non-isotropic and asymmetric about the Sun-Earth line. To complicate matters, dawn-dusk asymmetries are sensitive to various changes in the upstream conditions on an array of timescales. The present paper focuses exclusively on dawn-dusk asymmetries, in particularly that of ion density. We present a statistical study using THEMIS data of the dawn-dusk asymmetry of ion density in the dayside magnetosheath and its long-term variations between 2009 and 2015. Our data suggest that, in general, the dawn-side densities are higher, and the asymmetry grows from noon towards the terminator. This trend was only observed close to the magnetopause and not in the central magnetosheath. In addition, between 2009 and 2015, the largest asymmetry occurred around 2009 decreasing thereafter. We also concluded that no single parameter such as the Alfvén Mach number, plasma velocity, or the interplanetary magnetic field strength could exclusively account for the observed asymmetry. Interestingly, the dependence on Alfvén Mach number differed between data sets from different time periods. The asymmetry obtained in the THEMIS data set is consistent with previous studies, but the solar cycle dependence was opposite to an analysis based on IMP-8 data. We discuss the physical mechanisms for this asymmetry and its temporal variation. We also put the current results into context with the existing literature in order to relate THEMIS era measurements to those made during earlier solar cycles.

  14. Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves Along the Dusk-Side Boundary of Mercury's Magnetosphere During MESSENGER's Third Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardsen, Scott A.; Sundberg, Torgjoern; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Solomon, Sean C.; Blomberg, Lars G.

    2010-01-01

    During the third MESSENGER flyby of Mercury on 29 September 2009, 15 crossings of the dusk-side magnetopause were observed in the magnetic field data over a 2-min period, during which the spacecraft traveled a distance of 0.2 R(sub M) (where R(sub M) is Mercury's radius). The quasi-periodic nature of the magnetic field variations during the crossings, the characteristic time separations of approx.16 s between pairs of crossings, and the variations of the magnetopause normal directions indicate that the signals are likely the signature of surface waves highly steepened at their leading edge that arose from the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. At Earth, the Kelvin- Helmholtz instability is believed to lead to the turbulent transport of solar wind plasma into Earth's plasma sheet. This solar wind entry mechanism could also be important at Mercury. Citation: Boardsen, S. A., T. Sundberg, J. A.Slavin, B. J. Anderson, H. Korth, S. C. Solomon, and L. G. Blomberg (2010), Observations of Kelvin-Helmholtz waves along the dusk-side boundary of Mercury s magnetosphere during MESSENGER's third flyby,

  15. Additional stratifications in the equatorial F region at dawn and dusk during geomagnetic storms: Role of electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreeja, V.; Balan, N.; Ravindran, Sudha; Pant, Tarun Kumar; Sridharan, R.; Bailey, G. J.

    2009-08-01

    The role of electrodynamics in producing additional stratifications in the equatorial F region (F 3 layer) at dawn and dusk during geomagnetic storms is discussed. Two cases of F 3 layer at dawn (0600-0730 LT on 5 October 2000 and 8 December 2000) and one case of F 3 layer at dusk (1600-1730 LT on 5 October 2000) are observed, for the first time, by the digital ionosonde at the equatorial station Trivandrum (8.5°N 77°E dip ˜ 0.5°N) in India. The unusual F 3 layers occurred during the geomagnetic storms and are associated with southward turning of interplanetary magnetic field B z , suggesting that eastward prompt penetration electric field could be the main cause of the F 3 layers. The dawn F 3 layer on 5 October is modeled using the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model by using the E × B drift estimated from the real height variation of the ionospheric peak during the morning period. The model qualitatively reproduces the dawn F 3 layer. While the existing F 2 layer rapidly drifts upward and forms the F 3 layer and topside ledge, a new layer forming at lower heights develops into the normal F 2 layer.

  16. Dawn-dusk asymmetry in solar wind ion entry and dayside precipitation: Results from large-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, J.; Richard, R.; Escoubet, P.; Wing, S.; Pitout, F.

    2014-03-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of the interaction of solar wind ions with the dayside magnetospheric boundary for a southward interplanetary magnetic field and two solar wind speeds (250 and 500 km/s) using the results of global magnetohydrodynamics simulations in conjunction with large-scale kinetic calculations. Results of these studies show that a dawn-dusk asymmetry is found in the precipitation of low- to middle-energy ions over the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere. This asymmetry is consistent with statistical studies of DMSP data showing that ion precipitation from the mantle is predominantly seen over the morning and prenoon sector. Analysis of energy-latitude spectra and study of individual particle trajectories from the simulations revealed that low-energy ions can enter the magnetopause at high latitudes in regions where the parallel electric field associated with the magnetopause current is positive and strong enough for the ions to gain energies of the order of the parallel potential drop across the magnetopause. Because the parallel electric field in the Northern Hemisphere is positive in the prenoon sector and negative in the afternoon-evening sector, solar wind ions reaching the magnetopause in these regions are accelerated toward the ionosphere on the dawnside and outward on the duskside, creating the asymmetry in precipitation. The same dawn-dusk asymmetry is found in the Southern Hemisphere because both parallel electric field and magnetic field are reversed in direction.

  17. Dawn-Dusk Auroral Asymmetries as a Consequence of the Differential Inward Transport of Electrons and Protons (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.

    2013-12-01

    Electrons and ions are transported inwards in the magnetotail by quasi-steady and 'bursty' convection. Electrons and ions are drawn dawnward and duskward, respectively, by additional energy-dependent drifts, and the effects of the co-rotation electric field together conspire to create a highly asymmetric inner Central Plasma Sheet (CPS). These asymmetries have pronounced effects on the aurora, particularly so for diffuse aurora in the lower latitudes of auroral zone. Here I present an overview of these transport-related auroral asymmetries as seen in multi-spectral auroral observations from all-sky imagers and meridian scanning photometers, as well as topside in situ observations by the NASA FAST satellite. I will focus on how these asymmetries set the stage for different auroral mechanisms on the dusk and dawn sides.

  18. Dawn-dusk asymmetry in dayside ion precipitation for southward IMF: results from large-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchem, J.; Richard, R. L.; Escoubet, C.; Wing, S.; Pitout, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of numerical studies of the interaction of solar wind ions with the dayside magnetospheric boundary for a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). These studies use the time-dependent electric and magnetic fields predicted by three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to compute the trajectories of large samples of solar wind ions launched upstream of the bow shock. Energy-latitude spectra computed from the large scale kinetic (LSK) simulations show that a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry develops in the precipitation of low to middle energy ions over the high-latitude dayside magnetosphere. These results are consistent with statistical studies of DMSP data showing that ion precipitation from the mantle is predominantly seen over the morning and pre-noon sector.

  19. The Wonder and Enrichment of Teaching Wright Morris's "A Fight between a White Boy and a Black Boy in the Dusk of a Fall Afternoon in Omaha, Nebraska."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Jerrine

    2001-01-01

    Outlines a teaching method for Wright Morris's "A Fight Between a White Boy and a Black Boy in the Dusk of a Fall Afternoon in Omaha, Nebraska." Proposes that the story provides and opportunity to introduce stream-of-consciousness writing and to convey the significance of memory recall. (PM)

  20. Dawn-dusk asymmetry in ion pitch-angle anisotropy in the near-Earth magnetosphere and tail plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Zaharia, S. G.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    We found a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry in ion pitch-angle anisotropy from spatial distributions statistically determined using THEMIS observations. The asymmetry varies significantly with ion energies and is a result of different processes. The anisotropy of ions below several hundreds eV in the tail plasma sheet (beyond X = 10 Re) and the near-Earth magnetosphere (inside r = 10 Re) is dominantly negative (relatively higher particle fluxes near 0 and 180 degree pitch-angle) and is more strongly negative in the post-midnight sector than the pre-midnight sector. The negative anisotropy is likely caused by field-aligned ionosphere outflow and the post-midnight enhancement is correlated with stronger electron precipitation energy fluxes that create stronger outflow. For ions between 1 to 10 keV in the near-Earth magnetosphere, anisotropy is found to be strongly positive (relatively higher fluxes near 90 degree pitch-angle) in the morning sector while near isotropic in the evening sector. Comparing the fluxes within the region of the positive anisotropy with other MLTs suggests that the positive anisotropy is caused by field-aligned ions not being able to drift as earthward as 90 degree ions. For ions of 10 keV and above, magnetic drift shell splitting results in strongly positive anisotropy on the dayside, while additional magnetopause shadowing causes strongly negative anisotropy in the post-midnight sector.

  1. A statistical study into the spatial distribution and dawn-dusk asymmetry of dayside magnetosheath ion temperatures as a function of upstream solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Karimabadi, H.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetosheath contains the shocked solar wind and behaves as a natural filter to the solar wind plasma before it reaches the magnetosphere. The redistribution of kinetic energy at the bow shock results in significant thermalization of the solar wind plasma, resulting in a magnetosheath temperature profile which is highly nonhomogeneous and nonisotropic and differs between the dawn and dusk flanks. The present study attempts to study the spatial distribution of magnetosheath ion temperature as a function of upstream solar wind conditions. We pay particular attention to the dawn/dusk asymmetry in which we attempt to quantify using experimental data collected over a 7 year period. We also compare these data to simulated data from both the Block-Adaptive-Tree-Solarwind-Roe-Upwind-Scheme (BATS-R-US) MHD code and a kinetic hybrid model. We present evidence that the dawn flank is consistently hotter than the dusk flank for a variety of upstream conditions. Our statistical data also suggest a dependency on solar wind speed such that the level of asymmetry increases with faster speeds. We conclude that the dawn-favored asymmetry of the magnetosheath seed population is insufficient to explain the dawn asymmetry (30-40%) of cold component ions in the cold, dense plasma sheet, and therefore, other mechanisms are likely required.

  2. The dawn-dusk length of the X line in the near-Earth magnetotail: Geotail survey in 1994-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Tsugunobu; Shinohara, Iku; Zenitani, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    The dawn-dusk length of the X line is investigated for magnetic reconnection in association with substorms in the near-Earth magnetotail on the basis of the 21 year Geotail plasma sheet observations. The X line is identified as a simultaneous plasma flow Vx and magnetic field Bz reversal inside the ion-electron decoupling region of magnetic reconnection. Forty-four X lines can be found at XGSM = -20 to -31 RE in the magnetotail. The X line length is estimated on the basis of occurrence of magnetic reconnection. Characteristics of flows and fields are investigated for magnetic reconnection and tailward flow events to verify the obtained X line length. The dawn-dusk length of the X line is most likely 6 RE with its center in the premidnight sector for moderate substorms. Hence, the magnetic reconnection site is mapped to approximately 1 h local time sector in the auroral ionosphere. The dawn-dusk length of the X line is extended mainly dawnward for larger substorms.

  3. Control of the Polarity of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field on the Dawn-Dusk Symmetry of the Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shue, J.; Jhuang, B.; Song, P.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Russell, C. T.; Chen, S.

    2008-12-01

    The solar wind dynamic pressure is reduced when the solar wind flows around the magnetosphere due to the diversion of the flows. The magnetopause is the boundary where the reduced dynamic pressure is balanced with the magnetic pressure of the compressed magnetosphere by the solar wind. The size and shape of the magnetopause have long been considered among the most important parameters in Solar Terrestrial physics. Previous models of the size and shape of the magnetopause often assumed the axis- symmetry of the magnetopause with respect to the Sun-Earth line. With a large number of magnetopause crossings by ISEE-1 and -2, AMPTE/IRM, Hawkeye, Geotail, Interball-1, and Magion-4, we are able to consider the asymmetry of the magnetopuase. In the Shue et al. [1997] model, the magnetopause was modeled by two parameters, r0 and alpha, representing the subsolar standoff distance and the flaring level of the magnetopause, respectively. Parameter alpha was assumed to be independent of phi in the Shue et al. [1997] model, where phi is the angle between the Z axis and the mapping of the radial vector of the magnetopause on the YZ plane. In the present study we allow alpha to be a function of phi. We separate crossings with different phis and fit them in each bin to the new functional form proposed by Shue et al. [1997]. We find that the magnetopause is symmetric in the dawn-dusk direction for northward IMF. However, its size on the dawnside becomes larger when the IMF is southward. The function of alpha in terms of phi can be combined with the 2-D Shue et al. [1997] model into a 3-D magnetopause model. (Shue, J.-H., J. K. Chao, H. C. Fu, C. T. Russell, P. Song, K. K. Khurana, and H. J. Singer, A new functional form to study the solar wind control of the magnetopause size and shape, J. Geophys. Res., 102, 9497, 1997.)

  4. MHD instability with dawn-dusk symmetry in near-Earth plasma sheet during substorm growth phase*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Raeder, J.; Hegna, C.; Sovinec, C.

    2010-12-01

    Recent global MHD simulations of March 23, 2007 THEMIS substorm event using the OpenGGCM code have confirmed the presence of both high-ky ballooning modes and zero-ky instabilities in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the substorm growth phase [Raeder et al 2010]. These results are consistent with findings from earlier analyses [Siscoe et al 2009; Zhu et al 2009]. Here ky is the azimuthal wavenumber in the dawn-dusk direction. However, the nature and role of the ky=0 mode, as well as its interaction with the high ky ballooning modes, in the process leading to the expansion onset remain unclear. In this work, we focus on the stability properties of the ky=0 mode. A re-evaluation of the tail-tearing mode criterion by Sitnov and Schindler (2009) suggested that the dipolarization front (DF) structure identified in THEMIS observations [Runov et al 2009] could be tearing-unstable. Linear calculations using the NIMROD code have found a growing tearing mode in a generalized Harris sheet with a DF-like structure, which is also a unique feature closely correlated with the appearance of zero-ky mode in the OpenGGCM simulation. The ideal-MHD energy principle analysis is used to address the question whether the ky=0 mode is an ideal or resistive MHD instability. We further compare the linear and nonlinear tail-tearing mode in NIMROD simulations with the ky=0 mode from OpenGGCM simulations. *Supported by NSF Grants AGS-0902360 and PHY-0821899. References: Raeder, J., P. Zhu, Y.-S. Ge, and G. Siscoe (2010), Tail force imbalance and ballooning instability preceding substorm onset, submitted to J. Geophys. Res. Runov, A., et al. (2009), Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L14106. Siscoe, G.L., M.M. Kuznetsova, and J. Raeder (2009), Ann. Geophys., 27, 3141. Sitnov, M.I. and K. Schindler (2010), Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L08102. Zhu, P., J. Raeder, K. Germaschewski, and C.C. Hegna (2009), Ann. Geophys., 27, 1129.

  5. M-I coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight: repetitive substorm activity driven by interplanetary coronal mass ejections (CMEs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandholt, P. E.; Farrugia, C. J.; Denig, W. F.

    2014-04-01

    We study substorms from two perspectives, i.e., magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling across the auroral oval at dusk and at midnight magnetic local times. By this approach we monitor the activations/expansions of basic elements of the substorm current system (Bostrøm type I centered at midnight and Bostrøm type II maximizing at dawn and dusk) during the evolution of the substorm activity. Emphasis is placed on the R1 and R2 types of field-aligned current (FAC) coupling across the Harang reversal at dusk. We distinguish between two distinct activity levels in the substorm expansion phase, i.e., an initial transient phase and a persistent phase. These activities/phases are discussed in relation to polar cap convection which is continuously monitored by the polar cap north (PCN) index. The substorm activity we selected occurred during a long interval of continuously strong solar wind forcing at the interplanetary coronal mass ejection passage on 18 August 2003. The advantage of our scientific approach lies in the combination of (i) continuous ground observations of the ionospheric signatures within wide latitude ranges across the auroral oval at dusk and midnight by meridian chain magnetometer data, (ii) "snapshot" satellite (DMSP F13) observations of FAC/precipitation/ion drift profiles, and (iii) observations of current disruption/near-Earth magnetic field dipolarizations at geostationary altitude. Under the prevailing fortunate circumstances we are able to discriminate between the roles of the dayside and nightside sources of polar cap convection. For the nightside source we distinguish between the roles of inductive and potential electric fields in the two substages of the substorm expansion phase. According to our estimates the observed dipolarization rate (δ Bz/δt) and the inferred large spatial scales (in radial and azimuthal dimensions) of the dipolarization process in these strong substorm expansions may lead to 50-100 kV enhancements of the cross

  6. Low-Frequency Wave Activity Detected by MMS during Dusk Magnetopause Crossings and its Relation to Heating and Acceleration of Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Contel, O.; Roux, A.; Retino, A.; Mirioni, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Chust, T.; Berthomier, M.; Chasapis, A.; Aunai, N.; Leroy, P.; Alison, D.; Lavraud, B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Marklund, G. T.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T.; Ergun, R. E.; Needell, J.; Chutter, M.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Macri, J.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Fischer, D.; Leinweber, H. K.; Anderson, B. J.; Nakamura, R.; Argall, M. R.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Pollock, C. J.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goodrich, K.; Wilder, F. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 9th of July, the MMS fleet of four satellites have evolved into a tetrahedral configuration with an average inter-satellite distance of 160 km and an apogee of 12 earth radii on the dusk side. In this study we report on ultra-low (1 mHz to ~10 Hz) and very-low (10 Hz to ~ 4 kHz) frequency wave activity measured by the four satellites during several crossings of the dusk equatorial magnetopause. Since the Larmor radius of magnetosheath protons is of the order of 50 km, this inter-satellite distance allows us to investigate in detail the physics of the magnetopause at proton scales including current structures related to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as well as other energy transfer processes. From wave polarization analysis, we characterize the different types of emissions and discuss different mechanisms of heating and acceleration of particles. In particular, we focus on the electron heating by kinetic Alfvén waves and lower hybrid waves and the electron acceleration by oblique whistler mode waves, which have been suggested as possible mechanisms from previous Cluster and THEMIS measurements.

  7. Photoperiod-dependent changes in the phase of core clock transcripts and global transcriptional outputs at dawn and dusk in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Flis, Anna; Sulpice, Ronan; Seaton, Daniel D; Ivakov, Alexander A; Liput, Magda; Abel, Christin; Millar, Andrew J; Stitt, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Plants use the circadian clock to sense photoperiod length. Seasonal responses like flowering are triggered at a critical photoperiod when a light-sensitive clock output coincides with light or darkness. However, many metabolic processes, like starch turnover, and growth respond progressively to photoperiod duration. We first tested the photoperiod response of 10 core clock genes and two output genes. qRT-PCR analyses of transcript abundance under 6, 8, 12 and 18 h photoperiods revealed 1-4 h earlier peak times under short photoperiods and detailed changes like rising PRR7 expression before dawn. Clock models recapitulated most of these changes. We explored the consequences for global gene expression by performing transcript profiling in 4, 6, 8, 12 and 18 h photoperiods. There were major changes in transcript abundance at dawn, which were as large as those between dawn and dusk in a given photoperiod. Contributing factors included altered timing of the clock relative to dawn, light signalling and changes in carbon availability at night as a result of clock-dependent regulation of starch degradation. Their interaction facilitates coordinated transcriptional regulation of key processes like starch turnover, anthocyanin, flavonoid and glucosinolate biosynthesis and protein synthesis and underpins the response of metabolism and growth to photoperiod. PMID:27075884

  8. Electrodynamics of the Inner Magnetosphere Observed in the Dusk Sector by CRRES and DMSP during the Magnetic Storm of June 4-6, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruke, W. J.; Maynard, N. C.; Hagan, M. P.; Wolf, R. A.; Wilson, G. R.; Gentile, L. C.; Gussenhoven, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Garner, T. W.; Rich, F. J.

    1998-01-01

    We compare equatorward/earthward boundaries of convection electric fields and auroral/plasma sheet electrons detected by the DMSP F8 and CRRES satellites during the June 1991 magnetic storm. Measurements come from the dusk magnetic local time sector where the ring current penetrates closest to the Earth. The storm was triggered by a rapid increase in the solar wind dynamic pressure accompanied by a southward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Satellite data show the following: (1) all particle and field boundaries moved equatorward/earthward during the initial phase, probably in response to the strong southward IMF turning; (2) electric field boundaries were either at lower magnetic L shells or close to the inner edge of ring current ions throughout the main and early recovery phases. Penetration earthward of the ring current occurred twice as the polar cap potential increased rapidly; (3) electric potentials at subauroral latitudes were large fractions of the total potentials in the afternoon cell, twice exceeding 60 kV; and (4) the boundaries of auroral electron precipitation were more variable than those of electric fields and mapped to lower L shells than where CRRES encountered plasma sheet electrons. Observations qualitatively agree with predictions of empirical models for auroral electron and electric field boundaries.

  9. The reason "Why" graze cattle at dusk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work aimed and designed to assess the impact of timing of herbage allocation and fasting on patterns of ingestive behavior, herbage intake, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient flow to the duodenum. Treatments were daily herbage allocation in the afternoon (1500, AHA), morning (0800, MHA), AHA af...

  10. The dusk flank of Jupiter's magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Hospodarsky, G B; Farrell, W M; Roux, A; Dougherty, M K; Joy, S P; Kivelson, M G; Walker, R J; Crary, F J; Alexander, C J

    2002-02-28

    Limited single-spacecraft observations of Jupiter's magnetopause have been used to infer that the boundary moves inward or outward in response to variations in the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. At Earth, multiple-spacecraft observations have been implemented to understand the physics of how this motion occurs, because they can provide a snapshot of a transient event in progress. Here we present a set of nearly simultaneous two-point measurements of the jovian magnetopause at a time when the jovian magnetopause was in a state of transition from a relatively larger to a relatively smaller size in response to an increase in solar-wind pressure. The response of Jupiter's magnetopause is very similar to that of the Earth, confirming that the understanding built on studies of the Earth's magnetosphere is valid. The data also reveal evidence for a well-developed boundary layer just inside the magnetopause. PMID:11875558

  11. Linking pasture and animal processes. Why graze cattle at dusk?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work aimed and designed to assess the impact of timing of herbage allocation and fasting on patterns of ingestive behavior, herbage intake, ruminal fermentation, and nutrient flow to the duodenum. Treatments were daily herbage allocation in the afternoon (1500, AHA), morning (0800, MHA), AHA af...

  12. Dusk Lighting of Layered Textures in 'Cape Verde'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Full-shade lighting in the late Martian afternoon helps make details visible in this view of the layered cliff face of the 'Cape Verde' promontory making up part of the rim of Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of equatorial Mars.

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to shoot the dozens of individual images that have been combined into this mosaic. Opportunity was inside Victoria Crater and near the base of the cliff when it took these images on the 1,579th and 1,580th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (July 2 and 3, 2008).

    Photographing the promontory from this position in Victoria Crater presented challenges for the rover team. The geometry was such that Cape Verde was between the rover and the sun, which could cause a range of negative effects, from glinting off Pancam's dusty lenses to shadowing on the cliff face. The team's solution was to take the images for this mosaic just after the sun disappeared behind the crater rim, at about 5:30 p.m. local solar time. The atmosphere was still lit, but no direct sunlight was illuminating the wall of Cape Verde.

    The result is a high-resolution view of Cape Verde in relatively uniform diffuse sky lighting across the scene.

    Pancam used a clear filter for taking the images for this mosaic. Capturing images in low-light situations was one of the main motivations for including the clear filter among the camera's assortment of filters available for use.

    The face of Cape Verde is about 6 meters (20 feet) tall. Victoria Crater, at about 800 meters (one-half mile) wide, is the largest and deepest crater that Opportunity has visited. It sits more than 5 kilometers (almost 4 miles) away from Opportunity's Eagle Crater landing site. Researchers sent Opportunity into Victoria Crater to study the rock layers exposed inside. The textures seen in the rock layers of Cape Verde suggest that the exposed layers were originally deposited by wind.

  13. Let’s graze the cattle at dusk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research conducted in Argentina, US, Australia and Europe has shown significant variations in chemical composition of pasture throughout the day, which results in an increase in pasture digestibility and energy concentration as the day progresses. Cattle have adapted their grazing patterns during th...

  14. Seasonal Differences in the Dusk Equatorial Topside Ionosphere Measured by C/NOFS and DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hairston, M. R.; Coley, W. R.; Heelis, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    The C/NOFS spacecraft is in a near-equatorial elliptical orbit with an apogee of about 845 km which precesses through all local times over a period of about 66 days. The four operational DMSP spacecraft are in sun-synchronous circular polar orbits at roughly the same altitude as C/NOFS’s apogee. Thus the C/NOFS apogee overlaps with the DMSP duskside orbits every 66 days for a period of about two weeks. This work will present the analysis of three of these overlap periods during the northern winter (roughly December 30, 2008-January 12, 2009), the northern summer (roughly July 14-31, 2009), and one equinox period (roughly March 6-21, 2009) where we will use the combined C/NOFS and DMSP data to show the seasonal changes in ion density, composition, and temperature in the topside ionosphere. This will allow a further validation of the CINDI plasma instruments on C/NOFS as well as establishing a baseline of these geophysical parameters in the topside ionosphere through all seasons during the current extreme solar minimum conditions.

  15. From dusk till dawn: nocturnal and diurnal pollination in the epiphyte Tillandsia heterophylla (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, P A; Krömer, T; García-Franco, J G; MacSwiney G, M C

    2016-01-01

    In order to compare the effectiveness of diurnal and nocturnal pollinators, we studied the reproductive biology and pollinators of Tillandsia heterophylla E. Morren, an epiphytic tank bromeliad endemic to southeastern Mexico. Since anthesis in T. heterophylla is predominantly nocturnal but lasts until the following day, we hypothesised that this bromeliad would receive visits from both diurnal and nocturnal visitors, but that nocturnal visitors would be the most effective pollinators, since they arrive first to the receptive flower, and that bats would be the most frequent nocturnal visitors, given the characteristics of the nectar. Flowering of T. heterophylla began in May and lasted until July. The species is fully self-compatible, with an anthesis that lasts for ca. 15-16 h. Mean volume of nectar produced per flower was 82.21 μl, with a mean sugar concentration of 6.33%. The highest volume and concentration of nectar were found at 20:00 h, with a subsequent decline in both to almost zero over the following 12-h period. T. heterophylla has a generalist pollination system, since at least four different morphospecies of visitors pollinate its flowers: bats, moths, hummingbirds and bees. Most of the pollinating visits corresponded to bats and took place in the early evening, when stigma receptivity had already begun; making bats the probable pollinator on most occasions. However, diurnal pollinators may be important as a 'fail-safe' system by which to guarantee the pollination of T. heterophylla. PMID:25683682

  16. From dusk till dawn: the Arabidopsis thaliana sugar starving responsive network.

    PubMed

    Arias, Maria C; Pelletier, Sandra; Hilliou, Frédérique; Wattebled, Fabrice; Renou, Jean-Pierre; D'Hulst, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth and development are tightly controlled by photosynthetic carbon availability. The understanding of mechanisms governing carbon partitioning in plants will be a valuable tool in order to satisfy the rising global demand for food and biofuel. The goal of this study was to determine if sugar starvation responses were transcriptionally coordinated in Arabidopsis thaliana. A set of sugar-starvation responsive (SSR) genes was selected to perform a co-expression network analysis. Posteriorly, a guided-gene approach was used to identify the SSR-network from public data and to discover candidate regulators of this network. In order to validate the SSR network, a global transcriptome analysis was realized on three A. thaliana starch-deficient mutants. The starch-deficient phenotype in leaves induces sugar starvation syndrome at the end of the night due to the absence of photosynthesis. Promoter sequences of genes belonging to the SSR-network were analyzed in silico reveling over-represented motifs implicated in light, abscisic acid, and sugar responses. A small cluster of protein encoding genes belonging to different metabolic pathways, including three regulatory proteins, a protein kinase, a transcription factor, and a blue light receptor, were identified as the cornerstones of the SSR co-expression network. In summary, a large transcriptionally coordinated SSR network was identified and was validated with transcriptional data from three starch-deficient mutant lines. Candidate master regulators of this network were point out. PMID:25295047

  17. From dusk till dawn: the Arabidopsis thaliana sugar starving responsive network

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Maria C.; Pelletier, Sandra; Hilliou, Frédérique; Wattebled, Fabrice; Renou, Jean-Pierre; D'Hulst, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth and development are tightly controlled by photosynthetic carbon availability. The understanding of mechanisms governing carbon partitioning in plants will be a valuable tool in order to satisfy the rising global demand for food and biofuel. The goal of this study was to determine if sugar starvation responses were transcriptionally coordinated in Arabidopsis thaliana. A set of sugar-starvation responsive (SSR) genes was selected to perform a co-expression network analysis. Posteriorly, a guided-gene approach was used to identify the SSR-network from public data and to discover candidate regulators of this network. In order to validate the SSR network, a global transcriptome analysis was realized on three A. thaliana starch-deficient mutants. The starch-deficient phenotype in leaves induces sugar starvation syndrome at the end of the night due to the absence of photosynthesis. Promoter sequences of genes belonging to the SSR-network were analyzed in silico reveling over-represented motifs implicated in light, abscisic acid, and sugar responses. A small cluster of protein encoding genes belonging to different metabolic pathways, including three regulatory proteins, a protein kinase, a transcription factor, and a blue light receptor, were identified as the cornerstones of the SSR co-expression network. In summary, a large transcriptionally coordinated SSR network was identified and was validated with transcriptional data from three starch-deficient mutant lines. Candidate master regulators of this network were point out. PMID:25295047

  18. Statistics of intense dawn-dusk currents in the Earth's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2015-05-01

    We consider Cluster observations of events with an intense current density (>5 nA/m2) in the magnetotail current sheet. We use measurements by Cluster mission in the central magnetotail (X <- 16 RE, |Y|<10 RE, and |Bx|<10 nT) in the 2003 season when the spacecraft separation was about ˜300 km. For this season, when Cluster can probe very small scale currents, we collect the statistics of observations of strong current densities jy (in GSM coordinate system) and compare curlometer data with plasma parameters. The most intense currents are observed under disturbed conditions (plasma flow vx>300 km/s). We introduce the parameter vD/vTi (where vD=jy/ene, ne is an electron density, and vTi is a proton thermal velocity) and show that cases with vD/vTi˜1 correspond to the most intense currents observed in the vicinity of the reconnection regions. The comparison of electron and proton velocities demonstrates that electron often carry almost the entire current measured by a curlometer technique. The strong electron temperature anisotropy Te∥/Te⊥>1.2 corresponds to large magnitudes of By component of the magnetic field. We conclude that intense current sheets are often characterized by significant (more than 30%) contribution of electron curvature currents to the cross-tail current. The comparison of observations and models shows that the electron anisotropy level is likely controlled by competition of two processes: the electron scattering on fluctuations generated by fire-hose instability and the acceleration in sheared magnetic field configurations. We also suggest that current sheets embedded into the strong plasma flows (vx/vTi>0.1) can be balanced by ion flow anisotropy.

  19. From dawn till dusk: Shedding light on the recovery process by investigating daily change patterns in fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hülsheger, Ute R

    2016-06-01

    Although the notion that recovery is a process rather than a state lies at the heart of recovery theory, the continuous cycle of depletion and replenishment of resources itself has not yet been investigated empirically. In the present article, I therefore build on recovery theory and on evidence from chronobiological research and adopt a temporal research approach that allows investigating change trajectories in fatigue over the course of the day. Furthermore, the role of sleep quality and psychological detachment in these change trajectories is investigated. Hypotheses are tested in an experience-sampling study involving 133 employees who were asked to provide fatigue ratings 4 times a day over 5 consecutive workdays. Growth curve analyses revealed that on average fatigue decreased in the morning, reaching a nadir around midday and then increased until bedtime. Additionally, daily sleep quality explained variation in individuals' fatigue change trajectories: When sleep quality was low, next day fatigue decreased between morning and midday and then increased again until bedtime; when sleep quality was high, fatigue remained stable until midday and then increased again between the end of work and bedtime. Theoretical implications for the recovery literature and practical implications are discussed in conclusion. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26949820

  20. Dawn-dusk asymmetry of the tail region of the magnetosphere of Saturn and the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.; Roederer, M.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with the findings of the Voyager 1 mission, it appears that the tail lobe of Saturn is very different from that of earth and Jupiter, in that the latter are devoid of energetic particles, and magnetic field lines in this region are thought to be open and interconnecting with the interplanetary magnetic field at large distances in the antisolar direction. The present investigation is concerned with a possible explanation of these observations, taking into account a model of Saturn's magnetosphere. It is shown that the Voyager 1 spacecraft remained in the closed region of the magnetotail during its entire tail traversal and did not have an opportunity to penetrate into the high latitude lobe. It is concluded that Saturn probably has a tail lobe just like earth and Jupiter. However, this tail lobe was not traversed by Voyager.

  1. Equatorial disc and dawn-dusk currents in the frontside magnetosphere of Jupiter - Pioneer 10 and 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.; Thomas, B. T.; Melville, J. G., II

    1981-01-01

    Observations by Pioneer 10 and 11 show that the strongest azimuthal fields are observed near the dawn meridian (Pioneer 10) while the weakest occur near the noon meridian (Pioneer 11), suggesting a strong local time dependence for the corresponding radial current system. Modeling studies of the radial component of the field observed by both spacecraft suggest that the corresponding azimuthal current system must also be a strong function of local time. Both the azimuthal and the radial field component signatures exhibit sharp dips and reversals, requiring thin radial and azimuthal current systems. There is also a suggestion that these two current systems either are interacting or are due, at least in part, to the same current. It is suggested that a plausible current model consists of the superposition of a thin, local-time-independent azimuthal current system plus the equatorial portion of a tail-like current system that extends into the dayside magnetosphere.

  2. Cluster observations of the dusk flank magnetopause near the sash: Ion dynamics and flow-through reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.; Farrugia, Charles J.; Burke, William J.; Ober, Daniel M.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Rème, Henri; Dunlop, Malcolm; Siebert, Keith D.

    2012-10-01

    Compared to the dayside, dynamics on the flanks of the magnetopause are poorly understood. To help bridge this knowledge gap we analyzed Cluster plasma and field measurements acquired during a 90-min period on 20 November 2003 when Cluster crossed the magnetopause four times in the vicinity of the sash. MHD simulations provide a context for Cluster observations. Crossings were between the magnetosheath and an S-shaped plasma sheet, rather than to the open-field lobes of the magnetotail. Cluster encountered two regions of MHD-breaking differences between perpendicular ion velocities and E × B convection. Ion adiabatic expansion parameter (δi) calculations show that ion gyrotropy was not broken during an episode of strong Alfvén wave activity in the magnetosheath. However, gyrotropy was broken (δi > 1) during the fourth magnetopause crossing. In the magnetosheath, ion guiding-center motion was maintained but inertial effects associated with temporally varying electric fields are probable sources of velocity differences. Regarding the magnetopause crossing, the generalized Ohm's law limits possible sources for breaking ion gyrotropy to inertial forces and/or electron pressure gradients associated with a nearby reconnection event. We suggest that Cluster witnessed effects of a temporally varying and spatially limited, flow-through reconnection event between open mantle field lines from the two polar caps adding new closed flux to the LLBL at the sash. Future modeling of flank dynamics must consider inertial forces as significant drivers at the magnetopause and in the adjacent magnetosheath.

  3. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  4. Investigation of sudden electron density depletions observed in the dusk sector by the Poker Flat, Alaska incoherent scatter radar in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, P. G.; Nicolls, M. J.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.; Goodwin, L.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates unusually deep and sudden electron density depletions (troughs) observed in the Poker Flat (Alaska) Incoherent Scatter Radar data in middle summer of 2007 and 2008. The troughs were observed in the premidnight sector during periods of weak magnetic and solar activity. The density recovered to normal levels around midnight. At the time when the electron density was undergoing its steep decrease, there was usually a surge of the order of 100 to 400 K in the ion temperature that lasted less than 1 h. The Ti surges were usually related to similar surges in the AE index, indicating that the high-latitude convection pattern was expanding and intensifying at the time of the steep electron density drop. The convection patterns from the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network also indicate that the density troughs were associated with the expansion of the convection pattern to Poker Flat. The sudden decreases in the electron density are difficult to explain in summer because the high-latitude region remains sunlit for most of the day. This paper suggests that the summer density troughs result from lower latitude plasma that had initially been corotating in darkness for several hours post sunset and brought back toward the sunlit side as the convection pattern expanded. The magnetic declination of ~22° east at 300 km at Poker Flat greatly facilitates the contrast between the plasma convecting from lower latitudes and the plasma that follows the high-latitude convection pattern.

  5. Melatonin Signal Transduction Pathways Require E-Box-Mediated Transcription of Per1 and Per2 to Reset the SCN Clock at Dusk

    PubMed Central

    Kandalepas, Patty C.; Mitchell, Jennifer W.; Gillette, Martha U.

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is released from the pineal gland into the circulatory system at night in the absence of light, acting as “hormone of darkness” to the brain and body. Melatonin also can regulate circadian phasing of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). During the day-to-night transition, melatonin exposure advances intrinsic SCN neural activity rhythms via the melatonin type-2 (MT2) receptor and downstream activation of protein kinase C (PKC). The effects of melatonin on SCN phasing have not been linked to daily changes in the expression of core genes that constitute the molecular framework of the circadian clock. Using real-time RT-PCR, we found that melatonin induces an increase in the expression of two clock genes, Period 1 (Per1) and Period 2 (Per2). This effect occurs at CT 10, when melatonin advances SCN phase, but not at CT 6, when it does not. Using anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides (α ODNs) to Per 1 and Per 2, as well as to E-box enhancer sequences in the promoters of these genes, we show that their specific induction is necessary for the phase-altering effects of melatonin on SCN neural activity rhythms in the rat. These effects of melatonin on Per1 and Per2 were mediated by PKC. This is unlike day-active non-photic signals that reset the SCN clock by non-PCK signal transduction mechanisms and by decreasing Per1 expression. Rather, this finding extends roles for Per1 and Per2, which are critical to photic phase-resetting, to a nonphotic zeitgeber, melatonin, and suggest that the regulation of these clock gene transcripts is required for clock resetting by diverse regulatory cues. PMID:27362940

  6. How long and when should I graze my cattle?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle instinctively concentrate grazing during dusk, when pasture is more nutritive. Afternoon allocations of fresh pasture increase duration and intensity of dusk grazing bouts and consequently pasture intake at that time of day, which certainly has demonstrated to improve animal performance when ...

  7. A Few Hours Grazing Session Seems To Be Enough

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle instinctively intensify grazing during dusk, when pasture is more nutritive. Afternoon allocations of fresh pasture (PM) increase duration and intensity of dusk grazing bouts and consequently pasture intake at that time of day, which certainly has demonstrated to improve animal performance wh...

  8. Solar wind control of the low-latitude asymmetric magnetic disturbance field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Searls, C.

    1983-01-01

    The extent to which the low latitude dawn-dusk magnetic asymmetry is controlled by the dawn-dusk solar wind motional electric field VBs and/or substorm processes measured by the westward auroral electrojet index AL is studied using the technique of empirical linear prediction filters. A new index, (ASYM), defined as the difference between dawn and dusk deviations in the X (geomagnetic Northward) magnetic field component, is used to measure the dawn-dusk asymmetry. Quantitative information which characterizes the coupling processes are provided by the empirically determined filters obtained from this analysis. Results indicate that some currents are directly driven by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction and that their magnetic perturbations contribute to both the AL and ASYM indices. However, a portion of the AL index that is uncorrelated with VBs is correlated with ASYM which suggests that internal magnetospheric processes also contribute to AL and ASYM.

  9. Simultaneous conjugate observations of small-scale structures in Saturn's dayside ultraviolet auroras: Implications for physical origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, C. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Hansen, K. C.; Nichols, J. D.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2013-09-01

    Conjugacy of Saturn's auroras was studied using unique near-equinox HST images. Dawnside patches are consistent with expectations for second harmonic ULF waves. Dusk transients are strictly non-conjugate, suggesting an open flux tube origin.

  10. Leishmaniasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... parasitic disease spread by the bite of infected sand flies. There are several different forms of leishmaniasis. ... prevent the disease is to protect yourself from sand fly bites: Stay indoors from dusk to dawn, ...

  11. Bug Bites and Stings

    MedlinePlus

    ... are most active (dawn and dusk); and apply insect repellent when kids go outside. When in tick country, ... pets to prevent them from being bitten. Use insect repellent when spending time outdoors camping, hiking, etc. Repellents ...

  12. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid WNV is to prevent mosquito bites: Use insect repellent Get rid of mosquito breeding sites by emptying standing water from flower pots, buckets or barrels Stay indoors between dusk and ... out NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  13. WIDE AWAKE mediates the circadian timing of sleep onset.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Lamaze, Angelique; Liu, Qili; Tabuchi, Masashi; Yang, Yong; Fowler, Melissa; Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Zhang, Julia; Bedont, Joseph; Blackshaw, Seth; Lloyd, Thomas E; Montell, Craig; Sehgal, Amita; Koh, Kyunghee; Wu, Mark N

    2014-04-01

    How the circadian clock regulates the timing of sleep is poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila mutant, wide awake (wake), that exhibits a marked delay in sleep onset at dusk. Loss of WAKE in a set of arousal-promoting clock neurons, the large ventrolateral neurons (l-LNvs), impairs sleep onset. WAKE levels cycle, peaking near dusk, and the expression of WAKE in l-LNvs is Clock dependent. Strikingly, Clock and cycle mutants also exhibit a profound delay in sleep onset, which can be rescued by restoring WAKE expression in LNvs. WAKE interacts with the GABAA receptor Resistant to Dieldrin (RDL), upregulating its levels and promoting its localization to the plasma membrane. In wake mutant l-LNvs, GABA sensitivity is decreased and excitability is increased at dusk. We propose that WAKE acts as a clock output molecule specifically for sleep, inhibiting LNvs at dusk to promote the transition from wake to sleep. PMID:24631345

  14. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... protect themselves from mosquito bites by using mosquito repellent, especially at times when mosquitoes are most active, ... at dusk and dawn. The CDC recommends mosquito repellents that include one of the following ingredients: DEET ( ...

  15. West Nile Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... appeared in the United States in 1999. Infected mosquitoes spread the virus that causes it. People who ... barrels Stay indoors between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active Use screens on windows to ...

  16. Leishmaniasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease spread by the bite of infected sand flies. There are several different forms of leishmaniasis. The ... the disease is to protect yourself from sand fly bites: Stay indoors from dusk to dawn, when ...

  17. Ecology of colors of firefly bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, A.B.; Seliger, H.H.; Biggley, W.H.; Lloyd, J.E.

    1980-10-31

    Dark-active North American fireflies emit green bioluminescence and dusk-active species emit yellow, in general. Yellow light and yellow visual spectral sensitivity may be adaptations to increase the signal-to-noise (that is, foliage-reflected ambient light) ratio for sexual signaling during twilight. The peaks of the electroretinogram visual spectral sensitivities of four species tested, two dark- and two dusk-active, correspond with the peak of their bioluminescent emissions.

  18. Gyroresonance of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices with Na+ in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingell, Peter; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Burgess, David

    2015-04-01

    Observations of Mercury's plasma environment by the MESSENGER spacecraft have revealed that the planet hosts a strongly asymmetric magnetosphere as a result of an off-axis internal magnetic field, and significant finite Larmor radius effects at the boundary layer between magnetospheric and solar wind plasma environments. Linear analysis and global hybrid simulations suggest asymmetric growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability between the dusk and dawn flanks of the magnetopause, and indeed Kelvin-Helmholtz waves have been observed almost exclusively at the dusk flank during northward IMF. A previous study has shown that Kelvin-Helmholtz waves at the dusk flank are observed predominantly at scales associated with the gyration of hot sodium ions - a population originating at the dayside exosphere, and distributed preferentially at the dusk flank. This suggests that a resonance may occur between sodium ion gyration and Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex growth. Using two- and three-dimensional local hybrid simulations of dusk and dawn boundaries, with varying magnetospheric sodium ion density, we have reproduced the main observational features: we see a strong peak in the Kelvin-Helmholtz wave spectra at sodium gyro scales at the dusk boundaries, and suppression of the growth of vortices at the dawn boundaries. We examine the mechanism of the resonant interaction between counter-gyrating sodium ions and K-H vortices using test particle simulations. Finally, we discuss the effect of the sodium ion population on cross-boundary particle transport.

  19. Cusp geometry in MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, George; Crooker, Nancy; Siebert, Keith; Maynard, Nelson; Weimer, Daniel; White, Willard

    2005-01-01

    The MHD simulations described here show that the latitude of the high-altitude cusp decreases as the IMF swings from North to South, that there is a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at high-altitude associated with a dawn dusk component of the IMF, and that at the same time there is also a pronounced dawn dusk asymmetry at low-altitude. The simulations generate a feature that represents what has been called the cleft. It appears as a tail (when the IMF has a By component) attached to the cusp, extending either toward the dawn flank or the dusk flank depending on the dawn dusk orientation of the IMF. This one-sided cleft connects the cusp to the magnetospheric sash. We compare cusp geometry predicted by MHD simulations against published observations based on Hawkeye and DMSP data. Regarding the high-altitude predictions, the comparisons are not definitive, mainly because the observations are incomplete or mutually inconsistent. Regarding the low-altitude prediction of a strong dawn dusk asymmetry, the observations are unambiguous and are in good qualitative agreement with the prediction.

  20. The impact of a hot sodium ion population on the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingell, P. W.; Sundberg, T.; Burgess, D.

    2015-07-01

    Observations of Mercury's local plasma environment by MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging have revealed that the planet hosts a strongly asymmetric magnetosphere as a result of an off-axis dipolar or quadrupolar internal field and significant finite Larmor radius effects at the boundary layer between magnetospheric and solar wind plasma environments. One important asymmetry appears in the growth and evolution of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) waves at the dawn and dusk flanks of the magnetopause. Linear analysis and global hybrid simulations support a dusk-dawn asymmetry in the growth rate caused by finite Larmor radius effects, and indeed, K-H waves have been almost exclusively observed at the dusk magnetopause during northward interplanetary magnetic field. Observations of these K-H waves at sodium gyroscales invite investigation into the impact of the hot planetary sodium ion population, itself distributed preferentially on the dusk flank, on the growth of the K-H instability and associated plasma transport. We present local two-dimensional hybrid simulations of the dusk and dawn boundary layers, with varying magnetospheric sodium ion number density, and examine the associated changes in the growth rates of the K-H instability, K-H wave spectra, and cross-boundary particle transport. We show that gyroresonance between growing K-H vortices and sodium ion gyration introduces a strong spectral peak at sodium gyroscales at the dusk magnetopause, that an increase in sodium ion number density increases dawn-dusk asymmetry of K-H growth rates, and that cross-boundary particle transport decreases with sodium number density at the dawn flank.

  1. The impact of a hot sodium ion population on the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in Mercury's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingell, P.; Sundberg, T.; Burgess, D.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of Mercury's local plasma environment by MESSENGER have revealed that the planet hosts a strongly asymmetric magnetosphere as a result of an off-axis dipolar or quadrupolar internal field, and significant finite Larmor radius effects at the boundary layer between magnetospheric and solar wind plasma environments. One important asymmetry appears in the growth and evolution of Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) waves at the dawn and dusk flanks of the magnetopause. Linear analysis and global hybrid simulations support a dusk-dawn asymmetry in the growth rate caused by finite Larmor radius effects, and indeed K-H waves have been exclusively observed at the dusk magnetopause during northward IMF. Observations of these K-H waves at sodium gyro-scales invites investigation into the impact of the hot planetary sodium ion population, itself distributed preferentially on the dusk flank, on the growth of the K-H instability and associated plasma transport. We present local two- and three-dimensional hybrid simulations of the dusk and dawn boundary layers, with varying magnetospheric sodium ion number density, and examine the associated changes in the growth rates of the K-H instability, K-H wave spectra, and cross-boundary particle transport. We show that gyroresonance between growing K-H vortices and sodium ion gyration introduces a strong spectral peak at sodium gyro-scales at the dusk magnetopause, that an increase in sodium ion number density increases dawn-dusk asymmetry of K-H growth rates, and that cross-boundary particle transport increases with sodium number density.

  2. Surface waves on Saturn's magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Achilleos, N.; Cutler, J. C.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jones, G. H.

    2012-05-01

    Waves on the surface of a planetary magnetopause promote energy transport into the magnetosphere, representing an important aspect of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. At Saturn's magnetopause it has been proposed that growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability produces greater wave activity on the dawn side of the surface than on the dusk side. We test this hypothesis using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft during crossings of Saturn's magnetopause. Surface orientation perturbations are primarily controlled by the local magnetospheric magnetic field orientation, and are generally greater at dusk than at dawn. 53% of all crossings were part of a sequence of regular oscillations arising in consecutive surface normals that is strong evidence for tailward propagating surface waves, with no detectable local time asymmetry in this phenomenon. We estimate the dominant wave period to be ∼5 h at dawn and ∼3 h at dusk. The role played by the magnetospheric magnetic field, tailward wave propagation, and the dawn-dusk difference in wave period suggests that K-H instability is a major wave driving mechanism. Using linear K-H theory we estimate the dominant wavelength to be ∼10 Saturn radii (RS) and amplitude to be ∼1 RS at both dawn and dusk, giving propagation speeds of ∼30 and ∼50 km s-1 at dawn and dusk, respectively. The lack of the hypothesized dawn-dusk asymmetry in wave activity demonstrates that we need to revise our understanding of the growth of the K-H instability at Saturn's magnetopause, which will have implications for the study of other planetary magnetospheres.

  3. MESSENGER Observations of Asymmetries at Mercury's Magnetotail Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Gangkai; Slavin, James; Jia, Xianzhe; Raines, Jim; Sun, Wei-Jie; Genestreti, Kevin; Smith, Andy; Gershman, Daniel; Anderson, Brian

    2016-04-01

    Dawn-dusk asymmetries in the Earth's magnetotail current sheet have been observed and remain an active area of research. With an internal magnetic dipole field structure similar to Earth's, similar dawn-dusk asymmetries might be expected in Mercury's magnetotail current sheet. However, no observation of dawn-dusk asymmetries has been reported in the structure of Mercury's magnetotail. Using 4 years of MESSENGER's magnetic field and plasma data, we analyzed 319 current sheet crossings. From the polarity of Bz in the cross-tail current sheet, we determined that MESSENGER is on closed field lines about 90% of the time. During the other 10% MESSENGER observed negative Bz indicating that it was tailward of the Near Mercury Neutral Line (NMNL). The Bz magnetic field is also observed to be higher at the dawnside than the duskside of the magnetotail current sheet by approximately a factor of three. Further the asymmetry decreases with increasing downstream distance. A reduction (enhancement) in Bz should correspond to a more (less) stretched and thinned (thickened) current sheet. Analysis of current sheet thickness based upon MESSENGER's observations confirms this behavior with mean current sheet thickness and Bz intensity having dawn-dusk asymmetries with the same sense. Plasma β in the current sheet also exhibits a dawn-dusk asymmetry opposite to that of Bz. This is consistent with expectations based on MHD stress balance. Earlier studies had shown a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the heavy ion in Mercury's magnetotail. We suggest that this enhancement of heavy ions in the duskside current sheet, due to centrifugal acceleration of ions from the cusp and gradient-curvature drift from the NMNL, may provide a partial explanation of the dawn-dusk current sheet asymmetries found in this study.

  4. Non-parametric entrainment by natural twilight in the microchiropteran bat, Hipposideros speoris inside a cave.

    PubMed

    Joshi, D S; Vanlalnghaka, C

    2005-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the influence of repeated natural dawn and dusk twilight pulses in entraining the circadian flight activity rhythm of the microchiropteran bat, Hipposideros speoris, free-running in constant darkness in a natural cave. The bats were exposed to repeated dawn or dusk twilight pulses at eight circadian phases. All bats exposed to dawn twilight pulses were entrained by advancing transients, and the stable entrainment was reached when the onset of activity occurred about 12 h before the lights-on of the pulses, irrespective of the initial phase at which the bats were exposed to twilight. All bats exposed to dusk twilight pulses, however, were entrained by delaying transients, and the stable entrainment was reached when the onset of activity occurred about 1.6 h after the lights-on of the pulses. The entrainment caused by dawn and dusk twilight pulses is discussed in the context of the postulated two photoreceptors: the short wavelength sensitive (S) photoreceptors mediating entrainment via dusk twilight, and the medium wavelength sensitive (M) photoreceptors mediating entrainment via dawn twilight. PMID:16147895

  5. Interplanetary Electric Field Control of Field-Aligned Currents: Polar Magnetometer Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, M.; Russell, C. T.

    2001-05-01

    ACE and Wind measurements of the solar wind velocity and interplanetary magnetic field have been used to calculate the interplanetary electric field during passages of the Polar spacecraft above the southern auroral oval. Periods of the quasi-steady interplanetary electric field have been identified when the Polar spacecraft was transiting the auroral and polar regions both just in front of the terminator above the lit ionosphere and just behind the terminator above the dark ionosphere. The east-west magnetic perturbation observed was then used as a measure of the local field-aligned current density and extrapolated to a common altitude. Independent of whether the interplanetary electric field (IEF) is from dawn to dusk or dusk to dawn a significant field-aligned current always exists. The magnitude of its perturbation field for dusk to dawn IEF is about 180 nT. For dawn to dusk IEF the magnetic perturbation is roughly proportional to the dawn-dusk component of the IEF. The strength of the field-aligned current does not depend on whether the ionosphere under the spacecraft is in sunlight or in darkness.

  6. Concerning the Motion of FTEs and Attendant Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    2010-01-01

    We employ the Cooling et al. [2001] model to predict the location, orientation, and motion of flux transfer events (FTEs) generated along finite length component and anti parallel reconnection lines for typical solar wind plasma conditions and various interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations in the plane perpendicular to the SunEarth line at the solstices and equinoxes. For duskward and northward or southward IMF orientations, events formed by component reconnection originate along reconnection curves passing through the sub solar point that tilt from southern dawn to northern dusk. They maintain this orientation as they move either northward into the northern dawn quadrant or southward into the southern dusk quadrant. By contrast, events formed by antiparallel reconnection originate along reconnection curves running from northern dawn to southern dusk in the southern dawn and northern dusk quadrants and maintain these orientations as they move anti sunward into both these quadrants. Although both the component and antiparallel reconnection models can explain previously reported event orientations on the southern dusk magnetopause during intervals of northward and dawn ward IMF orientation, only the component model explains event occurrence near the subsolar magnetopause during intervals when the IMF does not point due southward.

  7. Intensity variation of ELF hiss and chorus during isolated substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Fiske, K. F.; Church, S. R.; Smith, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Electromagnetic ELF emissions (100-1000 Hz) observed on the polar-orbiting OGO-6 satellite within three hours of the dawn-dusk meridian consistently exhibit a predictable response to isolated substorm activity. Near dawn, the emissions intensify during the substorm and then subside following the magnetic activity; the waves are most intense at L greater than 4, exhibit considerable structure and have been primarily identified as chorus. At dusk the response is entirely different; the wave intensity falls to background levels during substorm activity but subsequently intensifies, usually reaching levels well in excess of that before the disturbance. The emissions near dusk extend to low L, are relatively featureless, and have been identified as plasmaspheric hiss. These features are interpreted in terms of changes in the drift orbits of outer-zone electrons which cyclotron resonate with ELF waves.

  8. Investigation of EMIC Waves During Balloon Detected Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Multiple relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events were detected by balloon-borne instrumentation during the MAXIS 2000 and MINIS 2005 campaigns. It has been suggested that resonance with EMIC waves caused these precipitation events (Lorentzen et al, 2000 and Millan et al, 2002) due to their location in the dusk sector. We present observations of dusk-side relativistic electron precipitation events, and use supporting satellite and theoretical data to investigate the relationship between EMIC waves and the detected REP. Satellite data can provide direct measurements of not only the waves themselves but also important resonance condition parameters. The data will be presented collectively with each event to showcase similarities and differences between events and the challenges that arise in trying to understand the relationship between dusk-side relativistic electron precipitation and EMIC waves.

  9. Natural twilight phase-response curves for the cave-dwelling bat, Hipposideros speoris.

    PubMed

    Vanlalnghaka, C; Keny, V L; Satralkar, M K; Khare, P V; Pujari, P D; Joshi, D S

    2005-01-01

    Phase-response curves (PRCs) for the circadian rhythm of flight activity of the microchiropteran bat (Hipposideros speoris) were determined in a cave, employing discrete natural dawn and dusk twilight pulses. These PRCs are reported for the first time for any circadian system and they are unlike other PRCs constructed for nocturnal mammals. Dawn and dusk twilight pulses evoked advance and delay phase shifts, respectively. Advance phase shifts were followed by 3 to 4 advancing transients and a subsequent shortening of free-running period (tau); whereas, the delay phase shifts were instantaneous without any transients but with a subsequent lengthening of tau. PMID:16298767

  10. The resolution of a magnetic anomaly map expected from GRM data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Arkani-Hamed, J.; Teskey, D. J.; Hood, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the MAGSAT mission were used to derive a global scalar magnetic anomaly map at an average altitude of about 400 km. It was possible to work with 2 data sets corresponding to dawn and dusk. The anomalies which were repeatable at dawn and at dusk was identified and the error limits of these anomalies were estimated. The repeatable anomalies were downward continued to about 10 km altitude. The anomalies over Canada were correlated quantitatively with bandpass filtered magnetic anomalies derived from aeromagnetic surveys. The close correlation indicates that the repeatable anomalies detected from orbit are due to geological causes. This correlation supports the geological significance of the global anomaly map.

  11. Surveillance for Japanese encephalitis in villages near Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Mani, T R; Rao, C V; Rajendran, R; Devaputra, M; Prasanna, Y; Hanumaiah; Gajanana, A; Reuben, R

    1991-01-01

    A simple dusk index was developed to monitor the density of recognized vectors of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) based on hand catches around cattlesheds at dusk and parous rates. When used routinely in combination with sentinel animal studies for surveillance in villages with a high prevalence (46.2%) of neutralizing antibodies against JEV in children under 16 years, there was a peak in vector density and virus activity during the north-east monsoon period, October-December. The reasons for an unusual outbreak of cases of encephalitis during the summer months of 1984 are discussed. PMID:1653473

  12. The Use of Technology in Literacy Instruction: Implications for Teaching Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds. HBSK 4072, Section 3, Fall 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Jennifer D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Almost every aspect of modern life is affected in some way by technology. Many people utilize technology from dawn to dusk to communicate; make decisions; reflect, gain, synthesize, evaluate or distribute information, among many other functions. One would be hard pressed to find a single professional, regardless of career field,…

  13. Temporal Links in Daily Activity Patterns between Coral Reef Predators and Their Prey

    PubMed Central

    Bosiger, Yoland J.; McCormick, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have documented the activity patterns of both predators and their common prey over 24 h diel cycles. This study documents the temporal periodicity of two common resident predators of juvenile reef fishes, Cephalopholis cyanostigma (rockcod) and Pseudochromis fuscus (dottyback) and compares these to the activity and foraging pattern of a common prey species, juvenile Pomacentrus moluccensis (lemon damselfish). Detailed observations of activity in the field and using 24 h infrared video in the laboratory revealed that the two predators had very different activity patterns. C. cyanostigma was active over the whole 24 h period, with a peak in feeding strikes at dusk and increased activity at both dawn and dusk, while P. fuscus was not active at night and had its highest strike rates at midday. The activity and foraging pattern of P. moluccensis directly opposes that of C. cyanostigma with individuals reducing strike rate and intraspecific aggression at both dawn and dusk, and reducing distance from shelter and boldness at dusk only. Juveniles examined were just outside the size-selection window of P. fuscus. We suggest that the relatively predictable diel behaviour of coral reef predators results from physiological factors such as visual sensory abilities, circadian rhythmicity, variation in hunting profitability, and predation risk at different times of the day. Our study suggests that the diel periodicity of P. moluccensis behaviour may represent a response to increased predation risk at times when both the ability to efficiently capture food and visually detect predators is reduced. PMID:25354096

  14. Timing of herbage and fasting allocation in strip grazed cattle: Effects on patterns of ingestive behavior, herbage intake, and nutrient supply

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Afternoon herbage allocations have shown to improve animal performance due to an increment in herbage intake during dusk, when herbage quality is higher. However, this phenomenon might not yet be maximized. This work aimed to assess the impact of timing of herbage and fasting allocation on patterns ...

  15. Older Drivers: How Health Affects Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... see clearly, especially at dawn, dusk, and night. Eyes become more sensitive to glare from headlights, street lights, or the sun, making it difficult to see people, things, and movements outside your direct line of sight. Peripheral vision — the ability to see to the ...

  16. Remote Observations of Ion Temperatures in the Quiet Time Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, A. M.; Buzulukova, N.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Scime, E. E.; Spence, H.; Fok, M. C.; Tallaksen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ion temperature analysis of the first energetic neutral atom images of the quiet -time, extended magnetosphere provides evidence of multiple regions of ion heating. This study confirms the existence of a dawn -dusk asymmetry in ion temperature predicted for quiescent magnetospheric conditions by Spence and Kivelson (1993) and demonstrates that it is an inherent magnetospheric feature.

  17. The plasmapause revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Gebowsky, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Saturation of the dc double probe instrument on Explorer 45 was used to identify the plasmapause. A data base was developed to statistically study the average position of the plasmapause over 14.5 hours of magnetic local time under differing magnetic conditions. The afternoon-evening bulge in the L coordinate of the plasmapause versus local time was found centered between 20 and 21 hours MLT during magnetically quiet periods and shifted toward dusk as activity increased, but always post dusk. During quiet periods a bulge in the L coordinate near noon was also seen, which disappeared as activity increased. The average local time distribution plasmapause position during high magnetic activity was irregular in the afternoon region where large scale convection models predict the creation of plasmatails or detached plasma regions from increases in the solar wind induced convection. The results suggest that solar wind induced convection is partially shielded from the dayside. As the intensity of the convection is increased, it more effectively penetrates the dayside, which shifts the post dusk bulge nearer to dusk and eliminates the quiet-time bulge near noon.

  18. The near-Earth magnetic field at 1980 determined from MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the MAGSAT spacecraft for November 1979 through April 1980 and from 91 magnetic observatories for 1978 through 1982 are used to derive a spherical harmonic model of the Earth's main magnetic field and its secular variation. Constant coefficients are determined through degree and order 13 and secular variation coefficients through degree and order 10. The first degree external terms and corresponding induced internal terms are given as a function of Dst. Preliminary modeling using separate data sets at dawn and dusk local time showed that the dusk data contains a substantial field contribution from the equatorial electrojet current. The final data set is selected first from dawn data and then augmented by dusk data to achieve a good geographic data distribution for each of three time periods: (1) November/December, 1979; (2) January/February; 1980; (3) March/April, 1980. A correction for the effects of the equatorial electrojet is applied to the dusk data utilized. The solution included calculation of fixed biases, or anomalies, for the observation data.

  19. Spatial distribution of upstream magnetospheric geq50 keV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Argyropoulos, G.; Kaliabetsos, G.

    2000-01-01

    We present for the first time a statistical study of geq50 keV ion events of a magnetospheric origin upstream from Earth's bow shock. The statistical analysis of the 50-220 keV ion events observed by the IMP-8 spacecraft shows: (1) a dawn-dusk asymmetry in ion distributions, with most events and lower intensities upstream from the quasi-parallel pre-dawn side (4 LT-6 LT) of the bow shock, (2) highest ion fluxes upstream from the nose/dusk side of the bow shock under an almost radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) configuration, and (3) a positive correlation of the ion intensities with the solar wind speed and the index of geomagnetic index Kp, with an average solar wind speed as high as 620 km s-1 and values of the index Kp > 2. The statistical results are consistent with (1) preferential leakage of sim50 keV magnetospheric ions from the dusk magnetopause, (2) nearly scatter free motion of sim50 keV ions within the magnetosheath, and (3) final escape of magnetospheric ions from the quasi-parallel dawn side of the bow shock. An additional statistical analysis of higher energy (290-500 keV) upstream ion events also shows a dawn-dusk asymmetry in the occurrence frequency of these events, with the occurrence frequency ranging between sim16%-sim34% in the upstream region.

