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Sample records for dust grains orbiting

  1. The lunar phases of dust grains orbiting Fomalhaut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, M.; Kama, M.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    Optical images of the nearby star Fomalhaut show a ring of dust orbiting the central star. This dust is in many respects expected to be similar to the zodiacal dust in the solar system. The ring displays a clear brightness asymmetry, attributed to asymmetric scattering of the central starlight by the circumstellar dust grains. Recent measurements show that the bright side of the Fomalhaut ring is oriented away from us. This implies that the grains in this system scatter most of the light in the backward direction, in sharp contrast to the forward-scattering nature of the grains in the solar system. In this letter, we show that grains considerably larger than those dominating the solar system zodiacal dust cloud provide a natural explanation for the apparent backward scattering behavior. In fact, we see the phases of the dust grains in the same way as we can observe the phases of the Moon and other large solar system bodies. We outline how the theory of the scattering behavior of planetesimals can be used to explain the Fomalhaut dust properties. This indicates that the Fomalhaut dust ring is dominated by very large grains. The material orbiting Fomalhaut, which is at the transition between dust and planetesimals, can, with respect to their optical behavior, best be described as micro-asteroids.

  2. Fractal dust grains in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.; Peng, R. D.; Liu, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Ye, M. F.; Wang, L.

    2012-09-15

    Fractal dust grains of different shapes are observed in a radially confined magnetized radio frequency plasma. The fractal dimensions of the dust structures in two-dimensional (2D) horizontal dust layers are calculated, and their evolution in the dust growth process is investigated. It is found that as the dust grains grow the fractal dimension of the dust structure decreases. In addition, the fractal dimension of the center region is larger than that of the entire region in the 2D dust layer. In the initial growth stage, the small dust particulates at a high number density in a 2D layer tend to fill space as a normal surface with fractal dimension D = 2. The mechanism of the formation of fractal dust grains is discussed.

  3. Dust grain resonant capture: A statistical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzari, F.; Vanzani, V.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A statistical approach, based on a large number of simultaneous numerical integrations, is adopted to study the capture in external mean motion resonances with the Earth of micron size dust grains perturbed by solar radiation and wind forces. We explore the dependence of the resonant capture phenomenon on the initial eccentricity e(sub 0) and perihelion argument w(sub 0) of the dust particle orbit. The intensity of both the resonant and dissipative (Poynting-Robertson and wind drag) perturbations strongly depends on the eccentricity of the particle while the perihelion argument determines, for low inclination, the mutual geometrical configuration of the particle's orbit with respect to the Earth's orbit. We present results for three j:j+1 commensurabilities (2:3, 4:5 and 6:7) and also for particle sizes s = 15, 30 microns. This study extends our previous work on the long term orbital evolution of single dust particles trapped into resonances with the Earth.

  4. Experiments on Dust Grain Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. N.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.

    2004-01-01

    Dust particles in various astrophysical environments are charged by a variety of mechanisms generally involving collisional processes with other charged particles and photoelectric emission with UV radiation from nearby sources. The sign and the magnitude of the particle charge are determined by the competition between the charging processes by UV radiation and collisions with charged particles. Knowledge of the particle charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a number of physical processes. The charge of a dust grain is thus a fundamental parameter that influences the physics of dusty plasmas, processes in the interplanetary medium and interstellar medium, interstellar dust clouds, planetary rings, cometary and outer atmospheres of planets etc. In this paper we present some results of experiments on charging of dust grains carried out on a laboratory facility capable levitating micron size dust grains in an electrodynamic balance in simulated space environments. The charging/discharging experiments were carried out by exposing the dust grains to energetic electron beams and UV radiation. Photoelectric efficiencies and yields of micron size dust grains of SiO2, and lunar simulates obtained from NASA-JSC will be presented.

  5. Kuiper Belt Dust Grains as a Source of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi; Zook, Herbert A.; Dermott, Stanley F.

    1996-01-01

    The recent discovery of the so-called Kuiper belt objects has prompted the idea that these objects produce dust grains that may contribute significantly to the interplanetary dust population. In this paper, the orbital evolution of dust grains, of diameters 1 to 9 microns, that originate in the region of the Kuiper belt is studied by means of direct numerical integration. Gravitational forces of the Sun and planets, solar radiation pressure, as well as Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag are included. The interactions between charged dust grains and solar magnetic field are not considered in the model. Because of the effects of drag forces, small dust grains will spiral toward the Sun once they are released from their large parent bodies. This motion leads dust grains to pass by planets as well as encounter numerous mean motion resonances associated with planets. Our results show that about 80% of the Kuiper belt grains are ejected from the Solar System by the giant planets, while the remaining 20% of the grains evolve all the way to the Sun. Surprisingly, the latter dust grains have small orbital eccentricities and inclinations when they cross the orbit of the Earth. This makes them behave more like asteroidal than cometary-type dust particles. This also enhances their chances of being captured by the Earth and makes them a possible source of the collected interplanetary dust particles; in particular, they represent a possible source that brings primitive/organic materials from the outer Solar System to the Earth. When collisions with interstellar dust grains are considered, however, Kuiper belt dust grains around 9 microns appear likely to be collisionally shattered before they can evolve toward the inner part of the Solar System. The collision destruction can be applied to Kuiper belt grains up to about 50 microns. Therefore, Kuiper belt dust grains within this range may not be a significant part of the interplanetary dust complex in the inner Solar

  6. Dust grain charging in a wake of other grains

    SciTech Connect

    Miloch, W. J.; Block, D.

    2012-12-15

    The charging of dust grain in the wake of another grains in sonic and supersonic collisionless plasma flows is studied by numerical simulations. We consider two grains aligned with the flow, as well as dust chains and multiple grain arrangements. It is found that the dust charge depends significantly on the flow speed, distance between the grains, and the grain arrangement. For two and three grains aligned, the charges on downstream grains depend linearly on the flow velocity and intergrain distance. The simulations are carried out with DiP3D, a three dimensional particle-in-cell code with both electrons and ions represented as numerical particles [W. J. Miloch et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 103703 (2010)].

  7. The adiabatic motion of charged dust grains in rotating magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrop, T. G.; Hill, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Adiabatic equations of motion are derived for the micrometer-sized dust grains detected in the Jovian and Saturn magnetospheres by the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft. The adiabatic theory of charged particle motion is extended to the case of variable grain charge. Attention is focused on the innermost and outermost limits to the grain orbit evolution, with all orbits tending to become circular with time. The parameters such as the center equation of motion, the drift velocity, and the parallel equation of motion are obtained for grains in a rotating magnetosphere. Consideration is given to the effects of periodic grain charge-discharge, which are affected by the ambient plasma properties and the grain plasma velocity. The charge-discharge process at the gyrofrequency is determined to eliminate the invariance of the magnetic moment and cause the grain to exhibit radial movement. The magnetic moment increases or decreases as a function of the gyrophase of the charge variation.

  8. Photoemission from glass dust grains: First measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouzak, Libor; Pechal, Radim; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2014-05-01

    Dust grains are present in the interstellar space and also on surfaces of space objects like the Moon. The grains are charged by photoemission caused by solar UV radiation and by charged particles from the ambient plasma (solar wind, planetary magnetospheres). A balance of different charging processes on both sunlit and night sides of the Moon causes interesting phenomena as dust horizon glow, dust fountains, and dust levitation. To contribute to a better understanding of these processes, we present laboratory investigations that use a single SiO2 grain of micron size (an archetype of the lunar dust) caught in the electrodynamic trap. We irradiate it by HeI (21.2 eV) photons and electrons and discuss a contribution of these two processes to the grain charge. The grain specific charge is evaluated by an analysis of its motion and position in the trap. We compare equilibrium charge-to-mass ratios given by the electron emissions induced by electrons and by the UV photons from the HeI lamp. First measurements indicate that the resulting charge is about twice larger for photoemission than that caused by an electron impact.

  9. Dust Spectroscopy and the Nature of Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Ground-based, air-borne and space-based, infrared spectra of a wide variety of objects have revealed prominent absorption and emission features due to large molecules and small dust grains. Analysis of this data reveals a highly diverse interstellar and circumstellar grain inventory, including both amorphous materials and highly crystalline compounds (silicates and carbon). This diversity points towards a wide range of physical and chemical birthsites as well as a complex processing of these grains in the interstellar medium. In this talk, I will review the dust inventory contrasting and comparing both the interstellar and circumstellar reservoirs. The focus will be on the processes that play a role in the lifecycle of dust in the interstellar medium.

  10. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, L.; Weber, T. D.; Malaspina, D.; Crary, F.; Ergun, R. E.; Delory, G. T.; Fowler, C. M.; Morooka, M. W.; McEnulty, T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Andrews, D. J.; Horanyi, M.; Collette, A.; Yelle, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars’s atmosphere.

  11. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    PubMed

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere. PMID:26542578

  12. Interstellar Silicate Dust: Modeling and Grain Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrajit

    We examine some aspects of the alignment of silicate dust grains with respect to the interstellar magnetic field. First, we consider possible observational constraints on the magnetic properties of the grains. Second, we investigate the role of collisions with gas atoms and the production of H2 molecules on the grain surface in the alignment process when the grain is drifting in the gaseous medium. Paramagnetism associated with Fe content in the dust is thought to play a critical role in alignment. Min et al (2007) claimed that the Fe content of the silicate dust can be constrained by the shape of the 10 μm extinction feature. They found low Fe abundances, potentially posing problems for grain alignment theories. We revisit this analysis modeling the grains with irregularly shaped Gaussian Random Sphere (GRS). We give a comprehensive review of all the relevant constraints researchers apply and discuss their effects on the inferred mineralogy. Also, we extend this analysis to examine whether constraints can be placed on the presence of Fe-rich inclusions which could yield "super-paramagnetism". This possibility has long been speculated, but so far observational constraints are lacking. Every time a gas atom collides with a grain, the grain's angular momentum is slightly modified. Likewise when an H2 molecule forms on the surface and is ejected. Here also we model the grain with GRS shape and considered various scenarios about how the colliding gas particles depart the grain. We develop theoretical and computational tools to estimate the torques associated with these aforementioned events for a range of grain drift speeds---from low subsonic to high supersonic speeds. Code results were verified with spherical grain for which analytical results were available. Finally, the above torque results were used to study the grain rotational dynamics. Solving dynamical equations we examine how these torques influence the grain alignment process. Our analysis suggests that

  13. Dust evolution from comets and asteroids: Their velocities at Earth orbit intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. A.; Zook, H. A.

    1994-01-01

    In this study on the evolution of dust particles from comets and asteroids, the effects of accurate many-body planetary motion on the gravitational perturbations of the dust grains are computed. In a computer simulation, dust grains of radius 10, 30, and 100 micron were released at perihelion passage from each of 36 different celestial bodies: 16 main asteroids, 15 short period comets with perihelion greater than 1 AU, and 5 short period comets with perihelion less than 1 AU. It is found that when dust grains evolve to intersection with the earth's orbit, they nearly always retain orbital characteristics indicative of their origins. Grains from main belt asteroids differ significantly in orbital characteristics, especially orbital eccentricity, from grains that evolve from comets.

  14. Dust grains from the heart of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchio, M.; Marassi, S.; Schneider, R.; Bianchi, S.; Limongi, M.; Chieffi, A.

    2016-03-01

    Dust grains are classically thought to form in the winds of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, there is increasing evidence today for dust formation in supernovae (SNe). To establish the relative importance of these two classes of stellar sources of dust, it is important to know the fraction of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta that is able to survive the passage of the reverse shock and be injected in the interstellar medium. With this aim, we have developed a new code, GRASH_Rev, that allows following the dynamics of dust grains in the shocked SN ejecta and computing the time evolution of the mass, composition, and size distribution of the grains. We considered four well-studied SNe in the Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud: SN 1987A, CasA, the Crab nebula, and N49. These sources have been observed with both Spitzer and Herschel, and the multiwavelength data allow a better assessment the mass of warm and cold dust associated with the ejecta. For each SN, we first identified the best explosion model, using the mass and metallicity of the progenitor star, the mass of 56Ni, the explosion energy, and the circumstellar medium density inferred from the data. We then ran a recently developed dust formation model to compute the properties of freshly formed dust. Starting from these input models, GRASH_Rev self-consistently follows the dynamics of the grains, considering the effects of the forward and reverse shock, and allows predicting the time evolution of the dust mass, composition, and size distribution in the shocked and unshocked regions of the ejecta. All the simulated models aagree well with observations. Our study suggests that SN 1987A is too young for the reverse shock to have affected the dust mass. Hence the observed dust mass of 0.7-0.9 M⊙ in this source can be safely considered as indicative of the mass of freshly formed dust in SN ejecta. Conversely, in the other three SNe, the reverse shock has already destroyed between 10-40% of the

  15. Transient Density Enhancements of the Martian Orbiting Dust Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, A.; Horanyi, M.

    2014-12-01

    The moons Phobos and Deimos have been suggested to be responsible for sustaining a permanently present dust cloud around Mars. The equilibrium size and spatial distribution of this dust torus has been the subject of numerous theoretical studies. However, no observational evidence has been found as of yet. Because of the renewed interest in Phobos and Deimos as potential targets for human precursor mission to Mars, there is a new opportunity for the detection of the putative Martian dust clouds using in situ measurements. Both Phobos and Deimos, as all airless bodies in the solar system, are continually bombarded by interplanetary dust grains, generating secondary ejecta particles. The surface gravity escape of these objects are low, hence most secondary particles escapethem, but remain in orbit about Mars. Subsequent perturbations by solar radiation pressure, electromagnetic forces acting on charged grains, and collisions with the moons or Mars itself limit the lifetime of the produced particles. The size dependent production rates and lifetimes set the most abundant particle size range of 10 - 30 micron in radius. Large, but short-lived, dust density enhancements can be predicted during periods of meteor showers. Also, comet Siding Spring will flyby Mars in October, 2014. Its dust tail can 'sand-blast' both Phobos and Deimos, dramatically increasing their dust production for a few hours. We present the results of our numerical studies on the temporal and spatial evolution of the dust clouds raised during highly enhanced production rates that last only hours-to-days.

  16. Charged dust dynamics - Orbital resonance due to planetary shadows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Burns, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics of a weakly charged dust grain orbiting in the equatorial plane of a planet surrounded by a rigidly corotating magnetospehre is examined. It is shown that an introduction of an effectilve 1D potential causes a perturbation due to electrostatic forces, which induces a motion of the pericenter, similar to the effect of the planetary oblateness. A case is examined where the charge varies periodically due to the modulation of the photoelectron current occurring as the grain enters and leaves the planetary shadow, causing the electromagnetic perturbation to resonate with the orbital period and to modify the size and eccentricity of the orbit. This effect is demonstrated both numerically and analytically for small grains comprising the Jovian ring, showing that their resulting changes are periodic, and their amplitude is much larger than that of the periodic changes due to light-pressure perturbation or the secular changes due to resonant charge variations that develop over a comparable time span.

  17. Exposure to grain dust in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Spankie, Sally; Cherrie, John W

    2012-01-01

    Airborne grain dust is a complex mixture of fragments of organic material from grain, plus mineral matter from soil, and possible insect, fungal, or bacterial contamination or their toxic products, such as endotoxin. In the 1990s, grain workers in Britain were frequently exposed to inhalable dust >10 mg.m(-3) (8 h), with particularly high exposures being found at terminals where grain was imported or exported and in drying operations (personal exposure typically approximately 20 mg.m(-3)). Since then, the industry has made substantial progress in improving the control of airborne dust through better-designed processes, increased automation, and an improved focus on product quality. We have used information from the published scientific literature and a small survey of industry representatives to estimate current exposure levels. These data suggest that current long-term exposure to inhalable dust for most workers is on average less than approximately 3 mg.m(-3), with perhaps 15-20% of individual personal exposures being >10 mg.m(-3). There are no published data from Britain on short-term exposure during cleaning and other tasks. We have estimated average levels for a range of tasks and judge that the highest levels, for example during some cleaning activities and certain process tasks such as loading and packing, are probably approximately10 mg.m(-3). Endotoxin levels were judged likely to be <10⁴ EU m(-3) throughout the industry provided inhalable dust levels are <10 mg.m(-3). There are no published exposure data on mycotoxin, respirable crystalline silica, and mite contamination but these are not considered to present widespread problems in the British industry. Further research should be carried out to confirm these findings. PMID:21976307

  18. THE DYNAMICS OF DUST GRAINS IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R. E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-11-10

    We study the dynamics of large dust grains {approx}>1 {mu}m with orbits outside of the heliosphere (beyond 250 AU). Motion of the solar system through the interstellar medium (ISM) at a velocity of 26 km s{sup -1} subjects these particles to gas and Coulomb drag (grains are expected to be photoelectrically charged) as well as the Lorentz force and the electric force caused by the induction electric field. We show that to zeroth order the combined effect of these forces can be well described in the framework of the classical Stark problem: particle motion in a Keplerian potential subject to an additional constant force. Based on this analogy, we elucidate the circumstances in which the motion becomes unbound, and show that under local ISM conditions dust grains smaller than {approx}100 {mu}m originating in the Oort Cloud (e.g., in collisions of comets) beyond 10{sup 4} AU are ejected from the solar system under the action of the electric force. Orbital motion of larger, bound grains is described analytically using the orbit-averaged Hamiltonian approach and consists of orbital plane precession at a fixed semimajor axis, accompanied by the periodic variations of the inclination and eccentricity (the latter may approach unity in some cases). A more detailed analysis of the combined effect of gas and Coulomb drag shows it is possible to reduce particle semimajor axes, but that the degree of orbital decay is limited (a factor of several at best) by passages through atomic and molecular clouds, which easily eject small particles.

  19. Prevalence of IgE antibodies to grain and grain dust in grain elevator workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.M.; Romeo, P.A.; Olenchock, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    IgE-mediated allergic reactions have been postulated to contribute to respiratory reactions seen in workers exposed to grain dusts. In an attempt better to define the prevalence of IgE antibodies in workers exposed to grain dusts, we performed the radioallergosorbent test (RAST) on worker sera using both commercial allergens prepared from grain and worksite allergens prepared from grain dust samples collected at the worksite. We found that the two types of reagents identified different populations with respect to the specificity of IgE antibodies present. The RAST assay performed using worksite allergens correlated well with skin test procedures. These results may allow us to gain better understanding of allergy associated with grain dust exposure, and document the utility of the RAST assay in assessment of occupational allergies.

  20. Zodiacal emission. I - Dust near the earth's orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reach, William T.

