Science.gov

Sample records for dust control devices

  1. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for each of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  2. Dust control for Enabler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, Kevin; Karl, Chad; Litherland, Mark; Ritchie, David; Sun, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    The dust control group designed a system to restrict dust that is disturbed by the Enabler during its operation from interfering with astronaut or camera visibility. This design also considers the many different wheel positions made possible through the use of artinuation joints that provide the steering and wheel pitching for the Enabler. The system uses a combination of brushes and fenders to restrict the dust when the vehicle is moving in either direction and in a turn. This design also allows for ease of maintenance as well as accessibility of the remainder of the vehicle.

  3. Conveyor dust control

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbeck, L.

    1999-11-01

    In the past, three different approaches have been used to control dust arising at conveyor load zones. They are: Dust Containment consists of those mechanical systems employed to keep material inside the transfer point with the main material body. Dust Suppression systems increase the mass of suspended dust particles, allowing them to fall from the air stream. Dust Collection is the mechanical capture and return of airborne material after it becomes airborne from the main material body. Previously, these three approaches have always been seen as separate entities. They were offered by separate organizations competing in the marketplace. The three technologies vied for their individual piece of the rock, at the expense of the other technologies (and often at the expense of overall success). There have been considerable amounts of I`m better selling, as well as finger pointing at the other systems when problems arose. Each system claimed its own technology was the best, providing the most effective, most cost-efficient, most maintenance-free solution to fugitive material.

  4. A DUST ABATEMENT DEVICE FOR HARVEST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A prototype device was designed and tested by USDA and New Mexico State University researchers to reduce nuisance dust emissions during nut harvesting. The main goal of the project was to develop a device that could be retrofitted to the many harvesters already in service in the nut producing regio...

  5. Electrostatic Dust Control on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Calle, C. I.; Curtis, S. A.; Keller, J. F.; Minetto, F.; Mantovani, J. G.

    2007-01-01

    Successful operation for exploration of planetary regoliths will depend on the capability to keep surfaces free of dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Such study is essential in order to resolve issues in dealing with regolith fines identified during the Apollo missions where dust behaved like abrasive Velcro before returning to the Moon. During Moon landings, locally-induced stirring of the regolith caused dust to be suspended long enough to come into contact with conducting surfaces. Lunar fines, because of their electrostatic charging, were difficult to collect and sparsely sampled: bag seals were broken, samples contaminated and lost. Our objectives here are to describe a multi-faceted electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue, as well as to present our preliminary results which confirm the view that the successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Our device concept combines electron or ion beams, acting as a plasma dust sweeper to control the flow of dust by systematic scanning of the surface with an electrostatically controlled potential. A plate of the opposite potential used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of < 5 kg mass and using <5 watts of power to be operational in <5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g., on POLAR). Rovers, human or robotic, wheeled, legged, or tetrahedral, could be fitted with devices that could harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on extensive areas of exposed impact-generated regolith, on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  6. Haul road dust control

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, W.R.; Organiscak, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    A field study was conducted to measure dust from haul trucks at a limestone quarry and a coal preparation plant waste hauling operation. The study found that primarily wind, distance and road treatment conditions notably affected the dust concentrations at locations next to, 50 ft from, and 100 ft away from the unpaved haulage road. Airborne dust measured along the unpaved haul road showed that high concentrations of fugitive dust can be generated with these concentrations rapidly decreasing to nearly background levels within 100 ft of the road. Instantaneous respirable dust measurements illustrated that the trucks generate a real-time dust cloud that has a peak concentration with a time-related decay rate as the dust moves past the sampling locations. The respirable dust concentrations and peak levels were notably diminished as the dust cloud was transported, diluted, and diffused by the wind over the 100 ft distance from the road. Individual truck concentrations and peak levels measured next to the dry road surface test section were quite variable and dependent on wind conditions, particularly wind direction, with respect to reaching the sampling location. The vast majority of the fugitive airborne dust generated from unpaved and untreated haulage roads was non-respirable. 6 figs.

  7. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Tool for Lunar Dust Control

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Cheung, C. Y.; Keller, J. F.; Moore, M.; Calle, C. I.

    2009-03-16

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Solving the dust problem is essential before we return to the Moon. During the Apollo missions, the discovery was made that regolith fines, or dust, behaved like abrasive velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, and making movement progressively more difficult as it was mechanically stirred up during surface operations, and abrading surfaces, including spacesuits, when attempts were made to remove it manually. In addition, some of the astronauts experienced breathing difficulties when exposed to dust that got into the crew compartment. The successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Here we will describe the surface properties of dust particles, the basis for their behavior, and an electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue confirmed by our preliminary results. Our device concept utilizes a focused electron beam to control the electrostatic potential of the surface. A plate of the opposite potential is then used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of <5 kg mass and using <5 watts of power to be operational in <5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  8. PARTICULATE CONTROL FOR FUGITIVE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of particulate control for fugitive dust. Study results indicate that many Air Quality Control Regions (AQCRs) do not meet ambient air standards for particulates. In a majority of these ACQRs, the emissions from fugitive dust sources are higher...

  9. Dust control for draglines

    SciTech Connect

    Grad, P.

    2009-09-15

    Monitoring dust levels inside draglines reveals room for improvement in how filtration systems are used and maintained. The Australian firm BMT conducted a field test program to measure airflow parameters, dust fallout rates and dust concentrations, inside and outside the machine house, on four draglines and one shovel. The study involved computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The article describes how the tests were made and gives results. It was not possible to say which of the two main filtration systems currently used on Australian draglines - Dynavane or Floseps - performs better. It would appear that more frequent maintenance and cleaning would increase the overall filtration performance and systems could be susceptible to repeat clogging in a short time. 2 figs., 1 photos.

  10. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher),more » devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.« less

  11. DEVICE CONTROLLER, CAMERA CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Marcia

    1998-07-20

    This is a C++ application that is the server for the cameral control system. Devserv drives serial devices, such as cameras and videoswitchers used in a videoconference, upon request from a client such as the camxfgbfbx ccint program. cc Deverv listens on UPD ports for clients to make network contractions. After a client connects and sends a request to control a device (such as to pan,tilt, or zooma camera or do picture-in-picture with a videoswitcher), devserv formats the request into an RS232 message appropriate for the device and sends this message over the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port to which the device is connected. Devserv then reads the reply from the device from the serial port and then formats and sends via multicast a status message. In addition, devserv periodically multicasts status or description messages so that all clients connected to the multicast channel know what devices are supported and their ranges of motion and the current position. The software design employs a class hierarchy such that an abstract base class for devices can be subclassed into classes for various device categories(e.g. sonyevid30, cononvco4, panasonicwjmx50, etc.). which are further subclassed into classes for various device categories. The devices currently supported are the Sony evi-D30, Canon, VCC1, Canon VCC3, and Canon VCC4 cameras and the Panasonic WJ-MX50 videoswitcher. However, developers can extend the class hierarchy to support other devices.

  12. Studies of dust transport in long pulse plasma discharges in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Kasahara, H.; Tokitani, M.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kamio, S.; Seki, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Pigarov, A.; Smirnov, R.; Kawamura, G.; Tanaka, H.; Masuzaki, S.; Uesugi, Y.; Mutoh, T.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional trajectories of incandescent dust particles in plasmas were observed with stereoscopic fast framing cameras in a large helical device. It proved that the dust is located in the peripheral plasma and most of the dust moves along the magnetic field lines with acceleration in the direction that corresponds to the plasma flow. ICRF heated long pulse plasma discharges were terminated with the release of large amounts of dust from a closed divertor region. After the experimental campaign, the traces of exfoliation of carbon rich mixed-material deposition layers were found in the divertor region. Transport of carbon dust is investigated using a modified dust transport simulation code, which can explain the observed dust trajectories. It also shows that controlling the radius of the dust particles to less than 1 mm is necessary to prevent the plasma termination by penetration of dust for the long pulse discharges. Dust transport simulation including heavy metal dust particles demonstrates that high heating power operation is effective for shielding the main plasma from dust penetration by an enhanced plasma flow effect and a high heat load onto the dust particles in the peripheral plasma. It shows a more powerful penetration characteristic of tungsten dust particles compared to that of carbon and iron dust particles.

  13. CONTROL LIMITER DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    DeShong, J.A.

    1960-03-01

    A control-limiting device for monltoring a control system is described. The system comprises a conditionsensing device, a condition-varying device exerting a control over the condition, and a control means to actuate the condition-varying device. A control-limiting device integrates the total movement or other change of the condition-varying device over any interval of time during a continuum of overlapping periods of time, and if the tothl movement or change of the condition-varying device exceeds a preset value, the control- limiting device will switch the control of the operated apparatus from automatic to manual control.

  14. Study on plasma parameters and dust charging in an electrostatically plugged multicusp plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-06-15

    The effect of the electrostatic confinement potential on the charging of dust grains and its relationship with the plasma parameters has been studied in an electrostatically plugged multicusp dusty plasma device. Electrostatic plugging is implemented by biasing the electrically isolated magnetic multicusp channel walls. The experimental results show that voltage applied to the channel walls can be a controlling parameter for dust charging.

  15. Trends in implementation of longwall dust controls

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    During the last ten years, longwall mining systems have undergone many changes. Panel widths and lengths have increased. Long-wall faces have become more automated. Average production from individual longwall panels has increased from 1,000 to 3,600 tons per shift. To control the dust generation resulting from the higher production, longwall dust control systems have integrated various dust control techniques. Systems designed to control dust generated at the crusher/stageloader, shearer, and supports are common to most longwall faces. A survey was made of the dust controls that are currently in place on all the longwalls in the U.S. This survey addressed the types of controls used to reduce dust generated at the crusher/stageloader, shearer and roof support movement. Additionally, information on face ventilation rates, cutting cycle and level of automation was obtained. The purpose of this paper is to review the dust control practices that have been implemented throughout the United States and to identify those controls that are being used on high production longwall faces. Additionally, a model is used to demonstrate how ventilation and automation affect occupational exposure. Automation of roof support movement can offer some of the greatest reductions in occupational dust exposures. While technically feasible, its full benefit has not been fully realized by the industry. Until technology to fully automate longwall mining systems becomes more reliable, future dust control systems must rely on increased ventilation, application of headgate dust collectors, improved shearer dust controls and improved shield dust suppression systems.

  16. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Dust Control Tool Proof of Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Marshall, J.; Nuth, J.; Calle, C.

    2010-01-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the performance-compromising dust. Once in contact with surfaces, whether set in motion by natural or mechanical means, regolith fines, or dust, behave like abrasive Velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, making movement progressively more difticult, and being almost impossible to remove by mechanical mcans (brushing). The successful dust removal strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between Van der Waals and Coulombic forces. Here, proof of concept for an electrostatically-based concept for dust control tool is described and demonstrated. A low power focused electron beam is used in the presence of a small electrical field to increase the negative charge to mass ratio of a dusty surface until dust repulsion and attraction to a lower potential surface, acting as a dust collector, occurred. Our goal is a compact device of less than 5 kg mass and using less than 5 watts of power to be operational in less than 5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g ., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could hamess the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  17. 30 CFR 56.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dust control. 56.9315 Section 56.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... control. Dust shall be controlled at muck piles, material transfer points, crushers, and on haulage...

  18. 30 CFR 56.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dust control. 56.9315 Section 56.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... control. Dust shall be controlled at muck piles, material transfer points, crushers, and on haulage...

  19. 30 CFR 56.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dust control. 56.9315 Section 56.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... control. Dust shall be controlled at muck piles, material transfer points, crushers, and on haulage...

  20. Dust control research for SEI. [Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.; Harris, Jeffrey R.

    1992-01-01

    A study, at NASA Johnson Space Center, of dust control requirements for surface habitats has focused on identification of the dust problem, identifying dust control techniques and dust control technology areas requiring research development. This research was performed for the Surface Habitats and Construction (SHAC) technology area. Dust control consists of two problems: (1) how to keep it out of the habitat; and (2) once the habitat or airlock is contaminated with dust, how to collect it. This paper describes the dust environment, the Apollo experience and dust control methods used, future EVA operational considerations, and dust control concepts for surface habitats.

  1. 78 FR 27442 - Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices; Correction AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: On April 30, 2013, Mine Safety...

  2. REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Kaufman, H.B.; Weiss, A.A.

    1959-08-18

    A shadow control device for controlling a nuclear reactor is described. The device comprises a series of hollow neutron-absorbing elements arranged in groups, each element having a cavity for substantially housing an adjoining element and a longitudinal member for commonly supporting the groups of elements. Longitudinal actuation of the longitudinal member distributes the elements along its entire length in which position maximum worth is achieved.

  3. Device control at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner, S.; Barker, D.; Bookwalter, V.

    1996-08-01

    CEBAF has undergone a major conversion of its accelerator control system from TACL to EPICS, affecting device control for the RF system, magnets, the machine protection system, the vacuum and valves, and the diagnostic systems including beam position monitors, harps, and the camera and solenoid devices (beam viewers, faraday cups, optical transition radiation viewers, synchrotron radiation monitor, etc.). Altogether these devices require approximately 125,000 EPICS database records. The majority of these devices are controlled through CAMAC; some use embedded microprocessors (RF and magnets), and newer interfaces are in VME. The standard EPICS toolkit was extended to include a driver for CAMAC which supports dual processors on one serial highway, custom database records for magnets and BPMs, and custom data acquisition tasks for the BPMs. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Device Oriented Project Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesio, Leo; Kraimer, Martin

    2013-11-20

    This proposal is directed at the issue of developing control systems for very large HEP projects. A de-facto standard in accelerator control is the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS), which has been applied successfully to many physics projects. EPICS is a channel based system that requires that each channel of each device be configured and controlled. In Phase I, the feasibility of a device oriented extension to the distributed channel database was demonstrated by prototyping a device aware version of an EPICS I/O controller that functions with the current version of the channel access communication protocol. Extensions have been made to the grammar to define the database. Only a multi-stage position controller with limit switches was developed in the demonstration, but the grammar should support a full range of functional record types. In phase II, a full set of record types will be developed to support all existing record types, a set of process control functions for closed loop control, and support for experimental beam line control. A tool to configure these records will be developed. A communication protocol will be developed or extensions will be made to Channel Access to support introspection of components of a device. Performance bench marks will be made on both communication protocol and the database. After these records and performance tests are under way, a second of the grammar will be undertaken.

  5. Contamination control device

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Robert M.; Cronin, John C.

    1977-01-01

    A contamination control device for use in a gas-insulated transmission bus consisting of a cylindrical center conductor coaxially mounted within a grounded cylindrical enclosure. The contamination control device is electrically connected to the interior surface of the grounded outer shell and positioned along an axial line at the lowest vertical position thereon. The contamination control device comprises an elongated metallic member having a generally curved cross-section in a first plane perpendicular to the axis of the bus and having an arcuate cross-section in a second plane lying along the axis of the bus. Each opposed end of the metallic member and its opposing sides are tapered to form a pair of generally converging and downward sloping surfaces to trap randomly moving conductive particles in the relatively field-free region between the metallic member and the interior surface of the grounded outer shell. The device may have projecting legs to enable the device to be spot welded to the interior of the grounded housing. The control device provides a high capture probability and prevents subsequent release of the charged particles after the capture thereof.

  6. Control of Dust Inventory in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rosanvallon, S.; Grisolia, C.; Andrew, P.; Ciattaglia, S.; Pitcher, C. S.; Taylor, N.; Furlan, J.

    2008-09-07

    Particles with sizes ranging from 100 nm to 100 {mu}m are produced in tokamaks by the interaction of the plasma with the first wall materials and divertor. Dust has not yet been of a major concern in existing tokamaks mainly because their quantities are small and these devices are not nuclear facilities. However, in ITER and in future reactors, they could represent operational and potential safety issues. The aim of this paper is thus to describe the dust creation processes in the tokamak environment. The diagnostics and removal techniques that are needed to be implemented to measure and minimise the dust inventory are also presented. The integration of these techniques into a tokamak environment is also discussed.

  7. REACTOR CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Graham, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    A wholly mechanical compact control device is designed for automatically rendering the core of a fission reactor subcritical in response to core temperatures in excess of the design operating temperature limit. The control device comprises an expansible bellows interposed between the base of a channel in a reactor core and the inner end of a fuel cylinder therein which is normally resiliently urged inwardly. The bellows contains a working fluid which undergoes a liquid to vapor phase change at a temperature substantially equal to the design temperature limit. Hence, the bellows abruptiy expands at this limiting temperature to force the fuel cylinder outward and render the core subcritical. The control device is particularly applicable to aircraft propulsion reactor service. (AEC)

  8. Pollution Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    BHA Group Inc.'s PrecipTech Power Guard SQ-200 automatic voltage controller, combined with a remote computer, is an automatic management system for smoke-cleaning precipitators. It is the second generation of the SQ 100 developed at Langley Research Center, and was commercialized by two NASA employees. An electrostatic precipitator cleans the smoke by removing particulate matter from smokestack gases before gases are expelled into the atmosphere. Smokestack gas is passed through a precipitator chamber and exposed to an electrostatic field; dust particles in the gas become electrically charged, migrate to collection surfaces and are "captured." Developed under a NASA program seeking a way to dispose refuse, the system monitors sparking, automatically adjusts to changes in operating conditions and does not require a skilled operator.