  20. Duskside enhancement of equatorial zonal electric field response to convection electric fields during the St. Patrick's Day storm on 17 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Otsuka, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Sripathi, S.; Veenadhari, B.; Heelis, R.; Ajith, K. K.; Gowtam, V. S.; Gurubaran, S.; Supnithi, P.; Le Huy, M.

    2016-01-01

    The equatorial zonal electric field responses to prompt penetration of eastward convection electric fields (PPEF) were compared at closely spaced longitudinal intervals at dusk to premidnight sectors during the intense geomagnetic storm of 17 March 2015. At dusk sector (Indian longitudes), a rapid uplift of equatorial F layer to >550 km and development of intense equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were observed. These EPBs were found to extend up to 27.13°N and 25.98°S magnetic dip latitudes indicating their altitude development to ~1670 km at apex. In contrast, at few degrees east in the premidnight sector (Thailand-Indonesian longitudes), no significant height rise and/or EPB activity has been observed. The eastward electric field perturbations due to PPEF are greatly dominated at dusk sector despite the existence of background westward ionospheric disturbance dynamo (IDD) fields, whereas they were mostly counter balanced by the IDD fields in the premidnight sector. In situ observations from SWARM-A and SWARM-C and Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellites detected a large plasma density depletion near Indian equatorial region due to large electrodynamic uplift of F layer to higher than satellite altitudes. Further, this large uplift is found to confine to a narrow longitudinal sector centered on sunset terminator. This study brings out the significantly enhanced equatorial zonal electric field in response to PPEF that is uniquely confined to dusk sector. The responsible mechanisms are discussed in terms of unique electrodynamic conditions prevailing at dusk sector in the presence of convection electric fields associated with the onset of a substorm under southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz.

  1. Application of ground-truth for classification and quantification of bird movements on migratory bird habitat initiative sites in southwest Louisiana: final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrow, Wylie C.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Randall, Lori A.; Pitre, John; Dudley, Kyle J.

    2013-01-01

    This project was initiated to assess migrating and wintering bird use of lands enrolled in the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Migratory Bird Habitat Initiative (MBHI). The MBHI program was developed in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, with the goal of improving/creating habitat for waterbirds affected by the spill. In collaboration with the University of Delaware (UDEL), we used weather surveillance radar data (Sieges 2014), portable marine radar data, thermal infrared images, and visual observations to assess bird use of MBHI easements. Migrating and wintering birds routinely make synchronous flights near dusk (e.g., departure during migration, feeding flights during winter). Weather radars readily detect birds at the onset of these flights and have proven to be useful remote sensing tools for assessing bird-habitat relations during migration and determining the response of wintering waterfowl to wetland restoration (e.g., Wetlands Reserve Program lands). However, ground-truthing is required to identify radar echoes to species or species group. We designed a field study to ground-truth a larger-scale, weather radar assessment of bird use of MBHI sites in southwest Louisiana. We examined seasonal bird use of MBHI fields in fall, winter, and spring of 2011-2012. To assess diurnal use, we conducted total area surveys of MBHI sites in the afternoon, collecting data on bird species composition, abundance, behavior, and habitat use. In the evenings, we quantified bird activity at the MBHI easements and described flight behavior (i.e., birds landing in, departing from, circling, or flying over the MBHI tract). Our field sampling captured the onset of evening flights and spanned the period of collection of the weather radar data analyzed. Pre- and post-dusk surveys were conducted using a portable radar system and a thermal infrared camera. Landbirds, shorebirds, and wading birds were commonly found on MBHI fields during diurnal

  2. Bimodal oscillations of cyclic nucleotide concentrations in the circadian system of the Madeira cockroach Rhyparobia maderae.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Julia; Schendzielorz, Thomas; Arendt, Andreas; Stengl, Monika

    2014-10-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is the most important coupling factor of the circadian system in insects, comparable to its functional ortholog vasoactive intestinal polypeptide of the mammalian circadian clock. In Drosophila melanogaster, PDF signals via activation of adenylyl cyclases, controlling circadian locomotor activity rhythms at dusk and dawn. In addition, PDF mediates circadian rhythms of the visual system and is involved in entrainment to different photoperiods. We examined whether PDF daytime-dependently elevates cAMP levels in the Madeira cockroach Rhyparobia maderae and whether cAMP mimics PDF effects on locomotor activity rhythms. To determine time windows of PDF release, we searched for circadian rhythms in concentrations of cAMP and its functional opponent cGMP in the accessory medulla (AMe), the insect circadian pacemaker controlling locomotor activity rhythms, and in the optic lobes, as the major input and output area of the circadian clock. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays detected PDF-dependent increases of cAMP in optic lobes and daytime-dependent oscillations of cAMP and cGMP baseline levels in the AMe, both with maxima at dusk and dawn. Although these rhythms disappeared at the first day in constant conditions (DD1), cAMP but not cGMP oscillations returned at the second day in constant conditions (DD2). Whereas in light-dark cycles the cAMP baseline level remained constant in other optic lobe neuropils, it oscillated in phase with the AMe at DD2. To determine whether cAMP and cGMP mimic PDF-dependent control of locomotor activity rhythms, both cyclic nucleotides were injected at different times of the circadian day using running-wheel assays. Whereas cAMP injections generated delays at dusk and advances at dawn, cGMP only delayed locomotor activity at dusk. For the first time we found PDF-dependent phase advances at dawn in addition to previously described phase delays at dusk. Thus, we hypothesize that PDF release at dusk and dawn

  3. Solar terminator effects on middle- to low-latitude Pi2 pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imajo, Shun; Yoshikawa, Akimasa; Uozumi, Teiji; Ohtani, Shinichi; Nakamizo, Aoi; Demberel, Sodnomsambuu; Shevtsov, Boris Mikhailovich

    2016-08-01

    To clarify the effect of the dawn and dusk terminators on Pi2 pulsations, we statistically analyzed the longitudinal phase and amplitude structures of Pi2 pulsations at middle- to low-latitude stations (GMLat = 5.30°-46.18°) around both the dawn and dusk terminators. Although the H (north-south) component Pi2s were affected by neither the local time (LT) nor the terminator location (at 100 km altitude in the highly conducting E region), some features of the D (east-west) component Pi2s depended on the location of the terminator rather than the LT. The phase reversal of the D component occurred 0.5-1 h after sunrise and 1-2 h before sunset. These phase reversals can be attributed to a change in the contributing currents from field-aligned currents (FACs) on the nightside to the meridional ionospheric currents on the sunlit side of the terminator, and vice versa. The phase reversal of the dawn terminator was more frequent than that of the dusk terminator. The D-to- H amplitude ratio on the dawn side began to increase at sunrise, reaching a peak approximately 2 h after sunrise (the sunward side of the phase reversal region), whereas the ratio on the dusk side reached a peak at sunset (the antisunward side). The dawn-dusk asymmetric features suggest that the magnetic contribution of the nightside FAC relative to the meridional ionospheric current on the dusk side is stronger than that on the dawn side, indicating that the center of Pi2-associated FACs, which probably corresponds to the Pi2 energy source, tends to be shifted duskward on average. Different features and weak sunrise/sunset dependences at the middle-latitude station (Paratunka, GMLat = 46.18°) can be attributed to the larger annual variation in the sunrise/sunset time and a stronger magnetic effect because of closeness from FACs. The D-to- H amplitude ratio decreased with decreasing latitude, suggesting that the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the FACs in darkness and the meridional ionospheric

  4. A statistical study of ion pitch-angle distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results of a statistical study of energetic (34-50 keV) ion pitch-angle distributions (PADs) within 9 Re of earth provide evidence for an orderly pattern consistent with both drift-shell splitting and magnetopause shadowing. Normal ion PADs dominate the dayside and inner magnetosphere. Butterfly PADs typically occur in a narrow belt stretching from dusk to dawn through midnight, where they approach within 6 Re of earth. While those ion butterfly PADs that typically occur on closed drift paths are mainly caused by drift-shell splitting, there is also evidence for magnetopause shadowing in observations of more frequent butterfly PAD occurrence in the outer magnetosphere near dawn than dusk. Isotropic and gradient boundary PADs terminate the tailward extent of the butterfly ion PAD belt.

  5. Irregular structure of thermal ion plasma near the plasmapause observed from Ogo 3 and Pc 1 measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, H.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Independent measurements of the plasmapause and associated thermal plasma structure from Ogo 3 are compared with ground-based Pc 1 observations from the period 1966-67. Substantial agreement between the plasmapause crossing identified on the satellite and the Pc 1 occurrence positions observed on the ground at midlatitudes during the nighttime (including dawn and dusk) indicates that these nighttime Pc 1 events are closely associated with the plasmapause. A correlation of selected closely spaced events obtained in the nighttime under quiet to moderate activity provides good agreement in the proton concentrations near the plasmapause boundary. Preliminary results indicate Pc 1 excitation is associated with plasma irregularities near the plasmapause and is particularly favorable in the region of 'post-storm recovery' and in the region of diurnal 'plasma bulge' in the afternoon-dusk sector.

  6. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and at MAGSAT altitudes, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    Geomagnetic field variations were studied by considering the parameter delta H which indicated H(observed) minus H(model), where H = (X squared + Y squared) (1/2) where X, Y, and Z are the components actually observed. Quiet time base values for 5 deg longitude belts were estimated. After subtracting these from the observed values, the residual delta H (dawn) and delta H (dusk) were studied for the two major storms. It was noticed that the dusk values attained larger (negative) values for a longer time, than the dawn value. Some changes in delta Y and delta Z were also noticed, indicating possibilities of either meridional currents and/or noncoincidence of the central plane of the ring current with the equatorial plane of the Earth. Other details are described.

  7. Diel changes in the near-surface biomass of zooplankton and the carbon content of vertical migrants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Graeme C.; Harris, Roger P.; Head, Robert N.

    Zooplankton biomass and the carbon content of vertical migrants were measured in the NE Atlantic (36.5°N, 19.2°W) between 11 and 18 July 1996 as part of the Plankton Reactivity in the Marine Environment (PRIME) programme. The increase in zooplankton biomass near the surface (0-100 m) at night compared to during the day suggested that diel vertical migration was an important feature at this site. For three species of vertically migrant copepods, Pleuromamma pisekii, P. gracilis and P. abdominalis, the carbon content of individuals collected at dusk was significantly less than for individuals collected at dawn, with this reduction being 6.2, 7.3 and 14.8%, respectively. This dawn-dusk reduction in carbon content is consistent with the diel pattern of feeding and fasting exhibited by vertical migrants and supports the suggestion that migrating zooplankton will cause an active export of carbon from the surface layers.

  8. The solar wind plasma entry and its effects on plasma sheet entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, S.; Johnson, J. R.

    2008-05-01

    The solar wind enters the plasma sheet during northward and southward IMF. The connection between solar wind ions and plasma sheet cold-component ions has been demonstrated with in situ Geotail and inferred DMSP observations. The cold dense ions that originate from the solar wind are expected to decrease the entropies in the plasma sheet. Order of magnitude calculations of plasma sheet filling rate from reconnection and diffusion (either by K-H instabilities or kinetic Alfven waves) suggest that both entry mechanisms could result in roughly comparable filling rates, which are found consistent with DMSP observations. Previous studies have shown the presence of the dawn-dusk asymmetries in the plasma sheet temperatures and densities, which may be key in distinguishing various proposed entry mechanisms. This is investigated further with the entropy profiles and their dawn-dusk asymmetries during northward and southward IMF.

  9. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and at MAGSAT altitudes, part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    The latitudinal distributions of delta H, delta X, delta Y, and delta Z were studied for quiet and disturbed periods. For quiet periods, the average patterns showed some variations common to dusk and dawn, thus indicating probable ground anomaly. However, there were significant differences too between dusk and dawn, indicating considerable diurnal variation effects. Particularly in delta Y, these effects were large and were symmetric about the dip equator. For disturbed day passes, the quiet day patterns were considered as base levels and the latter were subtracted from the former. The resulting residual latitudinal patterns were, on the average, symmetric about the geographical equator. However, individual passes showed considerable north-south asymmetries, probably indicating meanderings of the central plane of the magnetospheric ring current.

  10. Observation of bow shock protons at the lunar orbit. M.S. Thesis; [particle trajectory analysis of solar protons in the lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Protons with energies ranging from about 500 eV to 3,500 eV were observed by the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) on both the dusk and dawn sides of the magnetosphere. On each lunation these particles appeared as a rather continuous phenomenon for 3 to 5 days after crossing from the dawn-side magnetosheath into the solar wind and for about 2 days prior to entering the dusk-side magnetosheath. Data from the SIDE and from the Explorer 35 lunar orbiting magnetometer were analyzed and these data indicated that the transverse ion flows observed by the SIDE in the pre and post bow shock crossing regions of the lunar orbit are due to these deviated solar wind particles. A computer model based on drift trajectories for particles leaving the shock was developed and synthetic particle data produced by this model are in good agreement with the observed data.

  11. The relationship between the IMF B(y) and the distant tail (150-238 Re) lobe and plasmasheet B(y) fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J.; Jones, D. E.; Lepping, R. P.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    The relationships between the Solar Magnetospheric (SM) y-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the lobe and plasmasheet magnetic fields have been studied for the two ISEE-3 deep tail passes. It is found that for positive sector IMFs, 13 percent of the interplanetary magnetic field penetrates into the aberrated north-dawn and south-dusk lobe quadrants, and about the same amount in the north-dusk and south-dawn lobe quadrants for negative sector IMFs. For the above cases, field penetration is significantly less for opposite polarity IMFs. The former results are generally consistent with open magnetospheric models, but the latter (the lack of response in certain quadrants) are unexplained by theory at this time. If the magnitude of the plasmasheet B(y) fields are related to plasma pressure anisotropies, very small anisotropies of about 1.01 are expected.

  12. Lunar and daily spawning rhythms of Senegal sole Solea senegalensis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C; Dinis, M T; Soares, F; Cabrita, E; Pousão-Ferreira, P; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2009-07-01

    A periodicity of 29 days was observed in spawning rhythms in Senegal sole Solea senegalensis, with an acrophase around the last quarter and the new moon. In both spring and autumn, a very marked nocturnal spawning rhythm was registered, with spawning beginning after dusk and the acrophase occurring around 2300 hours. When the photoperiod was artificially extended (from 10L:14D to 14L:10D), S. senegalensis synchronized to the new photoperiod: spawning took place after the new 'dusk', the beginning gradually shifting from 2100 to 2300 hours and the acrophase from 2325 to 0032 hours. Under continuous light conditions, fish sustained rhythmicity for 2 days, with an acrophase at 2249 hours, which suggested the existence of an endogenous pacemaker controlling the daily spawning rhythm. These findings provided new insights for better understanding the reproductive physiology of this species and for optimizing the timing protocols of egg collection and larvae production in S. senegalensis aquaculture. PMID:20738482

  13. The inner edge of the plasma sheet and the diffuse aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Vinas, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Three dimensional measurements from the ISEE-1 low energy electron spectrometer are used to map the location of the inner edge of the plasma sheet and study the anisotropies in the electron distribution function associated with this boundary. Lower energy plasma sheet electrons have inner edges closer to the Earth than higher energies with the separations at different energies being larger near dawn and after dusk than at midnight. Lowest energy inner edges are frequently located adjacent to the plasmapause in the dawn hemisphere but are often separated from it in the dusk hemisphere by a gap of at least several Re. The energy dispersion is minimal in the afternoon quadrant where the inner edge is near the magnetopause and frequently oscillating on a time scale of minutes. The location of the inner edge is probably determined primarily by the motion of electrons in the existing electric and magnetic fields rather than by strong diffusion as has sometimes been supposed.

  14. Frequency variability of standing Alfvén waves excited by fast mode resonances in the outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, M. O.; Hartinger, M. D.; Walsh, B. M.; Plaschke, F.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled fast mode resonances (cFMRs) in the outer magnetosphere, between the magnetopause and a turning point, are often invoked to explain observed discrete frequency field line resonances. We quantify their frequency variability, applying cFMR theory to a realistic magnetic field model and magnetospheric density profiles observed over almost half a solar cycle. Our calculations show that cFMRs are most likely around dawn, since the plasmaspheric plumes and extended plasmaspheres often found at noon and dusk can preclude their occurrence. The relative spread (median absolute deviation divided by the median) in eigenfrequencies is estimated to be 28%, 72%, and 55% at dawn, noon, and dusk, respectively, with the latter two chiefly due to density. Finally, at dawn we show that the observed bimodal density distribution results in bimodal cFMR frequencies, whereby the secondary peaks are consistent with the so-called "CMS" frequencies that have previously been attributed to cFMRs.

  15. Average field-aligned current configuration parameterized by solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J. A.; Milan, S. E.; Coxon, J. C.; Walach, M.-T.; Anderson, B. J.

    2016-02-01

    We present the first large-scale comparison of the spatial distribution of field-aligned currents as measured by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment, with the location and brightness of the average auroral oval, determined from the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration far ultraviolet instrument. These distributions are compared under the same interplanetary magnetic field magnitude and clock angle conditions. The field-aligned currents and auroral oval drop to lower latitudes, as the interplanetary magnetic field becomes both increasingly stronger in magnitude and increasingly southward. We find that the region 2 currents are more closely aligned with the distribution of auroral UV emission, whether that be in the discrete auroral zone about dusk or in the postmidnight diffuse aurora sector. The lack of coincidence between the region 1 field-aligned currents with the auroral oval in the dusk sector is contrary to expectation.

  16. Electron plasma oscillations in the near-earth solar wind: Preliminary observations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Scarf, F. L.; Green, I. M.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary results and conclusions of a study of electric field oscillations in the upstream solar wind are reported. The OGO-5 orbits are on the dusk (three) and on the dawn (one) sides of the earth-sun line. It is concluded that there are electron streams produced at or near the bow shock. These streams penetrate the incoming solar wind plasma, and generate quasi-electromagnetic waves. The streams (as inferred from the wave levels) occur without regard to dawn-dusk location, as opposed to the low-frequency MHD upstream disturbances driven by backstreaming protons, which show a definitely strong preference for the dawn-noon sector. The presence of the suprathermal electron streams and associated wave turbulence indicates that some near-earth electron distributions are probably not representative of true solar wind distributions far away from the earth.

  17. Possible leakage of energetic particles from the magnetosphere into the upstream region on June 7, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudela, K.; Sibeck, D. G.; Belian, R. D.; Fischer, S.; Lutsenko, V.

    1990-01-01

    Prognoz 10 observed a series of energetic ion (E not less than 10 KeV) and electron (E not less than 30 KeV) bursts whilst upstream of the dusk bow shock from 2000-2200 UT on June 7, 1985. The particles streamed away from the bow shock along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during periods when the IMF connected the spacecraft to the bow shock/magnetosphere. Both ions and electrons were observed when the IMF connected the spacecraft to the subsolar bow shock, but only ions were observed when the IMF connected the spacecraft to the dusk bow shock. Simultaneous ground and magnetospheric observations are presented which indicate the onset of geomagnetic activity and an increase in magnetospheric energetic particle flux levels just prior to the series of particle bursts observed by Prognoz 10 upstream of the bow shock. The combined observations are consistent with a magnetospheric source for these upstream particle events.

  18. Distribution of larval fishes related to potential navigation impacts on the upper Mississippi River, pool 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, L.E.; Sylvester, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Ichthyoplankton samples were collected twice monthly during spring and summer 1981 from a variety of habitats in Navigation Pool 7 of the upper Mississippi River. Larval-fish distributions in the pool and variations in those distributions were analyzed relative to potential impacts of increased commercial navigation. Although as many as 66 species of adults have been found in the area (33 considered common), only 17 taxa were identified from our collections. In April and May, most larvae were collected in main-channel and main-channel-border areas next to major expanses of shallow backwaters. White bass Morone chrysops, yellow perch Perca flavescens, and crappies Pomoxis spp. were predominant. Numerous catostomids also were taken. In June and July, most larvae were taken in the lower pool. Freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens and gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum predominated in these samples, which also included many cyprinids and centrarchids. Diel patterns of abundance varied with species and sampling location. Freshwater drums were more abundant near the surface at midnight than during the day. Common carp Cyprinus carpio were most abundant in collections at dusk, whereas all other cyprinids were most abundant at dusk and dawn. Numbers of gizzard shad also increased slightly at dusk. Total numbers of larvae collected were greatest at dusk in main-channel and main-channel-border samples; backwater areas produced the greatest catches at midnight and dawn. Seasonal, spatial, diel, and species-specific variations in larval fish abundances significantly influenced the proportion of the community potentially vulnerable to increased boat traffic through Pool 7.

  19. Comparison of storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at ground and MAGSAT altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1982-01-01

    The MAGSAT data for the period Nov. 2-20, 1979 were studied. From the observed H, the HMD predicted by model was subtracted. The residue delta H = H-HMD shows storm-time variations similar to geomagnetic Dst, at least qualitatively. Delta H sub 0, i.e., equatorial values of delta H were studied separately for dusk and dawn and show some differences.

  20. Mapping high-latitude plasma convection with coherent HF radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.; Baker, K. B.; Villain, J.-P.; Hanuise, C.

    1989-01-01

    Several methods developed for mapping high-latitude plasma convection with a high-latitude HF radar are described, which utilize coherent backscatter from electron density irregularities at F-region altitudes to observe convective plasma motion. Several examples of two-dimensional convection-velocity maps are presented, showing instances of L-shell-aligned flow in the dusk sector, the reversal of convection near magnetic midnight, and counterstreaming in the dayside cleft.

  1. A consistent understanding of the ribbon structure for the Io plasma torus at the Voyager 1, 1991 ground-based, and Galileo J0 epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, William H.; Peterson, Charles A.; Marconi, Max L.

    2011-07-01

    A new four-dimensional (three spatial and local time) empirical model for the Io plasma torus is presented that includes several System III longitude asymmetries and a dawn-dusk electric field with variable direction and magnitude. The model is used to analyze and compare observations for the peak density structure of the plasma torus acquired at the 1979 Voyager 1, the 1991 ground-based, and the 1995 Galileo J0 epochs. The mean magnitude of the dawn-dusk electric field is determined to be much smaller at the 1991 ground-based epoch than at the Voyager 1 and Galileo J0 epochs. A consistent understanding of the radial structure for the density peaks in the plasma torus may then be achieved for these epochs if the dawn-dusk electric field departs by ˜20° from the true dawn-dusk direction and if account is taken of absolute density changes. The ratio of the electron density in the inner and outer plasma torus varies significantly for the three epochs and indicates different temporal evolutions in the balance of the plasma torus production and loss processes. The undisturbed electron density at Io's position in the plasma torus is calculated and has significantly different values at the three epochs; it is shown for each epoch to undergo large variations as Io changes its location in heliocentric phase angle and System III longitude. These large variations provide a wide variety of changing upstream plasma conditions for Io's atmospheric formation, local aurora and distant footprint emissions, and electrodynamic interaction.

  2. On chaotic conductivity in the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Daniel L.; Chen, James

    1992-01-01

    The concept of chaotic conductivity and the acceleration of particles due to a constant dawn dusk electric field are studied in a magnetotail-like magnetic field. A test particle simulation is used including the full nonlinear dynamics. It is found that the acceleration process can be understood without invoking chaos and that the cross tail current is determined by the particle dynamics and distributions. It is concluded that in general there is no simple relationship between the electric field and the current.

  3. Viking observations of a reverse convection cell developing in response to a northward turning of the interplanetary magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.G.; Murphree, J.S.

    1996-04-15

    The authors report the development of a reverse sense convection cell in the polar ionosphere from auroral images coming from UV Viking probes. The cell was observed to grow on the dusk side of the north polar oval, near the transpolar arcs. As it grew it seemed to displace the arc system toward dawn. They compare their observations with a model in which magnetic merging in the magnetopause produces such convection cells, typically associated with horse-collar or teardrop auroral features.

  4. Normal vision can compensate for the loss of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Schlichting, Matthias; Menegazzi, Pamela; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2015-09-22

    Circadian clocks are thought to be essential for timing the daily activity of animals, and consequently increase fitness. This view was recently challenged for clock-less fruit flies and mice that exhibited astonishingly normal activity rhythms under outdoor conditions. Compensatory mechanisms appear to enable even clock mutants to live a normal life in nature. Here, we show that gradual daily increases/decreases of light in the laboratory suffice to provoke normally timed sharp morning (M) and evening (E) activity peaks in clock-less flies. We also show that the compound eyes, but not Cryptochrome (CRY), mediate the precise timing of M and E peaks under natural-like conditions, as CRY-less flies do and eyeless flies do not show these sharp peaks independently of a functional clock. Nevertheless, the circadian clock appears critical for anticipating dusk, as well as for inhibiting sharp activity peaks during midnight. Clock-less flies only increase E activity after dusk and not before the beginning of dusk, and respond strongly to twilight exposure in the middle of the night. Furthermore, the circadian clock responds to natural-like light cycles, by slightly broadening Timeless (TIM) abundance in the clock neurons, and this effect is mediated by CRY. PMID:26378222

  5. IMF-By dependence of transient ionospheric flow perturbation associated with sudden impulses: SuperDARN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Tomoaki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Fujita, Shigeru; Nishitani, Nozomu

    2015-11-01

    A statistical study using a large dataset of Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) observations is conducted for transient ionospheric plasma flows associated with sudden impulses (SI) recorded on ground magnetic field. The global structure of twin vortex-like ionospheric flows is found to be consistent with the twin vortices of ionospheric Hall current deduced by the past geomagnetic field observations. An interesting feature, which is focused on in this study, is that the flow structures show a dawn-dusk asymmetry depending on the combination of the polarity of SI and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)-By. Detailed statistics of the SuperDARN observations reveal that the dawn-dusk asymmetry of flow vortices due to IMF-By appears during negative SIs, while such asymmetric characteristics are not seen during positive SIs. On the basis of the upstream observations, we suggest that this particular dawn-dusk asymmetry is caused by the interaction between the pre-existing round convection cell and a pair of the transient convection vortices associated with SIs.

  6. Label-free quantitative analysis of the casein kinase 2-responsive phosphoproteome of the marine minimal model species Ostreococcus tauri.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Thierry; Hindle, Matthew; Martin, Sarah F; Barrios-Llerena, Martin E; Krahmer, Johanna; Kis, Katalin; Millar, Andrew J; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2015-12-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a protein kinase that phosphorylates a plethora of cellular target proteins involved in processes including DNA repair, cell cycle control, and circadian timekeeping. CK2 is functionally conserved across eukaryotes, although the substrate proteins identified in a range of complex tissues are often different. The marine alga Ostreococcus tauri is a unicellular eukaryotic model organism ideally suited to efficiently study generic roles of CK2 in the cellular circadian clock. Overexpression of CK2 leads to a slow circadian rhythm, verifying functional conservation of CK2 in timekeeping. The proteome was analysed in wild-type and CK2-overexpressing algae at dawn and dusk, revealing that differential abundance of the global proteome across the day is largely unaffected by overexpression. However, CK2 activity contributed more strongly to timekeeping at dusk than at dawn. The phosphoproteome of a CK2 overexpression line and cells treated with CK2 inhibitor was therefore analysed and compared to control cells at dusk. We report an extensive catalogue of 447 unique CK2-responsive differential phosphopeptide motifs to inform future studies into CK2 activity in the circadian clock of more complex tissues. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000975 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000975). PMID:25930153

  7. FORTRAN programs to process Magsat data for lithospheric, external field, and residual core components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsdorf, Douglas E.; Vonfrese, Ralph R. B.

    1994-01-01

    The FORTRAN programs supplied in this document provide a complete processing package for statistically extracting residual core, external field and lithospheric components in Magsat observations. To process the individual passes: (1) orbits are separated into dawn and dusk local times and by altitude, (2) passes are selected based on the variance of the magnetic field observations after a least-squares fit of the core field is removed from each pass over the study area, and (3) spatially adjacent passes are processed with a Fourier correlation coefficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features between neighboring tracks. In the second state of map processing: (1) data from the passes are normalized to a common altitude and gridded into dawn and dusk maps with least squares collocation, (2) dawn and dusk maps are correlated with a Fourier correlation efficient filter to separate coherent and non-coherent features; the coherent features are averaged to produce a total field grid, (3) total field grids from all altitudes are continued to a common altitude, correlation filtered for coherent anomaly features, and subsequently averaged to produce the final total field grid for the study region, and (4) the total field map is differentially reduced to the pole.

  8. Hydrogen density in the dayside venusian exosphere derived from Lyman-α observations by SPICAV on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaufray, J.-Y.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quémerais, E.; Villard, E.; Leblanc, F.

    2012-02-01

    A series of observations of the venusian hydrogen corona made by SPICAV on Venus Express are analyzed to estimate the amount of hydrogen in the exosphere of Venus. These observations were made between November 2006 and July 2007 at altitudes from 1000 km to 8000 km on the dayside. The Lyman-α brightness profiles derived are reproduced by the sum of a cold hydrogen population dominant below ˜2000 km and a hot hydrogen population dominant above ˜4000 km. The temperature (˜300 K) and hydrogen density at 250 km (˜10 5 cm -3) derived for the cold populations, near noon, are in good agreement with previous observations. Strong dawn-dusk exospheric asymmetry is observed from this set of observations, with a larger exobase density on the dawn side than on the dusk side, consistent with asymmetry previously observed in the venusian thermosphere, but with a lower dawn/dusk contrast. The hot hydrogen density derived is very sensitive to the sky background estimate, but is well constrained near 5000 km. The density of the hot population is reproduced by the exospheric model from Hodges (Hodges, R.R. [1999]. J. Geophys. Res. 104, 8463-8471) in which the hot population is produced by neutral-ions interactions in the thermosphere of Venus.

  9. Cool night-time temperatures induce the expression of CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS T to regulate flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A; Tong, Xinran; Lee, Jae; Song, Young Hun; Ito, Shogo; Kim, Soo-Hyung; Imaizumi, Takato

    2016-07-01

    Day length and ambient temperature are major stimuli controlling flowering time. To understand flowering mechanisms in more natural conditions, we explored the effect of daily light and temperature changes on Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings were exposed to different day/night temperature and day-length treatments to assess expression changes in flowering genes. Cooler temperature treatments increased CONSTANS (CO) transcript levels at night. Night-time CO induction was diminished in flowering bhlh (fbh)-quadruple mutants. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) transcript levels were reduced at dusk, but increased at the end of cooler nights. The dusk suppression, which was alleviated in short vegetative phase (svp) mutants, occurred particularly in younger seedlings, whereas the increase during the night continued over 2 wk. Cooler temperature treatments altered the levels of FLOWERING LOCUS M-β (FLM-β) and FLM-δ splice variants. FT levels correlated strongly with flowering time across treatments. Day/night temperature changes modulate photoperiodic flowering by changing FT accumulation patterns. Cooler night-time temperatures enhance FLOWERING BHLH (FBH)-dependent induction of CO and consequently increase CO protein. When plants are young, cooler temperatures suppress FT at dusk through SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) function, perhaps to suppress precocious flowering. Our results suggest day length and diurnal temperature changes combine to modulate FT and flowering time. PMID:26856528

  10. Two encounters with the flank low-latitude boundary layer - Further evidence for closed field topology and investigation of the internal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Traver, D. P.; Mitchell, D. G.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The structure of the flank low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is examined through differential energy spectra and particle angular anisotropies for traversals of the dawn flank (December 19, 1977) and dusk flank (July 7, 1978) during periods of predominantly northward magnetosheath field orientation. Spectra are presented that were obtained from combined ISEE 1 low-energy-proton and electron-differential-energy-analyzer and medium-energy-particle-instrument data extending over the 200-eV/q to 2-MeV energy range for the plasma sheet, stagnation region, outer LLBL, and magnetosheath regions. The stagnation region and the outer LLBL are each a mixture of plasma-sheet and magnetosheath populations, but the stagnation region contains a relatively higher fraction of plasma sheet particles, consistent with its placement earthward of the outer LLBL. Evidence for energization of thermal electrons appears during the dusk flank crossing. Bidirectional field-aligned ion distributions are observed with typically 5-to-1 enhancement of the flux along the magnetic field during certain portions of the dusk flank crossing.

  11. Coupled Magnetotail-Ionosphere Asymmetries from Ionospheric Hall Conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotko, W.; Smith, R. H.; Zhang, B.; Ouellette, J.; Brambles, O.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Fast convective transport in the plasma sheet is more prevalent in the premidnight (dusk) sector relative to postmidnight. Ionospheric convection exhibits related asymmetries - more flux typically circulates in the dusk cell than in the dawn cell, and the nightside convection pattern is rotated clockwise when viewed over the North Pole. We show, using global simulations of the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction, that the electrodynamic interaction between Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere produces asymmetries resembling observed distributions in plasmasheet flows and ionospheric convection (Figure, center panel). The primary causal agent in the simulations is a meridional gradient in ionospheric Hall conductance which, through Cowling polarization, regulates the distributions of i) electrical currents flowing within and between the ionosphere and magnetotail and ii) the nightside reconnection rate and resulting dawn-dusk distribution of plasma sheet fast flows. The asymmetry disappears in the simulation when the Hall conductance is taken to be uniform (left panel), and it reverses when the conductance is artificially depleted at auroral latitudes (right panel). The coupling between meridional currents and electric fields in the ionosphere and axial currents and electric fields in the plasmasheet is demonstrated by a simple model for non-ideal coupling of field-aligned currents flowing between the plasma sheet and the region of enhanced ionospheric conductance straddling the nightside convection throat.

  12. Mapping electrostatic potentials from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Foster, J. C.; Banks, P. M.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques for mapping observed ionospheric-potential distributions into the magnetosphere are discussed and illustrated using published Millstone Hill and Chatanika incoherent-scatter-radar data. It is shown that the mapping of a given field line to the equator is subject to strong diurnal and seasonal variations (attributed to the combination of internal and tail-current magnetic-field sources at auroral latitudes and the diurnal variation of solar declination in dipole coordinates) and longitude-dependent differences in ionospheric geometry. A mapping based on the tilt-dependent model of Olson and Pfitzer (1977) and using an empirical ionospheric-potential distribution derived from Chatanika plasma-drift measurements produces a relativity uniform magnetospheric electric field in the tail region. The field at 12 earth radii (Re) is found to be between 1 and 2 kV/Re; at the dawn-dusk meridian beyond the plasmasphere it is as high as 5 kV/Re. The plasmasphere is shown to have a dusk bulge in its equipotential structure and to be almost symmetric about the dawn-dusk meridian.

  13. Mapping electrostatic potentials from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Foster, J. C.; Banks, P. M.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1983-11-01

    Techniques for mapping observed ionospheric-potential distributions into the magnetosphere are discussed and illustrated using published Millstone Hill and Chatanika incoherent-scatter-radar data. It is shown that the mapping of a given field line to the equator is subject to strong diurnal and seasonal variations (attributed to the combination of internal and tail-current magnetic-field sources at auroral latitudes and the diurnal variation of solar declination in dipole coordinates) and longitude-dependent differences in ionospheric geometry. A mapping based on the tilt-dependent model of Olson and Pfitzer (1977) and using an empirical ionospheric-potential distribution derived from Chatanika plasma-drift measurements produces a relativity uniform magnetospheric electric field in the tail region. The field at 12 earth radii (Re) is found to be between 1 and 2 kV/Re; at the dawn-dusk meridian beyond the plasmasphere it is as high as 5 kV/Re. The plasmasphere is shown to have a dusk bulge in its equipotential structure and to be almost symmetric about the dawn-dusk meridian.

  14. System III variations in apparent distance of Io plasma torus from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    System III variations in apparent distance of the Io plasma torus from Jupiter are examined on the basis of data obtained from UVS scans across Jupiter's satellite system. The displacement of the dawn and dusk ansae are found to be unexpectedly complex. The displacements are unequal and both ansae are in motion with the motion of the approaching ansa being the lesser of the two. The radial motions, as measured from either the center of Jupiter or the offset-tilted dipole, are of unequal magnitude and have the System III periodicity. It is concluded that the cross-tail electric field that causes these torus motions is concentrated on the dusk ansa, varied with the System III period, and shows magnetic-anomaly phase control. It is found that the dawn-dust asymmetry in brightness is not explained simply by the cross-tail electric field. It is concluded that there is a heating mechanism that causes the dusk side of the Io plasma torus to be brighter than the dawn side.

  15. Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope determination of the Io torus electron temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. T.; Bednar, C. J.; Durrance, S. T.; Feldman, P. D.; Mcgrath, M. A.; Moos, H. W.; Strobel, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfur ion emissions from the Io plasma torus observed by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) in 1990 December have been analyzed to determine the effective temperature of the exciting electrons. Spectra were obtained with a long slit that extended from 3.1 to 8.7 Jupiter radii R(sub J) on both dawn and dusk torus ansae. The average temperature of electrons exciting S(2+) emissions from the dawn ansa is (4800 +/- 2400) K lower than on the dusk ansa, a dawn-dusk asymmetry comparable in both sign and magnitude to that measured by the Voyager Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) experiment. Emissions from S(2+) ions are generated in a source region with electron temperatures in the range 32,000-56,000 K; S(3+) ion emissions are excited by electrons that average 20,000-40,000 K hotter. This distinct difference suggests that the S(3+) emission source region is spatially separate from the S(2+) source region. Estimated relative aperture filling factors suggest that the S(3+) emissions originate from a region more extended out of the centrifugal plane than the S(2+) emissions.

  16. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. W.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.

    2016-04-01

    Reconnection within planetary magnetotails is responsible for locally energizing particles and changing the magnetic topology. Its role in terms of global magnetospheric dynamics can involve changing the mass and flux content of the magnetosphere. We have identified reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data recorded during Cassini's exploration of Saturn's magnetotail. The events are identified from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, significant above a background level. Data were selected to provide full tail coverage, encompassing the dawn and dusk flanks as well as the deepest midnight orbits. Overall 2094 reconnection related events were identified, with an average rate of 5.0 events per day. The majority of events occur in clusters (within 3 h of other events). We examine changes in this rate in terms of local time and latitude coverage, taking seasonal effects into account. The observed reconnection rate peaks postmidnight with more infrequent but steady loss seen on the dusk flank. We estimate the mass loss from the event catalog and find it to be insufficient to balance the input from the moon Enceladus. Several reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. The reconnection X line location appears to be highly variable, though a statistical separation between events tailward and planetward of the X line is observed at a radial distance of between 20 and 30RS downtail. The small sample size at dawn prevents comprehensive statistical comparison with the dusk flank observations in terms of flux closure.

  17. Precipitating and trapped ions and electrons observed at 840 km during the great magnetic storm of February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Swider, W.

    1990-07-01

    A detailed picture is presented of the equatorward boundaries of the auroral ovals at dawn, morning, dusk, and evening for the three most disturbed days of February 1986. North-south symmetry for the boundaries of keV particles was good, and the differences between the ion and electron boundaries agreed with statistics which show the ion edge slightly equatorward of the electron edge at dusk, with the reverse for dawn. The electron boundary was most equatorward of the ion boundary for morning. Best symmetry and least difference were for evening, the sector nearest the central plasma sheet. Ions with energies from thermal to several hundred electron volts penetrated inward to L = 1.2. Initial penetration was confined mainly, if not exclusively, to the dawn sector. The sudden appearance of low-energy ions deep in the plasmasphere at dusk and evening after storm maximum suggests corotation from a plasmapause as low as L = 1.7 at dawn. Low-energy electrons rarely advanced equatorward of the deV electrons. On the other hand, keV electrons occasionally were detected about the equator, apparently in relation to the inward convection of the radiation belt. Very energetic, MeV, particles occurred near 52 deg MLAT, mainly after storm maximum and often unsymmetrically, which may reflect a characteristic akin to the South Atlantic Anomaly.

  18. Electrodynamic Context of Magnetotail and Magnetopause Dynamics Observed by Magnetospheric Multiscal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.; Samara, M.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Plaschke, F.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Merkin, V. G.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Torbert, R. B.; Leinweber, H. K.; Le, G.; Bromund, K. R.; Chutter, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Le Contel, O.; Mauk, B.; Westlake, J. H.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    After successful launch and deployment on 14 March 2015, the four Magnetosphere Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft were commissioned during the first local time precession of the orbit line of apsides across the magnetotail from dawn to dusk. Prime science observations began in September 2015 when orbit apogee had moved to the dusk sector at magnetopause distances. Signatures of magnetotail dynamics were observed during payload and fleet commissioning. The electrodynamic context of the magnetotail events at MMS as well as observations at the dusk and afternoon magnetopause is assessed using correlative observations from low Earth orbit and ground-based instruments including the Active Magnetosphere and Polar Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE), SuperMAG, and SuperDARN. Substorm current onsets are prevalent in AMPERE data and are highly correlated with magnetotail injections and dipolarizations observed by MMS. To better constrain how the MMS magnetotail observations are related to global processes, we also examine the occurrence and prevalence of similar ionospheric onset signatures when MMS was at high altitudes in the magnetotail but observed no local signatures of injections or dipolarizations. For MMS magnetopause observations, we explore the relationship of magnetic reconnection signatures at MMS with the convection patterns derived from AMPERE and ionosphere observations to establish the relationship of the local MMS observations and global magnetospheric convective state.

  19. High-latitude HF Doppler observations of ULF waves: 2. Waves with small spatial scale sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    1999-07-01

    The DOPE (Doppler Pulsation Experiment) HF Doppler sounder located near Tromsø, Norway (geographic: 69.6°N 19.2°E; L = 6.3) is deployed to observe signatures, in the high-latitude ionosphere, of magnetospheric ULF waves. A type of wave has been identified which exhibits no simultaneous ground magnetic signature. They can be subdivided into two classes which occur in the dawn and dusk local time sectors respectively. They generally have frequencies greater than the resonance fundamentals of local field lines. It is suggested that these may be the signatures of high-m ULF waves where the ground magnetic signature has been strongly attenuated as a result of the scale size of the waves. The dawn population demonstrate similarities to a type of magnetospheric wave known as giant (Pg) pulsations which tend to be resonant at higher harmonics on magnetic field lines. In contrast, the waves occurring in the dusk sector are believed to be related to the storm-time Pc5s previously reported in VHF radar data. Dst measurements support these observations by indicating that the dawn and dusk classes of waves occur respectively during geomagnetically quiet and more active intervals.

  20. Passive ranging redundancy reduction in diurnal weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jae H.; Abbott, A. Lynn; Szu, Harold H.

    2013-05-01

    Ambiguity in binocular ranging (David Marr's paradox) may be resolved by using two eyes moving from side to side behind an optical bench while integrating multiple views. Moving a head from left to right with one eye closed can also help resolve the foreground and background range uncertainty. That empirical experiment implies redundancy in image data, which may be reduced by adopting a 3-D camera imaging model to perform compressive sensing. Here, the compressive sensing concept is examined from the perspective of redundancy reduction in images subject to diurnal and weather variations for the purpose of resolving range uncertainty at all weather conditions such as the dawn or dusk, the daytime with different light level or the nighttime at different spectral band. As an example, a scenario at an intersection of a country road at dawn/dusk is discussed where the location of the traffic signs needs to be resolved by passive ranging to answer whether it is located on the same side of the road or the opposite side, which is under the influence of temporal light/color level variation. A spectral band extrapolation via application of Lagrange Constrained Neural Network (LCNN) learning algorithm is discussed to address lost color restoration at dawn/dusk. A numerical simulation is illustrated along with the code example.

  1. Solar wind influence on the Jovian inner magnetosphere observed by Hisaki/EXCEED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, G.; Yoshioka, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Tsuchiya, F.; Kimura, T.; Tao, C.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Uemizu, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Yoshikawa, I.; Fujimoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    The dawn-dusk asymmetry of the Io plasma torus has been seen by several observations [e.g., Sandel and Broadfoot, 1982; Steffl et al., 2004]. Ip and Goertz [1983] explained this asymmetry can be caused by a dawn-to-dusk electric field in the Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. However, the question what physical process can impose such an electric field deep inside the strong magnetosphere still remains. The long-term monitoring of the Io plasma torus is a key observation to answer this question. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer EXCEED onboard the Hisaki satellite observed the Io plasma torus continuously during the two periods: from December 2013 to March 2014 and from November 2014 to May 2015. We found clear responses of the dawn-dusk asymmetry to rapid increases of the solar wind dynamic pressure. We statistically analyzed the relations between solar wind and IPT response. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of Io's volcanic activity, detected by Hisaki in January 2015, on the solar wind response of Jovian inner magnetosphere. We will report the initial results of this study.

  2. Normal vision can compensate for the loss of the circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Matthias; Menegazzi, Pamela; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Circadian clocks are thought to be essential for timing the daily activity of animals, and consequently increase fitness. This view was recently challenged for clock-less fruit flies and mice that exhibited astonishingly normal activity rhythms under outdoor conditions. Compensatory mechanisms appear to enable even clock mutants to live a normal life in nature. Here, we show that gradual daily increases/decreases of light in the laboratory suffice to provoke normally timed sharp morning (M) and evening (E) activity peaks in clock-less flies. We also show that the compound eyes, but not Cryptochrome (CRY), mediate the precise timing of M and E peaks under natural-like conditions, as CRY-less flies do and eyeless flies do not show these sharp peaks independently of a functional clock. Nevertheless, the circadian clock appears critical for anticipating dusk, as well as for inhibiting sharp activity peaks during midnight. Clock-less flies only increase E activity after dusk and not before the beginning of dusk, and respond strongly to twilight exposure in the middle of the night. Furthermore, the circadian clock responds to natural-like light cycles, by slightly broadening Timeless (TIM) abundance in the clock neurons, and this effect is mediated by CRY. PMID:26378222

  3. Effects of the Dipole Tilt on Dayside Magnetic Reconnection in the Earth's Magnetosphere for Northward IMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K.; Ogino, T.

    2006-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause are dominantly affected by the relative orientation of the magnetic fields in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere, the relative perpendicular velocities of field lines both before and after reconnection, and the location of the minimum geomagnetic field. We have performed a high-resolution and time-dependent three dimensional MHD simulation of interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere when the dipole tilt, and By and Bz components of the IMF are simultaneously included in the whole volume of the simulation box. In the recent study of Park, K.S. et al. (2006) found that for positive dipole tilt (northern hemisphere is summer) and southward IMF (Bz = 5 nT, By = 5nT), the reconnection site shifts sunward and equatorward in the summer hemisphere, and moves tailward and away from equator in the winter hemisphere. The dipole tilt creates asymmetry that strongly affects the direction of the plasma flow due to reconnection. Moreover, the electric field in the northern "reconnection" region (antiparallel region) is 50% larger than that at the magnetic equator and twice that at the subsolar point. In present study, for the case of positive dipole tilt, and during the northward IMF (Bz = 5 nT, By = 5nT), magnetic reconnection occurs at high latitudes in the northern dusk due to antiparallel field condition in the summer hemisphere for By > 0 and creates open field lines. The open field lines which are generated in the dusk sector and their feet are on the northern ionosphere, move from dusk to dawn in the dayside magnetopause and then come back to dusk in the tail. Tail reconnection successively occurs in the slant and elevated plasma sheet. The polar cap potential in dusk cell is larger than that the dawn cell in summer hemisphere. Moreover three-cell pattern appears in the northern ionosphere. On the other hand, the negative potential is comparable to the positive potential in winter hemisphere and the

  4. Ionospheric vertical drift response at a mid-latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouba, Daniel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-07-01

    Vertical plasma drift data measured at a mid-latitude ionospheric station Pruhonice (50.0 ° N, 14.6 ° E) were collected and analysed for the year 2006, a year of low solar and geomagnetic activity. Hence these data provide insight into the drift behaviour during quiet conditions. The following typical diurnal trend is evident: a significant decay to negative values (downward peak) at dawn; generally less pronounced downward peak at dusk hours. Magnitude of the downward drift varies during the year. Typically it reaches values about 20 ms-1 at dawn hours and 10 ms-1 at dusk hours. Maximum dawn magnitude of about 40 ms-1 has been detected in August. During daytime the vertical drifts increases from the initial small downward drifts to zero drift around noon and to small upward drifts in the afternoon. Night-time drift values display large variability around a near zero vertical drift average. There is a significant trend to larger downward drift values near dawn and a less pronounced decrease of the afternoon upward vertical drifts near sunset. Two regular downward peaks of the drift associated with the dawn and dusk are general characteristics of the analysed data throughout the year 2006. Their seasonal course corresponds to the seasonal course of the sunrise and sunset. The duration of prevailing negative drift velocities forming these peaks and thus the influence of the dawn/dusk on the drift velocity is mostly 1.5-3 h. The dawn effect on vertical drift tends to be larger than the effect of the dusk. The observed magnitude of the sunrise and sunset peaks show significant annual course. The highest variability of the magnitude is seen during winter. High variability is detected till March equinox and again after September equinox. Around solstice, both peaks reaches lowest values. After that, the magnitudes of the drift velocity increase smoothly till maxima in summer (August). The vertical drift velocity course is smooth between June solstice and September

  5. Magnetic Field Observations of Partial Ring Current during Storm Recovery Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Lucek, E. A.

    2008-01-01

    We present results of an extensive survey of the magnetic field observations in the inner magnetosphere using 30 years of magnetospheric magnetic field data from Polar, Cluster, ISEE, and AMPTE/CCE missions. The purpose of this study is to understand the magnetic field evolution during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms, and its implication to the ring current recovery and loss mechanisms of ring current particles. It is now commonly believed that a strong partial ring current is formed during the storm main phase due to the enhanced earthward convection of energetic ions from nightside plasma sheet. But the presence of a strong partial ring current throughout the recovery phase remains controversial. The magnetic field generated by the ring current inflates the inner magnetosphere and causes magnetic field depressions in the equatorial magnetosphere. During the storm recovery phase, we find that the distribution of the equatorial magnetic field depression exhibits similar local time dependence as the ring current distribution obtained from the combined dataset in the earlier study. It shows that a strong partial ring current is a permanent feature throughout the recovery phase. In the early recovery phase, the partial ring current peaks near the dusk terminator as indicated by the peak of the magnetic field depression. As the recovery phase progresses, the partial ring current decays most quickly near the dusk and results in a dusk-to-midnight moving of the peak of the partial ring current. Thus the loss mechanisms work most effectively near the dusk. The magnetic field depression increases the gyroradius of ring current protons to a scale greater or comparable to the thickness of the magnetopause, which increases the chance of ion drift loss near the dusk magnetopause at larger L-shell (L greater than 5). But the drift loss mechanism alone cannot explain the loss of ring current ions especially in the smaller L-shell (L less than 5). The precipitation loss

  6. Superposed epoch analysis of the ionospheric convection evolution during substorms: IMF BY dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Milan, S. E.; Yeoman, T. K.; Sato, N.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Wild, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    We present superposed epoch analyses of the average ionospheric convection response in the northern and southern hemispheres to magnetospheric substorms occurring under different orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Observations of the ionospheric convection were provided by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) and substorms were identified using the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on board the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. We find that during the substorm growth phase the expected IMF BY-dependent dawn-dusk asymmetry is observed over the entire convection pattern, but that during the expansion phase this asymmetry is retained only in the polar cap and dayside auroral zone. In the nightside auroral zone the convection is reordered according to the local substorm electrodynamics with any remaining dusk-dawn asymmetry being more closely related to the magnetic local time of substorm onset, itself only weakly governed by IMF BY. Owing to the preponderance of substorms occurring just prior to magnetic midnight, the substorm-asymmetry tends to be an azimuthal extension of the dusk convection cell across the midnight sector, a manifestation of the so-called “Harang discontinuity.” This results in the northern (southern) hemisphere nightside auroral convection during substorms generally resembling the expected pattern for negative (positive) IMF BY. When the preexisting convection pattern in the northern (southern) hemisphere is driven by positive (negative) IMF BY, the nightside auroral convection changes markedly over the course of the substorm to establish this same “Harang” configuration.

  7. The role of pollinators in maintaining variation in flower colour in the Rocky Mountain columbine, Aquilegia coerulea

    PubMed Central

    Thairu, Margaret W.; Brunet, Johanne

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Flower colour varies within and among populations of the Rocky Mountain columbine, Aquilegia coerulea, in conjunction with the abundance of its two major pollinators, hawkmoths and bumble-bees. This study seeks to understand whether the choice of flower colour by these major pollinators can help explain the variation in flower colour observed in A. coerulea populations. Methods Dual choice assays and experimental arrays of blue and white flowers were used to determine the preference of hawkmoths and bumble-bees for flower colour. A test was made to determine whether a differential preference for flower colour, with bumble-bees preferring blue and hawkmoths white flowers, could explain the variation in flower colour. Whether a single pollinator could maintain a flower colour polymorphism was examined by testing to see if preference for a flower colour varied between day and dusk for hawkmoths and whether bumble-bees preferred novel or rare flower colour morphs. Key Results Hawkmoths preferred blue flowers under both day and dusk light conditions. Naïve bumble-bees preferred blue flowers but quickly learned to forage randomly on the two colour morphs when similar rewards were presented in the flowers. Bees quickly learned to associate a flower colour with a pollen reward. Prior experience affected the choice of flower colour by bees, but they did not preferentially visit novel flower colours or rare or common colour morphs. Conclusions Differences in flower colour preference between the two major pollinators could not explain the variation in flower colour observed in A. coerulea. The preference of hawkmoths for flower colour did not change between day and dusk, and bumble-bees did not prefer a novel or a rare flower colour morph. The data therefore suggest that factors other than pollinators may be more likely to affect the flower colour variation observed in A. coerulea. PMID:25808657

  8. Strain- and sex-specific differences in daily flight activity and the circadian clock of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Rund, Samuel S C; Lee, Samuel J; Bush, Brian R; Duffield, Giles E

    2012-12-01

    Anopheles gambiae, the primary African malaria vector, is currently speciating into two incipient species, the so-called "molecular forms" M and S. While some geographic areas may contain only one form, in many areas both forms are found coexisting, but reproductively isolated. It appears that spatial segregation of mating swarms may contribute significantly to reproductive isolation as in many locales single-form swarms exist almost exclusively even though they are in close geographic proximity. The mechanism causing this spatial segregation is not well understood. Here, we compare the locomotor flight activity of M and S form male and female An. gambiae mosquitoes with the goal of identifying potential strain-specific temporal differences that could potentially serve as a mating barrier. We use an infrared beam break method to monitor flight activity of individual mosquitoes with a minute-to-minute time resolution under both LD cycle and constant dark conditions. We compare daily total flight activity, activity onset, peak in early nocturnal activity, the build up of dusk-related activity, and the free-running circadian period length. Our investigations revealed strain- and sex-specific differences in total daily activity. In both forms, males commenced nightly flight activity earlier than females, and this corresponded with a significantly shorter circadian period length in males compared to females. We note strain-specific differences in this response to dusk as males of the M form have a pronounced build up in flight activity relative to the S form males prior to complete darkness. This is likely driven by a differential response to the decreasing light intensity at dusk. We hypothesize that this behavioral difference could be a temporal factor contributing to the assembly of single-form swarms. PMID:23068991

  9. Penetration Electric Fields and Inner Magnetosphere Dynamics: A Model and Data Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.

    1998-01-01

    Significant progress has been made on the analysis of the June, 1991 storm. We have completed the analysis of the CRRES and DMSP data sets. We have been able to follow the evolution during the storm of the inner edge of the electric field patterns in the dusk sector and its relation to electron boundaries, ion boundaries and the ring current. Whereas the CRRES data provide radial cuts out through the plasmasphere every I 0 hours, DMSP provides snapshots every orbit of the potential and particle boundaries. Electric field and energetic particle measurements from CRRES and ion drifts and energetic particle measurements from DMSP provide the principal data sets. The combined data set provides high resolution definition of the boundary motions over the phases of the storm. L shell differences between the DMSP and CRRES particle boundaries are easily explained by inflation of the dusk sector by the ring current. The electric field boundaries are typically associated with the ion boundary and the inner edge of the ring current except during rapid increases in the cross-polar cap potential. A significant fraction of the dusk cell potential is found inside the plasmasheet electron inner edge. Twice during the storm this potential exceeded 60 kV. A paper (copy attached) has been prepared (Burke et al., 1998) and submitted to JGR. An invited paper will be presented by Burke at the spring AGU meeting. An abstract has also been submitted to the COSPAR meeting for presentation by Maynard. New simulations have been carried out with the Rice Convection Model for the magnetic storm of June 4-5, 1991, and comparisons have been made with CRRES and DMSP data.

  10. Observations of Thermospheric Horizontal Winds at Watson Lake, Yukon Territory (lambda=65 Deg N)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niciejewski, R. J.; Killeen, T. L.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    1996-01-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer observations of the thermospheric O I (6300 A) emission have been conducted from an airglow observatory at a dark field site in the southeastern Yukon Territory, Canada, for the period November 1991 to April 1993. The experiment operated in unattended, remote fashion, has resulted in a substantial data set from which mean neutral winds have been determined. Dependent upon geomagnetic activity, the nocturnal location of the site is either equatorward of the auroral oval or within oval boundaries. The data set is rich enough to permit hourly binning of neutral winds based upon the K(sub p) geomagnetic disturbance index as well as the season. For cases of low geomagnetic activity the averaged vector horizontal neutral wind exhibits the characteristics of a midlatitude site displaying antisunward pressure-gradient-driven winds. As the geomagnetic activity rises in the late afternoon and evening winds slowly rotate sunward in an anticlockwise direction, initially remaining near 100 m/s in speed but eventually increasing to 300 m/s for K(sub p) greater than 5. For the higher levels of activity the observed neutral wind flow pattern resembles a higher-latitude polar cap pattern characterized by ion drag forcing of thermospheric neutral gases. In addition, rotational Coriolis forcing on the dusk side enhances the ion drag forcing, resulting in dusk winds which trace out the clockwise dusk cell plasma flow. On the dawn side the neutral winds also rotate in an anticlockwise direction as the strength of geomagnetic disturbances increase. Since the site is located at a transition latitude between the midlatitude and the polar cap the data set provides a sensitive test for general circulation models which attempt to parameterize the contribution of magnetospheric processes. A comparison with the Vector Spherical Harmonic (VSH) model indicates several regions of poor correspondence for December solstice conditions but reasonable agreement for the

  11. Average thermospheric wind patterns over the polar regions, as observed by CHAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, H.; Rentz, S.; Ritter, P.; Liu, H.; Häusler, K.

    2007-06-01

    Measurements of the CHAMP accelerometer are utilized to investigate the average thermospheric wind distribution in the polar regions at altitudes around 400 km. This study puts special emphasis on the seasonal differences in the wind patterns. For this purpose 131 days centered on the June solstice of 2003 are considered. Within that period CHAMP's orbit is precessing once through all local times. The cross-track wind estimates of all 2030 passes are used to construct mean wind vectors for 918 equal-area cells. These bin averages are presented in corrected geomagnetic coordinates. Both hemispheres are considered simultaneously providing summer and winter responses for the same prevailing geophysical conditions. The period under study is characterized by high magnetic activity (Kp=4-) but moderate solar flux level (F10.7=124). Our analysis reveals clear wind features in the summer (Northern) Hemisphere. Over the polar cap there is a fast day-to-night flow with mean speeds surpassing 600 m/s in the dawn sector. At auroral latitudes we find strong westward zonal winds on the dawn side. On the dusk side, however, an anti-cyclonic vortex is forming. The dawn/dusk asymmetry is attributed to the combined action of Coriolis and centrifugal forces. Along the auroral oval the sunward streaming plasma causes a stagnation of the day-to-night wind. This effect is particularly clear on the dusk side. On the dawn side it is evident only from midnight to 06:00 MLT. The winter (Southern) Hemisphere reveals similar wind features, but they are less well ordered. The mean day-to-night wind over the polar cap is weaker by about 35%. Otherwise, the seasonal differences are mainly confined to the dayside (06:00-18:00 MLT). In addition, the larger offset between geographic and geomagnetic pole in the south also causes hemispheric differences of the thermospheric wind distribution.

  12. Surface waves on Saturn's magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Achilleos, N.; Cutler, J. C.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2011-10-01

    Waves on the surface of a planetary magnetopause lead to the transport of energy into the magnetosphere, making them an important aspect of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. In the case of Saturn's magnetosphere it has been proposed that the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability produces greater wave activity on the dawn side of the magnetopause than on the dusk side. Here we test this hypothesis using data taken by the Cassini spacecraft during 520 magnetopause crossings. We determine the surface normal for 477 of the crossings and show that perturbations of the surface orientation are predominantly in the direction perpendicular to the local magnetospheric magnetic field, due to the stabilizing influence of magnetic tension forces. There are two most likely orientations with respect to the magnetospheric magnetic field, and 45% of the crossings were part of a clear oscillation of consecutive normals. The only local time asymmetry in the surface orientation is a greater level of normal perturbations at dusk than at dawn. These results suggest that surface waves on Saturn's magnetopause are ubiquitous, and the K-H instability is the most plausible driving mechanism. The waves generally propagate tailward, with a typical period, wavelength, speed, and amplitude of 4 hrs, 10 Saturn radii (RS), 50 km s-1, and 1 RS, respectively. The lack of the hypothesized dawn-dusk asymmetry in wave activity means that we need to revise our understanding of the growth of the K-H instability at Saturn's magnetopause, which will have implications for the study of other planetary magnetospheres.

  13. Properties of low-latitude mantle plasma in the Earth's magnetotail: ARTEMIS observations and global MHD predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Lyons, Larry R.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2014-09-01

    The Earth's plasma mantle is one of the major suppliers of particles for the plasma sheet. To understand its plasma characteristics, spatial distributions, and dependencies on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction, we statistically analyzed the Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) observations in the low-latitude magnetotail (~10 RE above and below the current sheet) and investigated the predictions from global Block Adaptive Tree Solar wind-Roe-Upwind Scheme MHD simulations. The mantle plasma flows tailward along magnetic field lines (~50-200 km/s) and at the same time drifts toward midnight and toward the current sheet. The mantle plasma has similar temperature (~0.05-0.2 keV) to the magnetosheath plasma but has lower density (~0.1-1 cm-3). The mantle appearance is dawn-dusk asymmetric depending mainly on the IMF By direction. The occurrence rates, density, and V|| all decrease with decreasing |Y|. This density cross-tail profile suggests that the low-latitude mantle plasma mainly comes from the magnetosheath entering through the tail magnetopause along the open field lines. Density is highly and positively correlated with V||. These observations are qualitatively consistent with the MHD results. The simulations indicate that as IMF By becomes dominant, the source locations at the magnetopause for the mantle move to lower latitudes and become dawn-dusk asymmetric, and the tail cross section also becomes distorted with the magnetopause shape elongating and the current sheet tilting significantly. Degrees of these changes also vary with the downtail distances and IMF Bz direction. The source location change leads to the dawn-dusk asymmetric mantle appearance. The tail cross-section change alters the distance from the sources to the current sheet and thus the resulting mantle density distributions just outside the plasma sheet.