    1988-01-01

    The infrared emission of interplanetary dust near the earth's orbit is derived from IRAS observations of the gradient of in-ecliptic brightness tangent to the earth's orbit, and the annual variation of the ecliptic polar brightness. Models with five grain constituents and three size distributions are compared with the observations. The observed emission is twice as bright as predicted; this discrepancy is due either to calibration errors or to enhanced radiative efficiency of 'fluffy' particles. Graphite and magnetite particles are ruled out because they are too hot. The size distribution is constrained to be less steep than that derived from lunar microcrater studies, and is consistent with that obtained by earth-orbiting satellites. Nonhomogeneous silicate grains with 3 percent graphite impurity produce the best fit to the spectrum. The model predictions extend from 3 microns to 1 mm, for use in analyzing future infrared background observations.

  1. First-principles simulations of electrostatic interactions between dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Itou, H. Amano, T.; Hoshino, M.

    2014-12-15

    We investigated the electrostatic interaction between two identical dust grains of an infinite mass immersed in homogeneous plasma by employing first-principles N-body simulations combined with the Ewald method. We specifically tested the possibility of an attractive force due to overlapping Debye spheres (ODSs), as was suggested by Resendes et al. [Phys. Lett. A 239, 181–186 (1998)]. Our simulation results demonstrate that the electrostatic interaction is repulsive and even stronger than the standard Yukawa potential. We showed that the measured electric field acting on the grain is highly consistent with a model electrostatic potential around a single isolated grain that takes into account a correction due to the orbital motion limited theory. Our result is qualitatively consistent with the counterargument suggested by Markes and Williams [Phys. Lett. A 278, 152–158 (2000)], indicating the absence of the ODS attractive force.

  2. Ion implantation effects in 'cosmic' dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.; Meunier, R.; Jouffrey, B.; Jouret, C.

    1974-01-01

    Cosmic dust grains, whatever their origin may be, have probably suffered a complex sequence of events including exposure to high doses of low-energy nuclear particles and cycles of turbulent motions. High-voltage electron microscope observations of micron-sized grains either naturally exposed to space environmental parameters on the lunar surface or artificially subjected to space simulated conditions strongly suggest that such events could drastically modify the mineralogical composition of the grains and considerably ease their aggregation during collisions at low speeds. Furthermore, combined mass spectrometer and ionic analyzer studies show that small carbon compounds can be both synthesized during the implantation of a mixture of low-energy D, C, N ions in various solids and released in space by ion sputtering.

  3. Beyond Orbital-Motion-Limited theory effects for dust transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Tang, Xianzhu

    2015-05-29

    Dust transport in tokamaks is very important for ITER. Can many kilograms of dust really accumulate in the device? Can the dust survive? The conventional dust transport model is based on Orbital-Motion-Limited theory (OML). But OML can break in the limit where the dust grain becomes positively charged due to electron emission processes because it overestimates the dust collected power. An OML+ approximation of the emitted electrons trapped/passing boundary is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations.

  4. Dust particles from comets and asteroids collected at the Earth's orbit: Parent-daughter relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. A.; Zook, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The relative contributions of comets and asteroids to the reservoir of dust in the interplanetary medium is not well known. There are direct observations of dust released from comets and there is evidence to associate the IRAS dust bands with possible collisions of Asteroids in the main belt. It is believed that one may combine lab analysis of the physics and chemistry of captured particles with orbital data in order to identify comet and asteroid parent bodies. It is possible to use the collected orbits of the dust to connect with its source in two ways. One is to consider the long time orbit evolution of the dust under Poynting-Robertson drag. The other is to look at the prompt orbit change of dust from comets onto trajectories that intersect the earth's orbit. In order to characterize the orbits of dust particles evolved over a long period of time, a study of its orbital evolution was undertaken. Various parameters associated with these dust orbits as they cross the Earth's orbit were considered in order to see if one may discriminate between particles evolved from comets and asteroids. The method was to calculate by a numerical procedure the orbits of dust particles after they left their parent bodies. It appears that as the particles pass the Earth's orbit, asteroidal grains and cometary grains can be differentiated on the basis of their measured orbital eccentricities even after much planetary perturbation. Broad parent daughter associations can be made on this basis from measurement of their trajectories intercepted in earth orbit.

  5. Computer simulation of dust grain evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liffman, K.

    1989-01-01

    The latest results are reported from a Monte Carlo code that is being developed at NASA Ames. The goal of this program, is to derive from the observed and presumed properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) the following information: (1) the size spectrum of interstellar dust; (2) the chemical structure of interstellar dust; (3) interstellar abundances; and (4) the lifetime of a dust grain in the ISM. Presently this study is restricted to refractory interstellar material, i.e., the formation and destruction of ices are not included in the program. The program is embedded in an analytic solution for the bulk chemical evolution of a two-phase interstellar medium in which stars are born in molecular clouds, but new nucleosynthesis products and stellar return are entered into a complementary intercloud medium. The well-mixed matter of each interstellar phase is repeatedly cycled stochastically through the complementary phase and back. Refractory dust is created by thermal condensation as stellar matter flows away from sites of nucleosynthesis such as novae and supernovae and/or from the matter returned from evolved intermediate stars. The history of each particle is traced by standard Monte Carlo techniques as it is sputtered and fragmented by supernova shock waves in the intercloud medium. It also accretes an amorphous mantle of gaseous refractory atoms when its local medium joins with the molecular cloud medium. Finally it encounters the possibility of astration (destruction by star formation) within the molecular clouds.

  6. Floating surface potential of spherical dust grains in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Dennie

    2016-01-01

    A particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation study of the charging processes of spherical dust grains in a magnetized plasma environment is presented. Different magnetic field strengths with corresponding electron/ion gyration radii of smaller, the same or larger size than the grain radius and the plasma Debye length are examined. The magnetized plasma is created by overlapping the simulation box with a homogeneous, constant magnetic field. The charging currents are significantly reduced in the presence of a magnetic field, resulting in a more negative grain floating potential. Indeed, the most probable electron gyration radius is always smaller than that of ions in a Maxwellian plasma: however, it is demonstrated that the situation of simultaneous magnetized electron but an unmagnetized ion charging current never exists. The simulation results do not fit with a modified orbital motion limited (OML) theory approach for this situation, since the ion current is significantly reduced due to the increase of the gyration radius in the potential field of the dust grain. For very small gyration radii, the simulation results are in good agreement with a modified OML approach for both magnetized electron and ion charging currents.

  7. On the theory of dynamics of dust grain in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanenko, A. A.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2013-03-15

    The dynamics of rotationally symmetric dust grains in plasma embedded in a magnetic field are of concern. The general expressions for forces and torques acting on dust are found. It is shown that dust spinning is determined by torques related to both the Lorentz force (dominant for relatively small grains) and the gyro-motion of plasma particles impinging the grain (which prevails for large grains). The stability of grain spinning is analyzed and it is shown that, for some cases (e.g., oblate spheroid), there is no stable dynamic equilibrium of grain spinning.

  8. Seeing the Universe in a Grain of Dust

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    Imagine traveling halfway to Jupiter--3.2 billion kilometers--for a small handful of comet dust. That's the mission for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Stardust spacecraft launched on February 7, 1999. This past January, Stardust flew by Comet Wild 2's nucleus and through a halo of gases and dust at the comet's head, collecting cometary dust particles released from the surface just hours before. In 2006, the spacecraft will deliver the less than 1 milligram of particles to Earth. A Lawrence Livermore team is perfecting ways to extract and analyze the tiny particles using its new focused-ion-beam instrument and SuperSTEM, a scanning transmission electron microscope. Stardust is the first NASA space mission dedicated solely to collecting comet dust and will be the first to return material from a comet to Earth. Comets are the oldest and most primitive bodies in the solar system. They are formed from frozen gas, water, and interstellar dust and may have brought water to Earth, making life possible. Wild 2--pronounced ''Vilt 2'' after the name of its Swiss discoverer--was formed with the Sun and the rest of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago. For billions of years, it has circled the Sun in the Kuiper Belt, a region beyond the orbit of Neptune. Scientists think comets from this region have escaped the warming, vaporization, and collisions that have altered matter in the inner solar system. Unlike Halley's Comet, which has been altered as a result of orbiting the Sun for a long time, Wild 2's pristine composition is expected to offer a rich source of information about the solar system's potential building blocks. As the 5-meter-long Stardust spacecraft traveled through Wild 2's dust and gas cloud, to within about 100 kilometers of the comet's nucleus, particles were captured in the spacecraft's collector grid. The 1,000-square-centimeter grid is filled with the silica-based material aerogel, whose lightness minimizes damage to the grains

  9. Potential around a dust grain in collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moulick, R. Goswami, K. S.

    2015-04-15

    The ion neutral collision can lead to interesting phenomena in dust charging, totally different from the expectations based on the traditional orbit motion limited theory. The potential around a dust grain is investigated for the collisional plasma considering the presence of ion neutral collisions. Fluid equations are solved for the one dimensional radial coordinate. It is observed that with the gradual increase in ion neutral collision, the potential structure around the dust grain changes its shape and is different from the usual Debye-Hückel potential. The shift however starts from a certain value of ion neutral collision and the electron-ion density varies accordingly. The potential variation is interesting and reconfirms the fact that there exists a region of attraction for negative charges. The collision modeling is done for the full range of plasma, i.e., considering the bulk and the sheath jointly. The potential variation with collision is also shown explicitly and the variation is found to cope up with the earlier observations.

  10. Using Spinning Dust Emission To Constrain The Evolution Of Dust Grains In Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Grainge, K.; Muchovej, S.; Pearson, T.; Perrott, Y.; Rumsey, C.; Scaife, A.; Stevenson, M.; Villadsen, J.

    Within many molecular clouds in our Galaxy there are cold, dense regions known as cold clumps in which stars form. These dense environments provide a great location in which to study dust grain evolution. Given the low temperatures (˜10-15 K) and high densities (˜105 cm-3 ), these environments are dark at mid-infrared (IR) wavelengths and emit strongly at wavelengths ≥160 µm. The lack of mid-IR emission can be attributed to one of two reasons: i) a deficit of the small dust grains that emit stochastically at mid-IR wavelengths; or ii) small dust grains are present, but due to the high densities, the stellar photons cannot penetrate deep enough into the clumps to excite them. Using mid-IR observations alone it is impossible to distinguish between these two scenarios. However, by using spinning dust emission at cm wavelengths it is possible to break this degeneracy, because if small dust grains are present in these clumps, then even though stellar photons cannot excite them to emit at mid-IR wavelengths, these dust grains will be spunup by collisions and hence emit spinning dust radiation. If spinning dust were detected in these clumps it would prove that there are small dust grains present and that the lack of mid-IR emission is due to a lack of stellar photons. Conversely, a lack of spinning dust emission would indicate a deficit of small dust grains in these clumps. Since small dust grains require harsh radiation fields to be destroyed, a lack of small dust grains is likely a result of dust grain coagulation. With this in mind, we present preliminary results illustrating our method of using spinning dust observations to determine the evolution of small dust grains in these environments.

  11. Formation of water on warm dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao; Shi, Jianming; Hopkins, Tyler; Kaufman, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The early stage of water formation on dust grains in the ISM depends on sticking and retention of atoms and molecules on surfaces of grains. We investigated the interaction of oxygen with amorphous silicates. We find that atomic oxygen is retained on an amorphous silicate surface with a much higher binding energy (1850K ± 90K) than previously estimated (800K). We then used such value in the simulation of the chemical evolution of an interstellar environment - a molecular cloud edge in star-forming regions in Orion exposed to FUV illumination, and found that OH and H2O formation on grains is considerably enhanced while O2 formation is suppressed because of the higher O binding energy. These effects are especially important in dense gas exposed to high FUV fields because of the wider temperature range in which oxygen can reside. Because of the higher binding energy, photodesorption controls the gas phase chemistry. Consequences of this discovery for observations will be discussed.This work is supported by the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Division (Grant No.1311958 to GV) and by NASA support for US research with the Herschel Space Observatory (RSA No. 1427170 to MJK).

  12. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Lin, D.; Suttner, G.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and -- due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly -- influence the evolution during early phases of star formation.

  13. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Suttner, G.; Lin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly influence the evolution during early phase of star formation.

  14. Radiation forces between dust grains in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Stenflo, L.

    2008-04-01

    In this work we show that a repulsive force between nearby dust grains in a plasma can exist, due to scattering of the incident radiation. Two types of forces are discussed, one of them being formally identical to electrostatic repulsion. This leads to the definition of an effective dust charge of the dust grain, which only depends on the scattering process. Our discussion shows that such a repulsive interaction occurs in quite general physical conditions.

  15. The search for electrostatically lofted grains above the Moon with the Lunar Dust Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalay, Jamey R.; Horányi, Mihály

    2015-07-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) on board the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer mission was designed to make in situ dust measurements while orbiting the Moon. Particles with radii a >˜ 0.3μm were detected as single impacts. LDEX was also capable of measuring the collective signal generated from dust impacts with sizes below its single-particle detection threshold. A putative population of electrostatically lofted grains above the lunar terminator with radii of approximately 0.1 μm has been suggested to exist since the Apollo era. LDEX performed the first search with an in situ dust detector for such a population. Here we present the results of the LDEX observations taken over the lunar terminator and report that within LDEX's detection limits, we found no evidence of electrostatically lofted grains in the altitude range of 3-250 km above the lunar terminator.

  16. Dust from periodic comet Encke - Large grains in short supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Schuster, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    A photographic observation of periodic comet Encke is analyzed which reveals the emission of large dust grains from the comet. Photometric reduction of the photographic plate is described, and a two-dimensional isodensitometer scan of P/Encke is presented. An analytical expression is obtained for the average mass-loss rate of the dust over the revolution period of about 1200 days. A comparison of the results for P/Encke with previous results for P/d'Arrest indicates that both comets shed dust at just about equal average rates. It is concluded that the current contribution of P/Encke to the interplanetary dust is quite negligible if the dust particles reflect more than 1% of light and that smaller dust grains probably tend to contribute more mass than larger grains.

  17. Temperature Dependence of the Particle Diffusion Coefficient in Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechal, Radim; Richterova, Ivana; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2014-05-01

    During the interaction of ions/neutrals with dust grains, some of the particles are implanted into the grain and, as a consequence, the density gradient induces their diffusion toward the grain surface. Their release can cause a transport of these particles over large distances in space. In our laboratory experiment, measurements of the diffusion coefficient of the particles implanted into the dust grain are carried out in an electrodynamic quadrupole trap. Although experimental setup does not allow an assessment of the dust grain temperature, it can be modified (e.g., by changing thermal radiation from the surrounding walls, laser irradiation, etc.). We present an upgraded laboratory set-up and the resulting temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient estimations and discuss implications for the space dust.

  18. Effect of particles attachment to multi-sized dust grains present in electrostatic sheaths of discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zaham, B.; Tahraoui, A. Chekour, S.; Benlemdjaldi, D.

    2014-12-15

    The loss of electrons and ions due to their attachment to a Gauss-distributed sizes of dust grains present in electrostatic sheaths of discharge plasmas is investigated. A uni-dimensional, unmagnetized, and stationary multi-fluid model is proposed. Forces acting on the dust grain along with its charge are self-consistently calculated, within the limits of the orbit motion limited model. The dynamic analysis of dust grains shows that the contribution of the neutral drag force in the net force acting on the dust grain is negligible, whereas the contribution of the gravity force is found considerable only for micrometer particles. The dust grains trapping is only possible when the electrostatic force is balanced by the ion drag and the gravity forces. This trapping occurs for a limited radius interval of micrometer dust grains, which is around the most probable dust grain radius. The effect of electron temperature and ion density at the sheath edge is also discussed. It is shown that the attachment of particles reduces considerably the sheath thickness and induces dust grain deceleration. The increase of the lower limit as well as the upper limit of the dust radius reduces also the sheath thickness.

  19. Large scale grain dust explosions-research in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecki, K.; Cybulski, K.; Śliz, J.; Dyduch, Z.; Wolański, P.

    1995-06-01

    For the last five years grain dust explosion research was carried out in surface and underground facilities of Experimental Mine “Barbara” Research was focused on problems of evaluation critical dust parameters influencing explosion course, explosion development and suppression by both passive and active means. The main conclusions are as follows: nominal dust concentration needed to obtain flame propagation must be higher than 50 g/m3, for nominal concentrations higher than 100 g/m3 flame acceleration is observed and detonation is possible; strong grain dust explosions can be effectively suppressed with passive water barriers whereas for weak ones active barries must be used.

  20. Complex role of secondary electron emissions in dust grain charging in space environments: measurements on Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mian; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James; Leclair, Andre C.

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, by electron/ion collisions, and sec-ondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstel-lar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynam-ical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of 0.2 to 13 µm diam-eters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong parti-cle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  1. Orbital Observations of Dust Lofted by Daytime Convective Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Lori; Reiss, Dennis; Lemmon, Mark; Marticorena, Béatrice; Lewis, Stephen; Cantor, Bruce

    2016-03-01

    Over the past several decades, orbital observations of lofted dust have revealed the importance of mineral aerosols as a climate forcing mechanism on both Earth and Mars. Increasingly detailed and diverse data sets have provided an ever-improving understanding of dust sources, transport pathways, and sinks on both planets, but the role of dust in modulating atmospheric processes is complex and not always well understood. We present a review of orbital observations of entrained dust on Earth and Mars, particularly that produced by the dust-laden structures produced by daytime convective turbulence called "dust devils". On Earth, dust devils are thought to contribute only a small fraction of the atmospheric dust budget; accordingly, there are not yet any published accounts of their occurrence from orbit. In contrast, dust devils on Mars are thought to account for several tens of percent of the planet's atmospheric dust budget; the literature regarding martian dust devils is quite rich. Because terrestrial dust devils may temporarily contribute significantly to local dust loading and lowered air quality, we suggest that martian dust devil studies may inform future studies of convectively-lofted dust on Earth. As on Earth, martian dust devils form most commonly when the insolation reaches its daily and seasonal peak and where a source of loose dust is plentiful. However this pattern is modulated by variations in weather, albedo, or topography, which produce turbulence that can either enhance or suppress dust devil formation. For reasons not well understood, when measured from orbit, martian dust devil characteristics (dimensions, and translational and rotational speeds) are often much larger than those measured from the ground on both Earth and Mars. Studies connecting orbital observations to those from the surface are needed to bridge this gap in understanding. Martian dust devils have been used to remotely probe conditions in the PBL (e.g., CBL depth, wind velocity

  2. Discovery of Jovian dust streams and interstellar grains by the ULYSSES spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, E.; Zook, H. A.; Baguhl, M.; Balogh, A.; Bame, S. J.; Fechtig, H.; Forsyth, R.; Hanner, M. S.; Horanyi, M.; Kissel, J.; Lindblad, B.-A.; Linkert, D.; Linkert, G.; Mann, I.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Phillips, J. L.; Polanskey, C.; Schwehm, G.; Siddique, N.; Staubach, P.; Svestka, J.; Taylor, A.