  9. Radiographic quality control devices.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    In this study, we evaluate eight radiographic quality control (QC) devices, which noninvasively measure the output from a variety of diagnostic x-ray production systems. When used as part of a quality assurance (QA) program, radiographic QC devices help ensure that x-ray equipment is working within acceptable limits. This in turn helps ensure that high-quality images are achieved with appropriate radiation doses and that resources are used efficiently (for example, by minimizing the number of repeat exposures required). Our testing focused on the physical performance, ease of use, and service and maintenance characteristics that affect the use of these devices for periodic, routine measurements of x-ray system parameters. We found that all the evaluated models satisfactorily measure all the parameters normally needed for a QA program. However, we did identify a number of differences among the models--particularly in the range of exposure levels that can be effectively measured and the ease of use. Three models perform well for a variety of applications and are very easy to use; we rate them Preferred. Three additional models have minor limitations but otherwise perform well; we rate them Acceptable. We recommend against purchasing two models because, although each performs acceptably for most applications, neither model can measure low levels of radiation. This Evaluation covers devices designed to measure the output of x-ray tubes noninvasively. These devices, called radiographic quality control (QC) devices, or QC meters, are typically used by medical physicists, x-ray engineers, biomedical engineers, and suitably trained radiographic technologists to make QC measurements. We focus on the use of these devices as part of an overall quality assurance (QA) program. We have not evaluated their use for other applications, such as acceptance testing. To be included in this study, a device must be able to measure the exposure- and kVp-related characteristics of most x

  10. Contaminate Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Robert H. (Inventor); Flynn, Kenneth P. (Inventor); Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A contaminate control device for filtering contaminates from a gas such as air is provided. The device includes a housing having a first inlet and a first outlet. An axial flow filter is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the axial flow filter has a second inlet and a second outlet. A second filter disposed about the axial flow filter and is fluidly coupled between the first inlet and the first outlet, the second filter having a third inlet on an inner diameter and a third outlet disposed on an outer diameter. A flow restrictor is fluidly coupled between the second inlet and the first inlet.

  11. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  12. 30 CFR 57.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dust control. 57.9315 Section 57.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling, and...

  13. 30 CFR 57.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dust control. 57.9315 Section 57.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling, and...

  14. 30 CFR 57.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dust control. 57.9315 Section 57.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling, and...

  15. 30 CFR 57.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dust control. 57.9315 Section 57.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling, and...

  16. 30 CFR 57.9315 - Dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dust control. 57.9315 Section 57.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Loading, Hauling, and...

  17. Controlling dust from concrete saw cutting.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Susan; Woskie, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Cutting concrete with gas-powered saws is ubiquitous in the construction industry and a source of exposure to respirable crystalline silica. Volunteers from the New England Laborers Training Center were recruited to participate in a field experiment examining dust reductions through the use of water, from a hose and from a sprayer, as a dust control. In four series of tests, reinforced concrete pipe was cut under both "dry" and "wet" control conditions. Overall, the geometric mean respirable dust concentration for "dry" cutting (14.396 mg/m³) exceeded both types of water-based controls by more than tenfold. Wet cutting reduced the respirable dust concentration by 85% compared with dry cutting when comparing tests paired by person and saw blade (n = 79 pairs). Using a respirable cyclone, a total of 178 samples were taken. Due to the high variability in dust exposure found in this and other studies of saw cutting, the data were examined for potential exposure determinants that contribute to that variability. Using mixed models, three fixed effects were statistically significant: control condition, worker experience, and location. A random effect for subject was included in the model to account for repeated measures. When each of the significant fixed effects was included with the random effect, it was apparent that inclusion of worker experience or location reduced the between-worker component of exposure variability, while inclusion of control condition (wet vs. dry) explained a large portion of the within-subject variability. Overall, the fixed effect variable for control condition explained the largest fraction of the total exposure variability. PMID:23252479

  18. 30 CFR 58.620 - Drill dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Drill dust control. 58.620 Section 58.620... SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 58.620 Drill dust control. Holes shall be collared and drilled wet, or other effective dust control measures shall be used,...

  19. 30 CFR 58.620 - Drill dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill dust control. 58.620 Section 58.620... SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 58.620 Drill dust control. Holes shall be collared and drilled wet, or other effective dust control measures shall be used,...

  20. 30 CFR 58.620 - Drill dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Drill dust control. 58.620 Section 58.620... SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 58.620 Drill dust control. Holes shall be collared and drilled wet, or other effective dust control measures shall be used,...

  1. 30 CFR 58.620 - Drill dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drill dust control. 58.620 Section 58.620... SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 58.620 Drill dust control. Holes shall be collared and drilled wet, or other effective dust control measures shall be used,...

  2. 30 CFR 58.620 - Drill dust control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Drill dust control. 58.620 Section 58.620... SAFETY AND HEALTH HEALTH STANDARDS FOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Miscellaneous § 58.620 Drill dust control. Holes shall be collared and drilled wet, or other effective dust control measures shall be used,...

  3. Controllable Mirror Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A deformable Mirror Device (DMD) is a type of spatial light modulator in which mirrors fabricated monolithically on a silicon chip are deformed, or tilted, under electronic control to change the direction of light that falls upon the mirror. NASA and Texas Instruments (TI) have worked to develop this technology, which has subsequently been commercialized by TI. Initial application is the DMD 2000 Travel Information Printer for high speed, high volume printing of airline tickets and boarding passes. Other possible applications range from real-time object tracking to advanced industrial machine vision systems.

  4. EVALUATION OF A NEW METHOD OF DUST CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M. Coleman; Shure, Norman

    1952-01-01

    Microscopic dust sampling was done to determine the amount of dust in the homes of six patients who were sensitive to house dust and who had allergic disease that was intractable to treatment. One case was subsequently excluded from the study because of extraordinary circumstances. The remaining five cases were studied with repeated dust counts before and after a water-and-oil emulsion was sprayed in the patient's bedroom to immobilize house dust. In all five cases, the patients had dramatic relief of symptoms after the spraying was done. In four out of five, there was concomitant reduction of the amount of dust in the air as determined by microscopic counting of the dust particles on a glycerincoated slide. In the fifth case, relief of symptoms was not accompanied by reduction of dust on slides, but investigation revealed an error in control of exposure of the slides. PMID:14886758

  5. Molten Wax As A Dust Control Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, E.E.

    2008-07-01

    Molten wax shows considerable promise as a fixative and dust control agent in demolition of radioactively contaminated facilities. Sticky molten wax, modified with special surfactants and wetting agents, is capable of not only coating materials but also penetrating into friable or dusty materials and making them incapable of becoming airborne during demolition. Wax also shows significant promise for stabilization of waste residuals that may be contained in buildings undergoing demolition. Some of the building materials that have been tested to date include concrete, wood, sheet-rock, fiber insulation, lime, rock, and paper. Protective clothing, clay, sand, sulfur, and bentonite clay have been tested as surrogates for certain waste materials that may be encountered during building demolition. The paper describes several potential applications of molten wax for dust control in demolition of radioactive contaminated facilities. As a case-study, this paper describes a research test performed for a pipeline closure project being completed by the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory. The project plans to excavate and remove a section of buried Duriron drain piping containing highly radioactive and friable and 'flighty' waste residuals. A full-scale pipeline mockup containing simulated waste was buried in sand to simulate the direct-buried subsurface condition of the subject piping. The pipeline was pre-heated by drawing hot air through the line with a HEPA vacuum blower unit. Molten wax was pumped into the line and allowed to cool. The line was then broken apart in various places to evaluate the permeation performance of the wax. The wax fully permeated all the surrogate materials rendering them non-friable with a consistency similar to modeling clay. Based on the performance during the mockup, it is anticipated that the wax will be highly effective in controlling the spread of radiological contamination during pipe demolition activities. A larger test

  6. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be controlled by use of permissible dust collectors, or by water, or water with a wetting agent, or... controlling the dust. (b) Dust collectors. Dust collectors shall be maintained in permissible and operating condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock...

  7. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be controlled by use of permissible dust collectors, or by water, or water with a wetting agent, or... controlling the dust. (b) Dust collectors. Dust collectors shall be maintained in permissible and operating condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock...

  8. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be controlled by use of permissible dust collectors, or by water, or water with a wetting agent, or... controlling the dust. (b) Dust collectors. Dust collectors shall be maintained in permissible and operating condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock...

  9. Fuel-air control device

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.

    1981-12-15

    The invention concerns a device for controlling the vehicles fuel-air mixture by regulating the air in the ventilation passage leading to the engine air intake from the crankcase. In a vehicle provided with a PCV valve, the device is located in the ventilation passage leading from the crankcase to the engine air intake and the device is downstream of the PCV valve. The device admits outside air to the ventilation passage to lean the gas mixture when the engine creates a vacuum less than 8 psi in the ventilation passage.

  10. Vehicle speed control device

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Trump, W.E.

    1987-03-10

    An apparatus is described for automatically limiting the speed of a vehicle powered by an internal combustion engine having a spark ignition system with an ignition coil, comprising: sensor means for generating a speed signal directly representative of the speed of the vehicle comprising a series of speed signal pulses having a pulse repetition frequency proportional to the speed of the vehicle; control means for converting speed signal pulses into a DC voltage proportional to the vehicle speed; means for comparing the DC voltage to a predetermined DC voltage having substantially zero AC components representative of a predetermined maximum speed and for generating a difference signal in response thereto; and means for generating a pulse-width modulated control signal responsive to the difference signal; power means responsive to the control signal for intermittently interrupting the ignition system.

  11. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  12. Control method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  13. CALUTRON CONTROL DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, L.W.

    1959-08-25

    Several interlock and control circuits for a calutron are described. In one of the arrangements, the ton source cooling water flow is interlocked with the current supply to the heaters assoctated with the charge chamber, arc chamber, and electrode structure. When the ion source coolant flow rate exceeds a predetermined level, the heater associated with the charge chamber is energized. After the charge chamber has reached a predetermined temperature, the arc chamber heater is energized. Thereafter, the electrode structure heater is energized and the ion source is ready to have the operating voltages applied.

  14. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dust control at underground areas of underground mines. (a) Dust resulting from drilling in rock shall... condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock Drilling... the purpose of this section. (c) Water control. Water used to control dust from drilling rock shall...

  15. 30 CFR 72.630 - Drill dust control at underground areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dust control at underground areas of underground mines. (a) Dust resulting from drilling in rock shall... condition. Dust collectors approved under Part 33—Dust Collectors for Use in Connection with Rock Drilling... the purpose of this section. (c) Water control. Water used to control dust from drilling rock shall...

  16. Controlling strongly correlated dust clusters with lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Hauke; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Schablinski, Jan; Block, Dietmar; Schella, André; Melzer, André

    2014-09-01

    Lasers have been used extensively to manipulate matter in a controlled way - from single atoms and molecules up to macroscopic materials. They are particularly valuable for the analysis and control of mesoscopic systems such as few-particle clusters. Here we report on recent work on finite size complex (dusty) plasma systems. These are unusual types of clusters with a very strong inter-particle interaction so that, at room temperature, they are practically in their ground state. Lasers are employed as a tool to achieve excited states and phase transitions. The most attractive feature of dusty plasmas is that they allow for a precise diagnostic with single-particle resolution. From such measurements, the structural properties of finite two-dimensional (2D) clusters and three-dimensional (3D) spherical crystals in nearly harmonic traps—so-called Yukawa balls—have been explored in great detail. Their structural features—the shell compositions and the order within the shells—have been investigated and good agreement to theoretical predictions was found. Open questions on the agenda are the excitation behaviour, the structural changes and phase transitions that occur at elevated temperature. Here we report on recent experimental results where laser heating methods were further improved and applied to finite 2D and 3D dust clusters. Comparing to simulations, we demonstrate that laser heating indeed allows to increase the temperature in a controlled manner. For the analysis of thermodynamic properties and phase transitions in these finite systems, we present theoretical and experimental results on the basis of the instantaneous normal modes, pair distribution function and the recently introduced centre-two-particle correlation function.

  17. Effective dust control systems on concrete dowel drilling machinery.

    PubMed

    Echt, Alan S; Sanderson, Wayne T; Mead, Kenneth R; Feng, H Amy; Farwick, Daniel R; Farwick, Dawn Ramsey

    2016-09-01

    Rotary-type percussion dowel drilling machines, which drill horizontal holes in concrete pavement, have been documented to produce respirable crystalline silica concentrations above recommended exposure criteria. This places operators at potential risk for developing health effects from exposure. United States manufacturers of these machines offer optional dust control systems. The effectiveness of the dust control systems to reduce respirable dust concentrations on two types of drilling machines was evaluated under controlled conditions with the machines operating inside large tent structures in an effort to eliminate secondary exposure sources not related to the dowel-drilling operation. Area air samples were collected at breathing zone height at three locations around each machine. Through equal numbers of sampling rounds with the control systems randomly selected to be on or off, the control systems were found to significantly reduce respirable dust concentrations from a geometric mean of 54 mg per cubic meter to 3.0 mg per cubic meter on one machine and 57 mg per cubic meter to 5.3 mg per cubic meter on the other machine. This research shows that the dust control systems can dramatically reduce respirable dust concentrations by over 90% under controlled conditions. However, these systems need to be evaluated under actual work conditions to determine their effectiveness in reducing worker exposures to crystalline silica below hazardous levels. PMID:27074062

  18. Design of a device to remove lunar dust from space suits for the proposed lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, David; Havens, Jack; Hester, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration plans to begin construction of a lunar base soon after the turn of the century. During the Apollo missions, lunar dust proved to be a problem because the dust adhered to all exposed material surfaces. Since lunar dust will be a problem during the establishment and operation of this base, the need exists for a device to remove the dust from space suits before the astronauts enter clean environments. The physical properties of lunar dust were characterized and energy methods for removing the dust were identified. Eight alternate designs were developed to remove the dust. The final design uses a brush and gas jet to remove the dust. The brush bristles are made from Kevlar fibers and the gas jet uses pressurized carbon dioxide from a portable tank. A throttling valve allows variable gas flow. Also, the tank is insulated with Kapton and electrically heated to prevent condensation of the carbon dioxide when the tank is exposed to the cold (- 240 F) lunar night.

  19. Control System for Prosthetic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that of movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the moveable body part through the full-shrg position of the moveable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the moveable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective moveable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  20. Mine demonstration of longwall dust control techniques: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pothini, B.R.

    1988-07-01

    This report represents the results of in-mine demonstration of three dust control techniques for controlling respirable dust levels on shearer-longwall faces. The techniques were: water infusion, foam spray and reverse shearer drum rotation. The mines in which tests were conducted were in Upper Freeport seam and Pocahontas No. 3 seam. Both gravimetric samplers and GCA RAM-1 real time dust monitors were used for dust surveys. Dust control technology was reviewed, pertinent techniques were selected, equipment was procured and demonstrated as part of the program. The results indicated that water infusion can be readily implemented, foam spray holds promise, but requires more work to be done, and reverse drum rotations effective in select conditions. The tests showed that reversing cutting drum rotation has brought several positive results: (1) lower dust levels; (2) lower methane liberations; (3) improved productivity and (4) less fines. Although the improvements were only in the 10% range, the costs except for the initial change of cutting drums are nil. Therefore this technique should further be tested in soft seams with thick binder rock and also in hard blocky seams. Such investigations may lead to universal application of reverse drum rotation in the industry for beneficial reductions in respirable dust levels at insignificant costs. 13 refs., 34 figs.

  1. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    SciTech Connect

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  2. Potential health benefits of controlling dust emissions in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing; Liu, Junfeng; Fan, Songmiao; Kang, Chuyun; Yi, Kan; Cheng, Yanli; Shen, Xing; Tao, Shu

    2016-06-01

    Although the adverse impact of fine particulate matter (i.e., PM2.5) on human health has been well acknowledged, little is known of the health effects of its specific constituents. Over the past decade, the annual average dust concentrations in Beijing were approximately ∼14 μg m(-3), a value that poses a great threat to the city's 20 million residents. In this study, we quantify the potential long-term health damages in Beijing resulting from the dust exposure that occurred from 2000 to 2011. Each year in Beijing, nearly 4000 (95% CI: 1000-7000) premature deaths may be associated with long-term dust exposure, and ∼20% of these deaths are attributed to lung cancer. A decomposition analysis of the inter-annual variability of premature deaths in Beijing indicates that dust concentrations determine the year-to-year tendency, whereas population growth and lung cancer mortality rates drive the increasing tendency of premature death. We suggest that if Beijing takes effective measures towards reducing dust concentrations (e.g., controlling the resuspension of road dust and the fugitive dust from construction sites) to a level comparable to that of New York City's, the associated premature deaths will be significantly reduced. This recommendation offers "low-hanging fruit" suggestions for pollution control that would greatly benefit the public health in Beijing. PMID:27038572

  3. Compact, Controlled Resistance Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulus, David C.; DeWitt, John K.; Reich, Alton J.; Shaw, James E.; Deaconu, Stelu S.

    2011-01-01

    Spaceflight leads to muscle and bone atrophy. Isoinertial (free-weight) exercises provide a sufficient stimulus to elicit increases in both muscle strength and bone mineral density in Earth-based studies. While exercise equipment is in use on the International Space Station for crewmember health maintenance, current devices are too large to place in a transport vehicle or small spacecraft. Therefore, a portable computer controlled resistance exercise device is being developed that is able to simulate the inertial loading experienced when lifting a mass on Earth. This portable device weighs less than 50 lb and can simulate the resistance of lifting and lowering up to 600 lb of free-weights. The objective is to allow crewmembers to perform resistance exercise with loads capable of maintaining muscle and bone health. The device is reconfigurable and allows for the performance of typical Earth-based free-weight exercises. Forces exerted, volume of work, range of motion, time-under-tension, and speed/ acceleration of movement are recorded and can be remotely monitored to track progress and modify individual protocols based on exercise session data. A performance evaluation will be completed and data will be presented that include ground-reaction force comparisons between the device and free-weight dead-lifts over a spectrum of resistance levels. Movement biomechanics will also be presented.