  14. Earth magnetotail current sheet near and beyond the Lunar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Artemyev, A.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the structure of the Earth magnetotail current sheet (CS) in middle, -50 REdusk distributions of the CS parameters: L is about 3000 km at the dusk flank and grows up to 12000 km toward the dawn flank; j0 grows toward the dusk flank by a factor of 2-3; the most intense CSs (with higher vD) are observed near the midnight. We show that ion-scale CSs with the thickness of several ion thermal gyroradii (say less than seven) are observed in middle and distant tail regions in more than 50% of crossings. For observed CSs electrons provide likely the dominant contribution to the current density. We divide the subset into intense and weak CSs (using parameter vD). The weak CSs have thickness of about 20 ion thermal gyroradii and Bz of about 1.5 nT. The intense CSs have thickness of about 3-7 thermal gyroradii and much smaller Bz implying a more stretched field line configuration. For intense CSs velocity vD is larger for larger amplitudes of ion bulk velocity vx that is likely due to larger contribution of Speiser ions. Intense CSs may be responsible for the Bursty Bulk Flow generation in the middle and distant tail regions.

  15. Evolution of ring current and radiation belt particles under the influence of storm-time electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Shinbori, A.; Ono, T.; Iizima, M.; Kumamoto, A.

    2007-06-01

    Electric field and potential distributions in the inner magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms have been investigated using the Akebono/EFD data. Using this electric field, we study injection of ring current particles and acceleration of radiation belt electrons by single-particle calculations. During the main phase, the dawn-dusk electric field is intensified especially in a range of 2 < L < 5 with a maximum amplitude of 6 mV/m on the duskside, and a two-cell convection pattern with a potential difference of 180 kV is identified. The convection pattern on the equatorial plane is significantly distorted with a large potential drop of 70 kV on the dawn and dusk sectors, indicating an intrinsic source of large-scale electric field in the inner magnetosphere. The plasma sheet ions are gathered into the dusk to premidnight sector in the inner magnetosphere in the region of enhanced electric field due to the strong E × B drift. The ions are transported into around 4 RE with an acceleration of more than 1 order of magnitude within 40 min, conserving the first adiabatic invariants. Relativistic electrons with initial energy of some hundreds of kiloelectron volts at 5 RE are energized to more than 100 keV for 3 hours. The energy spectrum during the recovery phase of 9 October 1990 geomagnetic storm observed by the CRRES satellite is reproduced without the radial diffusion or nonadiabatic acceleration by plasma waves. It is possible that this acceleration process is the inhomogeneity of the large-scale electric field, which corresponds to the ∇ × E term along orbits of electrons around the Earth.

  16. Review of Solar Wind Entry into and Transport Within the Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, S.; Johnson, J. R.; Chaston, C. C.; Echim, M.; Escoubet, C. P.; Lavraud, B.; Lemon, C.; Nykyri, K.; Otto, A.; Raeder, J.; Wang, C.-P.

    2014-11-01

    The plasma sheet is populated in part by the solar wind plasma. Four solar entry mechanisms are examined: (1) double cusp or double lobe reconnection, (2) Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI), (3) Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAW), and (4) Impulsive Penetration. These mechanisms can efficiently fill the plasma sheet with cold dense ions during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The solar wind ions appear to have been heated upon entry along the plasma sheet dawn flank. The cold-component (solar wind origin) ion density is higher on the dawn flank than the dusk flank. The asymmetric evolution of the KAW and magnetic reconnection in association with the KHI at the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause may partly produce the dawn-dusk temperature and density asymmetries. Solar wind that crosses the magnetopause lowers the specific entropy ( s= p/ ρ γ ) of the plasma sheet along the flanks. Subsequent transport of the cold ions from the flanks to the midnight meridian increases s by a factor of 5. T i , T e , s i , and s e increase when the solar wind particles are transported across the magnetopause, but T i / T e is roughly conserved. Within the magnetotail, E× B and curvature and gradient drifts play important roles in the plasma transport and can explain the large features seen in the plasma sheet. Turbulence can also play a significant role, particularly in the cold plasma transport from the flanks to the midnight meridian. Total entropy ( S= pV γ ) conservation provides important constraints on the plasma sheet transport, e.g., fast flows.

  17. Turbulence in a Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulation of the Earth's Magnetosphere during Northward and Southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Alaoui, M.; Richard, R. L.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Walker, R. J.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of MHD simulations of Earth's magnetosphere for idealized steady solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The simulations feature purely northward and southward magnetic fields and were designed to study turbulence in the magnetotail plasma sheet. We found that the power spectral densities (PSDs) for both northward and southward IMF had the characteristics of turbulent flow. In both cases, the PSDs showed the three scale ranges expected from theory: the energy-containing scale, the inertial range, and the dissipative range. The results were generally consistent with in-situ observations and theoretical predictions. While the two cases studied, northward and southward IMF, had some similar characteristics, there were significant differences as well. For southward IMF, localized reconnection was the main energy source for the turbulence. For northward IMF, remnant reconnection contributed to driving the turbulence. Boundary waves may also have contributed. In both cases, the PSD slopes had spatial distributions in the dissipative range that reflected the pattern of resistive dissipation. For southward IMF there was a trend toward steeper slopes in the dissipative range with distance down the tail. For northward IMF there was a marked dusk-dawn asymmetry with steeper slopes on the dusk side of the tail. The inertial scale PSDs had a dusk-dawn symmetry during the northward IMF interval with steeper slopes on the dawn side. This asymmetry was not found in the distribution of inertial range slopes for southward IMF. The inertial range PSD slopes were clustered around values close to the theoretical expectation for both northward and southward IMF. In the dissipative range, however, the slopes were broadly distributed and the median values were significantly different, consistent with a different distribution of resistivity.

  18. The magnetospheric lobe at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, M.F.; Bame, S.J.; McComas, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    On rare occasions, satellites at geosynchronous altitude enter the magnetospheric lobe, characterized by extremely low ion fluxes between 1 eV and 40 keV and electron fluxes above a few hundred eV. One year of plasma observations from two simultaneously operating spacecraft at synchronous orbit is surveyed for lobe encounters. A total of 34 full encounters and 56 apparent near encounters are identified, corresponding to {approximately}0.06% of the total observation time. Unlike energetic particle (E>40 keV) dropouts studied earlier, there is a strong tendency for the lobe encounters to occur postmidnight, as late as 07 local time. The two spacecraft encounter the lobe with different rates and in different seasons. These occurrence properties are not simply explicable in terms of the orbital geometry in either the solar magnetic or the geocentric solar magnetospheric coordinate system. A composite coordinate system which previously organized more energetic particle dropouts is somewhat more successful in organizing the lobe encounters, suggesting that solar wind distortion of the magnetic equatorial plane away from the dipole location and toward the antisolar direction may be largely responsible for these dropouts. The authors results further suggest that this distortion persists even sunward of the dawn-dusk terminator. However, a simple dawn-dusk symmetric distortion does not fully account for all the seasonal and local time asymmetries in the occurrence of the lobe encounters; thus there is probably an additional dawn-dusk asymmetry in the distorted field. The lobe encounters are strongly associated with magnetospheric activity and tend to occur in association with rare magnetosheath encounters at synchronous orbit. It thus appears that the presence of the lobe at geosynchronous orbit is the result of major, probably asymmetric modifications of the magnetospheric field geometry in times of strong disturbance. 19 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Earth's distant magnetotail current sheet near and beyond lunar orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasko, I. Y.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Artemyev, A. V.; Nakamura, R.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the structure of the Earth magnetotail current sheet (CS) in middle, X∈[-50,-20] RE, and distant, X∈[-100,-80] RE, regions using data set of 573 CS crossings by Geotail in 1994-1995. For a subset of 213 CSs we determine the CS thickness L, average current density j0, and velocity vD=j0/en0 (n0 is the ion number density). We find similar dawn-dusk distributions of CS parameters for middle and distant tail: L is about 3000 km at the dusk flank and grows up to 12,000 km toward the dawn flank; j0 grows toward the dusk flank by a factor of 2-3; and the most intense CSs (with higher vD) are observed near midnight. We show that ion-scale CSs with the thickness of several ion thermal gyroradii (say less than seven) are observed in middle and distant tail in more than 50% of crossings. For observed CSs electrons likely provide the dominant contribution to the current density. We divide the subset into intense and weak CSs (using parameter vD). Weak CSs have thickness of about 20 ion thermal gyroradii and Bz of about 1.5 nT. Intense CSs have thickness of about 3-7 thermal gyroradii and much smaller Bz implying more stretched field line configuration. Intense CSs are accompanied by fast ion flows: vD is larger for larger amplitudes of ion bulk velocity vx that is likely due to larger contribution of Speiser ions. The properties of the CS in middle and distant tail are compared with those found for the near-Earth tail.

  20. Ionospheric current contribution to the main impulse of a negative sudden impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vichare, Geeta; Rawat, Rahul; Bhaskar, Ankush; Pathan, Bashir M.

    2014-12-01

    The geomagnetic field response to a moderate-amplitude negative sudden impulse (SI-) that occurred on 14 May 2009 at 10:30 UT was examined at 97 geomagnetic observatories situated all over the globe. The response signature contains a contribution from magnetospheric as well as ionospheric currents. The main impulse (MI) is defined as the maximum depression in the observed geomagnetic field. It is observed that for low-to-high latitudes, the amplitude of the MI is larger in the afternoon to post-dusk sector than in the dawn-noon sector, indicating asymmetry in the MI amplitude. We estimated the contribution at various observatories due to the Chapman-Ferraro magnetopause currents using the Tsyganenko model (T01) and subtracted this from the observed MI amplitude to obtain the contribution due to ionospheric currents. It is found that the ionospheric currents contribute significantly to the MI amplitude of moderate SI- even at low-to-mid latitudes and that the contribution is in the same direction as that from the magnetopause currents near dusk and in the opposite direction near dawn. The equivalent current vectors reveal a clockwise (anticlockwise) ionospheric current loop in the afternoon (morning) sector during the MI of the negative pressure impulse. This evidences an ionospheric twin-cell-vortex current system (DP2) due to field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with the dusk-to-dawn convection electric field during the MI of an SI-. We also estimated the magnetic field variation due to prompt penetration electric fields, which is found to be very small at low latitudes in the present case. The studied SI- is not associated with shock, and hence no preliminary reverse impulse was evident. In addition, the summer hemisphere reveals larger MI amplitudes than the winter hemisphere, indicating once again the role of ionospheric currents.

  1. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Wave by Low-Altitude Space Technology 5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three-microsatellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km dawn-dusk and Sun-synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Because of the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc2-3 frequency range. These Pc2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 min. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 min, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-dusk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field line resonances.

  2. Observations of a unique type of ULF wave by low-altitude Space Technology 5 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-08-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three-microsatellite constellation deployed into a 300 × 4500 km dawn-dusk and Sun-synchronous polar orbit with 105.6° inclination angle. Because of the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc2-3 frequency range. These Pc2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 min. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 min, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-dusk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field line resonances.

  3. Observation of magnetopause fluctuations during a Cluster-THEMIS conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Kyoung-Joo; Goldstein, Mevlyn

    On April 27, 2007, THEMIS observed quasi-periodic magnetopause fluctuations for a prolonged time period (9 hrs) as they skimmed the dusk-side magnetopause, while Cluster detected 1.5-hour-long boundary undulations as they traversed the morning-side magnetopause. The com-parison between Cluster and THEMIS with ACE data implies that: 1) Similar periodicity and patterns of its variability between Cluster and THEMIS observations, with a certain time in-terval longer than is expected from the upstream magnetosheath travel time between THEMIS and Cluster locations, indicate that the dusk-side surface waves have been excited at the nearly subsolar region; 2) The complicated inner-LLBL fluctuations observed by THEMIS have been resulted from the development and modulation of the waves according to the local environment during convection along the LLBL, while Cluster observed the magnetopause fluctuations that appear to be more explicitly controlled by SW variations in the morning sector; 3) The intensity of KHW, often well characterized by Bm power spectra reflect the effects of IMF conditions, exhibiting a correlation with SW temperature and IMF clock angle, i.e., a more solid power law when IMF points due north or south rather than due dawn or dusk; 4) Steeper wavefront at the anti-sunward/sunward edge of KHW during southward/northward IMF support more rapid and turbulent evolution of KHW under southward IMF conditions [Hwang et al., 2010; Kuznetsova et al., 2008], and the steepening effects of the curvature forces of the magnetosheath flux tubes during northward IMF [Chen et al., 1997].

  4. Structure of the plasmapause from ISEE 1 low-energy ion and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, T.; Horwitz, J. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy ion pitch angle distributions are compared with plasma density profiles in the near-earth magnetosphere using ISEE 1 observations. The classical plasmapause determined by the sharp density gradient is not always observed in the dayside region, whereas there almost always exists the ion pitch angle distribution transition from cold, isotropic to warm, bidirectional, field-aligned distributions. In the nightside region the plasmapause density gradient is typically found, and it normally coincides with the ion pitch angle distribution transition. The sunward motion of the plasma is found in the outer part of the 'plasmaspheric' plasma in the dusk bulge region.

  5. The Los Alamos Photon Counting Detector Debris Detection Project: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Cheng; Priedhorsky, W.; Baron, M.; Casperson, D.

    1995-03-01

    At Los Alamos, the authors have been pursuing a project for space debris detection using a photon counting detector with high spatial and time resolution. By exploiting the three dimensionality of the high quality data, they expect to be able to detect an orbiting object of size below 2 cm, using a moderate size telescope and state-of-the-art photon counting detector. A working tube has been used to collect skyward looking data during dusk. In this paper, they discuss the progress in the development of detector and data acquisition system. They also report on analysis and results of these data sets.

  6. Direct-driven mechanism for geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arykov, A. A.; Maltsev, Yu. P.

    We have obtained the injection function for the part of the storm-time depression which is related to the cross-tail current and corresponding currents on the magnetopause. This injection function is QTC=-κU/S, where U is the electric potential difference between the dawn and dusk sides of the magnetosphere, S is the equatorial cross-section of the stable trapping region, and κ is a coefficient varying from 0.5 to 1.5 depending on the state of the magnetosphere and solar wind pressure. The injection function QTC appeared to be close to the observed one for the Dst-variation.

  7. A model of global convection in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1989-09-01

    Voyager observations of Jupiter's magnetosphere are compared with the planetary wind model in which corotation must break down outside some Alfven critical radius and a centrifugally driven wind outflow must develop. It is found that the model does not agree with the observations. A new global convection model for the Jovian magnetosphere is proposed, based on models of quasi-stationary plasma convection in the earth's magnetosphere. The model predicts a substantial dawn-dusk asymmetry in the structure, dynamics, and plasma composition of the magnetopause and magnetosheath. The model also predicts a region of cross-tail flow in the nightside plasma sheet containing a substantial admixture of solar wind plasma.

  8. Equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.; Mendis, D.A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents ot flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionosheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  9. Managing diabetes during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Velayudhan, M

    2012-06-01

    Target blood sugar levels in diabetes are achieved through manipulation of diet, exercise and medication. A change in any one of these three things can skew blood sugar levels and create complications associated with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. Fasting during the month of Ramadan is a religious activity that devout Muslims practice whether they are diabetic or not. Since such fasting involves abstinence from food and water for twelve hours or more during the day from dawn to dusk, it is evident that advice regarding exercise and medication will have to be modified during this period. PMID:23082439

  10. Estimates of the North--South electric field component in the magnetotail low latitude boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Candidi, M.; Orsini, S.

    1981-06-01

    The measurements of 0/sup +/ ions drift velocity in the magnetotail boundary layer are used to infer the North--South E/sub z/ component of the local electric field. It is shown that E/sub z/ is generally a substantial component of the field and that it reverses its sign from the dawn to the dusk side of the northern magnetotail between X/sub SM/ = -15 R/sub E/ and X/sub SM/ = -23 R/sub E/.

  11. Visual systems - The state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorrock, David

    State-of-the-art, computer-generated image simulator visual systems typically encompass a data base which generates the model of the operating environment, an image generator, and a display system suitable for the applications envisaged. Two basic approaches to such systems are discernible: those employing hybrid raster/calligraphy and those using raster/continuous tone. Attention is presently given to such capabilities and elements of visual displays as texture effects, transparencies, fade level-of-detail management, animation effects, and image generator functions for daylight and night/dusk conditions, as well as prospective developments in this field.

  12. Effect of pressure pulse on geomagnetic field oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A. K.; Rajaram, R.

    The effect of solar wind pressure pulse on geomagnetic field oscillations has been computed by using Green's function technique. The dominance of toroidal oscillations during dawn/dusk sectors appears to be natural consequences of solar wind pressure pulse and may not be attributed to K-H instability at the magnetopause boundary caused by velocity shear. Pressure pulse generates surface waves at the magnetopause boundary and couples to the field oscillations to give rise such effects. The paper adopts the 3-dimensional approach to explain the phenomena.

  13. Cassini magnetometer measurements in the Jovian environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, M. K.

    2001-05-01

    M. K. Dougherty, and the Cassini magnetometer team The recent Cassini flyby of Jupiter had the spacecraft flying along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere, a region which has only been visited very briefly before during the Ulysses outbound pass. The unique Cassini flyby resulted in the spacecraft making numerous entries into the magnetosheath region as well as into the magnetosphere itself. Initial results from the magnetometer instrument will be described including information concerning the solar wind IMF, the large amount of mirror mode activity measured within the magnetosheath and incursions into the magnetosphere proper.

  14. Longitudinal asymmetries in aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comparative study of auroral structure and dynamics over Poker Flat, Alaska and Tromso, Norway. These stations are at the same geomagnetic latitude but differ significantly (by 4 degrees) in geographic latitude. In the period of 25 November 2012 to 15 March 2013 we have optical imaging data from both stations. There is approximately a 12 hour difference in local time between them and therefore near winter solstice we have simultaneous observations in the dawn and dusk sectors. Differences in auroral morphology, for similar solar wind driving conditions, will be investigated.

  15. Opening the cusp. [using magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooker, N. U.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the magnetic field topology (determined by the superposition of dipole, image, and uniform fields) for mapping the cusp to the ionosphere. The model results are compared to both new and published observations and are then used to map the footprint of a flux transfer event caused by a time variation in the merging rate. It is shown that the cusp geometry distorts the field lines mapped from the magnetopause to yield footprints with dawn and dusk protrusions into the region of closed magnetic flux.

  16. Ramadan fasting and dental treatment considerations: a review.

    PubMed

    Shaeesta, Khaleelahmed Bhavikatti; Prabhuji, M Lv; Shruthi, J R

    2015-01-01

    During the sacred month of Ramadan, Muslims abstain from the consumption of food from dawn until dusk. Extended fasting hours produce changes in the body's metabolism during this period. A majority of the population who fast also restrict themselves from undergoing dental treatments due to a fear of breaking the fast. Even among health professionals, a certain amount of uncertainty prevails about the implications of treating a patient who is fasting. To help clinicians carry out safe and effective treatment without hampering a patient's religious beliefs, the present article focuses on the effect of Ramadan fasting on the body's metabolism and the ramifications for treatment aspects, including medications and dental procedures. PMID:26147170

  17. Hall current effect on tearing mode instability. [possible cause of magnetic field reconnection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terasawa, T.

    1983-01-01

    From a linear 2-D eigenmode analysis, it is found that the Hall current effect on collisional tearing mode instability becomes important for the thin magnetic reversal layer whose width is comparable to the ion inertia length; Hall currents produce a three-dimensional field structure and increase the reconnection (growth) rate. Since the magnetaic reversal layer widths both in the magnetopause and in the magnetotail are reported to become as thin as the ion inertial length (several hundred km) when the reconnection process is supposed to occur, the Hall current effect may explain the appearance of the dawn-dusk component of the magnetic field in the magnetotail reconnection region.

  18. Coherent radar observations of a storm sudden commencement having a preliminary reverse impulse

    SciTech Connect

    McDiarmid, D.R.; Nielsen, E. )

    1987-01-01

    Observations of the February 4, 1983, storm sudden commencement (ssc) by the STARE and SABRE radar systems are presented. The observing stations were in the dusk sector, where the ssc was accompanied by a preliminary reverse impulse (PRI). The radar data show the PRI to be a consequence of the ssc compression wave producing an initial antisunward flow. The polarization of the ssc electric field in the ionosphere is seen to have both longitudinal and latitudinal structure. The observations are discussed in terms of the propagation of the ssc disturbance throughout the magnetosphere.

  19. A simple model for polar cap convection patterns and generation of theta auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    An addition of the uniform interplanetary magnetic field and the earth's dipole magnetic field is used to evaluate electric field convection patterns over the polar caps that result from solar wind flow across open geomagnetic field lines. The model also accounts for field-aligned patterns within, and auroral arcs across, the polar cap. The qualitative predictions derived from the model express the electric field magnitudes, aurora intensity, sunward and antisunward flow, and the dusk-side reversal of the convection field in terms of the x and y components of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  20. Studying internal and external magnetic fields in Japan using MAGSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, N. (Principal Investigator); Maeda, H.; Yukutake, T.; Tanaka, M.; Oshima, S.; Ogawa, K.; Kawamura, M.; Miyazaki, Y.; Uyeda, S.; Kobayashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Examination of the total intensity data of CHRONIT on a few paths over Japan and its neighboring sea shows MAGSAT is extremely useful for studying the local magnetic anomaly. In high latitudes, the signatures of field aligned currents are clearly recognized. These include (1) the persistent basic pattern of current flow; (2) the more intense currents in the summer hemisphere than in the winter hemisphere; (3) more fluctuations in current intensities in summer dawn hours; and (4) apparent dawn-dusk asymmetry in the field-aligned current intensity between the north and south polar regions.

  1. Relativistic electron precipitation at International Space Station: Space weather monitoring by Calorimetric Electron Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Asaoka, Yoichi; Torii, Shoji; Terasawa, Toshio; Ozawa, Shunsuke; Tamura, Tadahisa; Shimizu, Yuki; Akaike, Yosui; Mori, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    The charge detector (CHD) of the Calorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) on board the International Space Station (ISS) has a huge geometric factor for detecting MeV electrons and is sensitive to relativistic electron precipitation (REP) events. During the first 4 months, CALET CHD observed REP events mainly at the dusk to midnight sector near the plasmapause, where the trapped radiation belt electrons can be efficiently scattered by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves. Here we show that interesting 5-20 s periodicity regularly exists during the REP events at ISS, which is useful to diagnose the wave-particle interactions associated with the nonlinear wave growth of EMIC-triggered emissions.

  2. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the midlatitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  3. Ion measurements during Pioneer Venus reentry: Implications for solar cycle variation of ion composition and dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kar, J.; Cloutier, P. A.; Taylor, H. A., Jr.; Brace, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    During the final, low solar activity phase of the Pioneer Venus (PV) mission, the Orbiter Ion Mass Spectrometer (OIMS) measurements found all ion species, in the midnight-dusk sector, reduced in concentration relative to that observed at solar maximum. Molecular ion species comprised a greater part of the total ion concentration as O(+) and H(+) had the greatest depletions. The nightside ionospheric states were strikingly similar to the isolated solar maximum 'disappearing' ionospheres. Both are very dynamic states characterized by a rapidly drifting plasma and 30-100 eV superthermal O(+) ions.

  4. An experimental test of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability within the earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Examples of propagating electromagnetic Alfven/ion cyclotron waves in plasma particle and magnetic field data observed by the ATS-6 geostationary satellite are discussed. These waves were viewed mainly near the afternoon and dusk regions of the earth's magnetosphere with normalized frequencies in the 0.05 to 0.5 range. Two wave events were analyzed: both appeared coincidentally with the encounter of cool plasma populations which joined the hot populations already present. An electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability was proposed as the wave generation mechanism; this theory was tested by evaluating the linear growth integrals under the measured anisotropic hot ion distribution.

  5. On the equatorial transport of Saturn's ionosphere as driven by a dust-ring current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1983-03-01

    The diurnal modulation of the dust ring current of Saturn's D-ring causes field-aligned Birkeland currents to flow near the dawn and dusk terminators and close across the mid-latitude ionosphere. One consequence of this current system is the establishment of a global convection pattern in the equatorial outer ionosphere. Outward motion of the dayside ionospheric plasma as well as the corresponding absorption effect of the inner ring system might be one physical cause of the depletion of the ionospheric content of Saturn.

  6. Aspects of Clock Resetting in Flowering of Xanthium 1

    PubMed Central

    Papenfuss, Herbert D.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1967-01-01

    Flowering is induced in Xanthium strumarium by a single dark period exceeding about 8.3 hours in length (the critical night). To study the mechanism which measures this dark period, plants were placed in growth chambers for about 2 days under constant light and temperature, given a phasing dark period terminated by an intervening light period (1 min to several hrs in duration), and finally a test dark period long enough normally to induce flowering. In some experiments, light interruptions during the test dark period were given to establish the time of maximum sensitivity. If the phasing dark period was less than 5 hours long, its termination by a light flash only broadened the subsequent time of maximum sensitivity to a light flash, but the critical night was delayed. In causing the delay, the end of the intervening light period was acting like the dusk signal which initiated time measurement at the beginning of the phasing dark period. If the phasing dark period was 6 hours or longer, time of maximum sensitivity during the subsequent test dark period was shifted by as much as 10 to 14 hours. In this case the light terminating the phasing dark period acted as a rephaser or a dawn signal. Following a 7.5-hour phasing dark period, intervening light periods of 1 minute to 5 hours did not shift the subsequent time of maximum sensitivity, but with intervening light periods longer than 5 hours, termination of the light acts clearly like a dusk signal. The clock appears to be suspended during intervening light periods longer than 5 to 15 hours. It is restarted by a dusk signal. There is an anomaly with intervening light periods of 10 to 13 hours, following which time of maximum sensitivity is actually less than the usual 8 hours after dusk. Ability of the clock in Xanthium to be rephased, suspended, restarted, or delayed, depending always upon conditions of the experiment, is characteristic of an oscillating timer and may confer upon this plant its ability to respond to

  7. Recirculation and Acceleration of Ionospheric Plasma in the Martian Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Wing-Huen

    2012-07-01

    The presence of strong crustal remnant magnetic fields on Mars has important influence on the dynamical behavior of the ionospheric plasma. A model based on computational simulation of the time-varying configuration of the mini-magnetosphere is described to examine the possible process of acceleration and heating of photo electrons and ions embedded in the magnetic flux tubes as Mars rotates from dawn to dusk. The main idea is that ionospheric H+ and O+ ions pumped into the mini-magnetospheres on the dawn side could be subject to adiabatic heating during "depolarization" of the magnetic field as the local time approaches noon.

  8. Local time occurrence frequency of energetic ions in the earth's magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Hill, P.; Baumjohann, W.; Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence frequency of energetic ions in the energy range from 8 to 40 keV/e as a function of local time in the magnetosheath is presented. Energetic ions are observed in the magnetosheath with a minimum probability of 25 percent for all local times. The occurrence frequency for the energetic ions is higher on the dawnside than on the duskside but shows a relative maximum postnoon in the local time range from 12 to 15 hours. The postnoon relative maximum is attributed to a magnetospheric source for the energetic ions while the dawn-dusk asymmetry is attributed to a quasi-parallel bow shock source.

  9. Variations in 13C discrimination during CO2 exchange by Picea sitchensis branches in the field.

    PubMed

    Wingate, Lisa; Seibt, Ulli; Moncrieff, John B; Jarvis, Paul G; Lloyd, Jon

    2007-05-01

    We report diurnal variations in (13)C discrimination ((13)Delta) of Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr. branches measured in the field using a branch chamber technique. The observations were compared to predicted (13)Delta based on concurrent measurements of branch gas exchange. Observed (13)Delta values were described well by the classical model of (13)Delta including isotope effects during photorespiration, day respiration and CO(2) transfer through a series of resistances to the sites of carboxylation. A simplified linear of model (13)Delta did not capture the observed diurnal variability. At dawn and dusk, we measured very high (13)Delta values that were not predicted by either of the said models. Exploring the sensitivity of (13)Delta to possible respiratory isotope effects, we conclude that isotopic disequilibria between the gross fluxes of photosynthesis and day respiration can explain the high observed (13)Delta values during net photosynthetic gas exchange. Based on the classical model, a revised formulation incorporating an isotopically distinct substrate for day respiration was able to account well for the high observed dawn and dusk (13)Delta values. PMID:17407538

  10. Take-off time of the first generation of the overwintering small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus in the temperate zone in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo; Otuka, Akira; Matsumura, Masaya; Etoh, Tomoki; Zhu, Yeqin; Zhou, Yijun; Zhang, Gufeng

    2015-01-01

    Overseas migration of the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), occurs during the winter wheat harvest season in East Asia. Knowing the take-off time of emigrating L. striatellus is crucial for predicting such migrations with a simulation technique because winds, carriers of migratory insects, change continuously. Several methods were used in China and Japan from late May to early June 2012 and again in 2013 to identify the precise timing of take-off. These methods included: a tow net trap mounted to a pole at 10 m above the ground, a helicopter-towed net trap, and a canopy trap (which also had video monitoring) set over wheat plants. Laodelphax striatellus emigrated from wheat fields mainly in the early evening, before dusk. The insects also emigrated during the daytime but rarely emigrated at dawn, showing a pattern that is unlike the bimodal emigration at dusk and dawn of two other rice planthoppers, the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), and the white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Horváth). There was no significant difference in the temporal pattern of take-off behavior between females and males of Japanese L. striatellus populations. PMID:25780936

  11. Take-Off Time of the First Generation of the Overwintering Small Brown Planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus in the Temperate Zone in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Sanada-Morimura, Sachiyo; Otuka, Akira; Matsumura, Masaya; Etoh, Tomoki; Zhu, Yeqin; Zhou, Yijun; Zhang, Gufeng

    2015-01-01

    Overseas migration of the small brown planthopper, Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén), occurs during the winter wheat harvest season in East Asia. Knowing the take-off time of emigrating L. striatellus is crucial for predicting such migrations with a simulation technique because winds, carriers of migratory insects, change continuously. Several methods were used in China and Japan from late May to early June 2012 and again in 2013 to identify the precise timing of take-off. These methods included: a tow net trap mounted to a pole at 10 m above the ground, a helicopter-towed net trap, and a canopy trap (which also had video monitoring) set over wheat plants. Laodelphax striatellus emigrated from wheat fields mainly in the early evening, before dusk. The insects also emigrated during the daytime but rarely emigrated at dawn, showing a pattern that is unlike the bimodal emigration at dusk and dawn of two other rice planthoppers, the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), and the white-backed planthopper, Sogatella furcifera (Horváth). There was no significant difference in the temporal pattern of take-off behavior between females and males of Japanese L. striatellus populations. PMID:25780936

  12. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma are described. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Lab (JHU/APL) HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dusk-dawn component, By greater than 0 the dawn cell is more crescent shaped and the dusk cell more round while for BY less than 0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent /round cell dichotomy is obtained for BY greater than 0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (magnetic local time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67 deg-69 deg lambda (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2.5 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings By greater than 0, summer and BY less than 0, winter; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT.

  13. MESSENGER Orbital Observations of Large-Amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at Mercury's Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Torbjorn; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a survey of Kelvi\\ n-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orb it. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub -sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopau are much larger than at Earth. We attribute these greater rates to the limited wave energy dissipation in Mercury's highly resistive regolith. The wave amplitude was often on the order of ' 00 nT or more, and the wave periods were - 10- 20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is present in the data, in that all of the observed wave events occurred in the post-noon and dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is like ly related to finite Larmor-radius effects and is in agreement with results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. The waves were observed almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward, a pattern similar to that for most terrestrial KH wave events. Accompanying plasma measurements show that the waves were associated with the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  14. The origin of life and the left-handed amino-acid excess: the furthest heavens and the deepest seas?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Geoffrey; Gershwin, M Eric

    2006-11-01

    The origin of life is an extraordinary problem that leads back to the structure and dynamics of the cosmos and early development of organic molecules. Within that wider question lies an unsolved problem that has troubled biologists for 150 years. What is the origin of the dominant presence of left-handed stereoisomers of amino acids in nature even though their synthesis normally results in an equal mixture of the right- and left-handed molecular forms? We propose that asymmetric Earth rotation caused at dawn and dusk circularly polarized UV light (CPUVL) of opposite polarity and reversed temperature profiles in the oceans. Destruction of the d-isomer by CPUVL at dusk in a sea surface hotter than at dawn created a daily l-isomer excess protected from radiation by nightfall, preserved by down-flow (diffusive, mechanical) into cold, darker regions, eventually initiating an l-amino-acid excess embodied in early marine forms. Innumerable mechanisms have been proposed for the origin of l-chiral dominance in amino acids and none proven. Since the thalidomide tragedy, homochirality of amino acids has been a growing practical issue for medicine. Understanding its origin may bring further and unexpected benefits. It may also be a modest pointer to the possibility of positive answers to whether intelligent life will have the capacity to continue to protect itself from conditions inimical to survival. PMID:17060678

  15. Diurnal variations in, and influences on, concentrations of particulate and dissolved arsenic and metals in the mildly alkaline Wallkill River, New Jersey, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, J.L.; Wilson, T.P.; Szabo, Z.; Bonin, J.L.; Fischer, J.M.; Smith, N.P.

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal variations in particulate and dissolved As and metal concentrations were observed in mildly alkaline water from a wetlands site on the Wallkill River in northwestern New Jersey. The site, underlain by glacial sediments over dolomite bedrock, is 10 km downstream from a mined area of the Franklin Marble, host to Zn ores, also As and Mn minerals. In mid-September 2005, maxima and minima in dissolved-oxygen-concentration and pH, typically caused by photosynthesis and respiration, occurred at 2000 and 0800 hours. Concentrations of dissolved As (1.52-1.95 ??g/L) peaked at dusk (2000 hours), whereas dissolved Mn and Zn concentrations (76.5-96.9 and 8.55-12.8 ??g/L, respectively) were lowest at dusk and peaked at 1000 hours. These opposing cycles probably reflect sorption and desorption of As (an anion), and Mn and Zn (cations) as pH varied throughout the 24-h period. Doubly-peaked cycles of B, Cl, SO4, and nutrients also were observed; these may result from upstream discharges of septic-system effluent. Both recoverable amd particulate Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn concentrations peaked between 0200 and 0600 hours. The particulate metals cycle, with perturbations at 0400 hours, may be influenced by biological activity. ?? 2007 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide mediates circadian rhythms in mammalian olfactory bulb and olfaction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jae-Eun Kang; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Wang, Thomas; Marpegan, Luciano; Holy, Timothy E; Herzog, Erik D

    2014-04-23

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the olfactory bulbs (OBs) function as an independent circadian system regulating daily rhythms in olfactory performance. However, the cells and signals in the olfactory system that generate and coordinate these circadian rhythms are unknown. Using real-time imaging of gene expression, we found that the isolated olfactory epithelium and OB, but not the piriform cortex, express similar, sustained circadian rhythms in PERIOD2 (PER2). In vivo, PER2 expression in the OB of mice is circadian, approximately doubling with a peak around subjective dusk. Furthermore, mice exhibit circadian rhythms in odor detection performance with a peak at approximately subjective dusk. We also found that circadian rhythms in gene expression and odor detection performance require vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or its receptor VPAC2R. VIP is expressed, in a circadian manner, in interneurons in the external plexiform and periglomerular layers, whereas VPAC2R is expressed in mitral and external tufted cells in the OB. Together, these results indicate that VIP signaling modulates the output from the OB to maintain circadian rhythms in the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:24760863

  17. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Mediates Circadian Rhythms in Mammalian Olfactory Bulb and Olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jae-eun Kang; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Wang, Thomas; Marpegan, Luciano; Holy, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the olfactory bulbs (OBs) function as an independent circadian system regulating daily rhythms in olfactory performance. However, the cells and signals in the olfactory system that generate and coordinate these circadian rhythms are unknown. Using real-time imaging of gene expression, we found that the isolated olfactory epithelium and OB, but not the piriform cortex, express similar, sustained circadian rhythms in PERIOD2 (PER2). In vivo, PER2 expression in the OB of mice is circadian, approximately doubling with a peak around subjective dusk. Furthermore, mice exhibit circadian rhythms in odor detection performance with a peak at approximately subjective dusk. We also found that circadian rhythms in gene expression and odor detection performance require vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or its receptor VPAC2R. VIP is expressed, in a circadian manner, in interneurons in the external plexiform and periglomerular layers, whereas VPAC2R is expressed in mitral and external tufted cells in the OB. Together, these results indicate that VIP signaling modulates the output from the OB to maintain circadian rhythms in the mammalian olfactory system. PMID:24760863

  18. Polarized skylight does not calibrate the compass system of a migratory bat.

    PubMed

    Lindecke, Oliver; Voigt, Christian C; Pētersons, Gunārs; Holland, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    In a recent study, Greif et al. (Greif et al. Nat Commun 5, 4488. (doi:10.1038/ncomms5488)) demonstrated a functional role of polarized light for a bat species confronted with a homing task. These non-migratory bats appeared to calibrate their magnetic compass by using polarized skylight at dusk, yet it is unknown if migratory bats also use these cues for calibration. During autumn migration, we equipped Nathusius' bats, Pipistrellus nathusii, with radio transmitters and tested if experimental animals exposed during dusk to a 90° rotated band of polarized light would head in a different direction compared with control animals. After release, bats of both groups continued their journey in the same direction. This observation argues against the use of a polarization-calibrated magnetic compass by this migratory bat and questions that the ability of using polarized light for navigation is a consistent feature in bats. This finding matches with observations in some passerine birds that used polarized light for calibration of their magnetic compass before but not during migration. PMID:26382077

  19. The CUSP as a Source of Magnetospheric Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, Theodore A.; Chen, Jiasheng

    1999-01-01

    Observations made by the Polar satellite have shown that plasma of solar wind magnetosheath origin is rammed into the high altitude polar cusp creating a diamagnetic cavity of large dimensions. The Earth's dipole field can be excluded from this region in it turbulent manner with the magnitude of the field strength reaching close to zero nT at times. At such times energetic particles are produced in this region in intensities which exceed those measured in the trapping regions of the magnetosphere beyond L = 6.5. These particles can then flow back out of the cusp along field lines that form the magnetopause. A fraction of these particles can enter the magnetosphere along the magnetopause on the dusk and dawn flanks. Due to existing gradients in the geomagnetic field, cusp accelerated ions can enter the magnetosphere along the dawn flank and electrons along the dusk flank. For those particles entering near the geomagnetic equatorial plane with pitch angles close to ninety degrees they will drift along contours of constant magnetic field strength reaching deep into the nightside inner magnetosphere. From observations made by the Polar ATS-6, and ISEE satellites it is argued that this cusp source appears to be capable of providing energetic ions to the magnetosphere and possibly energetic electrons which form the source population of the Subsequent radial diffusion and formation of the radiation belts.

  20. Asymmetric Magnetosphere Deformation Driven by Hot Flow Anomaly(ies)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safrankova, J.; Goncharov, O.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We present a case study of a large deformation of the magnetopause on November 26, 2008. The investigation is based on observations of five THEMIS spacecraft located at the dawn flank in the magnetosphere and magnetosheath, on Cluster measurements at the dusk magnetosheath, and is supported by ACE solar wind monitoring. The main revelation of our study is that the interaction of the IMF discontinuity with the bow shock creates either one very elongated hot flow anomaly (HFA) or a pair of them that is (are) simultaneously observed at both flanks. Whereas the dusk HFA is weak and does not cause observable deformation of the magnetopause, the pressure variations connected with the dawn HFA lead to a magnetopause displacement by approx. = 5 R(sub E) outward from its nominal position. This is followed by a rapid inward motion of the magnetopause approx. = 4 R(sub E) inward with respect to the model location. The surface deformation is so large that the outermost THEMIS spacecraft was in the magnetosphere, whereas the spacecraft located 9 R(sub E) inbound entered into the magnetosheath at the same time. The whole event lasted about 5 minutes.

  1. Substorm Current Wedge as a Combined Effect of Wedgelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how the substorm current wedge (SCW) is formed is crucial to solving the substorm mystery. One recent idea on the SCW formation is the "wedgelets" picture, which proposes that dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs) are the building elements of an SCW. (A DFB is a ~1-3 RE wide flux tube with stronger magnetic field than the ambient plasma in the magnetotail; its leading edge is known as a "dipolarization front", or "reconnection front", the product of near-Earth reconnection). Although each DFB carries field-aligned currents (FACs) in similar configuration to an SCW, it is unclear how the DFBs combine to become the large-scale (several magnetic local times wide) region-1-sense (towards Earth at the dawn sector of the magnetotail and away from Earth at the dusk sector) FACs of the SCW. To answer this question, we investigate the FACs of DFBs statistically using THEMIS data. Our results suggest that at the dawn (dusk) sector of the magnetotail, a DFB has more FAC towards (away from) Earth than away from (towards) Earth, so that the net FAC is towards (away from) Earth. The combined effect of many DFBs is therefore the same as the large-scale region-1-sense SCW, supporting the idea that "wedgelets" comprise the large scale substorm current wedge.

  2. Polarized skylight does not calibrate the compass system of a migratory bat

    PubMed Central

    Lindecke, Oliver; Voigt, Christian C.; Pētersons, Gunārs; Holland, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent study, Greif et al. (Greif et al. Nat Commun 5, 4488. (doi:10.1038/ncomms5488)) demonstrated a functional role of polarized light for a bat species confronted with a homing task. These non-migratory bats appeared to calibrate their magnetic compass by using polarized skylight at dusk, yet it is unknown if migratory bats also use these cues for calibration. During autumn migration, we equipped Nathusius' bats, Pipistrellus nathusii, with radio transmitters and tested if experimental animals exposed during dusk to a 90° rotated band of polarized light would head in a different direction compared with control animals. After release, bats of both groups continued their journey in the same direction. This observation argues against the use of a polarization-calibrated magnetic compass by this migratory bat and questions that the ability of using polarized light for navigation is a consistent feature in bats. This finding matches with observations in some passerine birds that used polarized light for calibration of their magnetic compass before but not during migration. PMID:26382077

  3. Ion trajectories in Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantos, M.; Reiff, P.; Killen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The atmosphere of Mercury is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Resulting ions are affected by both magnetic and electric field forces due to their small energy. The escape flux of these ions from Mercury's magnetosphere is believed to respond to the degree of solar wind - Hermean magnetosphere interaction. We present the structure of the Hermean magnetosphere obtained by the Toffoletto-Hill (JGR 98, 1339, 1993) model of an open magnetosphere, and supplement it with the Ding et al. (Phys. Space Plasmas, 1996) potential solver to represent the convection electric field. We follow thousands of Na and K ions in a tight grid of magnetic and electric fields at Mercury. Ions are created with a spatial distribution given from the neutral distribution to cover the entire dayside, and are launched at the surface, with an isotropic angular distribution. The initial energy is taken to be ˜1eV. We calculate the loci of points where the ions reimpact the planetary surface. We conclude that the dawn-dusk asymmetry and high-latitude enhancements in the sodium atmosphere are perpetuated by the pattern of ion redistribution due to a predominant dawn to dusk electric field. The solar wind ion sputtering effect will further amplify atmospheric patchiness.

  4. Impact of MHD shock physics on magnetosheath asymmetry and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyri, K.

    2013-08-01

    We have performed 13 three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field properties for Parker spiral (PS) and ortho-Parker spiral interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientations corresponding to a wide range of solar wind plasma conditions. To study the growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the dawn and dusk flank magnetopause, we have performed 26 local two-dimensional MHD simulations, with the initial conditions taken from global simulations on both sides of the velocity shear layer at the dawn-dusk terminator. These simulations indicate that while the MHD physics of the fast shocks does not directly lead to strong asymmetry of the magnetosheath temperature for typical solar wind conditions, the magnetosheath on the quasi-parallel shock side has a smaller tangential magnetic field along the magnetosheath flow which enables faster growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). Because the IMF is statistically mostly in the PS orientation, the KHI formation may statistically favor the dawnside flank. For all the 26 simulations, the growth rates of the KHI correlated well with the ratio of the velocity shear and Alfvén speed along the wave vector, k. Dynamics of the KHI may subsequently lead to formation of kinetic Alfvén waves and reconnection in the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices which can lead to particle energization. This may partly help to explain the observed plasma sheet asymmetry of cold-component ions, which are heated more on the dawnside plasma sheet.

  5. Plasma and convection reversal boundary motions in the high-latitude ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Heelis, R. A.; Cumnock, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a statistical study of the high-latitude ionospheric plasma motion at the convection reversal boundary (CRB) and its dependence on the location of the CRB and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation by using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F13 and F15 measurements over the period from 2000 to 2007. During periods of stable southward IMF, we find a smaller variability in plasma drifts across the CRB over a 4 h segment in magnetic local time (MLT) around dawn and dusk compared to that for variable IMF. Across these segments, the plasma motion at the CRB is directed poleward at local times closer to local noon and equatorward at local times closer to midnight on both the dawn and dusk sides with a total potential drop ~10 kV, suggesting that the CRB behaves much like an adiaroic line. For variable IMF with no stability constraint, we see a relatively narrow distribution of plasma drifts across the CRB only in the 6-7 h and 17-18 h MLT and equatorward/poleward motions of the CRB when the CRB is located at the highest/lowest latitudes. The smaller local time extent of the adiaroic line for variable IMF (~1 h) may be associated with rotation of the dayside merging gap in local time or local contractions and expansions of the polar cap boundary.

  6. The interaction of a magnetic cloud with the Earth - Ionospheric convection in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres for a wide range of quasi-steady interplanetary magnetic field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, M. P.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.; Hairston, M. R.; Greenspan, M. E.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Lepping, R. P.

    1993-01-01

    Observations are presented of the ionospheric convection in cross sections of the polar cap and auroral zone as part of the study of the interaction of the Earth's magnetosphere with the magnetic cloud of January 13-15, 1988. For strongly northward IMF, the convection in the Southern Hemisphere is characterized by a two-cell convection pattern comfined to high latitudes with sunward flow over the pole. The strength of the flows is comparable to that later seen under southward IMF. Superimposed on this convection pattern there are clear dawn-dusk asymmetries associated with a one-cell convection component whose sense depends on the polarity of the magnetic cloud's large east-west magnetic field component. When the cloud's magnetic field turns southward, the convection is characterized by a two-cell pattern extending to lower latitude with antisunward flow over the pole. There is no evident interhemispheric difference in the structure and strength of the convection. Superimposed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the flow patterns are observed which are only in part attributable to the east-west component of the magnetic field.

  7. Diel variation in ammonia excretion, glutamine levels, and hydration status in two species of terrestrial isopods.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan C; Peña-Peralta, Mariasol

    2005-01-01

    Terrestrial isopods (suborder Oniscidea) excrete most nitrogen diurnally as volatile ammonia, and ammonia-loaded animals accumulate nonessential amino acids, which may constitute the major nocturnal nitrogen pool. This study explored the relationship between ammonia excretion, glutamine storage/mobilization, and water balance, in two sympatric species Ligidium lapetum (section Diplocheta), a hygric species; and Armadillidium vulgare (Section Crinocheta), a xeric species capable of water-vapor absorption (WVA). Ammonia excretion (12-h), tissue glutamine levels, and water contents were measured following field collection of animals at dusk and dawn. In both species, diurnal ammonia excretion exceeded nocturnal excretion four- to fivefold while glutamine levels increased four- to sevenfold during the night. Most glutamine was accumulated in the somatic tissues ("body wall"). While data support the role of glutamine in nocturnal nitrogen storage, potential nitrogen mobilization from glutamine breakdown (162 micromol g(-1) in A. vulgare) exceeds measured ammonia excretion (2.5 micromol g(-1)) over 60-fold. This may serve to generate the high hemolymph ammonia concentrations (and high P(NH3)) seen during volatilization. The energetic cost of ammonia volatilization is discussed in the light of these findings. Mean water contents were similar at dusk and dawn in both species, indicating that diel cycles of water depletion and replenishment were not occurring. PMID:15578188

  8. Asymmetries observed in Saturn's magnetopause geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, N. M.; Achilleos, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Guio, P.; Masters, A.; Ray, L. C.; Sergis, N.; Thomsen, M. F.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    For over 10 years, the Cassini spacecraft has patrolled Saturn's magnetosphere and observed its magnetopause boundary over a wide range of prevailing solar wind and interior plasma conditions. We now have data that enable us to resolve a significant dawn-dusk asymmetry and find that the magnetosphere extends farther from the planet on the dawnside of the planet by 7 ± 1%. In addition, an opposing dawn-dusk asymmetry in the suprathermal plasma pressure adjacent to the magnetopause has been observed. This probably acts to reduce the size asymmetry and may explain the discrepancy between the degree of asymmetry found here and a similar asymmetry found by Kivelson and Jia (2014) using MHD simulations. Finally, these observations sample a wide range of season, allowing the "intrinsic" polar flattening (14 ± 1%) caused by the magnetodisc to be separated from the seasonally induced north-south asymmetry in the magnetopause shape found theoretically (5 ± 1% when the planet's magnetic dipole is tilted away from the Sun by 10-17°).

  9. Dynamics of Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Coster, A. J.; Huba, J.; Ridley, A. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Baker, J. B. H.; Wolf, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Subauroral Polarization Stream (SAPS) flow structures are narrow ionospheric channels of fast (in excess of 100 m/s) westward drift just outside the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora in the dusk-to-midnight local time sector. Other terms for this phenomenon include subauroral Ion Drift (SAID) events and Polarization Jets. SAPS structures represent a striking departure from the commonly-used two-cell convection pattern. They are thought to arise from the displacement of the downward region-2 Birkeland currents on the dusk side equatorward of the low-latitude boundary of the auroral oval during times of changing high-latitude convection. In this paper, we will use several event simulations with the SAMI3-RCM numerical model (a self-consistent ionosphere-inner magnetosphere model) and RCM-GITM (a self-consistent model of the ionosphere-thermosphere-inner magnetosphere) to analyze the relative roles of changes in the IMF Bz component, ionospheric electron density depletions, and thermospheric modifications in controlling the dynamics of SAPS. Simulation results will be compared to multi-instrument ionospheric observations.

  10. Distribution of H2 in the Lunar Exosphere from LAMP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Dana; Retherford, Kurt; Cook, Jason; Grava, Cesare; Greathouse, Thomas; Gladstone, Randy; Stern, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Hydrogen gas (H2) has been detected in the Moon’s exosphere. It was identified spectrally during the LCROSS impact plume (Gladstone et al., 2010). Then it was found in LAMP data from the nominal exosphere (Stern et al., 2013). We examine the distribution of H2 in the lunar exosphere using a Monte Carlo model and data from the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) FUV imaging spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). LAMP observations made in twilight, i.e., through illuminated exosphere, but with a footprint on the nightside of the Moon, are routinely made with LRO. However, during times when the beta angle of the orbit is close to beta=90°, a great portion of the nightside orbit is in the twilight viewing geometry. Using data from just behind the terminator on the post-dusk and pre-dawn sides, we compile a cumulative spectrum throughout LAMP’s bandpass. A dawn/dusk asymmetry is detected in the H2 abundance. Modeling is used to decipher the release mechanism and source distribution of diatomic hydrogen that best fits the observations. We examine the source rate and the total mass of the H2 exosphere consistent with the observations.

  11. Differential success in sampling of Atlantic Forest amphibians among different periods of the day.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F D; Siqueira, C C; Ariani, C V; Vrcibradic, D; Guedes, D M; Kiefer, M C; Almeida-Gomes, M; Goyannes-Araújo, P; Borges-Júnior, V N T; Van Sluys, M

    2015-05-01

    In general, anurans tend to be nocturnal, though diurnal activity is characteristic of some groups. Studies show that frog activity may be inferred based on the number of individuals collected at different periods of the day, during large-scale field surveys. We investigated the best period of the day to conduct amphibian sampling in nine Atlantic Rainforest areas in southeastern Brazil, based on intensive field surveys. At each locality we employed similar sampling effort during diurnal, crepuscular and nocturnal searches (totaling 704.5 sampling hours). We pooled data from all localities for each period and estimated the proportion of frogs of each species active at each period based on the total number of individuals and on the number of species found during all surveys for that period. We recorded a total of 817 individual frogs from 69 species. Species richness was highest at night (median = 12 species), intermediate at dusk (median = 8), and lowest during the day (median = 4). The percentage of the total number of individual frogs found (pooled species) was highest during the night (ca. 53%) and lowest during the day (ca. 14%). Analyzing each species separately, the number of individuals recorded was consistently higher at dusk and night for most species. Our study evidences a trend for nocturnal activity for most Atlantic Rainforest frogs, with few species having primarily diurnal habits. Those results may favor future studies and conservation efforts for amphibian species. PMID:26132005

  12. Extreme ultraviolet explorer satellite observation of Jupiter's Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. T; Gladstone, G. R.; Moos, H. W.; Bagenal, F.; Clarke, J. T.; Feldman, P. D.; Mcgrath, M. A.; Schneider, N. M.; Shemansky, D. E.; Strobel, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite observation of the Jupiter system, obtained during the 2 day period 1993 March 30 through April 1, which shows a rich emission-line spectrum from the Io plasma torus spanning wavelengths 370 to 735 A. The emission features correspond primarily to known multiplets of oxygen and sulfur ions, but a blended feature near 372 A is a plausible Na II transition. The summed detected energy flux of (7.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp -11) ergs/sq cm(s) corresponds to a radiated power of approximately equal to 4 x 10(exp 11) W in this spectral range. All ansa emissions show a distinct dawn-dusk brightness asymmetry and the measured dusk/dawn ratio of the bright S III lambda-680 feature is 2.3 +/- 0.3, significantly larger than the ratio measured by the Voyager spacecraft ultraviolet (UV) instruments. A preliminary estimate of ion partitioning indicates that the oxygen/sulfur ion ratio is approximately equal to 2, compared to the value approximately equal to 1.3 measured by Voyager, and that (Na(+))/(e) greater than 0.01.

  13. Ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmapauses'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoffman, J. H.; Maynard, N. C.

    1977-01-01

    During August 1972, Explorer 45 orbiting near the equatorial plane with an apogee of about 5.2 R sub e traversed magnetic field lines in close proximity to those simultaneously traversed by the topside ionospheric satellite ISIS 2 near dusk in the L range 2-5.4. The locations of the Explorer 45 plasmapause crossings during this month were compared to the latitudinal decreases of the H(+) density observed on ISIS 2 near the same magnetic field lines. The equatorially determined plasmapause field lines typically passed through or poleward of the minimum of the ionospheric light ion trough, with coincident satellite passes occurring for which the L separation between the plasmapause and trough field lines was between 1 and 2. Vertical flows of the H(+) ions in the light ion trough as detected by the magnetic ion mass spectrometer on ISIS were directed upward with velocities between 1 and 2 kilometers/sec near dusk on these passes. These velocities decreased to lower values on the low latitude side of the H(+) trough but did not show any noticeable change across the field lines corresponding to the magnetospheric plasmapause.

  14. Toroidal quarter waves in the Earth's magnetosphere: observational perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Jayashree; Sinha, A. K.; Vichare, Geeta

    2015-05-01

    Quarter waves in the Earth's magnetosphere are standing Alfvén waves excited on geomagnetic field lines when the conjugate ionospheres display strong asymmetry in conductivity. In this paper, we have examined the characteristics of these waves by analyzing two years (2007-2008) of magnetometer data from the geostationary satellite GOES-11. These waves are predominantly identified during quiet geomagnetic conditions based on interhemispheric conductivity contrast and opposite signs of wave reflection coefficients at the conjugate ionospheres. The observed frequencies are used in a numerical model to compute the equatorial ion density by assuming that the plasma consists only of protons at geostationary height during quiet conditions. The number density of protons thus obtained is compared with an empirical model. The phase difference between the waves observed at the satellite and northern conjugate ground station is in accord with model expectations for quarter mode waves. We also for the first time report the occurrence of an event depicting harmonically structured quarter wave oscillations. Statistical analysis of the seasonal and MLT (Magnetic local time) dependence of these oscillations shows that they mostly occur during solstices and around terminators (i.e. dawn and dusk time). In addition, it is observed that occurrence is more prevalent during dawn in the June solstice and dusk during the December solstice.

  15. Effects of interrupted photoperiods on the induction of ovulation in anestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, K; Johnson, A L; Scanes, C G

    1985-10-01

    The ability of interrupted photoperiods to induce early estrus and ovulation was examined. Horse mares were exposed to long (16 h light) or short (10 h light), noninterrupted photoperiods, ambient light, or various interrupted photoperiod treatments from December 1 to April 15 (135 d). Follicular development was assessed by rectal palpation and estrous behavior was determined by teasing with a stallion. Serum concentrations of progesterone were used as an indicator of corpus luteum function. Differences among the light treatment groups were compared for the following behavioral and ovarian characteristics: days to first detectable 3-cm follicle, days to first estrous behavior, days to first ovulation, the number of mares ovulating within the treatment period, and the number of ovulations within the treatment period per mare. Compared with the ambient and 10L:14D (L = h of light and D = h of darkness) photoperiod treatments, ovulation was advanced to the greatest extent by a photoperiod of 16L:8D and the interrupted photoperiod 10L:8D:2L:4D. These two stimulatory photoperiod treatments were characterized by the presence of light 8 to 10 h after dusk. Therefore, the present data are consistent with an external coincidence model for the induction of seasonal breeding in horses, with the photoinducible phase occurring within the period 8 to 10 h after dusk. PMID:4066545

  16. 3D PIC Simulation of the Magnetosphere during IMF Rotation from North to South: Signatures of Substorm Triggering in the Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Cao. D/ S/; Lembege, B.

    2008-01-01

    Three dimensional PIC simulations are performed in order to analyse the dynamics of the magnetotail as the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotates from northward to southward direction. This dynamics reveals to be quite different within meridian/equatorial planes over two successive phases of this rotation. First, as IMF rotates from North to Dawn-Dusk direction, the X-Point (magnetic reconnection) evidenced in the magnetotail (meridian plane) is moving earthward (from x=-35 Re to x=-17.5 ) distance at which it stabilizes. This motion is coupled with the formation of "Crosstail-S" patterns (within the plane perpendicular to the Sun-Earth mine) through the neutral sheet in the nearby magnetotail. Second, as IMF rotates from dawn-dusk to South, the minimum B field region is expanding within the equatorial plane and forms a ring. This two-steps dynamics is analyzed in strong association with the cross field magnetotail current Jy, in order to recover the signatures of substorms triggering.

  17. Dynamics of polar boundary of the auroral oval derived from the IMAGE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova, R.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2013-01-01

    Based on a new database on positions of the auroral oval boundaries including measurements made by the IMAGE satellite in 2000-2002 with correct determination of the glow boundaries, statistical estimations of the latitudinal position of the polar cap boundary (PCB) are obtained depending on the IMF B y and B z , and the PCB evolution during a magnetic storm is analyzed. At zero IMF in the noon (midnight) sector, PCB is located approximately at 80° (76°) CGMLat. The PCB displacement along the noon-midnight meridian is controlled by the IMF B z , and in the noon (midnight) sector it is equal to 0.45° (0.15°) CGMLat when B z changes by 1 nT. The PCB displacement along the dawn-dusk meridian depends on the IMF B y , and it equals 0.1° CGMLat when B y changes by 1 nT. Accordingly, the north polar cap as a whole is shifted to the dawn (dusk) side at B y > 0 ( B y <0). After northward turn of the IMF during the storm's recovery phase, the PCB on the dayside is shifted to the north practically without time delay. The night boundary requires 25 h or more in order to be shifted to the pole to a latitude corresponding to B z > 0.

  18. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hwang, K. -J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. -C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J. -J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; et al

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to thosemore » of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~20–30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in-situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in-situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.« less

  19. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K. -J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M. -C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J. -J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Onsager, T.

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to those of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ~20–30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in-situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in-situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

  20. Distribution of hydrogen and oxygen ion species in the plasmasheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Cao, Jinbin; Liu, Wenlong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, using data obtained by Cluster 4 satellite from 2001 to 2012, we statistically investigate the spatial distributions of H+ and O+ in the magnetotail plasmasheet and their relation with geomagnetic indices. Our work outlines the existence of two regions with enhanced O+ concentration in the tail plasmasheet, one is located in the mid-tail plasmasheet at R > 17 RE, and the other is located near the inner boundary of plasmasheet at R < 10 RE. The existence of the depletion region of O+ between 10 RE < R < 17 RE indicates that the O+ ions in the mid-tail plasmasheet, which come from polar cap, are not likely to be able to make important contribution to the formation of ring current. Both the distributions of density and temperature of O+ ions have a dawn-dusk asymmetry. The number density of O+ during geomagnetic active time (Dst < -20 nT/AE > 200 nT/Kp ⩾ 3) is much larger than that during non-storm time (Dst > -20 nT/AE < 200 nT/Kp < 3). This dawn-dusk asymmetry and the number density of O+ varying with geomagnetic activity apply for both regions (R < 10 RE and R > 17 RE) of O+. Therefore both substorm and enhanced convection provide a large number of O+ ions to the plasmasheet, which makes favorable condition for the growth of the ring current.

  1. Ramadan fasting and patients with renal diseases: A mini review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Emami-Naini, Afsoon; Roomizadeh, Peyman; Baradaran, Azar; Abedini, Amin; Abtahi, Mohammad

    2013-08-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is one of the five pillars of Islam. During this month, adult Muslims are obligated to refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to dusk. Although based on Islamic principles patients are exempted from fasting, each year, many Muslim patients express their willingness to observe the fast in Ramadan month to respect the cultural customs. There are concerns about the impact of fluid restriction and dehydration during Ramadan fasting for patients with renal diseases. In this study, we reviewed the PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, SCIRUS, Embase, and DOAJ data sources to identify the published studies on the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with renal diseases. Our review on published reports on renal transplant recipients revealed no injurious effect of Ramadan fasting for the renal graft function. Nearly all studies on this topic suggest that Ramadan fasting is safe when the function of the renal graft is acceptable and stable. Regarding the impact of Ramadan fasting on patients with chronic kidney disease, there is concern about the role of renal hypoperfusion in developing tubular cell injury. Finally, there is controversy between studies about the risk of dehydration in Ramadan in developing renal stones. There are uncertainties about the change in the incidence of renal colic in Ramadan month compared with the other periods of the year. Despite such discrepancies, nearly all studies are in agreement on consuming adequate amounts of water from dusk to dawn to reduce the risk of renal stone formation. PMID:24379850

  2. The global context of the 14 November 2012 storm event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Fok, M.-C. H.; Zheng, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Lee, J.-J.; Glocer, A.; Partamies, N.; Singer, H. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Onsager, T.

    2015-03-01

    From 2 to 5 UT on 14 November 2012, the Van Allen Probes observed repeated particle flux dropouts during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm as the satellites traversed the post-midnight to dawnside inner magnetosphere. Each flux dropout corresponded to an abrupt change in the magnetic topology, i.e., from a more dipolar configuration to a configuration with magnetic field lines stretched in the dawn-dusk direction. Geosynchronous GOES spacecraft located in the dusk and near-midnight sectors and the LANL constellation with wide local time coverage also observed repeated flux dropouts and stretched field lines with similar occurrence patterns to those of the Van Allen Probe events. THEMIS recorded multiple transient abrupt expansions of the evening-side magnetopause ˜20-30 min prior to the sequential Van Allen Probes observations. Ground-based magnetograms and all sky images demonstrate repeatable features in conjunction with the dropouts. We combine the various in situ and ground-based measurements to define and understand the global spatiotemporal features associated with the dropouts observed by the Van Allen Probes. We discuss various proposed hypotheses for the mechanism that plausibly caused this storm-time dropout event as well as formulate a new hypothesis that explains the combined in situ and ground-based observations: the earthward motion of magnetic flux ropes containing lobe plasmas that form along an extended magnetotail reconnection line in the near-Earth plasma sheet.