    1993-04-01

    Within 1 AU from Jupiter, the dust detector aboard the Ulysses spacecraft during the flyby on February 8, 1992 recorded periodic bursts of submicron dust particles with durations ranging from several hours to two days and occurring at about monthly intervals. These particles arrived at Ulysses in collimate streams radiating from close to the line-of-sight direction to Jupiter, suggesting a Jovian origin for the periodic bursts. Ulysses also detected a flux of micron-sized dust particles moving in high-velocity retrograde orbits. These grains are identified here as being of interstellar origin.

  3. Investigation of light scattering on a single dust grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlu, Jiri; Nemecek, Zdenek; Safrankova, Jana; Barton, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Complex phenomenon of light scattering by dust grains plays an important role in all dust--light interactions, especially in space, e.g., light passing through dense dusty clouds in the space as well as in the upper atmosphere, dust charging by photoemission, etc. When the wavelength of the incident light is about the size of the grain, the Mie theory is often used to characterize the scattering process. Unfortunately, we have only very limited knowledge of necessary material constants for most of the space-related materials and also the solution of Mie equations for general grain shapes is difficult or unknown. We develop an apparatus for observations of light scattering on small (micrometer-sized) arbitrary shaped dust grains. We directly measure the scattering by levitating grains in the field created by the standing-wave ultrasonic trap, where we can study single grains or small grain clusters. The experiment is performed at atmospheric air --- unlike other experiments, where grains were measured in water or other liquids. Therefore, the background effects are significantly reduced. Currently, the trap is under development and first tests are carried out. Besides initial results, we focus on theoretical computations of the ultrasonic field of the selected trap.

  4. Charging time for dust grain on surface exposed to plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2013-04-01

    We consider the charging of a dust grain sitting on a surface exposed to plasma. The stochastic model of Sheridan and Hayes [Appl. Phys. Lett. 98, 091501 (2011)] is solved analytically for the charging time, which is found to be directly proportional to the square root of the electron temperature and inversely proportional to both the grain radius and plasma density.

  5. Solitons in dusty plasmas with positive dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Baluku, T. K.; Hellberg, M. A.; Mace, R. L.

    2008-03-15

    Although ''typical'' micrometer-sized dust grains in a space or laboratory plasma are often negatively charged because of collisions with the mobile electrons, there are environments in which grains may take on a positive charge. We consider a dusty plasma composed of electrons, positive ions and positive dust grains, and use the fluid dynamic paradigm to identify existence domains in parameter space for both dust-acoustic (DA) and dust-modified ion-acoustic (DIA) solitons. Only positive potential DA solitons are found. This represents an expected antisymmetry with the case of negative dust, where previously only negative solitons were reported. However, whereas for negative dust DIA solitons of either sign of potential may exist, we find that for the case of positive dust, DIA solitons are restricted to positive potentials only. The results for both positive and negative dust are consistent with an hypothesis that, in the absence of flows, the sign(s) of the soliton potential coincide(s) with the sign(s) of the species whose inertia is included in the calculation; i.e., the cold, supersonic species present in the plasma.

  6. Lunar Surface and Dust Grain Potentials during the Earth’s Magnetosphere Crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaverka, J.; Richterová, I.; Pavlu˚, J.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between the lunar surface and the solar UV radiation and surrounding plasma environment leads to its charging by different processes like photoemission, collection of charged particles, or secondary electron emission (SEE). Whereas the photoemission depends only on the angle between the surface and direction to the Sun and varies only slowly, plasma parameters can change rapidly as the Moon orbits around the Earth. This paper presents numerical simulations of one Moon pass through the magnetospheric tail including the real plasma parameters measured by THEMIS as an input. The calculations are concentrated on different charges of the lunar surface itself and a dust grain lifted above this surface. Our estimations show that (1) the SEE leads to a positive charging of parts of the lunar surface even in the magnetosphere, where a high negative potential is expected; (2) the SEE is generally more important for isolated dust grains than for the lunar surface covered by these grains; and (3) the time constant of charging of dust grains depends on their diameter being of the order of hours for sub-micrometer grains. In view of these results, we discuss the conditions under which and the areas where a levitation of the lifted dust grains could be observed.

  7. Peculiarities of the Field Electron Emission from Dust Grains

    SciTech Connect

    Richterova, I.; Beranek, M.; Pavlu, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.

    2008-09-07

    The goal of the paper is investigation of the electron field emission that limits the attainable grain charge and can prevent electrostatic fragmentation of loosely bounded aggregates of dust grains. We have found that the effective work function of the spherical amorphous carbon grains does not depend on the relative beam energy. Preliminary results on an influence of the ion treatment/cleaning using the simultaneous electron and ion bombardments are discussed.

  8. DUST GRAIN EVOLUTION IN SPATIALLY RESOLVED T TAURI BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Males, Jared R.; Greene, Thomas P.

    2011-10-10

    Core-accretion planet formation begins in protoplanetary disks with the growth of small, interstellar medium dust grains into larger particles. The progress of grain growth, which can be quantified using 10 {mu}m silicate spectroscopy, has broad implications for the final products of planet formation. Previous studies have attempted to correlate stellar and disk properties with the 10 {mu}m silicate feature in an effort to determine which stars are efficient at grain growth. Thus far there does not appear to be a dominant correlated parameter. In this paper, we use spatially resolved adaptive optics spectroscopy of nine T Tauri binaries as tight as 0.''25 to determine if basic properties shared between binary stars, such as age, composition, and formation history, have an effect on dust grain evolution. We find with 90%-95% confidence that the silicate feature equivalent widths of binaries are more similar than those of randomly paired single stars, implying that shared properties do play an important role in dust grain evolution. At lower statistical significance, we find with 82% confidence that the secondary has a more prominent silicate emission feature (i.e., smaller grains) than the primary. If confirmed by larger surveys, this would imply that spectral type and/or binarity are important factors in dust grain evolution.

  9. Mars Orbiter Camera climatology of textured dust storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Kulowski, Laura; Wang, Huiqun

    2015-09-01

    We report the climatology of "textured dust storms", those dust storms that have visible structure on their cloud tops that are indicative of active dust lifting, as observed in Mars Daily Global Maps produced from Mars Orbiter Camera wide-angle images. Textured dust storms predominantly occur in the equinox seasons while both solstice periods experience a planet-wide "pause" in textured dust storm activity. These pauses correspond to concurrent decreases in global atmospheric dust opacity. Textured dust storms most frequently occur in Acidalia Planitia, Chryse Planitia, Arcadia Planitia, and Hellas basin. To examine the nature of the link between textured dust storms and atmospheric dust opacity, we compare the textured dust storm climatology with a record of atmospheric dust opacity and find a peak global correlation coefficient of approximately 0.5 with a lag of 20-40° in solar longitude in the opacity compared to the solar climatology. This implies that textured dust storms observed at 1400 local time by MOC are responsible for a large fraction of atmospheric dust opacity and that other mechanisms (e.g., dust devil lifting or storm-scale lifting not observed in this study) may supply a comparable amount of dust.

  10. Artist rendering of dust grains colliding at low speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Clues to the formation of planets and planetary rings -- like Saturn's dazzling ring system -- may be found by studying how dust grains interact as they collide at low speeds. To study the question of low-speed dust collisions, NASA sponsored the COLLisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) at the University of Colorado. It was designed to spring-launch marble-size projectiles into trays of powder similar to space or lunar dust. COLLIDE-1 (1998) discovered that collisions below a certain energy threshold eject no material. COLLIDE-2 was designed to identify where the threshold is. In COLLIDE-2, scientists nudged small projectiles into dust beds and recorded how the dust splashed outward (video frame at top; artist's rendering at bottom). The slowest impactor ejected no material and stuck in the target. The faster impactors produced ejecta; some rebounded while others stuck in the target.

  11. Infrared studies of dust grains in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    IR reflection nebulae, regions of dust which are illuminated by nearby embedded sources, were observed in several regions of ongoing star formation. Near IR observation and theoretical modelling of the scattered light form IR reflection nebulae can provide information about the dust grain properties in star forming regions. IR reflection nebulae were modelled as plane parallel slabs assuming isotropically scattering grains. For the grain scattering properties, graphite and silicate grains were used with a power law grain size distribution. Among the free parameters of the model are the stellar luminosity and effective temperature, the optical depth of the nebula, and the extinction by foreground material. The typical results from this model are presented and discussed.

  12. GRAIN SORTING IN COMETARY DUST FROM THE OUTER SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Wozniakiewicz, P. J.; Bradley, J. P.; Ishii, H. A.; Brownlee, D. E.; Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Price, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Most young stars are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust. Close to the hot stars, amorphous dust grains from the parent molecular cloud are reprocessed into crystals that are then distributed throughout the accretion disk. In some disks, there is a reduction in crystalline grain size with heliocentric distance from the star. We investigated crystalline grain size distributions in chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) believed to be from small, icy bodies that accreted in outer regions of the solar nebula. The grains are Mg-rich silicates and Fe-rich sulfides, the two most abundant minerals in CP IDPs. We find that they are predominantly <0.25 {mu}m in radius with a mean grain size that varies from one CP IDP to another. We report a size-density relationship between the silicates and sulfides. A similar size-density relationship between much larger silicate and sulfide grains in meteorites from the asteroid belt is ascribed to aerodynamic sorting. Since the silicate and sulfide grains in CP IDPs are theoretically too small for aerodynamic sorting, their size-density relationship may be due to another process capable of sorting small grains.

  13. TRAJECTORIES AND DISTRIBUTION OF INTERSTELLAR DUST GRAINS IN THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Frisch, Priscilla C.; Mueller, Hans-Reinhard; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Reach, William T.; Zank, Gary

    2012-11-20

    The solar wind carves a bubble in the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) known as the heliosphere. Charged interstellar dust grains (ISDG) encountering the heliosphere may be diverted around the heliopause or penetrate it depending on their charge-to-mass ratio. We present new calculations of trajectories of ISDG in the heliosphere, and the dust density distributions that result. We include up-to-date grain charging calculations using a realistic UV radiation field and full three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic fluid + kinetic models for the heliosphere. Models with two different (constant) polarities for the solar wind magnetic field (SWMF) are used, with the grain trajectory calculations done separately for each polarity. Small grains a {sub gr} {approx}< 0.01 {mu}m are completely excluded from the inner heliosphere. Large grains, a {sub gr} {approx}> 1.0 {mu}m, pass into the inner solar system and are concentrated near the Sun by its gravity. Trajectories of intermediate size grains depend strongly on the SWMF polarity. When the field has magnetic north pointing to ecliptic north, the field de-focuses the grains resulting in low densities in the inner heliosphere, while for the opposite polarity the dust is focused near the Sun. The ISDG density outside the heliosphere inferred from applying the model results to in situ dust measurements is inconsistent with local ISM depletion data for both SWMF polarities but is bracketed by them. This result points to the need to include the time variation in the SWMF polarity during grain propagation. Our results provide valuable insights for interpretation of the in situ dust observations from Ulysses.

  14. Magnetorotational instability in plasmas with mobile dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Haijun; Cao Jintao; Li Ding; Chu, Paul K.

    2013-03-15

    The magnetorotational instability of dusty plasmas is investigated using the multi-fluid model and the general dispersion relation is derived based on local approximation. The dust grains are found to play an important role in the dispersion relation in the low-frequency mode and exhibit destabilizing effects on the plasma. Both the instability criterion and growth rate are affected significantly by the dust and when the dust is heavy enough to be unperturbed, the reduced dispersion relations are obtained. The instability criteria show that the dust grains have stabilizing effects on the instability when the rotation frequency decreases outwards and conversely lead to destabilizing effects when the rotation frequency increases outwards. The results are relevant to accession and protoplanetary disks.

  15. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light. PMID:11538693

  16. Ion drag on dust grains in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Denysenko, I.; Yu, M.Y.; Stenflo, L.; Azarenkov, N.A.

    2005-04-15

    The electric and the positive- and negative-ion drag forces on a dust grain in an electronegative complex plasma are investigated. It is shown that the number of locations where the drag forces balance the electric force is considerably larger than that in an electropositive plasma. The balance occurs in the so-called oscillation regime where the electric field oscillates in space. The effect of the negative-ion drag force on the dust grain can be substantial in a certain parameter range.

  17. Astrophysical dust grains in stars, the interstellar medium, and the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of astrophysical dust grains in circumstellar shells, the interstellar medium, and the solar system may provide information about stellar evolution and about physical conditions in the primitive solar nebula. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the cycling of dust in stellar evolution and the formation of planetary systems; (2) astrophysical dust grains in circumstellar environments; (3) circumstellar grain formation and mass loss; (4) interstellar dust grains; (5) comet dust and the zodiacal cloud; (6) the survival of dust grains during stellar evolution; and (7) establishing connections between stardust and dust in the solar system.

  18. Nonlinear screening of dust grains and structurization of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsytovich, V. N. Gusein-zade, N. G.

    2013-07-15

    A review of theoretical ideas on the physics of structurization instability of a homogeneous dusty plasma, i.e., the formation of zones with elevated and depressed density of dust grains and their arrangement into different structures observed in laboratory plasma under microgravity conditions, is presented. Theoretical models of compact dust structures that can form in the nonlinear stage of structurization instability, as well as models of a system of voids (both surrounding a compact structure and formed in the center of the structure), are discussed. Two types of structures with very different dimensions are possible, namely, those smaller or larger than the characteristic mean free path of ions in the plasma flow. Both of them are characterized by relatively regular distributions of dust grains; however, the first ones usually require external confinement, while the structures of the second type can be self-sustained (which is of particular interest). In this review, they are called dust clusters and self-organized dust structures, respectively. Both types of the structures are characterized by new physical processes that take place only in the presence of the dust component. The role of nonlinearities in the screening of highly charged dust grains that are often observed in modern laboratory experiments turns out to be great, but these nonlinearities have not received adequate study as of yet. Although structurization takes place upon both linear and nonlinear screening, it can be substantially different under laboratory and astrophysical conditions. Studies on the nonlinear screening of large charges in plasma began several decades ago; however, up to now, this effect was usually disregarded when interpreting the processes occurring in laboratory dusty plasma. One of the aims of the present review was to demonstrate the possibility of describing the nonlinear screening of individual grains and take it into account with the help of the basic equations for the

  19. A note on dust grain charging in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Central to the study of dust-plasma interactions in the solar system is the electrostatic charging of dust grains. While previous calculations have generally assumed that the distributions of electrons and ions in the plasma are Maxwellian, most space plasmas are observed to have non-Maxwellian tails and can often be fit by a generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distribution. Here we use such a distribution to reevaluate the grain potential, under the condition that the dominant currents to the grain are due to electron and ion collection, as is the case in certain regions of space. The magnitude of the grain potential is found to be larger than that in a Maxwellian plasma as long as the electrons are described by a kappa distribution: this enhancement increased with ion mass and decreasing electron kappa. The modification of the grain potential in generalized Lorentzian plasmas has implications for both the physics (e.g., grain growth and disruption) and the dynamics of dust in space plasmas. These are also briefly discussed.

  20. GEMS Revealed: Spectrum Imaging of Aggregate Grains in Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Messenger, S.; Christoffersen, R.

    2005-01-01

    Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) of cometary origin contain abundant materials that formed in the early solar nebula. These materials were transported outward and subsequently mixed with molecular cloud materials and presolar grains in the region where comets accreted [1]. GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains are a major component of these primitive anhydrous IDPs, along with crystalline Mg-rich silicates, Fe-Ni sulfides, carbonaceous material, and other trace phases. Some GEMS grains (5%) are demonstrably presolar based on their oxygen isotopic compositions [2]. However, most GEMS grains are isotopically solar and have bulk chemical compositions that are incompatible with inferred compositions of interstellar dust, suggesting a solar system origin [3]. An alternative hypothesis is that GEMS grains represent highly irradiated interstellar grains whose oxygen isotopic compositions were homogenized through processing in the interstellar medium (ISM) [4]. We have obtained the first quantitative X-ray maps (spectrum images) showing the distribution of major and minor elements in individual GEMS grains. Nanometer-scale chemical maps provide critical data required to evaluate the differing models regarding the origin of GEMS grains.

  1. Radar meteor orbital structure of Southern Hemisphere cometary dust streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggaley, W. Jack; Taylor, Andrew D.

    1992-01-01

    The Christchurch, New Zealand meteor orbit radar (AMOR) with its high precision and sensitivity, permits studies of the orbital fine structure of cometary streams. PC generated graphics are presented of data on some Southern Hemisphere Streams. Such data can be related to the formation phase and subsequent dynamical processes of dust streams.

  2. COMPARTMENTALIZATION OF THE INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE TO INHALED GRAIN DUST

    EPA Science Inventory


    Interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the secreted form of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA) are involved in the inflammatory response to inhaled grain dust. Previously, we found considerable production of these cytokines in the lower...

  3. Stochastic histories of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liffman, Kurt; Clayton, D. D.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to study an evolving system of refractory dust grains within the Interstellar Medium (ISM). This is done via a combination of Monte Carlo processes and a system of partial differential equations, where refractory dust grains formed within supernova remnants and ejecta from high mass loss stars are subjected to the processes of sputtering and collisional fragmentation in the diffuse media and accretion within the cold molecular clouds. In order to record chemical detail, the authors take each new particle to consist of a superrefractory core plus a more massive refractory mantle. The particles are allowed to transfer to and fro between the different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) - on a time scale of 10(exp 8) years - until either the particles are destroyed or the program finishes at a Galaxy time of 6x10(exp 9) years. The resulting chemical and size spectrum(s) are then applied to various astrophysical problems with the following results. For an ISM which has no collisional fragmentation of the dust grains, roughly 10 percent by mass of the most refractory material survives the rigors of the ISM intact, which leaves open the possibility that fossilized isotopically anomalous material may have been present within the primordial solar nebula. Stuctured or layered refractory dust grains within the model cannot explain the observed interstellar depletions of refractory material. Fragmentation due to grain-grain collisions in the diffuse phase plus the accretion of material in the molecular cloud phase can under certain circumstances cause a bimodal distribution in grain size.