  4. 30 CFR 90.300 - Respirable dust control plan; filing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust control plan; filing... DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Respirable Dust Control Plans § 90.300 Respirable dust control plan; filing requirements. (a) If an operator abates a violation of § 90.100 (Respirable dust standard) or §...

  5. Calibrating a Respirable Dust Sampling Device. Module 24. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on calibrating a respirable dust sampling device. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn, are three lessons: (1) naming each part of…

  6. 78 FR 25308 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Mine Safety and Health Administration Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Coal Mine Dust Sampling Devices AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION: 60-Day Notice. SUMMARY: The Department...

  7. Determining controls on element concentrations in cement kiln dust leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Duchesne, J.; Reardon, E.J.

    1998-12-31

    Cement kiln dust is a waste residue composed chiefly of oxidized, anhydrous, micron-sized particles generated as a by-product of the manufacture of Portland cement. When cement kiln dust is brought into contact with water, high concentrations of potassium, sulfate and caustic alkalinity are leached. Other constitutents are leached to a lesser extent. The objective of this study was to determine whether the concentration of a given chemical constituent in kiln dust leachate is controlled by the precipitation of a secondary mineral phase or whether its concentration depends on its initial availability to the leachate solution and its subsequent diffusive flux from hydrating particles with time. Differentiating between these two distinctive styles of leaching behavior is necessary to predict the chemical composition of kiln dust leachate under dynamic flow conditions in disposal environments. Evidence of solubility control was found for Si, Ca, Mg, Al, Zn, Ti, Sr, and Ba. The concentrations of Na, Cl, K, Mo, Cr and Se, however, were found to have no solubility control. Because of the observed lack of solubility control and the particularly high concentrations of Cr and Mo in kiln dust leachate, The authors tested two additives to reduce their concentrations: (1) aluminum oxide to promote the precipitation of calcium aluminosulfates and the proxying of chromate and molybdate for sulfate in their structures; and (2) iron metal to promote the reduction of chromate and molybdate to lower valent and less soluble forms. Neither treatment had any effect on the concentration levels of Cr and Mo in solution.

  8. Review of fugitive dust control for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.T.; Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    An immediate concern associated with the disposal of uranium mill tailings is that wind erosion of the tailings from an impoundment area will subsequently deposit tailings on surrounding areas. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating the current technology for fugitive dust control. Different methods of fugitive dust control, including chemical, physical, and vegetative, have been used or tested on mill tailings piles. This report presents the results of a literature review and discussions with manufacturers and users of available stabilization materials and techniques.

  9. Portable control device for networked mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Feddema, John T.; Byrne, Raymond H.; Bryan, Jon R.; Harrington, John J.; Gladwell, T. Scott

    2002-01-01

    A handheld control device provides a way for controlling one or multiple mobile robotic vehicles by incorporating a handheld computer with a radio board. The device and software use a personal data organizer as the handheld computer with an additional microprocessor and communication device on a radio board for use in controlling one robot or multiple networked robots.

  10. Heliocentric trajectory analysis of Sun-pointing smart dust with electrochromic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengali, Giovanni; Quarta, Alessandro A.

    2016-02-01

    A smart dust is a micro spacecraft, with a characteristic side length on the order of a few millimeters, whose surface is coated with electrochromic material. Its orbital dynamics is controlled by exploiting the differential force due to the solar radiation pressure, which is obtained by modulating the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material within a range of admissible values. A significant thrust level can be reached due to the high values of area-to-mass ratio of such a spacecraft configuration. Assuming that the smart dust is designed to achieve a passive Sun-pointing attitude, the propulsive acceleration due to the solar radiation pressure lies along the Sun-spacecraft direction. The aim of this paper is to study the smart dust heliocentric dynamics in order to find a closed form, analytical solution of its trajectory when the reflectivity coefficient of the electrochromic material can assume two values only. The problem is addressed by introducing a suitable transformation that regularizes the spacecraft motion and translates the smart-dust dynamics into that of a linear harmonic oscillator with unitary frequency, whose forcing input is a boxcar function. The solution is found using the Laplace transform method, and afterwards the problem is generalized by accounting for the degradation of the electrochromic material due to its exposition to the solar radiation. Three spacecraft configurations, corresponding to low, medium and high performance smart dusts, are finally used to quantify the potentialities of these advanced devices in an interplanetary mission scenario.

  11. 30 CFR 90.301 - Respirable dust control plan; approval by District Manager; copy to part 90 miner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust control plan; approval by... EVIDENCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PNEUMOCONIOSIS Respirable Dust Control Plans § 90.301 Respirable dust... respirable dust control plans on a mine-by-mine basis. When approving respirable dust control plans,...

  12. Effects of dust particles and layer properties on organic electronic devices fabricated by stamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yifang; Kim, Changsoon; Forrest, Stephen R.; Soboyejo, Wole

    2005-08-01

    The mechanical properties of organic semiconductor thin films are determined using nanoindentation. The measured mechanical properties are incorporated into finite element simulations of deformation that arise during cathode patterning of organic electronic devices by pressure stamping methods. Simulations show that dust particles interposed between the stamp and film surface affect the evolution of contact areas when silicon or compliant polydimethyl-siloxane stamp dies are employed. We also examine the effects of the transferred metal layer thickness and stamp bulk modulus. Experimental and modeling results are found to be in good agreement. The implications of the results are discussed for the fabrication of a range of organic electronic devices.

  13. Respirable dust control on longwall mining operations in the United States. Informational report

    SciTech Connect

    Mundell, R.L.; Jankowski, R.A.; Ondrey, R.S.; Tomb, T.F.

    1984-01-01

    The paper discusses the results of respirable dust studies conducted on United States longwall mining operations in 1972 and 1978. Prevalent engineering control methods (ventilation, water application and use of machine cutting parameters) and administrative controls for minimizing employees respirable dust exposures are discussed. Current research efforts for the control of respirable dust on longwall mining operations are reviewed.

  14. 30 CFR 71.301 - Respirable dust control plan; approval by District Manager and posting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respirable dust control plan; approval by... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respirable Dust Control Plans § 71.301 Respirable dust control plan; approval by District Manager and posting. (a) The District Manager will approve respirable...

  15. Portable Colorimetric Paper-Based Biosensing Device for the Assessment of Bisphenol A in Indoor Dust.

    PubMed

    Alkasir, Ramiz S J; Rossner, Alan; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-08-18

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is found in polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins and is used in a variety of commercial and consumer products. The leaching of BPA can result in human exposure via inhalation, ingestion, and dermal routes. As a result, humans have been exposed in their home and work environment to BPA. Conventional methods for BPA exposure assessment rely on cumbersome laboratory instrumentation with high capital and operational expenditures which limit the number of samples that can be analyzed. We report here the design of a compact portable colorimetric paper-based biosensing device with integrated sampling/analysis units for field-based measurements of BPA in indoor dust. The system employs interchangeable low-cost paper-based enzyme sensors as a test zone for BPA detection interfaced with an air-sampling cassette as a sample collection area. The sensor response was concentration-dependent with a detection limit of 0.28 μg/g. The sensor was validated with the conventional gas chromatography method and used to detect BPA exposure in household dust. BPA concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 3.87 μg/g in 57 household dust samples when both methods were used. The potential of this method for field measurements of dust samples is discussed. PMID:26180900

  16. House dust mite control measures in the treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vallance, Gillian; McSharry, Charles; Wood, Stuart; Thomson, Neil C

    2006-01-01

    Sensitization to the house dust mite (Dermataphagoides pteronyssinus) (HDM) is the most common risk factor associated with the development of asthma in adults and children. The effectiveness of HDM control measures in the treatment of asthma is not yet proven. The strategies for control for avoidance depend on our understanding of the biology of the HDM. The evidence suggests a favorable effect of transferring allergic asthmatic children to naturally low dust mite environments, such as at altitude or in hospital, but little to suggest that this can be replicated in general practice by simple practical measures such as mattress covers. However, a recent multi-allergen reduction approach has suggested benefits may be achievable. HDM densities tend to be high in warm, humid conditions in the home, which may be modified by external factors, such as ventilation. However, ventilation control to reduce indoor humidity has had inconsistent effects on dust mite levels and asthma. The challenge is to further refine the interventions in large placebo-controlled trials such that clinical outcomes may be more easily demonstrated. PMID:18360647

  17. 25 CFR 226.36 - Control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Control devices. 226.36 Section 226.36 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.36 Control devices. In drilling operations in fields... operations to maintain proper control of subsurface strata....

  18. 25 CFR 226.36 - Control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Control devices. 226.36 Section 226.36 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.36 Control devices. In drilling operations in fields... operations to maintain proper control of subsurface strata....

  19. 25 CFR 226.36 - Control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Control devices. 226.36 Section 226.36 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.36 Control devices. In drilling operations in fields... operations to maintain proper control of subsurface strata....

  20. 25 CFR 226.36 - Control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Control devices. 226.36 Section 226.36 Indians BUREAU OF... AND GAS MINING Requirements of Lessees § 226.36 Control devices. In drilling operations in fields... operations to maintain proper control of subsurface strata....

  1. Magnetic field control. [electromechanical torquing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haeussermann, W. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A torque control for an electromechanical torquing device of a type where a variable clearance occurs between a rotor and field is described. A Hall effect device senses the field present, which would vary as a function of spacing between field and rotor. The output of the Hall effect device controls the power applied to the field so as to provide a well defined field and thus a controlled torque to the rotor which is well defined.

  2. Cursor Control Device Test Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Kritina; Sandor, Aniko; Pace, John; Thompson, Shelby

    2013-01-01

    The test battery was developed to provide a standard procedure for cursor control device evaluation. The software was built in Visual Basic and consists of nine tasks and a main menu that integrates the set-up of the tasks. The tasks can be used individually, or in a series defined in the main menu. Task 1, the Unidirectional Pointing Task, tests the speed and accuracy of clicking on targets. Two rectangles with an adjustable width and adjustable center- to-center distance are presented. The task is to click back and forth between the two rectangles. Clicks outside of the rectangles are recorded as errors. Task 2, Multidirectional Pointing Task, measures speed and accuracy of clicking on targets approached from different angles. Twenty-five numbered squares of adjustable width are arranged around an adjustable diameter circle. The task is to point and click on the numbered squares (placed on opposite sides of the circle) in consecutive order. Clicks outside of the squares are recorded as errors. Task 3, Unidirectional (horizontal) Dragging Task, is similar to dragging a file into a folder on a computer desktop. Task 3 requires dragging a square of adjustable width from one rectangle and dropping it into another. The width of each rectangle is adjustable, as well as the distance between the two rectangles. Dropping the square outside of the rectangles is recorded as an error. Task 4, Unidirectional Path Following, is similar to Task 3. The task is to drag a square through a tunnel consisting of two lines. The size of the square and the width of the tunnel are adjustable. If the square touches any of the lines, it is counted as an error and the task is restarted. Task 5, Text Selection, involves clicking on a Start button, and then moving directly to the underlined portion of the displayed text and highlighting it. The pointing distance to the text is adjustable, as well as the to-be-selected font size and the underlined character length. If the selection does not

  3. Daylight control system device and method

    DOEpatents

    Paton, John Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  4. Daylight control system, device and method

    DOEpatents

    Paton, John Douglas

    2012-08-28

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  5. Daylight control system device and method

    DOEpatents

    Paton, John Douglas

    2007-03-13

    A system and device for and a method of programming and controlling light fixtures is disclosed. A system in accordance with the present invention includes a stationary controller unit that is electrically coupled to the light fixtures. The stationary controller unit is configured to be remotely programmed with a portable commissioning device to automatically control the lights fixtures. The stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device include light sensors, micro-computers and transceivers for measuring light levels, running programs, storing data and transmitting data between the stationary controller unit and the portable commissioning device. In operation, target light levels selected with the portable commissioning device and the controller unit is remotely programmed to automatically maintain the target level.

  6. DEVICE FOR CONTROL OF OXYGEN PARTIAL PRESSURE

    DOEpatents

    Bradner, H.; Gordon, H.S.

    1957-12-24

    A device is described that can sense changes in oxygen partial pressure and cause a corresponding mechanical displacement sufficient to actuate meters, valves and similar devices. A piston and cylinder arrangement contains a charge of crystalline metal chelate pellets which have the peculiar property of responding to variations in the oxygen content of the ambient atmosphere by undergoing a change in dimension. A lever system amplifies the relative displacement of the piston in the cylinder, and actuates the controlled valving device. This partial pressure oxygen sensing device is useful in controlled chemical reactions or in respiratory devices such as the oxygen demand meters for high altitude aircraft.

  7. System for remote control of underground device

    DOEpatents

    Brumleve, T.D.; Hicks, M.G.; Jones, M.O.

    1975-10-21

    A system is described for remote control of an underground device, particularly a nuclear explosive. The system includes means at the surface of the ground for transmitting a seismic signal sequence through the earth having controlled and predetermined signal characteristics for initiating a selected action in the device. Additional apparatus, located with or adjacent to the underground device, produces electrical signals in response to the seismic signals received and compares these electrical signals with the predetermined signal characteristics.

  8. Statistical analysis of temporal and spatial evolution of in-vessel dust particles in fusion devices by using CCD images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Suk-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Rae; Nam, Yong-Un; Chung, Jinil; Grisolia, Christian; Rohde, Volker; KSTAR Team; TORE SUPRA Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2013-08-01

    Images of wide-angle visible standard CCD cameras contain information on Dust Creation Events (DCEs) that occur during plasma operations. Database on the DCEs can be built by analyzing the straight line-like dust trajectories in scrape-off layer caused by plasma-dust interaction along the vacuum vessel. The database provides short/long term temporal evolution and spatial distribution of origins of DCEs in fusion devices. We have studied DCEs of 2011 KSTAR campaign and compared with that of 2006 Tore Supra (TS) and 2007 ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) campaign. An analysis software, with which the location of dust trajectories in 3D position in the KSTAR vacuum vessel is identified, is developed and the dust velocity distribution in 2011 campaign is measured. ©2001 Elsevier Science.

  9. Control method for physical systems and devices

    DOEpatents

    Guckenheimer, John

    1997-01-01

    A control method for stabilizing systems or devices that are outside the control domain of a linear controller is provided. When applied to nonlinear systems, the effectiveness of this method depends upon the size of the domain of stability that is produced for the stabilized equilibrium. If this domain is small compared to the accuracy of measurements or the size of disturbances within the system, then the linear controller is likely to fail within a short period. Failure of the system or device can be catastrophic: the system or device can wander far from the desired equilibrium. The method of the invention presents a general procedure to recapture the stability of a linear controller, when the trajectory of a system or device leaves its region of stability. By using a hybrid strategy based upon discrete switching events within the state space of the system or device, the system or device will return from a much larger domain to the region of stability utilized by the linear controller. The control procedure is robust and remains effective under large classes of perturbations of a given underlying system or device.

  10. Fast-acting nuclear reactor control device

    DOEpatents

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.; West, Phillip B.

    1993-01-01

    A fast-acting nuclear reactor control device for moving and positioning a fety control rod to desired positions within the core of the reactor between a run position in which the safety control rod is outside the reactor core, and a shutdown position in which the rod is fully inserted in the reactor core. The device employs a hydraulic pump/motor, an electric gear motor, and solenoid valve to drive the safety control rod into the reactor core through the entire stroke of the safety control rod. An overrunning clutch allows the safety control rod to freely travel toward a safe position in the event of a partial drive system failure.

  11. Temperature-controlled fluidic device A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehsteiner, F. H.

    1970-01-01

    Symmetrical fluidic device directly converts electrical signals to mechanical signals in the form of a fluid-flow parameter. This device eliminates or reduces effects of all undesirable parameters on the departure angle, leaving it a function of the controlled wall and jet temperatures.

  12. Electromechanical control of flat optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Tapashree; Zhang, Shuyan; Jung, Il Woong; Capasso, Federico; Lopez, Daniel

    In the recent times flat optical elements, like lenses and beam deflectors, have come to the forefront of scientific research. These devices, also referred to as ``metasurfaces'', use metal or dielectric resonators, arbitrarily spaced with subwavelength resolution on a two dimensional plane, to mimic the phase profile of any conventional bulk optical device and beyond. Such metasurface-based planar devices are compact and lightweight compared to their conventional bulky counterparts. However, most of these nanostructured devices have so far been passive. In this work we introduce an important concept of actively controlling these flat optical devices. A prototype: an electromechanically controlled plasmonic flat lens focusing mid infrared signal in reflection will be presented. The lens is fabricated on a 2.8 micron thin membrane following photolithography processes and integrated with a micro electromechanical system (MEMS) device. When electrostatically actuated, the MEMS platform controls the mechanical tilt angle of the lens along two orthogonal axes by about 16 degrees that in turn controls the scanning of the focal spot. Such actively controlled miniaturized optical devices promise to provide faster, more efficient and often enhanced functionalities.

  13. Robotics and teleoperator-controlled devices.

    PubMed

    Meieran, H B

    1988-08-01

    This paper presents a rationale for and a summary of tasks and missions to which mobile and stationary robots and other teleoperator-controlled devices could be assigned in response to the accidental release of radioactive and other hazardous/toxic materials to the environment. Many of these vehicles and devices currently support operation and maintenance of nuclear power plants and other nuclear industry facilities. This paper also discusses specific missions for these devices at the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant sites at the time of the accidents. Also discussed is the status of devices under development for future applications, as well as research on robotics. PMID:3410688

  14. Respirable dust control on longwall mining operations in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Mundell, R.L.; Jankowski, R.A.; Ondrey, R.S.; Tomb, T.F.

    1984-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1978 use of longwall methods to mine coal in the United States continually increased. Although these methods offer several advantages, health hazards often exist because of unique and difficult problems in the control of respirable dust. This paper discusses the results of respirable dust studies conducted on United States longwall mining operations in 1972 and 1978. Prevalent engineering control methods (ventilation, water application and use of machine cutting parameters) and administrative controls for minimizing employees' respirable dust exposure are discussed. Current research efforts for the control of respirable dust on longwall mining operations are reviewed. 21 figs.