  3. Diurnal lighting patterns and habitat alter opsin expression and colour preferences in a killifish

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley M.; Stanis, Shannon; Fuller, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial variation in lighting environments frequently leads to population variation in colour patterns, colour preferences and visual systems. Yet lighting conditions also vary diurnally, and many aspects of visual systems and behaviour vary over this time scale. Here, we use the bluefin killifish (Lucania goodei) to compare how diurnal variation and habitat variation (clear versus tannin-stained water) affect opsin expression and the preference to peck at different-coloured objects. Opsin expression was generally lowest at midnight and dawn, and highest at midday and dusk, and this diurnal variation was many times greater than variation between habitats. Pecking preference was affected by both diurnal and habitat variation but did not correlate with opsin expression. Rather, pecking preference matched lighting conditions, with higher preferences for blue at noon and for red at dawn/dusk, when these wavelengths are comparatively scarce. Similarly, blue pecking preference was higher in tannin-stained water where blue wavelengths are reduced. In conclusion, L. goodei exhibits strong diurnal cycles of opsin expression, but these are not tightly correlated with light intensity or colour. Temporally variable pecking preferences probably result from lighting environment rather than from opsin production. These results may have implications for the colour pattern diversity observed in these fish. PMID:23698009

  4. Daily rhythms in antennal protein and olfactory sensitivity in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Rund, Samuel S. C.; Bonar, Nicolle A.; Champion, Matthew M.; Ghazi, John P.; Houk, Cameron M.; Leming, Matthew T.; Syed, Zainulabeuddin; Duffield, Giles E.

    2013-01-01

    We recently characterized 24-hr daily rhythmic patterns of gene expression in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes. These include numerous odorant binding proteins (OBPs), soluble odorant carrying proteins enriched in olfactory organs. Here we demonstrate that multiple rhythmically expressed genes including OBPs and takeout proteins, involved in regulating blood feeding behavior, have corresponding rhythmic protein levels as measured by quantitative proteomics. This includes AgamOBP1, previously shown as important to An. gambiae odorant sensing. Further, electrophysiological investigations demonstrate time-of-day specific differences in olfactory sensitivity of antennae to major host-derived odorants. The pre-dusk/dusk peaks in OBPs and takeout gene expression correspond with peak protein abundance at night, and in turn coincide with the time of increased olfactory sensitivity to odorants requiring OBPs and times of increased blood-feeding behavior. This suggests an important role for OBPs in modulating temporal changes in odorant sensitivity, enabling the olfactory system to coordinate with the circadian niche of An. gambiae. PMID:23986098

  5. Penetration of the solar wind electric field into the magnetosphere/ionosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael C.; Makela, Jonathan J.; Chau, Jorge L.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2003-02-01

    On April 17, 2002 an intense, long duration electric field penetration event was captured by the Jicamarca incoherent scatter radar. Other radars in the U. S. chain detected the event as well, although not with as much clarity. The Interplanetary Electric Field (IEF) is available from the ACE satellite as well. The ratio of the dawn-to-dusk component of the IEF to the dawn-to-dusk electric field in the equatorial ionosphere for periods less than about two hours is 15:1. We suggest that this corresponds to the ratio of the size of the magnetosphere to the length of the connection line between the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and the Earth's magnetic field. Simultaneous magnetic field measurements at Piura (off the magnetic equator) and at Jicamarca (under the magnetic equator) in Peru, reveal the same high frequency components and suggest that a chain of stations or an equatorial fleet of satellites in low earth orbit could be used to monitor the connection length continuously.

  6. Studies of medium scale travelling ionospheric disturbances using TIGER SuperDARN radar sea echo observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L.; Dyson, P.; Parkinson, M.; Wan, W.

    2004-12-01

    Seasonal and diurnal variations in the direction of propagation of medium-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) have been investigated by analyzing sea echo returns detected by the TIGER SuperDARN radar located in Tasmania (43.4° S, 147.2° E geographic; -54.6°Λ). A strong dependency on local time was found, as well as significant seasonal variations. Generally, the propagation direction has a northward (i.e. equatorward) component. In the early morning hours the direction of propagation is quite variable throughout the year. It then becomes predominantly northwest and changes to northeast around 09:00 LT. In late fall and winter it changes back to north/northwest around 15:00 LT. During the other seasons, northward propagation is very obvious near dawn and dusk, but no significant northward propagation is observed at noon. It is suggested that the variable propagation direction in the morning is related to irregular magnetic disturbances that occur at this local time. The changes in the MSTID propagation directions near dawn and dusk are generally consistent with changes in ionospheric electric fields occurring at these times and is consistent with dayside MSTIDs being generated by the Lorentz force.

  7. Sources of Local Time Asymmetries in Magnetodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Kane, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The rapidly rotating magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn contain a near-equatorial thin current sheet over most local times known as the magnetodisc, resembling a wrapped-up magnetotail. The Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons spacecraft at Jupiter and Saturn have provided extensive datasets from which to observationally identify local time asymmetries in these magnetodiscs. Imaging in the infrared and ultraviolet from ground- and space-based instruments have also revealed the presence of local time asymmetries in the aurora which therefore must map to local time asymmetries in the magnetosphere. Asymmetries are found in (i) the configuration of the magnetic field and magnetospheric currents, where a thicker disc is found in the noon and dusk sectors; (ii) plasma flows where the plasma flow has local time-dependent radial components; (iii) a thicker plasma sheet in the dusk sector. Many of these features are also reproduced in global MHD simulations. Several models have been developed to interpret these various observations and typically fall into two groups: ones which invoke coupling with the solar wind (via reconnection or viscous processes) and ones which invoke internal rotational processes operating inside an asymmetrical external boundary. In this paper we review these observational in situ findings, review the models which seek to explain them, and highlight open questions and directions for future work.

  8. High-latitude currents and their energy exchange with the ionosphere-thermosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, J. P.

    2000-10-01

    The transfer of electrical energy at high latitudes between the magnetosphere and ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system is contained within the resulting currents and electric fields between the two systems. As such, the electrodynamic state of the IT system can influence how much of the electrical energy is transferred at any one time by modulating the currents that flow in the region. For this study, 1557 hours of detailed E region measurements by the Sondrestrom incoherent-scatter radar from 1993 through 1998 were collected, of which 95 hours were used to determine the local electromagnetic energy transfer rates within the IT system and evaluate the role of the IT system in modifying this energy transfer. The measurements have been organized into 59 periods of enhanced electrical energy transfer and cover all universal times but are local to the region above Sondrestrom at 74.2° magnetic latitude. In many of the events studied it was found that the IT system acted to reduce the net electromagnetic energy transferred from the magnetosphere owing to the presence of neutral winds. The dawn sector proved to have on average greater passive energy deposition rates than in the dusk sector. The reduction of this rate by neutral winds also proved stronger in the dawn sector. This enhanced modulation caused the dawn-dusk asymmetry in energy transfer to be less pronounced but still apparent in the electromagnetic energy transfer rate.

  9. Observational test of shock drift and Fermi acceleration on a seed particle population upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Sarris, E. T.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of proposed shock acceleration mechanisms as they operate at the bow shock in the presence of a seed energetic particle population was examined using data from simultaneous observations of energetic solar-origin protons, carried out by the IMP 7 and 8 spacecraft in the vicinity of the quasi-parallel (dawn) and quasi-perpendicular (dusk) regions of the earth's bow shock, respectively. The results of observations (which include acceleration effects in the intensities of the energetic protons with energies as high as 4 MeV observed at the vicinity of the dusk bow shock, but no evidence for any particle acceleration at the energy equal to or above 50 keV at the dawn side of the bow shock) indicate that the acceleration of a seed particle population occurs only at the quasi-perpendicular bow shock through shock drift acceleration and that the major source of observed upstream ion populations is the leakage of magnetospheric ions of energies not less than 50 keV, rather than in situ acceleration.

  10. Solar wind driving of asymmetries in the magnetosheath - magnetosphere system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, Andrew; Pulkkinen, Tuija; Osmane, Adnane; Nykyri, Katariina

    2015-04-01

    Over the decades of in-situ measurements of the terrestrial magnetosphere it has been suggested and experimentally shown that various parameter dawn-dusk asymmetries arise. What is also apparent is that such asymmetries are delicately coupled to the properties of the solar wind. The IMF configuration has a considerable impact since its orientation dictates the shock geometry, thus driving different dawn-dusk plasma properties downstream. Magnetosheath asymmetries are notably important since the magnetosheath effectively modifies and reconfigures plasma before it enters the inner magnetosphere and therefore may play a role in driving asymmetries in the inner magnetosphere. We apply our existing statistical mapping tool which uses over 7 years of THEMIS and OMNI data to create statistical maps of plasma properties in the global magnetospheric system. We look at asymmetries of both steady state properties (e.g. B, V, n), and also transient/kinetic features such as mirror mode activity. We focus specifically on 1. solar wind dependence and 2. the co-dependence between the magnetosheath and magnetospheric regions.

  11. Epithermal Neutron Evidence for a Diurnal Surface Hydration Process in the Moon's High Latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, T. P.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Parsons, A.; Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Sanin, A.; Litvak, M.; Livengood, T.

    2015-01-01

    We report evidence from epithermal neutron flux observations that show that the Moon's high latitude surfaces are being actively hydrated, dehydrated and rehydrated in a diurnal cycle. The near-surface hydration is indicated by an enhanced suppression of the lunar epithermal neutron leakage flux on the dayside of the dawn terminator on poleward-facing slopes (PFS). At 0600 to 0800 local-time, hydrogen concentrations within the upper 1 meter of PFS are observed to be maximized relative to equivalent equator-facing slopes (EFS). During the lunar day surface hydrogen concentrations diminish towards dusk and then rebuild overnight. Surface hydration is determined by differential comparison of the averaged EFS to PFS epithermal neutron count rates above +/- 75 deg latitude. At dawn the contrast bias towards PFS is consistent with at least 15 to 25 parts-per-million (ppm) hydrogen that dissipates by dusk. We review several lines of evidence derived from temperature and epithermal neutron data by a correlated analysis of observations from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) that were mapped as a function of lunar local-time, Lunar Observing Laser Altimeter (LOLA) topography and Diviner (DLRE) surface temperature.

  12. Low-frequency wave activity related to dipolarization fronts detected by MMS in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Contel, O.; Retino, A.; Breuillard, H.; Mirioni, L.; Roux, A.; Chust, T.; Chasapis, A.; Lavraud, B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Fu, H.; Marklund, G. T.; Nakamura, R.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.; Ergun, R.; Goodrich, K.; Needell, J.; Chutter, M.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Le, G.; Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Fischer, D.; Leinweber, H. K.; Anderson, B. J.; Argall, M. R.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Pollock, C. J.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dipolarization fronts are often associated to reconnection jets in the magnetotail current sheet and are sites of important energy dissipation and particle energization. Since the launch on March 12th and until the 9th of July 2015, the MMS constellation has been moving from dawn to dusk in a string of pearls formation. Although particle instruments were rarely operating and only FIELDS instrument suite was often gathering data, the MMS spacecraft have detected numerous dipolarization fronts, in particular on May 15th. Since 9th of July, the MMS evolved into a tetrahedral configuration with an average inter-satellite distance of 160 km and was still able to detect dipolarization fronts in the dusk magnetotail. As the Larmor radius of thermal protons is about 500 km in this region and dipolarization fronts have a typical thickness of the order of the Larmor radius, such a separation allows us to investigate in detail the microphysics of dipolarization fronts. In this study, we focus in particular on low-frequency electromagnetic wave activity related to the fronts and discuss possible mechanisms of particle heating and acceleration both at large scales (string of pearls configuration) and at kinetic scales (tetrahedral configuration).

  13. Spatial Distribution of Rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices at Earth's Dayside and Flank Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, M. G. G. T.; Hasegawa, H.; Lavraud, B.; Phan, T.; Escoubet, C. P.; Dunlop, M. W.; Bogdanova, Y. V.; Borg, A. L.; Volwerk, M.; Berchem, J.; Constantinescu, O. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; Masson, A.; Laakso, H.; Soucek, J.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Frey, H. U.; Panov, E. V.; Shen, C.; Shi, J. K.; Sibeck, D. G.; Pu, Z. Y.; Wang, J.; Wild, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) can drive waves at the magnetopause. These waves can grow to form rolled-up vortices and facilitate transfer of plasma into the magnetosphere. To investigate the persistence and frequency of such waves at the magnetopause we have carried out a survey of all Double Star 1 magnetopause crossings, using a combination of ion and magnetic field measurements. Using criteria originally used in a Geotail study made by Hasegawa et al. (2006) (forthwith referred to as H2006), 17 candidate events were identified from the entire TC-1 mission (covering 623 orbits where the magnetopause was sampled), a majority of which were on the dayside of the terminator. The relationship between density and shear velocity was then investigated, to identify the predicted signature of a rolled up vortex from H2006 and all 17 events exhibited some level of rolled up behavior. The location of the events had a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry, with 12 (71 %) on the post noon, dusk flank suggesting preferential growth in this region.

  14. Heavy Ion Effects on Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability: Hybrid Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, D.; Lin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) is a candidate mechanism for solar wind tansportation into the magnetosphere. The statistical study of Bouhram et al. 2005 has shown that heavy ions could dominate the magnetopause for as much as 30% of the time on the dusk side. Thus the influence of heavy ions in solar wind-magnetosphere coupling should not be neglected. However, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) linear theory for KHI does not include any ion effects, and people working on the heavy ion effects have not come to an agreement either. Whether the heavy ions promote or inhibit the KHI still remains not well addressed. With a two-dimensional hybrid model, we investigated the effects of ion mass number on the KHI growth rate, starting from the simplest case of uniform density and uniform magnetic field perpendicular to the shear flow. It is shown that the growth rate of the KHI is lower with a heavier mass number. We try to to derive the linear theory for the kinetic KHI and compare it with the hybrid simulation results. The linear theory with ion effects considered is going to be further verified with varying heavy ion fractions and finite magnetic shear. More implications for the dawn-dusk asymmetry of KHI on planetary magnetopause are desirable when comparing the results of opposite magnetic field directions relative to the flow vorticity.

  15. Tidal influence on O(1S) airglow emission rate distributions at the geographic equator as observed by WINDII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephere, G. G.; Mclandress, C.; Solheim, B. H.

    1995-01-01

    WINDII, the Wind Imaging Interferometer on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, observes winds, temperatures and emission rates in the upper mesosphere and thermosphere. In this paper we report on nighttime observations of the vertical distribution of the O(1S) 557.7 nm emission near the geographic equator for March/April, 1993. The airglow volume emission rate distribution is found to be strongly dependent on local time. Beginning at dusk, an intense airglow emission layer descends from a mean altitude of 95 km, reaching 89 km by midnight after which the emission rapidly decays. Shortly after midnight it reappears weakly at a higher altitude and remains at this level as the emission rate gradually increases towards dawn. This strong local time dependence leads us to conclude that the effect is tidally driven. Comparison with the Forbes (1982a,b) model suggest that total density perturbations and changes in the atomic oxygen mixing ratio may the cause of the changes in emission rate distribution between dusk and midnight. The reappearance of the emission after midnight may be caused by downward winds bringing oxygen-rich air from above.

  16. Diurnal variations in, and influences on, concentrations of particulate and dissolved arsenic and metals in the mildly alkaline Wallkill River, New Jersey, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barringer, Julia L.; Wilson, Timothy P.; Szabo, Zoltan; Bonin, Jennifer L.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal variations in particulate and dissolved As and metal concentrations were observed in mildly alkaline water from a wetlands site on the Wallkill River in northwestern New Jersey. The site, underlain by glacial sediments over dolomite bedrock, is 10 km downstream from a mined area of the Franklin Marble, host to Zn ores, also As and Mn minerals. In mid-September 2005, maxima and minima in dissolved-oxygen-concentration and pH, typically caused by photosynthesis and respiration, occurred at 2000 and 0800 hours. Concentrations of dissolved As (1.52-1.95 μg/L) peaked at dusk (2000 hours), whereas dissolved Mn and Zn concentrations (76.5-96.9 and 8.55-12.8 μg/L, respectively) were lowest at dusk and peaked at 1000 hours. These opposing cycles probably reflect sorption and desorption of As (an anion), and Mn and Zn (cations) as pH varied throughout the 24-h period. Doubly-peaked cycles of B, Cl, SO4, and nutrients also were observed; these may result from upstream discharges of septic-system effluent. Both recoverable amd particulate Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn concentrations peaked between 0200 and 0600 hours. The particulate metals cycle, with perturbations at 0400 hours, may be influenced by biological activity.

  17. Effects of convection electric field on the distribution of ring current type protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Chen, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    The topology of the boundaries of penetration (or, inversely, the boundaries of the forbidden regions) of 90-deg pitch-angle equatorial protons with energies less than 100 keV are explored for an equatorial convection E-field which is directed in general from dawn to dusk. Due to the dependence of drift path on energy (or magnetic moment), complex structural features are expected in the proton energy spectra detected by satellites since the penetration distance of a proton is not a monotonically increasing or decreasing function of energy. During a storm when the convection E is enhanced, model calculations predict elongations of the forbidden regions analogous to tail extensions of the plasmasphere. Following a reduction in the convection field, spiral-structured forbidden regions can occur. Structural features inherent to large-scale convection field changes may be seen in the nose-like proton spectrograms observed near dusk by instrumentation on Explorer 45. These nose events are modelled by using an electric field model developed originally by Volland (1973). The strength of the field is related to the Kp index through night-time equatorial plasmapause measurements.

  18. Simultaneous measurements of energetic ion (50 keV and above) and electron (220 keV and above) activity upstream of earth's bow shock and inside the plasma sheet - Magnetospheric source for the November 3 and December 3, 1977 upstream events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarris, E. T.; Anagnostopoulos, G. C.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of energetic ions and electrons by the IMP 7 and 8 spacecraft are used here to separate temporal variations from spatial variations during the upstream ion events observed on December 3, 1977 and November 2-3, 1977, in order to determine the source of these particles. Analysis of the observations and comparison with theory shows that: (1) for each of the observed upstream enhancements, energetic ions and electrons were simultaneously present inside the plasma sheet; (2) the low-energy ion intensity profile inside the plasma sheet was relatively flat, while at higher energies there was considrable variability; (3) relativistic electron bursts were seen inside the plasma sheet and also upstream of the shock but at substantially reduced intensities; (4) the ion energy spectrum for the December 3 event, extended to energies of about 2 MeV, was identical in form with the plasma sheet and upstream of the shock; (5) ion anisotropies exhibited typically large dawn-dusk or dusk-dawn gradients and large field-aligned streaming away from the bow shock.

  19. Structure of kinetic/non-kinetic scale velocity shear layers and associated Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices: particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, I.

    2009-12-01

    Recent in-situ observations have revealed that Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices can roll-up not only at the Earth's magnetopause but also at the Mercury's magnetopause. Since kinetic effects cannot be neglected in Mercury-like small-scale situations, to universally understand the structure of the KH vortex the kinetic effects should be considered. Thus, in this study, we have performed 2D full particle (EM-PIC) simulations of KH vortices arising from kinetic and non-kinetic scale velocity shear layers. In this study, we focus on the basic situation in which the initial density, temperature and magnetic field are uniform and the magnetic field is perpendicular to the k-vector of KH instability. First, we investigated the kinetic equilibrium of velocity shear layers. In our simulation settings, particles are initialized with shifted Maxwellian velocity distributions having a bulk flow Vx0=±V0*tanh(Y/D0), where D0 is the initial half thickness of the velocity shear layer and V0 is the initial velocity jump across the shear layer. The +V0 (-V0) case corresponds to the dawn (dusk) case of the Earth’s and Mercury's situations. The Maxwellian loading of the particles, however, is only an approximation of equilibrium conditions, and past kinetic studies have shown that the true equilibrium condition is affected by the ion gyro-motion especially when D0<ρi, where ρi is the ion gyro radius. In this study, to exactly understand ion kinetic effects to the true equilibrium of various-scale velocity shear layer, we performed a parameter survey of D0 and V0. As a result, we found that in all cases until about 10 ion gyro-cycles the shear layer reaches the kinetic equilibrium, and further that when D0<ρi the thickness of the shear layer in the kinetic equilibrium always becomes 2ρi. It means there is a low threshold of the velocity shear layer which is determined by ρi. Moreover, we also found that the low threshold of the thickness in the dawn (dusk) case becomes thicker

  20. Quasi-periodic injections of relativistic electrons in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.; Palmaerts, B.; Kurth, W. S.; Badman, S. V.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-periodic, short-period injections of relativistic electrons have been observed in both Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres, but understanding their origin or significance has been challenging, primarily due to the limited number of in-situ observations of such events by past flyby missions. Here we present the first survey of such injections in an outer planetary magnetosphere using almost nine years of energetic charged particle and magnetic field measurements at Saturn. We focus on events with a characteristic period of about 60-70 min (QP60, where QP stands for quasi-periodic). We find that the majority of QP60, which are very common in the outer magnetosphere, map outside Titan's orbit. QP60 are also observed over a very wide range of local times and latitudes. A local time asymmetry in their distribution is the most striking feature, with QP60 at dusk being between 5 and 25 times more frequent than at dawn. Field-line tracing and pitch angle distributions suggest that most events at dusk reside on closed field lines. They are distributed either near the magnetopause, or, in the case of the post-dusk (or pre-midnight) sector, up to about 30 RS inside it, along an area extending parallel to the dawn-dusk direction. QP60 at dawn map either on open field lines and/or near the magnetopause. Both the asymmetries and varying mapping characteristics as a function of local time indicate that generation of QP60 cannot be assigned to a single process. The locations of QP60 seem to trace sites that reconnection is expected to take place. In that respect, the subset of events observed post-dusk and deep inside the magnetopause may be directly or indirectly linked to the Vasyliunas reconnection cycle, while magnetopause reconnection/Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability could be invoked to explain all other events at the duskside. Using similar arguments, injections at the dawnside magnetosphere may result from solar-wind induced storms and/or magnetopause reconnection

  1. Penetration of Large Scale Electric Field to Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Fok, M. C. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wygant, J. R.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    The direct penetration of large scale global electric field to the inner magnetosphere is a critical element in controlling how the background thermal plasma populates within the radiation belts. These plasma populations provide the source of particles and free energy needed for the generation and growth of various plasma waves that, at critical points of resonances in time and phase space, can scatter or energize radiation belt particles to regulate the flux level of the relativistic electrons in the system. At high geomagnetic activity levels, the distribution of large scale electric fields serves as an important indicator of how prevalence of strong wave-particle interactions extend over local times and radial distances. To understand the complex relationship between the global electric fields and thermal plasmas, particularly due to the ionospheric dynamo and the magnetospheric convection effects, and their relations to the geomagnetic activities, we analyze the electric field and cold plasma measurements from Van Allen Probes over more than two years period and simulate a geomagnetic storm event using Coupled Inner Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Model (CIMI). Our statistical analysis of the measurements from Van Allan Probes and CIMI simulations of the March 17, 2013 storm event indicate that: (1) Global dawn-dusk electric field can penetrate the inner magnetosphere inside the inner belt below L~2. (2) Stronger convections occurred in the dusk and midnight sectors than those in the noon and dawn sectors. (3) Strong convections at multiple locations exist at all activity levels but more complex at higher activity levels. (4) At the high activity levels, strongest convections occur in the midnight sectors at larger distances from the Earth and in the dusk sector at closer distances. (5) Two plasma populations of distinct ion temperature isotropies divided at L-Shell ~2, indicating distinct heating mechanisms between inner and outer radiation belts. (6) CIMI

  2. Equatorial counterelectrojets during geomagnetic storms and their possible dynamos in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Hashimoto, K. K.; Ebihara, Y.; Tsuji, Y.; Veenadhari, B.; Nishimura, T.; Tanaka, T.; Fujita, S.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2012-12-01

    During the substorm growth phase and storm main phase, the high pressure plasma accumulated in the cusp and mantle regions activates a dynamo for the dawn-to-dusk convection electric field and the Region-1 field-aligned currents (R1 FACs) [Tanaka, 1995]. The electric field and FACs are conveyed by the shear Alfven waves to the polar ionosphere and the electric field extends promptly to low latitude through the Earth-ionosphere waveguide [Kikuchi and Araki, 1979]. The electric field drives the DP2 currents at mid latitudes [Wilson et al., 2001; Tsuji et al., 2012] and intensifies the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) [Kikuchi et al., 1996, 2008]. The convection electric field extends to the inner magnetosphere promptly [Nishimura et al., 2009] and energizes the plasma in the partial ring current region with the help of the gradient and curvature drift [Ebihara and Ejiri, 2000], which in turn works as a dynamo for the dusk-to-dawn electric field and the R2 FACs. The dusk-to-dawn electric field causes the counterelectrojet (CEJ) at the equator when the IMF turns northward [Rastogi, 1975]. The CEJ often appears during substorms [Kobea et al., 2000; Kikuchi et al., 2000]. Both the R1 and R2 FACs are intensified by the substorm expansion, with the R2 FACs strong enough to cause the CEJ [Hashimoto et al., 2011]. The CEJ often occurs during the recovery phase of geomagnetic storms [Kikuchi et al., 2008; Tsuji et al., 2012], while the CEJ also appears during the storm main phase under the relatively stable southward IMF [Fejer et al., 2007; Veenadhari et al., 2010]. In this paper, we analyzed several storm events to identify the dynamo for the stormtime CEJ. The disturbance dynamo is a commonly accepted dynamo for the long lasting stormtime CEJ [Blanc and Richmond, 1980; Fejer and Scherliess 1997]. However, the observed rapid and periodic development of the CEJ should be attributed to the R2 FACs generated in the inner magnetosphere. Based on the magnetometer and radar

  3. Dynamics of the inner magnetosphere near times of substorm onsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Burke, W. J.; Basinska, E. M.; Erickson, G. M.; Hughes, W. J.; Singer, H. J.; Yahnin, A. G.; Hardy, D. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1996-04-01

    The electrodynamics of the inner magnetosphere near times of substorm onsets have been investigated using CRRES measurements of magnetic and electric fields, energetic electron fluxes, in conjunction with ground-based observations. Six events were studied in detail, spanning the 2100 to 0000 MLT sector and L values from 5 to 7. In each case the dawn-dusk electric field was enhanced over typical background electric fields, and significant, low-frequency pulsation activity was observed. The amplitudes of the pulsations were larger than the background electric fields. Dusk-dawn excursions of the cross-tail electric field often correlated with changes in currents and particle energies at CRRES and with ULF wave activity observed on the ground. Variations of the electric field and Poynting vectors with periods in the Pi 2 range are consistent with bouncing Alfvén waves that provide electromagnetic communication between the ionosphere and plasma sheet. Magnetic signatures of field-aligned current filaments directed away from the ionosphere, presumably associated with the substorm current wedge, were observed during three orbits. In all cases, ground signatures of substorm expansion were observed at least 5 min before the injection of electrons at CRRES. Field-aligned fluxes of counter-streaming, low-energy electrons were detected after three of the injections. We develop an empirical scenario for substorm onset. The process grows from ripples at the inner edge of the plasma sheet associated with dusk-dawn excursions of the electric field, prior to the beginning of dipolarization. Energy derived from the braking of the inward plasma convection flows into the ionosphere in the form of Poynting flux. Subsequently reflected Poynting flux plays a crucial role in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Substorms develop when significant energy (positive feedback?) flows in both directions, with the second cycle stronger than the initial. Pseudobreakups occur when energy flow

  4. Elements of M-I Coupling in Repetitive Substorm Activity Driven by Interplanetary CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    By means of case studies we explore key elements of the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system associated with repetitive substorm activity during persistent strong forcing by ICMEs. Our approach consists of a combination of the magnetospheric and ionospheric perspectives on the substorm activity. The first aspect is the near-Earth plasma sheet with its repetitive excitations of the substorm current wedge, as monitored by spacecraft GOES-10 when it traversed the 2100-0300 MLT sector, and its coupling to the westward auroral electrojet (WEJ) centered near midnight during the stable interplanetary (IP) conditions. The second aspect is the excitation of Bostrom type II currents maximizing at dusk and dawn and their associated ionospheric Pedersen current closure giving rise to EEJ (WEJ) events at dusk (dawn). As documented in our study, this aspect is related to the braking phase of Earthward-moving dipolarization fronts-bursty bulk flows. We follow the magnetospheric flow/field events from spacecraft Geotail in the midtail (X = - 11 Re) lobe to geostationary altitude at pre-dawn MLTs (GOES 10). The associated M-I coupling is obtained from ground-satellite conjunctions across the double auroral oval configuration along the meridian at dusk. By this technique we distinguish between ionospheric manifestations in three latitude regimes: (i) auroral oval south, (ii) auroral oval north, and (iii) polar cap. Regime (iii) is characterized by events of enhanced antisunward convection near the polar cap boundary (flow channel events) and in the central polar cap (PCN-index events). The repetitive substorm activity is discussed in the context of the level of IP driving as given by the geoeffective IP electric field (E_KL), magnetotail reconnection (inferred from the PCN-index and spacecraft Wind at X = - 77 Re) and the storm SYM-H index. We distinguish between different variants of the repetitive substorm activity, giving rise to electrojet (AL)-plasma convection (PCN) events

  5. The search for Ar in the lunar atmosphere using the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's LAMP instrument.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. C.; Stern, S. A.; Feldman, P. D.; Gladstone, R.; Retherford, K. D.; Greathouse, T. K.; Grava, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Apollo 17 mass spectrometer, LACE, first measured mass 40 particles in the lunar atmosphere, and over a nine-month period, detected variations correlated with the lunar day (Hoffman et al., 1973, LPSC, 4, 2865). LACE detected a high particle density at dusk (0.6-1.0x104 cm-3), decreasing through the lunar night to a few hundred cm-3, then increasing rapidly before dawn to levels 2-4 times greater than at dusk. No daytime measurements were made due to instrument saturation. Given the LACE measurements' periodic nature, and the Ar abundance in lunar regolith samples (Kaiser, 1972, EPSL, 13, 387), it was concluded that mass 40 was likely due to Ar. Benna et al. (2014, LPSC, 45, 1535) recently reported that the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) aboard LADEE also detected Ar (mass 40) with similar diurnal profiles. We report on UV spectra of the lunar atmosphere as obtained by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Aboard LRO is the UV-spectrograph, LAMP (Lyman Alpha Mapping Project), spanning the spectral range 575 to 1965 Å. LAMP is typically oriented toward the surface and has been mapping the Moon since September 2009. LAMP also observes the tenuous lunar atmosphere when the surface is in darkness, but the atmospheric column below LRO is illuminated. We have previously used nadir oriented twilight observations to examine the sparse lunar atmosphere (Feldman et al., 2012, Icarus, 221, 854; Cook et al., 2013, Icarus, 225, 681; Stern et al., 2013, Icarus, 226, 1210; Cook & Stern 2014, Icarus, 236, 48). In Cook et al., 2013, we reported an upper limit for Ar of 2.3x104 cm-3. Since then, we have collected additional data and refined our search method by focusing on the regions (near equator) and local times (dawn and dusk) where Ar has been reported previously. We have carefully considered effective area calibration and g-factor accuracies and find these to be unlikely explanations for the order of magnitude differences. We will report new results, which provide much

  6. Plasma convection in the nightside magnetosphere of Saturn determined from energetic ion anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-02-01

    The Cassini Ion and Neutral Camera measures intensities of hydrogen and oxygen ions and neutral atoms in the Saturnian magnetosphere and beyond. We use the measured intensity spectrum and anisotropy of energetic hydrogen and oxygen ions to detect, qualify, and quantify plasma convection. We find that the plasma azimuthal convection speed relative to the local rigid corotation speed decreases with radial distance, lagging the planetary rotation rate, and has no significant local time dependences. Plasma in the dusk-midnight quadrant sub-corotates at a large fraction of the rigid corotation speed, with the primary velocity being azimuthal but with a distinct radially outward component. The duskside velocities are similar to those obtained from earlier orbits in the midnight-dawn sector, in contrast to the depressed velocities measured at Jupiter using Energetic Particles Detector measurements on the Galileo spacecraft in the dusk-midnight quadrant. We find significant radial outflow in most of the nightside region. The radial component of the flow decreases with increasing local time in the midnight-dawn sector and reverses as dawn is approached. This and previous results are consistent with a plasma disk undergoing a centrifugally induced expansion as it emerges into the nightside, while maintaining partial rotation with the planet. The magnetodisk expansion continues as plasma rotates across the tail to the dawnside. We do not see evidence in the convection pattern for steady state reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail. The outermost region of the magnetodisk, having undergone expansion upon emerging from the dayside magnetopause confinement, is unlikely to recirculate back into the dayside. We conclude that plasma in the outer magnetodisk [at either planet] rotates from the dayside, expands at the dusk flank, but remains magnetically connected to the respective planet while moving across the tail until it interacts with and is entrained into the dawnside

  7. Investigation of storm time magnetotail and ion injection using three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Wang, X. Y.; Lu, S.; Perez, J. D.; Lu, Q.

    2014-09-01

    Dynamics of the near-Earth magnetotail associated with substorms during a period of extended southward interplanetary magnetic field is studied using a three-dimensional (3-D) global hybrid simulation model that includes both the dayside and nightside magnetosphere, for the first time, with physics from the ion kinetic to the global Alfvénic convection scales. It is found that the dayside reconnection leads to the penetration of the dawn-dusk electric field through the magnetopause and thus a thinning of the plasma sheet, followed by the magnetotail reconnection with 3-D, multiple flux ropes. Ion kinetic physics is found to play important roles in the magnetotail dynamics, which leads to the following results: (1) Hall electric fields in the thin current layer cause a systematic dawnward ion drift motion and thus a dawn-dusk asymmetry of the plasma sheet with a higher (lower) density on the dawnside (duskside). Correspondingly, more reconnection occurs on the duskside. Bidirectional fast ions are generated due to acceleration in reconnection, and more high-speed earthward flow injections are found on the duskside than the dawnside. Such finding of the dawn-dusk asymmetry is consistent with recent satellite observations. (2) The injected ions undergo the magnetic gradient and curvature drift in the dipole-like field, forming a ring current. (3) Ion particle distributions reveal multiple populations/beams at various distances in the tail. (4) Dipolarization of the tail magnetic field takes place due to the pileup of the injected magnetic fluxes and thermal pressure of injected ions, where the fast earthward flow is stopped. Oscillation of the dipolarization front is developed at the fast-flow braking, predominantly on the dawnside. (5) Kinetic compressional wave turbulence is present around the dipolarization front. The cross-tail currents break into small-scale structures with k⟂ρi˜1, where k⟂ is the perpendicular wave number. A sharp dip of magnetic field

  8. Dipolarization fronts as earthward propagating flux ropes: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Lin, Yu; Wang, Xueyi; Ge, Yasong; Wang, Rongsheng; Zhou, Meng; Fu, Huishan; Huang, Can; Wu, Mingyu; Wang, Shui

    2015-08-01

    Dipolarization fronts (DFs) as earthward propagating flux ropes (FRs) in the Earth's magnetotail are presented and investigated with a three-dimensional (3-D) global hybrid simulation for the first time. In the simulation, several small-scale earthward propagating FRs are found to be formed by multiple X line reconnection in the near tail. During their earthward propagation, the magnetic field Bz of the FRs becomes highly asymmetric due to the imbalance of the reconnection rates between the multiple X lines. At the later stage, when the FRs approach the near-Earth dipole-like region, the antireconnection between the southward/negative Bz of the FRs and the northward geomagnetic field leads to the erosion of the southward magnetic flux of the FRs, which further aggravates the Bz asymmetry. Eventually, the FRs merge into the near-Earth region through the antireconnection. These earthward propagating FRs can fully reproduce the observational features of the DFs, e.g., a sharp enhancement of Bz preceded by a smaller amplitude Bz dip, an earthward flow enhancement, the presence of the electric field components in the normal and dawn-dusk directions, and ion energization. Our results show that the earthward propagating FRs can be used to explain the DFs observed in the magnetotail. The thickness of the DFs is on the order of several ion inertial lengths, and the electric field normal to the front is found to be dominated by the Hall physics. During the earthward propagation from the near-tail to the near-Earth region, the speed of the FR/DFs increases from ~150 km/s to ~1000 km/s. The FR/DFs can be tilted in the GSM (x, y) plane with respect to the y (dawn-dusk) axis and only extend several Earth radii in this direction. Moreover, the structure and evolution of the FRs/DFs are nonuniform in the dawn-dusk direction, which indicates that the DFs are essentially 3-D.

  9. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging at Low Altitudes from the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid: Images and Spectral Analysis. Paper 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Pontus C:son; Barabash, Stas; Norberg, Olle; Lundin, Rickard; Roelof, Rdmond C.; Chase, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the energy range 26- 52 keV are reported from four occasions during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The data were acquired by the ENA imager flown on the Swedish microsatellite Astrid in a 1000 km circular orbit with 83 deg inclination. The ENA imager separates charged particles from neutrals through an electrostatic deflection system in the energy range between 0.1 and 114 keV. ENA images obtained from vantage points in the polar cap and in the afternoon magnetic local time (MLT) hours looking into the antisunward hemisphere show intense ENA fluxes (approx. 10(exp 4)/sq cm sr s over 26-37 keV) coming from the dusk region and low altitudes (approx. 300 km). The morphology shows no relation to local magnetic field excluding the possibility of charged particle detection. It is concluded that the source of these ENAs are precipitating/mirroring ions from the ring current/trapped radiation interacting with the exobase on auroral L-shells and in the dusk region. The observed ENA fluxes show a relation with Kp and Dst geomagnetic indices. The observed ENA spectrum from a geomagnetic storm on February 8, 1995, is investigated in more detail and compared to the parent ion spectrum obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Project (DMSP) satellite, Fl2, during the same period on L = 6 +/- 2 around dusk. The observed ENA spectral slope is used to derive the parent ion spectral temperature. The derived ion temperatures range is 3.0 - 6.0 keV for H and 4.5 - 8.5 keV for O. The higher of these ion temperatures comes closest in agreement to the extrapolated DMSP spectrum leading us to favor O over H as the species of the detected ENAS. It is shown that the detected ENAs must have been produced at L greater than or equal to 6 to reach the detector without atmospheric attenuation and that the main energy dependence of the ENA spectrum, apart from the parent ion spectrum, is governed by the energy dependence of the charge

  10. Occurrence of equatorial spread F during intense geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, S.; Roy, B.; Das, A.

    2015-07-01

    Equatorial spread F (ESF) has been observed in response to the prompt penetration of magnetospheric electric field to equatorial latitudes during intense (minimum Dst ≤ -100 nT; Bz ≤ -10 nT for at least 3 h) magnetic storms using global ion density plots of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) over nearly one solar cycle (1996-2005). Geostationary amplitude scintillation observations from Calcutta at VHF and L band for 1996-2005 and GPS amplitude scintillation measurements during 2004-2005 from the Indian Satellite Based Augmentation System Geostationary and GPS Navigation Outlay (GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation) network of stations all over India have been used to corroborate the DMSP observations. Subsequent to the time of southward interplanetary magnetic field Bz crossing -10 nT for an intense storm, it has been observed that within 4 h, ESF is generated at a longitude where the local time is dusk.

  11. Adiabatic particle motion in a nearly drift-free magnetic field - Application to the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation is made of the adiabatic particle motion occurring in an almost drift-free magnetic field. The dependence of the mean drift velocity on the equatorial pitch angle and the variation of the local drift velocity along the trajectories is studied. The fields considered are two-dimensional and resemble the geomagnetic tail. Derivations are presented for instantaneous and average drift velocities, bounce times, longitudinal invariants, and approximations to the adiabatic Hamiltonian. As expected, the mean drift velocity is significantly smaller than the instantaneous drift velocities found at typical points on the trajectory. The slow drift indicates that particles advance in the dawn-dusk direction rather slowly in the plasma sheet of the magnetospheric tail.

  12. Orbit design for solar and dual satellite occultation measurements of atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. R.; Harrison, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of satellite based occultation missions are considered for measuring atmospheric constituents. Nominal cases for each type are presented to demonstrate representative solutions to orbit design problems. For the solar occultation mode, large areas of the globe can be covered during a one year mission, but the measurements are limited to local dawn or dusk. For the dual satellite mode, with a laser aboard a second satellite to act as a source, diurnal coverage can be obtained at the expense of more complex systems and mission scenarios. In this mode, orbit pairs are selected which maintain their relative orbit plane geometry while their differing periods drive cyclic patterns of latitude coverage. A simulated one year solar occultation mission is used to illustrate one way of analyzing occultation data by averaging measurements within bands of constant latitude.

  13. Ion cyclotron waves observed near the plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, B. J.; Samson, J. C.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    Pc2 electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves at 0.1 Hz, near the oxygen cyclotron frequency, have been observed by ISEE-1 and -2 between L = 7.6 - 5.8 on an inbound near equatorial pass in the dusk sector. The waves occurred in a thick plasmapause of width about 1 earth radius and penetrated about 1 earth radius into the plasmasphere. Wave onset was accompanied by significant increases in the thermal (0-100 eV) He(+) and the warm (0.1-16 keV/e) O(+) and He(+) heavy ion populations. Wave polarization is predominantly left-handed with propagation almost parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and the spectral slot and polarization reversal predicted by multicomponent cold plasma propagation theory are identified in the wave data. The results are considered as an example of wave-particle interactions occurring during the outer plasmasphere refilling process at the time of the substorm recovery phase.

  14. A three-dimensional time-dependent model of the polar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    A time-dependent three-dimensional multiion model of the polar wind was developed, which covers the altitude range of from 120 to 9000 km and takes into account supersonic ion outflow, shock formation, and ion energization during plasma expansion events. The model was used to study the temporal response of global polar wind to changing magnetospheric conditions, for the winter solstice and for solar-minimum conditions in the northern polar region. Graphs illustrating temporal changes with changes in T(e), T(i), and T(n) along the dawn, the trough, and the dusk convection trajectories and in the O(+), O, and H densities along the same convection trajectories are presented together with conntours of the H(+) and the O(+) densities along the three convection trajectories.

  15. Evidence for lightning on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangeway, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Lightning is an interesting phenomenon both for atmospheric and ionospheric science. At the Earth lightning is generated in regions where there is strong convection. Lightning also requires the generation of large charge-separation electric fields. The energy dissipated in a lightning discharge can, for example, result in chemical reactions that would not normally occur. From an ionospheric point of view, lightning generates a broad spectrum of electromagnetic radiation. This radiation can propagate through the ionosphere as whistler mode waves, and at the Earth the waves propagate to high altitudes in the plasmasphere where they can cause energetic particle precipitation. The atmosphere and ionosphere of Venus are quite different from those on the Earth, and the presence of lightning at Venus has important consequences for our knowledge of why lightning occurs and how the energy is dissipated in the atmosphere and ionosphere. As discussed here, it now appears that lightning occurs in the dusk local time sector at Venus.

  16. Electric field evidence for tailward flow at substorm onset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishida, A.; Tulunay, Y. K.; Mozer, F. S.; Cattell, C. A.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Birn, J.

    1983-01-01

    Electric field observations made near the neutral sheet of the magnetotail provide additional support for the view that reconnection occurs in the near-earth region of the tail. Southward turnings of the magnetic field that start at, or shortly after, substorm onsets are accompanied by enhancements in the dawn-to-dusk electric field, resulting in a tailward E x B drift velocity. Both the magnetic and the electric fields in the tailward-flowing plasma are nonuniform and vary with inferred spatial scales of several earth radii in the events examined in this paper. These nonuniformities may be the consequence of the tearing-mode process. The E x B flow was also towards the neutral sheet and away from midnight in the events studied.

  17. Simulations and observations of vortices near Saturn's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Raymond; Fukazawa, Keiichiro; Ogino, Tatsuki; Morozoff, Daniel

    We have used a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with Saturn's magnetosphere and Cassini observations to investigate vorticity in the dayside magnetosphere when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is northward. Following the northward turning of the IMF, vortices form on the morning magnetopause in the region of large velocity shear. Later vortices form on the afternoon magnetopause near dusk. In the simulations the boundary vortices cause magnetic field oscillations in the Kronian magnetosphere. The oscillations have a period of about three hours. We have examined Cassini magnetic field observations1 in the morning magnetosphere and find similar oscillations. We will present a comparison between the observations and the simulation results. 1 Daugherty, M. K., S. Kellock, A. P. Slootweg, N. Achilles, S. P. Joy and J. N. Mafi, CASSINI MAG CALIBRATED SUMMARY AVERAGED , CO-E/SWS/J/S-MAG-4-SUMM-AVERAGED-V1.0, NASA Planetary Data System, 2007.

  18. Operation Dominic, Fish Bowl Series. Project Officer's report. Project 9. 1b. Ionospheric wind and diffusion measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, K.; Manring, E.R.

    1985-09-01

    The aim of this project was to measure high-altitude wind velocities and diffusion coefficients in the altitude region between 60 and 150 km. The method involved the ejection of a sodium vapor trail from a Cajun rocket at dust or dawn twilight. The sodium was sunlit, and as a result of emission of resonance radiation, was visible against a darkened background for about 20 minutes. The trail was photographed simultaneously from four different sites, allowing for subsequent triangulation to determine the altitude of various parts of the cloud. A major application of these wind and diffusion data, taken at dusk and dawn following the high-altitude nuclear tests, was to aid in determining the disposition of the nuclear debris.

  19. Large-scale, near-Earth, magnetic fields from external sources and the corresponding induced internal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Data from MAGSAT analyzed as a function of the Dst index to determine the first degree/order spherical harmonic description of the near-Earth external field and its corresponding induced field. The analysis was done separately for data from dawn and dusk. The MAGSAT data was compared with POGO data. A local time variation of the external field persists even during very quiet magnetic conditions; both a diurnal and 8-hour period are present. A crude estimate of Sq current in the 45 deg geomagnetic latitude range is obtained for 1966 to 1970. The current strength, located in the ionosphere and induced in the Earth, is typical of earlier determinations from surface data, although its maximum is displaced in local time from previous results.

  20. Asymmetric auroral intensities in the Earth's Northern and Southern hemispheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laundal, K. M.; Østgaard, N.

    2009-07-01

    It is commonly assumed that the aurora borealis (Northern Hemisphere) and aurora australis (Southern Hemisphere) are mirror images of each other because the charged particles causing the aurora follow the magnetic field lines connecting the two hemispheres. The particles are believed to be evenly distributed between the two hemispheres, from the source region in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere. Although it has been shown that similar auroral features in the opposite hemispheres can be displaced tens of degree in longitude and that seasonal effects can cause differences in global intensity, the overall auroral patterns were still similar. Here we report observations that clearly contradict the common assumption about symmetric aurora: intense spots are seen at dawn in the Northern summer Hemisphere, and at dusk in the Southern winter Hemisphere. The asymmetry is interpreted in terms of inter-hemispheric currents related to seasons, which have been predicted but hitherto had not been seen.

  1. Numerical solution of the geoelectrodynamic problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Joseph C.

    1990-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the sources of the near-Earth ambient magnetic field as observed by recent spacecraft surveys and surface variational magnetic observations so as to determine the electrical properties of the crust and upper mantle. Also included is the structure and changes on a short time scale of the core field which must be separated and identified. The Magsat data collection interval provides an opportunity to compare the vector field projections of ionospheric currents computed from surface data above the ionosphere as does the POGO data for scalar projections. The limitation of Magsat is its sun-synchronous orbit, which only sampled low latitudes at dawn and dusk, whereas POGO, though only making observations of the scalar field, sampled all local times. Magsat operated at a lower altitude than POGO (down to 350 km) whereas the orbits of the three POGO spacecraft ranged up to 1500 km and were never lower than about 400 km.

  2. Downstream properties of magnetic flux transfer events. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the downstream evolution of the field line tubes known as 'flux transfer events' (FTEs), whose magnetic field and plasma properties are distinct from those of the nearby unmerged magnetosheath and magnetosphere field lines. After the FTE has moved 200 earth radii down the tail, its drained portion reaches 25 earth radii radially outward from the tail boundary. It is suggested that most multiple crossings of the tail boundary observed by spacecraft are encounters with tailward-moving FTEs, thereby explaining both the behavior of boundary normals during multiple crossings and how the sign of the IMF causes the observed dawn-dusk asymmetries in the thickness of the magnetotail boundary layer.

  3. ARISTOTELES: A European approach for an Earth gravity field recovery mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, R.; Faulks, H.; Langemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Under contract of the European Space Agency a system study for a spaceborne gravity field recovery mission was performed, covering as a secondary mission objective geodetic point positioning in the cm range as well. It was demonstrated that under the given programmatic constraints including dual launch and a very tight development schedule, a six months gravity field mission in a 200 km near polar, dawn-dusk orbit is adequate to determine gravity anomalies to better than 5 mgal with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 km half wavelength. This will enable scientists to determine improved spherical harmonic coefficients of the Earth gravity field equation to the order and degree of 180 or better.

  4. Plasma structuring by the gradient drift instability at high latitudes and comparison with velocity shear driven processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Mackenzie, E.; Basu, S.; Coley, W. R.; Sharber, J. R.; Hoegy, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Using results of the in situ measurements made by the DE 2 satellite, the nature of plasma structuring at high latitudes, caused by the gradient drift instability process, is described. Using noon-midnight and dawn-dusk orbits of the DE 2 satellite, it was possible to examine the simultaneous density and electric field spectra of convecting large-scale plasma density enhancements in the polar cap known as 'patches', in directions parallel and perpendicular to their antisunward convection. The results provide evidence for the existence of at least two generic classes of instabilities operating in the high-latitude ionosphere: one driven by large-scale density gradients in a homogeneous convection field with respect to the neutrals, and the other driven by the structured convection field itself in an ambient ionosphere where density fluctuations are ubiquitous.

  5. PolarDARN Radar Observations of Plasma Flows Associated with Morning Polar Cap Forms Detaching from the Auroral Oval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koustov, A. V.; Hosokawa, K.; Nishitani, N.; Ogawa, T.; Shiokawa, K.; Liu, H.

    2009-12-01

    OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay (Canada) often detects optical forms detaching from the poleward edge of the dawnside auroral oval and moving toward dusk. Such forms typically consist of rayed arc-like fragments stretched toward the Sun. The two newly installed PolarDARN-SuperDARN HF radars at Rankin Inlet and Inuvik sometimes detect signatures of such forms. In this study, several events of joint radar-optical observations are presented to investigate features in the plasma flow patterns. We show that the forms typically occur within a band of anti-sunward flow. Strong sunward flow channels are sometimes seen between the form and auroral oval so that strong flow shears are formed. The data can be interpreted in terms of a mesoscale vortex embedded into a large-scale morning side convection cell. Other features are discussed.

  6. Howling at two Minnesota wolf pack summer homesites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, F.H.; Mech, L.D.

    1978-01-01

    Howling sessions were monitored at two Minnesota wolf pack homesites for 2255 h between 29 April and 3 August 1973. All sessions recorded occurred from dusk through early morning, with an evening peak for one pack. Within a night, multiple sessions were grouped temporally, most occurring within an hour of one another. Howling rates for both packs increased throughout the homesite season, with the larger pack howling twice as frequently. The role of howling in both intrapack and interpack contexts was considered. Much of the howling seemed to be involved in the coordination of pack activities. Further, the low frequency and clumped temporal distribution of sessions suggest that howling plays a secondary role in interpack contexts to other modes such as scent marking during the homesite season, but may increase in relative importance once homesites are abandoned and pack travel becomes nomadic.

  7. Field aligned current study during the solar declining- extreme minimum of 23 solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepolian, Jeni Victor; Kumar, Anil; C, Panneerselvam

    Field Aligned Current (FAC) density study has been carried out during the solar declining phase from 2004 to 2006 of the 23rd solar cycle and the ambient terrestrial magnetic field of the extended minimum period of 2008 and 2009. We mainly depended on CHAMP satellite data (http://isdc.gfz-potsdam.de/) for computing the FAC density with backup of IGRF-10 model. The study indicates that, the FAC is controlled by quasi-viscous processes occurring at the flank of the earth’s magnetosphere. The dawn-dusk conventional pattern enhanced during disturbed days. The intensity of R1 current system is higher than the R2 current system. Detailed results will be discussed in the conference.

  8. The significance of the Culex pipiens fatigans Wiedemann problem in Ceylon*

    PubMed Central

    Abdulcader, M. H. M.

    1967-01-01

    Bancroftian filariasis became a problem in Ceylon after the Second World War. The only vector is Culex pipiens fatigans, which is widely distributed throughout the country and is prevalent throughout the year. It is a domestic mosquito found resting mainly on hangings and household articles. Its biting hours are from dusk to dawn, with peaks around midnight and in the early hours of the morning. So far this mosquito has not been incriminated as either the natural or the laboratory vector of animal filariasis in Ceylon. C. p. fatigans collected from northern, eastern and north-central parts of the country are capable of transmitting bancroftian infection. This mosquito was able to survive after ingesting high numbers of microfilariae. The main larval habitat consists of collections of polluted water. Husk pits, underground drains and receptables around houses constitute special problems. The control results so far obtained are encouraging. PMID:5300061

  9. Statistical study of the ULF Pc4-Pc5 range fluctuations in the vicinity of Earth's magnetopause and correlation with the Low Latitude Boundary Layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    The main generation mechanisms for the Earth's Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) are considered to be magnetic reconnection, viscous interactions such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and associated plasma mixing and diffusion. We have performed a statistical study of the Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) fluctuation power at the Pc4-Pc5 range using ≈6 years of THEMIS measurements of the plasma velocity and magnetic field. The results reveal a clear dawn-dusk asymmetry showing that the fluctuation power is typically more enhanced in the vicinity of the magnetopause downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The statistical study of the Vx-component of the plasma velocity indicates that the LLBL is also thicker on the dawn-sector. These results may suggest that the physical mechanisms that provide power in the Pc4-Pc5 range are more effective on the dawn-sector and provide a means for a more effective LLBL generation.

  10. Studies of the gas tori of Titan and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    1995-01-01

    Progress in the development of the model for the circumplanetary distribution of atomic hydrogen in the Saturn system produced by a Titan source is discussed. Because of the action of the solar radiation acceleration and the obliquity of Saturn, the hydrogen distribution is shown to undergo seasonal changes as the planet moves about the Sun. Preliminary model calculations show that for a continuous Titan source, the H distribution is highly asymmetric about the planet and has a density maximum near the dusk side of Saturn, qualitatively similar to the pattern recently deduced by Shemansky and Hall from observations acquired by the UVS instruments aboard the Voyager spacecrafts. The investigation of these Voyager data will be undertaken in the next project year.

  11. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability under Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field conditions at the magnetospheric flanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, E.; Nykyri, K.; Otto, A.

    2016-07-01

    We have generated fully three-dimensional, high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) Instability during Parker-Spiral Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions at the dawnside magnetospheric flank magnetopause. Results of these simulations show that, although the draping of a strong tangential magnetic field component around the magnetopause, tailward of the terminator (due to the Parker-Spiral orientation), tends to stabilize the growth of such instabilities within the shear-flow plane, Kelvin-Helmholtz waves with a k -vector tilted out of this plane may, nonetheless, develop into the nonlinear phase. This result suggests that obliquely propagating KH waves may contribute to the dawn-dusk asymmetries observed in plasma sheet parameters.

  12. New Understanding of Mercury's Magnetosphere from MESSENGER'S First Flyby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Killen, M.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Raines, James M.; Schriver, David; Somomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard; Travnicek, Pavel; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    Observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft on 14 January 2008 have revealed new features of the solar system's smallest planetary magnetosphere. The interplanetary magnetic field orientation was unfavorable for large inputs of energy from the solar wind and no evidence of magnetic substorms, internal magnetic reconnection, or energetic particle acceleration was detected. Large-scale rotations of the magnetic field were measured along the dusk flank of the magnetosphere and ultra-tow frequency waves were frequently observed beginning near closest approach. Outbound the spacecraft encountered two current-sheet boundaries across which the magnetic field intensity decreased in a step-like manner. The outer current sheet is the magnetopause boundary. The inner current sheet is similar in structure, but weaker and -1000 km closer to the planet. Between these two current sheets the magnetic field intensity is depressed by the diamagnetic effect of planetary ions created by the photo-ionization of Mercury's exosphere.

  13. Substorm electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, David P.

    1990-01-01

    The present one-dimensional model analysis of substorm electrodynamics proceeds from the standard scenario in which the plasma sheet collapses into a neutral sheet, and magnetic merging occurs between the two tail lobes; plasma flows into the neutral sheet from the lobes and the sides, undergoing acceleration in the dawn-dusk direction. The process is modified by the tendency of the accelerated plasma to unbalance charge neutrality, leading to an exchange of electrons with the ionosphere in order to maintain neutrality. The cross-tail current is weakened by the diversion: this reduces the adjacent lobe-field intensity, but without notable effects apart from a slight expansion of the tail boundary.

  14. The electric field and global electrodynamics of the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The conception of the electrodynamics of the quiet-time magnetosphere obtained during the last four years of magnetospheric study is presented. Current understandings of the open magnetosphere, convective plasma flows in the plasma sheet, the shielding of the inner magnetosphere from the convective magnetospheric electric field, the space charge produced when injected electrons drift towards dawn and injected ions drift towards dusk, the disruption of the flow of the Birkeland current by plasma instabilities and the shielding of the convective electric field by the dayside magnetopause are discussed. Attention is also given to changes of magnetic field line topology magnetic storms and substorms. Unresolved questions and new tools which may play a role in the further understanding of magnetospheric electrodynamics and the role of the magnetospheric electric field are presented.

  15. Identifying signatures of plasma waves and reconnection associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas Wesley

    The magnetopause marks the boundary between the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma. Understanding the dynamics of the plasma processes at the magnetopause boundary is crucial to the study of plasma transport into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have shown that there exists a temperature asymmetry in the plasma sheet. During northward IMF, the cold component ions are 30-40% hotter in the dawn flank plasma sheet compared to the dusk flank. However, the mechanisms responsible are still not entirely clear. Recent work has shown that reconnection in Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices can transport plasma into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have also shown that mode conversion at the magnetopause can generate kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) activity. Both magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity can heat plasma. In this thesis we look for new cases of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) from Cluster spacecraft data and search for signatures of associated magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity.

  16. Photocontrol of Dark Circadian Rhythms in Stomata of Phaseolus vulgaris L

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, M. Geoffrey; Klein, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Stomatal diffusion resistance in primary leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris L. which had been grown in light:dark cycles followed a marked circadian rhythm when the plants were transferred to continuous darkness. Reentrainment of the rhythm required more than one inductive change in photoperiod. The phasing of the rhythm of dark stomatal opening was contolled primarily by the light-on (dawn) signal, whereas the rhythm of dark closure was related to the light-off (dusk) signal. The evidence points to a dual control of the circadian clock in which a product of photosynthesis plays a major role. No evidence for phytochrome involvement in the phasing of the rhythm was found. An influence of phytochrome on the amplitude of the stomatal rhythm was observed in which removal of phytochrome-far-red absorbing form caused rapid damping. PMID:16665006

  17. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of a three-dimensional MHD simulation we discuss the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B/sub yN/. As a consequence of b/sub yN/ /ne/ 0 the plasmid gets a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmid flux rope remain connected with the Earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of ad-hoc plasmid models. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Multipoint Observations of Oval-aligned Transpolar Arc Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumnock, J. A.; Le, G.; Zhang, Y.; Slavin, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze changes in field-aligned currents associated with auroral oval-aligned transpolar arc formation during quiet times on time scales of a few minutes. This is accomplished using observations from the highly accurate multipoint magnetic field measurements provided by the Space Technology 5 mission which consists of three micro-satellites in low Earth orbit. Simultaneous measurements of precipitating particles are provided by three DMSP satellites. We analyze field-aligned currents associated with the dusk oval. For the first time we observe the field-aligned currents associated with the formation of an oval-aligned transpolar arc poleward of the auroral oval which in one case are large compared with the field-aligned currents associated with the auroral oval measured 10 minutes earlier. These events clearly illustrate the dynamic nature of oval-aligned arc formation.

  19. Ground-based UV-Vis spectroscopy: Diurnal OClO-profiles during January 1990 above Soendre Stroemfjord, Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Perner, D.; Kluepfel, T.; Parchatka, U.; Roth, A. ); Joergensen, T. )

    1991-04-01

    Considerable amounts of chlorine dioxide, OClO, were observed from 5 January through 2 February, 1990 in the stratosphere above Soendre Stroemfjord showing a highly perturbed chlorine chemistry. Photolysis and simultaneous formation of the OClO leads to a typical concentration minimum at noon. Its changes in concentration indicate the release of the OClO precursors BrO and ClO from their respective reservoir substances in the morning. Two incidences of increased OClO production occur repeatedly at 92{degree} and 89{degree} solar zenith angle (SZA). Furthermore, in the beginning of January OClO morning values exceed those found at dusk for comparable SZA whereas towards the end of the month the morning values become depressed compared to the evening. The twilight vertical column densities of OClO often reach about 1.6 {times} 10{sup 13} molec/cm{sup 2} and a comparison shows an increase from 1988 to 1990.

  20. Substorm associated micropulsations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The state of the art of observations of substorm associated waves in GEO is reviewed and research directions are indicated. Data were taken from fluxgate magnetometers on board the ATS 1 and 6 spacecraft in GEO. Mixed mode Pc 4 and 5 waves, with the largest amplitude of magnetic pulsations observed at GEO, have been found to display a quasi-sinusoidal waveform with amplitudes from 10-30 gamma and a period of 50-200 sec. The wave spectra confined the excited frequencies to a narrow band, and possible generating mechanisms for the Pc 4 and 5 waves are discussed. Pc 1 and 2 magnetic pulsations are the most common in GEO, with Pc 1 occurring every third day, particularly in the afternoon to dusk sector and during major substorm expansion onset. Pi 2 outbursts are observed in the majority of substorms passing through the midnight sector and have been correlated with changes in field aligned currents.

  1. On the azimuthal variation of the equatorial plasmapause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    Previous results of plasmapause position surveys have been synthesized into a comprehensive description of the plasmapause, taken to represent the boundary between diurnal near-corotation and large-scale circulation streamlines that traverse the entire magnetosphere. The result indicates a plasmapause that has a pronounced bulge in the dusk sector, that rotates sunward and shrinks markedly as geomagnetic activity (and presumably magnetospheric convection) increase. The shape of the plasmapause so determined is significantly different from that associated with the simple superposition of sunward flow and corotation, both in its detailed shape and in its varying orientation. The results imply that the magnetospheric circulation departs from a uniform flow field, having a radial dependence with respect to the Earth that is qualitatively consistent with electrostatic shielding of the convection electric field. Also, the results imply the the inner magnetospheric flow field rotates from duskward to dawnward as its intensity increases.

  2. Evolution of partial ring current ion pitch angle distributions during the main phase of a storm on 17 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runov, A.; Zhang, X. J.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-06-01

    During a severe magnetic storm from 17 to 19 March 2015, three identically instrumented Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms probes crossed the magnetosphere in a string-of-pearls configuration enabling sequential observations of same regions of the magnetosphere with a 2 h time separation. These observations allow us to study the temporal evolution of ion pitch angle distributions (PADs) in the dusk-premidnight sector (between 17 and 20 h magnetic local time) during the storm's main phase. We found that the ion PAD evolved from pancake to isotropic in fewer than 2 h. Analysis of electromagnetic wave spectra revealed the presence of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves at frequencies below the helium cyclotron frequency. We conclude that the observed pitch angle evolution was due to ion scattering by EMIC waves.