  4. Nature of dust grains in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swamy, K. S. Krishna; Shah, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The observed reddening in the wavelength range 0.26-2.25 microns for comae of several comets can be represented quite well with model grains having real and imaginary parts of refractive index, m = m-prime - im-double prime, given by m-prime of about 1.38 and m-double prime of about 0.039, respectively. It is also possible to explain the observations of linear polarization and geometric albedo of comet comae.

  5. Scientists Detect Radio Emission from Rapidly Rotating Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-11-01

    Astronomers have made the first tentative observations of a long-speculated, but never before detected, source of natural radio waves in interstellar space. Data from the National Science Foundation's 140 Foot Radio Telescope at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va., show the faint, tell-tale signals of what appear to be dust grains spinning billions of times each second. This discovery eventually could yield a powerful new tool for understanding the interstellar medium - the immense clouds of gas and dust that populate interstellar space. The NRAO 140 Foot Radio Telescope The NRAO 140-Foot Radio Telescope "What we believe we have found," said Douglas P. Finkbeiner of Princeton University's Department of Astrophysics, "is the first hard evidence for electric dipole emission from rapidly rotating dust grains. If our studies are confirmed, it will be the first new source of continuum emission to be conclusively identified in the interstellar medium in nearly the past 20 years." Finkbeiner believes that these emissions have the potential in the future of revealing new and exciting information about the interstellar medium; they also may help to refine future studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The results from this study, which took place in spring 1999, were accepted for publication in Astrophysical Journal. Other contributors to this paper include David J. Schlegel, department of astrophysics, Princeton University; Curtis Frank, department of astronomy, University of Maryland; and Carl Heiles, department of astronomy, University of California at Berkeley. "The idea of dust grains emitting radiation by rotating is not new," comments Finkbeiner, "but to date it has been somewhat speculative." Scientists first proposed in 1957 that dust grains could emit radio signals, if they were caused to rotate rapidly enough. It was believed, however, that these radio emissions would be negligibly small - too weak to be of any impact to

  6. Changes of Dust Grain Properties Under Particle Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlu, J.; Richterova, I.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Fujita, D.

    2008-09-07

    The dust in space environments is exposed to particle bombardment. Under an impact of ions, electrons, and photons, the charge of a particular grain changes and, in some cases, the grain structure can be modified. The present study deals with spherical melamine formaldehyde resin grains that are frequently used in many dusty plasmas and microgravity experiments and it concentrates on the influence of the electron beam impact on a grain size. We have performed series of experiments based on the SEM technique. Our investigation has shown that the electron impact can cause a significant increase of the grain size. We discuss changes of material properties and consequences for its applications in laboratory and space experiments.

  7. Large amplitude dust acoustic solitary wave with positively charged dust grain

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Samiran; Gupta, M.R.

    2006-04-15

    Large amplitude solitary waves are investigated in a dusty plasma containing electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and positively charged dust grains [N. D'Angelo, J. Phys. D 37, 860 (2004)] by the Sagdeev potential. Numerical investigations related to Q machine dusty plasma with a positive charge reveal that the nonlinear dust acoustic wave possesses only a supersonic compressive soliton. The range of Mach numbers where such solitary waves exist is also investigated.

  8. Dust extinction and absorption: the challenge of porous grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Il'in, V. B.; Henning, Th.; Dubkova, D. N.

    2006-01-01

    In many models of dusty objects in space the grains are assumed to be composite or fluffy. However, the computation of the optical properties of such particles is still a very difficult problem. We analyze how the increase of grain porosity influences basic features of cosmic dust - interstellar extinction, dust temperature, infrared bands and millimeter opacity. It is found that an increase of porosity leads to an increase of extinction cross sections at some wavelengths and a decrease at others depending on the grain model. However, this behaviour is sufficient to reproduce the extinction curve in the direction of the star σ Sco using current solar abundances. In the case of the star ζ Oph our model requires larger amounts of carbon and iron in the dust-phase than is available. Porous grains can reproduce the flat extinction across the 3 - 8 μm wavelength range measured for several lines of sight by ISO and Spitzer. Porous grains are generally cooler than compact grains. At the same time, the temperature of very porous grains becomes slightly larger in the case of the EMT-Mie calculations in comparison with the results found from the layered-sphere model. The layered-sphere model predicts a broadening of infrared bands and a shift of the peak position to larger wavelengths as porosity grows. In the case of the EMT-Mie model variations of the feature profile are less significant. It is also shown that the millimeter mass absorption coefficients grow as porosity increases with a faster growth occurring for particles with Rayleigh/non-Rayleigh inclusions. As a result, for very porous particles the coefficients given by two models can differ by a factor of about 3.

  9. Solid Solution Model for Interstellar Dust Grains and Their Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Minoru M.; Freund, Friedemann T.

    2006-03-01

    We present a dust grain model based on the fundamental principle of solid solutions. The model is applicable to the mineral (silicate) component of the dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). We show that nanometer-sized mineral grains, which condense in the gas-rich outflow of late-stage stars or expanding gas shells of supernova explosions, do not consist of just high melting point oxides or silicates. Instead they form solid solutions with gas-phase components H2O, CO, and CO2 that are omnipresent in environments where the grains condense. Through a series of thermodynamically well-understood solid-state processes, these solid solutions become ``parents'' of organic matter that precipitates inside the grains. Thus, the mineral dust grains and their organics become part of the same thermodynamically defined solid phase and, hence, physically inseparable. This model can account for many astronomical observations, which no prior model can adequately address, specifically: (1) Organics in the diffuse ISM are identified by a 3.4 μm IR band, characteristic of aliphatic hydrocarbons composed of CH2 and of CH3 groups. (2) The methylene-to-methyl ratio is nearly constant, implying a CH2:CH3 ratio of ~5:2. (3) The intensity ratio between the 9.7 and the 3.4 μm band is nearly constant, implying a silicate-to-organics ratio of ~10:1. (4) In dense clouds the complex 3.4 μm band is replaced by a weak, featureless 3.47 μm band. (5) Whereas silicate grains identified by their 9.7 μm band tend to align in magnetic fields, grains with a strong 3.4 μm organic signature do not tend to align.

  10. Motion of dust in a planetary magnetosphere - Orbit-averaged equations for oblateness, electromagnetic, and radiation forces with application to Saturn's E ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.

    1993-01-01

    The orbital dynamics of micrometer-sized dust grains is explored numerically and analytically, treating the strongest perturbation forces acting on close circumplanetary dust grains: higher-order gravity, radiation pressure, and the electromagnetic force. The appropriate orbit-average equations are derived and applied to the E ring. Arguments are made for the existence of azimuthal and vertical asymmetries in the E ring. New understanding of the dynamics of E ring dust grains is applied to problems of the ring's breadth and height. The possibility for further ground-based and spacecraft observations is considered.

  11. Motion of dust in a planetary magnetosphere - Orbit-averaged equations for oblateness, electromagnetic, and radiation forces with application to Saturn's E ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    1993-02-01

    The orbital dynamics of micrometer-sized dust grains is explored numerically and analytically, treating the strongest perturbation forces acting on close circumplanetary dust grains: higher-order gravity, radiation pressure, and the electromagnetic force. The appropriate orbit-average equations are derived and applied to the E ring. Arguments are made for the existence of azimuthal and vertical asymmetries in the E ring. New understanding of the dynamics of E ring dust grains is applied to problems of the ring's breadth and height. The possibility for further ground-based and spacecraft observations is considered.

  12. Organic grain coatings in primitive interplanetary dust particles: Implications for grain sticking in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George J.; Wirick, Sue; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2013-10-01

    The chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), fragments of asteroids and comets collected by NASA high-altitude research aircraft from the Earth's stratosphere, are recognized as the least altered samples of the original dust of the Solar Nebula available for laboratory examination. We performed high-resolution, ~25 nm/pixel, x-ray imaging and spectroscopy on ultramicrotome sections of CP IDPs, which are aggregates of >104 grains, and identified and characterized ~100 nm thick coatings of organic matter on the surfaces of the individual grains. We estimated the minimum tensile strength of this organic glue to be ~150 to 325 N/m2, comparable to the strength of the weakest cometary meteors, based on the observation that the individual grains of ~5 μm diameter aggregate CP IDPs are not ejected from the particle by electrostatic repulsion due to charging of these IDPs to 10 to 15 volts at 1 A.U. in space. Since organic coatings can increase the sticking coefficient over that of bare mineral grains, these organic grain coatings are likely to have been a significant aid in grain sticking in the Solar Nebula, allowing the first dust particles to aggregate over a much wider range of collision speeds than for bare mineral grains.

  13. Water Formation and Oxygen Chemistry on Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco; He, Jiao

    Water plays an important role in space. As ice on cold dust grains, it provides the medium for a rich chemistry; in the gas-phase, it gives information on the particular environment it is in. It is understood that the formation of water occurs both in the gas-phase and on grains. While the importance of water formation on dust grain surfaces has been recognized for a long time (1) , it is only recently that laboratory investigations have been undertaken to characterize the network of reactions (2) . Closely connected to this work on water formation, is the study of oxygen chemistry on dust grains. Of particular importance is the characterization of the energetics of adsorption, diffusion and desorption of oxygen-containing molecules. I will present data from recent experiments on the interaction of oxygen and hydroxyls with silicate surfaces and on the formation of water on warm (T>30K) amorphous silicates. Such results provide new values to parameters used in simulation codes of the chemical evolution of interstellar space environments. 1. A.G.G.M Tielens & W. Hagen, Astron. & Astrophys. 114, 245 (1982). 2. G. Vidali, J. Low Temp. Phys. 170,1 (2013). This work is supported by the NSF, Astronomy & Astrophysics Division (Grants No. 0908108 and 1311958), and NASA (Grant No. NNX12AF38G). We thank Dr. J.Brucato of the Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri for providing the samples used in these experiments.

  14. Large dust grains in the wind of VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicluna, P.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Wesson, R.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Kasper, M.; Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Wolf, S.

    2015-12-01

    Massive stars live short lives, losing large amounts of mass through their stellar wind. Their mass is a key factor determining how and when they explode as supernovae, enriching the interstellar medium with heavy elements and dust. During the red supergiant phase, mass-loss rates increase prodigiously, but the driving mechanism has proven elusive. Here we present high-contrast optical polarimetric-imaging observations of the extreme red supergiant VY Canis Majoris and its clumpy, dusty, mass-loss envelope, using the new extreme-adaptive-optics instrument SPHERE at the VLT. These observations allow us to make the first direct and unambiguous detection of submicron dust grains in the ejecta; we derive an average grain radius ~0.5 μm, 50 times larger than in the diffuse ISM, large enough to receive significant radiation pressure by photon scattering. We find evidence for varying grain sizes throughout the ejecta, highlighting the dynamical nature of the envelope. Grains with 0.5 μm sizes are likely to reach a safe distance from the eventual explosion of VY Canis Majoris; hence it may inject upwards of 10-2 M⊙ of dust into the ISM. Based on observations made with European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program 60.A-9368(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. Computation of ion drag force on a static spherical dust grain immersed in rf discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Melzer, A.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.

    2009-04-15

    The ion drag force on static spherical dust grains located in an argon rf discharge under typical laboratory experiment conditions has been computed using a three-dimensional particle-particle-particle-mesh code. Elastic and inelastic collisions have been included in the current model to obtain realistic rf discharge plasma conditions. The ion drag has been computed for various sizes of dust placed at different locations in the rf discharge under different gas pressures. The orbital drag force is typically found larger than the collection drag force. Ion-neutral collisions increase flux to the dust and hence the total drag force for collisional case is found larger than the collisionless case. Within the pressure range investigated, the drag forces do not vary much with pressure. The size dependence of the drag force is nonlinear and agrees well with the forces computed from the analytical models.

  16. PROPERTIES OF DUST GRAINS PROBED WITH EXTINCTION CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, Takaya; Fukugita, Masataka

    2013-06-10

    Modern data of the extinction curve from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared are revisited to study properties of dust grains in the Milky Way (MW) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We confirm that the graphite-silicate mixture of grains yields the observed extinction curve with the simple power-law distribution of the grain size but with a cutoff at some maximal size: the parameters are tightly constrained to be q = 3.5 {+-} 0.2 for the size distribution a {sup -q} and the maximum radius a{sub max} = 0.24 {+-} 0.05 {mu}m, for both MW and SMC. The abundance of grains, and hence the elemental abundance, is constrained from the reddening versus hydrogen column density, E(B - V)/N{sub H}. If we take the solar elemental abundance as the standard for the MW, >56% of carbon should be in graphite dust, while it is <40% in the SMC using its available abundance estimate. This disparity and the relative abundance of C to Si explain the difference of the two curves. We find that 50%-60% of carbon may not necessarily be in graphite but in the amorphous or glassy phase. Iron may also be in the metallic phase or up to {approx}80% in magnetite rather than in silicates, so that the Mg/Fe ratio in astronomical olivine is arbitrary. With these substitutions, the parameters of the grain size remain unchanged. The mass density of dust grains relative to hydrogen is {rho}{sub dust}/{rho}{sub H}= 1 / (120{sup +10}{sub -16}) for the MW and 1 / (760{sup +70}{sub -90}) for the SMC under the elemental abundance constraints. We underline the importance of the wavelength dependence of the extinction curve in the near-infrared in constructing the dust model: if A{sub {lambda}}{proportional_to}{lambda}{sup -{gamma}} with {gamma} {approx_equal} 1.6, the power-law grain-size model fails, whereas it works if {gamma} {approx_equal} 1.8-2.0.

  17. Photoelectric and Triboelectric Charging of Dust Grains on Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickafoose, A. A.; Colwell, J. E.; Horanyi, M.; Robertson, S.

    2000-10-01

    Dust particles in the regoliths of objects with no atmosphere and low surface gravity may be levitated and transported vertically and horizontally by electric fields in the near-surface photoelectron layer. This phenomenon has been observed on the Moon and may affect the size distribution and spatial distribution of regolith on asteroids and small planetary satellits. We have performed experiments on the charging of single dust particles due to photoemission, collection of electrons from a photoemissive surface, and triboelectric charging. The particles tested are 100 microns in diameter and include JSC-1 (lunar regolith simulant), and JSC-Mars-1 (martian regolith simulant). Isolated conducting grains (Zn, Cu, and graphite) illuminated by ultraviolet light reach a positive equilibrium floating potential (a few volts) that depends upon the work function of the particle. Conducting grains dropped past a photoemitting surface attain a negative floating potential for which the sum of the emitted and collected currents is zero. Nonconducting grains (glass, SiC, and the regolith simulants) have a large initial triboelectric charging potential (up to + 10 V) with a distribution approximately centered on zero. The nonconducting grains are weak photoemitters and attain a negative floating potential when dropped past a photoemitting surface. Our experimental results show that for realistic silicate planetary regolith analogs, triboelectric charging may be the dominant charging process and will therefore play an important role in the subsequent dynamical behavior of grains released from planetary regoliths. New experiments and numerical simulations are under way to study the levitation and dynamics of charged dust grains near surfaces in space. This research supported by NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program (NAG3-2136).

  18. Catalysis by dust grains in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1996-10-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, the authors applied their time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10-5 to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650K. Results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  19. Interactions of Dust Grains with Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Cycle Variations of the F-Coronal Brightness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragot, B. R.; Kahler, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    The density of interplanetary dust increases sunward to reach its maximum in the F corona, where its scattered white-light emission dominates that of the electron K corona above about 3 Solar Radius. The dust will interact with both the particles and fields of antisunward propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs). To understand the effects of the CME/dust interactions we consider the dominant forces, with and without CMEs. acting on the dust in the 3-5 Solar Radius region. Dust grain orbits are then computed to compare the drift rates from 5 to 3 Solar Radius. for periods of minimum and maximum solar activity, where a simple CME model is adopted to distinguish between the two periods. The ion-drag force, even in the quiet solar wind, reduces the drift time by a significant factor from its value estimated with the Poynting-Robertson drag force alone. The ion-drag effects of CMEs result in even shorter drift times of the large (greater than or approx. 3 microns) dust grains. hence faster depletion rates and lower dust-pain densities, at solar maxima. If dominated by thermal emission, the near-infrared brightness will thus display solar cycle variations close to the dust plane of symmetry. While trapping the smallest of the grains, the CME magnetic fields also scatter the grains of intermediate size (0.1-3 microns) in latitude. If light scattering by small grains close to the Sun dominates the optical brightness. the scattering by the CME magnetic fields will result in a solar cycle variation of the optical brightness distribution not exceeding 100% at high latitudes, with a higher isotropy reached at solar maxima. A good degree of latitudinal isotropy is already reached at low solar activity since the magnetic fields of the quiet solar wind so close to the Sun are able to scatter the small (less than or approx. 3 microns) grains up to the polar regions in only a few days or less, producing strong perturbations of their trajectories in less than half their orbital

  20. A Wealth of Dust Grains in Quasar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This plot of data captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reveals dust entrained in the winds rushing away from a quasar, or growing black hole. The quasar, called PG2112+059, is located deep inside a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. Astronomers believe the dust might have been forged in the winds, which would help explain where dust in the very early universe came from.

    The data were captured by Spitzer's infrared spectrograph, an instrument that splits apart light from the quasar into a spectrum that reveals telltale signs of different minerals. Each type of mineral, or dust grain, has a unique signature, as can be seen in the graph, or spectrum, above.

    The strongest features are from the mineral amorphous olivine, or glass (purple); the mineral forsterite found in sand (blue); and the mineral corundum found in rubies (light blue). The detection of forsterite and corundum is highly unusual in galaxies without quasars. Therefore, their presence is a key clue that these grains might have been created in the quasar winds and not by dying stars as they are in our Milky Way galaxy. Forsterite is destroyed quickly in normal galaxies by radiation, so it must be continually produced to be detected by Spitzer.

    Corundum is hard, and provides a seed that softer, more common minerals usually cover up. As a result, corundum is usually not seen in spectra of galaxies. Since Spitzer did detect the mineral, it is probably forming in a clumpy environment, which is expected in quasar winds. All together, the signatures of the unusual minerals in this spectrum point towards dust grains forming in the winds blowing away from quasars.