  15. Mineralogical controls on dust emissions in the Bodele Depression, Chad

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface mineralogy is critical in the understanding of aeolian processes, however its role in dust production is currently underestimated. Recent research indicates that discrepancies between predicted and observed dust loads by dust models may be attributed to inadequacies within their associated d...

  16. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  17. Vortex control for rotor blade devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    To control vortices originating at the tips of a rotor's blades rotating through the air at a revolution frequency f, separation control device(s) are actuated to periodically introduce perturbations into the airflow moving over the blades. The periodic introduction of perturbations is controlled in accordance with a periodic modulating frequency of introduction f.sub.0 while the frequency of the perturbations so-introduced is designated as f.sub.e. Vortex control is achieved when the periodic modulating frequency of introduction f.sub.0 satisfies the relationship nf.ltoreq.f.sub.0.ltoreq.f.sub.e where n is the number of blades.

  18. Evaluations of bit sleeve and twisted-body bit designs for controlling roof bolter dust

    PubMed Central

    Beck, T.W.

    2015-01-01

    Drilling into coal mine roof strata to install roof bolts has the potential to release substantial quantities of respirable dust. Due to the proximity of drill holes to the breathing zone of roof bolting personnel, dust escaping the holes and avoiding capture by the dust collection system pose a potential respiratory health risk. Controls are available to complement the typical dry vacuum collection system and minimize harmful exposures during the initial phase of drilling. This paper examines the use of a bit sleeve in combination with a dust-hog-type bit to improve dust extraction during the critical initial phase of drilling. A twisted-body drill bit is also evaluated to determine the quantity of dust liberated in comparison with the dust-hog-type bit. Based on the results of our laboratory tests, the bit sleeve may reduce dust emissions by one-half during the initial phase of drilling before the drill bit is fully enclosed by the drill hole. Because collaring is responsible for the largest dust liberations, overall dust emission can also be substantially reduced. The use of a twisted-body bit has minimal improvement on dust capture compared with the commonly used dust-hog-type bit. PMID:26257435

  19. Mine demonstrations of longwall dust-control techniques. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Although longwall mining offers a number of advantages such as high productivity, improved safety, and higher coalbed recovery, longwall operators are experiencing great difficulty in consistently complying with the federal dust standard of 2 mg/m/sup 3/. Because of the severe problem which the coal mining industry is experiencing with longwall dust control, a systematic evaluation and demonstration of currently available and new dust control technology is needed. This contract is concerned with the evaluation of air sprays and foam systems for dust control on double-drum longwall shearer faces.

  20. Handbook on Numerically Controlled Operational Devices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    This handbook presents an organized set of descriptive information on numerically controlled operational devices. The information is intended for those involved in industry and technical education and to contribute to the knowledge of numerical control technology. It is also intended for supervisors, manufacturers, machine operators, and others…

  1. 40 CFR 63.995 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other control devices. 63.995 Section... Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.995 Other control devices. (a) Other control device equipment and...

  2. 40 CFR 63.995 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other control devices. 63.995 Section... Emission Standards for Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, Recovery Devices and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 63.995 Other control devices. (a) Other control device equipment and...

  3. Comparative Efficacy of Selected Dust Insecticides for Controlling Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Wang, Desen; Cooper, Richard; Zha, Chen

    2016-08-01

    Bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L., are one of the most difficult urban pests to control. Pest management professionals rely heavily on insecticide sprays and dusts to control bed bugs. Dust formulations are considered to provide longer residual control than sprays. However, there are no scientific data available on the comparative efficacy of the commonly used insecticide dusts. We evaluated the efficacy of eight insecticide dust products using three exposure methods: 1) brief exposure-bed bugs crossed a 2.54-cm-wide dust-treated band, 2) forced exposure-bed bugs were continuously exposed to a dust-treated substrate, and 3) choice exposure-bed bugs were given a choice to stay on either dust-treated or untreated substrate. The brief exposure method was the most sensitive in detecting the differences among the insecticides. Only CimeXa (silica gel) dust caused 100% mortality from all three exposure methods. Other tested dusts (1% cyfluthrin, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.075% zeta-cypermethrin + 0.15% piperonyl butoxide, 1% pyrethrins, 1% 2-phenethyl propionate + 0.4% pyrethrin, 0.25% dinotefuran + 95% diatomaceous earth, 100% diatomaceous earth) caused ≤65% mortality in a brief exposure assay. We also evaluated the horizontal transfer effect of the silica gel dust. Silica gel dust-exposed bed bugs transferred the dust horizontally to unexposed bed bugs resulting in 100% mortality at 4:6 donor: recipient ratio and 88.0 ± 5.0% mortality at 1:5 donor: recipient ratio. The results suggest silica gel is the most promising insecticide dust for controlling C. lectularius. PMID:27377377

  4. EFFECTIVENESS OF A HIGH-PRESSURE, WATER FOGGING SYSTEM IN CONTROLLING DUST EMISSIONS AT GRAIN RECEIVING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain dust at the receiving area is a fire hazard, a health concern, and a sanitation problem and should be controlled. The effectiveness of a high-pressure, water-fog system in controlling grain dust emissions was evaluated with corn and wheat while spouting 2.1 m3 (60 bu) of grain into a test c...

  5. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-06-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials.

  6. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2015-05-15

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  7. System and method for controlling remote devices

    DOEpatents

    Carrender, Curtis Lee; Gilbert, Ronald W.; Scott, Jeff W.; Clark, David A.

    2006-02-07

    A system and method for controlling remote devices utilizing a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag device having a control circuit adapted to render the tag device, and associated objects, permanently inoperable in response to radio-frequency control signals. The control circuit is configured to receive the control signals that can include an enable signal, and in response thereto enable an associated object, such as a weapon; and in response to a disable signal, to disable the tag itself, or, if desired, to disable the associated weapon or both the device and the weapon. Permanent disabling of the tag can be accomplished by several methods, including, but not limited to, fusing a fusable link, breaking an electrically conductive path, permanently altering the modulation or backscattering characteristics of the antenna circuit, and permanently erasing an associated memory. In this manner, tags in the possession of unauthorized employees can be remotely disabled, and weapons lost on a battlefield can be easily tracked and enabled or disabled automatically or at will.

  8. Evaluation of Motor Control Using Haptic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruki, Atsuo; Kawabata, Takuro; Shimozono, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Masafumi; Yunokuchi, Kazutomo

    When the kinesthesia and the touch act at the same time, such perception is called haptic perception. This sense has the key role in motor information on the force and position control. The haptic perception is important in the field where the evaluation of the motor control is needed. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the motor control, perception of heaviness and distance in normal and fatigue conditions using psychophysical experiment. We used a haptic device in order to generate precise force and distance, but the precedent of the evaluation system with the haptic device has been few. Therefore, it is another purpose to examine whether the haptic device is useful as evaluation system for the motor control. The psychophysical quantity of force and distance was measured by two kinds of experiments. Eight healthy subjects participated in this study. The stimulation was presented by haptic device [PHANTOM Omni: SensAble Company]. The subjects compared between standard and test stimulation, and answered it had felt which stimulation was strong. In the result of the psychophysical quantity of force, just noticeable difference (JND) had a significant difference, and point of subjective equality (PSE) was not different between normal and muscle fatigue. On the other hand, in the result of the psychophysical quantity of distance, JND and PSE were not difference between normal and muscle fatigue. These results show that control of force was influenced, but control of distance was not influenced in muscle fatigue. Moreover, these results suggested that the haptic device is useful as the evaluation system for the motor control.

  9. An evaluation of an aftermarket local exhaust ventilation device for suppressing respirable dust and respirable crystalline silica dust from powered saws.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alberto; Jones, Erica; Echt, Alan S; Hall, Ronald M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the respirable dust and respirable silica exposures of roofing workers using an electric-powered circular saw with an aftermarket local exhaust ventilation attachment to cut concrete roofing tiles. The study was conducted to determine whether the local exhaust ventilation attachment was able to control respirable dust and respirable silica exposure below occupational exposure limits (OELs). Time-integrated filter samples and direct reading respirable dust concentrations were evaluated. The local exhaust ventilation consisted of a shroud attached to the cutting plane of the saw; the shroud was then connected to a small electric axial fan, which is intended to collect dust at the point of generation. All sampling was conducted with the control in use. Roofers are defined as those individuals who only lay tiles. Cutters/roofers are defined as those workers who operate the powered saw to cut tiles and also lay tiles. Respirable dust from this evaluation ranged from 0.13 to 6.59 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m(3)) with a geometric mean of 0.38 mg/m(3) for roofers and from 0.45 to 3.82 mg/m(3) with a geometric mean of 1.84 mg/m(3) for cutters/roofers. Cutters/roofers usually handle areas close to crevices, edges, or tips of the roof whereas roofers handle areas where complete tiles can be placed. The respirable dust exposures for all cutters/roofers indicated concentrations exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) for respirable dust containing silica; it was also exceeded for some of the roofers. The respirable silica concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 0.15 mg/m(3) with a geometric mean of 0.09 mg/m(3) for roofers, and from 0.13 to 1.21 mg/m(3) with a geometric mean of 0.48 mg/m(3) for cutters/roofers. As with respirable dust, the respirable silica exposures for cutters/roofers were higher than the exposures for roofers. PMID:25148513

  10. An Evaluation of an Aftermarket Local Exhaust Ventilation Device for Suppressing Respirable Dust and Respirable Crystalline Silica Dust from Powered Saws

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Alberto; Jones, Erica; Echt, Alan S.; Hall, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the respirable dust and respirable silica exposures of roofing workers using an electric powered circular saw with an aftermarket local exhaust ventilation attachment to cut concrete roofing tiles. The study was conducted to determine whether the local exhaust ventilation attachment was able to control respirable dust and respirable silica exposure below occupational exposure limits. Time-integrated filter samples and direct reading respirable dust concentrations were evaluated. The local exhaust ventilation consisted of a shroud attached to the cutting plane of the saw; the shroud was then connected to a small electric axial fan, which is intended to collect dust at the point of generation. All sampling was conducted with the control in use. Roofers are defined as those individuals who solely lay tiles. Cutters/roofers are defined as those workers who operate the powered saw to cut tiles and also lay tiles. Respirable dust from this evaluation ranged from 0.13 to 6.59 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) with a geometric mean of 0.38 mg/m3 for roofers and from 0.45 to 3.82 mg/m3 with a geometric mean of 1.84 mg/m3 for cutters/roofers. Cutters/roofers usually handle areas close to crevices, edges, or tips of the roof whereas roofers handle areas where complete tiles can be placed. The respirable dust exposures for all cutters/roofers indicated concentrations exceeding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) for respirable dust containing silica; it was also exceeded for some of the roofers. The respirable silica concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 0.15 mg/m3 with an average of 0.09 mg/m3 for roofers, and from 0.13 to 1.21 mg/m3 with an average of 0.48 mg/m3 for cutters/roofers. As with respirable dust, the respirable silica exposures to cutters/roofers were higher than the exposures for roofers. PMID:25148513

  11. Control system and method for prosthetic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A control system and method for prosthetic devices is provided. The control system comprises a transducer for receiving movement from a body part for generating a sensing signal associated with that movement. The sensing signal is processed by a linearizer for linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part. The linearized sensing signal is normalized to be a function of the entire range of body part movement from the no-shrug position of the movable body part through the full-shrug position of the movable body part. The normalized signal is divided into a plurality of discrete command signals. The discrete command signals are used by typical converter devices which are in operational association with the prosthetic device. The converter device uses the discrete command signals for driving the movable portions of the prosthetic device and its sub-prosthesis. The method for controlling a prosthetic device associated with the present invention comprises the steps of receiving the movement from the body part, generating a sensing signal in association with the movement of the body part, linearizing the sensing signal to be a linear function of the magnitude of the distance moved by the body part, normalizing the linear signal to be a function of the entire range of the body part movement, dividing the normalized signal into a plurality of discrete command signals, and implementing the plurality of discrete command signals for driving the respective movable prosthesis device and its sub-prosthesis.

  12. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  13. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  14. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  15. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  16. 14 CFR 23.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Speed control devices. 23.373 Section 23....373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are incorporated....441 and 23.443, with the device extended at speeds up to the placard device extended speed; and (b)...

  17. A 16-year record of eolian dust in Southern Nevada and California, USA: Controls on dust generation and accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    differences in the response of source types control dust production and accumulation. A major factor is the hydrologic condition of surface sediments. The silt-clay and soluble-salt fluxes increased during the El Nino events of 1987-1988 and 1997-1998 at sites close to "wet" playas with shallow depths to groundwater (<10 m), consistent with the concept that active evaporative concentration of salts disrupts surface crusts and increases the susceptibility of surface sediment to deflation. The silt-clay flux also increased during drought periods (1989-1991, 1995-1997) at sites downwind of alluvial sources and "dry" playas with deeper groundwater (<10 m). These increases are probably related to the die-off of drought-stressed vegetation on alluvial sediments, and in some cases to local runoff events that deliver fresh sediment to playa margins and distal portions of alluvial fans. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Boundary layer control device for duct silencers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H. (Inventor); Soderman, Paul T. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A boundary layer control device includes a porous cover plate, an acoustic absorber disposed under the porous cover plate, and a porous flow resistive membrane interposed between the porous cover plate and the acoustic absorber. The porous flow resistive membrane has a flow resistance low enough to permit sound to enter the acoustic absorber and high enough to damp unsteady flow oscillations.

  19. EVALUATIONS OF NOVEL PARTICULATE CONTROL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of fractional and overall mass efficiency tests of four novel particulate control devices. Three were wet scrubbers: an Aronetics (Chemico) Two-Phase Jet Scrubber, an Entoleter Centrifield Scrubber, and a CEA Variable-Throat Venturi Scrubber. The fourth w...

  20. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathies, Richard A. (Inventor); Grover, William H. (Inventor); Skelley, Alison (Inventor); Lagally, Eric (Inventor); Liu, Chung N. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  1. Fluid control structures in microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Grover, William H.; Skelley, Alison; Lagally, Eric; Liu, Chung N.

    2008-11-04

    Methods and apparatus for implementing microfluidic analysis devices are provided. A monolithic elastomer membrane associated with an integrated pneumatic manifold allows the placement and actuation of a variety of fluid control structures, such as structures for pumping, isolating, mixing, routing, merging, splitting, preparing, and storing volumes of fluid. The fluid control structures can be used to implement a variety of sample introduction, preparation, processing, and storage techniques.

  2. Dust protection for environmental control and life support systems in the lunar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhs, Susan; Harris, Jeffrey

    1992-01-01

    Lunar dust is pervasive, and requirements for dust protection will affect both hardware design and operations planning for lunar surface systems. On Earth, mechanical problems caused by particulates include erosive and abrasive effects, clogging of mechanical equipment, and impairment of seals and bonds. In addition, dust tends to degrade the heat rejection properties of contaminated surfaces. All these effects have been observed on the lunar surface as well. This paper discusses the potential applicability of current dust protection methods to the problem of dust protection for the environmental control and life support (ECLS) systems of a lunar base, and highlights areas where development may be necessary. A review of dust problems experienced during the Apollo missions and of additional, ground-based experience with lunar dust provides a baseline for identifying operations and areas where dust may be expected to affect the ECLS systems. Current Earth-based methods of dust protection are identified and the impact of differences between the Earth and lunar environments on these methods is evaluated. Finally, integration of dust protection equipment with ECLS systems equipment is discussed.

  3. Satellite-based Dust Source Identification over North Africa: Diurnal Cycle, Meteorological Controls, and Interannual Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Tegen, Ina; Macke, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    frequencies of local dust source activations (DSAF). Dust emission is mainly controlled by the occurrence of strong surface wind speeds and surface conditions like vegetation cover which may differ for individual years depending on the climatic conditions. The role of interannualy changing wind and precipitation pattern for DSAF variability is investigated.

  4. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Face ventilation control devices. 75.330... control devices. (a) Brattice cloth, ventilation tubing and other face ventilation control devices shall be made of flame-resistant material approved by MSHA. (b)(1) Ventilation control devices shall...

  5. Geomorphic and hydrologic controls of dust emissions during drought from Yellow Lake playa, West Texas, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research on the factors that control dust emissions from playas has revealed a number of complex geomorphic and hydrologic factors, yet there are few measurements of dust emissions from playas during drought or low-emission seasons. Deflation of Yellow Lake, a saline playa in West Texas, produces sa...

  6. 30 CFR 72.620 - Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drill dust control at surface mines and surface... § 72.620 Drill dust control at surface mines and surface areas of underground mines. Holes shall be collared and drilled wet, or other effective dust control measures shall be used, when drilling...

  7. Large Aperture Electrostatic Dust Detector

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner, R. Hensley, and A.L Roquemore

    2007-10-09

    Diagnosis and management of dust inventories generated in next-step magnetic fusion devices is necessary for their safe operation. A novel electrostatic dust detector, based on a fine grid of interlocking circuit traces biased to 30 or 50 ν has been developed for the detection of dust particles on remote surfaces in air and vacuum environments. Impinging dust particles create a temporary short circuit and the resulting current pulse is recorded by counting electronics. Up to 90% of the particles are ejected from the grid or vaporized suggesting the device may be useful for controlling dust inventories. We report measurements of the sensitivity of a large area (5x5 cm) detector to microgram quantities of dust particles and review its applications to contemporary tokamaks and ITER.

  8. Hydraulic control device for automatic transmissions

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, Y.; Taga, Y.; Kashihara, Y.