  3. The magnetopause motion in response to solar wind disturbance of 10 February 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, N.; Parkhomov, V.; Borodkova, N.; Yermolaev, Yu.

    The magnetospheric boundary motion in response to solar wind disturbance of 10 February 1997 was considered The plasma and magnetic field data obtained on WIND INTERBALL-1 GEOTAIL GOES 8 9 satellites and magnetometer measurements on ground based stations were compared The multiple magnetopause crossings were observed on INTERBALL-1 satellite at dusk side of low latitude magnetotail We considered some causes of the magnetospheric boundary motion such as variation of solar wind parameters the Kelvin-Helmholtz K-H instability and substorm activity increasing It was shown that only the last observed magnetopause crossing was consistent with measured variation of solar wind parameters The evaluation of K-H instability pointed that only a few magnetopause crossings can be explained by wavy boundary motion connected with K-H instability The results obtained during substorm increasing suggest the possible connection of short-time motion of the magnetospheric boundary with tail current disruption and the substorm current wedge formation

  4. Model of the evolution of the plasmasphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Xu, R. L.

    The morphology of the plasmasphere during a geomagnetic storm is simulated by considering the two dimensional E × B drift motion of plasmaspheric charged particles in the equatorial plane. Assuming a time-independent dipolar magnetic field and a corotation electric field plus, a spatially uniform dawn-dusk convection electric field varying with Kp index, the spatial distributions of charged particles at different time during a geomagnetic storm are obtained. Our results show that if Kp increases with time, some particles inside the original plasmapause will convect into the magnetopause, forming a long tail that stretches from the plasmasphere to the magnetopause in the afternoon region. The particle convection weakens as Kp decreases, and as Kp returns to its normal value, the plasmasphere develops a thin tail that wraps around the Earth.

  5. Probing the Martian atmosphere with MAVEN/IUVS stellar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröller, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Koskinen, T. T.; Montmessin, F.; Lacombe, G.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Jain, S. K.; Chaffin, M. S.; Crismani, M. M. J.; Stiepen, A.; Lefèvre, F.; McClintock, W. E.; Clarke, J. T.; Holsclaw, G. M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Bougher, S. W.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    The first campaign of stellar occultations with the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument on board of Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission was executed between 24 and 26 March 2015. From this campaign 13 occultations are used to retrieve CO2 and O2 number densities in the altitude range between 100 and 150 km. Observations probe primarily the low-latitude regions on the nightside of the planet, just past the dawn and dusk terminator. Calculation of temperature from the CO2 density profiles reveals that the lower thermosphere is significantly cooler than predicted by the models in the Mars Climate Database. A systematically cold layer with temperatures of 105-120 K is seen in the occultations at a pressure level around 7 × 10-6 Pa.

  6. Auroral Undulations During Magnetic Storms: TIMED/GUVI Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Morrison, D.; Lui, T.; Kil, H.; Wolven, B.; Meng, C. I.

    2005-05-01

    Giant undulations on the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora have been identified in TIMED/GUVI auroral images in the far ultraviolet wavelengths. Some new features have been observed: (1) The GUVI 121.6nm auroral images provide direct optical evidence that the undulations occur in the proton aurora, (2) Undulations are not limited to the dusk sector, they can occur in all local time sectors, (3) Both large ionospheric ion drift velocity (1000 m/s and above) and strong velocity shear (> 0.1 1/s) appear to be a necessary condition for the undulation to occur, (4) While almost all of the undulation events are observed during magnetic storms (Dst < -60 nT), one exceptional case shows undulation in the dayside associated with a positive Dst (30 nT), a large solar wind speed and a high solar wind dynamic pressure. The undulations can be explained by the K-H instability.

  7. Magnetic Flux Transport and Pressure Variations at Magnetotail Plasma Flow Bursts during Geomagnetically Quiet Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowada, M.; Fu, S.-Y.; Parks, G. K.; Pu, Z.-Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Carlson, C. W.; Auster, H.-U.

    2012-04-01

    The fast plasma flows in the geomagnetotail are observed during both geomagnetically active and quiet times. However, it has been unclear about the fundamental difference in the plasma fast flows between at two different geomagnetic conditions, that is, the generation mechanism of, and pictures of the energy transport and balance at the fast plasma flows. Magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail has been believed as one of the most possible mechanisms to generate the fast plasma flows regardless of the geomagnetic conditions. Recently, Nowada et al. [2012], however, demonstrated that the magnetotail magnetic reconnection does not always contribute to the generation of the fast plasma flows at geomagnetically quiet times based on the THEMIS measurements. It is very important to reveal how the energy transport and balance in the magnetotail in association with these plasma fast flows are on obtaining a clue to elucidate an essential difference in the plasma fast flows between during active and quiet geomagnetic conditions. Based on three events of the magnetotail plasma flow bursts, which are transient fast plasma flows with the durations between 1 and 2 minutes, during geomagnetically quiet times, observed by THEMIS, we examined detailed variations of the electric field as a proxy of the flux transport aspect, and associated pressure. The main characteristics of these events are shown as follows; 1) the GSM-X component of the plasma velocity (Vx) was higher than 300 km/s 2) associated parallel (V//) and perpendicular (V⊥) velocities to the local magnetic field line were higher than 200 km/s 3) the flow bursts were observed during which AL and AU indices were lower than 40 nT, and simultaneous Kp index range was between -1 and 1. For almost events, the parallel (E//) and perpendicular (E⊥) components of the electric field to the local magnetic field line were much stronger than the dawn-dusk electric field component (Ey). This result implies that a larger amount

  8. Plasma density enhancements in the high-altitude polar cap region observed on Akebono

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Yoh-ichi; Abe, Takumi; Yau, Andrew W.

    2002-05-01

    The plasma density in the polar cap ionosphere is generally low (<103 cm-3 above 3000 km), mainly because of plasma escape from the ionosphere along open magnetic-field lines. The Akebono satellite occasionally encounters regions of unusually high plasma density (>=103 cm-3) above 4000 km altitude, in which the thermal plasma exhibits a distinctively low electron temperature (<3000 K) and low parallel ion drift velocity (<=1 km/s). Such events are almost always observed on the dusk side. The occurrence of low electron temperature and ion drift velocity appears to suggest the antisunward convection of high-density plasma into the polar cap, and the decrease in electron temperature due to the disruption of field-aligned heat flux in the high-altitude polar cap.

  9. Midday magnetopause shifts earthward of geosynchronous orbit during geomagnetic superstorms with Dst ≤ -300 nT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Wang, C.; Kan, J. R.

    2010-08-01

    Geomagnetic storm intensity, as measured by the Dst (SYMH) index, shows no limit as the solar wind dawn-to-dusk electric field increases. We show that the magnetopause around noon erodes earthward with increasing storm intensity. The panoramic geosynchronous BZ signatures for the magnetic storm groups with different intensity are differ significantly from each other. For superstorms with SYMH ≤ -300 nT, the magnetopause around noon erodes to inside the geosynchronous orbit, which causes the BZ reversal near local noon. The necessary conditions for superstorms with SYMH ≤ -300 nT to occur include the following: (1) interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) BZ < -27 nT lasts for at least ˜1 h; (2) solar wind dynamic pressure, Pd > ˜ 12 nPa; (3) the projected interplanetary electric field, EK - L > ˜30 mV/m.

  10. High latitude proton precipitation and light-ion density profiles during the magnetic storm initial phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of precipitating protons and light ion densities by experiments on OGO-4 indicate that widespread proton precipitation occurs in predawn hours during the magnetic storm initial phase from the latitude of the high-latitude ion trough, or plasmapause , up to Lambda 75 deg. A softening of the proton spectrum is apparent as the plasmapause is approached. The separation of the low-latitude precipitation boundaries for 7.3 kev and 23.8 kev protons is approximately 1 deg, compared with a 3.6 deg separation which has been computed using the formulas of Gendrin and Eather and Carovillano. Consideration of probable proton drift morphology leads to the conclusion that protons ase injected in predawn hours, with widespread precipitation occurring in the region outside the plasmapause. Protons less energetic than approximately 7 kev drift eastward, while the more energetic protons drift westward, producing the observed dawn-dusk asymmetry for the lower-energy protons.

  11. Lobe crossing events observed by the Van Allen Probes as tests of magnetic field line mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, P.; MacDonald, E.; Grande, M.; Glocer, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we examine a series of lobe crossing events witnessed by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft between 0200 and 0515 on November 14th 2012. The events occurred on the flank between 0400 and 0635 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE. During the events Dst was less than 100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = - 15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). Other observations at geosynchronous orbit also show lobe crossings at dawn and dusk flanks. These events provide a chance to examine the magnetic field topology in detail and compare it with models. We will show that the spacecraft were in locations with access to the open field lines by comparison to the CRCM + BATS-RUS models as well as comparing spacecraft encounters with the lobe to the predicted magnetic field topology.

  12. Investigation of EMIC Wave Scattering as the Cause for the BARREL January 17, 2013 Relativistic Electron Precipitation Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Millan, R. M.; Hudson, M. K.; Woodger, L. A.; Fennell, J. F.; Engebretson, M. J.; MacDonald, E.

    2013-12-01

    Scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves has been suggested to be a major cause of relativistic electron precipitation (REP). This mechanism has also been proposed as the cause for REP observed by balloon-borne detectors predominantly in the dusk sector. Observations from the recent BARREL balloon campaign, along with simultaneous detailed spacecraft measurements of waves and plasma conditions, give us an unprecedented opportunity to investigate this mechanism. We simulate relativistic electron pitch-angle diffusion by EMIC waves using wave and particle data measured by GOES and the Van Allen Probes, and compare the energy distribution of the resulting precipitation with BARREL observations of precipitation made on January 17, 2013. This comparison sheds light on the role of EMIC waves in causing REP as well as the effectiveness of the quasi-linear model.

  13. Low altitude, one centimeter, space debris search at Lincoln Laboratory's (M.I.T.) experimental test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taff, L. G.; Beatty, D. E.; Yakutis, A. J.; Randall, P. M. S.

    1985-01-01

    The majority of work performed by the Lincoln Laboratory's Space Surveillance Group, at the request of NASA, to define the near-earth population of man-made debris is summarized. Electrooptical devices, each with a 1.2 deg FOV, were employed at the GEODSS facility in New Mexico. Details of the equipment calibration and alignment procedures are discussed, together with implementation of a synchronized time code for computer controlled videotaping of the imagery. Parallax and angular speed data served as bases for distinguishing between man-made debris and meteoroids. The best visibility was obtained in dawn and dusk twilight conditions at elevation ranges of 300-2000 km. Tables are provided of altitudinal density distribution of debris. It is noted that the program also yielded an extensive data base on meteoroid rates.

  14. Dayside Pc5 ULF Activities at High Latitudes (L≈14 RE): Their Relation With Interplanetary Conditions and Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Pathan, B. M.; Dhar, A.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetic field data from a newly commissioned Indian Antarctic station, Bharati (CGM location 74.8 deg S, 97.8 deg E; L=14.8 RE) has been analyzed to investigate the high latitude characteristics of dayside Pc5 pulsations. High speed solar wind streams during smaller IMF Bz magnitudes appear to generate large amplitude Pc5 waves. However, significant dayside ULF wave activities were also observed during slow solar wind streams and substorms occurring on the nightside. Inter-hemispherical characteristics of these ULF waves have been examined using data from IMAGE chain observatory Hornsund (74.3 deg N, 108.5 deg E; L=13.9 RE) which is near-conjugate to Bharati. For some of the events, THEMIS and CLUSTER satellites were located near dawn or dusk local times, or even sometimes the foot-points of satellites were near the selected ground observatories. Data from these space missions have been used for detailed investigation.

  15. The dynamic expansion and contraction of the Jovian plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Observations suggesting the sequential expansion and compression of the Jovian plasma sheet are reported. Plasma flow in the vicinity of Jupiter was monitored by the four modulated-grid Faraday cups on board each of the Voyager spacecraft at times of closest Jupiter approach. Sensor measurements reveal the flow of magnetospheric plasma to be directed away from the equatorial current sheet near local noon and to be directed towards the sheet in the dusk to midnight sector. The observed flow patterns are interpreted in terms of short-time-scale perturbations of magnetic flux tubes due to the compression of the dayside magnetosphere by the solar wind. It is noted that such a dynamic motion is quite different from what would be expected of slower, quasi-static equilibrium plasma sheet expansion and contraction.

  16. First MMS Observations of High Time Resolution 3D Electric and Magnetic fields at the Dayside Magnetopause.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Ergun, R. E.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Le Contel, O.; Vaith, H.; Macri, J.; Myers, S.; Rau, D.; Needell, J.; King, B.; Granoff, M.; Chutter, M.; Dors, I.; Argall, M. R.; Shuster, J. R.; Olsson, G.; Marklund, G. T.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Eriksson, A. I.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Steller, M.; Bromund, K. R.; Le, G.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Tucker, S.; Westfall, J.; Fischer, D.; Plaschke, F.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Moore, T. E.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The electrodynamics at the magnetopause is key to our understanding of ion and electron acceleration within reconnection regions. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) fleet of four spacecraft was launched into its Phase-1 equatorial orbit of 12 Re apogee specifically to investigate these regions at the Earth's magnetopause. In addition to a comprehensive suite of particle measurements, MMS makes very high time resolution 3D electric and magnetic field measurements of high accuracy using flux-gate, search coil, 3-axis double probe, and electron drift sensors. In September 2015, the MMS fleet will begin to encounter the dusk-side magnetopause in its initial configuration of approximately 160 km separation, allowing investigation of the spatial and temporal characteristics of important electrodynamics during reconnection. Using these field and particle measurements, we present first observations of 3D magnetic and electric fields (including their parallel component), and inferred current sheets, during active magnetopause crossings using the highest time resolution data available on MMS.

  17. MMS Spacecraft Observation of Near Tail Thin Current Sheets: Their Locations, Conditions for Formation and Relation to Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Anderson, B. J.; Baumjohann, W.; Bromund, K. R.; Chutter, M.; Fischer, D.; Kepko, L.; Le Contel, O.; Leinweber, H. K.; Magnes, W.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Slavin, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the commissioning phase of the MMS mission, when the apogee (~12Re) of MMS orbit swept from the pre-midnight to the dusk section of the magnetosphere, the four spacecraft probed the dynamic region of the near-Earth magnetotail. The MMS fleet encountered many structures with unambiguously small-scale spatial gradient in magnetic field (comparable to the separation of the fleet), indicating the existence of very thin current sheets in this near-tail region. During this commissioning phase, the MMS spacecraft were in a string of pearls configuration, not ideally suitable for "curlometer" determination of the current density. Thus the current density and thickness of the sheets are only roughly determined using reasonable assumptions. In this study we correlate the current sheet's location and thickness with solar wind conditions and the ground magnetic field records.

  18. The magnetic topology of the plasmoid flux rope in a MHD-simulation of magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of a 3D MHD simulation, the magnetic topology of a plasmoid that forms by a localized reconnection process in a magnetotail configuration (including a net dawn-dusk magnetic field component B sub y N is discussed. As a consequence of B sub y N not equalling 0, the plasmoid assumes a helical flux rope structure rather than an isolated island or bubble structure. Initially all field lines of the plasmoid flux rope remain connected with the earth, while at later times a gradually increasing amount of flux tubes becomes separated, connecting to either the distant boundary or to the flank boundaries. In this stage, topologically different flux tubes become tangled and wrapped around each other, consistent with predictions on the basis of an ad hoc plasmoid model.

  19. Nocturnal activity by diurnal lizards (Sceloporus jarrovi, S. virgatus) eaten by small owls (Glaucidium gnoma, Otus trichopsis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncan, W.W.; Gehlbach, F.R.; Middendorf, G. A., III

    2003-01-01

    Whiskered screech-owls (Otus trichopsis) and northern pygmy-owls (Glaucidium gnoma) delivered freshly caught Yarrow's spiny lizards (Sceloporus jarrovi) and striped plateau lizards (S. virgatus) to nestlings from dusk to dark in southeastern Arizona. This observation stimulated studies of the prey deliveries by the owls and lizard activity patterns, because the lizards are not known to be nocturnal. Lizards were more frequent prey of both owls than endothermic vertebrates but infrequent compared to arthropods, a pattern in the pygmy-owl that differs from its northern populations. Yarrow's spiny lizard, the most abundant and frequently captured lizard, was most active in the morning but also active in the evening. Striped plateau lizard, the second most abundant and depredated species, had morning and evening peaks of activity. Few lizards, including S. clarki and Urosaurus ornatus, but not Cnemidophorus exsanguis and C. sonorae, were active at or after dark, when relatively few were captured by the owls.

  20. The influence of the wind in the Schmallenberg virus outbreak in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedda, Luigi; Rogers, David J.

    2013-11-01

    A model previously developed for the wind-borne spread by midges of bluetongue virus in NW Europe in 2006 is here modified and applied to the spread of Schmallenberg virus in 2011. The model estimates that pregnant animals were infected 113 days before producing malformed young, the commonest symptom of reported infection, and explains the spatial and temporal pattern of infection in 70% of the 3,487 affected farms, most of which were infected by midges arriving through downwind movement (62% of explained infections), or a mixture of downwind and random movements (38% of explained infections), during the period of day (1600-2100 h, i.e. dusk) when these insects are known to be most active. The main difference with Bluetongue is the higher rate of spread of SBV, which has important implications for disease control.

  1. Towards developing an analytical procedure of defining the equatorial electrojet for correcting satellite magnetic anomaly data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravat, Dhananjay; Hinze, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the total magnetic intensity MAGSAT data has identified and characterized the variability of ionospheric current effects as reflected in the geomagnetic field as a function of longitude, elevation, and time (daily as well as monthly variations). This analysis verifies previous observations in POGO data and provides important boundary conditions for theoretical studies of ionospheric currents. Furthermore, the observations have led to a procedure to remove these temporal perturbations from lithospheric MAGSAT magnetic anomaly data based on 'along-the-dip-latitude' averages from dawn and dusk data sets grouped according to longitudes, time (months), and elevation. Using this method, high-resolution lithospheric magnetic anomaly maps have been prepared of the earth over a plus or minus 50 deg latitude band. These maps have proven useful in the study of the structures, nature, and processes of the lithosphere.

  2. IMF By-dependent plasma flow and Birkeland currents in the dayside magnetosphere. I - Dynamics Explorer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Reiff, P. H.; Menietti, J. D.; Winningham, J. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.; Shawhan, S. D.; Shelley, E. G.; Sugiura, M.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma, magnetic-field, and dc electric-field observations from Dynamics Explorers 1 and 2 are used to investigate the morphology of solar-wind ion injection, Birkeland currents, and plasma convection in the morning sector for both positive and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By components. The results of the study are used to construct a By-dependent global convection model for southward IMF. A significant element of the model is the coexistence of three types of convection cells ('merging cells', 'viscous cells', and 'lobe cells'). This model can account for observations of a nearly stationary (in local time) convection 'throat', a sunward-antisunward convection reversal zone at the polar-cap boundary in both the morning and afternoon quadrants, the morphology of solar-wind ion injection and transport in the mid-altitude polar cusp, and the By-dependent dawn-dusk asymmetry of polar-cap electron fluxes.

  3. Isolated cold plasma regions: Observations and their relation to possible production mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Chen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Regions of enhanced cold plasma, isolated from the main plasmasphere along the Explorer 45 orbit on the equatorial plane, are reported using the sheath induced potentials seen by the electric field experiment. The occurrence of these regions has a strong correlation with negative enhancements of Dst, and their locations are primarily in the noon-dusk quadrant. The data support the concept that changes in large scale convection play a dominant role in the formation of these regions. Plasmatails that are predicted from enhancements of large scale convection electric fields in general define where these regions may be found. More localized processes are necessary to account for the exact configuration and structure seen in these regions and may eventually result in detachment from the main plasmasphere.

  4. Sequence Determinants of Circadian Gene Expression Phase in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Vikram

    2013-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 exhibits global biphasic circadian oscillations in gene expression under constant-light conditions. Class I genes are maximally expressed in the subjective dusk, whereas class II genes are maximally expressed in the subjective dawn. Here, we identify sequence features that encode the phase of circadian gene expression. We find that, for multiple genes, an ∼70-nucleotide promoter fragment is sufficient to specify class I or II phase. We demonstrate that the gene expression phase can be changed by random mutagenesis and that a single-nucleotide substitution is sufficient to change the phase. Our study provides insight into how the gene expression phase is encoded in the cyanobacterial genome. PMID:23204469

  5. Plasma and electric field boundaries at high and low altitudes on July 29, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennell, J. F.; Johnson, R. G.; Young, D. T.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T. E.

    1982-01-01

    Hot plasma observations at high and low altitudes were compared. The plasma ion composition at high altitudes outside the plasmasphere was 0+. Heavy ions were also observed at low altitudes outside the plasmasphere. It is shown that at times these ions are found well below the plasmapause inside the plasmasphere. Comparisons of the low altitude plasma and dc electric fields show that the outer limits of the plasmasphere is not always corotating at the low L-shells. The corotation boundary, the estimated plasmapause boundary at the boundary of the inner edge of plasma sheet ions were at the same position. The inner edge of plasma sheet electrons is observed at higher latitudes than the plasmasphere boundary during disturbed times. The inner edge of the plasma sheaths shows a strong dawn to dusk asymmetry. At the same time the inner edge of the ring current and plasma sheath also moves to high latitudes reflecting an apparent inflation of the magnetosphere.

  6. Basic rules of Ramadan: A medico-religious perspective.

    PubMed

    Laway, Bashir Ahmad; Ashraf, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    Fasting during the month of Ramadan is obligatory for all adult Muslims with few exceptions. The person observing a fast does not eat, drink, and smoke from dawn to dusk. Google and Medline search was undertaken for the articles related to basic rules of fasting-religious and medical perspectives in the previous 24 years using following key words: Islamic fasting, fasting and diabetes, fasting and endocrine system. There are clear cut guidelines regarding fasting in healthy people and exemptions have been emphasized. Some alterations in pulmonary, cardiac, gastrointestinal and neuropsychiatric systems are observed which do not harm a normal person. A risk strategy has been devised for people with diabetes regarding management during Ramadan fasting. Rules regarding adherence to fasting and concessions during the month of Ramadan are clear. Minor alterations in different body systems are observed in normal people during Ramadan. PMID:26013776

  7. Design of energy-saving control system for LED street lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xiao; Jin, Wenguang

    2013-10-01

    Based on the energy-saving and safe-driving requirements of road lighting, a kind of energy-saving system is proposed for street lamps in this paper, which is handled by two controllers. At daybreak and dusk, the lamps are turned on or off according to local sunrise and sunset. And at night, it is controlled by a fuzzy controller. Traffic flow and its variation rate, the highest road speed limit are taken as the inputs of the controller, at the same time, the lighting comfort and the experience of driver are defined as the fuzzy sets and control rules. LED lamps are used in the system as illuminant. The numerical simulation in MATLAB and analysis on the practical measured data show that the system is effective in energy-saving for road lighting.

  8. In short photoperiods, human sleep is biphasic.

    PubMed

    Wehr

    1992-06-01

    Results of a photoperiod experiment show that human sleep can be unconsolidated and polyphasic, like the sleep of other animals. When normal individuals were transferred from a conventional 16-h photoperiod to an experimental 10-h photo-period, their sleep episodes expanded and usually divided into two symmetrical bouts, several hours in duration, with a 1-3 h waking interval between them. The durations of nocturnal melatonin secretion and of the nocturnal phase of rising sleepiness (measured in a constant routine protocol) also expanded, indicating that the timing of internal processes that control sleep and melatonin, such as circadian rhythms, had been modified by the change in photoperiod. Previous work suggests that the experimental results could be simulated with dual-oscillators, entrained separately to dawn and dusk, or with a two-process model, having a lowered threshold for sleep-onset during the scotoperiod. PMID:10607034

  9. Electromagnetic deep-probing (100-1000 kms) of the Earth's interior from artificial satellites: Constraints on the regional emplacement of crustal resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermance, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    The reconnaissance phase of using satellite observtions to studying electromagnetic induction in the solid earth is summarized. Several points are made: (1) satellite data apparently suffer far less from the effects of near surface lateral heterogeneities in the earth than do ground-based data; (2) zonal ionospheric currents during the recovery phase of major magnetic storms appear to be minimal, at least in the dawn and dusk sectors wher MAGSAT was flown; hence the internal contributions that satellites observe during these times is in fact due primarily to induction in the Earth with little or no contribution from ionospheric currents; and (3) the interpretation of satellite data in terms of primitive electromagnetic response functions, while grossly over-simplified, results in a surprisingly well-resolved radius for an equivalent super-conductor representing the conductivity region of the Earth's interior (5,370 + or - 120 km).

  10. Colonization of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, C; Arredondo-Jiménez, J I; Rodriguez, M H; Ulloa, A

    1998-12-01

    Two colonies of Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, Tapachula and Abasolo strains, were established under laboratory conditions with a thermoperiod (29 degrees C during the day; 24 degrees C during the night) and artificial dusk. To stimulate mating, a light beam from a flashlight was shone on the cage shortly after lights off. This procedure was repeated for the first 6 mosquito generations (parental to F6) and thereafter light stimulation was unnecessary for mating. The Tapachula colony has been maintained for 24 generations in 24 months, with insemination rates in females > 80% since the F3, and a monthly production of 30,000 pupae since the F7. Using the same procedure, the Abasolo colony from northeastern Mexico has been maintained for 13 generations in 14 months, with insemination rates of 26-52%. PMID:10084128

  11. Correlation between convection electric fields in the nightside magnetosphere and several wave and particle phenomena during two isolated substorms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.; Unwin, R. S.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Heacock, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Correlation of several magnetoionospheric wave and particle phenomena previously linked observationally to magnetospheric substorms and inferred to involve convection electric fields with whistler measurements of convection activity during two relatively isolated substorms. The events occurred at about 0600 UT on July 15, 1965, and about 0500 UT on Oct. 13, 1965. The correlated phenomena include cross-L inward plasma drifts near midnight within the plasmaphere, diffuse auroral radar echoes observed near the dusk meridian, IPDP micropulsations (intervals of pulsations of diminishing period) in the premidnight sector, apparent contractions and expansions of the plasma sheet at about 20 earth radii in the magnetotail, and Pc 1/Pi 1 micropulsation events near or before midnight. Two new vlf phenomena occurred during the October 13 event - a noise band within the plasmasphere associated with a convecting whistler path, and ?hisslers,' falling-tone auroral-hiss forms repeated at intervals of about 2 sec.

  12. Field line resonances in a realistic magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, G.K.; Rajaram, R. )

    1989-04-01

    An internally consistent theoretical framework is developed to study the field line oscillations in the realistic magnetospheric magnetic field using the Mead and Fairfield (1975) model. The nondipolar contributions are numerically computed for the fundamental period of the modes that would reduce to the localized toroidal and poloidal modes described by Cummings et al. (1969) in the dipole limit. It is shown that the nondipolar contributions are not significant at the geostationary orbit but become large further out in the magnetosphere. The nondipolar contributions are very different for the two modes. The situation becomes very much more complicated in the dawn/dusk region where a continuous range of periods exist depending on the orientation of the field line oscillation.

  13. Simultaneous Pc 1 observations by the synchronous satellite ATS-1 and ground stations - Implications concerning IPDP generation mechanisms. [Intervals of Pulsations Diminishing by Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bossen, M.; Mcpherron, R. L.; Russell, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study designed to examine the properties of Pc 1 activity observed simultaneously at ATS 1 and two Canadian ground stations. The Pc 1 activity is found to follow substorm expansion phase onsets and to occur most frequently at dusk. Dynamic spectra waves at both ground stations are that of IPDP (Intervals of Pulsations Diminishing by Period) type Pc 1. A previously proposed mechanism to explain IPDP generation, which required a rapid increase in the equatorial magnetic field to produce IPDP, is inconsistent with the dynamic spectra and magnetic field observations. Either purely azimuthal or a combination of azimuthal and radial inward drift of energetic resonant protons is an equally plausible mechanism to explain IPDP generation.

  14. Statistical mapping of ULF Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath as a function of solar wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, A. P.; Nykyri, K.; Osmane, A.; Pulkkinen, T. I.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a statistical study of Pc3 velocity fluctuations in the Earth's dayside magnetosheath. There exists a notable dawn-dusk asymmetry, such that velocity fluctuations generally exhibit enhanced spectral power in the magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The fluctuations in the central magnetosheath and close to bow shock tend to dampen with increasing tail-ward distance while the opposite trend is observed close to the magnetopause. This strongly suggests that velocity shear driven processes such as the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drive Pc3 flow variations close to the magnetopause as the velocity shear increases with increasing tail-ward distance. We also show strong evidence that Pc3 velocity fluctuations are significantly enhanced during intervals of faster solar wind speeds. We see negligible differences between data collected during northward and southward IMF orientations, but in general, a dawn-favoured asymmetry persists.

  15. Scalar magnetic anomaly maps of Earth derived from POGO and Magsat data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar; Langel, Robert A.; Purucker, Mike

    1994-01-01

    A new Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) scalar magnetic anomaly map at 400 km altitude is presented which consists of spherical harmonics of degree 15-60. On the basis of the common features of this map with two new Magsat anomaly maps, dawn and dusk, two scalar magnetic anomaly maps of the Earth are presented using two selection criteria with different levels of stringency. These selection criteria suppress the noncrustal components of the original maps by different amounts. The more stringent selection criteria seek to eliminate as much contamination as possible, at the expense of suppressing some anomaly signal. This map is represented by spherical harmonics of degree 15-60. The less stringent selection criteria seek to retain as much crustal signal as possible, at the expense of also retaining some contaminating fields. This map is represented by spherical harmonics of degree 15-65. The resulting two maps are highly correlated with degree correlation coefficients greater than 0.8.

  16. Toward a political analysis of the consequences of a world climate change produced by increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Schware, R.

    1980-01-01

    It was Hegel's extraordinarily deep and perceptive insight that mankind is caught up in a drama that cannot be fully understood until it has been played out. The owl of Minewa spreads its wings only with the falling of the dusk. On the more hopeful side is the fact that, although we cannot know the consequences of future interactions between climate and society, we can begin to work toward political solutions and gird ourselves for ominous trends that are now coming into view. The purpose of this paper is to identify one such trend, namely the increase of atmospheric temperatures due to increased carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) and lay some initial groundwork for political research related to climate-societal interactions.

  17. The GRADIO spaceborne gravity gradiometer: Development and accommodation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, A.

    1989-01-01

    The European ARISTOTELES mission aims at the determination of the Earth's gravity field at short wavelength with a global coverage. Gravity gradient measurements will be achieved during six months by the GRADIO instrument onboard a dedicated satellite in a near dawn-dusk sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 200 km. The objective is an accuracy of better than 5 mgals for gravity anomalies, at ground level for blocks of 1 x 1 deg. According to present knowledge of the potential, the recovery of higher spherical harmonics (degree and order greater than 30) is of main importance. This leads to focus on the variations of the measured components T(sub ij) of the gravity gradient tensor, at frequencies greater than 5 x 10(exp -3) Hz. The resolution, required for the gradiometer is 10(exp -2) Eotvos (i.e., 10(exp -11)/s squared) with an averaging time of 4 s.

  18. An analysis of howling response parameters useful for wolf pack censusing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, F.H.; Mech, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Gray wolves (Canis lupus) were studied from April-1972 through April 1974 in the Superior National Forest in northeastern Minnesota by radio-tracking and simulated howling. Based on replies during 217 of 456 howling sessions, the following recommendations were derived for using simulated howling as a census technique: (1) the best times of day are dusk and night; (2) July, August, and September are the best months; (3) precipitation and winds greater than 12 km/hour should be aVQided; (4) a sequence of 5 single howls should be used, alternating 'flat' and 'breaking' howls; (5) trials should be repeated 3 times at about 2-minute intervals with the first trial at lower volume; and (6) the trial series should be repeated on 3 nights as close to each other as possible. Two censuses are described: a saturation census and a sampling census.

  19. Foreshock ions observed behind the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, R. A.; Yamauchi, M.; Winningham, J. D.; Lundin, R.; Sharber, J. R.; Nilsson, H.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Express Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment contains ion and electron instruments for conducting plasma measurements. On January 23, 2012, during in-bound travel of Mars Express in the southern hemisphere of Mars from its dawn side toward periapsis at dusk, the plasma instruments measured foreshock-like ion beams extending from outside the bow shock and into the magnetosphere, continuing to a distance of about a proton gyroradius from the bow shock. These ion beams were mostly protons, were observed to have energies greater than solar wind protons, and were not gyrating, in agreement with reflections of the solar wind proton beam. Furthermore, in the foreshock region the ion energy gradually decreased toward the magnetosheath, in agreement with an acceleration by outward-directed electric field in the bowshock. The observations also suggest that this electric field exists even inside the magnetosheath within the distance of a proton gyroradius from the bow shock.

  20. High latitude f-region drift studies. Technical report, October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, B.W.; Buchau, J.; Weber, E.J.; Dozois, C.G.; Bibl, K.

    1986-12-01

    The large-scale, high-latitude ionospheric-convection pattern is driven by the interaction of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field with the earth's magnetosphere. Ground-based digital ionosondes, with spaced receiving antennas, have been developed and deployed at the high latitude stations of Thule, Greenland and Goose Bay, Labrador. Results from these stations demonstrate that the ionospheric convection can be measured for the bottomside ionosphere. Data from Thule consistently show the predominant antisunward convection. The data from Goose Bay indicate the sunward return flows of the polar plasma convection and the switch over when the station rotates from the dusk into the dawn cell. These data also illustrate the potential for systematic study of the convection patterns that is possible with a network of ground-based digital ionosondes.

  1. Two Duskside Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events Seen During the 2008/2009 Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) Piggyback Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, A. X.

    2009-12-01

    The Balloon Array for Radiation-belt Relativistic Electron Losses (BARREL) is a balloon-based mission studying the loss of relativistic electrons from the outer radiation belts. Understanding and quantifying electron losses is a vital component of understanding radiation belt dynamics. Radiation belt electrons lost to the Earth's atmosphere, called relativistic electron precipitation (REP), can be observed by the bremsstrahlung X-rays produced as the electrons are scattered in the atmosphere. In December 2008 a test balloon payload with an X-ray detector was launched and collected data for 54 days. Analysis of the data from this flight shows two intense and spectrally hard events occurring during the dusk sector of MLT. Interpretation requires modeling both the interaction of electrons in the atmosphere to make gammas and the interaction of the gammas in the atmosphere and in the instrument. A spectral analysis of these two events will be presented and electron spectra will be derived for these events.

  2. Consequences of centrifugally-driven phase bunching in the near-earth magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, D. C.; Belmont, G.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Moore, T. E.; Martin, R. F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of the plasma sheet ions in the near-earth magnetotail where the Larmor radii are comparable to the magnetic field line curvature radius are examined. It is shown that enhanced centrifugal effects lead to the prominent bunching of the particles in the gyration phase. As a result of this bunching effect, it is demonstrated that a thin current sheet develops in the vicinity of the tail midplane. Using average values of the plasma density and temperature, the current sheet obtained has a characteristic thickness of the order of a few tenths of an earth radius, and leads to significant stretching of the local magnetic field lines. A further consequence of phase bunching is the build-up of a substantial current in the earth tail direction at low latitudes which leads to field line inclination in the dawn-dusk direction.

  3. Evidence for Directly Driven Auroral Signatures Resulting from Interplanetary Pressure Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    It has been observed that the auroral signature of the arrival of an interplanetary pressure pulse at the bow shock causes an initial brightening near noon. Consequently, the bright region propagates to the night side via the dawn and dusk flanks. The delay time for subsequent auroral breakup is observed to vary significantly from seconds to hours. We have examined the 1998 and early 1999 interplanetary pressure pulse events recorded by WIND and ACE (over 35 in all) and correlated these with the Polar UVI data for the events that are imaged. Evidence for directly driven auroral activity resulting from an interplanetary pressure pulse will be discussed as well as the variation of the delay time for auroral breakup.

  4. Theory for substorms triggered by sudden reductions in convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1996-01-01

    Many substorm expansions are triggered by interplanetary magnetic field changes that reduce magnetospheric convection. This suggests that expansion onsets are a result of a reduction in the large-scale electric field imparted to the magnetosphere from the solar wind. Such a reduction disrupts the inward motion and energization of plasma sheet particles that occur during the growth phase. It is proposed that the resulting magnetic drift of particles and a large dawn to dusk gradient in the ion energies leads to a longitudinally localized reduction in the plasma pressure, and thus, to the current wedge formation. This theory accounts for the rapid development of the expansion phase relative to growth phase, the magnitude of the wedge currents, the speeds of tailward and westward expansion of the current reduction region in the equatorial plane, and the speeds of the poleward and westward motion of active aurora in the ionosphere.

  5. The plasmaspheric electric field as measured by ISEE 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.; Aggson, T. L.; Heppner, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    The electrodynamics of the plasmasphere has been a topic of considerable interest. Models predict a space charge buildup, or Alfven layer, at the inner edge of the ring current which opposes the dawn-dusk convection electric field in the magnetosphere and thus shields the plasmasphere from the convection electric field. The current study has the objective to present data from the ISEE 1 double cylindrical probe instrument. All measurements reported were made in the plasmasphere with electron densities of the order of 30-50 or greater per cu cm. The average electric field pattern for quiet conditions is found to be qualitatively consistent with previous average results from whistler measurements and radar backscattering measurements. The magnitudes and gross patterns are in qualitative agreement with representative ionospheric dynamo models. The basic convective flow vectors from the penetration of the magnetospheric electric field tend to follow contours which are parallel to those of the average plasmapause boundary on the nightside.

  6. PDF-modulated visual inputs and cryptochrome define diurnal behavior in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cusumano, Paola; Klarsfeld, André; Chélot, Elisabeth; Picot, Marie; Richier, Benjamin; Rouyer, François

    2009-11-01

    Morning and evening circadian oscillators control the bimodal activity of Drosophila in light-dark cycles. The lateral neurons evening oscillator (LN-EO) is important for promoting diurnal activity at dusk. We found that the LN-EO autonomously synchronized to light-dark cycles through either the cryptochrome (CRY) that it expressed or the visual system. In conditions in which CRY was not activated, flies depleted for pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) or its receptor lost the evening activity and displayed reversed PER oscillations in the LN-EO. Rescue experiments indicated that normal PER cycling and the presence of evening activity relied on PDF secretion from the large ventral lateral neurons and PDF receptor function in the LN-EO. The LN-EO thus integrates light inputs and PDF signaling to control Drosophila diurnal behavior, revealing a new clock-independent function for PDF. PMID:19820704

  7. Further determination of the characteristics of magnetospheric plasma vortices with Isee 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hones, E. W., Jr.; Bame, S. J.; Asbridge, J. R.; Birn, J.; Paschmann, G.; Sckopke, N.; Haerendel, G.

    1981-01-01

    Further studies of the vortices in magnetospheric plasma flow with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut (LASL/MPI) fast plasma experiment on Isee 1 and 2 have revealed that the pattern of vortical flow has a wavelength of approximately 20-40 earth radii and moves tailward through the magnetosphere at speeds of several hundred kilometers per second. The tendency toward vorticity pervades the total breadth of the plasma sheet tailward of the dawn-dusk meridian. The sense of rotation of the plasma flow (as viewed from above the ecliptic plane) is clockwise in the morning side of the plasma sheet and counterclockwise in the evening side. The sense of rotation in the morning and evening boundary layers is reversed from that in the contiguous regions of the plasma sheet. The occurrence of vortical flow is independent of the level of geomagnetic activity but is associated with long-period geomagnetic pulsations.

  8. ISEE-1 and 2 observations of field-aligned currents in the distant midnight magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Kelly, T. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic field measurements obtained in the nightside magnetosphere by the co-orbiting ISEE-1 and 2 spacecraft have been examined for signatures of field-aligned currents (FAC). Such currents are found on the boundary of the plasma sheet both when the plasma sheet is expanding and when it is thinning. Evidence is often found for the existence of waves on the plasma sheet boundary, leading to multiple crossings of the FAC sheet. At times the boundary layer FAC sheet orientation is nearly parallel to the X-Z GSM plane, suggesting 'protrusions' of plasma sheet into the lobes. The boundary layer current polarity is, as expected, into the ionosphere in the midnight to dawn local time sector, and outward near dusk. Current sheet thicknesses and velocities are essentially independent of plasma sheet expansion or thinning, having typical values of 1500 km and 20-40 km/s respectively. Characteristic boundary layer current densities are about 10 nanoamps per square meter.

  9. Structure of the martian ionosphere as revealed by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer during the first two years of the MAVEN mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Yelle, Roger; Grebowsky, Joseph; Fox, Jane L.; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of the observations of the ionosphere of Mars by the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS). These observations were conducted during the first two years of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission (MAVEN), which also cover a full Martian year. The NGIMS observations revealed the spatial and temporal structures in the density distributions of major and several minor ion species (H_2^+, H_3^+, He^+, O_2^+, C^+, CH^+, N^+, NH^+, O^+, OH^+, H_2O^+, H_3O^+, N_2^+/CO^+, CO^+/HOC^+/N_2H^+, NO^+, HNO^+, O_2^+, HO_2^+, Ar^+, ArH^+, CO_2^+, and OCOH^+). Dusk/dawn and day/night asymmetries in the density distributions were also observed for nearly all ion species. Additionally, NGIMS revealed the presence of a persistent metal layer below 140 km. This layer was accessible for measurement during the MAVEN's "deep-dip" campaigns.

  10. Theoretical magnetograms based on quantitative simulation of a magnetospheric substorm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Wolf, R. A.; Karty, J. L.; Harel, M.

    1982-01-01

    Substorm currents derived from the Rice University computer simulation of the September 19, 1976 substorm event are used to compute theoretical magnetograms as a function of universal time for various stations, integrating the Biot-Savart law over a maze of about 2700 wires and bands that carry the ring, Birkeland and horizontal ionospheric currents. A comparison of theoretical results with corresponding observations leads to a claim of general agreement, especially for stations at high and middle magnetic latitudes. Model results suggest that the ground magnetic field perturbations arise from complicated combinations of different kinds of currents, and that magnetic field disturbances due to different but related currents cancel each other out despite the inapplicability of Fukushima's (1973) theorem. It is also found that the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the horizontal magnetic field disturbance component at low latitudes is due to a net downward Birkeland current at noon, a net upward current at midnight, and, generally, antisunward-flowing electrojets.

  11. DEET-based insect repellents: safety implications for children and pregnant and lactating women

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Gideon; Matsui, Doreen; Bailey, Benoit

    2003-01-01

    REDUCING THE RISK OF MOSQUITO BITES is currently the only way to reduce the risk of West Nile virus infection. Methods for avoiding mosquito bites include limiting the time spent outdoors at dawn and dusk, wearing protective clothing and using an insect repellent. Repellents containing DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide, also known as N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide) are the most effective and most widely used. However, concerns have been raised over the risk of adverse toxic effects, especially in young children and pregnant and lactating women. In this article, we review the available evidence on the effectiveness and safety of DEET-based products. The evidence does not support increased risk in young children. PMID:12900480

  12. Polar cap electric field distributions related to the interplanetary magnetic field direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The correlations between the azimuthal direction of the interplanetary magnetic field and the most simple polar cap signatures are discussed. Only the spatial distribution of the dawn-dusk polar cap field is considered. For each OGO 6 traverse across the northern or southern polar cap, the simultaneous values of the interplanetary magnetic field in solar-equatorial coordinates were recorded by the Explorer 33 magnetometer. Histograms of these values are presented and are discussed. The high degree of correlation with the longitudinal angle indicates that the relative geometry of the interplanetary magnetic field and magnetospheric magnetic fields must be fundamental to explaining the distribution of polar cap electric fields. The sign of the solar-equatorial component perpendicular to the sun-earth line appears to be a more critical parameter than the sign of the component toward the sun. The Svalgaard-Mansurov correlation and the correspondence between fast convection and parallel magnetospheric and interplanetary magnetic fields are described.

  13. A survey of ISEE-3 energetic ion results (EPAS) in the deep geomagnetic tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, P. W.

    1986-10-01

    An overview is presented of the results of the energetic particle anisotropy spectrometer (EPAS) on board ISEE-3 during its geotail mission. Ions of energy greater than 35 keV are seen in the plasma sheet with very strong streaming, predominantly in the tailward direction. The change-over from almost equal earthward and tailward flow to mainly tailward flow occurs near 100 earth radii. A dawn-dusk anisotropy is also observed, and interpreted as a density gradient effect within the plasma sheet. The existence of an energetic particle boundary layer has been established, where the ion flows are also highly anisotropic in the tailward direction, but apparently uncoupled from the plasma particles. Remote sensing of the plasma sheet, using finite gyroradius effects, shows that the plasma sheet is layered and oscillating. A 'vortex-like' event has been observed, in which the ion flow vector rotates through 720 deg in 30 min.

  14. Steepening of waves at the duskside magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaschke, F.; Kahr, N.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Magnes, W.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.; Giles, B. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Leinweber, H. K.; Bromund, K. R.; Anderson, B. J.; Le, G.; Chutter, M.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, E. L.

    2016-07-01

    Surface waves at the magnetopause flanks typically feature steeper, i.e., more inclined leading (antisunward facing) than trailing (sunward facing) edges. This is expected for Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) amplified waves. Very rarely, during northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, anomalous/inverse steepening has been observed. The small-scale tetrahedral configuration of the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft and their high time resolution measurements enable us to routinely ascertain magnetopause boundary inclinations during surface wave passage with high accuracy by four-spacecraft timing analysis. At the dusk flank magnetopause, 77%/23% of the analyzed wave intervals exhibit regular/inverse steepening. Inverse steepening happens during northward IMF conditions, as previously reported and, in addition, during intervals of dominant equatorial IMF. Inverse steepening observed under the latter conditions may be due to the absence of KHI or due to instabilities arising from the alignment of flow and magnetic fields in the magnetosheath.

  15. Model of the high-latitude ionospheric convection pattern during southward interplanetary magnetic field using DE 2 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairston, M. R.; Heelis, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    Data from the polar-orbiting satellite DE 2 are used to calculate one-dimensional electrostatic potential distributions across the polar cap region. Using passes that lie within + or - 3 hours MLT of the dawn-dusk line, various parameters of the polar potential distribution (location and magnitude of the maxima and minima, location of the zero potential point, etc.) are analyzed in relation to each other and to the IMF. The resulting dependences are used to derive a two-dimensional model of the distribution of the electrostatic potential in the high-latitude ionosphere during times of southward IMF. This model can be generated using as inputs either the ionospheric potential parameters or, based on the relationships analyzed here, the IMF conditions. The capabilities of the resulting mathematical model are illustrated, and the importance of retaining a flexibility in the model to accommodate individual observations is emphasized.

  16. Jupiter's nightside airglow and aurora.

    PubMed

    Gladstone, G Randall; Stern, S Alan; Slater, David C; Versteeg, Maarten; Davis, Michael W; Retherford, Kurt D; Young, Leslie A; Steffl, Andrew J; Throop, Henry; Parker, Joel Wm; Weaver, Harold A; Cheng, Andrew F; Orton, Glenn S; Clarke, John T; Nichols, Jonathan D

    2007-10-12

    Observations of Jupiter's nightside airglow (nightglow) and aurora obtained during the flyby of the New Horizons spacecraft show an unexpected lack of ultraviolet nightglow emissions, in contrast to the case during the Voyager flybys in 1979. The flux and average energy of precipitating electrons generally decrease with increasing local time across the nightside, consistent with a possible source region along the dusk flank of Jupiter's magnetosphere. Visible emissions associated with the interaction of Jupiter and its satellite Io extend to a surprisingly high altitude, indicating localized low-energy electron precipitation. These results indicate that the interaction between Jupiter's upper atmosphere and near-space environment is variable and poorly understood; extensive observations of the day side are no guide to what goes on at night. PMID:17932286

  17. Solar Wind Entry Into and Transport Within Planetary Magnetotails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Simon; Johnson, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's magnetosphere on the nightside is stretched out in an elongated fashion that resembles a taillike configuration, which is often referred to as a magnetotail. The magnetotail is fundamentally important for understanding dynamical processes in the magnetosphere such as geomagnetic storms and substorms. Once the solar wind plasma enters the magnetotail, it will be distributed throughout the plasma sheet by the transport processes within the magnetotail or plasma sheet. This chapter discusses and reviews (a) plasma sheet filling rate; (b) dawn-dusk asymmetry; (c) entropies (s and S); and (d) Ti /Te ratio and how they can discriminate the three entry mechanisms: (i) double-cusp reconnection, (ii) Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), and (iii) Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAW). It then discusses the transport within the plasma sheet. The entry rate from each mechanism is quite similar and consistent with the observed filling rate.

  18. Low-Frequency Waves in the Tail Reconnection Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, I.; Fujimoto, M.; Nagai, T.; Zenitani, S.; Kojima, H.

    2016-02-01

    The wave modes in the ion-electron hybrid scales, such as the lower hybrid drift wave, has been the center of attention because they enable coupling between electron and ion dynamics and thus can be the agent for the anomalous resistivity. This chapter reports the results of a statistical survey on the wave activity in the lower hybrid frequency range. First, it briefly describes what the Geotail's best X-line crossing event tells us. Then, the chapter labels 16 flow reversals as "nonactive" flow reversal events, contrariwise to the 30 "active" X-line events. An important result in the chapter is the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the spatial distribution of the electric wave energy densities that coincides with the spatial structure of the reconnection region.

  19. A plasma bulk motion in the midnight magnetosphere during auroral breakup inferred from all-sky image and magnetic field observations at geosynchronous altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, O.; Koga, D.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-07-01

    Auroral events that occurred on January 24, 1986 in central Canada were recorded by an all-sky TV imager. During these events, auroral breakup was confined to a region between two foot points of neighboring geosynchronous satellites, GOES5 and GOES6. We examined field line signatures at satellite locations in unique station distributions and concluded that field line observation indicated plasma motion in the equatorial plane. The plasma motion showed an earthward compression combined with bifurcation (duskward or dawnward displacement in dusk/dawn sectors). In addition, we were able to infer an elliptical circulation of plasmas in the equatorial plane at Pi2 periods. Appearance in opposite rotation beside the auroral region indicated excitation of surface waves. We were able to show that auroral breakups occurred at a meridian of bifurcation. We suggest that a high plasma pressure region occurring tailward of geosynchronous altitudes may drive those plasma motions.

  20. A global model of the earth's ionosphere for use in space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O. H.; Yip, K. B. W.; Escobal, P. R.

    1974-01-01

    A general expression is derived for the F layer electron density profile as a function of latitude and longitude for that part of the earth which is in direct sunlight including dawn and dusk. Furthermore, the derived model is extended to encompass the night-time ionosphere. The expressions allow determination by standard means of the range correction for arbitrary ray path directions. It is also shown that the naive application of the Chapman ionospheric model entails range correction errors which for low elevation angles (less than 20 deg) and large solar zenith angles (40 deg) cannot be tolerated. Numerical calculations are displayed showing the dependence of the range correction on the pertinent parameters.

  1. Why the Viking descent probes found only one ionospheric layer at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayyasi, Majd; Mendillo, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Radio wave transmissions from satellites revealed that Mars had two relatively distinct layers of ionization: a maximum electron density near 130 km, and a secondary layer near 110 km. When the Viking descent probes—with their in situ observing capabilities—passed through the ionosphere, the peak electron density was found, with no indication of a secondary layer below. Here we use an ionospheric model to show that profiles of electron density versus height have shapes that favor the detection of two layers at local times near dawn and dusk (where many thousands of radio occultation observations have been made), but that the two layers essentially merge into one during midday hours (when Viking measurements were made). The profile shapes are attributed to ionizing geometry of solar photons and to chemical processes that affect the profile shapes in a way that favors secondary peak formation near sunrise and sunset.

  2. Instantaneous pictures of the high-latitude electrodynamics using Viking and DMSP/F7 observations

    SciTech Connect

    Marklund, G.T.; Blomberg, L.G.; Hardy, D.A.; Rich, F.J.

    1987-08-01

    Simultaneous observations by the Viking and the DMSP/F7 satellites were applied to a new technique to obtain realistic pictures of the auroral electrodynamics. In particular, an instantaneous global equipotential pattern is calculated using field-aligned current and conductivity distributions that are qualitatively consistent with the Viking auroral imager data and quantitatively consistent with magnetic-field and particle data from the two satellites. This convection pattern agrees with the E x B-drift vectors estimated from Viking electric-field data. Discrepancies consistent with upward parallel electric fields occur in regions of upward currents. The pattern is of the normal two-cell type, with a small dusk cell and a large, elongated crescent-shaped dawn cell. The excellent agreement between the satellite and model data demonstrates the reliability of the results.

  3. The relationship of total Birkeland currents to the merging electric field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bythrow, P. F.; Potemra, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    Magsat data were used to examine the behavior of Birkeland currents during 1100-2000 UT in consecutive orbits passing near the dawn-dusk meridian. The field was measured with a three-axis fluxgate instrument with a resolution of within 0.5 nT, with the sampling occurring every 1/16th sec. A total of 32 crossings of the Northern Hemisphere auroral zone were available for analysis. The changes in the magnetic readings were correlated more closely with variation in the IMF parameters than to the latitudinal width of the changes. Evidence was found for a relationship between the reconnection electric field and the intensity of the large-scale Birkeland current system. The total conductance of the auroral zone was calculated to be about 18.7 mhos.

  4. A comparison of the radio data and model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. I - The high energy electron distribution in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere. II - East-west asymmetry in the radiation belts as a function of Jovian longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison has been made between detailed model calculations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation and the radio data at wavelengths of 6, 21, and 50 cm. The calculations were performed for a Jovian longitude of 200 deg and were based on the multipole field configurations as derived from the Pioneer data. The electron distribution in the inner magnetosphere was derived as a function of energy, pitch angle, and spatial coordinates. In addition, the hot region or east-west asymmetry in the radiation belts is investigated. It is suggested that this asymmetry is due to the combined effect of an overabundance of electrons at jovicentric longitudes of 240-360 deg and the existence of a dusk-to-dawn directed electric field over the inner magnetosphere generated by the wind system in the upper atmosphere.

  5. The Ashen Light. [faint luminosity on nightside of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Present understanding of the Ashen Light of Venus is reviewed. Ashen Light is most often reported when Venus is in the evening sky, when the evening terminator of Venus is toward the earth. It is argued that the local time asymmetry is too great to be explained by terrestrial effects alone. It is argued that Venus lightning is the only known phenomenon that shows a marked dawn-dusk asymmetry on Venus and which could also explain the occurrence of Ashen Light. The following factors appear to affect the visibility of Ashen Light from earth: the distance of Venus from the earth, the length of time Venus is above the horizon, and the local time distribution of the Ashen Light source on Venus.

  6. Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Rankin, R.; Yuan, C.-J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ˜1 MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or "dropout echoes", constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a "drifting electron dropout" with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ˜1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons is induced by the strong dusk-dawn asymmetric interplanetary shock compression on the magnetosphere.

  7. The Fast Plasma Investigation on the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rager, A. C.; Pollock, C. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Burch, J. L.; Chandler, M. O.; Clark, G. B.; Coffey, V. N.; Dickson, C.; Dorelli, J.; Ergun, R.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gliese, U.; Giles, B. L.; Holland, M. P.; Jacques, A. D.; Kreisler, S.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Moore, T. E.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Rosnack, T.; Saito, Y.; Salo, C.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Smith, D. L.; Smith, S. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    Launched in March 2015, the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) instrument suite on the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) is producing the highest time and spatial resolution 3D electron and ion particle distribution function measurements to date. During FPI science operations, the four spacecraft maintain a tetrahedral formation such that 3D measurements of the plasma and field gradients are enabled. This allows the spacecraft to better investigate reconnection and to distinguish between spatial and temporal structures. In the first three months, we expect to observe magnetic phenomena such as dipolarization fronts, the plasma sheet boundary layer, magnetopause crossings, ion dispersive signatures of from remote reconnection sites, and magnetic holes. This poster is intended to supplement the invited talk on FPI results by Pollock et al. by providing further detail of the instrumentation and calibration, as well as a sampling of early magnetospheric plasma observations in the evening-side magnetotail, dusk flank, and afternoon magnetopause.

  8. Identification of higher frequency plasma waves inside a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex responsible for plasma heating and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetopause marks the boundary between the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma. Understanding the dynamics of the plasma processes at the magnetopause boundary is crucial to the study of plasma transport into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have shown that there exists a temperature asymmetry in the plasma sheet. During northward IMF, the cold component ions are 30-40% hotter in the dawn flank plasma sheet compared to the dusk flank. However, the mechanisms responsible are still not entirely clear. Recent work has shown that reconnection in Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices can transport plasma into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have also shown that mode conversion at the magnetopause can generate kinetic Alfvén wave activity. Both magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity can heat plasma. For the first time we have determined from observations the dispersion relation of higher frequency waves responsible for plasma mixing and heating within a KH vortex.

  9. High-Latitude Ionospheric Dynamics During Conditions of Northward IMF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In order to better understand the physical processes operating during conditions of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), in situ measurements from the Dynamics Explorer-2 (low altitude) polar satellite and simultaneous observations from the auroral imager on the Dynamics Explorer-1 (high altitude) satellite were used to investigate the relationships between optical emissions, particle precipitation, and convective flows in the high-latitude ionosphere. Field aligned current and convective flow patterns during IMF north include polar cap arcs, the theta aurora or transpolar arc, and the 'horse-collar' aurora. The initial part of the study concentrated on the electrodynamics of auroral features in the horse-collar aurora, a contracted but thickened emission region in which the dawn and dusk portions can spread to very high latitudes, while the latter part focused on the evolution of one type of IMF north auroral pattern to another, specifically the quiet-time horse-collar pattern to a theta aurora.

  10. Relationship between ATS-6 spacecraft-charging occurrences and warm plasma encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Lennartsson, W.

    1976-01-01

    The occurrences in local time of spacecraft-charging and warm plasma events observed by the University of California at San Diego plasma detector on ATS-6 have been examined using data from 40 contiguous orbits. The local time distribution of charging events was found to maximize between local midnight and dawn and was also similar to the distribution of synchronous spacecraft anomalies reported by others. More than half of the charging events had potentials of -50 V or more, and potentials on the order of -1000 V were observed. All of the spacecraft charging events reported in this paper occurred during sunlit conditions. The warm plasma encounters were concentrated in the local noon-to-dusk sector, and the local-time distributions of charging events and warm plasma encounters were found to be anticorrelated.

  11. A new plasma regime in the distant geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, D. A.; Hills, H. K.; Freeman, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Observations are reported of an extensive region of low-energy plasma particles (LEP) flowing antisunward along the ordered field lines in the lobes of the geomagnetic tail at lunar distances. The flow was detected by three suprathermal ion detectors deployed on the lunar surface during the Apollo 12, 14, and 15 missions. This particle regime is found to be similar to the 'boundary layer' and 'plasma mantle' observed at smaller geocentric distances and to an interior flow region parallel to the magnetopause in the dayside magnetosphere. It is located exterior to the plasma sheet across essentially the entire tail and adjacent to the magnetopause on both the dawn and dusk sides of the magnetosphere. Variations in the integral flux, temperature, and number density are described. It is suggested that this flow and the three similar regimes are simply connected along the inner surface of the magnetopause and are, in fact, the same phenomenon.

  12. In search of the pathways for light-induced pacemaker resetting in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Johanna H; Schwartz, William J

    2003-06-01

    Within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus is a circadian pacemaker that functions as a clock. Its endogenous period is adjusted to the external 24-h light-dark cycle, primarily by light-induced phase shifts that reset the pacemaker's oscillation. Evidence using a wide variety of neurobiological and molecular genetic tools has elucidated key elements that comprise the visual input pathway for SCN photoentrainment in rodents. Important questions remain regarding the intracellular signals that reset the autoregulatory molecular loop within photoresponsive cells in the SCN's retino-recipient subdivision, as well as the intercellular coupling mechanisms that enable SCN tissue to generate phase shifts of overt behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms such as locomotion and SCN neuronal firing rate. Multiple neurotransmitters, protein kinases, and photoinducible genes add to system complexity, and we still do not fully understand how dawn and dusk light pulses ultimately produce bidirectional, advancing and delaying phase shifts for pacemaker entrainment. PMID:12828281

  13. New protective battle-dress impregnated against mosquito vector bites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mixing repellent and organophosphate (OP) insecticides to better control pyrethroid resistant mosquito vectors is a promising strategy developed for bed net impregnation. Here, we investigated the opportunity to adapt this strategy to personal protection in the form of impregnated clothes. Methods We compared standard permethrin impregnated uniforms with uniforms manually impregnated with the repellent KBR3023 alone and in combination with an organophosphate, Pirimiphos-Methyl (PM). Tests were carried out with Aedes aegypti, the dengue fever vector, at dusk in experimental huts. Results Results showed that the personal protection provided by repellent KBR3023-impregnated uniforms is equal to permethrin treated uniforms and that KBR3023/PM-impregnated uniforms are more protective. Conclusion The use of repellents alone or combined with OP on clothes could be promising for personal protection of military troops and travellers if residual activity of the repellents is extended and safety is verified. PMID:20809969

  14. Food of young and colony-attendance of adult guillemots Uria aalge on Helgoland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, M. F.; Wolf, P. A.; Hüppop, O.

    1992-06-01

    The guillemot colony on Helgoland, Germany, was visited from June 5th to 21st 1990. The presence of adults and food delivery to chicks was studied on a ledge holding about 50 breeding pairs. Attendance varied through the day, with most birds present at mid-day. Food consisted only of fish, 94.6% Clupeidae (herring and sprat) and 5.4% sand-eel. On average, a chick received 2.72 fish per day. After a marked early morning peak of feeding, the number of feeds per hour levelled off to a constant rate during the rest of the day until dusk. At sea, high numbers of guillemots were present in front of the colony, with densities dropping steeply with distance. The birds are thought to forage at distances of more than 5 km away from the colony.

  15. Unfixed in a fixated world: identity, sexuality, race and culture.

    PubMed

    Offord, B; Cantrell, L

    1999-01-01

    At the dusk of the twentieth century the confluence of sexuality and the multicultural subject offers a deep interrogation into identity. On the edge of the world, Australia is experiencing a poignant moment of identity crisis. For someone who is from a multicultural, multisexual background, identity is fragmented. Law and society demand unambiguous subjects, fixed by socio-political-cultural mores and expectations. To be unfixed presents difficulties in negotiating systems of knowledge and power which are fundamentally homeostatic. In the end it is all a matter of being unfixed but connected to "others," aware of the substance beyond identity and labels. This is being unfixed in a fixated world, challenging gravity, resisting definition and compromise. PMID:10197555

  16. Outer satellite atmospheres: Their extended nature and planetary interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Model calculations for the brightness of the sodium cloud in Region A were performed to clarify the role played by the plasma torus sink in producing the east-west intensity asymmetry observed in the sodium D-lines. It was determined that the east-west electric field, proposed by Barbosa and Kievelson (1983) and Ip and Goertz (1983) to explain the dawn-dusk asymmetry in the torus ion emissions measured by the Voyager UVS instrument, could also produce the east-west sodium intensity asymmetry discovered earlier by Bergstralh et al. (1975, 1977). Model results for the directional features of the sodium cloud are also reported. The completion of the development of the Io potassium cloud model, progress in improving the Titan hydrogen torus model, and efforts in developing our model for hydrogen cometary atmospheres are also discussed.