  1. Localized excitations of charged dust grains in dusty plasma lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kourakis, Ioannis; Shukla, Padma Kant; Basios, Vassileios

    2005-10-31

    The nonlinear aspects of charged dust grain motion in a one-dimensional dusty plasma (DP) monolayer are discussed. Both horizontal (longitudinal, acoustic mode) and vertical (transverse, optic mode) displacements are considered, and various types of localized excitations are reviewed, in a continuum approximation. Dust crystals are shown to support nonlinear kink-shaped supersonic longitudinal solitary excitations, as well as modulated envelope (either longitudinal or transverse) localized modes. The possibility for Discrete Breather (DB-) type excitations (Intrinsic Localized Modes, ILMs) to occur is investigated, from first principles. These highly localized excitations owe their existence to lattice discreteness, in combination with the interaction and/or substrate (sheath) potential nonlinearity. This possibility may open new directions in DP- related research. The relation to previous results on atomic chains as well as to experimental results on strongly-coupled dust layers in gas discharge plasmas is discussed.

  2. Using cm observations to constrain the abundance of very small dust grains in Galactic cold cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbs, C. T.; Paladini, R.; Cleary, K.; Muchovej, S. J. C.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Stevenson, M. A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Ysard, N.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Perrott, Y. C.; Rumsey, C.; Villadsen, J.

    2016-03-01

    In this analysis, we illustrate how the relatively new emission mechanism, known as spinning dust, can be used to characterize dust grains in the interstellar medium. We demonstrate this by using spinning dust emission observations to constrain the abundance of very small dust grains (a ≲ 10 nm) in a sample of Galactic cold cores. Using the physical properties of the cores in our sample as inputs to a spinning dust model, we predict the expected level of emission at a wavelength of 1 cm for four different very small dust grain abundances, which we constrain by comparing to 1 cm CARMA observations. For all of our cores, we find a depletion of very small grains, which we suggest is due to the process of grain growth. This work represents the first time that spinning dust emission has been used to constrain the physical properties of interstellar dust grains.

  3. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    A model has been developed for reflection nebulae around luminous IR sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The shape of the IR spectrum is shown to be the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of the model results with IR observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse ISM, or consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains. By adding water-ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, the 3.08 micron ice-band feature observed in the spectra of several IR reflection nebulae has been modeled. It is shown that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains.

  4. Creation of fully vectorized FORTRAN code for integrating the movement of dust grains in interplanetary environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colquitt, Walter

    1989-01-01

    The main objective is to improve the performance of a specific FORTRAN computer code from the Planetary Sciences Division of NASA/Johnson Space Center when used on a modern vectorizing supercomputer. The code is used to calculate orbits of dust grains that separate from comets and asteroids. This code accounts for influences of the sun and 8 planets (neglecting Pluto), solar wind, and solar light pressure including Poynting-Robertson drag. Calculations allow one to study the motion of these particles as they are influenced by the Earth or one of the other planets. Some of these particles become trapped just beyond the Earth for long periods of time. These integer period resonances vary from 3 orbits of the Earth and 2 orbits of the particles to as high as 14 to 13.

  5. Effects of turbulent dust grain motion to interstellar chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J. X.; He, J. H.; Yan, H. R.

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical studies have revealed that dust grains are usually moving fast through the turbulent interstellar gas, which could have significant effects upon interstellar chemistry by modifying grain accretion. This effect is investigated in this work on the basis of numerical gas-grain chemical modelling. Major features of the grain motion effect in the typical environment of dark clouds (DC) can be summarized as follows: (1) decrease of gas-phase (both neutral and ionic) abundances and increase of surface abundances by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude; (2) shifts of the existing chemical jumps to earlier evolution ages for gas-phase species and to later ages for surface species by factors of about 10; (3) a few exceptional cases in which some species turn out to be insensitive to this effect and some other species can show opposite behaviours too. These effects usually begin to emerge from a typical DC model age of about 105 yr. The grain motion in a typical cold neutral medium (CNM) can help overcome the Coulomb repulsive barrier to enable effective accretion of cations on to positively charged grains. As a result, the grain motion greatly enhances the abundances of some gas-phase and surface species by factors up to 2-6 or more orders of magnitude in the CNM model. The grain motion effect in a typical molecular cloud (MC) is intermediate between that of the DC and CNM models, but with weaker strength. The grain motion is found to be important to consider in chemical simulations of typical interstellar medium.

  6. Comparison of dust charging between orbital-motion-limited theory and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2015-11-15

    The Orbital-Motion-Limited (OML) theory has been modified to predict the dust charge and the results were contrasted with the Whipple approximation [X. Z. Tang and G. L. Delzanno, Phys. Plasmas 21, 123708 (2014)]. To further establish its regime of applicability, in this paper, the OML predictions (for a non-electron-emitting, spherical dust grain at rest in a collisionless, unmagnetized plasma) are compared with particle-in-cell simulations that retain the absorption radius effect. It is found that for large dust grain radius r{sub d} relative to the plasma Debye length λ{sub D}, the revised OML theory remains a very good approximation as, for the parameters considered (r{sub d}/λ{sub D} ≤ 10, equal electron and ion temperatures), it yields the dust charge to within 20% accuracy. This is a substantial improvement over the Whipple approximation. The dust collected currents and energy fluxes, which remain the same in the revised and standard OML theories, are accurate to within 15%–30%.

  7. Star dust. [refractory grains blown into interstellar space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ney, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    Recent infrared techniques have revealed that the dust which is a major constituent of the universe, is composed of refractory grains produced by certain classes of stars, condensed in their atmospheres and blown into interstellar space by the radiation pressure of these stars. In some cases stars are surrounded by dust shells which consist of carbon refractories in the case of a carbon-rich environment, and metallic silicates of the kind that produced terrestrial planets in the case of oxygen-rich environments. A few of these infrared stars (called cygnids) exhibit a unique morphology that suggests the formation of a planetary stage in the evolution of a planetary nebula. Comets which are bright in the infrared and believed to be the remnants of the most primitive material in the solar nebula, are found to inject the astrophysical dust into our solar system together with asteroidal debris. Certain novae are also found to condense grains which are blown out in their shells after the explosion.

  8. Dust grain coagulation modelling : From discrete to continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruta, P.; Hendrix, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    In molecular clouds, stars are formed from a mixture of gas, plasma and dust particles. The dynamics of this formation is still actively investigated and a study of dust coagulation can help to shed light on this process. Starting from a pre-existing discrete coagulation model, this work aims to mathematically explore its properties and its suitability for numerical validation. The crucial step is in our reinterpretation from its original discrete to a well-defined continuous form, which results in the well-known Smoluchowski coagulation equation. This opens up the possibility of exploiting previous results in order to prove the existence and uniqueness of a mass conserving solution for the evolution of dust grain size distribution. Ultimately, to allow for a more flexible numerical implementation, the problem is rewritten as a non-linear hyperbolic integro-differential equation and solved using a finite volume discretisation. It is demonstrated that there is an exact numerical agreement with the initial discrete model, with improved accuracy. This is of interest for further work on dynamically coupled gas with dust simulations.

  9. From Nuclei to Dust Grains: How the AGB Machinery Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobrecht, D.; Cristallo, S.; Piersanti, L.

    2015-12-01

    With their circumstellar envelopes AGB stars are marvelous laboratories to test our knowledge of microphysics (opacities, equation of state), macrophysics (convection, rotation, stellar pulsations, magnetic fields) and nucleosynthesis (nuclear burnings, slow neutron capture processes, molecules and dust formation). Due to the completely different environments those processes occur, the interplay between stellar interiors (dominated by mixing events like convection and dredge-up episodes) and stellar winds (characterized by dust formation and wind acceleration) is often ignored. We intend to develop a new approach involving a transition region, taking into consideration hydrodynamic processes which may drive AGB mass-loss. Our aim is to describe the process triggering the mass-loss in AGB stars with different masses, metallicities and chemical enrichments, possibly deriving a velocity field of the outflowing matter. Moreover, we intend to construct an homogeneous theoretical database containing detailed abundances of atomic and molecular species produced by these objects. As a long term goal, we will derive dust production rates for silicates, alumina and silicon carbides, in order to explain laboratory measurements of isotopic ratios in AGB dust grains.

  10. The Charging of Dust Grains in the Inner Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, K.; Slavin, J.; Zank, G. P.; Frisch, P.

    2008-12-01

    Equilibrium electric charge and surface potential on a dust grain in the heliosheath are calculated. The grain is charged due to heliosheath plasma flux, photo electrons flux, secondary electron emission flux and transmission flux. Realistically, the heliosheath plasma consists of solar electrons, solar wind ions [SWI] and pick up ions [PUI]. These species interact differently with TS and thus have different characteristics down stream in the heliosheath. The PUI suffer multiple reflections at TS and are accelerated to high energies in the range of ~ 106 K. The solar electrons, on the other hand, are heated adiabatically through the TS and have temperature in the range ~ 5x105 K. The SWI may have a smaller temperature typically in the range 1-5x104 K The density of electrons could be in the range ~5 x 10-4 cm-3, while the ratio of PUI to SWI density could range from 0.1 to 0.5. Taking into account these parameters, grain charging due to different plasma species and other fluxes mentioned earlier, is calculated. Our results show that (a) surface potential is very sensitive to electron temp. It goes through a maxima and for realistic values close to or less than 5x105 K it can be as big as 26V which is twice the value calculated by Kimura and Mann1. This may have implications for electrostatic disruption and the size distribution of dust particles in the heliosheath. With PUI density the surface potential increases about 10 to 20 %. Though temperature of PUI is significantly larger than that of electrons, it is not large enough to make up for the mass ratio of electrons to protons. On account small temperature and electron/proton mass ratio, the effect of SWI on dust charge is very weak. (1) H. Kimura and I. Mann, Ap.J. 499, 454 (1998).

  11. EFFECTIVENESS OF A HIGH-PRESSURE, WATER FOGGING SYSTEM IN CONTROLLING DUST EMISSIONS AT GRAIN RECEIVING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Grain dust at the receiving area is a fire hazard, a health concern, and a sanitation problem and should be controlled. The effectiveness of a high-pressure, water-fog system in controlling grain dust emissions was evaluated with corn and wheat while spouting 2.1 m3 (60 bu) of grain into a test c...

  12. An improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes to the outer planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present an improved model for interplanetary dust grain fluxes in the outer solar system constrained by in-situ dust density observations. A dynamical dust grain tracing code is used to establish relative dust grain densities and three-dimensional velocity distributions in the outer solar system for four main sources of dust grains: Jupiter-family comets, Halley-type comets, Oort-Cloud comets, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt objects. Model densities are constrained by in-situ dust measurements by the New Horizons Student Dust Counter, the Pioneer 10 meteoroid detector, and the Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS). The model predicts that Jupiter-family comet grains dominate the interplanetary dust grain mass flux inside approximately 10 AU, Oort-Cloud cometary grains may dominate between 10 and 25 AU, and Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt grains are dominant outside 25 AU. The model also predicts that while the total interplanetary mass flux at Jupiter roughly matches that inferred by the analysis of the Galileo DDS measurements, mass fluxes to Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are at least one order-of-magnitude lower than that predicted by extrapolations of dust grain flux models from 1 AU. We present modeled mass fluxes to various moons, atmospheres, and ring systems of the outer planets.

  13. Polarimetric Models of Circumstellar Discs Including Aggregate Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Mahesh

    The work conducted in this thesis examines the nature of circumstellar discs by investigating irradiance and polarization of scattered light. Two circumstellar discs are investigated. Firstly, H-band high contrast imaging data on the transitional disc of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD169142 are presented. The images were obtained through the polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) technique on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the adaptive optics system NACO. Our observations use longer exposure times, allowing us to examine the edges of the disc. Analysis of the observations shows distinct signs of polarization due to circumstellar material, but due to excessive saturation and adaptive optics errors further information on the disc could not be inferred. The HD169142 disc is then modelled using the 3D radiative transfer code Hyperion. Initial models were constructed using a two disc structure, however recent PDI has shown the existence of an annular gap. In addition to this the annular gap is found not to be devoid of dust. This then led to the construction of a four-component disc structure. Estimates of the mass of dust in the gap (2.10E-6 Msun) are made as well as for the planet (1.53E-5 Msun (0.016 Mjupiter)) suspected to be responsible for causing the gap. The predicted polarization was also estimated for the disc, peaking at ~14 percent. The use of realistic dust grains (ballistic aggregate particles) in Monte Carlo code is also examined. The fortran code DDSCAT is used to calculate the scattering properties for aggregates which are used to replace the spherical grain models used by the radiative transfer code Hyperion. Currently, Hyperion uses four independent elements to define the scattering matrix, therefore the use of rotational averaging and a 50/50 percent population of grains and their enantiomers were explored to reduce the number of contributing scattering elements from DDSCAT. A python script was created to extract the scattering data from the DDSCAT

  14. Catalysis by Dust Grains in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, Monika E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, we have applied our time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10(exp -5) to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650 K. Under these physical conditions, the reaction 3H2 + CO yields CH4 + H2O is readily catalyzed by an iron or nickel surface, whereas the same reaction is kinetically inhibited in the gas phase. Our model results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  15. Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Dust Grain Charging in Space Environments: Measurements on Apollo 11 and 17 Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10- 400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of approximately 0.2 to 13 microns diameters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  16. Computation of Ion Drag Force and Charge on a Static Spherical Dust Grain in RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Melzer, A.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.

    2008-09-07

    The ion drag force and charge on a spherical dust grain located in RF discharge plasma is computed using a 3-dimensional Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh (P3M) code. Our plasma model includes finite-size effects for dust grains and allows to self-consistently resolve the dust grain charging due to absorption of plasma electrons and ions. Ion drag and dust charge have been computed for various sizes of dust particles placed at various locations in the discharge. The results for ion drag have been compared with previous collisionless models and affect of collisions on drag has been discussed in detail.

  17. Locations of stationary/periodic solutions in mean motion resonances according to properties of dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pástor, P.

    2016-04-01

    The equations of secular evolution for dust grains in mean motion resonances with a planet are solved for stationary points. This is done including both Poynting-Robertson effect and stellar wind. The solutions are stationary in semimajor axis, eccentricity, and resonant angle, but allow the pericentre to advance. The semimajor axis of stationary solutions can be slightly shifted from the exact resonant value. The periodicity of the stationary solutions in a reference frame orbiting with the planet is analytically proved. The existence of periodic solutions in mean motion resonances means that analytical theory enables for dust particles also infinitely long capture times. The stationary solutions are periodic motions to which the eccentricity asymptotically approaches and around which the libration occurs. Using numerical integration of equation of motion are successfully found initial conditions corresponding to the stationary solutions. Numerically and analytically determined shifts of the semimajor axis form the exact resonance for the stationary solutions are in excellent agreement. The stationary solutions can be plotted by locations of pericenters in the reference frame orbiting with the planet. The pericenters are distributed in the space according to properties of dust particles.

  18. Photoemission Experiments for Charge Characteristics of Individual Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; West, E.; Pratico, J.; Tankosic, D.; Venturini, C. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Photoemission experiments with UV radiation have been performed to investigate the microphysics and charge characteristics of individual isolated dust grains of various compositions and sizes by using the electrodynamic balance facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Dust particles of 2-10 gm diameter are levitated in a vacuum chamber at pressures approximately 10(exp-5) torr and exposed to a collimated beam of UV radiation in the 120-200 nm spectral range from a deuterium lamp source with a MgF2 window. A monochromator is used to select the UV wavelength with a spectral resolution of 8 nm. The electrodynamic facility permits measurements of the charge and diameters of particles of known composition, and monitoring of photoemission rates with the incident UV radiation. Experiments have been conducted on test particles of silica and polystyrene to determine the photoelectric yields and surface equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. A brief description of an experimental procedure for photoemission studies is given and some preliminary laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust particles are presented.

  19. Stochastic charging of dust grains in planetary rings: Diffusion rates and their effects on Lorentz resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, L.; Burns, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Dust grains in planetary rings acquire stochastically fluctuating electric charges as they orbit through any corotating magnetospheric plasma. Here we investigate the nature of this stochastic charging and calculate its effect on the Lorentz resonance (LR). First we model grain charging as a Markov process, where the transition probabilities are identified as the ensemble-averaged charging fluxes due to plasma pickup and photoemission. We determine the distribution function P(t;N), giving the probability that a grain has N excess charges at time t. The autocorrelation function tau(sub q) for the strochastic charge process can be approximated by a Fokker-Planck treatment of the evolution equations for P(t; N). We calculate the mean square response to the stochastic fluctuations in the Lorentz force. We find that transport in phase space is very small compared to the resonant increase in amplitudes due to the mean charge, over the timescale that the oscillator is resonantly pumped up. Therefore the stochastic charge variations cannot break the resonant interaction; locally, the Lorentz resonance is a robust mechanism for the shaping of etheral dust ring systems. Slightly stronger bounds on plasma parameters are required when we consider the longer transit times between Lorentz resonances.

  20. Charging of Individual Micron-Size Interstellar/Planetary Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with UV/X-ray radiation, as well as by electron/ion impact. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of individual dust grains is required for understanding of the physical and dynamical processes in space environments and the role of dust in formation of stellar and planetary systems. In this paper, we discuss experimental results on dust charging by electron impact, where low energy electrons are scattered or stick to the dust grains, thereby charging the dust grains negatively, and at sufficiently high energies the incident electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly by low energy electron impact. Available theoretical models based on the Sternglass equation (Sternglass, 1954) are applicable for neutral, planar, and bulk surfaces only. However, charging properties of individual micron-size dust grains are expected to be different from the values measured on bulk materials. Our recent experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance facility (at NASA-MSFC) indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (e.g. Abbas et al, 2010). Here we discuss the complex nature of SEE charging properties of individual micron-size lunar dust grains and silica microspheres.