    1989-06-20

    This patent describes a hydraulic control device for an automatic transmission including a control unit, a shift gear mechanism, clutches and brakes for controlling the shift gear mechanism, hydraulic servos for actuating the clutches and brakes to control the shift gear mechanism and having hydraulic servo for a forward clutch, and an electronically operated regulating value for regulating pressure according to signals from the control unit. The control device consists of: a selecting value switched by signals indicating stopping and running condition of a vehicle, the selecting valve being connected to the hydraulic servo for the forward clutch for engaging and transmitting torque during the forward running conditon, the selecting valve selectively receiving a line pressure and a control pressure from the regulating valve so that hydraulic pressure just below engaging pressure regulated by the regulating valve is applied to the hydraulic servo for the forward clutch during stopping, and a line pressure is applied to the hydraulic servo for the forward clutch during running.

  9. Coupling the Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Role of Clouds in Controlling the Vertical Distribution of Dust During N. H. Summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Wilson, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere (Gierasch and Goody, 1968; Haberle et al., 1982; Zurek et al., 1992). Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer (Smith, 2004). Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across (Cantor et al., 2001). During some years, regional storms combine to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by as much as 40 K (Smith et al., 2002). Key recent observations of the vertical distribution of dust indicate that elevated layers of dust exist in the tropics and sub-tropics throughout much of the year (Heavens et al., 2011). These observations have brought particular focus on the processes that control the vertical distribution of dust in the Martian atmosphere. The goal of this work is to further our understanding of how clouds in particular control the vertical distribution of dust, particularly during N. H. spring and summer

  10. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K W; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-01-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials. PMID:27329068

  11. Piezo Voltage Controlled Planar Hall Effect Devices

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bao; Meng, Kang-Kang; Yang, Mei-Yin; Edmonds, K. W.; Zhang, Hao; Cai, Kai-Ming; Sheng, Yu; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Yang; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zheng, Hou-Zhi; Wang, Kai-You

    2016-01-01

    The electrical control of the magnetization switching in ferromagnets is highly desired for future spintronic applications. Here we report on hybrid piezoelectric (PZT)/ferromagnetic (Co2FeAl) devices in which the planar Hall voltage in the ferromagnetic layer is tuned solely by piezo voltages. The change of planar Hall voltage is associated with magnetization switching through 90° in the plane under piezo voltages. Room temperature magnetic NOT and NOR gates are demonstrated based on the piezo voltage controlled Co2FeAl planar Hall effect devices without the external magnetic field. Our demonstration may lead to the realization of both information storage and processing using ferromagnetic materials. PMID:27329068

  12. Distributed control using linear momentum exchange devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, J. P.; Waites, Henry; Doane, G. B., III

    1987-01-01

    MSFC has successfully employed the use of the Vibrational Control of Space Structures (VCOSS) Linear Momentum Exchange Devices (LMEDs), which was an outgrowth of the Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory (AFWAL) program, in a distributed control experiment. The control experiment was conducted in MSFC's Ground Facility for Large Space Structures Control Verification (GF/LSSCV). The GF/LSSCV's test article was well suited for this experiment in that the LMED could be judiciously placed on the ASTROMAST. The LMED placements were such that vibrational mode information could be extracted from the accelerometers on the LMED. The LMED accelerometer information was processed by the control algorithms so that the LMED masses could be accelerated to produce forces which would dampen the vibrational modes of interest. Experimental results are presented showing the LMED's capabilities.

  13. Bidirectional telemetry controller for neuroprosthetic devices.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishnu; McCreery, Douglas B; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor

    2010-02-01

    We present versatile multifunctional programmable controller with bidirectional data telemetry, implemented using existing commercial microchips and standard Bluetooth protocol, which adds convenience, reliability, and ease-of-use to neuroprosthetic devices. Controller, weighing 190 g, is placed on animal's back and provides bidirectional sustained telemetry rate of 500 kb/s , allowing real-time control of stimulation parameters and viewing of acquired data. In continuously-active state, controller consumes approximately 420 mW and operates without recharge for 8 h . It features independent 16-channel current-controlled stimulation, allowing current steering; customizable stimulus current waveforms; recording of stimulus voltage waveforms and evoked neuronal responses with stimulus artifact blanking circuitry. Flexibility, scalability, cost-efficiency, and a user-friendly computer interface of this device allow use in animal testing for variety of neuroprosthetic applications. Initial testing of the controller has been done in a feline model of brainstem auditory prosthesis. In this model, the electrical stimulation is applied to the array of microelectrodes implanted in the ventral cochlear nucleus, while the evoked neuronal activity was recorded with the electrode implanted in the contralateral inferior colliculus. Stimulus voltage waveforms to monitor the access impedance of the electrodes were acquired at the rate of 312 kilosamples/s. Evoked neuronal activity in the inferior colliculus was recorded after the blanking (transient silencing) of the recording amplifier during the stimulus pulse, allowing the detection of neuronal responses within 100 mus after the end of the stimulus pulse applied in the cochlear nucleus. PMID:19933010

  14. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  15. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  16. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  17. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  18. 14 CFR 25.697 - Lift and drag devices, controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Lift and drag devices, controls. 25.697....697 Lift and drag devices, controls. (a) Each lift device control must be designed so that the pilots....101(d). Lift and drag devices must maintain the selected positions, except for movement produced by...

  19. MEMS device for spacecraft thermal control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theordore D. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A micro-electromechanical device that comprises miniaturized mechanical louvers, referred to as Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) louvers are employed to achieve a thermal control function for spacecraft and instruments. The MEMS louvers are another form of a variable emittance control coating and employ micro-electromechanical technology. In a function similar to traditional, macroscopic thermal louvers, the MEMS louvers of the present invention change the emissivity of a surface. With the MEMS louvers, as with the traditional macroscopic louvers, a mechanical vane or window is opened and closed to allow an alterable radiative view to space.

  20. The efficacy of local exhaust ventilation for controlling dust exposures during concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Gerry A; Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Camp, Janice E; Seixas, Noah S

    2004-08-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a commercially available local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system for controlling respirable dust and crystalline silica exposures during concrete grinding activities. Surface grinding was conducted at six commercial building construction sites in Seattle, WA, by cement masons. Time-integrated filter samples and direct reading respirable dust concentrations were collected using a cyclone in line with a direct reading respirable dust monitor. Personal exposure levels were determined with and without LEV, one sample directly after the other. A total of 28 paired samples were collected in which three different dust collection shroud configurations were tested. Data obtained with a direct reading respirable dust monitor were adjusted to remove non-work task-associated dust exposures and was subsequently used to calculate the exposure reduction achieved. The application of LEV resulted in a reduction in the overall geometric mean respirable dust exposure from 4.5 to 0.14 mg/m(3), a mean exposure reduction of 92%. Despite the effective control of dust generated during surface grinding, 22 and 26% of the samples collected while LEV was being used were greater than the 8 h time-weighted average permissible exposure limit (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and threshold limit value (American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists) for respirable crystalline silica, respectively. PMID:15298850

  1. Modelling and Control of an Annular Momentum Control Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James R.; Johnson, Bruce G.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a modelling and control study for an advanced momentum storage device supported on magnetic bearings are documented. The control challenge posed by this device lies in its dynamics being such a strong function of flywheel rotational speed. At high rotational speed, this can lead to open loop instabilities, resulting in requirements for minimum and maximum control bandwidths and gains for the stabilizing controllers. Using recently developed analysis tools for systems described by complex coefficient differential equations, the closed properties of the controllers were analyzed and stability properties established. Various feedback controllers are investigated and discussed. Both translational and angular dynamics compensators are developed, and measures of system stability and robustness to plant and operational speed variations are presented.

  2. Control device for prosthetic urinary sphincter cuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinicke, Robert H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A device for controlling flow of fluid to and from a resilient inflatable cuff implanted about the urethra to control flow of urine therethrough. The device comprises a flexible bulb reservoir and a control unit that includes a manually operated valve that opens automatically when the bulb is squeezed to force fluid into the cuff for closing the urethra. The control unit also includes a movable valve seat member having a relatively large area exposed to pressure of fluid in a chamber that is connected to the cuff and which moves to a position in which the valve member is unseated by an abutment when fluid pressure in the chamber exceeds a predetermined value to thereby relieve excess fluid pressure in the cuff. The arrangement is such that the valve element is held closed against the seat member by the full differential in fluid pressures acting on both sides of the valve element until the seat member is moved away from the valve element to thus insure positive closing of the valve element until the seat member is moved out of engagement with the valve element by excess pressure differential.

  3. Ferrofluid Microwave Devices With Magnetically Controlled Impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Marin, C. N.; Malaescu, I.; Totoreanu, R.

    2010-08-01

    Ferrofluid filled transmission lines are microwave electronic devices. The complex dielectric permittivity and the complex magnetic permeability of a kerosene based ferrofluid with magnetite nanoparticles, in the frequency range (0.5-6) GHz were measured, for several values of polarising field, H. Afterwards, the input impedance of a short-circuited transmission line filled with this ferrofluid was computed using the equation Z = Zc tanh(γl). Here Zc and l are the characteristic impedance and the length of the coaxial line and γ is the propagation constant, depending on the dielectric and magnetic parameters of the material within the line. It is demonstrated how the impedance displays a frequency and polarizing field dependence, which has application in the design of magnetically controlled microwave devices.

  4. Effect of an evaporative cooling and dust control system on rearing environment and performance of male broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Willis, W L; Ouart, M D; Quarles, C L

    1987-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of a micromist, high pressure, evaporative cooling and dust control system on rearing environment characteristics and performance of broiler chickens. Air of rearing chambers with the cooling and dust control system had significantly lower dust concentrations than that of chambers without the system. Birds reared with the cooling and dust control system were 45 and 165 g heavier at 4 and 7 wk of age, respectively, and had significantly higher 7-wk bursa weights than those reared without the system. Presence of the cooling and dust control system had no effect on mortality or lung weights. PMID:3432185

  5. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  6. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  7. Evaluation of Surface Modification as a Lunar Dust Mitigation Strategy for Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Waters, Deborah L.; Misconin, Robert M.; Banks, Bruce A.; Crowder, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Three surface treatments were evaluated for their ability to lower the adhesion between lunar simulant dust and AZ93, AlFEP, and AgFEP thermal control surfaces under simulated lunar conditions. Samples were dusted in situ and exposed to a standardized puff of nitrogen gas. Thermal performance before dusting, after dusting, and after part of the dust was removed by the puff of gas, were compared to perform the assessment. None of the surface treatments was found to significantly affect the adhesion of lunar simulants to AZ93 thermal control paint. Oxygen ion beam texturing also did not lower the adhesion of lunar simulant dust to AlFEP or AgFEP. But a workfunction matching coating and a proprietary Ball Aerospace surface treatment were both found to significantly lower the adhesion of lunar simulants to AlFEP and AgFEP. Based on these results, it is recommended that all these two techniques be further explored as dust mitigation coatings for AlFEP and AgFEP thermal control surfaces.

  8. Dust feed mechanism

    DOEpatents

    Milliman, Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a dust feed device for delivery of a uniform supply of dust for long periods of time to an aerosolizing means for production of a dust suspension. The device utilizes at least two tandem containers having spiral brushes within the containers which transport the dust from a supply to the aerosolizer means.

  9. Bidirectional Telemetry Controller for Neuroprosthetic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishnu; McCreery, Douglas B.; Han, Martin; Pikov, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We present versatile multifunctional programmable controller with bidirectional data telemetry, implemented using existing commercial microchips and standard Bluetooth protocol, which adds convenience, reliability, and ease-of-use to neuroprosthetic devices. Controller, weighing 190 g, is placed on animal's back and provides bidirectional sustained telemetry rate of 500 kb/s, allowing real-time control of stimulation parameters and viewing of acquired data. In continuously-active state, controller consumes ∼420 mW and operates without recharge for 8 h. It features independent 16-channel current-controlled stimulation, allowing current steering; customizable stimulus current waveforms; recording of stimulus voltage waveforms and evoked neuronal responses with stimulus artifact blanking circuitry. Flexibility, scalability, cost-efficiency, and a user-friendly computer interface of this device allow use in animal testing for variety of neuroprosthetic applications. Initial testing of the controller has been done in a feline model of brainstem auditory prosthesis. In this model, the electrical stimulation is applied to the array of microelectrodes implanted in the ventral cochlear nucleus, while the evoked neuronal activity was recorded with the electrode implanted in the contralateral inferior colliculus. Stimulus voltage waveforms to monitor the access impedance of the electrodes were acquired at the rate of 312 kilosamples/s. Evoked neuronal activity in the inferior colliculus was recorded after the blanking (transient silencing) of the recording amplifier during the stimulus pulse, allowing the detection of neuronal responses within 100 μs after the end of the stimulus pulse applied in the cochlear nucleus. PMID:19933010

  10. Device Control Using Gestures Sensed from EMG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present neuro-electric interfaces for virtual device control. The examples presented rely upon sampling Electromyogram data from a participants forearm. This data is then fed into pattern recognition software that has been trained to distinguish gestures from a given gesture set. The pattern recognition software consists of hidden Markov models which are used to recognize the gestures as they are being performed in real-time. Two experiments were conducted to examine the feasibility of this interface technology. The first replicated a virtual joystick interface, and the second replicated a keyboard.

  11. Electronic 4-wheel drive control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayato, S.; Takanori, S.; Shigeru, H.; Tatsunori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The internal rotation torque generated during operation of a 4-wheel drive vehicle is reduced using a control device whose clutch is attached to one part of the rear-wheel drive shaft. One torque sensor senses the drive torque associated with the rear wheel drive shaft. A second sensor senses the drive torque associated with the front wheel drive shaft. Revolution count sensors sense the revolutions of each drive shaft. By means of a microcomputer, the engagement of the clutch is changed to insure that the ratio of the torque sensors remains constant.

  12. DSP control of superconducting quantum interference devices

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.R.; Kung, Pang-Jen; Lewis, P.S.; Flynn, E.R.

    1994-08-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDS) are used to defect very law level magnetic fields. Los Alamos National Laboratory is involved in developing digital signal processing (DSP) based instrumentation for these devices in conjunction with detecting magnetic flux from the human brain. This field of application is known as magnetoencephalography (MEG). The magnetic signals generated by the brain are on the order of a billion times smaller than the earth`s magnetic field, yet they can readily be detected with these highly ,sensitive magnetic detectors. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed and implemented DSP control of the SQUID system. This has been accomplished by using an AT&T DSP32C DSP in conjunction with dual 18 bit a-to-d and d-to-a converters. The DSP performs the signal demodulation by synchronously sampling the recovered signal and applying the appropriate full wave rectification. The signal is then integrated and filtered and applied to the output. Also, the modulation signal is generated with the DSP system. All of the flux lock loop electronics are replaced except for the low noise analog preamplifier at the front of the recovery components. The system has been tested with both an electronic SQUID simulator and a low temperature thin film SQUID from Conductus. A number of experiments have been performed to allow evaluation of the system improvement made possible by use of DSP control.

  13. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  14. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  15. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  16. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  17. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  18. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  19. 40 CFR 65.155 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Other control devices. 65.155 Section 65.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.155 Other control devices....

  20. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en...

  1. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en...

  2. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en...

  3. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  4. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  5. 36 CFR 1004.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 1004.12 Section 1004.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 1004.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device...

  6. 36 CFR 4.12 - Traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Traffic control devices. 4.12... VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.12 Traffic control devices. Failure to comply with the directions of a traffic control device is prohibited unless otherwise directed by the superintendent....

  7. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en...

  8. 14 CFR 25.373 - Speed control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Speed control devices. 25.373 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Supplementary Conditions § 25.373 Speed control devices. If speed control devices (such as spoilers and drag flaps) are installed for use in en...

  9. Survey of air-cure experience on dust control system design for PRB coal

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.R.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes major changes required in features for coal dust control systems when existing coal fired power plants switch to PRB (Powder River Basin) coal. It encompasses all transfer points within the coal handling system from receiving to the plant bunkers or silos. It provides a comparison of bituminous and PRB coal from a dust collection aspect, the major features required for reliability and safety and the reasons for implementation.

  10. Dusting control of magnesium slag produced by Pidgeon process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Laner; Yang, Qixing; Han, Fenglan; Du, Chun

    2013-06-01

    Magnesium production by Pidgeon process has been developed very fast in China since 1990's. The waste slag from magnesium production has attracted broad attention because the huge amounts of the slag. For each ton of magnesium produced, there will be 6-8 tons of the slag generated. A big part of the Mg slag exists as fine dust with particle size of D95 < 0.1mm, which may pollute air, soil and water surrounding the Mg industry. The fine particles are generated by phase transformations of dicalcium silicate C2S (2CaOṡSiO2) during the slag cooling. There is a volume expansion of more than 10% with the transformation of β-C2S to γ-C2S phase, causing a disintegration or dusting of the Mg slag. In the present study, several chemical stabilizers were used to treat the dusting Mg slag at 1200°C, including borates, phosphates and rare earth oxides, in order to obtain volume stable slag aggregates for environmental protection and recycling of the Mg slag. The volume expanding rates of the samples were measured. XRD and SEM studies were carried out to confirm effects of the stabilizers. The results show that all of the stabilizers were effective for the stabilization of Mg slag. Some differences between the stabilizers were also described and discussed.