  17. Digital hf radar observations of equatorial spread-F

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    Modern digital ionosondes, with both direction finding and doppler capabilities can provide large scale pictures of the Spread-F irregularity regions. A morphological framework has been developed that allows interpretation of the hf radar data. A large scale irregularity structure is found to be nightward of the dusk terminator, stationary in the solar reference frame. As the plasma moves through this foehn-wall-like structure it descends, and irregularities may be generated. Localized upwellings, or bubbles, may be produced, and they drift with the background plasma. The spread-F irregularity region is found to be best characterized as a partly cloudy sky, due to the patchiness of the substructures. 13 references, 16 figures.

  18. Storm-time changes of geomagnetic field at MAGSAT altitudes (325-550 Km) and their comparison with changes at ground locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Kane, R. P.; Trivedi, N. B.

    1983-01-01

    The values of H, X, Y, Z at MAGSAT altitudes were first expressed as residuals delta H, delta X, delta Y, delta Z after subtracting the model HMD, XMD, YMD, ZMC. The storm-time variations of H showed that delta H (Dusk) was larger (negative) than delta H (Dawn) and occurred earlier, indicating a sort of hysteresis effect. Effects at MAGSAT altitudes were roughly the same (10% accuracy) as at ground, indicating that these effects were mostly of magnetospheric origin. The delta Y component also showed large storm-time changes. The latitudinal distribution of storm-time delta H showed north-south asymmetries varying in nature as the storm progressed. It seems that the central plane of the storm-time magnetospheric ring current undergoes latitudinal meanderings during the course of the storm.

  19. Orientation variation of dayside auroral arc alignments obtained from all-sky observation at yellow river station, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Qi; Yang, Hui-Gen; Lu, Quan-Ming; Hu, Ze-Jun; Han, De-Sheng; Wang, Qian

    2016-05-01

    The orientations of dayside auroral arc alignments were calculated for over 40,000 images from all-sky observation at Yellow River Station, Svalbard. For each arc, its "orientation" and "tilt" are defined as the angle the arc alignment makes with the dusk-dawn direction and the local east-west direction, respectively. The mean arc orientation increases linearly with the increasing magnetic local time (MLT). There is a reversal point of the arc tilt located at near 10.5 MLT. Compared with the mean orientation, auroral arc alignment tilts to morning side in the higher latitude and tilts to evening side in the lower latitude in the prenoon sector, whereas it is the opposite in the postnoon sector. We further studied the effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on the location of the arc tilt reversal point. We found that the reversal position shifts toward the midday for negative By.

  20. Investigating Plasmasphere Location during Relativistic Electron Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.; Goldstein, J.; McCarthy, M. P.; Smith, D. M.; Sample, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    The plasmasphere plays a crucial role in the generation of different wave modes and their resonance conditions with radiation belt relativistic electrons. Meredith's (et. al., 2003) statistical study of resonant conditions for >2MeV electrons with EMIC waves found that the majority of these events occur in the vicinity of the plasmpause. The MAXIS and MINIS balloon observations found a distinct class of relativistic electron precipitation occurring at dusk, suggesting EMIC waves as a possible precipitation mechanism. We investigate the location of these relativistic electron precipitation events with respect to the plasmapause using data from IMAGE EUV, POLAR EFI, and a plasmapause test particle simulation driven by an electric field model with terms representing solar-wind-driven convection and ring-current-ionospheric coupling.

  1. Investigation of Relativistic Electron Resonance with EMIC Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodger, L. A.; Millan, R. M.; Denton, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    Wave-particle interaction of relativistic electrons with EMIC waves has been proposed as an important loss mechanism for radiation belt electrons (e.g. Thorne and Andreoli, 1980). Lorentzen et al (2000) and Millan et al (2002) suggested this mechanism to be responsible for dusk side relativistic electron precipitation (REP) detected by balloon borne instrumentation. This study will use the linear electromagnetic dispersion code WHAMP to investigate the effects of density, magnetic field, anisotropy, and heavy ions on the minimum resonance energy for relativistic electrons with EMIC waves. Results will be compared with observations of REP during the MAXIS balloon campaign on Jan. 19, 2000 and the MINIS balloon campaign on Jan. 21, 2005.

  2. Magnetospheric sash dependence on IMF direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Erickson, G. M.; Ö Sonnerup, B. U.; Maynard, N. C.; Siebert, K. D.; Weimer, D. R.; White, W. W.

    The magnetospheric sash is a ribbon of weak field shaped like a horseshoe with its open ends adjacent to the north and south dayside, magnetopause cusps and its closed end forming the cross-tail current sheet. The clock angle of the sash in the dawn-dusk meridian plane (as seen from the sun) rotates from 0° to 90° as the clock angle of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) rotates from 0° to 180°. We use a global MHD simulation to obtain the sash clock angles for IMF clock angles of 45°, 90°, and 135°. Remarkably, the results are very close to the clock angle of the magnetic null points obtained by superposing a uniform field representing the IMF on a dipole field representing the earth. Contours of magnetic field strength on cross sections perpendicular to the solar wind flow direction show how the sash evolves tailward from the dayside cusps.

  3. Observations of O+ in the Distant Tail from the STEREO B Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Popecki, M. A.; Simunac, K.; Farrugia, C.; Klecker, B.; Bochsler, P.; Blush, L. M.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2008-05-01

    During the month of February, 2007, the STEREO B spacecraft traversed the dusk-side magnetotail, from -100 Re to -300 Re. This month was relatively quiet, with minimum Dst never below -39, and less than -20 for most of the month. Throughout this time, bursts of energetic O+ ions with energies up to 80 keV were observed using the Plasma and Suprathermal Ion Composition (PLASTIC), instrument. The O+ bursts are normally observed during time periods when density was low and the Bx component of the magnetic field changed orientation, indicating that the spacecraft was in the plasma sheet, crossing the neutral sheet. The energy of the bursts was highest for the highest solar wind speeds. During the most energetic events, O++ was also observed, simultaneous with the O+. These results show that the ionosphere can be a significant source for the plasma sheet, even in the deep tail during quiet times.

  4. Creating Day and Night: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    The capability to produce compelling renderings of daylight and nocturnal environments has been a challenge both for flight simulation and for film and related entertainment venues. In this chapter, I compare and contrast the technologies and techniques that these communities have employed during the last half-century. In particular, I will examine the varying criteria (aesthetics-based, performance-based, information-based) employed to evaluate the “goodness” of the rendering. I will also discuss the future challenges awaiting the simulation community, as humans migrate to space environments whose lighting characteristics are decidedly non-terrestrial, and where the transition between “day” and “night” occurs, not at dusk, but at the edge of a boulder or crevasse.

  5. Observations of Field-Aligned Current Spatial and Temporal Variations by Space Technology 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the results of magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) using multi-point magnetic field data from Space Technology 5 (ST-5) mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun synchronous polar orbit. The spacecraft were maintained in a 'pearls on a sting' constellation with controlled spacings ranging from just over 5000 km down to under 50 km. During the three-month mission duration, the constellation mission returned high quality multi-point measurements of the magnetic field through Earth's dynamic ionospheric current systems over a range of inter-satellite spacing. In this study, we use the ST-5 magnetic field measurements to separate spatial and temporal variations of FACs and to quantify the imbalance between the region 1 (R1) and the region 2 (R2) currents.

  6. A two-temperature plasma distribution in the magnetosheath at lunar distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, G. D.; Freeman, J. W.; Maher, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    Least squares Maxwellian fits have been made to data from the Apollo 15 suprathermal ion detector experiment (SIDE) during the moon's passage through the dusk magnetosheath. It is found that the data are best fit by superimposing two co-moving proton populations whose temperatures differ radically: kT roughly 10 eV and kT roughly 100 eV. This two-temperature distribution cannot be explained by alpha particles. The higher temperature population is typical of that expected for the fully shocked magnetosheath at lunar distances. The colder distribution could arise from cold plasma from within the magnetosphere brought up to magnetosheath flow speeds, but it is more probably due to unshocked solar wind.

  7. Low-harmonic magnetosonic waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Olson, C. N.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Boardsen, S. A.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-08-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves (fast magnetosonic waves), generated at multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (fluxgate and search coil magnetometers and electric field sensors), but most recent studies have used data from search coil sensors, and many have been restricted to high harmonics. We report here on a survey of low-harmonic waves, based on electric and magnetic field data from the Electric Fields and Waves double probe and Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first full precession through all local times, from 1 October 2012 to 13 July 2014. These waves were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause (PP), at L shells from 2.4 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee), and in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Consistent with earlier studies, wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator. Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk, and often occurred within 3 h after substorm injections. Outside the PP occurrence maximized broadly across noon, and inside the PP occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. We confirm recent ray-tracing studies showing wave refraction and/or reflection at PP-like boundaries. Comparison with waveform receiver data indicates that in some cases these low-harmonic magnetosonic wave events occurred independently of higher-harmonic waves; this indicates the importance of including this population in future studies of radiation belt dynamics.

  8. Observations of purely compressional waves in the upper ULF band observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Johnson, J.; Kim, E. H.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves, also denoted fast magnetosonic waves, equatorial noise, and ion Bernstein modes, can both heat thermal protons and accelerate electrons up to relativistic energies. These waves have been observed both in the near-equatorial region in the inner magnetosphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer. Although these waves have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (DC and AC magnetometers and electric field sensors), most recent studies have used data from AC sensors, and many have been restricted to frequencies above ~50 Hz. We report here on a survey of ~200 of these waves, based on DC electric and magnetic field data from the EFW double probe and EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first two years of operation. The high sampling rate of these instruments makes it possible to extend observational studies of the lower frequency population of such waves to lower L shells than any previous study. These waves, often with multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause, in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator and occurred at L shells from below 2 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee). Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk. Outside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized broadly across noon. Inside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. Every event occurred in association with a positive gradient in the HOPE omnidirectional proton flux in the range between 2 keV and 10 keV. The Poynting vector, determined for 8 events, was in all cases directed transverse to B, but with variable azimuth, consistent with earlier models and observations.

  9. Variation of surface electric field during geomagnetic disturbed period at Maitri, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, N. Jeni; Panneerselvam, C.; Anil Kumar, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The paper discusses on the variations of the atmospheric vertical electric field measured at sub-auroral station Maitri (70∘75'S, 11∘75'E), and polar station Vostok (78.5∘S, 107∘E) during the geomagnetic disturbances on 25-26 January 2006. Diurnal variation of surface electric field measured at Maitri shows a similar variation with worldwide thunderstorm activity, whereas the departure of the field is observed during disturbed periods. This part of the field corresponds to the magnetospheric/ionospheric (an additional generator in the polar regions) voltage generators. Solar wind parameters and planetary indices represent the temporal variation of the disturbances, and digital fluxgate magnetometer variation continuously monitored to trace the auroral movement at Maitri. We have observed that the electrojet movement leaves its signature on vertical and horizontal components of the DFM in addition; the study infers the position of auroral current wedge with respect to Maitri. To exhibit the auroral oval, OVATION model is obtained with the aid of DMSP satellite and UV measurements. It is noted that the Maitri is almost within the auroral oval during the periods of disturbances. To examine the simultaneous changes in the vertical electric field associated with this magnetic disturbance, the dawn-dusk potential is studied for every UT hours; the potential was obtained from Weimer model and SuperDARN radar. The comparison reveals the plausible situation for the superposition of dawn-dusk potential on surface electric field over Maitri. This observation also shows that the superposition may not be consistent with the phase of the electrojet. Comparison of surface electric field at Maitri and Vostok shows that the parallel variation exhibits with each other, but during the period of geomagnetic disturbances, the influence is not much discerned at Vostok.

  10. Storm-enhanced plasma density and polar tongue of ionization development during the 15 May 2005 superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Ildiko; Lovell, Brian C.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the ionosphere's global response to the 15 May 2005 superstorm in terms of storm evolution and ionospheric electrodynamics. Our aim is to study the global distribution of plasma and the resultant large-scale ionospheric features including the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), storm-enhanced density (SED), and polar tongue of ionization (TOI). We have combined multi-instrument ionospheric data, solar and terrestrial magnetic data, and polar convection maps. Results reveal the prompt penetration of the interplanetary electric field to the polar region and then to the equator with a dusk-to-dawn polarity during the initial phase and with a dawn-to-dusk polarity during the main phase. This drove during the initial phase a weak eastward equatorial electrojet (EEJ) in the American sector at nighttime and a weak westward EEJ in the Indian-Australian sector at daytime. During the main phase, these EEJs intensified and changed polarities. SED and polar TOI development was observed prior to and during the initial phase at evening-premidnight hours over North America and during the main phase in the south at afternoon-evening hours in the Australian sector. During the main phase and early in the recovery phase, the EIA-SED structure was well formed in the Asian longitude sector. Then, polar TOI development was absent in the north because of the long distance from the magnetic pole but was supported in the south because of the closeness of daytime cusp and magnetic pole. Thus, the EIA-SED-TOI structure developed twice but each time in a different longitude sector and with different characteristics.

  11. GPS Based Daily Activity Patterns in European Red Deer and North American Elk (Cervus elaphus): Indication for a Weak Circadian Clock in Ungulates

    PubMed Central

    Ensing, Erik P.; Ciuti, Simone; de Wijs, Freek A. L. M.; Lentferink, Dennis H.; ten Hoedt, André; Boyce, Mark S.; Hut, Roelof A.

    2014-01-01

    Long-term tracking using global positioning systems (GPS) is widely used to study vertebrate movement ecology, including fine-scale habitat selection as well as large-scale migrations. These data have the potential to provide much more information about the behavior and ecology of wild vertebrates: here we explore the potential of using GPS datasets to assess timing of activity in a chronobiological context. We compared two different populations of deer (Cervus elaphus), one in the Netherlands (red deer), the other in Canada (elk). GPS tracking data were used to calculate the speed of the animals as a measure for activity to deduce unbiased daily activity rhythms over prolonged periods of time. Speed proved a valid measure for activity, this being validated by comparing GPS based activity data with head movements recorded by activity sensors, and the use of GPS locations was effective for generating long term chronobiological data. Deer showed crepuscular activity rhythms with activity peaks at sunrise (the Netherlands) or after sunrise (Canada) and at the end of civil twilight at dusk. The deer in Canada were mostly diurnal while the deer in the Netherlands were mostly nocturnal. On an annual scale, Canadian deer were more active during the summer months while deer in the Netherlands were more active during winter. We suggest that these differences were mainly driven by human disturbance (on a daily scale) and local weather (on an annual scale). In both populations, the crepuscular activity peaks in the morning and evening showed a stable timing relative to dawn and dusk twilight throughout the year, but marked periods of daily a-rhythmicity occurred in the individual records. We suggest that this might indicate that (changes in) light levels around twilight elicit a direct behavioral response while the contribution of an internal circadian timing mechanism might be weak or even absent. PMID:25208246

  12. GPS based daily activity patterns in European red deer and North American elk (Cervus elaphus): indication for a weak circadian clock in ungulates.

    PubMed

    Ensing, Erik P; Ciuti, Simone; de Wijs, Freek A L M; Lentferink, Dennis H; Ten Hoedt, André; Boyce, Mark S; Hut, Roelof A

    2014-01-01

    Long-term tracking using global positioning systems (GPS) is widely used to study vertebrate movement ecology, including fine-scale habitat selection as well as large-scale migrations. These data have the potential to provide much more information about the behavior and ecology of wild vertebrates: here we explore the potential of using GPS datasets to assess timing of activity in a chronobiological context. We compared two different populations of deer (Cervus elaphus), one in the Netherlands (red deer), the other in Canada (elk). GPS tracking data were used to calculate the speed of the animals as a measure for activity to deduce unbiased daily activity rhythms over prolonged periods of time. Speed proved a valid measure for activity, this being validated by comparing GPS based activity data with head movements recorded by activity sensors, and the use of GPS locations was effective for generating long term chronobiological data. Deer showed crepuscular activity rhythms with activity peaks at sunrise (the Netherlands) or after sunrise (Canada) and at the end of civil twilight at dusk. The deer in Canada were mostly diurnal while the deer in the Netherlands were mostly nocturnal. On an annual scale, Canadian deer were more active during the summer months while deer in the Netherlands were more active during winter. We suggest that these differences were mainly driven by human disturbance (on a daily scale) and local weather (on an annual scale). In both populations, the crepuscular activity peaks in the morning and evening showed a stable timing relative to dawn and dusk twilight throughout the year, but marked periods of daily a-rhythmicity occurred in the individual records. We suggest that this might indicate that (changes in) light levels around twilight elicit a direct behavioral response while the contribution of an internal circadian timing mechanism might be weak or even absent. PMID:25208246

  13. Mercury's Neutral and Ionized Exosphere Observed with the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer During the Three MESSENGER Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervack, Ronald J.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Sprague, A. L.; Burger, M. H.; Benna, M.; Mouawad, N.; Bradley, E. T.; Anderson, B. J.; Izenberg, N. R.; Kochte, M. C.; Lankton, M. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2010-10-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft observed Mercury's exosphere during each of the probe's three Mercury flybys (M1 on 14 January 2008, M2 on 6 October 2008, and M3 on 29 September 2009). Two previously observed species, Na and Ca, were seen in unprecedented spatial resolution, and two species - Mg and Ca+ - were discovered in the exosphere by MASCS. A dawn/dusk asymmetry in the Ca exosphere with a dawnside enhancement was found to be a persistent feature that was not previously known to exist. Surprisingly, a corresponding feature was not seen in Mg or the more volatile species Na. A dawn/dusk asymmetry in Na cannot necessarily be ruled out because MASCS did not observe the dayside. Most surprising was the observation of a region of intense concentration of Ca+ about 2-3 planetary radii anti-sunward from the planet's center. This measurement provides evidence for tailward magnetospheric convection of photoions produced inside the magnetosphere. Observations of neutral sodium, calcium, and magnesium above the planet's north and south poles revealed altitude distributions that are distinct for each species. Strong emission was seen above the poles in each of these species, but the altitude distribution was most unusual for Mg and is inconsistent with an exponentially decreasing density with altitude. A two-component exosphere was clearly measured for Na, indicating that a combination of processes is at work in producing and maintaining the exosphere. Whereas the Na distribution is consistent with ground-based observations, the differences in spatial distributions for the chemically similar elements, Ca and Mg, are unexpected and remain unexplained.

  14. How Does a Carnivore Guild Utilise a Substantial but Unpredictable Anthropogenic Food Source? Scavenging on Hunter-Shot Ungulate Carcasses by Wild Dogs/Dingoes, Red Foxes and Feral Cats in South-Eastern Australia Revealed by Camera Traps

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, David M.; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D.; Hampton, Jordan O.; Woolnough, Andrew P.; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources. PMID:24918425

  15. The use of automated bioacoustic recorders to replace human wildlife surveys: an example using nightjars.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Mieke C; Baker, Andrew; McGowan, Philip J K; Whittingham, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    To be able to monitor and protect endangered species, we need accurate information on their numbers and where they live. Survey methods using automated bioacoustic recorders offer significant promise, especially for species whose behaviour or ecology reduces their detectability during traditional surveys, such as the European nightjar. In this study we examined the utility of automated bioacoustic recorders and the associated classification software as a way to survey for wildlife, using the nightjar as an example. We compared traditional human surveys with results obtained from bioacoustic recorders. When we compared these two methods using the recordings made at the same time as the human surveys, we found that recorders were better at detecting nightjars. However, in practice fieldworkers are likely to deploy recorders for extended periods to make best use of them. Our comparison of this practical approach with human surveys revealed that recorders were significantly better at detecting nightjars than human surveyors: recorders detected nightjars during 19 of 22 survey periods, while surveyors detected nightjars on only six of these occasions. In addition, there was no correlation between the amount of vocalisation captured by the acoustic recorders and the abundance of nightjars as recorded by human surveyors. The data obtained from the recorders revealed that nightjars were most active just before dawn and just after dusk, and least active during the middle of the night. As a result, we found that recording at both dusk and dawn or only at dawn would give reasonably high levels of detection while significantly reducing recording time, preserving battery life. Our analyses suggest that automated bioacoustic recorders could increase the detection of other species, particularly those that are known to be difficult to detect using traditional survey methods. The accuracy of detection is especially important when the data are used to inform conservation. PMID

  16. Energetic electron response to interplanetary shocks at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Zong, Q.-G.

    2015-06-01

    Interplanetary (IP) shocks have great impacts on Earth's magnetosphere, especially in causing global dynamic changes of energetic particles. In order to study the response of energetic electrons (50keV-1.5MeV) at geosynchronous orbit to IP shocks, we have systematically analyzed 215 IP shock events based on ACE, GOES, and LANL observations during 1998-2007. Our study shows that after the shock arrival low-energy electron fluxes increase at geosynchronous orbit. However, in higher energy channels fluxes show smaller increases and eventually become unchanged or even decrease. The oscillations of electron fluxes following the shock arrival have also been studied in this paper. Statistical analysis revealed a frequency preference for 2.2 mHz and 3.3 mHz oscillations of energetic electron fluxes. The amplitude of these oscillations is larger under southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) than under northward IMF. Furthermore, oscillations from high-energy and low-energy electron fluxes show different phase characteristics and power distributions. The phase angles of the oscillations are the same in the dawn, dusk, and noon sectors for low-energy channels (50-500keV), while they have a π/2 difference between two adjacent local time sectors for high-energy channels (0.5-1.5MeV). The wave power distribution of electron fluxes shows different dawn-dusk asymmetries for low-energy channels and high-energy channels. The results presented in this paper provide an energetic particle point of view of the magnetospheric response to the interplanetary shock impact.

  17. Magnetic reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail: A comprehensive magnetic field survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. W.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process throughout the solar system, significantly shaping and modulating the magnetospheres of the magnetized planets. Within planetary magnetotails reconnection can be responsible for energizing particles and potentially changing the total flux and mass contained within the magnetosphere. The Kronian magnetosphere is thought to be a middle ground between the rotationally dominated Jovian magnetosphere and the solar wind driven terrestrial magnetosphere. However, previous studies have not been able to find a statistical reconnection x-line, as has been possible at both Jupiter and Earth. Additionally the standard picture of magnetotail reconnection at Saturn, developed by Cowley et al. [2004], suggests a potential asymmetry between the dawn and dusk flanks, caused by different reconnection processes dominating. This work centers on the development of an algorithm designed to find reconnection related events in spacecraft magnetometer data, aiming to reduce the bias that manual searches could inherently introduce, thereby ensuring the validity of any statistical analysis. The algorithm primarily identifies the reconnection related events from deflections in the north-south component of the magnetic field, allowing an almost uninterrupted in-situ search (when the spacecraft is situated within the magnetotail). The new catalogue of candidate reconnection events, produced by the algorithm, enables a more complete statistical view of reconnection in the Kronian magnetotail. Well-studied data encompassing the deep magnetotail and dawn flank (particularly from orbits in 2006) were used to train the algorithm and develop reasonable criteria. The algorithm was then applied to data encompassing the dusk flank (including orbits from 2009, for which plasma data have been examined by Thomsen et al. [2014]). This combination enables a robust, and global, comparison of reconnection rates, signatures and properties in the Kronian magnetotail.

  18. How does a carnivore guild utilise a substantial but unpredictable anthropogenic food source? Scavenging on hunter-shot ungulate carcasses by wild dogs/dingoes, red foxes and feral cats in south-eastern Australia revealed by camera traps.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, David M; Woodford, Luke; Moloney, Paul D; Hampton, Jordan O; Woolnough, Andrew P; Tucker, Mark

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in understanding how anthropogenic food resources subsidise carnivore populations. Carcasses of hunter-shot ungulates are a potentially substantial food source for mammalian carnivores. The sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) is a large (≥ 150 kg) exotic ungulate that can be hunted throughout the year in south-eastern Australia, and hunters are not required to remove or bury carcasses. We investigated how wild dogs/dingoes and their hybrids (Canis lupus familiaris/dingo), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and feral cats (Felis catus) utilised sambar deer carcasses during the peak hunting seasons (i.e. winter and spring). We placed carcasses at 1-km intervals along each of six transects that extended 4-km into forest from farm boundaries. Visits to carcasses were monitored using camera traps, and the rate of change in edible biomass estimated at ∼ 14-day intervals. Wild dogs and foxes fed on 70% and 60% of 30 carcasses, respectively, but feral cats seldom (10%) fed on carcasses. Spatial and temporal patterns of visits to carcasses were consistent with the hypothesis that foxes avoid wild dogs. Wild dog activity peaked at carcasses 2 and 3 km from farms, a likely legacy of wild dog control, whereas fox activity peaked at carcasses 0 and 4 km from farms. Wild dog activity peaked at dawn and dusk, whereas nearly all fox activity occurred after dusk and before dawn. Neither wild dogs nor foxes remained at carcasses for long periods and the amount of feeding activity by either species was a less important predictor of the loss of edible biomass than season. Reasons for the low impacts of wild dogs and foxes on sambar deer carcass biomass include the spatially and temporally unpredictable distribution of carcasses in the landscape, the rapid rate of edible biomass decomposition in warm periods, low wild dog densities and the availability of alternative food resources. PMID:24918425

  19. IMF By-controlled field-aligned currents in the magnetotail during northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z. W.; Shi, J. K.; Dunlop, M.; Liu, Z. X.

    2014-08-01

    The influence of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By component on the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) in the magnetotail during the northward IMF were investigated using the data from Cluster. There are 748 FACs cases selected to do analysis. We present that the IMF By component plays a very important role in controlling the flow direction of the FACs in the PSBL in the magnetotail. In the northern hemisphere, the influence of the positive (negative) IMF By is an earthward (tailward) FACs. To the contrary, in the southern hemisphere, the effect of the positive (negative) IMF By is a tailward (earthward) FACs. There is a clear north-south asymmetry of the polarity of the FACs in the PSBL when IMF By is positive or negative, and this asymmetry of the polarity is more distinct when IMF By is positive. The FAC density is controlled by IMF By only when |IMF By| is large. When |IMF By| is more than 10 nT the absolute FAC density in the PSBL has an obvious positive correlation with the |IMF By|. When |IMF By| is less than 10 nT, there is no correlation between the absolute FAC density and |IMF By|. There is a clear dusk-dawn asymmetry in the current densities for the FACs in the PSBL, with the dawn currents appearing larger than the dusk currents. The FAC with the largest (smallest) density is located in the range of 0100≤MLT<0200 (2100≤MLT<2200).

  20. Multi-Scale Kelvin-Helmholtz Vortices Along Mercury's Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, D. J.; Raines, J. M.; Slavin, J. A.; Zurbuchen, T.; Sundberg, T.; Boardsen, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Data from the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) and Magnetometer (MAG) sensors on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft have revealed stark differences in the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability at Mercury compared with that at Earth. Although K-H vortices have been documented in planetary magnetospheres at the interface of magnetosheath and magnetospheric plasmas, such features at Mercury have been observed exclusively on the dusk side. From a survey of 58 K-H events, we find that these vortices have two distinct sets of behavior separated by the dusk terminator. On the dayside, the wave frequencies measured by MAG are nearly constant at ~0.025 Hz (~40 s period) under a variety of magnetosheath conditions, whereas the wave frequency measured on the nightside is correlated with the strength of the magnetic field near the magnetopause and matches the local Na+ gyrofrequency. The polarization of these waves inside the magnetosphere is distinctly right-handed, consistent with non-linear roll-up of K-H vortices as opposed to the left-handed ion-cyclotron wave mode. During these events, measurements from FIPS reveal strong (~30%) concentrations of Na+ in the nightside plasma sheet adjacent to the magnetopause. The keV energies of these planetary ions provide them with gyroradii that are ~500-1000 km, a scale at which a kinetic description of the K-H instability may be appropriate at Mercury. These data suggest a transition from fluid-scale to kinetic scale K-H vortices from day to night along Mercury's duskside magnetopause.

  1. Observation of Neutral Sodium above Mercury During the Transit of November 8, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Andrew E.; Killen, R. M.; Reardon, K. P.; Bida, T. A.

    2012-10-01

    We mapped the absorption of sunlight by sodium vapor in the exosphere of Mercury during the transit of Mercury on November 8, 2006, using the IBIS Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer at the Dunn solar telescope operated by the National Solar Observatory at Sunspot, New Mexico. The measurements were reduced to line-of-sight equivalent widths for absorption at the sodium D2 line, and mapped in thirty degree increments around the shadow of Mercury. We observed north and south polar enhancements of sodium absorption. The sodium absorptions fell off exponentially with altitude up to about 600 km, and we analyzed the altitude distributions to determine surface densities, zenith column densities, temperatures and scale heights for sodium. The average surface concentration of sodium atoms was about 900 atoms/cm3, and the average zenith column density was 0.8 x 1010 atoms/cm2. The average temperature was about 1100 K, with excursions to 1750 and 700 K. The 2003 transit was observed by Schleicher et al. [2004], using instrumentation similar to that employed for this research. They reported the appearance of a streamer-like feature extending a thousand kilometers above the north polar region, and a similar but smaller feature above the south polar region. Our observations did not detect similar features. They observed considerably more sodium absorption over the dawn terminator than over the dusk terminator. In contrast, we observed slightly larger sodium absorption on the dawn relative to the dusk side. The difference might be due to the slow advance of the dawn terminator at during the 2006 transit (0.13 degrees/day) relative to the 2003 transit (3.27 degrees/day). Reference Schleicher, H.; Wiedemann, G.; Wöhl, H.; Berkefeld, T.; Soltau, D. (2004), Detection of neutral sodium above Mercury during the transit on 2003 May 7. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 425, 1119-1124

  2. Mercury’s Sodium Exosphere: Up-Close with MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Merkel, A. W.; McClintock, W. E.; Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.

    2013-10-01

    The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) UltraViolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft orbiting Mercury provides the first up-close look at the planet’s sodium exosphere. We have observed the exosphere from orbit almost daily for more than 9 Mercury years and have used these data to make estimates of sodium density and temperature for the equatorial dayside and south pole. We find that the density varies over time but that this variability repeats itself: the density and temperature at a given local time and true anomaly (time of year) are nearly identical from one Mercury year to the next. The bulk of the exosphere has a temperature of around 1200 K, consistent with photon-stimulated desorption, although a more energetic and as-yet uncertain mechanism populates the relatively tenuous high altitudes and tail. The density varies in a manner consistent with transport caused by radiation pressure, which acts to push sodium away from noon and toward the terminators. Radiation pressure transport is one aspect of the exosphere identified by ground based observers over the last three decades. Some interpretations of their data, however, are inconsistent with our analysis of the orbital data. For example, they conclude that the exosphere has a persistent dawn/dusk asymmetry with more sodium at dawn, while we see a dawn/dusk asymmetry only during half of Mercury’s year. Many ground-based observers also reported frequent brightenings of polar sodium emissions and attributed them to episodic ion flux. Our limited observations of the south polar region show primarily seasonal, rather than episodic, variability.

  3. Three-Dimensional MHD Simulation of the Magnetosheath Plasma and Magnetic Field in the Presence of Cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H. C.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wing, S.

    2001-12-01

    An accurate knowledge of the magnetosheath is essential for studies of the bow shock, magnetopause, and solar input into the magnetosphere. Gasdynamic models may not give sufficient accuracy whereas the cost/time constraints preclude running the 3-D MHD global simulations for numerous solar wind conditions. A 3-D magnetosheath MHD model is needed and presented as a viable alternative. The inner boundary of the model is the magnetopause, which has been previously determined from the pressure balance and exhibits a small indentation near the cusp regions. The initial position of the bow shock is taken from a gasdynamic model and subsequently adjusted when the magnetic field is included. The results of the gasdynamic and MHD models are compared with the following input parameters: the heat capacity ration γ = 2, the solar wind sonic Mach number, M∞ = 7, 9.81 (solar wind velocity v = 400 ; km ; s-1), temperature T = 105, 1.96 x 105 K, n = 10 ; cm-3, Bx = 10 \\cos θ \\cos φ ; nT, By = 10 \\cos θ sin φ ; nT, and Bz = 10 sin θ ; nT. There is a pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetry for both Mack numbers, and the presence of a strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field results in an equatorial belt of depressed depletion layer densities and plasma pressures between the cusp. The missing pressure is supplied by an equatorial band of enhanced magnetic field strengths. Near the subsolar point MHD densities fall to values 60% and 45 % of those in the gasdynamic models for M∞ = 9.81 and 7, resepctively. However, the standoff distance of bow shock increases significantly with stronger southward field component for low Mack numbers. By contrast, a standing shock wave attached to the the cusp becomes particularly noticeable for a strong dawn-dusk IMF orientation and high Mach numbers (M∞ = 9.81).

  4. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetotail boundary: MHD simulation and comparison with Geotail observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, A.; Fairfield, D. H.

    2000-09-01

    On March 24, 1995, the Geotail spacecraft observed large fluctuations of the magnetic field and plasma properties in the low-latitude boundary layer about 15 RE tailward of the dusk meridian. Although the magnetospheric and magnetosheath magnetic fields were strongly northward, the Bz component showed strong short-duration fluctuations in which Bz could even reach negative values. We have used two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with magnetospheric and magnetosheath input parameters specifically chosen for this Geotail event to identify the processes which cause the observed boundary properties. It is shown that these fluctuations can be explained by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability if the k vector of the instability has a component along the magnetic field direction. The simulation results show many of the characteristic properties of the Geotail observations. In particular, the quasi-periodic strong fluctuations are well explained by satellite crossings through the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. It is illustrated how the interior structure of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices leads to the rapid fluctuations in the Geotail observations. Our results suggest an average Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength of about 5 RE, with a vortex size of close to 2 RE for an average repetition time of 2.5 min. The growth time for these waves implies a source region of about 10-16 RE upstream from the location of the Geotail spacecraft (i.e., near the dusk meridian). The results also indicate a considerable mass transport of magnetosheath material into the magnetosphere by magnetic reconnection in the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  5. Tracking the Plasmapause by Its Optical and Thermal Signatures in the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, M.; Wroten, J.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Martinis, C. R.; Smith, S. M.; Merenda, K.; Fritz, T. A.; Hairston, M. R.; Heelis, R. A.; Barbieri, C.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric optical emissions and in-situ plasma temperatures can be used to identify energy sources and structures in the magnetosphere via geomagnetic field-line mapping between the two regions. At mid-latitudes, stable auroral red (SAR) arcs appear in all-sky imagers (ASIs) with fields of view that map to the L ~ 2-4 domain of the inner magnetosphere. The emission at 6300 Å is excited at ~400 km by ambient ionospheric electrons heated by conduction from the plasmapause-ring current interaction region. The plasma instruments onboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) vehicles detect electron temperature (Te) enhancements and ionospheric plasma depletions along the same SAR arc field line at ~840 km. In this study, we present the first case of a SAR arc observed from three widely-spaced ASI systems (Europe, North American, New Zealand) during the geomagnetic storm of 26-27 September 2011. Mapping the SAR arcs' latitude centers-of-emission to the geomagnetic equatorial plane provided the continuous location of the plasmapause (to × 0.1 L-value) from 18:00 UT on the 26th to 18:00 UT on the 27th. Using the lowest latitude where Te = 5000 K as the thermal marker of a SAR arc at ~840 km, DMSP satellites F15-16-17 encountered this signature 60 times within the L < 4 Re domain during the same 24-hour UT period. The average location at dusk was Ldusk = 3.1 × 0.3 Re, while at dawn Ldawn = 2.7 × 0.1 Re, in excellent agreement with the SAR arc optical locations. We thus demonstrate than plasmapause locations can be determined under cloudy sky conditions using DMSP data (but only along satellite longitudes near dawn and dusk local times), while optical imaging can give locations of the plasmpause throughout the local time night (but only regionally, and only if skies are clear).

  6. Polarization patterns of the twilight sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Thomas W.; Warrant, Eric J.; Greiner, Birgit

    2005-08-01

    Although natural light sources produce depolarized light, patterns of partially linearly polarized light appear in the sky due to scattering from air molecules, dust, and aerosols. Many animals, including bees and ants, orient themselves to patterns of polarization that are present in daytime skies, when the intensity is high and skylight polarization is strong and predictable. The halicitid bee Megalopta genalis inhabits rainforests in Central America. Unlike typical bees, it forages before sunrise and after sunset, when light intensities under the forest canopy are very low, and must find its way to food sources and return to its nest in visually challenging circumstances. An important cue for the orientation could be patterns of polarization in the twilight sky. Therefore, we used a calibrated digital camera to image skylight polarization in an overhead patch of sky, 87.6° across, before dawn on Barro Colorado Island in Panama, where the bees are found. We simultaneously measured the spectral properties of polarized light in a cloudless patch of sky 15° across centered on the zenith. We also performed full-sky imaging of polarization before dawn and after dusk on Lizard Island in Australia, another tropical island. During twilight, celestial polarized light occurs in a wide band stretching perpendicular to the location of the hidden sun and reaching typical degrees of polarization near 80% at wavelengths >600 nm. This pattern appears about 45 minutes before local sunrise or disappears 45 minutes after local sunset (about 20 minutes after the onset of astronomical twilight at dawn, or before its end at dusk) and extends with little change through the entire twilight period. Such a strong and reliable orientation cue could be used for flight orientation by any animal with polarization sensitivity that navigates during twilight.

  7. Alterations of estrous activity in the ewe by circadian-based manipulation of the endogenous pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Guerin, M V; Matthews, C D

    1998-02-01

    The timing of reproductive activity in the seasonal breeding Romney Marsh ewe depends on the measurement of photoperiodic time. In this experiment, artificial light and dark signals are provided in a measured sequence at an inappropriate time of year to induce breeding out of phase with environmental photoperiod. The endogenous circadian responses and reproductive effects are documented. One group (Group A, control) of 6 Romney Marsh ewes was held in natural photoperiod throughout the experiment. For 8 weeks centered about the winter solstice (Stage 1), an additional 18 animals (Groups B, C, and D) were exposed to an artificial earlier dawn. Measurements of endogenous melatonin performed under acutely extended darkness confirmed a phase advance of the endogenous circadian pacemaker of the suprachiasmatic nucleus compared to control animals. In Stage 2, to the summer solstice (21 December), Group B animals were returned to natural photoperiod, Group C animals were subjected to an earlier artificial dusk, and Group D animals were subjected to an artificial delayed dawn. Melatonin measurements during Stage 2 confirmed that onset and offset times for Group C were earlier and that onset and offset times for Group D were delayed compared to corresponding times for Group B animals. Ovarian activity was monitored throughout. During Stage 2, Groups C and D commenced reproductive activity in mid-spring, and this continued until the experimental conditions changed. Groups A and B commenced reproductive activity at the normal timing in the subsequent autumn. Although not exclusive, these results are consistent with a coincidence model to explain the timing of seasonal breeding in this species with a dusk-located phase of the endogenous pacemaker sensitive to both light and melatonin. The temporal relationship between circadian alterations and the environmental photoperiod warrants further investigation as an explanation for seasonal breeding. PMID:9486844

  8. Relationship of Topside Ionospheric Ion Outflows to Auroral Forms and Precipitations, Plasma Waves, and Convection Observed by POLAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirahara, M.; Horwitz, J. L.; Moore, T. E.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Peterson, W. K.; Shelley, E. G.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Scudder, J. D.; Maynard, N. C.; Mozer, F. S.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Nagai, T.

    1997-01-01

    The POLAR satellite often observes upflowing ionospheric ions (UFls) in and near the auroral oval on southern perigee (approximately 5000 km altitude) passes. We present the UFI features observed by the thermal ion dynamics experiment (TIDE) and the toroidal imaging mass-angle spectrograph (TIMAS) in the dusk-dawn sector under two different geomagnetic activity conditions in order to elicit their relationships with auroral forms, wave emissions, and convection pattern from additional POLAR instruments. During the active interval, the ultraviolet imager (UVI) observed a bright discrete aurora on the dusk side after the substorm onset and then observed a small isolated aurora form and diffuse auroras on the dawn side during the recovery phase. The UFls showed clear conic distributions when the plasma wave instrument (PWI) detected strong broadband wave emissions below approximately 10 kHz, while no significant auroral activities were observed by UVI. At higher latitudes, the low-energy UFI conics gradually changed to the polar wind component with decreasing intensity of the broadband emissions. V-shaped auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) signatures observed above approximately 200 kHz by PWI coincided with the region where the discrete aurora and the UFI beams were detected. The latitude of these features was lower than that of the UFI conics. During the observations of the UFI beams and conics, the lower-frequency fluctuations observed by the electric field instrument (EFI) were also enhanced, and the convection directions exhibited large fluctuations. It is evident that large electrostatic potential drops produced the precipitating electrons and discrete auroras, the UFI beams, and the AKR, which is also supported by the energetic plasma data from HYDRA. Since the intense broadband emissions were also observed with the UFIs. the ionospheric ions could be energized transversely before or during the parallel acceleration due to the potential drops.

  9. Reconstructing the magnetosphere from data using radial basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Varvara A.; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A.

    2016-03-01

    A new method is proposed to derive from data magnetospheric magnetic field configurations without any a priori assumptions on the geometry of electric currents. The approach utilizes large sets of archived satellite data and uses an advanced technique to represent the field as a sum of toroidal and poloidal parts, whose generating potentials Ψ1 and Ψ2 are expanded into series of radial basis functions (RBFs) with their nodes regularly distributed over the 3-D modeling domain. The method was tested by reconstructing the inner and high-latitude field within geocentric distances up to 12RE on the basis of magnetometer data of Geotail, Polar, Cluster, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and Van Allen space probes, taken during 1995-2015. Four characteristic states of the magnetosphere before and during a disturbance have been modeled: a quiet prestorm period, storm deepening phase with progressively decreasing SYM-H index, the storm maximum around the negative peak of SYM-H, and the recovery phase. Fitting the RBF model to data faithfully resolved contributions to the total magnetic field from all principal sources, including the westward and eastward ring current, the tail current, diamagnetic currents associated with the polar cusps, and the large-scale effect of the field-aligned currents. For two main phase conditions, the model field exhibited a strong dawn-dusk asymmetry of the low-latitude magnetic depression, extending to low altitudes and partly spreading sunward from the terminator plane in the dusk sector. The RBF model was found to resolve even finer details, such as the bifurcation of the innermost tail current. The method can be further developed into a powerful tool for data-based studies of the magnetospheric currents.

  10. Responses to solar cosmic rays of neutron monitors of a various design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashenyuk, E. V.; Balabin, Yu. V.; Stoker, P. H.

    The modeled and observed responses of neutron monitors of two various types: the standard 3-NM-64 and a leadless neutron moderated detector 4NMD at the SANAE South African Antarctic station during a number of large GLE events were compared to precise the specific yield of the NMD at low rigidity range. The parameters of primary relativistic solar protons outside magnetosphere: rigidity spectrum, anisotropy direction and pitch angle distribution were determined on data of the worldwide NM-64 neutron monitor network by modeling technique. The modeling included: definition of asymptotic viewing cones of the neutron monitor (NM) stations under study by the particle trajectory computations in a model magnetosphere [Tsyganenko, N.A. A model of the near magnetosphere with a down-dusk asymmetry: 1. Mathematical structure. Geophys. Res. 107(A8) 1176, doi: 10.101029/2001JA000219, 2002a; Tsyganenko, N.A. A model of the near magnetosphere with a down-dusk asymmetry: 2. Parameterization and fitting to observations. J. Geophys. Res. 107(A8) 1179, doi: 10.1029/2001JA000220, 2002b.]; calculation of the NM responses at variable primary solar proton flux parameters; determination of primary solar proton parameters outside the magnetosphere by a least square procedure at comparison of computed NM responses with observations. Then the response of both neutron monitors NM-64 and leadless NMD was calculated using the specific yield functions obtained earlier in the latitude and high-altitude survey of both instruments [Stoker, P.H. Spectra of solar proton ground level events using neutron monitor and neutron moderated detector recordings. in: Proc. 19th ICRC La Jolla, vol. 4, pp. 114-117, 1985; Stoker, P.H. Relativistic solar proton events, Space Sci. Rev. 73, 327-385, 1994.]. By fitting modeled responses to observations in a number of large GLEs the specific yield function for the NMD detector was adjusted so that it precisely described the response to solar cosmic rays.

  11. Discontinuous ammonia excretion and glutamine storage in littoral Oniscidea (Crustacea: Isopoda): testing tidal and circadian models.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maya; Wright, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    A key evolutionary development facilitating land colonization in terrestrial isopods (Isopoda: Oniscidea) is the intermittent liberation of waste nitrogen as volatile ammonia. Intermittent ammonia release exploits glutamine (Gln) as an intermediary nitrogen store. Here, we explore the relationship between temporal patterns of ammonia release and Gln accumulation in three littoral oniscideans from Southern California. Results are interpreted in terms of water availability, habitat, activity patterns, and ancestry. A two-way experimental design was used to test whether ammonia excretion and Gln accumulation follow a tidal or diel periodicity. Ammonia excretion was studied in the laboratory using chambers with or without available seawater and using an acid trap to collect volatile ammonia. Ligia occidentalis releases ammonia directly into seawater and accumulates Gln during low tide (48.9 ± 6.5 μmol g⁻¹ at low tide, 24.1 ± 3.0 μmol g⁻¹ at high tide), indicating that excretion is tidally constrained. Alloniscus perconvexus and Tylos punctatus can excrete ammonia directly into seawater or utilize volatilization. Both species burrow in sand by day and show a diel excretory pattern, accumulating Gln nocturnally (31.8 ± 2.7 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 21.8 ± 2.3 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for A. perconvexus; 85.7 ± 15.1 μmol g⁻¹ at dawn and 25.4 ± 2.9 μmol g⁻¹ at dusk for T. punctatus) and liberating ammonia diurnally. Glutaminase shows higher activity in terrestrial (0.54-0.86 U g⁻¹) compared to intertidal (0.25-0.31 U g⁻¹) species, consistent with the need to generate high PNH₃ for volatilization. The predominant isoform in Armadillidium vulgare is phosphate dependent and maleate independent; phosphate is a plausible regulator in vivo. PMID:22836297

  12. Strong IMF By-Related Plasma Convection in the Ionosphere and Cusp Field-Aligned Currents Under Northward IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Lu, G.; Strangeway, R. J.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present in this paper an investigation of IMF-By related plasma convection and cusp field-aligned currents using FAST data and AMIE model during a prolonged interval with large positive IMF By and northward Bz conditions (By/Bz much greater than 1). Using the FAST single trajectory observations to validate the global convection patterns at key times and key locations, we have demonstrated that the AMIE procedure provides a reasonably good description of plasma circulations in the ionosphere during this interval. Our results show that the plasma convection in the ionosphere is consistent with the anti-parallel merging model. When the IMF has a strongly positive By component under northward conditions, we find that the global plasma convection forms two cells oriented nearly along the Sun-earth line in the ionosphere. In the northern hemisphere, the dayside cell has clockwise convection mainly circulating within the polar cap on open field lines. A second cell with counterclockwise convection is located in the nightside circulating across the polar cap boundary, The observed two-cell convection pattern appears to be driven by the reconnection along the anti-parallel merging lines poleward of the cusp extending toward the dusk side when IMF By/Bz much greater than 1. The magnetic tension force on the newly reconnected field lines drives the plasma to move from dusk to dawn in the polar cusp region near the polar cap boundary. The field-aligned currents in the cusp region flow downward into the ionosphere. The return field-aligned currents extend into the polar cap in the center of the dayside convection cell. The field-aligned currents are closed through the Peterson currents in the ionosphere, which flow poleward from the polar cap boundary along the electric field direction.

  13. Mass Transport and Dynamics at Subauroral Latitudes During The March 17, 2013 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, P. J.; Foster, J. C.; Coster, A. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    During geomagnetic storm periods, plasmasphere erosion carries cold dense plasma of ionospheric origin in a storm-enhanced density plume, extending from dusk toward and through the noontime cusp and dayside magnetopause and back across polar latitudes in a polar tongue of ionization. The March 17, 2013 large storm provided an excellent opportunity to observe these mass transfer processes using a number of ground and in-situ sensors. We examine dusk sector (20 MLT) plasmasphere erosion during the 17 March 2013 storm (Dst ~ 130 nT) using simultaneous, magnetically aligned direct sunward ion flux observations at high altitude by Van Allen Probes RBSP-A (at ~3.0 Re) and at topside ionospheric heights (~840 km) by DMSP F-18, along with direct F region ionospheric observations using the subauroral Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar system. Plasma erosion occurs at both high and low altitudes where the subauroral polarization stream flow overlaps the outer plasmasphere. At ~20 UT, RBSP-A observed ~1.2E12 m-2 s-1 erosion flux, while DMSP F-18 observed ~2E13 m-2 s-1 sunward flux. We find close similarities at high and low altitudes between the erosion plume in both invariant latitude spatial extent and plasma characteristics. Other incoherent scatter radar facilities at Poker Flat, along with both the mainland Europe and Svalbard EISCAT radars, also have observations available during this period. We use these combined, multi-scale data sets in comparison to model predictions of SAPS, e.g. BATSRUS/RAM, OpenGGCM-RM. We will highlight successes and areas where progress is needed in the quantitative understanding of cold ionospheric origin mass flow through the geospace system and its direct impact on energy coupling to the solar wind.

  14. Climatology of the inter-hemispheric field-aligned currents system over the Nigeria ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolaji, O. S.; Rabiu, A. B.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Yumoto, K.

    2012-11-01

    Records of the declination (D) magnetic field data for the year 2009 from the Magnetic Data Acquisition System (MAGDAS) facilities at University of Ilorin were employed for this work. From the minutes value of the D-component, the deduced hourly values of the D-component (Sq(QD)) were used to estimate its diurnal (Sq(D)) values with the most five quietest days identified. The monthly mean (MSq(D)) of the most five quietest days and their seasonal (SSq(D)) variabilities were investigated. The inter-hemispheric field aligned currents (IHFACs) exhibit downward and upward inter-hemispheric field-aligned sheet current that appears as a pair at all local times of the Sq(D), MSq(D), and SSq(D) variations. From these variabilities, the IHFACs were observed to flow from the winter to summer hemisphere during noon and dusk sector and flowing in opposite direction during the dawn sector. The Sq(D) variability patterns that were observed in May, June, August September are gentle compared to the disturbed variabilities in January, February, March and November. The highest positive (˜1.7 arc-min) and negative (˜-2.7 arc min) MSq(D) maxima values were observed in August during the dawn and noon sectors respectively. These values indicated that the IHFACs flow in August is strongly southbound (positive) and northbound (negative) in the dawn and noon sectors respectively. Dusk-side IHFACs as can be observed by MAGDAS are weakly northbound in all the seasons. The direction of IHFACs does not flip at the equinoxes but in June and November and does not become largest at solstices but in August. The IHFACs was observed to exhibit longitudinal variability, which indicated that larger amplitude of winter-to-summer IHFACs is observed to be greater in June solstice (northbound/negative IHFACs) than in the December solstice (southbound/positive IHFACs) during the noon sector.

  15. Host-seeking activity and avian host preferences of mosquitoes associated with West Nile virus transmission in the northeastern U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suom, Channsotha; Ginsberg, Howard S.; Bernick, Andrew; Klein, Coby; Buckley, P.A.; Salvatore, Christa; LeBrun, Roger A.

    2010-01-01

    Mosquito host-seeking activity was studied using a custom-designed trap to explore: (1) at which time interval of the night adult mosquito abatement would be most effective, and (2) if there exists an avian-specific host-seeking preference. Overnight trials using traps baited with dry ice showed that Aedes taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) was most active at dusk and was then captured throughout the night. In contrast, Culex spp. (Cx. pipiens (Linnaeus) and Cx. restuans (Theobald) delayed most activity until about two h after dusk and were then captured through the night. This pattern suggests that management activities directed at adult Culex spp. would be most effective if initiated well after sunset. Mosquito capture rates in traps baited with birds in net bags were significantly greater than those with empty net bags, indicating that mosquitoes were attracted to the birds and not incidentally being sucked in by the custom trap's strong fan motor (Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test, n = 24, t = 30, p 2 = 0.21, p = 0.02). Trials with paired traps that contained different native bird species showed that Gray Catbirds, Dumatella carolinensis, attracted more mosquitoes than the heavier Northern Cardinals, Cardinalis cardinalis (paired samples t-test, t = 2.58, df = 7, p = 0.04). However, attractiveness did not differ substantially among bird species, and Gray Catbirds did not attract more mosquitoes than all other birds combined as a group. American Robins, Turdus migratorius (n = 4) were comparable in attractiveness to other bird species, but not enough American Robins were captured for a comprehensive study of mosquito avian preference.

  16. Effect of oral melatonin on the date of the first ovulation after ovarian inactivity in mares under artificial photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, D; Palmer, E

    1991-01-01

    Two experiments tested the hypothesis that exogenous melatonin (12 mg) given 4 h before dusk (evening melatonin), or near dawn (morning melatonin), would mimic a prolongation of the night and suppress stimulation of the ovaries induced by long days. Experiment 1 consisted of a non-stimulated control group, a control group stimulated by 14.5 h of light, a treated group stimulated with 14.5 h of light plus evening melatonin, a control group given 17.5 h of light and a treatment group given 17.5 h of light plus morning melatonin. The mean (+/- s.e.m.) intervals from the start of treatment to the first ovulation were 135 +/- 26, 68 +/- 4, 147 +/- 11, 94 +/- 6 and 107 +/- 13 days, respectively. Experiment 2 consisted of 3 groups exposed to 14.5 h of light, a control group and a morning and an evening melatonin group. The mean (+/- s.e.m.) intervals from treatment to first ovulation were 53 +/- 12, 62 +/- 8 and 101 +/- 5 days, respectively. Thus, evening melatonin suppressed the stimulatory effect of the applied light, but morning melatonin did not (P greater than 0.05). In non-treated mares, peripheral blood melatonin levels were higher at night than during the day. In the treated mares, very high plasma melatonin concentrations occurred 10-20 min after treatment and levels began to fall again immediately after this peak was reached. This decline was steeper after morning than the evening treatments. Conversely, the endogenous night-time plasma melatonin concentrations before the morning treatment were lower than the night-time levels measured in the treated animals. Two hypotheses are proposed: (a) exogenous treatment with melatonin in the morning is perceived as dusk and is followed by only approximately 5 h of high melatonin concentrations in the blood and (b) in the morning the mare is sensitive to light regardless of the presence of high levels of melatonin in her blood. PMID:1795267

  17. Observations of IMF and seasonal effects in high-latitude convection

    SciTech Connect

    Ruohoniemi, J.M.; Greenwald, R.A.

    1995-05-01

    The authors describe strong interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and seasonal effects in the convection of nightside ionospheric plasma. The findings are based on a statistical analysis of observations made with the JHU/APL HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador. For positive sign of the IMF dawn-dusk component, i.e., B{sub y}>0, the dawn cell is more crescent-shaped and the dusk cell more round while for B{sub y}<0 these pairings of size and shape are reversed. The more extreme crescent/round cell dichotomy is obtained for B{sub y}>0. The return flows associated with the crescent-shaped cell dominate at midnight MLT (Magnetic Local Time); the reversal in the zonal velocity in the 67{degrees}-69{degrees}{Lambda} (magnetic latitude) interval occurs 2 1/2 hr earlier for B{sub y}>0. The seasonal dependence of nightside convection resembles in important respects the B{sub y} dependence. Greater latitudinal velocity shears occur in the morning/afternoon sector for summer/winter and the return flow of this sector dominates at midnight. The zonal flow reversal occurs 2 1/2 hr earlier in summer than in winter. The maximum effects are obtained on the nightside for the pairings [B{sub y}>0, summer] and [B{sub y}<0, winter]; the first produces the more structured cell in the morning, the second in the evening, and this cell dominates the return flow at midnight. The difference in the zonal flow reversals for these pairings exceeds 4 hr in MLT. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Plasma Wave Measurements in Earth's Magnetosphere by Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bolton, S. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Santolik, O.; Kletzing, C.; Thorne, R. M.; Pickett, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    On October 9, 2013, Juno will fly within about 550 km of Earth in the process of executing a gravity assist on its way to its eventual arrival at Jupiter in July 2016. Since this will be the only magnetospheric plasma regime Juno will sample prior to arrival at Jupiter, it presents both engineering and scientific opportunities. One of the scientific opportunities is to make observations in the inner magnetosphere at the same time as the twin Van Allen Probes and Cluster. During the Juno flyby, which is on the dusk side at closest approach, the Van Allen Probes' apoapsis is also in the dusk sector. The Cluster orbits favor comparisons on the nightside after Juno's closest approach. Models of the radiation belts suggest that Juno will traverse both the inner and outer belts, albeit at higher latitudes than the low-inclination Van Allen Probes while the Cluster spacecraft are in a rather high inclination orbit. The Waves instrument on Juno utilizes a single electric dipole antenna and a single search coil sensor for measurements of the electric and magnetic components of plasma waves, consequently it will provide wave spectra and brief bursts of waveforms. The Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes, on the other hand makes triaxial electric and magnetic measurements of plasma waves, hence, can determine the propagation characteristics of waves such as the wave-normal angle, Poynting flux, and polarization characteristics of the waves. The Wideband Instrument on Cluster can be configured to capture single axis (electric or magnetic) waveforms at selected times to coincide with Juno and Van Allen Probes burst observations. We will compare observations of whistler-mode emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in and near the radiation belts from the vantage points of these spacecraft.

  19. Response of the incompressible ionosphere to the compression of the magnetosphere during the geomagnetic sudden commencements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Hashimoto, K. K.; Tomizawa, I.; Ebihara, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Araki, T.; Shinbori, A.; Veenadhari, B.; Tanaka, T.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2016-02-01

    The ionospheric plasma in midlatitude moves upward/downward during the geomagnetic sudden commencement causing the HF Doppler frequency changes; SCF (+ -) and (- +) on the dayside and nightside, respectively, except for the SCF (+ -) in the evening as found by Kikuchi et al. (1985). Although the preliminary and main frequency deviations (PFD, MFD) of the SCF have been attributed to the dusk-to-dawn and dawn-to-dusk potential electric fields, there still remain questions if the positive PFD can be caused by the compressional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave and what causes the evening anomaly of the SCF. With the HF Doppler sounder, we show that the dayside ionosphere moves upward toward the Sun during the main impulse (MI) of the SC, when the compressional wave is supposed to push the ionosphere downward. The motion of the ionosphere is shown to be correlated with the equatorial electrojet, matching the potential electric field transmitted with the ionospheric currents from the polar ionosphere. We confirmed that the electric field of the compressional wave is severely suppressed by the conducting ionosphere and reproduced the SC electric fields using the global MHD simulation in which the potential solver is employed. The model calculations well reproduced the preliminary impulse and MI electric fields and their evening anomaly. It is suggested that the electric potential is transmitted from the polar ionosphere to the equator by the zeroth-order transverse magnetic (TM0) mode waves in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The near-instantaneous transmission of the electric potential leads to instantaneous global response of the incompressible ionosphere.

  20. Storm time plasma transport at middle and high latitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    Associated with the large-scale enhancement of the ionospheric convection electric field during disturbed geomagnetic conditions, solar-produced F region plasma is transported to and through the noontime cleft from a source region at middle and low latitudes in the afternoon sector. As a result of the offset between the geomagnetic and geographic poles, the afternoon sector region of strong sunward convection is shifted to increasingly lower geographic latitude throughout the interval between 12 UT and 24 UT. A snowplow effect occurs in which the convection cell continually encounters fresh corotating ionospheric plasma along its equatorward edge, producing a latitudinally narrow region of storm-enhanced plasma density (SED) and increased total electron content which is advected toward higher latitudes in the noon sector. The Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar regularly observes SED as a spatially continuous, large-scale feature spanning local times between noon and midnight and at latitudes between the polar cap and its mid- or low-latitude source region. For local times away from noon, the latitude of most probable SED occurrence moves equatorward by 6[degrees] for an increase of 2 in the Kp index. During strong disturbances the topside SED is observed to be convecting sunward at [approximately]750 m s[sup [minus]1] with a flux of 10[sup 14] m[sup [minus]2] s[sup [minus]1]. This feature accounts for the pronounced enhancement of ionospheric density near dusk at middle latitudes observed during the early stages of magnetic storms (called the dusk effect) and constitutes a source for the enhanced F region plasma observed in the polar cap during disturbed conditions. 34 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The hot plasma environment at jupiter: ulysses results.

    PubMed

    Lanzerotti, L J; Armstrong, T P; Gold, R E; Anderson, K A; Krimigis, S M; Lin, R P; Pick, M; Roelof, E C; Sarris, E T; Simnett, G M; Maclennan, C G; Choo, H T; Tappin, S J

    1992-09-11

    Measurements of the hot plasma environment during the Ulysses flyby of Jupiter have revealed several new discoveries related to this large rotating astrophysical system. The Jovian magnetosphere was found by Ulysses to be very extended, with the day-side magnetopause located at approximately 105 Jupiter radii. The heavy ion (sulfur, oxygen, and sodium) population in the day-side magnetosphere increased sharply at approximately 86 Jupiter radii. This is somewhat more extended than the "inner" magnetosphere boundary region identified by the Voyager hot plasma measurements. In the day-side magnetosphere, the ion fluxes have the anisotropy direction expected for corotation with the planet, with the magnitude of the anisotropy increasing when the spacecraft becomes more immersed in the hot plasma sheet. The relative abundances of sulfur, oxygen, and sodium to helium decreased somewhat with decreasing radial distance from the planet on the day-side, which suggests that the abundances of the Jupiter-derived species are dependent on latitude. In the dusk-side, high-latitude region, intense fluxes of counter-streaming ions and electrons were discovered from the edge of the plasma sheet to the dusk-side magnetopause. These beams of electrons and ions were found to be very tightly aligned with the magnetic field and to be superimposed on a time- and space-variable isotropic hot plasma background. The currents carried by the measured hot plasma particles are typically approximately 1.6 x 10(-4) microamperes per square meter or approximately 8 x 10(5) amperes per squared Jupiter radius throughout the high-latitude magnetosphere volume. It is likely that the intense particle beams discovered at high Jovian latitudes produce auroras in the polar caps of the planet. PMID:17776161

  2. Plasmaspheric hiss properties: Observations from Polar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Falkowski, Barbara J.; Pickett, Jolene S.; Santolik, Ondrej; Lakhina, Gurbax S.

    2015-01-01

    the region between L = 2 to 7 at all Magnetic Local Time (MLTs) plasmaspheric hiss was detected 32% of the time. In the limited region of L = 3 to 6 and 15 to 21 MLT (dusk sector), the wave percentage detection was the highest (51%). The latter plasmaspheric hiss is most likely due to energetic ~10-100 keV electrons drifting into the dusk plasmaspheric bulge region. On average, plasmaspheric hiss intensities are an order of magnitude larger on the dayside than on the nightside. Plasmaspheric hiss intensities are considerably more intense and coherent during high-solar wind ram pressure intervals. A hypothesis for this is generation of dayside chorus by adiabatic compression of preexisting 10-100 keV outer magnetospheric electrons in minimum B pockets plus chorus propagation into the plasmasphere. In large solar wind pressure events, it is hypothesized that plasmaspheric hiss can also be generated inside the plasmasphere. These new generation mechanism possibilities are in addition to the well-established mechanism of plasmaspheric hiss generation during substorms and storms. Plasmaspheric hiss under ordinary conditions is of low coherency, with small pockets of several cycles of coherent waves. During high-solar wind ram pressure intervals (positive SYM-H intervals), plasmaspheric hiss and large L hiss can have higher intensities and be coherent. Plasmaspheric hiss in these cases is typically found to be propagating obliquely to the ambient magnetic field with θkB0 ~30° to 40°. Hiss detected at large L has large amplitudes (~0.2 nT) and propagates obliquely to the ambient magnetic field (θkB0 ~70°) with 2:1 ellipticity ratios. A series of schematics for plasmaspheric hiss generation is presented.