  1. Laboratory Studies of Charging Properties of Dust Grains in Astrophysical/Planetary Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with UV/X-ray radiation, as well as by electron/ion impact. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of individual dust grains is required for understanding of the physical and dynamical processes in space environments and the role of dust in formation of stellar and planetary systems. In this paper we focus on charging of individual micron/submicron dust grains by processes that include: (a) UV photoelectric emissions involving incident photon energies higher than the work function of the material and b) electron impact, where low energy electrons are scattered or stick to the dust grains, thereby charging the dust grains negatively, and at sufficiently high energies the incident electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). It is well accepted that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. However, no viable models for calculation of the charging properties of individual micron size dust grains are available at the present time. Therefore, the photoelectric yields, and secondary electron emission yields of micron-size dust grains have to be obtained by experimental methods. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains. Our experimental results, obtained on individual, micron-size dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance facility (at NASA-MSFC), show that: (1) The measured photoelectric yields are substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a particle size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains; (2) dust charging by low energy electron impact is a complex process. Also, our measurements indicate that

  2. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-15

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  3. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  4. Experimental investigations of the optical and physical properties of interstellar and lunar dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankosic, Dragana

    2010-10-01

    Dust grains constitute a major component of matter in the universe. About half of all elements in the interstellar medium (ISM) heavier than helium are in the form of dust. Dust particles are formed in astrophysical environments by processes such as stellar outflows and supernovae. Ejected into the ISM, they lead to the formation of diffuse and dense molecular clouds of gas and dust. The gas and dust in the interstellar clouds undergo a variety of complex physical and chemical evolutionary processes leading to the formation of stars and planetary systems, forming a cosmic dust cycle. Micron/submicron size cosmic dust grains have a significant role in physical and dynamical processes in the galaxy, the ISM, and the interplanetary and planetary environments. Therefore, the knowledge of the physical, optical, and charging properties of the cosmic dust provides valuable information about many issues related to the role of dust in astrophysical environments. An experimental facility based on an electrodynamic balance (EDB) has been developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for investigation of several different properties and processes of individual, levitated micron/submicron size dust grains in simulated space environments. This dissertation focuses on experimental investigations in the following areas: (1) Radiation pressure on individual micron-sized dust grains; (2) Rotation and alignment of micron-sized dust grains simulating rotation of dust grains in astrophysical environment; (3) Charging of analogs of individual cosmic dust grains and lunar dust grains by UV radiation; (4) Charging of Apollo 11 & 17 lunar dust grains by electron impact simulating the charging of lunar dust by the solar wind plasma. The experimental results obtained on individual micron/submicron-size dust grains in the EDB facility at NASA/MSFC in each of the above four areas were unique and first to be reported. Experimental studies of the physical and optical properties of

  5. Cycloid motions of grains in a dust plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-Liang, Zhang; Fan, Feng; Fu-Cheng, Liu; Li-Fang, Dong; Ya-Feng, He

    2016-02-01

    Hypocycloid and epicycloid motions of irregular grains (pine pollen) are observed for the first time in a dust plasma in a two-dimensional (2D) horizontal plane. These cycloid motions can be regarded as a combination of a primary circle and a secondary circle. An inverse Magnus force originating from the spin of the irregular grain gives rise to the primary circle. Radial confinement resulting from the electrostatic force and the ion drag force, together with inverse Magnus force, plays an important role in the formation of the secondary circle. In addition, the cyclotron radius is seen to change periodically during the cycloid motion. Force analysis and comparison experiments have shown that the cycloid motions are distinctive features of an irregular grain immersed in a plasma. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2011201006 and A2012201015), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. Y2012009), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project.

  6. Measurement of photoemission and secondary emission from laboratory dust grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelton, Robert C.; Yadlowsky, Edward J.; Settersten, Thomas B.; Spanjers, Gregory G.; Moschella, John J.

    1995-01-01

    The overall goal of this project is experimentally determine the emission properties of dust grains in order to provide theorists and modelers with an accurate data base to use in codes that predict the charging of grains in various plasma environments encountered in the magnetospheres of the planets. In general these modelers use values which have been measured on planar, bulk samples of the materials in question. The large enhancements expected due to the small size of grains can have a dramatic impact upon the predictions and the ultimate utility of these predictions. The first experimental measurement of energy resolved profiles of the secondary electron emission coefficient, 6, of sub-micron diameter particles has been accomplished. Bismuth particles in the size range of .022 to .165 micrometers were generated in a moderate pressure vacuum oven (average size is a function of oven temperature and pressure) and introduced into a high vacuum chamber where they interacted with a high energy electron beam (0.4 to 20 keV). Large enhancements in emission were observed with a peak value, delta(sub max) = 4. 5 measured for the ensemble of particles with a mean size of .022 micrometers. This is in contrast to the published value, delta(sub max) = 1.2, for bulk bismuth. The observed profiles are in general agreement with recent theoretical predictions made by Chow et al. at UCSD.

  7. Measurements of Charging of Apollo 17 Lunar Dust Grains by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James F.; Dube, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    It is well known since the Apollo missions that the lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of micron size dust grains with unusually high adhesive characteristics. The dust grains observed to be levitated and transported on the lunar surface are believed to have a hazardous impact on the robotic and human missions to the Moon. The observed dust phenomena are attributed to the lunar dust being charged positively during the day by UV photoelectric emissions, and negatively during the night by the solar wind electrons. The current dust charging and the levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena, with the uncertainty of dust charging processes and the equilibrium potentials of the individual dust grains. It is well recognized that the charging properties of individual dust grains are substantially different from those determined from measurements made on bulk materials that are currently available. An experimental facility has been developed in the Dusty Plasma Laboratory at MSFC for investigating the charging and optical properties of individual micron/sub-micron size positively or negatively charged dust grains by levitating them in an electrodynamic balance in simulated space environments. In this paper, we present the laboratory measurements on charging of Apollo 17 individual lunar dust grains by a low energy electron beam. The charging rates and the equilibrium potentials produced by direct electron impact and by secondary electron emission process are discussed.

  8. Different-sized dust grains and the chemical evolution of protostellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochina, O. V.; Wiebe, D. S.

    2014-04-01

    Results of modeling the chemical evolution of protostellar objects are presented. The models take into account the existence of different dust populations with distinct grain sizes, total mass fractions, and temperatures. In addition to "classical" dust grains, the models include an entirely different second dust population, with dust grain sizes of 30 Å and a higher temperature. Two chemical-evolution models are compared, one taking into account only classical dust and the other including both dust populations. The influence of a complex dust composition on the general evolution of the molecular contents of prestellar cores and the abundances of a number of chemical species is studied. At early evolutionary stages, differences are mainly determined by the modification changes in the photoprocesses' balance due to efficient UV absorption by the second population of dust grains and in collisional reactions with the dust grains. At late stages, distinctions between the models are also determined by the increasing dominance of additional reaction channels. The species that respond to the presence of small grains in different ways are separated into different groups. Allowing for the presence of small grains makes it possible to significantly lower the water abundance in the gas phase.

  9. Effect of Dust Grains on Solitary Kinetic Alfven Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Wu, D. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-09-07

    Solitary kinetic Alfven wave has been studied in dusty plasmas. The effect of the dust charge-to-mass ratio is considered. We derive the Sagdeev potential for the soliton solutions based on the hydrodynamic equations. A singularity in the Sagdeev potential is found and this singularity results in a bell-shaped soliton. The soliton solutions comprise two branches. One branch is sub-Alfvenic and the soliton velocities are much smaller than the Alfven speed. The other branch is super-Alfvenic and the soliton velocities are very close to or greater than the Alfven speed. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons can exist in each branch. For the sub-Alfvenic branch, the rarefactive soliton is a bell shape curve which is much narrower than the compressive one. In the super-Alfvenic branch, however, the compressive soliton is bell-shaped and the rarefactive one is broadened. We also found that the super-Alfvenic solitons can develop to other structures. When the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust grains is sufficiently high, the width of the rarefactive soliton will increase extremely and an electron density depletion will be observed. When the velocity is much higher than the Alfven speed, the bell-shaped soliton will transit to a cusped structure.

  10. Size Distribution and Rate of Dust Generated During Grain Elevator Handling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust generated during grain handling is an air pollutant that produces safety and health hazards. This study was conducted to characterize the particle size distribution (PSD) of dust generated during handling of wheat and shelled corn in the research elevator of the USDA Grain Marketing and Product...

  11. Experimental Investigation of Charging Properties of Interstellar Type Silica Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. Incident low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grains, leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available classical theoretical models for calculations of SEE yields are generally applicable for neutral, planar, or bulk surfaces. These models, however, are not valid for calculations of the electron impact charging properties of electrostatically charged micron/submicron-size dust grains in astrophysical environments. Rigorous quantum mechanical models are not yet available, and the SEE yields have to be determined experimentally for development of more accurate models for charging of individual dust grains. At the present time, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains, particularly for low energy electron impact. The experimental results on individual, positively charged, micron-size lunar dust grains levitated carried out by us in a unique facility at NASA-MSFC, based on an electrodynamic balance, indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a complex process. The electron impact may lead to charging or discharging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration (Abbas et al, 2010, 2012). In this paper, we discuss SEE charging properties of individual micron-size silica microspheres that are believed to be analogs of a class of interstellar dust grains. The measurements indicate charging of the 0.2m silica particles when exposed to 25 eV electron beams and discharging when exposed to higher energy electron beams. Relatively large size silica particles (5.2-6.82m) generally discharge to lower equilibrium potentials at both electron energies

  12. Dust Dynamics in Protoplanetary Disk Winds Driven by Magnetorotational Turbulence: A Mechanism for Floating Dust Grains with Characteristic Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Tomoya; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of dust grains of various sizes in protoplanetary disk winds driven by magnetorotational turbulence, by simulating the time evolution of the dust grain distribution in the vertical direction. Small dust grains, which are well-coupled to the gas, are dragged upward with the upflowing gas, while large grains remain near the midplane of a disk. Intermediate-size grains float near the sonic point of the disk wind located at several scale heights from the midplane, where the grains are loosely coupled to the background gas. For the minimum mass solar nebula at 1 au, dust grains with size of 25-45 μm float around 4 scale heights from the midplane. Considering the dependence on the distance from the central star, smaller-size grains remain only in an outer region of the disk, while larger-size grains are distributed in a broader region. We also discuss the implications of our result for observations of dusty material around young stellar objects.

  13. The evolution of hydrocarbon dust grains in the interstellar medium and its influence on the infrared spectra of dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murga, M. S.; Khoperskov, S. A.; Wiebe, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    Computations of the evolution of the distributions of the size and degree of aromatization of interstellar dust grains, destruction by radiation and collisions with gas particles, and fragmentation during collisions with other grains are presented. The results of these computations are used to model dust emission spectra. The evolution of an ensemble of dust particles sensitively depends on the initial size distribution of the grains. Radiation in the considered range of fluxes mainly aromatizes grains. With the exception of the smallest grains, it is mainly erosion during collisions with gas particles that leads to the destruction of grains. In the presence of particle velocities above 50 km/s, characteristic for shocks in supernova remnants, grains greater than 20 Å in size are absent. The IR emission spectrum changes appreciably during the evolution of the dust, and depends on the adopted characteristics of the grains, in particular, the energy of their C-Cbonds ( E 0). Aromatic bands are not observed in the near-IR (2-15 μm) when E 0 is low, even when the medium characteristics are typical for the average interstellarmedium in our Galaxy; this indicates a preference for high E 0 values. The influence of the characteristics of the medium on the intensity ratios for the dust emission in various photometric bands is considered. The I 3.4/ I 11.3 intensity ratio is most sensitive to the degree of aromatization of small grains. The I 3.3/ I 70+160 ratio is a sensitive indicator of the contribution of aromatic grains to the total mass of dust.

  14. Excitation of dust acoustic waves by an ion beam in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Kaur, Daljeet; Gahlot, Ajay; Sharma, Jyotsna

    2014-10-15

    An ion beam propagating through a plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives a low frequency electrostatic dust acoustic wave (DAW) to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales to the one-third power of the beam density. The real part of the frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales to almost one-half power of the beam energy. The phase velocity, frequency, and wavelength results of the unstable mode are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  15. Photometry of dust grains of comet 67P and connection with nucleus regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremonese, G.; Simioni, E.; Ragazzoni, R.; Bertini, I.; La Forgia, F.; Pajola, M.; Oklay, N.; Fornasier, S.; Lazzarin, M.; Lucchetti, A.; Sierks, H.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Agarwal, J.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Da Deppo, V.; Davidsson, B.; De Cecco, M.; Debei, S.; Fulle, M.; Groussin, O.; Güttler, C.; Gutierrez, P. J.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kueppers, M.; Kürt, E.; Lara, L. M.; Magrin, S.; Lopez Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Thomas, N.; Tubiana, C.; Vincent, J.-B.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Multiple pairs of high-resolution images of the dust coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko have been collected by OSIRIS onboard Rosetta allowing extraction and analysis of dust grain tracks. Methods: We developed a quasi automatic method to recognize and to extract dust tracks in the Osiris images providing size, FWHM and photometric data. The dust tracks characterized by a low signal-to-noise ratio were checked manually. We performed the photometric analysis of 70 dust grain tracks observed on two different Narrow Angle Camera images in the two filters F24 and F28, centered at λ = 480.7 nm and at λ = 743.7 nm, respectively, deriving the color and the reddening of each one. We then extracted several images of the nucleus observed with the same filters and with the same phase angle to be compared with the dust grain reddening. Results: Most of the dust grain reddening is very similar to the nucleus values, confirming they come from the surface or subsurface layer. The histogram of the dust grain reddening has a secondary peak at negative values and shows some grains with values higher than the nucleus, suggesting a different composition from the surface grains. One hypothesis comes from the negative values point at the presence of hydrated minerals in the comet.

  16. Complex Kepler Orbits and Particle Aggregation in Charged Microscopic Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victor; Waitukaitis, Scott; Miskin, Marc; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2015-03-01

    Kepler orbits are usually associated with the motion of astronomical objects such as planets or comets. Here we observe such orbits at the microscale in a system of charged, insulating grains. By letting the grains fall freely under vacuum, we eliminate the effects of air drag and gravity, and by imaging them with a co-falling high-speed camera we track the relative positions of individual particles with high spatial and temporal precision. This makes it possible to investigate the behaviors caused by the combination of long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range, dissipative, contact interactions in unprecedented detail. We make the first direct observations of microscopic elliptical and hyperbolic Kepler orbits, collide-and-capture events between pairs of charged grains, and particle-by-particle aggregation into larger clusters. Our findings provide experimental evidence for electrostatic mechanisms that have been suspected, but not previously observed at the single-event level, as driving the early stages of particle aggregation in systems ranging from fluidized particle bed reactors to interstellar protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, since particles of different net charge and size are seen to aggregate into characteristic spatial configurations, our results suggest new possibilities for the formation of charge-stabilized ``granular molecules''. We can reproduce the observed molecule configurations by taking many-body, dielectric polarization effects into account.

  17. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: DEPENDENCE OF THE SURFACE POTENTIAL ON THE GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Z.; Pavlu, J.; Safrankova, J.; Beranek, M.; Richterova, I.; Vaverka, J.; Mann, I.

    2011-09-01

    The secondary electron emission is believed to play an important role for the dust charging at and close to the lunar surface. However, our knowledge of emission properties of the dust results from model calculations and rather rare laboratory investigations. The present paper reports laboratory measurements of the surface potential on Lunar Highlands Type regolith simulants with sizes between 0.3 and 3 {mu}m in an electron beam with energy below 700 eV. This investigation is focused on a low-energy part, i.e., {<=}100 eV. We found that the equilibrium surface potential of this simulant does not depend on the grain size in our ranges of grain dimensions and the beam energies, however, it is a function of the primary electron beam energy. The measurements are confirmed by the results of the simulation model of the secondary emission from the spherical samples. Finally, we compare our results with those obtained in laboratory experiments as well as those inferred from in situ observations.

  18. Measurements of Photoelectric Yield and Physical Properties of Individual Lunar Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, F. A.; Taylor, L.; Hoover, R.

    2005-01-01

    Micron size dust grains levitated and transported on the lunar surface constitute a major problem for the robotic and human habitat missions for the Moon. It is well known since the Apollo missions that the lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of micron/sub-micron size dust grains. Transient dust clouds over the lunar horizon were observed by experiments during the Apollo 17 mission. Theoretical models suggest that the dust grains on the lunar surface are charged by the solar UV radiation as well as the solar wind. Even without any physical activity, the dust grains are levitated by electrostatic fields and transported away from the surface in the near vacuum environment of the Moon. The current dust charging and the levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena. Since the abundance of dust on the Moon's surface with its observed adhesive characteristics is believed to have a severe impact on the human habitat and the lifetime and operations of a variety of equipment, it is necessary to investigate the phenomena and the charging properties of the lunar dust in order to develop appropriate mitigating strategies. We will present results of some recent laboratory experiments on individual micro/sub-micron size dust grains levitated in electrodynamic balance in simulated space environments. The experiments involve photoelectric emission measurements of individual micron size lunar dust grains illuminated with UV radiation in the 120-160 nm wavelength range. The photoelectric yields are required to determine the charging properties of lunar dust illuminated by solar UV radiation. We will present some recent results of laboratory measurement of the photoelectric yields and the physical properties of individual micron size dust grains from the Apollo and Luna-24 sample returns as well as the JSC-1 lunar simulants.

  19. Charged dust in planetary magnetospheres: Hamiltonian dynamics and numerical simulations for highly charged grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffer, L.; Burns, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We use a combination of analytical and numerical methods to investigate the dynamics of charged dust grains in planetary magnetospheres. Our emphasis is on obtaining results valid for particles that are not necessarily dominated either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces. A Hamiltonian formulation of the problem yields exact results, for all values of charge-to-mass ratio, when we introduce two constraints: particles remain in the equatorial plane and the magnetic field is taken as axially symmetric. In particular, we obtain locations of equilibrium points, the frequencies of stable periodic orbits, the topology of separatrices in phase space, and the rate of longitudinal drift. These results are significant for specific applications: motion in the nearly aligned dipolar field of Saturn, and the trajectories of arbitrarily charged particles in complex magnetic fields for limited periods of time after ejection from parent bodies. Since the model is restrictive, we also use numerical integrations of the full three-dimensional equations of motion and illustrate under what conditions the constrained problem yields reasonable results. We show that a large fraction of the intermediately charged and highly charged (gyrating) particles will always be lost to a planet's atmosphere within a few hundred hours, for motion through tilted-dipole magnetic fields. We find that grains must have a very high charge-to-mass ratio in order to be mirrored back to the ring plane. Thus, except perhaps at Saturn where the dipole tilt is very small, the likely inhabitants of the dusty ring systems are those particles that are either nearly Keplerian (weakly charged) grains or grains whose charges place them in the lower end of the intermediate charge zone. Fianlly, we demonstrate the effect of plasma drag on the orbits of gyrating particles to be a rapid decrease in gyroradius followed by a slow radial evolution of the guiding center.

  20. ACCELERATION OF VERY SMALL DUST GRAINS DUE TO RANDOM CHARGE FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.

    2012-12-20

    We study the acceleration of very small dust grains including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons arising from electrostatic interactions of dust grains that have charge fluctuating randomly in time. Random charge fluctuations of very small grains due to discrete charging events (i.e., sticking collisions with electrons and ions in plasma, and emission of photoelectrons by UV photons) are simulated using the Monte Carlo (MC) method. The motion of dust grains in randomly fluctuating electric fields induced by surrounding charged grains is studied using MC simulations. We identify the acceleration induced by random charge fluctuations as a dominant acceleration mechanism for very small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We find that this acceleration mechanism is efficient for environments with a low degree of ionization (i.e., large Debye length), where charge fluctuations are slow but have a large amplitude. The implications of the present acceleration mechanism for grain coagulation and shattering in the diffuse ISM and dark clouds are also discussed.