  11. Comparison of a direct-reading device to gravimetric methods for evaluating organic dust aerosols in an enclosed swine production environment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C D; Reynolds, S J

    2001-01-01

    The production of livestock in enclosed facilities has become an accepted practice, driven by the need for increased efficiency. Exposure to organic dusts, containing various bioactive components, has been identified an important risk factor for the high rate of lung disease found among workers in these environments. Assessment of organic dust exposure requires technical skills and instrumentation not readily available to most agricultural enterprises. Development of a simple, cost-effective method for measuring organic dust levels would be useful in evaluating and controlling exposures in these environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the direct reading MIE PDM-3 Miniram for estimating organic dust concentrations in enclosed swine production facilities. Responses from the MIE PDM-3 Miniram were compared to gravimetric methods for total and inhalable dust. Total dust determinations were conducted in accordance with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method 0500. Inhalable particulate mass (IPM) sampling was conducted using SKC brand IOM (Institute of Occupational Medicine) sampling cassettes, which meet the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists ACGIH criteria for inhalable dust sampling. This study design also allowed for the comparison of traditional total dust method to the IPM method, in collecting organic dusts in an agricultural setting. Fifteen sets of side-by-side samples (Miniram, total dust, and IPM) were collected over a period of six months in a swine confinement building. There were statistically significant differences in the results provided by the three sampling methods. Measurements for inhalable dust exceeded those for total dust in eleven of fifteen samples. The Miniram time-weighted average (TWA) response to the organic dust was always the lower of the three methods. A high degree of correlation was found among all three methods. The Miniram performed well under

  12. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, F. Q. L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 cu mm volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales 1 s).

  13. Evaluation of an electrostatic dust removal system with potential application in next-step fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, F. Q. L.; John, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Roquemore, A. L.; Calle, C. I.

    2011-05-15

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass, and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm{sup 3} volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 s. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  14. Evaluation of an Electrostatic Dust Removal System with Potential Application in Next-Step Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, F. QL.

    2011-01-20

    The ability to manage inventories of carbon, tritium, and high-Z elements in fusion plasmas depends on means for effective dust removal. A dust conveyor, based on a moving electrostatic potential well, was tested with particles of tungsten, carbon, glass and sand. A digital microscope imaged a representative portion of the conveyor, and dust particle size and volume distributions were derived before and after operation. About 10 mm3 volume of carbon and tungsten particles were moved in under 5 seconds. The highest driving amplitude tested of 3 kV was the most effective. The optimal driving frequency was 210 Hz (maximum tested) for tungsten particles, decreasing to below 60 Hz for the larger sand particles. Measurements of particle size and volume distributions after 10 and 100 cycles show the breaking apart of agglomerated carbon, and the change in particle distribution over short timescales (<1 s).

  15. Rates and environmental controls of aeolian dust accumulation, Athabasca River Valley, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Wolfe, Stephen A.

    2010-09-01

    Despite an abundance of sedimentary archives of mineral dust (i.e. loess) accumulations from cold, humid environments, the absence of contemporary process investigations limits paleoenvironmental interpretations in these settings. Dust accumulations measured at Jasper Lake, a seasonally-filled reach of the glacially-fed Athabasca River in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, are some of the highest contemporary rates recorded to date. High deposition rates, including a maximum of 27,632 kg ha -1 month -1, occur during river low-flow periods, but even the lowest deposition rates, occurring during bankfull periods, exceed other contemporary rates of deposition. High rates of dust deposition may be attributed to geomorphic and climatic controls affecting sediment supply, availability and transport, and biologic factors affecting accumulation. Localized confinement of the Jasper River by tributary river alluvial fans has caused channel expansion upstream, and formation of the shallow depositional basin known as Jasper Lake. This localized sedimentary basin, coupled with large seasonal water level fluctuations and suitably high wind speeds, favors seasonal dust production. In addition, a dense source-proximal coniferous forest stand encourages high dust accumulation, via increased aerodynamic roughness and airflow deceleration. The forest stand also appears to act as an efficient dust filter, with the interception and storage of dust by the forest canopy playing a significant role with regards to secondary fallout and sediment accumulation. Overall, these results provide new insights on the environmental controls of dust entrainment and accumulation in cold, humid settings, and help clarify controls on the formation of Holocene river-sourced loess deposits.

  16. 78 FR 36132 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... January 11, 2013, the FHWA published a Request for Comments at 78 FR 2347 (Docket ID: FHWA-2012-0118...; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notification; response to comments. SUMMARY: The Manual on Uniform Traffic...

  17. Device Configuration Handler for Accelerator Control Applications at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Matt Bickley; P. Chevtsov; T. Larrieu

    2003-10-01

    The accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab uses hundreds of physical devices with such popular instrument bus interfaces as Industry Pack (IPAC), GPIB, RS-232, etc. To properly handle all these components, control computers (IOCs) must be provided with the correct information about the unique memory addresses of the used interface cards, interrupt numbers (if any), data communication channels and protocols. In these conditions, the registration of a new control device in the control system is not an easy task for software developers. Because the device configuration is distributed, it requires the detailed knowledge about not only the new device but also the configuration of all other devices on the existing system. A configuration handler implemented at Jefferson Lab centralizes the information about all control devices making their registration user-friendly and very easy to use. It consists of a device driver framework and the device registration software developed on the basis of ORACLE database and freely available scripting tools (perl, php).

  18. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changyi; Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang; Rubanov, Sergey; Jamieson, David N.

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5-30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11-68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the differences

  19. Dust control products at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, Texas: environmental safety and performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunz, Bethany K.; Little, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling fugitive dust while protecting natural resources is a challenge faced by all managers of unpaved roads. Unfortunately, road managers choosing between dust control products often have little objective environmental information to aid their decisions. To address this information gap, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collaborated on a field test of three dust control products with the objectives of (a) evaluating product performance under real-world conditions, (b) verifying the environmental safety of products identified as practically nontoxic in laboratory tests, and (c) testing the feasibility of several environmental monitoring techniques for use in dust control tests. In cooperation with refuge staff and product vendors, three products (one magnesium chloride plus binder, one cellulose, and one synthetic fluid plus binder) were applied in July 2012 to replicated road sections at the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge in Texas. These sections were monitored periodically for 12 months after application. Product performance was assessed by mobile-mounted particulate-matter meters measuring production of fugitive dust and by observations of road conditions. Environmental safety was evaluated through on-site biological observations and leaching tests with samples of treated aggregate. All products reduced dust and improved surface condition during those 12 months. Planned environmental measurements were not always compatible with day-to-day refuge management actions; this incompatibility highlighted the need for flexible biological monitoring plans. As one of the first field tests of dust suppressants that explicitly incorporated biological endpoints, this effort provides valuable information for improving field tests and for developing laboratory or semifield alternatives.

  20. MSHA review of silicosis and dust control in mining

    SciTech Connect

    Thaxton, R.

    1996-12-31

    Silicosis has become a forgotten disease. Many miners, when told of the risks of silicosis, indicate that they have never heard of the disease. A 1992 National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ALERT, however, pointed out that drilling in rock is hazardous to miners due to exposure to excessive amounts of silica-containing dust. Recent Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and NIOSH surveys also indicate that silicosis continues to be a significant health risk faced by miners. A joint field study conducted by NIOSH and MSHA in the Johnstown, Pennsylvania area found 8 cases of silicosis among 150 surveyed surface coal miners. Additional x-ray surveillance studies found 6 cases of disease among 234 current and former surface coal miners in the Poteau, Oklahoma area and 3 cases among 66 surface coal miners in the northern West Virginia area. These studies cannot be used to determine quantitative risk, or prevalence of the disease. They do, however, indicate the unacceptable reality that coal miners continue to develop silicosis. Surface miners are not the only miners potentially exposed to levels of silica-containing dust that may lead to development of silicosis. NIOSH and MSHA have received reports of disease among underground coal miners. Several of these cases involve coal miners under age 50. The focus of this presentation is to highlight the specific initiatives undertaken by MSHA`s Coal Mine Safety and Health to address this health hazard.

  1. An evaluation of the use of individual grass species in retaining polluted soil and dust particulates in vegetated sustainable drainage devices.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, S M; Bennett, J; Waite, A

    2016-08-01

    A sustainable means of preventing polluted particulates carried in urban storm water entering rivers, groundwater and lakes is by employing vegetated sustainable drainage system (SUDS) devices, or best management practices to trap or biodegrade them. In the UK, a mixture of grass species is recommended for use in devices such as swales or filter strips. However, there is little evidence in support of the efficiency of the individual grasses or mixtures to deal with such contaminated material. A pot-based pollutant retention study was conducted using processed street dust from central Coventry, UK, as a simulated pollutant to be applied in different quantities to a variety of recommended grasses for vegetated SUDS devices. Analysis was conducted on compost cores, roots and shoots for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn). Street dust mainly concentrated in the top compost layer for all grasses with only the finer material migrating down the profile. Analysis of roots indicated little accumulation, with ANOVA statistical tests indicating significant differences in heavy metal concentrations, with less in the compost and more in the shoots. Development of root systems on or near the surface possibly explains increased uptake of heavy metals by some species. Overall Agrostis canina and Poa pratensis showed the greatest accumulations compared to their controls although Agrostis capillaris syn.tenuis and Agrostis stolonifera also demonstrated accumulation potential. On ranking, Agrostis canina and Poa pratensis were highest overall. These rankings will assist in selecting the best grasses to address pollution of the urban environment by contaminated particulates. PMID:26753553

  2. Controls of dust emission fluxes and wind erosion threshold on a wet playa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, G.; King, J.; Thomas, D. S.; Washington, R.

    2012-12-01

    The control of dust emissions from crusted surfaces is both highly variable and difficult to measure directly. Seasonal changes in moisture availability, temperature, evaporation, surface roughness, and sediment supply result in a highly complex surface condition that remains to be fully described in the context of wind erosion potential. A highly intensive project on Sua Pan, Botswana using the PI-SWERL (portable wind tunnel) combined with surface measurements of crust and soil properties has led to a new understanding of the controls on wind erosion from these surfaces. The PI-SWERL is a highly portable wind tunnel that applies a wind shear to the surface using a motor-controlled rotating annular blade and measures resulting dust emissions with a DustTrak dust monitor. We undertook a sequence of tests with the PI-SWERL to obtain both the wind erosion threshold (using a slowly increasing shear velocity) and a dust emission flux (using a constant shear velocity) across a 12 km by 12 km grid across the pan surface. A total of just under 1000 wind tunnel tests and 2000 correlated measurements of a variety of surface properties including crust thickness, surface and subsurface soil moisture, shearing strength (shear vane), normal stress resistance (penetrometer), and surface roughness were conducted in August 2011. These results show that wind erosion potential is best described by measurements of normal stress resistance rather than shearing strength at low dust emission fluxes, but despite their frequent use in wind erosion studies of crusted surfaces neither metric provided a good explanation of higher dust emission fluxes. Surface soil moisture explained the most variation in both dust emissions and wind erosion threshold although much variation remains unexplained. Our results suggested that combining measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, and crust thickness provided a reasonable explanation of wind erosion potential on the salt pan surface. As pan

  3. Chemical and physical processes controlling aerosol compositions during Asian dust in May, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I.; Lee, M.; Han, J.; Lee, G.; Han, J.; Lim, S.; Kim, J.

    2008-12-01

    Asian dust events took place on May 29-31, 2008, which was the latest dust event ever observed in the spring. To examine chemical and physical processes controlling compositions of Asian dust particles, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 samples were collected using cyclone along with MOUDI (Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) samples from May 29 to June 2, 2008. For these particles, water soluble ions, and elemental and organic carbons were analyzed. Also, the morphology and elemental composition were examined using SEM/EDX. When dust intensity reached the maximum, the mass concentrations of PM10, PM2.5 and PM1.0 were 299.68ug/m3, 42.35ug/m3, 19.01ug/m3, respectively. During that period, all ions except NH4+ showed the maximum concentration for PM10. Particularly, the concentrations of NO3- and Ca2+ were remarkably elevated to 7.83¥ìg/m3 and 2.76¥ìg/m3, respectively. In contrast, NH4+, SO42- and NO3- concentrations of PM2.5 and PM1.0 were the highest on May 29, which was a day before the maximum dust intensity. This elevated levels of NH4+, SO42- and NO3- concentrations suggested the mixed plume of pollutants and dust particles on 29 May. For MOUDI samples, Ca2+ concentration were relatively uniform through the whole size range during the maximum dust intensity (30 May). In the following day, Ca2+ and NO3- concentrations increased noticeably at 0.1~0.18um. Sulfate concentrations were decreased during dust event. Detailed discussion will be presented in the meeting.

  4. Evaluation of Brushing as a Lunar Dust Mitigation Strategy for Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Journey, Khrissaundra; Christopher, Steven; Davis, Shanon

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of brushing to remove lunar simulant dust from thermal control surfaces is described. First, strip brushes made with nylon, PTFE, or Thunderon (Nihon Sanmo Dyeing Company Ltd.) bristles were used to remove JSC-1AF dust from AZ93 thermal control paint or aluminized FEP (AlFEP) thermal control surface under ambient laboratory conditions. Nylon and PTFE bristles removed a promising amount of dust from AZ93, and nylon and Thunderon bristles from AlFEP. But when these were tested under simulated lunar conditions in the lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB), they were not effective. In a third effort, seven brushes made up of three different materials, two different geometries, and different bristle lengths and thicknesses were tested under laboratory conditions against AZ93 and AlFEP. Two of these brushes, the Zephyr fiberglass fingerprint brush and the Escoda nylon fan brush, removed over 90 percent of the dust, and so were tested in the fourth effort in the LDAB. They also performed well under these conditions recovering 80 percent or more of the original thermal performance (solar absorptance/thermal emittance) of both AZ93 and AgFEP after 20 strokes, and 90 or more percent after 200 strokes

  5. Evaluation of Brushing as a Lunar Dust Mitigation Strategy for Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Journey, Hhrissaundra; Christopher, Steven; Davis, Shanon

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of brushing to remove lunar simulant dust from thermal control surfaces is described. First, strip brushes made with nylon, PTFE, or Thunderon bristles were used to remove JSC-1AF dust from AZ93 thermal control paint or aluminized FEP (AlFEP) thermal control surface under ambient laboratory conditions. Nylon and PTFE bristles removed a promising amount of dust from AZ93, and nylon and Thunderon bristles from AlFEP. But when these were tested under simulated lunar conditions in the lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB), they were not effective. In a third effort, seven brushes made up of three different materials, two different geometries, and different bristle lengths and thicknesses were tested under laboratory conditions against AZ93 and AlFEP. Two of these brushes, the Zephyr fiberglass fingerprint brush and the Escoda nylon fan brush, removed over 90 percent of the dust, and so were tested in the fourth effort in the LDAB. They also performed well under these conditions recovering 80 percent or more of the original thermal performance (solar absorptance/thermal emittance) of both AZ93 and AgFEP after 20 strokes, and 90 or more percent after 200 strokes.

  6. Dust and Black Carbon Radiative Forcing Controls on Snowmelt in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, Sara McKenzie

    Light absorbing impurities (LAIs), like dust and black carbon (BC), initiate powerful albedo feedbacks when deposited on snow cover, yet due to a scarcity of observations radiative forcing by LAIs is often neglected, or poorly constrained, in climate and hydrological models. This has important consequences for regions like the Colorado River Basin, where dust deposition to mountain snow cover frequently occurs in the upper basin in the springtime, a relatively new phenomenon since western expansion of the US. Previous work showed that dust on snow (DOS) enhances snowmelt by 3-7 weeks, shifts timing and intensity of runoff, and reduces total water yield. Here, advanced methods are presented to measure, model, and monitor DOS in the hydrologically sensitive Colorado River Basin. A multi-year multi-site spatial variability analysis indicates the heaviest dust loading comes from point sources in the southern Colorado Plateau, but also shows that lower levels of dust loading from diffuse sources still advances melt by 3-4 weeks. A high-resolution snow property dataset, including vertically resolved measurements of snow optical grain size and dust/BC concentrations, confirms that impurity layers remain in the layer in which they are deposited and converge at the surface as snow melts: influencing snow properties, rapidly reducing snow albedo, and increasing snowmelt rates. The optical properties of deposited impurities, which are mainly dust, are determined using an inversion technique from measurements of hemispherical reflectance and particle size distributions. Using updated optical properties in the snow+aerosols radiative transfer model SNICAR improves snow albedo modeling over a more general dust characterization, reducing errors by 50% across the full range of snow reflectance. Radiative forcing by LAIs in the CRB, estimated directly from measurements and updated optical properties, is most strongly controlled by dust concentrations in the uppermost surface layer

  7. Effect of Simulant Type on the Absorptance and Emittance of Dusted Thermal Control Surfaces in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program the effects of lunar dust on thermal control surfaces was found to be more significant than anticipated, with several systems overheating due to deposition of dust on them. In an effort to reduce risk to future missions, a series of tests has been initiated to characterize the effects of dust on these surfaces, and then to develop technologies to mitigate that risk. Given the variations in albedo across the lunar surface, one variable that may be important is the darkness of the lunar dust, and this study was undertaken to address that concern. Three thermal control surfaces, AZ-93 white paint and AgFEP and AlFEP second surface mirrors were dusted with three different lunar dust simulants in a simulated lunar environment, and their solar absorptivity and thermal emissivity values determined experimentally. The three simulants included JSC 1AF, a darker mare simulant, NU-LHT-1D, a light highlands simulant, and 1:1 mixture of the two. The response of AZ-93 was found to be slightly more pronounced than that of AgFEP. The increased with fractional dust coverage in both types of samples by a factor of 1.7 to 3.3, depending on the type of thermal control surface and the type of dust. The of the AZ-93 decreased by about 10 percent when fully covered by dust, while that of AgFEP increased by about 10 percent. It was found that alpha/epsilon varied by more than a factor of two depending on the thermal control surface and the darkness of the dust. Given that the darkest simulant used in this study may be significantly lighter than the darkest dust that could be encountered on the lunar surface, it becomes apparent that the performance degradation of thermal control surfaces due to dust on the moon will be strongly dependent on the and of the dust in the specific locality.