  3. Plasmaspheric Hiss Properties: Observations from Polar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Falkowski, Barbara; Pickett, Jolene; Santolik, Ondrej; Lakhina, Gurbax

    2015-04-01

    In the region between L = 2 to 7 at all MLTs, plasmaspheric hiss was detected 32% of the time. In the limited region of L = 3 to 6 and 15 to 21 MLT (dusk sector), the wave percentage detection was the highest (51%). The latter plasmaspheric hiss is most likely due to energetic ~10-100 keV electrons drifting into the dusk plasmaspheric bulge region. On average plasmaspheric hiss intensities are an order of magnitude larger on the dayside than on the nightside. Plasmaspheric hiss intensities are considerably more intense and coherent during high solar wind ram pressure intervals. A hypothesis for this is generation of dayside chorus by adiabatic compression of preexisting 10-100 keV outer magnetospheric electrons in minimum B pockets plus chorus propagation into the plasmasphere. In large solar wind pressure events, it is hypothesized that plasmaspheric hiss can also be generated inside the plasmasphere as well. These new generation mechanism possibilities are in addition to the well-established mechanism of plasmaspheric hiss generation during substorms and storms. Plasmaspheric hiss under ordinary conditions is of low coherency, with small pockets of several cycles of coherent waves. During high solar wind ram pressure intervals (positive SYM-H intervals, plasmaspheric hiss and large L hiss can have higher intensities and be coherent. Plasmaspheric hiss in these cases is typically found to be propagating obliquely to the ambient magnetic field with θkB0 ~30° to 40°. Hiss detected at large L has large amplitudes (~0.2 nT) and propagates obliquely to the ambient magnetic field (θkB0 ~70°) with 2:1 ellipticity ratios. A series of schematics for plasmaspheric hiss generation is presented.

  4. Development of a monitoring system to record the activity patterns in juvenile Japanese spiny lobsters, Panulirus japonicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Yoshitaka; Norman, Christopher Paul; Nuka, Toshimitsu; Nagata, Yutaka

    A preliminary study of the effectiveness of an infrared monitoring system to detect the timing of exit and re-entry to a hole used as a daytime refuge by an individual juvenile P. japonicus was carried out at the Kominato Marine Biosystems Research Center of Chiba University. The monitoring system consisted of the infrared beam source and sensor which were attached to either side of the hole and connected by a 5 m cable to an external exchangeable battery and data logger. For a six day period (25th September to 1st October, 1998) clear activity patterns were observed for an individual lobster (ca. 120 mm total length) showing that the nocturnal foraging pattern of the individual lobster had a high degree of variation in both the duration of foraging (between ca. 1 to 4 hrs) and the period remaining in the hole during the night. The sensor showed high levels of response especially around dusk and dawn when we conclude that the lobster was near to the entrance of the hole and also intermittent peaks during the night when the lobster emerged to forage and then returned. In summary, the lobster remained in its hole during the day and moved to the entrance of the hole at dusk observed before emerging to forage and then returned to the hole at intermittent periods during the night. We conclude that the possession of a suitable hole and its defense from conspecifics may be a key factor, along with prey availability, determining the duration of foraging behavior and that the infrared system is highly effective for monitoring the movement patterns of juvenile lobsters.

  5. A comparison of 2 techniques for estimating deer density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    We applied mark-resight and area-conversion methods to estimate deer abundance at a 2,862-ha area in and surrounding the Gettysburg National Military Park and Eisenhower National Historic Site during 1987-1991. One observer in each of 11 compartments counted marked and unmarked deer during 65-75 minutes at dusk during 3 counts in each of April and November. Use of radio-collars and vinyl collars provided a complete inventory of marked deer in the population prior to the counts. We sighted 54% of the marked deer during April 1987 and 1988, and 43% of the marked deer during November 1987 and 1988. Mean number of deer counted increased from 427 in April 1987 to 582 in April 1991, and increased from 467 in November 1987 to 662 in November 1990. Herd size during April, based on the mark-resight method, increased from approximately 700-1,400 from 1987-1991, whereas the estimates for November indicated an increase from 983 for 1987 to 1,592 for 1990. Given the large proportion of open area and the extensive road system throughout the study area, we concluded that the sighting probability for marked and unmarked deer was fairly similar. We believe that the mark-resight method was better suited to our study than the area-conversion method because deer were not evenly distributed between areas suitable and unsuitable for sighting within open and forested areas. The assumption of equal distribution is required by the area-conversion method. Deer marked for the mark-resight method also helped reduce double counting during the dusk surveys.

  6. Kelvin Helmholtz Instability at the Equatorial Magnetotail Boundary: MHD Simulation and Comparison with Geotail Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, Donald H.; Otto, A.

    1999-01-01

    On March 24, 1995 the Geotail spacecraft observed large fluctuations of the magnetic field and plasma properties in the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL) about 15 R(sub E) tailward of the dusk meridian. Although the magnetospheric and the magnetosheath field were strongly northward, the B(sub z) component showed strong short duration fluctuations in which B(sub z) could even reach negative values. We have used two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with magnetospheric and magnetosheath input parameters specifically chosen for this. Geotail event to identify the processes which cause the observed boundary properties. It is shown that these fluctuations can be explained by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability if the k vector of the instability has a component along the magnetic field direction. The simulation results show many of the characteristic properties of the Geotail observations. In particular, the quasi-periodic strong fluctuations are well explained by satellite crossings through the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. It is illustrated how the interior structure of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices leads to the rapid fluctuations in the Geotail observations. Our results suggest an average Kelvin-Helmholtz wavelength of about 5 R(sub E) with a vortex size of close to 2 R(sub E) for an average repetition time of 2.5 minutes. The growth time for these waves implies a source region of about 10 to 16 R(sub E) upstream from the location of the Geotail spacecraft (i.e., near the dusk meridian). The results also indicate a considerable mass transport of magnetosheath material into the magnetosphere by magnetic reconnection in the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  7. Local time distribution of the SSC-associated HF-Doppler frequency shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Sugiuchi, H.; Ishimine, T.

    1985-01-01

    The HF-Doppler frequency shift observed at the storm's sudden commencement is composed of a frequency increase (+) and decrease (-), and classified into four types, SCF(+ -), SCF(- +), SCF(+) and SCF(-). Since the latter two types are special cases of the former two types, two different kinds of electrical field exist in the F region and cause the ExB drift motion of plasma. HUANG (1976) interpreted the frequency increase of SCF(+ -) as due to the westward induction electric field proportional to delta H/ delta t and the succeeding frequency decrease due to the eastward conduction electric field which produces ionospheric currents responsible for the magnetic increase on the ground. In spite of his success in interpreting the SCF(+ -), some other interpretations are needed for the explanation of the whole set of SCF's, particularly SCF(- +). Local time distributions of the SCF's are derived from 41 SCF's which are observed on the HF standard signal (JJY) as received in Okinawa (path length =1600 km) and Kokubunji (60 km). It is shown that the SCF(+ -) appears mainly during the day, whereas the SCF(- +) is observed during the night. The results indicate that the preliminary frequency shift (+) of SCF(+ -) and (-) of SCF(- +) is caused by a westward electric field in the dayside hemisphere, while by an eastward electric field in the nightside hemisphere. The main frequency shift (-) of SCF(+ -) and (+) of SCF(- +) is caused by the reversed electric field. Consequently, the preliminary frequency shift is caused by the dusk-to-dawn electric field, while the main frequency shift by the dawn-to-dusk electric field.

  8. Pi2 modulation of aurora as observed by all-sky TV image and magnetometers on board two geosynchronous satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saka, O.; Hayashi, K.

    2007-12-01

    We analyzed the auroral event of January 24 1986 using all-sky TV images and magnetometer data from two geosynchronous satellites (Goes5 and Goes6) separated by 2 hours of local time. From those analyses we found that poleward expansion of aurora following the auroral onset by 1 min was accompanied by surface waves excited in the midnight sector. The surface waves demonstrated out-of-phase relation in the D component (dipole east) and in-phase relation in the V component (radial outward) at GOES5 and GOES6 meridians, respectively. The oscillations in V-D plane led to CCW polarizations in the dawn side of aurora and CW polarizations in the dusk side. Simultaneous observations of those polarization patterns by ground magnetometers in auroral zone suggested an FLR structure in the midnight magnetosphere. We found that auroras ignited between GOES5 and GOES6 meridians were intensified when the largest eastward and westward bending of field lines occurred in the dawn and dusk side of aurora. The latitudinal extent of auroral modulations by surface waves expanded in geomagnetic latitudes up to 70N. Surface waves excited in the midnight magnetosphere might act as possible wave energy sources for auroral acceleration regions in lower altitudes. Those surface waves may also be a driving source of slow shock that supplies kinetic energies (bulk plasma flow) directly to the acceleration regions. A slow shock model based on double adiabatic equations of state was constructed. This theoretical model showed that although slow shock cannot carry particles having pitch angle distributions that are peaked perpendicular to the field lines, slow shock carry particles having isotropic pitch angle distributions. It is supposed that magnetic mirror force is responsible for this effect.

  9. Specification of the Occurrence of Equatorial Ionospheric Scintillations During the Main Phase of the Early Magnetic Storms Within Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.; Groves, K. M.; Roddy, P. A.; MacKenzie, E.

    2010-12-01

    Two moderate magnetic storms with their Dst minima on the order of -75nt were observed during the rising phase of solar cycle 24 in 2010. Earlier these authors had shown with a statistical study for solar cycle 23 that during large magnetic storms with Dst < -100nT and dDst/dt >50nt/hour, scintillations and plasma bubbles occur over a specific longitude sector for which the evening period corresponds to the time interval of the main phase of storms (S. Basu et al., Radio Science, 2010, in press). This was attributed to the penetration of the high latitude electric field to the magnetic equator which enhanced the rise in the F-region at dusk thereby generating the instability that give rise to plasma bubbles. This result overrides the climatological pattern of quiet-time variation of scintillation with longitude and season that shows an equinoctial maximum at all longitudes, a maximum in the December solstice over the African/American sector and a maximum in the June solstice over the Pacific sector. The scintillations observed for the magnetic storms during solar cycle 24 did not require a large rate of change of the Dst index leading to the implication that smaller electric field perturbations were sufficient to destabilize the ionosphere which has been cooled and contracted by the unusually long and quiet current sunspot phase. We will present two storms, one of which perturbs the SCINDA sites in the African/American sector and the other one which perturbs the Pacific sector sites, both at dusk. The outstanding addition to our study in this case is the availability of the perigee orbits of the in-situ C/NOFS data allowing the tracking of the plasma bubbles in space in the development of these storms.

  10. Photostimulation of Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Molino, A B; Garcia, E A; Santos, G C; Vieira Filho, J A; Baldo, G A A; Almeida Paz, I C L

    2015-02-01

    To adapt commercial poultry production to a new scenario of energy savings and to develop specific practices for quail production aimed at reducing costs while maintaining or improving productivity, four experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, birds were allocated to four treatments (photoperiod duration): T1: 14 L:10 D; T2: 15 L:9 D; T3: 16 L:8 D; and T4: 17 L:7 D. In the second experiment, birds were subjected to four levels of brightness: T1: 5 lux; T2: 10 lux; T3:15 lux; and T4: 22 lux (control). In the third experiment, four types of lamps were evaluated: T1: compact fluorescent lamp (color temperature: 6,500 K); T2: compact fluorescent lamp (color temperature: 2,700 K); T3: incandescent lamp; and T4: yellow LED. In the last experiment, four lighting programs were compared: T1: continuous program (control), in which there was a single photoperiod of 15 h; the other treatments consisted of intermittent lighting programs, as follows: T2: 1 h of light provided 1 h after dusk; T3: 1 h of light provided 2 h before dawn; T4: half an hour of light provided 1 h after dusk and half an hour of light provided 1.5 h before dawn. In each experiment, 1,296 Japanese quail were evaluated for four 28-d cycles, totaling 112 experimental days. A completely randomized experimental design of 4 treatments with 12 replicates of 27 birds each was applied in all trials. Performance and egg quality were evaluated in each experiment. Higher egg production and adequate egg quality, as well as energy savings, can be obtained with Japanese quail using compact fluorescent lamps or LEDs and a photoperiod of 15 h/d supplied using an intermittent lighting program, with 1 h of artificial light 2 h before dawn at a brightness of 5 lux. PMID:25589080

  11. Spatial Dynamics and Expanded Vertical Niche of Blue Sharks in Oceanographic Fronts Reveal Habitat Targets for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E.; Noble, Leslie R.; Santos, António M.; Sims, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic population declines among species of pelagic shark as a result of overfishing have been reported, with some species now at a fraction of their historical biomass. Advanced telemetry techniques enable tracking of spatial dynamics and behaviour, providing fundamental information on habitat preferences of threatened species to aid conservation. We tracked movements of the highest pelagic fisheries by-catch species, the blue shark Prionace glauca, in the North-east Atlantic using pop-off satellite-linked archival tags to determine the degree of space use linked to habitat and to examine vertical niche. Overall, blue sharks moved south-west of tagging sites (English Channel; southern Portugal), exhibiting pronounced site fidelity correlated with localized productive frontal areas, with estimated space-use patterns being significantly different from that of random walks. Tracked female sharks displayed behavioural variability in diel depth preferences, both within and between individuals. Diel depth use ranged from normal DVM (nDVM; dawn descent, dusk ascent), to reverse DVM (rDVM; dawn ascent, dusk descent), to behavioural patterns where no diel differences were apparent. Results showed that blue sharks occupy some of the most productive marine zones for extended periods and structure diel activity patterns across multiple spatio-temporal scales in response to particular habitat types. In so doing, sharks occupied an extraordinarily broad vertical depth range for their size (1.0–2.0 m fork length), from the surface into the bathypelagic realm (max. dive depth, 1160 m). The space-use patterns of blue sharks indicated they spend much of the time in areas where pelagic longlining activities are often highest, and in depth zones where these fisheries particularly target other species, which could account for the rapid declines recently reported for blue sharks in many parts of the world's oceans. Our results provide habitat targets for blue shark conservation

  12. Global modeling of Pc5 ULF Wave Activity and Relativistic Electron Dynamics following a Large Geomagnetic Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeling, A. W.; Rankin, R.; Khazanov, G. V.; Rae, I. J.

    2008-12-01

    Ground-based observations during an interval of narrow-band ULF activity following a geomagnetic storm on November 25, 2001 are used to constrain the temporal and spatial characteristics of waves produced by a global model for ULF waves in the magnetosphere. This event is characterized by a long interval of high solar wind speed, and a strong field line resonance (FLR) localized to the local dusk sector. Both Polar and Cluster satellite observations during the interval of interest indicate that MHD fast waves produced by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability along the dusk magnetopause flank are the likely source of wave power for the FLR. Based on this interpretation, an anti-sunward propagating ULF wave source is prescribed along the magnetopause boundary of the ULF wave model. The model is constrained by adjusting parameters that specify the source power distribution and bandwidth to improve local comparisons between the model output and observed time-series for field lines mapping to ground-based magnetometer stations. In order to assess the effects of these ULF waves on the relativistic electron population within the magnetosphere, the output from the ULF wave model is used to provide a time dependent magnetic field input for the bounce-averaged electron dynamics model developed by M-C Fok. This model computes the non-diffusive transport of electron phase space density (PSD) due to electrostatic and electromagnetic perturbations, assuming initial and outer boundary conditions for PSD that are dependent on solar wind parameters. The first results of this study will be presented.

  13. Magnetic reconnection, buoyancy, and flapping motions in magnetotail explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Merkin, V. G.; Swisdak, M.; Motoba, T.; Buzulukova, N.; Moore, T. E.; Mauk, B. H.; Ohtani, S.

    2014-09-01

    A key process in the interaction of magnetospheres with the solar wind is the explosive release of energy stored in the magnetotail. Based on observational evidence, magnetic reconnection is widely believed to be responsible. However, the very possibility of spontaneous reconnection in collisionless magnetotail plasmas has been questioned in kinetic theory for more than three decades. In addition, in situ observations by multispacecraft missions (e.g., THEMIS) reveal the development of buoyancy and flapping motions coexisting with reconnection. Never before have kinetic simulations reproduced all three primary modes in realistic 2-D configurations with a finite normal magnetic field. Moreover, 3-D simulations with closed boundaries suggest that the tail activity is dominated by buoyancy-driven instabilities, whereas reconnection is a secondary effect strongly localized in the dawn-dusk direction. In this paper, we use massively parallel 3-D fully kinetic simulations with open boundaries to show that sufficiently far from the planet explosive processes in the tail are dominated by reconnection motions. These motions occur in the form of spontaneously generated dipolarization fronts accompanied by changes in magnetic topology which extend in the dawn-dusk direction over the size of the simulation box, suggesting that reconnection onset causes a macroscale reconfiguration of the real magnetotail. In our simulations, buoyancy and flapping motions significantly disturb the primary dipolarization front but neither destroy it nor change the near 2-D picture of the front evolution critically. Consistent with recent multiprobe observations, dipolarization fronts are also found to be the main regions of energy conversion in the magnetotail.

  14. The Use of Automated Bioacoustic Recorders to Replace Human Wildlife Surveys: An Example Using Nightjars

    PubMed Central

    Zwart, Mieke C.; Baker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    To be able to monitor and protect endangered species, we need accurate information on their numbers and where they live. Survey methods using automated bioacoustic recorders offer significant promise, especially for species whose behaviour or ecology reduces their detectability during traditional surveys, such as the European nightjar. In this study we examined the utility of automated bioacoustic recorders and the associated classification software as a way to survey for wildlife, using the nightjar as an example. We compared traditional human surveys with results obtained from bioacoustic recorders. When we compared these two methods using the recordings made at the same time as the human surveys, we found that recorders were better at detecting nightjars. However, in practice fieldworkers are likely to deploy recorders for extended periods to make best use of them. Our comparison of this practical approach with human surveys revealed that recorders were significantly better at detecting nightjars than human surveyors: recorders detected nightjars during 19 of 22 survey periods, while surveyors detected nightjars on only six of these occasions. In addition, there was no correlation between the amount of vocalisation captured by the acoustic recorders and the abundance of nightjars as recorded by human surveyors. The data obtained from the recorders revealed that nightjars were most active just before dawn and just after dusk, and least active during the middle of the night. As a result, we found that recording at both dusk and dawn or only at dawn would give reasonably high levels of detection while significantly reducing recording time, preserving battery life. Our analyses suggest that automated bioacoustic recorders could increase the detection of other species, particularly those that are known to be difficult to detect using traditional survey methods. The accuracy of detection is especially important when the data are used to inform conservation. PMID

  15. Spatial dynamics and expanded vertical niche of blue sharks in oceanographic fronts reveal habitat targets for conservation.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Nuno; Humphries, Nicolas E; Noble, Leslie R; Santos, António M; Sims, David W

    2012-01-01

    Dramatic population declines among species of pelagic shark as a result of overfishing have been reported, with some species now at a fraction of their historical biomass. Advanced telemetry techniques enable tracking of spatial dynamics and behaviour, providing fundamental information on habitat preferences of threatened species to aid conservation. We tracked movements of the highest pelagic fisheries by-catch species, the blue shark Prionace glauca, in the North-east Atlantic using pop-off satellite-linked archival tags to determine the degree of space use linked to habitat and to examine vertical niche. Overall, blue sharks moved south-west of tagging sites (English Channel; southern Portugal), exhibiting pronounced site fidelity correlated with localized productive frontal areas, with estimated space-use patterns being significantly different from that of random walks. Tracked female sharks displayed behavioural variability in diel depth preferences, both within and between individuals. Diel depth use ranged from normal DVM (nDVM; dawn descent, dusk ascent), to reverse DVM (rDVM; dawn ascent, dusk descent), to behavioural patterns where no diel differences were apparent. Results showed that blue sharks occupy some of the most productive marine zones for extended periods and structure diel activity patterns across multiple spatio-temporal scales in response to particular habitat types. In so doing, sharks occupied an extraordinarily broad vertical depth range for their size (1.0-2.0 m fork length), from the surface into the bathypelagic realm (max. dive depth, 1160 m). The space-use patterns of blue sharks indicated they spend much of the time in areas where pelagic longlining activities are often highest, and in depth zones where these fisheries particularly target other species, which could account for the rapid declines recently reported for blue sharks in many parts of the world's oceans. Our results provide habitat targets for blue shark conservation that

  16. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6 inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as sub auroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at sub auroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST -5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  17. Observations of Field Line Resonances by Low-Altitude ST-5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) mission is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pe 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2- 3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  18. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this study, we use the in-situ magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) currents. During the three-month duration of the ST5 mission, geomagnetic conditions range from quiet to moderately active. We find that the R1 current intensity is consistently stronger than the R2 current intensity both for the dawnside and the duskside large-scale field-aligned current system. The net currents flowing into (out of) the ionosphere in the dawnside (duskside) are in the order of 5% of the total RI currents. We also find that the net currents flowing into or out of the ionosphere are controlled by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the same way as the field-aligned currents themselves are. Since the net currents due to the imbalance of the R1 and R2 currents require that their closure currents flow across the polar cap from dawn to dusk as Pedersen currents, our results indicate that the total amount of the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents is in the order of approx. 0.1 MA. This study, although with a very limited dataset, is one of the first attempts to quantify the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. Given the importance of the Joule heating due to Pedersen currents to the high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, quantifying the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents and associated Joule heating is needed for developing models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  19. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology Five Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth s rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft s dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  20. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6 degree inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at sub auroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that these unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  1. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-altitude ST-5 Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6° inclination angle. Even though the spacecraft are in a high-inclination orbit, the combined effects of the Earth’s rotation and dipole tilt allow the spacecraft’s dawn-dusk orbit track to reach subauroral latitudes on the day side. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations of the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are around 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. Coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact high azimuthal wave number Pc 4-5 waves Doppler-shifted to higher frequencies by the rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. These unique low altitude observations, where the spacecraft motion is mainly azimuthal at subauroral latitudes, reveal the azimuthal wave-number characteristics of the field-aligned resonance signals.

  2. Observations of a Unique Type of ULF Waves by Low-Latitude Space Technology 5 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6deg inclination angle. Due to the Earth s rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft s dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  3. Observations of a unique type of ULF waves by low-altitude ST-5 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P.-J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Slavin, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    We report a unique type of ULF waves observed by low-altitude Space Technology 5 (ST-5) constellation mission. ST-5 is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, and sun synchronous polar orbit with 105.6° inclination angle. Due to the Earth's rotation and the dipole tilt effect, the spacecraft's dawn-dusk orbit track can reach as low as subauroral latitudes during the course of a day. Whenever the spacecraft traverse across the dayside closed field line region at subauroral latitudes, they frequently observe strong transverse oscillations at 30-200 mHz, or in the Pc 2-3 frequency range. These Pc 2-3 waves appear as wave packets with durations in the order of 5-10 minutes. As the maximum separations of the ST-5 spacecraft are in the order of 10 minutes, the three ST-5 satellites often observe very similar wave packets, implying these wave oscillations occur in a localized region. The coordinated ground-based magnetic observations at the spacecraft footprints, however, do not see waves in the Pc 2-3 band; instead, the waves appear to be the common Pc 4-5 waves associated with field line resonances. We suggest that this unique Pc 2-3 waves seen by ST-5 are in fact the Doppler-shifted Pc 4-5 waves as a result of rapid traverse of the spacecraft across the resonant field lines azimuthally at low altitudes. The observations with the unique spacecraft dawn-disk orbits at proper altitudes and magnetic latitudes reveal the azimuthal characteristics of field-aligned resonances.

  4. Is Substorm Onset Seeded by Cross-Tail Current Enhancement Resulting from Parallel Energization of Oxygen Ion Polar Cap Outflow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofko, G. J.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    The parallel energization of polar cap outflow (PCO) has been shown to be highly effective along newly-created lobe lines where the geometry is such that the Coulomb force due to the dawn-to-dusk electric field is roughly parallel to the curvature drift of the ions. This "Coulomb-curvature" interaction can produce a parallel energization rate that raises the parallel energy of the ions to about 5-6 keV before they reach the Neutral Sheet (NSh) at about 11 earth radii downtail. Then, in the outer NSh, they produce a strong westward curvature current. When they enter the inner neutral sheet (INSh) where they become "unmagnetized", they are accelerated westward by the dawn-dusk electric field. This causes their perpendicular energy and their pitch angle to increase such that the ions essentially become trapped in the inner NSh while continuing to accelerate westward. This additional westward current in the inner NSh accompanies the westward curvature current produced in the two outer NSh layers. This total ion current is supplemented by the westward curvature current caused by the eastward curvature drift of the electrons. The combined total ion and electron current is sufficient to severely decrease the magnetic field near the earthward end of the NSh. The magnetic pressure decrease is compensated by the particle pressure increase due to inflow of oxygen ions from the northern and southern polar caps. The conditions near the earthward edge of the NSh and in the adjoining plasmasheet regions neighbouring the NSh become ideal for reconnection and the dipolarization that follows.

  5. Seasonal abundance & role of predominant Japanese encephalitis vectors Culex tritaeniorhynchus & Cx. gelidus Theobald in Cuddalore district, Tamil Nadu

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, D.; Muniaraj, M.; Samuel, P. Philip; Thenmozhi, V.; Venkatesh, A.; Nagaraj, J.; Tyagi, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. The first major JE outbreak occurred in 1978 and since 1981 several outbreaks had been reported in the Cuddalore district (erstwhile South Arcot), Tamil Nadu, India. Entomological monitoring was carried out during January 2010 - March 2013, to determine the seasonal abundance and transmission dynamics of the vectors of JE virus, with emphasis on the role of Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus. Methods: Mosquito collections were carried out fortnightly during dusk hours in three villages viz. Soundara Solapuram, Pennadam, Erappavur of Cuddalore district. Mosquitoes were collected during dusk for a period of one hour in and around the cattle sheds using oral aspirator and torch light. The collected mosquitoes were later identified and pooled to detect JE virus (JEV) infection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: A total of 46,343 mosquitoes comprising of 25 species and six genera were collected. Species composition included viz, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus (46.26%), Cx. gelidus (43.12%) and other species (10.62%). A total of 17,678 specimens (403 pools) of Cx. gelidus and 14,358 specimens (309 pools) of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus were tested, of which 12 pools of Cx. gelidus and 14 pools of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus were positive for JE virus antigen. The climatic factors were negatively correlated with minimum infection rate (MIR) for both the species, except mean temperature (P<0.05) for Cx. gelidus. Interpretation & conclusions: High abundance of Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. gelidus was observed compared to other mosquito species in the study area. Detection of JEV antigen in the two species confirmed the maintenance of virus. Appropriate vector control measures need to be taken to reduce the vector abundance. PMID:26905238

  6. Short-Term Regulation of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Activity in a Tropical Hemiepiphyte, Clusia uvitana.

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, G.; Winter, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diel courses of net CO2 exchange of leaves were studied in Clusia uvitana (Clusiaceae), a tropical Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) hemiepiphyte, growing in the crown of a 47-m tall kapok tree on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Measurements on days without precipitation showed that net uptake of atmospheric CO2 occurred at night, a feature of CAM, as well as in the early morning and late afternoon. During 36 h of almost continuous rainfall, nocturnal net CO2 uptake was abolished and the diel pattern of net CO2 exchange became similar to that of a C3 plant. Exposing well-watered, potted plants of Clusia in the laboratory to temperatures and photosynthetic photon flux densities similar to those during the tropical rainstorm also abolished nocturnal net CO2 uptake. In contrast, Kalanchoe pinnata (Crassulaceae), an obligate CAM plant, still showed net CO2 dark fixation following the same low-light and moderate-temperature conditions, albeit at decreased rates. During these 12-h photoperiods, titratable acidity in Clusia increased slightly above its high level measured at the end of the previous dark period, whereas in Kalanchoe, the acid content decreased by about 40%. A survey among outer canopy leaves of Clusia on Barro Colorado Island showed that leaves that exhibited little or no nocturnal acidification maintained high levels of H+ at dawn and dusk. Progressively lower levels of H+ at dusk were accompanied by progressively higher nocturnal increases in H+. The data suggest that in C. uvitana the rapid switching between CAM- and C3-type carbon fixation that may occur within 24 h in response to environmental changes is controlled by the acidity status of the leaves in the light. Nocturnal CO2 fixation is enhanced by conditions that decrease the organic acid content during the light period. PMID:12231870

  7. Hemispheric asymmetries of the Venus plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Dyadechkin, S.

    2013-07-01

    We study the Venus-solar wind interaction and the hemispheric asymmetries of the Venus plasma environment in the global HYB-Venus hybrid simulation. We concentrate especially on the role of the flow-aligned interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) component (i.e., the Parker spiral angle or the IMF cone angle) and analyze the dawn-dusk and Esw asymmetries between four magnetic quadrants around Venus. Using the simulation model, we study two upstream condition cases in detail: the perpendicular IMF to the solar wind flow case and the nominal Parker spiral case (dominant flow-aligned IMF component). Several differences and similarities were found in these two simulation runs. Common features of the Venus plasma environment between the two cases include asymmetric magnetic barrier and tail lobes and asymmetric planetary ion escape in the direction of the solar wind convection electric field. Further, protons of planetary origin and of solar wind origin were found to follow similar velocity patterns in the Venus plasma wake in both cases. The differences when the IMF flow-aligned component is dominating compared to the perpendicular IMF case, the so-called (magnetic) dawn-dusk asymmetries, include the parallel bow shock and the foreshock region, the asymmetric magnetic barrier, the asymmetric tail current system, and the asymmetric central tail current sheet. Further, the escaping planetary H+ and O+ ion fluxes are concentrated more on the hemisphere of the parallel bow shock. When interpreting in situ plasma and magnetic observations from Venus, the features of at least these two basic IMF configurations should be considered.

  8. Interplanetary magnetic field dependency of stable Sun-aligned polar cap arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valladares, C. E.; Carlson, H. C., Jr.; Fukui, K.

    1994-01-01

    This is the first analysis, using a statistically significant data set, of the morphological dependence of the presence, orientation, and motion of stable sun-aligned polar cap arcs upon the vector interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). For the one winter season analyzed we had 1392 all-sky 630.0-nm images of 2-min resolution containing a total of 150 polar cap arcs, all with corresponding values of the IMF as measured by International Monitoring Platform (IMP) 8 or International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) 2. After demonstrating an unbiased data set with smooth normal distributions of events versus the dimensions of time, space, and IMF component, we examine IMF dependencies of the properties of the optical arcs. A well-defined dependence for B(sub z) is found for the presence/absence of stable Sun-aligned polar cap arcs. Consistent with previous statistical studies, the probability of observing polar cap aurora steadily increases for larger positive values of B(sub z), and linearly decreases when B(sub z) becomes more negative. The probability of observing Sun-aligned arcs within the polar cap is determined to vary sharply as a function of the arc location; arcs were observed 40% of the time on the dawnside and only 10% on the duskside. This implies an overall probability of at least 40% for the whole polar cap. 20% of the arcs were observed during 'southward IMF conditions,' but in fact under closer inspection were found to have been formed under northward IMF conditions; these 'residual' positive B(sub z) arcs ha d a delayed residence time in the polar cap of about what would be expected after a north to south transition of B(sub z). A firm dependence on B(sub y) is also found for both the orientation and the dawn-dusk direction of motion of the arcs. All the arcs are Sun-aligned to a first approximation, but present deviations from this orientation, depending primarily upon the location of the arc in corrected geomagnetic (CG) coordinates. The arcs populating the

  9. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Leaves of C3 Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon isotope composition is regarded as a powerful tool in understanding carbon cycling, both as a tracer and as a process recorder. However, accurate predictions of, for example, partitioning the net carbon flux into its components or obtaining climate information from tree rings, requires a good understanding of plant metabolism and related isotopic fractionations. Mechanistic models have concentrated largely on photosynthetic pathways and their isotopic composition. This cannot be said for respiratory processes. The mechanistic models of leaf isotope discrimination hence do not describe dawn, dusk and night very realistically or not at all. A new steady-state approach of the carbon isotope distribution in glucose potentially addresses the time of twilight and night (Tcherkez et al. 2004). Here, a new model of 13C discrimination in leaves of C3 plants is presented. The model is based on the steady-state approach of Tcherkez et al. (2004) but with much reduced complexity while retaining its general characteristics. In addition, the model introduces some new concepts such as a day-length dependent starch synthesis, night-length dependent starch degradation, energy-driven biosynthesis rates, and continuous leaf discrimination calculation for the whole diel cycle. It is therefore well adapted for biosphere-atmosphere exchange studies. The model predicts enriched sucrose and starch pools in the leaf compared to assimilated CO2. Biosynthesis on the other hand acts as the sink of the remaining, depleted carbon. The model calculates slightly different absolute starch compositions from the Tcherkez et al. (2004) model but this depends on chosen fractionation factors. The greatest difference between the two models is during dawn, dusk and night. For example, while Tcherkez et al. has changing phloem sucrose isotope composition during night, the model here predicts constant sucrose export composition. Observations seem to support rather constant phloem isotope composition

  10. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee; Vervack, Ronald J.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Sprague, Ann L.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere comprised of atomic species including hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and likely oxygen. Because it is collisionless. the exosphere's composition represents a balance of the active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface. Space ENvironment. GEochemistry. and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data has been the substantial differences in the spatial distribution of each species, Our modeling demonstrates that these differences cannot be due to post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure. but instead point to differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry. with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere significantly greater than over the dusk. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced in a molecular exosphere (e.g., one consisting of CaO). Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Preliminary results suggest a high temperature ( I-2x 10(exp 4) K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. The high temperature is consistent with the dissociation of CaO in a near-surface exosphere with scale height <= 100 km, which imparts 2 eV to the freshly produced Ca atom. This

  11. Variation of The Magnetotail Electric Fields During Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudovkin, M.; Zaitseva, S.; Nakamura, R.

    The behaviour of the midtail electric fields during two magnetospheric substorms on November, 22, 1995, is investigated. The magnetospheric electric field is supposed to consist of two components: a potential electric field penetrating into the magneto- sphere from the solar wind, and an inductive electric field associated with variation of the geomagnetic field. The first component is supposed to be proportional (with some time delay) to the Y -component of the solar wind electric field, and the second one is estimated from the time derivative of the tail lobe magnetic flux. The latter is obtained by converting total pressure to lobe magnetic field by assuming pressure balance be- tween lobe and plasma sheet (Nakamura et al., 1999). The Y -component of the total electric field is calculated from GEOTAIL spacecraft data as Ey = -[v × B]y. Analysis of experimental data shows that the inductive electric field (Ec) is "switched on" in the magnetotail practically simultaneously with the intensification of the IMF southern component. At the preliminary phase of the substorm, the Ec field within the plasmasheet is directed from dusk to dawn compensating the potential field Ep, so that the total field Ey is rather small there (Semenov and Sergeev, 1981). With the beginning of the active phase, the Ec changes its sign, and adding to the Ep, provides a rapid increase of the dawn­dusk Ey field. As the intensity of Ep during the active phase of the substorm is less than the intensity of the induced field, Ey is determined during this period by the latter mainly and does not correlate with the Esw field. However, the intensity of the potential electric field at this time may be obtained from the data on the velocity of the auroral arc motion (Pudovkin et al., 1992). So, judging by the dynamics of aurorae at the Poker Flat (Alaska) station, Ep field in the inner magnetosphere (X -10 RE) amounts the value of 0.7 mV/m, and it varies in proportion to Esw with the time delay of

  12. Evolution of flux ropes in the magnetotail: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, S.; Lin, Y.; Lu, Q. M.; Wang, X. Y.; Wang, R. S.; Huang, C.; Wu, M. Y.; Wang, S.

    2015-05-01

    Flux ropes in the Earth's magnetotail are widely believed to play a crucial role in energy transport during substorms and the generation of energetic particles. Previous kinetic simulations are limited to the local-scale regime, and thus cannot be used to study the structure associated with the geomagnetic field and the global-scale evolution of the flux ropes. Here, the evolution of flux ropes in the magnetotail under a steady southward interplanetary magnetic field are studied with a newly developed three-dimensional global hybrid simulation model for dynamics ranging from the ion Larmor radius to the global convection time scales. Magnetic reconnection with multiple X-lines is found to take place in the near-tail current sheet at geocentric solar magnetospheric distances x = - 30 R E ˜ - 15 R E around the equatorial plane ( z = 0 ). The magnetotail reconnection layer is turbulent, with a nonuniform structure and unsteady evolution, and exhibits properties of typical collisionless fast reconnection with the Hall effect. A number of small-scale flux ropes are generated through the multiple X-line reconnection. The diameter of the flux ropes is several R E , and the spatial scale of the flux ropes in the dawn-dusk direction is on the order of several R E and does not extend across the entire section of the magnetotail, contrary to previous models and MHD simulation results and showing the importance of the three-dimensional effects. The nonuniform and unsteady multiple X-line reconnection with particle kinetic effects leads to various kinds of flux rope evolution: The small-scale flux ropes propagate earthward or tailward after formation, and eventually merge into the near-Earth region or the mid-/distant-tail plasmoid, respectively. During the propagation, some of the flux ropes can be tilted in the geocentric solar magnetospheric ( x , y ) plane with respect to the y (dawn-dusk) axis. Coalescence between flux ropes is also observed. At the same time, the

  13. The kinetic features of ion dynamics in the closed magnetic configurations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykhin, Andrey; Grigorenko, Elena; Malova, Helmi

    2016-04-01

    A lot of spacecraft observations showed that the closed magnetic configurations such as plasmoids and magnetic islands are often observed in the Earth magnetotail. The purpose of our study is to analyze the kinetic features of nonadiabatic ion dynamics in the current sheet (CS) inside a plasmoid and the efficiency of ion acceleration in such configurations. Trajectories of test ions of different masses (H+ i O+) were studied in the prescribed magnetic configuration similar to the one observed by Cluster spacecraft (s/c). The magnetic configuration consists of a single stationary plasmoid in the tail side of a near-Earth magnetic X-line. Everywhere in the system there is the constant and uniform dawn-dusk electric field Ey ~ 0.1 mV/m. Cold ion beams with the characteristics similar to the ones observed in the lobe were launched in the system. In the absence of electromagnetic fluctuations the plasmoid localization in the dawn-dusk direction imposes a limit on the ion energy gain in the course of ion nonadiabatic interaction with the plasmoid's CS (in the region of minimum |B| field). The ion dynamics and energy gain changed dramatically when we introduced the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations into the plasmoid. The spectra of the magnetic and electric field fluctuations were similar to the ones observed inside the plasmoids by Cluster spacecraft. Our analysis showed that in the presence of fluctuations the ion dynamics and energy gain are defined by the resonant interaction of ions with the wave harmonics. Ions can gain energy hundred times larger than their energy gain in the system without electromagnetic fluctuations. The inclusion of a guide magnetic field (By) significantly affects the ion dynamics inside the plasmoid. The presence of a guide field generates the "north-south" asymmetry in the ejection of nonadiabatic ions from the CS. The effects of the "north-south" asymmetry in the spatial distribution of the nonadiabatic ions inside the plasmoid on

  14. Effects of bilateral and unilateral laser ocular exposure in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamper, David A.; Lund, David J.; Molchany, Jerome W.; Stuck, Bruce E.

    2003-06-01

    INTRODUCTION: The amount of visual disruption experienced by individuals exposed to a visible laser source at levels, which are below that, which will damage the cornea or retina will depend on laser exposure parameters and task demands. Previous work has evaluated the effects of wavelength, duration, ambient light level, and target variables. One factor that has not received attention is monocular vs. binocular exposure. Whether the exposure is monocular or binocular may alter pupil dynamics, eyelid closure, and ultimately affect visual performance. METHODS: In this study 10 males and females were exposed to 0.1 and 3.0 sec laser flashes while tracking a dynamic target at 0.28 deg/sec through a scope that was capable of selecting binocular or monocular viewing. Bright (430 nits) and dawn/dusk (4.3 nits) ambient light conditions were simulated using ND filters. A collimated 514.5 nm argon laser beam produced corneal radiant exposures of 0.16 and 1.0 mJ/cm2 for the 0.1 and 3.0 sec conditions respectively. For each flash trial total time off target and maximum absolute error scores were calculated. Eye response (changes in pupil diameter) was assessed by evaluation of videotape from an IR eye camera. Tracking error scores (total time off target) were calculated for each flash trial. RESULTS: Analysis of variance results for the total time off target scores found all three main factors (light level, exposure duration, and monocular/binocular to be significant. Earlier studies have previously shown dawn/dusk flash exposures be more disruptive than bright light trials. Also three sec exposures were more disruptive than one sec exposures. Finally, monocular exposures produced significantly higher error scores than did binocular exposures. For the pupil diameters the post-flash diameters were significantly smaller that the pre-flash diameters and monocular diameters larger that binocular pupil sizes. SUMMARY: The Total Time Off Target error scores for the monocular

  15. A Double-Disruption Substorm Model - The Growth Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofko, G. J.; McWilliams, K. A.; Hussey, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    When the IMF turns from Bz- to Bz+, dayside merging forms open lobe field lines at low latitudes. These lobe lines are populated with shocked solar wind and dayside magnetospheric plasma from the reconnection inflow. As those lobe flux tubes pass tailward over the polar caps, they are also populated with outflow from the north and south polar cap ionospheres. As the lobe lines move tailward, they acquire a convex curvature that blocks the westward-flowing cross-tail current (XTJ). This constitutes the first stage of XTJ disruption, and it begins less than 10 min after the frontside merging.The disrupted XTJ closes dawn-to-dusk in the transition plasmasheet (TPS), where it produces a downward FAC to the ionosphere. This causes the proton arc, which is seen for the period from about 10 - 80 min after frontside merging begins at time t=0. The lobe lines eventually reconnect well downtail at about t=30 minutes. The middle section that closes the lobe lines has concave curvature and is called the Neutral Sheet (NSh). The resulting stretched field lines thus have a central NSh which separates the two convex-curvature regions to the north and south, regions which are called the Disruption Zones (DZs); the overall combination of the NDZ, NSh and SDZ is called the Stretched Plasmasheet (SPS). As the SPS continues to grow and the stretched lines are pulled earthward to relieve the magnetic tension, the filling of the NSh occurs both from the DTNL with the higher energy magnetospheric particle population on the lobe lines, but eventually also at about 25 earth radii when the polar cap ionospheric outflow (PCO) component finally reaches the NSh. A NSh FAC system forms, from which electrons flow down to the auroral ionosphere to create the pre-onset arc, starting at about t=65 min. At the same time, the Lyons-Speiser mechanism is initiated in the inner NSh, causing the PCO ions to become trapped and accelerated in the inner NSh region. Eventually, when the SPS grows earthward

  16. A Case Study in Leveraging Major Science at Low Cost: Development of Large Scale Birkeland Currents Determined from AMPERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Dyrud, L. P.; Korth, H.; Waters, C. L.; Green, D. L.; Barnes, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) uses the constellation of Iridium Communications satellites in 780-km-altitude, circular, polar orbits to monitor the global Birkeland currents with a nine-minute cadence. This allows us to follow the development of these currents through transitions from quiescent conditions to moderate driving as indicated by rotations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) from northward to southward. AMPERE data are available beginning on October 2009 for development testing purposes and for continuous science observations starting in June 2010. Data are processed in 10-minute windows stepped by two minutes to derive global Birkeland currents with a minimum intensity of 0.2 mirco-A/m2. A transition event ocurred on 24 February 2010, which illustrates one type of systematic behavior found. As measured by ACE at the first Langrangian point, L1, the IMF was northward and sunward from 1300 to 1420 UT with a BZ component of +2 to +3 nT. At 1420 UT, the IMF began rotating southward reaching -2 to -3 nT by 1510 UT. At Earth, the first enhancement in Birkeland currents occurs at 1524-1534 UT on the dayside, reflecting reconnection driven convection associated with the positive IMF BY that persisted through the event. The dayside currents continued to intensify through 1540-1550 UT and extended from mid-morning to dusk. At 1542-1552 UT, isolated nightside currents appear at midnight and are localized in latitude and longitude, extending less than one hour pre or post-midnight. Ten minutes later the nightside currents expand to most of the nighside and merge with the dayside system. The nightside currents then continue to intensify, first near midnight and expand toward both dawn and dusk, resulting in a fully formed classic Region 1/Region 2 current system by 1640-1650 UT. The results indicate that dayside reconnection drives both Region-1 and Region-2-sense currents, whereas the nightside currents

  17. Investigation of solar wind dependence of the plasma sheet based on long-term Geotail/LEP data evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, R.; Seki, K.; Saito, Y.; Shinohara, I.; Miyashita, Y.; Imada, S.; Machida, S.

    2014-12-01

    It is observationally known that the plasma density and temperature in plasma sheet are significantly changed by solar wind conditions [e.g., Terasawa et al., 1997]. Thus it is considered that the plasma sheet plasma is originated from the solar wind, and several entry mechanisms have been suggested. When the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is southward, the solar wind plasma enters the plasma sheet mainly through magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause. In contrast, for the northward IMF, the double-lobe reconnection [Song et al., 1999], abnormal diffusion [Johnson and Cheng., 1997], and plasma mixing through the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability caused by viscous interaction [Hasegawa et al., 2004] have been proposed. Relative contribution of each process is, however, far from understood. In the present study, we use magnetotail observations by the Geotail spacecraft at radial distances of 10-32 Re during 12-year period from 1995 to 2006 to investigate properties of the plasma sheet. We conducted a statistical analysis with calibrated LEP-EA [Mukai et al., 1994] ion and electron data. We selected central plasma sheet observations and derived electron and ion temperature and density using the same method and criteria as Terasawa et al. [1997]. In addition, OMNI solar-wind data are used. The results show that the plasma sheet density (both ion and electron temperatures) has a good correlation with the solar wind density (kinetic energy) over the whole solar cycle. We find clear dawn-dusk asymmetry in the temperature ratio Ti/Te, i.e., the average Ti/Te is higher on the duskside than the dawn. The density also shows the dawn-dusk asymmetry and higher on the duskside than on the dawnside. A previous study by Wang et al. [2012] showed that Ti/Te is high (typically 5-10) in the magnetosheath. The statistical results, therefore, suggest that the shocked solar wind plasma can easily enter the duskside plasma sheet rather than the dawnside. We will discuss the

  18. Evolution of phase space densities from the dayside to nightside magnetosphere during a prolonged northward-IMF period: Cluster-II, GEOTAIL, and LANL-MPA comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, K.; Lavraud, B.; Thomsen, M. F.; Elphic, R. C.; Matsumoto, Y.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.; Rème, H.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2004-12-01

    It is observationally known that the plasma sheet becomes much cooler and denser than usual under prolonged northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions [e.g., Terasawa et al., 1997]. However, the mechanism responsible for the formation of CDPS is still far from understood. The Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability driven by the velocity shear at the magnetopause has been proposed as a possible mechanism of magnetosheath plasma entry through the LLBL [Fujimoto and Terasawa, 1994; Otto and Fairfield, 2000; Hasegawa et al., 2004]. Double lobe reconnection, i.e., reconnection of a magnetosheath flux tube with lobe field at the high-latitude magnetopause in both hemispheres, thereby becoming closed, is also an important candidate process for the dense, thick LLBL formation during northward IMF periods [e.g., Song and Russell, 1992]. On the basis of evolution of electron and ion phase space densities (PSDs) from the dayside to the nightside magnetosphere observed by Cluster II, GEOTAIL, and LANL-MPA spacecraft during a northward IMF interval on March 16, 2002, we examine the relative importance of the K-H instability and double lobe reconnection for formation of the CDPS. This event corresponds to one of the CDPS events at geosynchronous orbit during prolonged northward IMF periods [Thomsen et al., 2003]. The heated electron signature observed by Cluster II indicates that formation of closed flux tube(s) through lobe reconnection in both northern and southern hemispheres indeed took place during the event. Comparison of PSDs between the newly closed flux tube observed by Cluster II and the dusk-flank LLBL by GEOTAIL indicates that double lobe reconnection is responsible for formation of the outer-LLBL. On the other hand, GEOTAIL observed wavy structures in the dusk LLBL, and comparison with results from numerical simulation of the K-H instability [Matsumoto et al., 2004] suggests that the observed structure is consistent with the non-linear phase of K

  19. Nonideal high-β magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability driven by the shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity at the subsolar magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Akira

    2003-02-01

    A nonideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability peculiar to a high-β plasma with a nonuniform pressure is studied for the magnetosheath field due north at the subsolar magnetopause, where the ideal MHD K-H instability driven by the shear in the E × B drift velocity is not operative. This instability is driven by the shear in the ion diamagnetic drift velocity, which is a nonideal MHD drift in a high-β plasma and is a macroscopic effect not visible at the guiding center level. The two-dimensional stability (k · B0 = 0) of a model subsolar magnetopause is investigated by solving the eigenmode equation for a polygonal ion diamagnetic drift velocity profile with the density ratio across the magnetopause as a parameter. Near the subsolar magnetopause the fastest growing wave or vortex propagates duskward with a phase velocity from 8 km/s to 14 km/s, and the normalized growth rate decreases with an increase in the ratio of the magnetosheath density to the magnetospheric density. The wavelength and period of the fastest growing mode increases with the density ratio. For realistic parameters near the subsolar magnetopause the wave period becomes 750 s to 2000 s and the wavelength becomes 11000 km to 16000 km. The present K-H instability ("diamagnetically driven K-H instability") may cause a plasma transport across the subsolar magnetopause, since the plasma motion is decoupled from that of the magnetic field owing to nonideal MHD. We discuss a possible dawn-dusk asymmetry (caused by the ion diamagnetic drift velocity at the magnetopause) of the K-H instability when the present instability is extended to the dayside magnetopause off the noon meridian, where the tailward E × B drift is no longer negligible. The vortex created by the present instability near the subsolar magnetopause has the same rotational sense as that created by the E × B shear driven K-H instability within the dusk flank boundary but has the opposite rotational sense to that

  20. Calcium in Mercury's Exosphere: Modeling MESSENGER Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Sprague, A. L.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is surrounded by a surface-bounded exosphere known to contain hydrogen, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. Because the exosphere is collisionless, its composition represents a balance of active source and loss processes. The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has made high-spatial-resolution observations of sodium, calcium, and magnesium near Mercury's surface and in the extended, anti-sunward direction. The most striking feature of these data is the substantial differences among species, which was detected during three close flybys of the planet and has been persistantly present during MESSENGER's orbital phase. Our modeling demonstrates that these differences are not because of post-ejection dynamics such as differences in photo-ionization rate and radiation pressure, but rather result from differences in the source mechanisms and regions on the surface from which each species is ejected. The observations of calcium have revealed a strong dawn/dusk asymmetry, with the abundance over the dawn hemisphere substantially greater than that on the dusk side. To understand this asymmetry, we use a Monte Carlo model of Mercury's exosphere that we developed to track the motions of exospheric neutrals under the influence of gravity and radiation pressure. In this model, Ca atoms can be ejected directly from the surface or produced by ejection of CaO followed by dissociation to produce Ca and O. Particles are removed from the system if they stick to the surface or escape from the model region of interest (within 15 Mercury radii). Photoionization reduces the final weighting given to each particle when simulating the Ca radiance. Data from the flybys are consistent with a high temperature (~1-2 x 104 K) source of atomic Ca concentrated over the dawn hemisphere. Such a high temperature resutls from dissociation of CaO in a near

  1. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    -aligned potential difference, particularly during active time (AE > 100 nT). On the other hand, in the dusk side outer magnetosphere (source of the region 1), electron density and temperature are small, thus the thermal current is much smaller than the typical auroral current suggested by Iijima and Potemra (JGR, 1976). From this result, we suppose that electron acceleration is necessary on the dusk side region 1 upward field-aligned current. Our preliminary result, however, does not consider contamination of the radiation belt particles into the ESA data that is apparent inside 9 Re. In the presentation, we show the results with removal of the radiation belt particle contamination.

  2. Implementation and Effects of Low-Altitude Boundary Conditions in Global Magnetosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Sheng

    The forecast capabilities of global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of geospace are sensitive to the particular specification of low-altitude (inner) boundary conditions. The low-altitude boundary conditions imposed in all global simulations (at least six different models are in active use around the world) are artificial in varying degrees. Consequently, they introduce nonphysical artifacts in the MHD solution. The principle objectives of this thesis are to improve the low-altitude boundary conditions in global magnetospheric MHD models in two ways: 1) by developing and employing Poynting flux-conserving boundary conditions and 2) by including the effects of field-aligned potential drops in the magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction in the boundary specification. The proposed boundary conditions have been implemented in the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global simulation model. LFM simulation results are diagnosed to qualify the resulting improvements in the solution. The results presented in the dissertation illustrate the nonphysical artifacts introduced near the low-altitude boundary by the currently implemented LFM boundary conditions. It is shown that these artifacts are largely eliminated by flux-conserving boundary conditions, which conserve low-frequency (essentially DC) Poynting flux flowing along magnetic field lines. The field-aligned DC Poynting flux just above the boundary is also shown to be very nearly equal to the ionospheric Joule heating, as it should be if electromagnetic energy is conserved. The effects of field-aligned potential drops attributed to anomalous resistive layers that form at low altitude, in the "gap region" between the inner simulation boundary and the ionosphere, have also been included in the effective boundary condition. The model produces much larger potential drops in regions of upward field-aligned current, which are most prevalent on the dusk side, in contrast with those that occur in downward field-aligned currents that

  3. Strong ion energization by electromagnetic fluctuations in plasmoid-like magnetic structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies based on data from many magnetospheric missions reported the observations of energetic ions with energies of hundreds of keV in the Earth magnetotail. The acceleration of charged particles to energies exceeding the potential drop across the tail can be produced by strong inductive electric fields generated in the course of transient processes related to changes of the magnetic field topology: e.g., magnetic reconnection, dipolarization, magnetic turbulence, and so on. The observations of energetic ion flows by Cluster/RAPID instruments in the near-Earth tail show the increase of H+, He+, and O+ fluxes in the energy range ≥130 keV during the periods of the tailward flows. The hardening of ion spectra is observed inside the plasmoid-like magnetic structures propagating tailward through the Cluster spacecraft. Simultaneously, the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations were observed in such structures. The analysis of 37 events demonstrated that the following factors are favorable for the ion energization: (1) the spatial scale of a plasmoid should exceed the thermal gyroradius of a given ion component in the plasmoid neutral plane; (2) the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of the magnetic fluctuations near the gyrofrequency of a particular ion component should exceed ~ 50.0 nT2/Hz for oxygen ions; while the energization of He+ and H+ takes place for much lower values of the PSD. The kinetic analysis of ion dynamics in the plasmoid-like magnetic configurations with the superimposed electromagnetic fluctuations similar to the observed ones confirms the importance of ion resonant interactions with the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations for ion energization inside plasmoids. The analysis also show that to be strongly accelerated ions do not need to pass a large distance in the duskward direction and the effective energization can be reached even at the localized source. Thus, ion acceleration by the electromagnetic fluctuations may smear the dawn-dusk

  4. Multi-instrument study of the Jovian radio emissions triggered by solar wind shocks and inferred magnetospheric subcorotation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S. L. G.; Echer, E.; Zarka, P.; Lamy, L.; Delamere, P. A.

    2014-09-01

    The influence of solar wind conditions on the Jovian auroral radio emissions has long been debated, mostly because it has always been difficult to get accurate solar wind and radio observations at the same time. We present here a study of Jupiter's radio emissions compared to solar wind conditions using radio (RPWS) and magnetic (MAG) data from the Cassini spacecraft from October to December 2000, just before its flyby of Jupiter. The spacecraft was then in the solar wind and could record both the radio emissions coming from the Jovian magnetosphere and the solar wind magnetic field (IMF). With these data, we found a good correspondence between the arrival of interplanetary shocks at Jupiter and the occurrence of radio storms. Our results confirm those from the previous studies showing that fast forward shocks (FFS) trigger mostly dusk emissions, whereas fast reverse shocks (FRS) trigger both dawn and dusk emissions. FFS-triggered emissions are found to occur 10-30 h after the shock arrival when the IMF is weak (below 2 nT), and quasi-immediately after shock arrival when the IMF is strong (above 2 nT). FRS-triggered emissions are found to occur quasi-immediately even when the IMF is weak. We show and discuss in depth the characteristic morphologies of the radio emissions related to each type of shock and their implications. We also used simultaneous radio observations from the ground-based Nançay decameter array and from the Galileo radio instrument (PWS). From the comparison of these measurements with Cassini's, we deduce the regions where the radio storms occur, as well as the radio source subcorotation rates. We show that FFS-triggered emissions onset happens in a sector of local time centered around 15:00 LT, and that all the shock-triggered radio sources sub-corotate with a subcorotation rate of ~50% when the IMF is below 2 nT and of ~80% when it is above 2 nT. These rates could correspond to the extended and compressed states of the Jovian magnetosphere.

  5. An epidemiological study of roadway fatalities related to farm vehicles: United States, 1988 to 1993.

    PubMed

    Gerberich, S G; Robertson, L S; Gibson, R W; Renier, C

    1996-11-01

    Compared with the estimated injury fatality rate for workers in all occupations (nine in 100,000 in 1988) the farm fatality rate (48 in 100,000) was among the highest in the nation; in 1993, these rates were eight and 35 in 100,000, respectively. On-road farm-vehicle fatalities have been identified as a significant problem, yet these events apparently have not been investigated in a comprehensive manner. The purpose of this study was to investigate the circumstances surrounding all on-road, non-truck, farm-vehicle crash fatalities in the United States form 1988 through 1993. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Fatal Accident Reporting System, which includes data for all US fatal on-road motor vehicle crashes, was the source of data. Driver-related variables were compared among farm vehicles, vehicles in collisions with farm vehicles, and all other vehicles in rural, fatal crashes; environmental variables were compared between rural farm-vehicle and non-farm-vehicle crashes. During 1988 to 1993, in rural areas, 444 farm-vehicle occupants were killed; in addition, 238 occupants of other vehicles or pedestrians were killed in collisions with the farm vehicles. The farm vehicles were disproportionately involved in overturns, rear-end collisions, and incidents in which the injured person fell from the vehicle, when compared with all other non-farm vehicles involved in rural-area fatal crashes. Of the farm vehicles involved in fatal crashes at night, dawn, or dusk, 65% were struck in the rear, compared with 4% of vehicles involved in fatal non-farm-vehicle crashes. Compared with drivers in all other rural crashes, farm-vehicle operators were more likely to be male, have a greater proportion of convictions for driving while intoxicated, and a lower proportion of previous speeding convictions. From this initial investigation, it appears that the fatal-crash involvement of farm vehicles are related to vehicle and environmental factors that are changeable

  6. Evolution of flux ropes in the magnetotail: A three-dimensional global hybrid simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Lin, Y.; Wang, X. Y.; Lu, Q. M. Huang, C.; Wu, M. Y.; Wang, S.; Wang, R. S.

    2015-05-15

    Flux ropes in the Earth's magnetotail are widely believed to play a crucial role in energy transport during substorms and the generation of energetic particles. Previous kinetic simulations are limited to the local-scale regime, and thus cannot be used to study the structure associated with the geomagnetic field and the global-scale evolution of the flux ropes. Here, the evolution of flux ropes in the magnetotail under a steady southward interplanetary magnetic field are studied with a newly developed three-dimensional global hybrid simulation model for dynamics ranging from the ion Larmor radius to the global convection time scales. Magnetic reconnection with multiple X-lines is found to take place in the near-tail current sheet at geocentric solar magnetospheric distances x=−30R{sub E}∼−15R{sub E} around the equatorial plane (z=0). The magnetotail reconnection layer is turbulent, with a nonuniform structure and unsteady evolution, and exhibits properties of typical collisionless fast reconnection with the Hall effect. A number of small-scale flux ropes are generated through the multiple X-line reconnection. The diameter of the flux ropes is several R{sub E}, and the spatial scale of the flux ropes in the dawn-dusk direction is on the order of several R{sub E} and does not extend across the entire section of the magnetotail, contrary to previous models and MHD simulation results and showing the importance of the three-dimensional effects. The nonuniform and unsteady multiple X-line reconnection with particle kinetic effects leads to various kinds of flux rope evolution: The small-scale flux ropes propagate earthward or tailward after formation, and eventually merge into the near-Earth region or the mid-/distant-tail plasmoid, respectively. During the propagation, some of the flux ropes can be tilted in the geocentric solar magnetospheric (x,y) plane with respect to the y (dawn-dusk) axis. Coalescence between flux ropes is also observed. At the same time, the

  7. Differences in timing of mating swarms in sympatric populations of Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae s.s. (formerly An. gambiae M and S molecular forms) in Burkina Faso, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae s.s. Giles appear to have speciated in West Africa and the M form is now formally named An. coluzzii Coetzee & Wilkerson sp.n. and the S form retains the nominotypical name (abbreviated here to An. gambiae). Reproductive isolation is thought to be the main barrier to hybridisation; even though both species are found in the same mating swarms, hybrid fertilisations in copulae have not been found in the study area. The aim of the study, therefore, was to determine whether differences in circadian and/or environmental control over the timing of swarming in the two species contribute to reproductive isolation. Methods The timing of male swarming in these species was recorded four nights per month over four years at five swarming sites in each of two villages. The timing of the start and end of swarming, and the concurrent environmental parameters, temperature, humidity and light intensity, were recorded for n = 20 swarms/month/species. The timing of 'spontaneous’ activity at dusk of individual An. coluzzii and An. gambiae males was video-recorded in an actograph outdoors for 21 nights. Results Of the environmental parameters considered, swarming was most strongly correlated with sunset (r2 > 0.946). Anopheles gambiae started and stopped swarming earlier than An. coluzzii (3:35 ± 0:68 min:sec and 4:51 ± 1:21, respectively), and the mean duration of swarming was 23:37 ± 0:33 for An. gambiae and 21:39 ± 0:33 for An. coluzzii. Accordingly, in principle, whenever both species swarm over the same marker, a mean of 15.3 ± 3.1% of An. gambiae swarming would occur before An. coluzzii males arrived, and 19.5 ± 4.55% of An. coluzzii swarming would occurred after An. gambiae males had stopped swarming. These results are consistent with the finding that An. gambiae males became active in the actograph 09:35 ± 00:22 min:sec earlier than An. coluzzii males. Conclusions The

  8. Statistical survey of pitch angle distributions in core (0-50 eV) ions from Dynamics Explorer 1: Outflow in the auroral zone, polar cap, and cusp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, B. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Moore, T. E.; Comfort, R. H.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Core (0-50 eV) ion pitch angle measurements from the retarding ion mass spectrometer on Dynamics Explorer 1 are examined with respect to magnetic disturbance, invariant latitude, magnetic local time, and altitude for ions H(+), He(+), O(+), M/Z = 2 (D(+) or He(++)), and O(++). Included are outflow events in the auroral zone, polar cap, and cusp, separated into altitude regions below and above 3 R(sub E). In addition to the customary division into beam, conic, and upwelling distributions, the high-latitude observations fall into three categories corresponding to ion bulk speeds that are (1) less than, (2) comparable to, or (3) faster than that of the spacecraft. This separation, along with the altitude partition, serves to identify conditions under which ionospheric source ions are gravita- tionally bound and when they are more energetic and able to escape to the outer magnetosphere. Features of the cleft ion fountain inferred from single event studies are clearly identifiable in the statistical results. In addition, it is found that the dayside pre-noon cleft is a dayside afternoon cleft, or auroral zone, becomes an additional source for increased activity. The auroral oval as a whole appears to be a steady source of escape velocity H(+), a steady source of escape velocity He(+) ions for the dusk sector, and a source of escape velocity heavy ions for dusk local times primarily during increased activity. The polar cap above the auroral zone is a consistent source of low-energy ions, although only the lighter mass particles appear to have sufficient velocity, on average, to escape to higher altitudes. The observations support two concepts for outflow: (1) The cleft ion fountain consists of ionospheric plasma of 1-20 eV energy streaming upward into the magnetosphere where high-latitude convection electric fields cause poleward dispersion. (2) The auroral ion fountain involves field-aligned beams which flow out along auroral latitude field lines; and, in addition, for

  9. Three-dimensional exospheric hydrogen atom distributions obtained from observations of the geocorona in Lyman-alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Justin J.