  1. Chemically anomalous, pre-accretionally irradiated grains in interplanetary dust -- interstellar grains?. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrafine-grained matrix is a unique and fundamental building block of chondritic porous (CP) interplanetary dust particles. Most IDPs so far determined to be of cometary origin belong to the CP class. The matrix in CP IDPs is not homogeneous but rather a loose mixture of discrete single crystals (e.g., olivine, pyroxene, Fe sulfides) and polyphase grains. The petrographic diversity observed among the polyphase grains suggest that they were formed under variable physiochemical conditions. One particular class of polyphase grains are a dominant component in cometary IDPs. Although their occurrence is well documented, the terminology used to describe them is confused. They have been called many names. Here they are simply called GEMS (Glass with Embedded Metal and Sulfides). The bulk compositions of GEMS are within a factor of 3 chondritic (solar) for all major elements except C. Quantitative thin-film X-ray (EDS) analyses have shown that GEMS are systematically depleted in Mg and Si, enriched in S, Fe, and Ni, and stoichiometrically enriched in O. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) suggests that the excess O is present as hydroxyl (-OH) groups. These same chemical 'anomalies' were observed in solar-wind-irradiated amorphous rims on the surfaces of IDPs, suggesting that the compositions of GEMS reflect prior exposure to ionizing radiation. In order to test this hypothesis, a sample of Allende (CV3) matrix was exposed to proton flux. Radiation-damaged amorphous rims on olivine and pyroxene crystals in the Allende sample were found to be depleted in Mg and Ca, enriched in S, Fe, and Ni, and stoichiometrically enriched in O. Thus, the compositions of GEMS are indeed consistent with exposure to ionizing radiation. This study suggests that chemical as well as isotopic anomalies may be used to identify presolar interstellar grains in primitive meteoritic materials.

  2. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA DUST DESTRUCTION. I. CLOUD-CRUSHING AND POST-PROCESSED GRAIN SPUTTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia, Devin W.; Smith, Britton D.; Michael Shull, J. E-mail: britton.smith@colorado.ed

    2010-06-01

    We investigate through hydrodynamic simulations the destruction of newly formed dust grains by sputtering in the reverse shocks of supernova (SN) remnants. Using an idealized setup of a planar shock impacting a dense, spherical clump, we implant a population of Lagrangian particles into the clump to represent a distribution of dust grains in size and composition. We then post-process the simulation output to calculate the grain sputtering for a variety of species and size distributions. We explore the parameter space appropriate for this problem by altering the overdensity of the ejecta clumps and the speed of the reverse shocks. Since radiative cooling could lower the temperature of the medium in which the dust is embedded and potentially protect the dust by slowing or halting grain sputtering, we study the effects of different cooling methods over the timescale of the simulations. In general, our results indicate that grains with radii less than 0.1 {mu}m are sputtered to much smaller radii and often destroyed completely, while larger grains survive their interaction with the reverse shock. We also find that, for high ejecta densities, the percentage of dust that survives is strongly dependent on the relative velocity between the clump and the reverse shock, causing up to 50% more destruction for the highest velocity shocks. The fraction of dust destroyed varies widely across grain species, ranging from total destruction of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains to minimal destruction of Fe grains (only 20% destruction in the most extreme cases). C and SiO{sub 2} grains show moderate to strong sputtering as well, with 38% and 80% mass loss. The survival rate of grains formed by early SNe is crucial in determining whether or not they can act as the 'dust factories' needed to explain high-redshift dust.

  3. Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Distant Galaxies Probed by Quasar Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam

    2015-01-01

    Dust grains are a fundamental component of the interstellar medium, and significantly impact many of the physical processes driving galaxy evolution, including star formation, and the heating, cooling and ionization of interstellar material. Using the absorption features produced by dust in the spectra of luminous background quasars, it is possible to study the properties of extragalactic interstellar dust grains. We will present results from an ongoing program utilizing existing Spitzer Space Telescope infrared quasar spectra to probe silicate dust grain properties in z<1.4 quasar absorption systems. In combination with complementary ground-based data on associated gas-phase metal absorption lines, we explore connections between the interstellar dust and gas in the quasar absorption systems. Our project yields clear detections of the 10 micron silicate dust absorption feature in the studied systems, as well as detections of the 18 micron silicate dust absorption feature in sources with adequate spectral coverage. Based on measured variations in the breath, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 micron absorption features, there appear to be differences in the silicate dust grain properties from system-to-system. We also show indications of trends between the gas-phase metal properties, such as metallicity and gas velocity spread, with the silicate dust grain absorption properties. Support for this work is provided by NASA through an award issued by JPL/Caltech and through NASA grant NNX14AG74G, and from National Science Foundation grants AST-0908890 and AST-1108830 to the University of South Carolina.

  4. Laboratory Measurements of Optical and Physical Properties of Individual Lunar Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Hoover, R. B.

    2006-01-01

    The lunar surface is covered with a thick layer of sub-micron/micron size dust grains formed by meteoritic impact over billions of years. The fine dust grains are levitated and transported on the lunar surface, and transient dust clouds over the lunar horizon were observed by experiments during the Apollo 17 mission. Theoretical models suggest that the dust grains on the lunar surface are charged by the solar UV radiation as well as the solar wind. Even without any physical activity, the dust grains are levitated by electrostatic fields and transported away from the surface in the near vacuum environment of the Moon. The current dust charging and levitation models, however, do not fully explain the observed phenomena. Since the abundance of dust on the Moon's surface with its observed adhesive characteristics has the potential of severe impact on human habitat and operations and lifetime of a variety of equipment, it is necessary to investigate the charging properties and the lunar dust phenomena in order to develop appropriate mitigating strategies. Photoelectric emission induced by the solar UV radiation with photon energies higher than the work function of the grain materials is recognized to be the dominant process for charging of the lunar dust, and requires measurements of the photoelectric yields to determine the charging and equilibrium potentials of individual dust grains. In this paper, we present the first laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains selected from sample returns of Apollo 17, and Luna 24 missions, as well as similar size dust grains from the JSC-1 simulants. The experimental results were obtained on a laboratory facility based on an electrodynamic balance that permits a variety of experiments to be conducted on individual sub-micron/micron size dust grains in simulated space environments. The photoelectric emission measurements indicate grain size dependence with the yield

  5. Lunar Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 μm size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  6. LUNAR DUST GRAIN CHARGING BY ELECTRON IMPACT: COMPLEX ROLE OF SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSIONS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; LeClair, A. C.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.

    2010-08-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEEs). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 {mu}m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEEs discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  7. Lunary Dust Grain Charging by Electron Impact: Complex Role of Secondary Electron Emissions in Space Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Crave, P. D.; LeClair, A.; Spann, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, or by electron/ion collisions by sticking or secondary electron emissions (SEES). The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynamical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstellar medium, and heliospheric, interplanetary/ planetary, and lunar environments. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron-/submicron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials. In this paper, we present experimental results on the charging of individual 0.2-13 m size dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and 17 dust samples, and spherical silica particles by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-200 eV energy range. The dust charging process by electron impact involving the SEES discussed is found to be a complex charging phenomenon with strong particle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between the polarity and magnitude of the dust charging rates of individual small-size dust grains, and the measurements and model properties of corresponding bulk materials. A more comprehensive plan of measurements of the charging properties of individual dust grains for developing a database for realistic models of dust charging in astrophysical and lunar environments is in progress.

  8. Rapid formation of large dust grains in the luminous supernova 2010jl.

    PubMed

    Gall, Christa; Hjorth, Jens; Watson, Darach; Dwek, Eli; Maund, Justyn R; Fox, Ori; Leloudas, Giorgos; Malesani, Daniele; Day-Jones, Avril C

    2014-07-17

    The origin of dust in galaxies is still a mystery. The majority of the refractory elements are produced in supernova explosions, but it is unclear how and where dust grains condense and grow, and how they avoid destruction in the harsh environments of star-forming galaxies. The recent detection of 0.1 to 0.5 solar masses of dust in nearby supernova remnants suggests in situ dust formation, while other observations reveal very little dust in supernovae in the first few years after explosion. Observations of the spectral evolution of the bright SN 2010jl have been interpreted as pre-existing dust, dust formation or no dust at all. Here we report the rapid (40 to 240 days) formation of dust in its dense circumstellar medium. The wavelength-dependent extinction of this dust reveals the presence of very large (exceeding one micrometre) grains, which resist destruction. At later times (500 to 900 days), the near-infrared thermal emission shows an accelerated growth in dust mass, marking the transition of the dust source from the circumstellar medium to the ejecta. This provides the link between the early and late dust mass evolution in supernovae with dense circumstellar media. PMID:25030169

  9. Processes accompanying the charging of dust grains in the ionospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kopnin, S. I.; Morzhakova, A. A.; Popel, S. I.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-08-15

    The influence of the neutral component of the dusty ionospheric plasma on the process of dust grain charging is analyzed. Microscopic ion fluxes onto a dust grain are calculated with allowance for the interaction with the neutral components of the ionospheric plasma for both negatively and positively charged dust grains. For the latter case, which takes place in the presence of intense UV or X-ray solar radiation, the electron heating caused by the photoelectric effect is also investigated. It is found that the efficiency of electron heating depends on the density of neutral particles. The altitudes at which these effects appreciably influence the charging of different types of nano- and microscale dust grains are determined. It is shown that these effects should be taken into account in describing noctilucent clouds, polar mesosphere summer echoes, and physical phenomena involving grains of meteoric origin.

  10. A Compact Concentration of Large Grains in the HD 142527 Protoplanetary Dust Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, Simon; Wright, Chris M.; Marino, Sebastian; Maddison, Sarah T.; Wootten, Al; Roman, Pablo; Pérez, Sebastian; Pinilla, Paola; Wyatt, Mark; Moral, Victor; Ménard, Francois; Christiaens, Valentin; Cieza, Lucas; van der Plas, Gerrit

    2015-10-01

    A pathway to the formation of planetesimals, and eventually giant planets, may occur in concentrations of dust grains trapped in pressure maxima. Dramatic crescent-shaped dust concentrations have been seen in recent radio images at submillimeter wavelengths. These disk asymmetries could represent the initial phases of planet formation in the dust trap scenario, provided that grain sizes are spatially segregated. A testable prediction of azimuthal dust trapping is that progressively larger grains should be more sharply confined and should follow a distribution that is markedly different from the gas. However, gas tracers such as 12CO and the infrared emission from small grains are both very optically thick where the submillimeter continuum originates, so previous observations have been unable to test the trapping predictions or to identify compact concentrations of larger grains required for planet formation by core accretion. Here we report multifrequency observations of HD 142527, from 34 to 700 GHz, that reveal a compact concentration of grains approaching centimeter sizes, with a few Earth masses, embedded in a large-scale crescent of smaller, submillimeter-sized particles. The emission peaks at wavelengths shorter than ∼1 mm are optically thick and trace the temperature structure resulting from shadows cast by the inner regions. Given this temperature structure, we infer that the largest dust grains are concentrated in the 34 GHz clump. We conclude that dust trapping is efficient enough for grains observable at centimeter wavelengths to lead to compact concentrations.

  11. Ion beam driven ion-acoustic waves in a plasma cylinder with negatively charged dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Walia, Ritu; Sharma, Kavita

    2012-07-15

    An ion beam propagating through a magnetized potassium plasma cylinder having negatively charged dust grains drives electrostatic ion-acoustic waves to instability via Cerenkov interaction. The phase velocity of sound wave increases with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The unstable wave frequencies and the growth rate increase, with the relative density of negatively charged dust grains. The growth rate of the unstable mode scales as one-third power of the beam density. The real part of frequency of the unstable mode increases with the beam energy and scales as almost the one-half power of the beam energy.

  12. Coagulation of dust grains in the plasma of an RF discharge in argon

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal', A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2009-03-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of coagulation of dust grains of different sizes injected into a low-temperature plasma of an RF discharge in argon. A theoretical model describing the formation of dust clusters in a low-temperature plasma is developed and applied to interpret the results of experiments on the coagulation of dust grains having large negative charges. The grain size at which coagulation under the given plasma conditions is possible is estimated using the developed theory. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data.

  13. Dust-grain processing in circumbinary discs around evolved binaries. The RV Tauri spectral twins RU Centauri and AC Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, C.; van Winckel, H.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Min, M.; Dominik, C.

    2007-11-01

    Context: We study the structure and evolution of the circumstellar discs around evolved binaries and their impact on the evolution of the central system. Aims: By combining a wide range of observational data and techniques, we aim to study in detail the binary nature of RU Cen and AC Her, as well as the structure and mineralogy of the circumstellar environment. Methods: We combine a multi-wavelength observational program with a detailed 2D radiative transfer study. Our radial velocity program is instrumental in the study of the nature of the central stars, while our Spitzer spectra complimented with the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) are used to constrain mineralogy, grain sizes and physical structure of the circumstellar environment. Results: We determine the orbital elements of RU Cen showing that the orbit is highly eccentric with a large velocity amplitude despite the rather long period of 1500 days. The infrared spectra of both objects are very similar and the spectral dust features are dominated by magnesium-rich crystalline silicates. The small peak-to-continuum ratios are interpreted as being due to large grains. Our model contains two components with a cold midplain dominated by large grains, and the near- and mid-IR which is dominated by the emission of smaller silicates. The infrared excess is well modelled assuming a hydrostatic passive irradiated disc. The profile-fitting of the dust resonances shows that the grains must be very irregular. Conclusions: These two prototypical RV Tauri pulsators with circumstellar dust are binaries where the dust is trapped in a stable disc. The mineralogy and grain sizes show that the dust is highly processed, both in crystallinity and grain size. The cool crystals show that either radial mixing is very efficient and/or that the thermal history at grain formation has been very different from that in outflows. The physical processes governing the structure of these discs are very similar to those observed

  14. The dust grain size-stellar luminosity trend in debris discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawellek, Nicole; Krivov, Alexander V.

    2015-12-01

    The cross-section of material in debris discs is thought to be dominated by the smallest grains that can still stay in bound orbits despite the repelling action of stellar radiation pressure. Thus the minimum (and typical) grain size smin is expected to be close to the radiation pressure blowout size sblow. Yet a recent analysis of a sample of Herschel-resolved debris discs showed the ratio smin/sblow to systematically decrease with the stellar luminosity from about 10 for solar-type stars to nearly unity in the discs around the most luminous A-type stars. Here, we explore this trend in more detail, checking how significant it is and seeking to find possible explanations. We show that the trend is robust to variation of the composition and porosity of dust particles. For any assumed grain properties and stellar parameters, we suggest a recipe of how to estimate the `true' radius of a spatially unresolved debris disc, based solely on its spectral energy distribution. The results of our collisional simulations are qualitatively consistent with the trend, although additional effects may also be at work. In particular, the lack of grains with small smin/sblow for lower luminosity stars might be caused by the grain surface energy constraint that should limit the size of the smallest collisional fragments. Also, a better agreement between the data and the collisional simulations is achieved when assuming debris discs of more luminous stars to have higher dynamical excitation than those of less-luminous primaries. This would imply that protoplanetary discs of more massive young stars are more efficient in forming big planetesimals or planets that act as stirrers in the debris discs at the subsequent evolutionary stage.

  15. PROPERTIES OF NEWLY FORMED DUST GRAINS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, K.; Nozawa, T.; Folatelli, G.; Moriya, T. J.; Nomoto, K.; Bersten, M.; Quimby, R.; Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C.; Minowa, Y.; Pyo, T.-S.; Motohara, K.; Kitagawa, Y.; Ueno, I.; Kawabata, K. S.; Yamanaka, M.; Kozasa, T.; Iye, M.

    2013-10-10

    Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ∼1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ∼(7.5-8.5) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (∼< 0.1 μm, and most likely ∼< 0.01 μm). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ∼10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ∼> 3 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ∼> 0.02 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ∼100 km s{sup –1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.

  16. Effects of grain dust exposure and smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function.

    PubMed

    Cotton, D J; Graham, B L; Li, K Y; Froh, F; Barnett, G D; Dosman, J A

    1983-02-01

    In four groups of individually-matched subjects (nonsmoking grain workers, smoking grain workers, nonsmoking community controls, and smoking community controls) we measured pulmonary function variables from the spirogram, from the maximal expiratory flow-volume curve breathing air and helium, and from the single breath nitrogen test as well as symptom prevalences from a questionnaire in order to assess the relative effects of smoking and occupational exposure to grain dust in Saskatchewan country grain elevators. There were similar increased prevalences of respiratory symptoms and reductions in pulmonary function associated with either grain dust exposure or smoking, but the effects of smoking were slightly more pronounced. The combined effects of grain dust and smoking on lung function appeared to be additive except in the least exposed workers (five years or less) where a synergistic effect was observed in tests of peripheral airways dysfunction. PMID:6834161

  17. Laboratory Studies of Charging Properties of Dust Grains in Astrophysical/Planetary Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-11-01

    Dust grains immersed in ambient plasmas and radiation, are charged and coupled to the plasma through electric and magnetic fields. Dust grains in various astrophysical/planetary environments are generally charged by: (a) photoelectric emissions with incident radiation at photon energies higher than the work function of the material and (b) sticking of low energy electrons and ions of the surrounding plasma or by secondary electron emissions induced by incident electrons/ions at sufficiently high energies. Consequenly, the particle charge is an important parameter that influences physical and dynamical processes in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, planetary rings, interstellar dust clouds, comets and the outer atmospheres of planets. The charging properties of individual micron-size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. However, no viable models for calculation of the charging properties of individual micron size dust grains are available at the present time. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size dust grains. In this paper we give a review of the results of the measurements on charging of analogs of the interstellar as well as Apollo 11 and 17 lunar dust grains carried out on the Electrodynamic Balance Facility at the NASA-MSFC.

  18. Capture of Cometary Dust Grains in Impacts at 6.1 km s-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, M. J.; Foster, N.; Kearsley, A.; Wozniakiewicz, P.