  8. Effect of Simulant Type on the Absorptance and Emittance of Dusted Thermal Control Surfaces in a Simulated Lunar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo program the effects of lunar dust on thermal control surfaces was found to be more significant than anticipated, with several systems overheating due to deposition of dust on them. In an effort to reduce risk to future missions, a series of tests has been initiated to characterize the effects of dust on these surfaces, and then to develop technologies to mitigate that risk. Given the variations in albedo across the lunar surface, one variable that may be important is the darkness of the lunar dust, and this study was undertaken to address that concern. Three thermal control surfaces, AZ-93 white paint and AgFEP and AlFEP second surface mirrors were dusted with three different lunar dust simulants in a simulated lunar environment, and their integrated solar absorptance ( ) and thermal emittance ( ) values determined experimentally. The three simulants included JSC-1AF, a darker mare simulant, NU-LHT-1D, a light highlands simulant, and 1:1 mixture of the two. The response of AZ-93 was found to be slightly more pronounced than that of AgFEP. The increased with fractional dust coverage in both types of samples by a factor of 1.7 to 3.3, depending on the type of thermal control surface and the type of dust. The of the AZ-93 decreased by about 10 percent when fully covered by dust, while that of AgFEP increased by about 10 percent. It was found that / varied by more than a factor of two depending on the thermal control surface and the darkness of the dust. Given that the darkest simulant used in this study may be lighter than the darkest dust that could be encountered on the lunar surface, it becomes apparent that the performance degradation of thermal control surfaces due to dust on the Moon will be strongly dependent on the and of the dust in the specific locality

  9. Adaptive control system for large annular momentum control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Johnson, C. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A dual momentum vector control concept, consisting of two counterrotating rings (each designated as an annular momentum control device), was studied for pointing and slewing control of large spacecraft. In a disturbance free space environment, the concept provides for three axis pointing and slewing capabilities while requiring no expendables. The approach utilizes two large diameter counterrotating rings or wheels suspended magnetically in many race supports distributed around the antenna structure. When the magnets are energized, attracting the two wheels, the resulting gyroscopic torque produces a rate along the appropriate axis. Roll control is provided by alternating the radiative rotational velocity of the two wheels. Wheels with diameters of 500 to 800 m and with sufficient momentum storage capability require rims only a few centimeters thick. The wheels are extremely flexible; therefore, it is necessary to account for the distributed nature of the rings in the design of the bearing controllers. Also, ring behavior is unpredictably sensitive to ring temperature, spin rate, manufacturing imperfections, and other variables. An adaptive control system designed to handle these problems is described.

  10. 49 CFR 178.338-11 - Discharge control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-11 Discharge control devices. (a) Excess... control system. (ii) On a cargo tank motor vehicle of 3,500 gallons water capacity or less, at least one... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge control devices. 178.338-11 Section...

  11. The role of moisture on controlling dust emissions from crusted supply-limited surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, James; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Thomas, David S. G.; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Dust emissions from crusted surfaces are both highly variable and difficult to measure directly. Seasonal changes in surface soil moisture, temperature, evaporation, surface roughness, and sediment supply result in a highly complex surface condition that remains to be fully described in the context of wind erosion potential. A highly intensive project on Makgadikgadi Pan, Botswana using the PI-SWERL (portable wind tunnel) combined with surface measurements of crust and soil properties has led to a new understanding of the time sensitive controls on wind erosion from these surfaces. The PI-SWERL is a highly portable wind tunnel that applies a shear stress to the surface using a motor-controlled rotating annular blade and measures resulting dust emissions with a PM10 monitor (DustTrak TSI Inc.). We undertook a sequence of tests with the PI-SWERL to obtain both the wind erosion threshold (using a slowly increasing shear velocity) and a dust emission flux (using a constant shear velocity) across a 12 km by 12 km grid across the pan surface. A total of just over 1500 wind tunnel tests and 3000 correlated measurements of a variety of surface properties including crust thickness, surface and subsurface soil moisture, shearing strength (shear vane), normal stress resistance (penetrometer), and surface roughness were conducted in August 2011 and August through October 2012. Two sets of results are presented providing discussion on: 1) Spatial variations in surface characteristics 2) Temporal variation in the control of surface characteristics and climatic conditions on potential dust emissions. These results show that wind erosion potential is best described by measurements of normal stress resistance rather than shearing strength at low dust emission fluxes, but despite their frequent use in wind erosion studies of crusted surfaces neither metric provided a good explanation of higher dust emission fluxes. Surface soil moisture explained the most variation in both dust

  12. Quality Control On Strained Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dommann, Alex; Neels, Antonia

    2010-11-24

    New semiconductor devices are based very often on strained silicon which promises to squeeze more device performance out of current devices. With strained silicon it is possible to get the same device performance using less power. The technique is using strain as a 'design element' for silicon to improve the device performance and has become a hot topic in semiconductor research in the past years. However in the same time topics like 'System in Package'(SiP) on thin wafers are getting more and more important. The chips of thin wafers in advanced packaging are extremely sensitive to induced stresses due to packaging issues. If we are using now strain as a design element for improving device performance we increase the sensitivity again and therefore also the risk of aging of such SiP's. High Resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) techniques such as Rocking Curves (RC's) and Reciprocal Space Mapping (RSM) are therefore very powerful tools to study the stresses in packaged devices.

  13. WINDBREAK EFFECTIVENESS FOR STORAGE-PILE FUGITIVE-DUST CONTROL: A WIND TUNNEL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of wind-tunnel experiments to determine the optimal size and location of porous windbreaks for controlling fugitive-dust emissions from storage piles in a simulated neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Straight sections of windbreak material were placed upwin...

  14. Transport control of dust particles via the electrical asymmetry effect: experiment, simulation and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Shinya; Schüngel, Edmund; Schulze, Julian; Hartmann, Peter; Donkó, Zoltán; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2013-06-01

    The control of the spatial distribution of micrometre-sized dust particles in capacitively coupled radio frequency discharges is relevant for research and applications. Typically, dust particles in plasmas form a layer located at the sheath edge adjacent to the bottom electrode. Here, a method of manipulating this distribution by the application of a specific excitation waveform, i.e. two consecutive harmonics, is discussed. Tuning the phase angle θ between the two harmonics allows one to adjust the discharge symmetry via the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE). An adiabatic (continuous) phase shift leaves the dust particles at an equilibrium position close to the lower sheath edge. Their levitation can be correlated with the electric field profile. By applying an abrupt phase shift the dust particles are transported between both sheaths through the plasma bulk and partially reside at an equilibrium position close to the upper sheath edge. Hence, the potential profile in the bulk region is probed by the dust particles providing indirect information on plasma properties. The respective motion is understood by an analytical model, showing both the limitations and possible ways of optimizing this sheath-to-sheath transport. A classification of the transport depending on the change in the dc self-bias is provided, and the pressure dependence is discussed.

  15. 40 CFR 65.155 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for... a control device to replace an existing recovery device that is used on a Group 2A process vent, the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Other control devices. 65.155...

  16. 40 CFR 65.155 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for... a control device to replace an existing recovery device that is used on a Group 2A process vent, the... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Other control devices. 65.155...

  17. 40 CFR 65.155 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for... a control device to replace an existing recovery device that is used on a Group 2A process vent, the... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Other control devices. 65.155...

  18. 40 CFR 65.155 - Other control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR 60.562-1(a)(1)(i)(A) for process vents, or § 65.83(a)(1) for... a control device to replace an existing recovery device that is used on a Group 2A process vent, the... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Other control devices. 65.155...

  19. FINE PARTICLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: CONVENTIONAL AND NOVEL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the development of technology in fine particle control. Electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), scrubbers, fabric filters, and novel devices were assessed to determine their efficiency. ESPs were found to be excellent in controlling fine particles: with an efficien...

  20. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.; Micklich, B.J.

    1983-06-01

    This invention pertains to methods of controlling in the steady state, neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices, and in particular, to methods of controlling the flux and energy distribution of collided neutrons which are incident on an outboard wall of a toroidal fusion device.

  1. 30 CFR 75.330 - Face ventilation control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Face ventilation control devices. 75.330 Section 75.330 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.330 Face ventilation control devices. (a) Brattice cloth,...

  2. 40 CFR 65.151 - Condensers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... parts per million by volume outlet concentration requirements as specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR... control device on a Group 1 process vent or a high-throughput transfer rack with a condenser used as a... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Condensers used as control devices....

  3. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices. 65.150 Section 65.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.150...

  4. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... parts per million by volume outlet concentration requirements as specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR... control device on a Group 1 process vent or a high-throughput transfer rack with an absorber used as a... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices....

  5. 40 CFR 65.151 - Condensers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... parts per million by volume outlet concentration requirements as specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR... control device on a Group 1 process vent or a high-throughput transfer rack with a condenser used as a... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Condensers used as control devices....

  6. 40 CFR 65.151 - Condensers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Condensers used as control devices. 65.151 Section 65.151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED FEDERAL AIR RULE Closed Vent Systems, Control Devices, and Routing to a Fuel Gas System or a Process § 65.151...

  7. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... parts per million by volume outlet concentration requirements as specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR... control device on a Group 1 process vent or a high-throughput transfer rack with an absorber used as a... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices....

  8. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow...

  9. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow...

  10. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow...

  11. 40 CFR 65.150 - Absorbers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... parts per million by volume outlet concentration requirements as specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Absorbers used as control devices. 65... System or a Process § 65.150 Absorbers used as control devices. (a) Absorber equipment and...

  12. 40 CFR 65.151 - Condensers used as control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... parts per million by volume outlet concentration requirements as specified in § 65.63(a)(2), or 40 CFR... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Condensers used as control devices. 65... System or a Process § 65.151 Condensers used as control devices. (a) Condenser equipment and...

  13. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow...

  14. 49 CFR 236.501 - Forestalling device and speed control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Forestalling device and speed control. 236.501... Train Stop, Train Control and Cab Signal Systems Standards § 236.501 Forestalling device and speed... the following features: (1) Low-speed restriction, requiring the train to proceed under slow...

  15. Design of equipment for lunar dust removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belden, Lacy; Cowan, Kevin; Kleespies, Hank; Ratliff, Ryan; Shah, Oniell; Shelburne, Kevin

    1991-01-01

    NASA has a long range goal of constructing a fully equipped, manned lunar base on the near side of the moon by the year 2015. During the Apollo Missions, lunar dust coated and fouled equipment surfaces and mechanisms exposed to the lunar environment. In addition, the atmosphere and internal surfaces of the lunar excursion module were contaminated by lunar dust which was brought in on articles passed through the airlock. Consequently, the need exists for device or appliance to remove lunar dust from surfaces of material objects used outside of the proposed lunar habitat. Additionally, several concepts were investigated for preventing the accumulation of lunar dust on mechanisms and finished surfaces. The character of the dust and the lunar environment present unique challenges for the removal of contamination from exposed surfaces. In addition to a study of lunar dust adhesion properties, the project examines the use of various energy domains for removing the dust from exposed surfaces. Also, prevention alternatives are examined for systems exposed to lunar dust. A concept utilizing a pressurized gas is presented for dust removal outside of an atmospherically controlled environment. The concept consists of a small astronaut/robotic compatible device which removes dust from contaminated surfaces by a small burst of gas.

  16. Determining Desirable Cursor Control Device Characteristics for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina L.

    2007-01-01

    A test battery was developed for cursor control device evaluation: four tasks were taken from ISO 9241-9, and three from previous studies conducted at NASA. The tasks focused on basic movements such as pointing, clicking, and dragging. Four cursor control devices were evaluated with and without Extravehicular Activity (EVA) gloves to identify desirable cursor control device characteristics for NASA missions: 1) the Kensington Expert Mouse, 2) the Hulapoint mouse, 3) the Logitech Marble Mouse, and 4) the Honeywell trackball. Results showed that: 1) the test battery is an efficient tool for differentiating among input devices, 2) gloved operations were about 1 second slower and had at least 15% more errors; 3) devices used with gloves have to be larger, and should allow good hand positioning to counteract the lack of tactile feedback, 4) none of the devices, as designed, were ideal for operation with EVA gloves.

  17. Residential dust lead loading immediately after intervention in the HUD lead hazard control grant program.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Sherry L; Wilson, Jonathan W; Succop, Paul A; Chen, Mei; Galke, Warren A; Menrath, William; Clark, C Scott

    2004-11-01

    At the conclusion of most lead hazard control interventions in federally assisted housing built before 1978, a certified clearance examiner must verify that the lead hazard control work was completed as specified and that the area is safe for residents, a process referred to as clearance. This study explores the experience of 14 grantees participating in the Evaluation of the HUD Lead-Based Paint Hazard Control Grant Program in passing clearance. The study also considers how preintervention lead levels (interior dust and paint), building condition/characteristics, and the scope of work influenced initial clearance dust lead loadings and clearance rates. At the initial clearance inspection, 80% of the 2682 dwellings achieved grantee-specific clearance standards on windowsills, window troughs (500 microg/ft2 and 800 microg/ft2, respectively), and floors (80, 100, or 200 microg/ft2 depending on state/local regulations at the dates of clearance in the mid-1990s), with individual grantee success rates ranging from 63 to 100%. Dwellings that failed initial clearance required an average of 1.13 retests to clear. The high level of success at clearance demonstrates that following methods for work site containment, lead hazard control, and cleaning similar to those recommended in the HUD Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint in Housing is effective. The most common lead hazard control intervention was window abatement accompanied by the repair or abatement of all other deteriorated lead-based paint (56% of dwellings). An additional 5% of dwellings were fully abated, 29% had lower intensity interventions. Interventions including window replacement are recommended to reduce dust lead loading on windowsills and troughs at clearance, but lower level interventions such as full paint stabilization are just as good at reducing floor dust lead loadings. Whatever lead hazard control activities are selected, the condition of the surfaces of interest should be

  18. Development of an autonomous 32-bit intelligent device controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, D.; Waters, G.; Dale, D.; Ewert, T.; Harrison, D.; Lam, J.; Keitel, R.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes the development and present status of an intelligent device controller for embedded systems. The controller is a low-cost single-board module in Euro-card format based on a Motorola MC68332 microcontroller. An onboard Ethernet interface allows software downloading and remote device control. Also included are 12 ADC channels, 4 DAC channels, 56 bits of digital I/O and 3 serial ports. Custom modules may be added using a backplane bus. The controller is designed to function as a VME slave device. A multitasking environment is provided by the VxWorks kernel.

  19. 78 FR 2347 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ...The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) is incorporated in our regulations, approved by the Federal Highway Administration, and recognized as the national standard for traffic control devices used on all streets, highways, bikeways, and private roads open to public travel. Consistent with Executive Order 13563, and in particular its emphasis on burden-reduction and on......

  20. Evaluation of cut-off saw exposure control methods for respirable dust and crystalline silica in roadway construction.

    PubMed

    Middaugh, Beauregard; Hubbard, Bryan; Zimmerman, Neil; McGlothlin, James

    2012-01-01

    Dust reduction equipment adapted for single-person operation was evaluated for gas-powered, commercially available cut-off saws during concrete curb cutting. Cutting was performed without dust control and with two individual exposure control methods: wet suppression and local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The wet suppression system comprised a two-nozzle spray system and a 13.3-L hand-pressurized water supply system with an optimum mean flow rate of 0.83 L/min for 16 min of cutting. The LEV system consisted of a spring-loaded guard, an 18.9-L collection bag, and a centrifugal fan with an estimated exhaust rate of 91 ft(3)/min. Task-based, personal filter samples were obtained for four saw operators during cutting durations of 4 to 16 min on five job sites. Seventeen filter samples were collected without dust control, 14 with wet suppression, and 12 with LEV, yielding a geometric mean respirable dust concentration of 16.4 mg/m(3), 3.60 mg/m(3), and 4.40 mg/m(3), respectively. A dust reduction of 78.0% for wet suppression and 73.2% for LEV was observed vs. no dust control. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was also revealed for wet suppression and LEV when compared with no dust control; however, a significant difference (p = 0.09) was not observed between wet suppression and LEV. Despite these significant dust reductions, workers are still projected to exceed the ACGIH 8-hr time-weighted average threshold limit value for quartz (0.025 mg/m(3)) in less than 1 hr of cutting for both dust control methods. Further research is still needed to improve dust reduction and portability of both control methods, but the current LEV system offers important advantages, including a drier, less slippery work area and year-round functionality in cold weather. PMID:22394370

  1. Measurements of the effectiveness of dust control on cut-off saws used in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, A; Ritchie, A S; Gibson, M J; Brown, R C

    1999-10-01

    Materials used in the construction industry frequently contain large quantities of silica. When they are cut or shaped with power tools considerable respirable dust can be produced. Three dust control systems for use with cut-off saws have been evaluated on site: wet dust suppression using mains water, the same system using water from a portable water tank, and local exhaust ventilation. The efficiency of water suppression on cut-off saws has been precisely quantified in controlled laboratory conditions by means of measurements with and without dust control. When dust control was used on-site, the mean concentrations of airborne silica were reduced by a factor of between three and seven, the accuracy being limited by the relatively high limit of detection for silica. All controls systems generally reduced respirable dust levels by at least 90%. Although the effectiveness of dust suppression did not depend on blade type, a diamond blade was more effective than a resin-bonded blade with the pressurised water system; cutting a slab with this type of blade could be completed before the water tank required repressurization. In laboratory tests, the application of water reduced the dust concentration to < 4% of its value without control. The method for monitoring the dust concentration was sufficiently sensitive to measure a difference in concentration produced during cutting in different directions. It is important, however, that the pressure in supply reservoirs is properly maintained, that the water is correctly applied and that it is used at the correct rate. If this is done effective dust control can be achieved. PMID:10582028

  2. Linear optimal control of tokamak fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Firestone, M.A.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-05-01

    The control of plasma position, shape and current in a tokamak fusion reactor is examined using linear optimal control. These advanced tokamaks are characterized by non up-down symmetric coils and structure, thick structure surrounding the plasma, eddy currents, shaped plasmas, superconducting coils, vertically unstable plasmas, and hybrid function coils providing ohmic heating, vertical field, radial field, and shaping field. Models of the electromagnetic environment in a tokamak are derived and used to construct control gains that are tested in nonlinear simulations with initial perturbations. The issues of applying linear optimal control to advanced tokamaks are addressed, including complex equilibrium control, choice of cost functional weights, the coil voltage limit, discrete control, and order reduction. Results indicate that the linear optimal control is a feasible technique for controlling advanced tokamaks where the more common classical control will be severely strained or will not work. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  4. A Mechanical Decision-Making Device for Structural Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Deh-Shiu; Hou, Chien-Yuan; Yeh, Ming-Chang; Yeh, Chiu-Shang

    2002-11-01

    In the present study a new. mechanical. decision-making device is proposed for structural control. When a structure is excited by external loadings or around accelerations, the structural sides-way can be detected by the device, and control forces are provided or released if pre-defined conditions are fulfilled. Mathematical results show that structures mounted with the device exhibit less dynamic response when the structures are Subjected to earthquake excitations. Preliminary model test results showed that tile device is useful. Howe it has a much less efficiency than predicted by the mathematical model. This device is more reliable and is cost saving because the device is a machine without complex and expensive electronic facilities.