    Exospheric atomic hydrogen (H) resonantly scatters solar Lyman-alpha (121.567 nm) radiation, observed as the glow of the geocorona. Measurements of scattered solar photons allow one to probe time-varying three-dimensional distributions of exospheric H atoms. The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission images the magnetosphere in energetic neutral atom (ENA) fluxes and additionally carries Lyman-alpha Detectors (LADs) to register line-of-sight intensities of the geocorona. This work details a process for preparing TWINS data such that LAD measurements can be used to obtain global H density distributions with three-dimensional asymmetries above 3 earth radii. Sequences of distributions are presented to investigate the dynamic exosphere, responding to seasonal variations between a summer solstice and autumnal equinox, as well as to solar and geomagnetic variations as described by commonly used indices. The distributions reveal asymmetries from day to night, north to south, and dawn to dusk. A nightside extension persists that is consistent with the location of a geotail. A seasonal north-south asymmetry occurs as solar illumination differs between the summer and winter polar regions. Pole-equator and less pronounced dawn-dusk asymmetries also appear, possibly due to a coupling effect via charge exchange with the polar wind and plasmasphere, respectively. A common phenomenon in geospace occurs as magnetospheric energetic ions collide with neutral background atoms and produce ENAs that, no longer bound by Earth's magnetic field, can travel large distances though space with minimal disturbance ---providing an opportunity for remote detection. Knowledge of the distribution of the primary neutral partner, exospheric H atoms, is therefore essential for the interpretation of ENA fluxes and subsequent retrieval of ion densities. An analysis is summarized that demonstrates the importance of exospheric H density distributions on reconstructing

  10. Comparing Local-Time and Storm-Phase Distributions of EMIC Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes A, GOES-13, and Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnsted, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.; Singer, H. J.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Horne, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are expected to be highly efficient in depleting the ring current and in removing outer radiation belt electrons. However, the distribution of these waves in subauroral regions has not been well characterized. In this study we present 0-5 Hz magnetic field data from the Van Allen Probes A (RBSP A) spacecraft (in elliptical equatorial orbit with apogee at 5.8 RE), 0-1 Hz data from GOES-13 (in geosynchronous orbit), and 0-5 Hz data from Halley, Antarctica (L ~4.6), during the first full local-time precession of the Van Allen Probes from October 2012 through July 2014. The considerably different hourly local time vs. L distributions observed point to distinct locations and geomagnetic activity-dependent patterns of EMIC wave activity. GOES-13 wave occurrences exhibited a broad peak in the noon-to-dusk sector. He+ band events peaked near dusk, while H+ band waves peaked near noon, with a secondary peak centered near dawn. More EMIC waves occurred during storm main phase in the He+ band (5%) than in the H+ band (1%), and 80% and 89% of the He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, occurred under late storm recovery or quiet conditions. During all storm phases the local time occurrence patterns of < 0.4 Hz and 0.4-1.0 Hz events at Halley resembled those of He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, at GOES-13. The relatively few wave events at Halley with f > 1.0 Hz occurred at all local times, but with a modest, broad peak near dawn. Roughly 90% of both the 1570 Halley events < 1.0 Hz and the 142 Halley events > 1.0 Hz occurred during late storm recovery and quiet conditions. Events during compressions at GOES-13 (10%), Halley (6%), and RBSP A (6%) peaked near local noon, but with a secondary peak near midnight. Waves observed by RBSP A were distributed rather evenly in local time in all L shell ranges between 3 and 6, and the percentage occurring during late storm recovery or quiet conditions was only 65%. We interpret the difference in

  11. Effects of bed net use, female size, and plant abundance on the first meal choice (blood vs sugar) of the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine whether the sugar-or-blood meal choice of Anopheles gambiae females one day after emergence is influenced by blood-host presence and accessibility, nectariferous plant abundance, and female size. This tested the hypothesis that the initial meal of female An. gambiae is sugar, even when a blood host is available throughout the night, and, if not, whether the use of a bed net diverts mosquitoes to sugar sources. Methods Females and males <1-day post-emergence were released in a mesocosm. Overnight they had access to either one or six Senna didymobotrya plants. Simultaneously they had access to a human blood host, either for 8 h or for only 30 min at dusk and dawn (the remainder of the night being excluded by an untreated bed net). In a third situation, the blood host was not present. All mosquitoes were collected in the morning. Their wing lengths, an indicator of pre-meal energetic state, were measured, and their meal choice was determined by the presence of midgut blood and of fructose. Results Female sugar feeding after emergence was facultative. When a blood host was accessible for 8 h per night, 92% contained blood, and only 3.7% contained sugar. Even with the use of a bed net, 78% managed to obtain a blood meal during the 30 min of accessibility at dusk or dawn, but 14% of females were now fructose-positive. In the absence of a blood host, and when either one or six plants were available, a total of 21.7% and 23.6% of females and 30.8% and 43.5% of males contained fructose, respectively. Feeding on both sugar and blood was more likely with bed net use and with greater plant abundance. Further, mosquitoes that fed on both resources were more often small and had taken a sugar meal earlier than the blood meal. The abundance of sugar hosts also affected the probability of sugar feeding by males and the amount of fructose obtained by both males and females. Conclusion Even in an abundance of potential sugar

  12. Non-steady state effects in diurnal 180 discrimination by Picea sitchensis branches in the field.

    PubMed

    Seibt, U; Wingate, L; Berry, J A; Lloyd, J

    2006-05-01

    We report diurnal variations in 18O discrimination (18 delta) during photosynthesis (18 delta A) and respiration (18 delta R) of Picea sitchensis branches measured in branch chambers in the field. These observations were compared with predicted 18 delta (18 delta pred) based on concurrent measurements of branch gas exchange to evaluate steady state and non-steady state (NSS) models of foliage water 18O enrichment for predicting the impact of this ecosystem on the Delta 18O of atmospheric CO2. The non-steady state approach substantially improved the agreement between 18 delta pred and observed 18 delta (18 delta obs) compared with the assumption of isotopic steady state (ISS) for the Delta 18O signature of foliage water. In addition, we found direct observational evidence for NSS effects: extremely high apparent 18 delta values at dusk, dawn and during nocturnal respiration. Our experiments also show the importance of bidirectional foliage gas exchange at night (isotopic equilibration in addition to the net flux). Taken together, neglecting these effects leads to an underestimation of daily net canopy isofluxes from this forest by up to 30%. We expect NSS effects to be most pronounced in species with high specific leaf water content such as conifers and when stomata are open at night or when there is high relative humidity, and we suggest modifications to ecosystem and global models of delta 18O of CO2. PMID:17087476

  13. Cyclotron side-band emissions from ring-current electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper examines temporal variations in electron energy spectra and pitch-angle distributions during a VLF-emission event observed by Explorer 45 in the main phase of a magnetic storm. It is noted that the observed event occurred outside the plasmasphere on the night side of the magnetosphere and that the dusk-side plasmapause had a double structure during the event. It is found that the VLF emissions consisted of two frequency bands, corresponding to the whistler and electrostatic modes, and that there was a sharp band of 'missing emissions' along frequencies equal to half the equatorial electron gyrofrequency. A peculiar pitch-angle distribution for high-energy electrons (50 to 350 keV) is noted. It is concluded that the VLF-producing particles were enhanced low-energy (about 5 keV) ring-current electrons which penetrated into the night side of the magnetosphere from the magnetotail plasma sheet and which drifted eastward after encountering the steep gradient of the geomagnetic field.

  14. Glass buildings on river banks as "polarized light traps" for mass-swarming polarotactic caddis flies.

    PubMed

    Kriska, György; Malik, Péter; Szivák, Ildikó; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-05-01

    The caddis flies Hydropsyche pellucidula emerge at dusk from the river Danube and swarm around trees and bushes on the river bank. We document here that these aquatic insects can also be attracted en masse to the vertical glass surfaces of buildings on the river bank. The individuals lured to dark, vertical glass panes land, copulate, and remain on the glass for hours. Many of them are trapped by the partly open, tiltable windows. In laboratory choice experiments, we showed that ovipositing H. pellucidula are attracted to highly and horizontally polarized light stimulating their ventral eye region and, thus, have positive polarotaxis. In the field, we documented that highly polarizing vertical black glass surfaces are significantly more attractive to both female and male H. pellucidula than weakly polarizing white ones. Using video polarimetry, we measured the reflection-polarization characteristics of vertical glass surfaces of buildings where caddis flies swarmed. We propose that after its emergence from the river, H. pellucidula is attracted to buildings by their dark silhouettes and the glass-reflected, horizontally polarized light. After sunset, this attraction may be strengthened by positive phototaxis elicited by the buildings' lights. The novelty of this visual-ecological phenomenon is that the attraction of caddis flies to vertical glass surfaces has not been expected because vertical glass panes do not resemble the horizontal surface of waters from which these insects emerge and to which they must return to oviposit. PMID:18253711

  15. Sound production by dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus at spawning aggregation sites.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, F; Lejeune, P; Payrot, J; Parmentier, E

    2015-08-01

    Sound production by the dusky grouper Epinephelus marginatus was monitored both in captivity and at two Mediterranean spawning sites during the summers of 2012 and 2013. The results of long-term passive acoustic recordings provide for the first time a description of the sounds produced by E. marginatus. Two types of sounds were mainly recorded and consisted of low-frequency booms that can be produced singly or in series with dominant frequencies below 100 Hz. Recordings in captivity validated these sounds as belonging to E. marginatus and suggested that they may be associated with reproductive displays usually performed during early stages of courtship behaviour. This study also allowed the identification of a third, low-frequency growl-like type of sound typically found in other grouper species. These growls were, however, not recorded in tanks and it is cautiously proposed that they are produced by E. marginatus. Acoustic signals attributed to E. marginatus were produced throughout the spawning season, with a diel pattern showing an increase before dusk, i.e., from 1900 to 2200 hours, before decreasing until the morning. The occurrence of sounds during the spawning season of this species suggests that they are probably involved in social activity occurring close to aggregation sites. Passive acoustics offer a helpful tool to monitor aggregation sites of this emblematic species in order to improve conservation efforts. PMID:26177857

  16. Modeling the magnetospheric X-ray emission from solar wind charge exchange with verification from XMM-Newton observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Ian C.; Sembay, Steve; Carter, Jennifer A.; Read, Andrew M.; Milan, Steve E.; Palmroth, Minna

    2016-05-01

    An MHD-based model of terrestrial solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) is created and compared to 19 case study observations in the 0.5-0.7 keV emission band taken from the European Photon Imaging Cameras on board XMM-Newton. This model incorporates the Global Unified Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Simulation-4 MHD code and produces an X-ray emission datacube from O7+ and O8+ emission lines around the Earth using in situ solar wind parameters as the model input. This study details the modeling process and shows that fixing the oxygen abundances to a constant value reduces the variance when comparing to the observations, at the cost of a small accuracy decrease in some cases. Using the ACE oxygen data returns a wide ranging accuracy, providing excellent correlation in a few cases and poor/anticorrelation in others. The sources of error for any user wishing to simulate terrestrial SWCX using an MHD model are described here and include mask position, hydrogen to oxygen ratio in the solar wind, and charge state abundances. A dawn-dusk asymmetry is also found, similar to the results of empirical modeling. Using constant oxygen parameters, magnitudes approximately double that of the observed count rates are returned. A high accuracy is determined between the model and observations when comparing the count rate difference between enhanced SWCX and quiescent periods.

  17. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Arnico K.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    2009-05-01

    During the dry season of 2004-2005 we carried out field measurements of air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, a bowl-shaped urban basin in the Himalayan foothills of Nepal. We measured the trace gases carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) and particulates (PM10), as well as meteorological variables. In our field observations we noted a very regular pattern of morning and evening peaks in CO and PM10 occurring daily in the valley bottom, interspersed with low values in the afternoons and at night. This pattern occurred even on days with unusual timing of emissions and was influenced by the timing of ventilation from the valley. Meteorological variables showed great day-to-day similarity, with a strong westerly wind blowing through the valley from late morning until dusk. We found that the air mass on nearby mountaintops was disconnected from pollution within the valley during the night, but received significant pollution during the morning, when up-slope flows began. At a pass on the western edge of the valley we found a diurnal switch in wind direction, with an inflow from late morning until late evening, and an outflow during the rest of the time. We found that part of the morning peak in pollution was caused by recirculation of pollutants emitted the night before, which spend the night in elevated layers over the valley.

  18. Global Magnetospheric Response to an Interplanetary Shock: THEMIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Sibeck, David G.; Zong, Q.-G.; McFadden, James P.; Larson, Davin; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the global response of geospace plasma environment to an interplanetary shock at approx. 0224 UT on May 28, 2008 from multiple THEMIS spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath (THEMIS B and C) and the mid-afternoon (THEMIS A) and dusk magnetosphere (THEMIS D and E). The interaction of the transmitted interplanetary shock with the magnetosphere has global effects. Consequently, it can affect geospace plasma significantly. After interacting with the bow shock, the interplanetary shock transmitted a fast shock and a discontinuity which propagated through the magnetosheath toward the Earth at speeds of 300 km/s and 137 km/s respectively. THEMIS A observations indicate that the plasmaspheric plume changed significantly by the interplanetary shock impact. The plasmaspheric plume density increased rapidly from 10 to 100/ cubic cm in 4 min and the ion distribution changed from isotropic to strongly anisotropic distribution. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by THEMIS A are most likely excited by the anisotropic ion distributions caused by the interplanetary shock impact. To our best knowledge, this is the first direct observation of the plasmaspheric plume response to an interplanetary shock's impact. THEMIS A, but not D or E, observed a plasmaspheric plume in the dayside magnetosphere. Multiple spacecraft observations indicate that the dawn-side edge of the plasmaspheric plume was located between THEMIS A and D (or E).

  19. A quantitative deconstruction of the morphology of high-latitude ionospheric convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, A.; Milan, S. E.; Imber, S. M.; Lester, M.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-05-01

    We present an analysis of ionospheric convection data derived from velocity measurements made by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). Our analysis uses an established technique for combining the network data to produce maps of large-scale convection by fitting a spherical harmonic expansion of the ionospheric electric potential to the radar measurements. We discuss how the basis functions of the spherical harmonic expansion describe different characteristic elements of the ionospheric convection pattern and show how their associated coefficients can be used to quantify the morphology of the convection, much like the total transpolar voltage is used to quantify its strength, in relation to upstream interplanetary magnetic field conditions and associated magnetospheric activity. We find that ˜2/3 of the voltage associated with the typical convection pattern is described by a simple twin vortex basis function. The magnitude of the twin vortex is strongly dependent on IMF BZ and the degree of its (typically westward) rotation is weakly dependent on IMF BY. The remaining ˜1/3 of the total voltage is associated with deviations from the basic twin vortex pattern, introduced by the addition of other basis functions, such as IMF BY associated dusk-dawn asymmetries, nightside convection features associated with tail activity, and “reverse” high-latitude convection cells associated with intervals of IMF BZ > 0.

  20. Observations of dayside subauroral proton arcs and EMIC waves associated with increases in solar wind pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Dasrath, D. K.; Frey, H. U.; Yeoman, T. K.; Lessard, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present three examples of simultaneous subauroral proton arcs in the southern hemisphere near local noon recorded by the Far Ultraviolet (FUV) instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft and associated Pc1 waves recorded by ground based magnetometers at high latitude stations in Antarctica. Each event appeared to be triggered by a large increase in solar wind dynamic pressure during otherwise quiet geomagnetic conditions. The resulting compression of the dayside magnetosphere triggered ~0.5 Hz EMIC waves which were observed by search coil magnetometers at Halley and South Pole Station, Antarctica. These waves in turn caused energetic protons to precipitate into the southern high latitude ionosphere where they caused the appearance of an aurora several degrees of latitude equatorward of the steady southern auroral oval, and generated plasma irregularities which were detected by the Halley SuperDARN radar. Two additional proton arcs at similar latitude but in the dusk sector occurred shortly after the main phase of minor geomagnetic storms, and were not associated with solar wind pressure increases.

  1. On the Azimuthal Variation of Core Plasma in the Equatorial Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Previous results of plasmapause position surveys have been synthesized into a description of the underlying global distribution of plasmasphere-like or core plasma densities unique to a steady state magnetosphere. Under these steady conditions, the boundary between high- and low-density regions is taken to represent the boundary between diurnal near-corotation and large-scale circulation streamlines that traverse the entire magnetosphere. Results indicate a boundary that has a pronounced bulge in the dusk sector that is rotated westward and markedly reduced in size at increased levels of geomagnetic activity (and presumably magnetospheric convection). The derived profile is empirical confirmation of an underlying 'tear drop' distribution of core plasma, which is valid only for prolonged steady conditions and is somewhat different from that associated with the simple superposition of sunward flow and corotation, both in its detailed shape and in its varying orientation. Variation away from the tear drop profile suggests that magnetospheric circulation departs from a uniform flow field, having a radial dependence with respect to the Earth that is qualitatively consistent with electrostatic shielding of the convection electric field and which is rotated westward at increased levels of geophysical activity.

  2. Longitudinal frequency variation of long-lasting EMIC Pc1-Pc2 waves localized in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-H.; Shiokawa, K.; Mann, I. R.; Park, J.-S.; Kwon, H.-J.; Hyun, K.; Jin, H.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    Long-lasting (> 20 h) electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) Pc1-Pc2 waves were observed by the Athabasca (L =˜ 4.6) induction magnetometer and Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity (L =˜ 4-6) fluxgate magnetometers on 5 April 2007. These waves showed a systematic frequency change with local time, the minimum frequency near dusk, and the maximum frequency near dawn. Assuming the plasmapause as a potential source region of the waves, we estimated the plasmapause location from localized proton enhancement (LPE) events observed at NOAA-Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites and METOP-2 satellites. We found that the longitudinal frequency variation of EMIC waves has a clear correlation with the estimated plasmapause location and that the waves are in the frequency band between the equatorial helium and oxygen gyrofrequencies at the estimated plasmapause. With our analysis results we suggest that the LPE events are caused by wave-particle interaction with the helium band EMIC waves generated near the plasmapause.

  3. Magnetic field power spectra and magnetic radial diffusion coefficients using CRRES magnetometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ashar F.; Elkington, Scot R.; Tu, Weichao; Ozeke, Louis G.; Chan, Anthony A.; Friedel, Reiner H. W.

    2015-02-01

    We used the fluxgate magnetometer data from Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) to estimate the power spectral density (PSD) of the compressional component of the geomagnetic field in the ˜1 mHz to ˜8 mHz range. We conclude that magnetic wave power is generally higher in the noon sector for quiet times with no significant difference between the dawn, dusk, and the midnight sectors. However, during high Kp activity, the noon sector is not necessarily dominant anymore. The magnetic PSDs have a very distinct dependence on Kp. In addition, the PSDs appear to have a weak dependence on McIlwain parameter L with power slightly increasing as L increases. The magnetic wave PSDs are used along with the Fei et al. (2006) formulation to compute DLLB[CRRES] as a function of L and Kp. The L dependence of DLLB[CRRES] is systematically studied and is shown to depend on Kp. More significantly, we conclude that DLLEis the dominant term driving radial diffusion, typically exceeding DLLB by 1-2 orders of magnitude.

  4. Quantification of Overnight Movement of Birch (Betula pendula) Branches and Foliage with Short Interval Terrestrial Laser Scanning.

    PubMed

    Puttonen, Eetu; Briese, Christian; Mandlburger, Gottfried; Wieser, Martin; Pfennigbauer, Martin; Zlinszky, András; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the study was to determine circadian movements of silver birch (Petula Bendula) branches and foliage detected with terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). The study consisted of two geographically separate experiments conducted in Finland and in Austria. Both experiments were carried out at the same time of the year and under similar outdoor conditions. Experiments consisted of 14 (Finland) and 77 (Austria) individual laser scans taken between sunset and sunrise. The resulting point clouds were used in creating a time series of branch movements. In the Finnish data, the vertical movement of the whole tree crown was monitored due to low volumetric point density. In the Austrian data, movements of manually selected representative points on branches were monitored. The movements were monitored from dusk until morning hours in order to avoid daytime wind effects. The results indicated that height deciles of the Finnish birch crown had vertical movements between -10.0 and 5.0 cm compared to the situation at sunset. In the Austrian data, the maximum detected representative point movement was 10.0 cm. The temporal development of the movements followed a highly similar pattern in both experiments, with the maximum movements occurring about an hour and a half before (Austria) or around (Finland) sunrise. The results demonstrate the potential of terrestrial laser scanning measurements in support of chronobiology. PMID:26973668

  5. Ecology and mode-of-life explain lifespan variation in birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Kevin; Guillerme, Thomas; Finlay, Sive; Kane, Adam; Kelly, Seán B. A.; McClean, Deirdre; Kelly, David J.; Donohue, Ian; Jackson, Andrew L.; Cooper, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Maximum lifespan in birds and mammals varies strongly with body mass such that large species tend to live longer than smaller species. However, many species live far longer than expected given their body mass. This may reflect interspecific variation in extrinsic mortality, as life-history theory predicts investment in long-term survival is under positive selection when extrinsic mortality is reduced. Here, we investigate how multiple ecological and mode-of-life traits that should reduce extrinsic mortality (including volancy (flight capability), activity period, foraging environment and fossoriality), simultaneously influence lifespan across endotherms. Using novel phylogenetic comparative analyses and to our knowledge, the most species analysed to date (n = 1368), we show that, over and above the effect of body mass, the most important factor enabling longer lifespan is the ability to fly. Within volant species, lifespan depended upon when (day, night, dusk or dawn), but not where (in the air, in trees or on the ground), species are active. However, the opposite was true for non-volant species, where lifespan correlated positively with both arboreality and fossoriality. Our results highlight that when studying the molecular basis behind cellular processes such as those underlying lifespan, it is important to consider the ecological selection pressures that shaped them over evolutionary time. PMID:24741018

  6. Comparison of spherical double probe electric field measurements with plasma bulk flows in plasmas having densities less than 1 cm-3. [magnetosphere parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozer, F. S.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Birn, J.

    1983-01-01

    For a three-hour period in the magnetotail over which plasma density varied from less than 0.1 to about 1/cu cm, comparisons of ISEE-1 spherical double probe (dawn to dusk) electric field measurements and ISEE-2 plasma flows (converted to electric fields) show the zero lag cross correlation coefficient between 768 second averages of the two data sets to have been 0.93. A statistical relative uncertainty between pairs of points in the two data sets, estimated by only including counting statistics in the plasma measurement and time variations of the observed electric field over the measurement interval, is able to account for at least 75 percent of the deviations between the two data sets. In agreement with simple Langmuir probe theory, it has been found that the spacecraft potential measured over the three-hour interval by the double probe instrument varied as the log of the product of the plasma density and the square root of the electron temperature.

  7. Solar Wind Effects on Plasma Density Depletions: C/NOFS Results with Related Observations from DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, W. J.; Gentile, L. C.; Roddy, P. A.; Retterer, J. M.; Wilson, G. R.; de La Beaujardiere, O.; Su, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Before C/NOFS, the prevailing wisdom was that equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were primarily a post-sunset phenomenon. Changes in the ionosphere after sunset create conditions favorable for instability formation as polarization electric fields increase near the terminator. Plasma irregularities that develop in the bottomside of the F-layer grow into large depletions that rise rapidly into the topside ionosphere. By two hours in local time after sunset the initial upward drift of the ionosphere reverses suppressing further development of instabilities. Tsunoda’s [1985] seasonal-longitudinal model predicted that EPB rates should peak near times when the equatorial declination and the dusk terminator are closely aligned. Under these conditions E-layer conductance vanishes at both ends of flux tubes simultaneously, allowing EPBs to grow most rapidly. We validated this model during the recent solar maximum. In this unusual solar minimum, however, C/NOFS has encountered very few post-sunset depletions. They commonly appear between local midnight and dawn. We trace the energy flow from the Sun to the Earth to demonstrate that C/NOFS measurements are providing key insights into the dynamics of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere system. Results suggest that systematic effects of solar wind / IMF on dynamics of equatorial plasmas and electric fields may allow long-term alerts about impending ionospheric disturbances that lead to scintillation activity. Reference: Tsunoda, R. T. (1985), J. Geophys. Res., 90, 447.

  8. Saturn's northern auroras as observed using the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Bunce, E. J.; Clarke, J. T.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Hunt, G. J.; Provan, G.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the features of Saturn's northern FUV auroras as observed during a program of Hubble Space Telescope observations which executed over 2011-2013 and culminated, along with Cassini observations, in a comprehensive multi-spectral observing campaign. Our 2011-2013 observations of the northern aurora are also compared with those from our 2007-2008 observation of the southern aurora. We show that the variety of morphologies of the northern auroras is broadly consistent with the southern, and determine the statistical equatorward and poleward boundary locations. We find that our boundaries are overall consistent with previous observations, although a modest poleward displacement of the poleward boundaries is due to the increased prevalence of poleward auroral patches in the noon and afternoon sectors during this program, likely due to the solar wind interaction. We also show that the northern auroral oval oscillates with the northern planetary period oscillation (PPO) phase in an elongated ellipse with semi-major axis ∼1.6° oriented along the post-dawn/post-dusk direction. We further show that the northern auroras exhibit dawn-side brightenings at zero northern magnetic PPO phase, although there is mixed evidence of auroral emissions fixed in the rotating frame of the northern PPO current system, such that overall the dependence of the auroras on northern magnetic phase is somewhat weak.

  9. Daily Activity and Nest Occupation Patterns of Fox Squirrels (Sciurus niger) throughout the Year.

    PubMed

    Wassmer, Thomas; Refinetti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigated the general activity and nest occupation patterns of fox squirrels in a natural setting using temperature-sensitive data loggers that measure activity as changes in the microenvironment of the animal. Data were obtained from 25 distinct preparations, upon 14 unique squirrels, totaling 1385 recording days. The animals were clearly diurnal, with a predominantly unimodal activity pattern, although individual squirrels occasionally exhibited bimodal patterns, particularly in the spring and summer. Even during the short days of winter (9 hours of light), the squirrels typically left the nest after dawn and returned before dusk, spending only about 7 hours out of the nest each day. Although the duration of the daily active phase did not change with the seasons, the squirrels exited the nest earlier in the day when the days became longer in the summer and exited the nest later in the day when the days became shorter in the winter, thus tracking dawn along the seasons. During the few hours spent outside the nest each day, fox squirrels seemed to spend most of the time sitting or lying. These findings suggest that fox squirrels may have adopted a slow life history strategy that involves long periods of rest on trees and short periods of ground activity each day. PMID:26963918

  10. Twilight and photoperiod affect behavioral entrainment in the house mouse (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Comas, M; Hut, R A

    2009-10-01

    The effect of twilight transitions on entrainment of C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice (Mus musculus) was studied using light-dark cycles of different photoperiods (6, 12, and 18 h) and twilight transitions of different durations (0, 1, and 2 h). Phase angle differences of the onset, center of gravity, and offset of activity, activity duration (alpha), as well as free-running period (tau) in continuous darkness were analyzed. The main finding was that for all conditions the onset of activity was close to dusk or lights-off except for the short photoperiod with 2 h of twilight where activity onset was on average 5.3 (SEM 1.07) h after lights-off. This finding contrasts with the results of Boulos and Macchi for Syrian hamsters where a 5.9-h earlier activity onset was observed when similar photoperiod and twilight conditions are compared with a rectangular LD cycle. The authors suggest the opposite effects of 2 h of twilight in the 2 species may be related to their different free-running periods under DD conditions following entrainment to short photoperiod with 2-h twilight conditions. Since the authors observed larger variation in phase angle of entrainment in longer twilight conditions, twilight does not necessarily form a stronger zeitgeber. PMID:19755585

  11. The effectiveness of slow-stroke massage in diffusing agitated behaviors in individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rowe, M; Alfred, D

    1999-06-01

    Agitated behaviors of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), often endured or unsuccessfully treated with chemical or physical restraints, markedly increase the stress levels of family caregivers. The Theoretical Model for Aggression in the Cognitively Impaired guided the examination of caregiver-provided slow-stroke massage on the diffusion of actual and potential agitation for community-dwelling individuals with AD. Characteristics and frequency of agitation were quantified by two highly correlated instruments, the Agitated Behavior Rating Scale Scoring Guide and the Brief Behavior Symptom Rating Scale. Expressions of agitation of patients with AD increased in a linear pattern from dawn to dusk. Verbal displays of agitation, the most frequently cited form of agitation in community-dwelling individuals with AD, were not diffused by slow-stroke massage. However, the more physical expressions of agitation such as pacing, wandering, and resisting were decreased when slow-stroke massage was applied. This study contributes to building a body of knowledge regarding the phenomenon of agitated behaviors in cognitively impaired elderly individuals--its nature, frequency of occurrence, measurement, associated factors, and management. PMID:10603811

  12. The ecology of elk in an arid environment: An overview of the Hanford elk project

    SciTech Connect

    McCorquodale, S.M . Wildlife Resource Management); Eberhardt, L.E. )

    1990-08-01

    We studied elk (Cerves elaphus) in Washington's shrub-steppe region from 1982 to the present. The population originated from a small number of colonizers that took up residence on the Hanford Site in winter 1972--73. Rapid population growth was facilitated by high reproductive and survival rates. Elk showed strong preferences for bedding in sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) stands, the only vegetative cover available. Foraging elk typically selected previously burned habitats that no longer supported sagebrush. Elk limited their major diurnal activity, favoring dusk-to-dawn foraging with relatively high nocturnal activity levels. Elk diets were dominated by grasses from winter through early summer and by forbs during the summer drought period. High reproductive success and survival and superior antler growth relative to elk occupying more mesic environments suggested that these elk were effectively utilizing the shrub-steppe environment. Mild, short winters in the shrub-steppe were hypothesized to contribute to reduced winter energy deficits common in temperate herbivores, partly facilitating the observed high fitness. We also hypothesize that in the absence of a significant overstory, the proportion of the range of these elk that would be considered foraging habitat exceeded that typical of elk occupying coniferous forests. Thus, the quantity of foraging areas may have compensated for reduced productivity typical of this region. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Acute Suppressive and Long-Term Phase Modulation Actions of Orexin on the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Belle, Mino D.C.; Hughes, Alun T.L.; Bechtold, David A.; Cunningham, Peter; Pierucci, Massimo; Burdakov, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Circadian and homeostatic neural circuits organize the temporal architecture of physiology and behavior, but knowledge of their interactions is imperfect. For example, neurons containing the neuropeptide orexin homeostatically control arousal and appetitive states, while neurons in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) function as the brain's master circadian clock. The SCN regulates orexin neurons so that they are much more active during the circadian night than the circadian day, but it is unclear whether the orexin neurons reciprocally regulate the SCN clock. Here we show both orexinergic innervation and expression of genes encoding orexin receptors (OX1 and OX2) in the mouse SCN, with OX1 being upregulated at dusk. Remarkably, we find through in vitro physiological recordings that orexin predominantly suppresses mouse SCN Period1 (Per1)-EGFP-expressing clock cells. The mechanisms underpinning these suppressions vary across the circadian cycle, from presynaptic modulation of inhibitory GABAergic signaling during the day to directly activating leak K+ currents at night. Orexin also augments the SCN clock-resetting effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY), another neurochemical correlate of arousal, and potentiates NPY's inhibition of SCN Per1-EGFP cells. These results build on emerging literature that challenge the widely held view that orexin signaling is exclusively excitatory and suggest new mechanisms for avoiding conflicts between circadian clock signals and homeostatic cues in the brain. PMID:24599460

  14. Kinetic effects on the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale transverse velocity shear layers: Particle simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, T. K. M.; Hasegawa, H.; Shinohara, I.

    2010-01-01

    Ion-to-magnetohydrodynamic scale physics of the transverse velocity shear layer and associated Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) in a homogeneous, collisionless plasma are investigated by means of full particle simulations. The shear layer is broadened to reach a kinetic equilibrium when its initial thickness is close to the gyrodiameter of ions crossing the layer, namely, of ion-kinetic scale. The broadened thickness is larger in B⋅Ω<0 case than in B⋅Ω>0 case, where Ω is the vorticity at the layer. This is because the convective electric field, which points out of (into) the layer for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), extends (reduces) the gyrodiameters. Since the kinetic equilibrium is established before the KHI onset, the KHI growth rate depends on the broadened thickness. In the saturation phase of the KHI, the ion vortex flow is strengthened (weakened) for B⋅Ω<0 (B⋅Ω>0), due to ion centrifugal drift along the rotational plasma flow. In ion inertial scale vortices, this drift effect is crucial in altering the ion vortex size. These results indicate that the KHI at Mercury-like ion-scale magnetospheric boundaries could show clear dawn-dusk asymmetries in both its linear and nonlinear growth. PMID:20838425

  15. Migration timing of female kokanee salmon Oncorhynchus nerka: diel patterns and effects of maturation state.

    PubMed

    Warren, M A; Morbey, Y E

    2012-09-01

    Diel patterns of migration and migration speed were compared between reproductive timing phenotypes in female kokanee salmon Oncorhynchus nerka. Females of varying degrees of reproductive maturation were captured on their migration route to the Meadow Creek Spawning Channel (British Columbia, Canada), were tagged with passive-integrated transponders (PIT tags) and were subsequently monitored with stationary receivers. Females showed crepuscular migration timing, with approximately equal detections at dawn and dusk. In particular, peaks of movement were associated with the appearance of the sun over the mountains in the east and the disappearance of the sun over the mountains in the west. Over 25 m, migration speed was 1·0 body lengths (measured as fork length; L(F)) s(-1) and did not depend on maturation state. Over 3 km, migration speed was much slower (0·2-0·3 L(F) s(-1)) than over the short distance, with less mature females migrating more slowly than more mature females. Less mature females appeared to be in less of a hurry to reach breeding areas compared with more mature females. PMID:22957867

  16. Year-round observations of carbon biomass and flux variability in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, James K.B.; Wood, Todd

    2009-02-01

    Three Carbon Explorer (CE) floats profiling to kilometer depths in the Southern Ocean tracked dawn-dusk variations of mixing/stratification, particulate organic carbon (POC), and light scattering and sedimentation at 100, 250, and 800 m continuously from January 2002 to April 2003. Data were analyzed in conjunction with contemporaneous satellite winds and chlorophyll and derived subsurface light fields. The CE deployed at 66{sup o}S 172{sup o}W operated in the ice edge zone in absence of light. Two CEs deployed at 55{sup o}S 172{sup o}W recorded wintertime mixing to {approx}400 m, yet observed very different bloom dynamics and sedimentation the following spring. Four hypotheses are explored. The strongest is that shallow transient stratification of the deep winter mixed layer to shallower than photosynthetic critical depth occurred more frequently in the non-bloom/higher sedimentation case. The lower particle export to 800 m under the bloom was hypothesized to be due to higher interception of sinking carbon by a relatively starved over wintering zooplankton population. In the Southern Ocean surface phytoplankton biomass may counter indicate particle flux at kilometer depths.

  17. Photoperiodic modulation of voluntary ethanol intake in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, A M; Fixaris, M C; McCulley, W D

    2015-08-01

    Seasonal and geographic variations in light exposure influence human mood and behavior, including alcohol consumption. Similarly, manipulation of the environmental lighting regimen modulates voluntary ethanol intake in experimental animals. Nevertheless, previous studies in rats and hamsters have been somewhat inconsistent, and little is known concerning such effects in mice. In the present study, we maintained male C57Bl/6 mice in running-wheel cages under either short- or long-photoperiod light-dark cycles (LD 6:18 vs. LD 18:6); subsequently, the same animals were maintained under short or long "skeleton photoperiods", consisting of two daily 15-min light pulses signaling dusk and dawn (SP 6:18 vs. SP 18:6). Running wheels were locked mechanically for half the animals under each photoperiod. Analysis of running wheel patterns showed that mice displayed stable circadian adaptation to both standard LD cycles and skeleton photoperiods. Mice consumed more ethanol and less water, and thus showed higher ethanol preference, under LD 6:18 and SP 6:18 relative to the corresponding long-photoperiod regimens. While running-wheel access increased water intake, ethanol intake was unaffected by this manipulation. These effects are consistent with previous studies showing that short photoperiods or constant darkness increases ethanol intake in rodents. Further, the similarity of the effects of complete and skeleton photoperiods suggests that these effects are mediated by photoperiod-induced alterations in the circadian entrainment pattern, rather than by light exposure per se. PMID:25992479

  18. Quality control of automated hyperspectral remote sensing measurements from a seaborne platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaba, S. P.; Wernand, M. R.; Zielinski, O.

    2011-03-01

    In this study four data quality flags are presented for automated and unmanned above-water hyperspectral optical measurements collected underway in the North Sea, The Minch, Irish Sea and Celtic Sea in April/May 2009. Coincident to these optical measurements a DualDome D12 (Mobotix, Germany) camera system was used to capture sea surface and sky images. The first three flags are based on meteorological conditions, to select erroneous incoming solar irradiance (ES) taken during dusk, dawn, before significant incoming solar radiation could be detected or under rainfall. Furthermore, the relative azimuthal angle of the optical sensors to the sun is used to identify possible sunglint free sea surface zones. A total of 629 spectra remained after applying the meteorological masks (first three flags). Based on this dataset, a fourth flag for sunglint was generated by analysing and evaluating water leaving radiance (LW) and remote sensing reflectance (RRS) spectral behaviour in the presence and absence of sunglint salient in the simultaneously available sea surface images. Spectra conditions satisfying "mean LW (700-950 nm) < 2 mW m-2 nm-1 Sr-1" or alternatively "minimum RRS (700-950 nm) < 0.010 Sr-1", mask the most measurements affected by sunglint, providing efficient flagging of sunglint in automated quality control. It is confirmed that valid optical measurements can be performed 0° ≤ Φ ≤ 360° although 90° ≤ Φ ≤ 135° is recommended.

  19. MAGSAT scalar anomaly map of South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ridgway, J. R.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A scalar magnetic anomaly map was prepared for South America and adjacent marine areas directly from original MAGSAT orbits. The preparation of the map poses special problems, notably in the separation of external field and crustal anomalies, and in the reduction of data to a common altitude. External fields are manifested in a long-wavelength ring current effect, a medium-wavelength equatorial electrojet, and short-wavelength noise. The noise is reduced by selecting profiles from quiet periods, and since the electrojet is confined primarily to dusk profiles, its effect is minimized by drawing the data set from dawn profiles only. The ring current is corrected through the use of the standard ring current equation, augmented by further filtering with a Butterworth bandpass filter. Under the assumption that the time-variant ring current is best removed when a replication of redundant profiles is achieved, a test set of 25 groups of 3 nearly coincident orbits per group is set up for filtering with a range of long-wavelength cutoffs to determine which cutoff best replicates the residual profiles. Altitude differences are then normalized by an inversion of the profile data onto a grid of equivalent point dipoles, and recalculated at an altitude of 350 km. The resulting map, when compared to the 2 deg averaged map, shows more coherent anomalies, with notable differences in the region affected by the electrojet.

  20. A circadian gene expression atlas in mammals: Implications for biology and medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ray; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Ballance, Heather I.; Hughes, Michael E.; Hogenesch, John B.

    2014-01-01

    To characterize the role of the circadian clock in mouse physiology and behavior, we used RNA-seq and DNA arrays to quantify the transcriptomes of 12 mouse organs over time. We found 43% of all protein coding genes showed circadian rhythms in transcription somewhere in the body, largely in an organ-specific manner. In most organs, we noticed the expression of many oscillating genes peaked during transcriptional “rush hours” preceding dawn and dusk. Looking at the genomic landscape of rhythmic genes, we saw that they clustered together, were longer, and had more spliceforms than nonoscillating genes. Systems-level analysis revealed intricate rhythmic orchestration of gene pathways throughout the body. We also found oscillations in the expression of more than 1,000 known and novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Supporting their potential role in mediating clock function, ncRNAs conserved between mouse and human showed rhythmic expression in similar proportions as protein coding genes. Importantly, we also found that the majority of best-selling drugs and World Health Organization essential medicines directly target the products of rhythmic genes. Many of these drugs have short half-lives and may benefit from timed dosage. In sum, this study highlights critical, systemic, and surprising roles of the mammalian circadian clock and provides a blueprint for advancement in chronotherapy. PMID:25349387

  1. Plasma convection in the magnetotail lobes: statistical results from Cluster EDI measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Paschmann, G.; Förster, M.; Quinn, J.; Torbert, R.; Vaith, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P.; Kletzing, C.

    2008-08-01

    A major part of the plasma in the Earth's magnetotail is populated through transport of plasma from the solar wind via the magnetotail lobes. In this paper, we present a statistical study of plasma convection in the lobes for different directions of the interplanetary magnetic field and for different geomagnetic disturbance levels. The data set used in this study consists of roughly 340 000 one-minute vector measurements of the plasma convection from the Cluster Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) obtained during the period February 2001 to June 2007. The results show that both convection magnitude and direction are largely controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). For a southward IMF, there is a strong convection towards the central plasma sheet with convection velocities around 10 km s-1. During periods of northward IMF, the lobe convection is almost stagnant. A By dominated IMF causes a rotation of the convection patterns in the tail with an oppositely directed dawn-dusk component of the convection for the northern and southern lobe. Our results also show that there is an overall persistent duskward component, which is most likely a result of conductivity gradients in the footpoints of the magnetic field lines in the ionosphere.

  2. The anticorrelation of auroral arc and Pc5 pulsation occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, E.; Knudsen, D.; Rankin, R.; Baker, G.; Jackel, B.; Cogger, L.; Wallis, D.

    2003-04-01

    Using extensive data sets from the CANOPUS All-Sky Imager (ASI) and magnetometer at Gillam, Canada (manetic latitude 67 degrees), we have compiled occurrence statistics of Pc5 pulsations, and auroral arcs. For our purpose, Pc5 pulsations were defined as monochromatic, quasisunsoidal magnetic perturbations, with a frequency between 1.7 and 6.7 mHz, and that underwent at least four complete cycles. Auroral arcs were defined to be elongated auroral features. We find, consistent with the results of previous studies, that Pc5 pulsation occurrence peaks near both the dawn and dusk meridians, and auroral arc occurrence in the late evening sector, near 2300 hours MLT. We discuss the implications of these results for candidate auroral mechanism, in particular those which demand time variation ( ie., the field line resonance) versus those that rely on static processes, showing examples of auroral arcs which display characteristics which could be attributed to mechanisms from one or the other category. We conclude that while it is clear that field-line resonances with frequencies in the Pc5 band cause or at least modulate electron precipitation in some arcs, there are equally clearly arcs for which this is not true.

  3. Domestication effects on behavioural synchronization and individual distances in chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Eklund, Beatrix; Jensen, Per

    2011-02-01

    Behavioural synchrony (allelomimetic behaviour), and inter-individual distances are aspects of social and anti-predator strategies which may have been affected by domestication. Chickens are known to adjust synchronization and inter-individual distances depending on behaviour. We hypothesized that White Leghorn (WL) chickens would show less synchronized behaviour than the ancestor, the red jungle fowl (RJF). Sixty birds, 15 female and 15 male WL and the same number of RJF (28 weeks old) were studied in groups of three in furnished pens (1 m×2 m) for 24 consecutive hours per group, following 24 h of habituation. Video tapes covering 4 h per group (dawn, 9-10 am, 1-2 pm and dusk) were analysed. Red junglefowl perched significantly more, but there were no breed effects on the frequency or daily rhythm of any other activities, or on average inter-individual distances. Red junglefowl were more synchronized during perching and a tendency for the same was found for social behaviour. After performance of the two most synchronized behaviours, perching and comfort behaviour, individual distance increased more for RJF than WL. According to this study domestication of chickens appears not to have significantly altered the relative frequencies of different activities or average inter-individual distances, but have caused some changes in behavioural synchronization and maintenance of activity-specific inter-individual distances in chickens. The changes may indicate an adaptive response to captivity and domestication. PMID:21187131

  4. Competitive interactions between walleye (Sander vitreus) and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) under various controlled conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wuellner, M.R.; Graeb, B.D.S.; Willis, D.W.; Galster, B.J.; Selch, T.M.; Chipps, S.R.

    2011-01-01

    The range of smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) is expanding northward, creating new interactions with native predators, including walleye (Sander vitreus). We used a series of experiments to investigate competition between walleye (WAE) and smallmouth bass (SMB) at different life stages and light conditions, identified behaviors that allowed one fish to outcompete another, and evaluated whether prey switching mitigated competitive interactions. Juvenile and adult SMB appeared to outcompete WAE when fed during the daytime; neither species dominated when fed near dusk. Attack rates and capture efficiencies of both species were similar with an intra- or interspecific competitor, but SMB often exploited prey before the competitor had a chance to feed (exploitative competition) or displayed agonistic behaviors toward a potential competitor (interference competition). Prey selectivity of WAE or SMB did not differ when by themselves or with a potential competitor. These results indicate that SMB could outcompete WAE under limiting prey conditions due to the aggressive nature of SMB, but resources may be partitioned at least along a temporal scale. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  5. Vocalisation Repertoire of Female Bluefin Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) in Captivity: Sound Structure, Context and Vocal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Craig A.; Ghazali, Shahriman M.; Montgomery, John C.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Fish vocalisation is often a major component of underwater soundscapes. Therefore, interpretation of these soundscapes requires an understanding of the vocalisation characteristics of common soniferous fish species. This study of captive female bluefin gurnard, Chelidonichthys kumu, aims to formally characterise their vocalisation sounds and daily pattern of sound production. Four types of sound were produced and characterised, twice as many as previously reported in this species. These sounds fit two aural categories; grunt and growl, the mean peak frequencies for which ranged between 129 to 215 Hz. This species vocalized throughout the 24 hour period at an average rate of (18.5 ± 2.0 sounds fish-1 h-1) with an increase in vocalization rate at dawn and dusk. Competitive feeding did not elevate vocalisation as has been found in other gurnard species. Bluefin gurnard are common in coastal waters of New Zealand, Australia and Japan and, given their vocalization rate, are likely to be significant contributors to ambient underwater soundscape in these areas. PMID:26890124

  6. Observation of Neutral Sodium Above Mercury During the Transit of November 8, 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Reardon, Kevin P.; Bida, T. A.

    2013-01-01

    We mapped the absorption of sunlight by sodium vapor in the exosphere of Mercury during the transit of Mercury on November 8, 2006, using the IBIS Interferometric BIdimensional Spectrometer at the Dunn Solar Telescope operated by the National Solar Observatory at Sunspot, New Mexico. The measurements were reduced to line-of-sight equivalent widths for absorption at the sodium D2 line around the shadow of Mercury. The sodium absorption fell off exponentially with altitude up to about 600 km. However there were regions around north and south polar-regions where relatively uniform sodium absorptions extended above 1000 km. We corrected the 0-600 km altitude profiles for seeing blur using the measured point spread function. Analysis of the corrected altitude distributions yielded surface densities, zenith column densities, temperatures and scale heights for sodium all around the planet. Sodium absorption on the dawn side equatorial terminator was less than on the dusk side, different from previous observations of the relative absorption levels. We also determined Earthward velocities for sodium atoms, and line widths for the absorptions. Earthward velocities resulting from radiation pressure on sodium averaged 0.8 km/s, smaller than a prediction of 1.5 km/s. Most line widths were in the range of 20 mA after correction for instrumental broadening, corresponding to temperatures in the range of 1000 K.

  7. Modelling the magnetic field in Mercury's magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parunakian, David; Dyadechkin, Sergey; Alexeev, Igor; Belenkaya, Elena; Khodachenko, Maxim; Kallio, Esa; Alho, Markku

    2016-04-01

    The main focus of the present work is to estimate the accuracy of the new assimilated model (based on the paraboloid model of magnetosphere by Moscow State University and the 3D hybrid model by Aalto University) for Mercury's magnetic field in the magnetosheath by comparing its predictions with MESSENGER magnetometer measurements along several typical orbits. The duration of each magnetosheath pass is approximately one hour for dawn-dusk orbits, which is substantially longer than characteristic times of inner magnetospheric processes as well as the time required for solar wind to flow past Mercury's magnetosphere (approximately 1 min for L ˜ 10RM). Because of that, we need to carefully select the orbits to use from the available array of over 8000 magnetosheath crossings to satisfy the necessary condition of similar solar wind properties in orbit segments incoming and outgoing the magnetosheath. We pay special attention to the differences in the Mercury-solar wind interactions for southward and northward IMF. Dependence of reconnection phenomena on the IMF Bz direction is clearly demonstrated by our assimilated hybrid and paraboloid model simulation runs. We also examine the magnetosheath plasma parameters for signatures of a plasma depletion layer and examine the properties of Mercury's magnetopause.

  8. Electron beam experiments at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments with the electron gun on the SCATHA satellite produced evidence of beam-plasma interactions, and heating of the low energy electrons around the satellite. These experiments were conducted near geosynchronous orbit, in the dusk bulge, and plasma sheet, with one short operation in the lobe regions, providing a range of ambient plasma densities. The electron gun was operated at 50 eV, with beam currents of 1, 10, and 100 micro-A. Data from electrostatic analyzers and the dc electric field experiment show that the satellite charged to near the beam energy in sunlight, if the beam current was sufficient. Higher ambient densities required higher beam currents. The electrostatic analyzers showed distribution functions which had peaks, or plateaus, at energies greater than the satellite potential. These measurements indicate heating of the ambient plasma at several Debye lengths from the satellite, with the heated plasma then accelerated into the satellite. It is likely that the ambient plasma is in fact the photoelectron sheath generated by the satellite.

  9. Electron beam experiments at high altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.; Cohen, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments with the electron gun on the SCATHA satellite produced evidence of beam-plasma interactions, and heating of the low energy electrons around the satellite. These experiments were conducted near geosynchronous orbit, in the dusk bulge, and plasma sheet, with one short operation in the lobe regions, providing a range of ambient plasma densities. The electron gun was operated at 50 eV, with beam currents of 1, 10, and 100 micro-A. Data from electrostatic analyzers and the DC electric field experiment show that the satellite charged to near the beam energy in sunlight, if the beam current was sufficient. Higher ambient densities required higher beam currents. The electrostatic analyzers showed distribution functions which had peaks, or plateaus, at energies greater than the satellite potential. These measurements indicate heating of the ambient plasma at several Debye lengths from the satellite, with the heated plasma then accelerated into the satellite. It is likely that the ambient plasma is in fact the photoelectron sheath generated by the satellite.

  10. Dynamic effects of restoring footpoint symmetry on closed magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reistad, J. P.; Østgaard, N.; Tenfjord, P.; Laundal, K. M.; Snekvik, K.; Haaland, S.; Milan, S. E.; Oksavik, K.; Frey, H. U.; Grocott, A.

    2016-05-01

    Here we present an event where simultaneous global imaging of the aurora from both hemispheres reveals a large longitudinal shift of the nightside aurora of about 3 h, being the largest relative shift reported on from conjugate auroral imaging. This is interpreted as evidence of closed field lines having very asymmetric footpoints associated with the persistent positive y component of the interplanetary magnetic field before and during the event. At the same time, the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network observes the ionospheric nightside convection throat region in both hemispheres. The radar data indicate faster convection toward the dayside in the dusk cell in the Southern Hemisphere compared to its conjugate region. We interpret this as a signature of a process acting to restore symmetry of the displaced closed magnetic field lines resulting in flux tubes moving faster along the banana cell than the conjugate orange cell. The event is analyzed with emphasis on Birkeland currents (BC) associated with this restoring process, as recently described by Tenfjord et al. (2015). Using data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) during the same conditions as the presented event, the large-scale BC pattern associated with the event is presented. It shows the expected influence of the process of restoring symmetry on BCs. We therefore suggest that these observations should be recognized as being a result of the dynamic effects of restoring footpoint symmetry on closed field lines in the nightside.

  11. A Multispacecraft/Instrument Case Study of the Relationship Between the Solar Wind and Ionospheric Plasma Outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craven, Paul D.; Chandler, M. O.; Moore, T. E.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    The study of the relationship between the solar wind and ionospheric plasma outflows is fundamental to understanding the solar- terrestrial relationship. A multi-spacecraft/instrument case study has been carried out to address this relationship. On 11-26-00 the Polar spacecraft made a pass through the southern cleft region near perigee where the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) instrument observed a classic Cleft Ion Fountain/upwelling ion signature. These observations followed several pressure pulses from the solar wind as evidenced by observations from the Magnetic Field Instrument (MFI) on the WIND spacecraft. Several interesting electric field features were observed by the Electric Field Instrument (EFI) as Polar appeared to pass through a narrow region of strong currents into a region with significant oscillations at a large range of frequencies. In addition, coincident with the TIDE observations of ion outflow, the low-energy edge of the characteristic V-shape of cusp ion injections was also observed. During this same time frame the Cluster spacecrafts crossed the magnetopause in the dusk sector and observed the electric field signatures associated with this region on all three satellites. This event is addressed in detail to further detail cleft ion fountain source characteristics, to add additional data regarding the hypothesis that solar wind pressure pulses are a trigger for cleft outflow, and to investigate possible interactions among waves, ionospheric plasma, and cusp injected plasma.

  12. Recurrent pulsations in Saturn's high latitude magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Carbary, J. F.; Bunce, E. J.; Radioti, A.; Badman, S. V.; Pryor, W. R.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the course of about 6 h on Day 129, 2008, the UV imaging spectrograph (UVIS) on the Cassini spacecraft observed a repeated intensification and broadening of the high latitude auroral oval into the polar cap. This feature repeated at least 5 times with about a 1 h period, as it rotated in the direction of corotation, somewhat below the planetary rotation rate, such that it moved from noon to post-dusk, and from roughly 77° to 82° northern latitudes during the observing interval. The recurring UV observation was accompanied by pronounced ∼1 h pulsations in auroral hiss power, magnetic perturbations consistent with small-scale field aligned currents, and energetic ion conics and electrons beaming upward parallel to the local magnetic field at the spacecraft location. The magnetic field and particle events are in phase with the auroral hiss pulsation. This event, taken in the context of the more thoroughly documented auroral hiss and particle signatures (seen on many high latitude Cassini orbits), sheds light on the possible driving mechanisms, the most likely of which are magnetopause reconnection and/or Kelvin Helmholtz waves.

  13. Chronology of eclipse "San Miao"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ci-Yuan

    2001-06-01

    The ancient book "Mozi" (5th century BC) records: "In ancient times, the San Miao tribes were in disarray. The sun rose in the evening...King Yu vanquished them. "King Yu is a prehistoric person living in 23-19th century BC. The strange phenomena "sun rose in evening" was explained as a large solar eclipse at sunset by Pang. Therefore investigations on it may lead to an important progress of Chinese chronology. After an analysis on all similar records in Chinese history, we pay main attention to the relationship of eclipse computations with parameter "c", the long term of earth's rotation rate. We have computed all the solar eclipses in that period by the way similar to that used for investigating the "double dawn" eclipse. By change parameter "c" in reasonable range (28-36 sec/cy2), we have found 11 possible results listed in a table. One figure shows the eclipse maps and relative "double dawn/dusk" areas while another one illustrates how the parameter "c" affects the result. For an exact conclusion of King Yu's chronology, we need further progress from both side: history which may limit the King Yu's period and astronomy which may limit the possible range of parameter "c".

  14. The nature of the hydrogen tori of Titan and Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Marconi, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of the hydrogen tori of Titan and Triton is examined. Critical time scales of the two tori are discussed. For the Titan torus, where atom-atom collisions are not important, the time scale for solar radiation pressure to act on the system is shown to be comparable to the hydrogen lifetime due to ionization and charge exchange losses by solar, magnetospheric, and solar wind processes. The solar radiation pressure then provides a mechanism which destroys the initial azimuthal symmetry of the hydrogen atom orbits about the planet and causes atom orbits to move inward and to collide with the planet on its dusk side. For Triton, the atom-atom collision time scale dominates all other time scales in the system. The evolution of the torus is then an inherently nonlinear problem that depends upon the collisional redistribution of atom-orbit velocities in the presence of a planetary gravitational force field. This nonlinear process introduces an expansion mechanism into the torus problem which dramatically alters its structure.

  15. Motion of reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail. Multiple reconnection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, Alexandra; Nakamura, Rumi; Semenov, Vladimir S.; Nakamura, Takuma K. M.

    2016-04-01

    During magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail, the reconnection site (X-line) can move in a specific direction. We present a detailed statistical study of the X-line motion. Using four-spacecraft Cluster observations, we identify the X-line velocity distinguishing between the single and multiple reconnection events. Most of the X-lines move tailward (radial outward) along the current sheet, however the Earthward motion was estimated for a couple of multiple X-lines. The X-lines also propagate outward from the midnight sector in the dawn-dusk direction in the current sheet plane. We found that the X-line radial motion is consistent with the direction of the radial pressure gradient. Besides, we found that the X-line speed in the Earth-tail direction is comparable and proportional to the reconnection inflow speed and approximately 0.1 of the reconnection outflow speed. These results suggest that both the global pressure distribution and the local reconnection physics may affect the X-line motion. We also discuss the interaction among multiple X-lines based on detailed analysis of an event showing counter-streaming jets from two different X-lines.

  16. Variations in the occurrence of SuperDARN F region echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezelbash, M.; Fiori, R. A. D.; Koustov, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    The occurrence of F region ionospheric echoes observed by a number of SuperDARN HF radars is analyzed statistically in order to infer solar cycle, seasonal, and diurnal trends. The major focus is on Saskatoon radar data for 1994-2012. The distribution of the echo occurrence rate is presented in terms of month of observation and magnetic local time. Clear repetitive patterns are identified during periods of solar maximum and solar minimum. For years near solar maximum, echoes are most frequent near midnight during winter. For years near solar minimum, echoes occur more frequently near noon during winter, near dusk and dawn during equinoxes and near midnight during summer. Similar features are identified for the Hankasalmi and Prince George radars in the northern hemisphere and the Bruny Island TIGER radar in the southern hemisphere. Echo occurrence for the entire SuperDARN network demonstrates patterns similar to patterns in the echo occurrence for the Saskatoon radar and for other radars considered individually. In terms of the solar cycle, the occurrence rate of nightside echoes is shown to increase by a factor of at least 3 toward solar maximum while occurrence of the near-noon echoes does not significantly change with the exception of a clear depression during the declining phase of the solar cycle.

  17. Avoidance of overheating and selection for both hair loss and bipedality in hominins

    PubMed Central

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Wilkinson, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Two frequently debated aspects of hominin evolution are the development of upright bipedal stance and reduction in body hair. It has long been argued, on the basis of heat-balance models, that thermoregulation might have been important in the evolution of both of these traits. Previous models were based on a stationary individual standing in direct sunlight; here we extend this approach to consider a walking hominin, having argued that walking is more thermally challenging than remaining still. Further, stationary activities may be more compatible with shade seeking than activities (such as foraging) involving travel across the landscape. Our model predictions suggest that upright stance probably evolved for nonthermoregulatory reasons. However, the thermoregulatory explanation for hair loss was supported. Specifically, we postulate progressive hair loss being selected and this allowing individuals to be active in hot, open environments initially around dusk and dawn without overheating. Then, as our ancestors’ hair loss increased and sweating ability improved over evolutionary time, the fraction of the day when they could remain active in such environments extended. Our model suggests that only when hair loss and sweating ability reach near-modern human levels could hominins have been active in the heat of the day in hot, open environments. PMID:22160694

  18. Storytelling and Science Under the Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggard, Daryl

    2013-01-01

    This summer the Aspen Center for Physics and the Aspen Science Center collaborated with a small team of astrophysicists to host a joint stargazing, storytelling, ask an astronomer, and ice cream social event. The team consisted of staff members from the ACP and the ASC, four visting professional astrophysicists, and professional storytellers from the international organization "Spellbinders" (including the two founders). The event kicked off with liquid nitrogen ice cream making, which was a big hit with the more than 150 people in attendance. At dusk we divided into 4 groups and teams of two (a Spellbinder and an astrophysicist) circulated from group to group telling stories about the sky from all over the world, and answering questions about planets, stars, galaxies, and black holes. Three small telescopes focused on Saturn and lines formed after it finally got dark. I'll discuss how we put this event together, why it is important to join science and culture in order to engage the public, and how fantastic the stars are for creating this union.

  19. F-Region Dynamo Simulations at Low and Mid-Latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maute, Astrid; Richmond, Arthur D.

    2016-07-01

    The " F-layer dynamo" or " F-region dynamo" concept was introduced by Rishbeth (Planet. Space Sci. 19(2):263-267, 1971a; 19(3):357-369, 1971b). F-region winds blow the plasma across magnetic field lines setting up transverse drifts and polarization electric fields leading to equatorial downward current during the daytime and upward current at dusk which were confirmed by satellite observations. In the daytime the F-region current can close through the highly conducting E-region. At night when the E-region conductivity is small the F-region dynamo generates polarization electric fields and is mainly responsible for the nighttime drift variations. In the evening the F-region dynamo is instrumental in generating an enhanced vertical drift, the pre-reversal enhancement. The current due to the F-region dynamo is larger at day than at night, but the F-region dynamo contributes approximately 10-15 % to the total current at day versus approximately 50 % at night (Rishbeth in J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 43(56):387-392, 1981). The F-region dynamo effects strongly depend on the Pedersen conductivity and therefore on the solar cycle. We will review the influence of the F-region dynamo on the ionosphere in general and particularly focus on the role it plays in generating ionospheric currents and magnetic perturbations at low-earth orbiting (LEO) satellite altitudes.

  20. Spike firing pattern of output neurons of the Limulus circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiahui S; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2011-08-01

    The lateral eyes of the horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) show a daily rhythm in visual sensitivity that is mediated by efferent nerve signals from a circadian clock in the crab's brain. How these signals communicate circadian messages is not known for this or other animals. Here the authors describe in quantitative detail the spike firing pattern of clock output neurons in living horseshoe crabs and discuss its possible significance to clock organization and function. Efferent fiber spike trains were recorded extracellularly for several hours to days, and in some cases, the electroretinogram was simultaneously acquired to monitor eye sensitivity. Statistical features of single- and multifiber recordings were characterized via interval distribution, serial correlation, and power spectral analysis. The authors report that efferent feedback to the eyes has several scales of temporal structure, consisting of multicellular bursts of spikes that group into clusters and packets of clusters that repeat throughout the night and disappear during the day. Except near dusk and dawn, the bursts occur every 1 to 2 sec in clusters of 10 to 30 bursts separated by a minute or two of silence. Within a burst, each output neuron typically fires a single spike with a preferred order, and intervals between bursts and clusters are positively correlated in length. The authors also report that efferent activity is strongly modulated by light at night and that just a brief flash has lasting impact on clock output. The multilayered firing pattern is likely important for driving circadian rhythms in the eye and other target organs. PMID:21775292