  5. Modified shearer clearer system for dust and methane control. Information circular/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Cecala, A.; Jayaraman, N.I.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a detailed description of the Bureau of Mines designed modified shearer clearer system. Engineering drawings are provided for all major components of this system. The modified shearer clearer system is a revised version of the original system intended to improve the ventilation around both cutting drums. The original shearer clearer technique was solely a dust control technique that has been effective in lowering shearer operator's dust exposures. The technique uses a series of water sprays that not only knock down a portion of the dust cloud but also act as small fans that move a substantial amount of air and keep the dust cloud from dispersing over the shearer body. The modified version is composed of two additional spray blocks for improved air movement around both cutting drums, thus lowering methane levels and the likelihood of an ignition. A laboratory study performed with the modified version in a full-scale longwall gallery resulted in a 73 pct reduction in methane concentrations at the shearer machine for both cut directions. The air moving capabilities of the system provides more turbulence at the cutting drums and reduces methane levels.

  6. An Optically Controllable Transformation-dc Illusion Device.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Luo, Chen Yang; Ge, Shuo; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Cui, Tie Jun

    2015-08-19

    The concept of multifunctional transformation-dc devices is proposed and verified experimentally. The functions of dc metamaterials can be remotely altered by illuminating with visible light. If the light-induced dc illusion effect is activated, the electrostatic behavior of the original object is perceived as multiple equivalent objects with different pre-designed geometries. The experimental verification of the functional device makes it possible to control sophisticated transformation-dc devices with external light illumination. PMID:26177597

  7. Smart Rehabilitation Devices: Part I – Force Tracking Control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been widely reported to have positive rehabilitation effects for patients with neuromuscular and orthopaedic conditions. This article presents prototypes of smart variable resistance exercise devices using magneto-rheological fluid dampers. An intelligent supervisory control for regulating the resistive force or torque of the device is developed, and is validated both numerically and experimentally. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training for the human joints including knee, elbow, hip, and ankle. PMID:18504509

  8. Migrated Essure permanent birth control device: sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Khati, Nadia Juliet; Gorodenker, Joseph; Brindle, Kathleen Ann

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of a migrated Essure permanent birth control device. The correct diagnosis was made on conventional two-dimensional and three-dimensional pelvic sonography 7 years after placement of the device when the patient presented with persistent right-sided pain. The 3-month post placement hysterosalpingogram had shown an appropriately occluded right fallopian tube but had overlooked the abnormal position of the right Essure device, which was too proximal and extending slightly in the uterine cavity. PMID:24122949

  9. Controllable optical transparency using an acoustic standing-wave device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Kamran; El-Zahab, Bilal

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a suspended-particle device with controllable light transmittance was developed based on acoustic stimuli. Using a glass compartment and carbon particle suspension in an organic solvent, the device responded to acoustic stimulation by alignment of particles. The alignment of light-absorbing carbon particles afforded an increase in light transmittance as high as 84.5% and was controllable based on the control of the frequency and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The device also demonstrated alignment memory rendering it energy-efficient.

  10. Smart Rehabilitation Devices: Part II – Adaptive Motion Control

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, J. Q.; Rudolph, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study of adaptive motion control of smart versatile rehabilitation devices using MR fluids. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and is reconfigurable for several human joints. Adaptive controls are developed to regulate resistance force based on the prescription of the therapist. Special consideration has been given to the human–machine interaction in the adaptive control that can modify the behavior of the device to account for strength gains or muscle fatigue of the human subject. PMID:18548131

  11. Self-regulating flow control device

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, Duane A.

    1984-01-01

    A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

  12. LAM actuated propellant flow control device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinicke, Robert H.; Cust, Kevin M.

    1992-02-01

    An advanced design LAM (limited angle motor) positions an integral flow control element for bi-level flow control of storable propellants. The LAM incorporates permanent magnet latching to maintain the flow control element in either the low or high flow position without continuous electrical energization. The LAM stator and rotor are fully sheathed within stainless steel. This construction method permits the LAM to control storable propellants without using dynamic seals to isolate the LAM from the propellants. All welded construction prevents external leakage. The design concept selection rationale and the computer FEA (finite element analysis) methods employed to optimize design characteristics are presented. Correlations of analyses to test results are described.

  13. Does coal mine dust present a risk for lung cancer. A case-control study of U. S. coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.; Amandus, H.; Attfield, M.; Green, F.Y.; Vallyathan, V.

    1983-11-01

    The relationship between the risk of lung cancer mortality and coal mine dust exposure under control by cigarette smoking status is evaluated. Two case-control studies based on 317 white male lung cancer mortality cases are presented. A one-to-one matched-case design allows examination of the risk of coal mine dust exposure and cigarette smoking. A two-to-one matched-case design was employed to examine the lung cancer risk of coal mine dust exposure independent of cigarette smoking. Based upon these data, no evidence of a coal mine dust exposure-lung cancer risk was found, although the expected increased risk for lung cancer in cigarette smokers was observed. There was no evidence of an interactive effect between cigarette smoking and coal mine dust exposure. (13 refs.)

  14. Inverted Control Rod Lock-In Device

    DOEpatents

    Brussalis, W. G.; Bost, G. E.

    1962-12-01

    A mechanism which prevents control rods from dropping out of the reactor core in the event the vessel in which the reactor is mounted should capsize is described. The mechanism includes a pivoted toothed armature which engages the threaded control rod lead screw and prevents removal of the rod whenever the armature is not attracted by the provided electromagnetic means. (AEC)

  15. DESIGN MANUAL: SWIRL AND HELICAL BEND POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This design manual contains descriptions of design procedures and operating experience to date, including results obtained, for secondary flow pollution control devices. Two types of combined sewer overflow regulators are described: the swirl and the helical bend regulator/separa...

  16. Control of impurities in toroidal plasma devices

    DOEpatents

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1980-01-01

    A method and apparatus for plasma impurity control in closed flux plasma systems such as Tokamak reactors is disclosed. Local axisymmetrical injection of hydrogen gas is employed to reverse the normally inward flow of impurities into the plasma.

  17. Molecular gels-based controlled release devices for pheromones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    2-Heptanone is a volatile solvent that is effective in controlling parasitic mites (Varroa) in honeybee. Controlled-release of 2-heptanone is needed to avoid overdosing, minimize chemical usage, and provide a sustained release over a several week period. Control-release devices comprised of a reserv...

  18. The effect of local exhaust ventilation controls on dust exposures during concrete cutting and grinding activities.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Gerry A; Guffey, Steven E; Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Seixas, Noah S

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of commercially available local exhaust ventilation (LEV) systems for controlling respirable dust and crystalline silica exposures during concrete cutting and grinding activities. Work activities were performed by union-sponsored apprentices and included tuck-point grinding, surface grinding, paver block and brick cutting (masonry saw), and concrete block cutting (hand-held saw). In a randomized block design, implemented under controlled field conditions, three ventilation rates (0, 30, and 75 cfm) were tested for each tool. Each ventilation treatment was replicated three times in random order for a total of nine 15-min work sessions per study subject. With the exception of the hand-held saw, the use of LEV resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in respirable dust exposure. Mean exposure levels for the 75 cfm treatments were less than that of the 30 cfm treatments; however, differences between these two treatments were only significant for paver block cutting (p < 0.01). Although exposure reduction was significant (70-90% at the low ventilation rate and 80-95% reduction at the high ventilation rate), personal respirable dust [corrected] exposures remained very high: 1.4-2.8 x PEL (permissible exposure limit) at the low ventilation rate and 0.9-1.7 x PEL at the high ventilation rate. Exposure levels found under actual field conditions would likely be lower due to the intermittent nature of most job tasks. Despite incomplete control LEV has merit, as it would reduce the risk of workers developing disease, allow workers to use a lower level of respiratory protection, protect workers during short duration work episodes reduce exposure to nearby workers, and reduce clean-up associated dust exposures. PMID:12486779

  19. The dynamics and control of a haptic interface device

    SciTech Connect

    Kazerooni, H. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Her, M.G. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    Haptic Interface Devices are machines that are controlled by the human arm contact forces. These devices are necessary elements of virtual reality machines. These devices may be programmed to give the human arm the sensation of forces associated with various arbitrary maneuvers. As examples, these devices can give the human the sensation that he/she is maneuvering a mass, or pushing onto a spring or a damper. In general, these devices may be programmed for any trajectory-dependant force. To illustrate and verify the analysis of these machines, a two-degree-of-freedom electrically-powered haptic interface device was designed and built at the Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) of the University of California-Berkeley.

  20. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-01

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  1. Optically controlled multiple switching operations of DNA biopolymer devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Chao-You; Tu, Waan-Ting; Lin, Yi-Tzu; Fruk, Ljiljana; Hung, Yu-Chueh

    2015-12-21

    We present optically tunable operations of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biopolymer devices, where a single high-resistance state, write-once read-many-times memory state, write-read-erase memory state, and single low-resistance state can be achieved by controlling UV irradiation time. The device is a simple sandwich structure with a spin-coated DNA biopolymer layer sandwiched by two electrodes. Upon irradiation, the electrical properties of the device are adjusted owing to a phototriggered synthesis of silver nanoparticles in DNA biopolymer, giving rise to multiple switching scenarios. This technique, distinct from the strategy of doping of pre-formed nanoparticles, enables a post-film fabrication process for achieving optically controlled memory device operations, which provides a more versatile platform to fabricate organic memory and optoelectronic devices.

  2. Optimization of a fluidic temperature control device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabsky, J. M.; Rask, D. R.; Starr, J. B.

    1970-01-01

    Refinements are described to an existing fluidic temperature control system developed under a prior study which modulated temperature at the inlet to the liquid-cooled garment by using existing liquid supply and return lines to transmit signals to a fluidic controller located in the spacecraft. This earlier system produced a limited range of garment inlet temperatures, requiring some bypassing of flow around the suit to make the astronaut comfortable at rest conditions. Refinements were based on a flow visualization study of the key element in the fluidic controller: the fluidic mixing valve. The valve's mixing-ratio range was achieved by making five key changes: (1) geometrical changes to the valve; (2) attenuation of noise generated in proportional amplifier cascades; (3) elimination of vortices at the exit of the fluidic mixing valve; (4) reduction of internal heat transfer; and (5) flow balancing through venting. As a result, the refined system is capable of modulating garment inlet temperature from 45 F to 70 F with a single manual control valve in series with the garment. This control valve signals without changing or bypassing flow through the garment.

  3. 76 FR 46213 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... compromised based on engineering judgment or engineering study.'' \\1\\ 74 FR 66732, December 16, 2009. This... numbered accordingly. \\2\\ 75 FR 20935, April 22, 2010. This Federal Register notice can be viewed at the... Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways; Revision AGENCY:...

  4. 75 FR 20935 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Printing Office's Web page at: http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara . Background On December 21, 2007, at 72 FR... retroreflectivity final rule was published in the Federal Register at 72 FR 72574 on December 21, 2007, and can be... Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways; Maintaining...

  5. DEVICE FOR CONTROLLING INSERTION OF ROD

    DOEpatents

    Beaty, B.J.

    1958-10-14

    A device for rapidly inserting a safety rod into a nuclear reactor upon a given signal or in the event of a power failure in order to prevent the possibility of extensive damage caused by a power excursion is described. A piston is slidably mounted within a vertical cylinder with provision for an electromagnetic latch at the top of the cylinder. This assembly, with a safety rod attached to the piston, is mounted over an access port to the core region of the reactor. The piston is normally latched at the top of the cylinder with the safety rod clear of the core area, however, when the latch is released, the piston and rod drop by their own weight to insert the rod. Vents along the side of the cylinder permit the escape of the air entrapped under the piston over the greater part of the distance, however, at the end of the fall the entrapped air is compressed thereby bringing the safety rod gently to rest, thus providing for a rapid automatic insertion of the rod with a minimum of structural shock.

  6. Implementation of Adaptive Digital Controllers on Programmable Logic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; King, Kenneth D.; Smith, Keary J.; Montenegro, Justino (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Much has been made of the capabilities of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA's) in the hardware implementation of fast digital signal processing functions. Such capability also makes an FPGA a suitable platform for the digital implementation of closed loop controllers. Other researchers have implemented a variety of closed-loop digital controllers on FPGA's. Some of these controllers include the widely used Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller, state space controllers, neural network and fuzzy logic based controllers. There are myriad advantages to utilizing an FPGA for discrete-time control functions which include the capability for reconfiguration when SRAM- based FPGA's are employed, fast parallel implementation of multiple control loops and implementations that can meet space level radiation tolerance requirements in a compact form-factor. Generally, a software implementation on a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) device or microcontroller is used to implement digital controllers. At Marshall Space Flight Center, the Control Electronics Group has been studying adaptive discrete-time control of motor driven actuator systems using DSP devices. While small form factor, commercial DSP devices are now available with event capture, data conversion, Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) outputs and communication peripherals, these devices are not currently available in designs and packages which meet space level radiation requirements. In general, very few DSP devices are produced that are designed to meet any level of radiation tolerance or hardness. An alternative is required for compact implementation of such functionality to withstand the harsh environment encountered on spacemap. The goal of this effort is to create a fully digital, flight ready controller design that utilizes an FPGA for implementation of signal conditioning for control feedback signals, generation of commands to the controlled system, and hardware insertion of adaptive-control algorithm

  7. Control of Combustion-Instabilities Through Various Passive Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Nesman, Tom; Canabal, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Results of a computational study on the effectiveness of various passive devices for the control of combustion instabilities are presented. An axi-symmetric combustion chamber is considered. The passive control devices investigated are, baffles, Helmholtz resonators and quarter-waves. The results show that a Helmholtz resonator with a smooth orifice achieves the best control results, while a baffle is the least effective for the frequency tested. At high sound pressure levels, the Helmholtz resonator is less effective. It is also found that for a quarter wave, the smoothness of the orifice has the opposite effect than the Helmholtz resonator, i.e. results in less control.

  8. Dust control at longwalls with water infusion and foam. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-12

    Phase II tasks were: equipment procurement, installation, testing, debugging and modifications for both water infusion and foam spray techniques. These tasks were completed for both Pocahontas No. 3 seam as well as the Upper Freeport Seam. Several modifications were made in the hardware after the initial tests and debugging. Additional hardware has been added to the system to cope with some site specific constraints. Some original hardware was discarded following the initial tests in favor of more efficient equipment or lower cost equipment. Ten important innovations implemented during the contract work are described. Each of these improvements in the systems has been discussed in detail in individual monthly reports. In all the foregoing, the objectives were to simplify the system to make technology transfer to the mine laborers easier, to minimize capital and operating costs of dust control, to avoid interference with coal production operations and to eliminate respirable dust as a health hazard and a bottleneck to productivity on longwalls.

  9. Flow control concepts for thread-based microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, David R.; Li, Xu; Shen, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The emerging concept of thread-based microfluidics has shown great promise for application to inexpensive disease detection and environmental monitoring. To allow the creation of more sophisticated and functional thread-based sensor designs, the ability to better control and understand the flow of fluids in the devices is required. To meet this end, various mechanisms for controlling the flow of reagents and samples in thread-based microfluidic devices are investigated in this study. A study of fluid penetration in single threads and in twined threads provides greater practical understanding of fluid velocity and ultimate penetration for the design of devices. “Switches” which control when or where flow can occur, or allow the mixing of multiple fluids, have been successfully prototyped from multifilament threads, plastic films, and household adhesive. This advancement allows the fabrication of more functional sensory devices which can incorporate more complex detection chemistries, while maintaining low production cost and simplicity of construction. PMID:21483659

  10. DEVICE CONTROL TOOL FOR CEBAF BEAM DIAGNOSTICS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2008-02-11

    Continuously monitoring the beam quality in the CEBAF accelerator, a variety of beam diagnostics software created at Jefferson Lab makes a significant contribution to very high availability of the machine for nuclear physics experiments. The interface between this software and beam instrumentation hardware components is provided by a device control tool, which is optimized for beam diagnostics tasks. As a part of the device/driver development framework at Jefferson Lab, this tool is very easy to support and extend to integrate new beam instrumentation components. All device control functions are based on the configuration (ASCII text) files that completely define the used hardware interface standards (CAMAC, VME, RS-232, GPIB, etc.) and communication protocols. The paper presents the main elements of the device control tool for beam diagnostics software at Jefferson Lab.