    2009-12-01

    The NASA Stardust mission to comet 81P/Wild 2 collected grains of cometary dust freshly ejected from the comet during a fly-by at a speed of 6.1 km s-1. These were captured on aluminum foils and in blocks of silica aerogel. The dust underwent a severe shock during capture. The nature of the shock process depends on the properties of the dust and the collecting media. On the aluminium, the shock process and impact damage is typical of that between high-density (or hard materials) at high velocity, resulting in craters lined with impactor residues. The peak shock pressures are estimated at 60-80 GPa. Two main crater types are seen, simple bowl shaped and multiple pit craters: these reflect the degree of consolidation of the original dust grain. Capture in the low density aerogel was via a more gradual slowing of the dust grains accompanied by a variety of effects on the grains (complete break up of weak grains vs. ablation of well consolidated grains). The relation between the structure of the dust grains and the resulting impact features in both collector materials is discussed.

  19. Mechanism for the acceleration and ejection of dust grains from Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Morfill, G.; Gruen, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Ulysses mission detected quasi-periodic streams of high-velocity submicron-sized dust particles during its encounter with Jupiter. It is shown here how the dust events could result from the acceleration and subsequent ejection of small grains by Jupiter's magnetosphere. Dust grains entering the plasma environment of the magnetosphere become charged, with the result that their motion is then determined by both electromagnetic and gravitational forces. This process is modeled, and it is found that only those particles in a certain size range gain sufficient energy to escape the Jovian system. Moreover, if Io is assumed to be the source of the dust grains, its location in geographic and geomagnetic coordinates determines the exit direction of the escaping particles, providing a possible explanation for the observed periodicities. The calculated mass and velocity range of the escaping dust gains are consistent with the Ulysses findings.

  20. On vapor shielding of dust grains of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. T.; Smirnov, R. D. Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-02-15

    The shielding effects of ablation cloud around a small dust grain composed of iron, molybdenum, or tungsten in fusion plasmas are considered. These include collisional dissipation of momentum flux of impinging plasma ions, heat transfer by secondary plasma created due to electron impact ionization of the ablated atoms, and radiative plasma power losses in the ablation cloud. The maximum radius, which limits applicability of existing dust-plasma interaction models neglecting the cloud shielding effects, for dust grains of the considered high-Z metals is calculated as function of plasma parameters. The thermal bifurcation triggered by thermionic electron emission from dust grains, observed for some of the considered materials, is analyzed. The results are compared with previous calculations for dust composed of low-Z fusion related materials, i.e., lithium, beryllium, and carbon.

  1. Mechanism for the acceleration and ejection of dust grains from Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, M.; Morfill, G.; Grun, E.

    1993-05-01

    The Ulysses mission detected quasi-periodic streams of high-velocity submicron-sized dust particles during its encounter with Jupiter. It is shown here how the dust events could result from the acceleration and subsequent ejection of small grains by Jupiter's magnetosphere. Dust grains entering the plasma environment of the magnetosphere become charged, with the result that their motion is then determined by both electromagnetic and gravitational forces. This process is modeled, and it is found that only those particles in a certain size range gain sufficient energy to escape the Jovian system. Moreover, if Io is assumed to be the source of the dust grains, its location in geographic and geomagnetic coordinates determines the exit direction of the escaping particles, providing a possible explanation for the observed periodicities. The calculated mass and velocity range of the escaping dust gains are consistent with the Ulysses findings.

  2. Diffusion coefficients of Fokker-Planck equation for rotating dust grains in a fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiyari-Ramezani, M. Alinejad, N.; Mahmoodi, J.

    2015-11-15

    In the fusion devices, ions, H atoms, and H{sub 2} molecules collide with dust grains and exert stochastic torques which lead to small variations in angular momentum of the grain. By considering adsorption of the colliding particles, thermal desorption of H atoms and normal H{sub 2} molecules, and desorption of the recombined H{sub 2} molecules from the surface of an oblate spheroidal grain, we obtain diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution function of fluctuating angular momentum. Torque coefficients corresponding to the recombination mechanism show that the nonspherical dust grains may rotate with a suprathermal angular velocity.

  3. Diffusion coefficients of Fokker-Planck equation for rotating dust grains in a fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiyari-Ramezani, M.; Mahmoodi, J.; Alinejad, N.

    2015-11-01

    In the fusion devices, ions, H atoms, and H2 molecules collide with dust grains and exert stochastic torques which lead to small variations in angular momentum of the grain. By considering adsorption of the colliding particles, thermal desorption of H atoms and normal H2 molecules, and desorption of the recombined H2 molecules from the surface of an oblate spheroidal grain, we obtain diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution function of fluctuating angular momentum. Torque coefficients corresponding to the recombination mechanism show that the nonspherical dust grains may rotate with a suprathermal angular velocity.

  4. Grain-size signature of Saharan dust over the Atlantic Ocean at 12°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Does, Michelle; Korte, Laura; Munday, Chris; Brummer, Geert-Jan; Stuut, Jan-Berend

    2015-04-01

    Every year, an estimated 200 million tons of Saharan dust are deposited in the Atlantic Ocean. On its way from source to sink, the dust can be influenced by many climatic processes, but it also affects climate itself in various ways that are far from understood. In order to constrain the relations between atmospheric dust and climate, we deployed ten submarine sediment traps along a transect in the Atlantic Ocean at 12˚N, at 1200m and 3500m water depth. These have been sampling Saharan dust settling in the ocean since October 2012. Samples of seven of these sediment traps have been successfully recovered during RV Pelagia cruise 64PE378 in November 2013. The transect also includes three floating dust collectors and two on-land dust collectors, and all the instruments lie directly underneath the largest dust plume originating from the African continent. This study focuses on the size of the dust particles, which can have an effect on the positive or negative radiation balance in the atmosphere. Small particles in the high atmosphere can reflect incoming radiation and therefore have a cooling effect on climate. Large particles in the lower atmosphere have the opposite effect by absorbing reflected radiation from the Earth's surface. Mineral dust also affects carbon export to the deep ocean by providing mineral ballast for organic particles, and the size of the dust particles directly relates to the downward transport velocity. Here I will present the measured grain-size distributions of samples from seven sediment traps recovered from the 12°N-latitude transect. The data show seasonal variations, with finer grained dust particles during winter and spring, and coarser grained particles during summer and fall. Samples from multiple years should give more details about the dust's seasonality. Also a fining trend of the grain sizes of the dust particles from source (Africa) to sink (Caribbean) is observed, which is also expected due to intuitive relationships between

  5. Shotgun Pyrosequencing Metagenomic Analyses of Dusts from Swine Confinement and Grain Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Boissy, Robert J.; Romberger, Debra J.; Roughead, William A.; Weissenburger-Moser, Lisa; Poole, Jill A.; LeVan, Tricia D.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of agricultural dusts causes inflammatory reactions and symptoms such as headache, fever, and malaise, which can progress to chronic airway inflammation and associated diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Although in many agricultural environments feed particles are the major constituent of these dusts, the inflammatory responses that they provoke are likely attributable to particle-associated bacteria, archaebacteria, fungi, and viruses. In this study, we performed shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of DNA from dusts from swine confinement facilities or grain elevators, with comparisons to dusts from pet-free households. DNA sequence alignment showed that 19% or 62% of shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic DNA sequence reads from swine facility or household dusts, respectively, were of swine or human origin, respectively. In contrast only 2% of such reads from grain elevator dust were of mammalian origin. These metagenomic shotgun reads of mammalian origin were excluded from our analyses of agricultural dust microbiota. The ten most prevalent bacterial taxa identified in swine facility compared to grain elevator or household dust were comprised of 75%, 16%, and 42% gram-positive organisms, respectively. Four of the top five swine facility dust genera were assignable (Clostridium, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Eubacterium, ranging from 4% to 19% relative abundance). The relative abundances of these four genera were lower in dust from grain elevators or pet-free households. These analyses also highlighted the predominance in swine facility dust of Firmicutes (70%) at the phylum level, Clostridia (44%) at the Class level, and Clostridiales at the Order level (41%). In summary, shotgun pyrosequencing metagenomic analyses of agricultural dusts show that they differ qualitatively and quantitatively at the level of microbial taxa present, and that the bioinformatic analyses

  6. Prototype detector development for measurement of high altitude Martian dust using a future orbiter platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Patel, Darshil; Chokhawala, Vimmi; Bogavelly, Anvesh

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils mostly occur during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer on Mars and play a key role in the background dust opacity. Due to continuous bombardment of micrometeorites, secondary ejecta come out from the Moons of the Mars and can easily escape. This phenomenon can contribute dust around the Moons and therefore, also around the Mars. Similar to the Moons of the Earth, the surfaces of the Martian Moons get charged and cause the dust levitation to occur, adding to the possible dust source. Also, interplanetary dust particles may be able to reach the Mars and contribute further. It is hypothesized that the high altitude Martian dust could be in the form of a ring or tori around the Mars. However, no such rings have been detected to the present day. Typically, width and height of the dust torus is ~5 Mars radii wide (~16950 km) in both the planes as reported in the literature. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, a langmuir probe cannot explain the source of such dust particles. It is a puzzling question to the space scientist how dust has reached to such high altitudes. A dedicated dust instrument on future Mars orbiter may be helpful to address such issues. To study origin, abundance, distribution and seasonal variation of Martian dust, a Mars Orbit Dust Experiment (MODEX) is proposed. In order to measure the Martian dust from a future orbiter, design of a prototype of an impact ionization dust detector has been initiated at PRL. This paper presents developmental aspects of the prototype dust detector and initial results. The further work is underway.

  7. Effect Of Grain Size-Distribution And Nonthermal Ion Distribution On Dust Acoustic Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Annou, K.; Annou, R.

    2005-10-31

    The investigation of the formation of non-linear coherent structures in dusty plasmas taking into account the dust size and non-thermal ion distributions is conducted. Conditions of the existence of solitons in terms of the Mach number, concentration of non-thermal ions, dust charge and the permeability of the grains are evaluated.

  8. Coronagraphic Polarimetry with NICMOS: Dust grain evolution in T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn

    2006-07-01

    The formation of planetary systems is intimately linked to the dust population in circumstellar disks, thus understanding dust grain evolution is essential to advancing our understanding of how planets form. By combining {1} the coronagraphic polarimetry capabilities of NICMOS, {2} powerful 3-D radiative transfer codes, and {3} observations of objects known to span the Class II-III stellar evolutionary phases, we will gain crucial insight into dust grain growth. By observing objects representative of a known evolutionary sequence of YSOs, we will be able to investigate how the dust population evolves in size and distribution during the crucial transition from a star+disk system to a system containing planetesimals. When combine with our previous study on dust grain evolution in the Class I-II phase, the proposed study will help to establish the fundamental time scales for the depletion of ISM-like grains: the first step in understanding the transformation from small submicron sized dust grains, to large millimeter sized grains, and untimely to planetary bodies.

  9. Supernova Remnants As Laboratories For Determining The Properties Of Ejecta Dust And The Processing Of Dust Grains In Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwek, Eli

    Recent infrared satellites, such as the Spitzer, Herschel, and WISE, have obtained a wealth of spectral and broadband data on the infrared (IR) emission from dust in supernova remnants (SNRs). Supernovae (SNe) are important producers of newly condensed dust during the early free-expansion phase of their evolution, and the dominant destroyers of dust during the subsequent remnant phase of their evolution. The infrared observations hold the key for determining their role in the origin and evolution of dust in the universe. We propose to model the composition, abundance, and size distribution of the dust in select Galactic and Magellanic Cloud remnants. As explained in detail below, the remnants were selected for the availability of IR and X-ray observations. All selected remnants have Spitzer IRS spectral data in the 5-35 μm regions which allow us to determine the effect of grain processing in the shock. Some have spectral maps that allow the distinction between the IR emission from SN-condensed and swept up circumstellar and interstellar dust. All remnants have also been covered by Spitzer, Herschel, and WISE imaging, and have existing X-ray Chandra and/or XMM observations. The dust in some remnants is radiatively-heated by a pulsar wind nebula, and in others collisionally- heated by shocked X-ray or line emitting gas. We will use physical models to calculate the radiative and collisional heating of SNR dust, the equilibrium or fluctuating dust temperatures, and the resulting IR emission for various dust compositions and size distributions. Specific examples of Cas A, SN1987A, the Crab Nebula, and Puppis A, are discussed in detail to illustrate our modeling approach. Our study will be the first comprehensive and physical analysis of a large sample of SNRs in different evolutionary states and different astrophysical environments. They will cover a wide range of interactions between the dust grains and their surroundings, including the radioactively- powered and

  10. Dust acoustic shock waves in two temperatures charged dusty grains

    SciTech Connect

    El-Shewy, E. K.; Abdelwahed, H. G.; Elmessary, M. A.

    2011-11-15

    The reductive perturbation method has been used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation and modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger for dust acoustic shock waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust species with Boltzmann distributions for electrons and ions in the presence of the cold (hot) dust viscosity coefficients. The behavior of the shock waves in the dusty plasma has been investigated.

  11. Vertical grain size distribution in dust devils: Analyses of in situ samples from southern Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, J.; Reiss, D.; Ori, G. G.; Taj-Eddine, K.

    2014-04-01

    Dust devils are vertical convective vortices occurring on Earth and Mars [1]. Entrained particle sizes such as dust and sand lifted by dust devils make them visible [1]. On Earth, finer particles (<~50 μm) can be entrained in the boundary layer and transported over long distances [e.g., 2]. The lifetime of entrained particles in the atmosphere depends on their size, where smaller particles maintain longer into the atmosphere [3]. Mineral aerosols such as desert dust are important for human health, weather, climate, and biogeochemistry [4]. The entrainment of dust particles by dust devil and its vertical grain size distribution is not well constrained. In situ grain size samples from active dust devils were so far derived by [5,6,7] in three different continents: Africa, Australia, and North America, respectively. In this study we report about in situ samples directly derived from active dust devils in the Sahara Desert (Erg Chegaga) in southern Morocco in 2012 to characterize the vertical grain size distribution within dust devils.

  12. Charged Dust Grain Dynamics Subject to Solar Wind, Poynting–Robertson Drag, and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting–Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. For this reason, we derive a secular theory of motion by the means of an averaging method and validate it with numerical simulations of the unaveraged equations of motions. The theory predicts that the secular motion of charged particles is mainly affected by the z-component of the solar magnetic axis, or the normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field. The normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field leads to an increase or decrease of semimajor axis depending on its functional form and sign of charge of the dust grain. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting–Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semimajor axis on secular timescales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain, as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semimajor axis.

  13. Nonkeplerian dust dynamics at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. E.; Horányi, M.

    We calculate the spatial location of possible stable nonequatorial halo dust grain orbits about Saturn, with surface potential determined by local photoionization and magnetospheric charging currents. Stability loci are calculated for both dielectric and conducting grains, in prograde and retrograde orbits, with the sign of the charge determined by the plasma environment. The results show that very small (<100 nm) grains in positive retrograde orbits are most likely to be found by the Cassini orbiter, while negatively charged grains are dynamically excluded.

  14. Recommendations for reducing the effect of grain dust on the lungs. Canadian Thoracic Society Standards Committee.

    PubMed Central

    Becklake, M; Broder, I; Chan-Yeung, M; Dosman, J A; Ernst, P; Herbert, F A; Kennedy, S M; Warren, P W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the appropriateness of the current Canadian standards for exposure to grain dust in the workplace. OPTIONS: The current permissible exposure limit of 10 mg of total grain dust per cubic metre of air (expressed as mg/m3) as an 8-hour time-weighted average exposure, or a lower permissible exposure limit. OUTCOMES: Acute symptoms of grain-dust exposure, such as cough, phlegm production, wheezing and dyspnea, similar chronic symptoms, and spirometric deficits revealing obstructive or restrictive disease. EVIDENCE: Articles published from 1924 to December 1993 were identified from Index Medicus and the bibliographies of pertinent articles. Subsequent articles published from 1994 (when the recommendations were approved by the Canadian Thoracic Society Standards Committee) to June 1996 were retrieved through a search of MEDLINE, and modification of the recommendations was not found to be necessary. Studies of interest were those that linked measurements of total grain dust levels to the development of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and changes in lung function in exposed workers. Papers on the effects of grain dust on workers in feed mills were not included because other nutrients such as animal products may have been added to the grain. Unpublished reports (e.g., to Labour Canada) were included as sources of information. VALUES: A high value was placed on minimizing the biological harm that grain dust has on the lungs of grain workers. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: A permissible exposure limit of 5 mg/m3 would control the short-term effects of exposure to grain dust on workers. Evidence is insufficient to determine what level is needed to prevent long-term effects. The economic implications of implementing a lower permissible exposure limit have not been evaluated. RECOMMENDATIONS: The current Canadian standards for grain-dust exposure should be reviewed by Labour Canada and the grain industry. A permissible exposure level of 5 mg/m3 is

  15. The colour of the solar corona and dust grains in it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimanov, A. K.; Nikolskii, G. M.

    1980-02-01

    The paper examines the photometry of coronal color negatives and determines the distribution of the coronal brightness in the red, green, and blue wavelength intervals up to distances of 6-7 solar radii. A correlation between the color indexes and diffuse external reinforcement brightness (RED) is indicated, and the results show that RED consists of dust grains with radii of at least 1 micron. It is concluded that the whole dust mass of RED is at least 1% of the coronal mass within the RED region, and the dust grain number density is about 10 to the -11th power/cu cm.

  16. Light scattering on a single dust grain in the ultrasonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Petr; Pavlu, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Light scattering by dust grains is a complex phenomenon playing an important role in all dust-light interactions. This includes light passing through dense dusty clouds in space as well as in the upper atmosphere, dust charging by photoemission, etc. When the size of the grain is close to the wavelength of the incident light, the Mie theory is often used to characterize the scattering process. However, our knowledge of necessary material constants for most of the space-related materials is limited. Moreover, solutions of Mie equations for general grain shapes is difficult and often not known. Objective of our work is development of an apparatus for observations of light scattering on small (micrometer-sized) arbitrary shaped dust grains. We measure scattering directly by levitating grains in the field created by the standing-wave ultrasonic trap. Such setup allows us to study single grains or small grain clusters. The experiment is performed at atmosphere - unlike other experiments, where grains were measured in water or other liquids, thus, the background effects are significantly reduced. Currently, the trap is under development and first tests are carried out. In this paper, we also focus on theoretical computation of the ultrasonic field of the selected trap.

  17. Dust grains potential variation in a Vasyliunas Cairns-distributed plasmas with negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, A. A.; Khan, M. Z.; Wong, C. S.; Yap, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dust grains' potential variation is presented by using a non-equilibrium complex (dusty) plasma following the Vasyliunas Cairns (VC)-distribution, in which the components such as the electrons, ions [positive and negative], and dust grains have negative charge. For this reason, mathematical statement of currents is solved for dust grains having negatively charge to accomplish the equilibrium state value (viz., qd = constant) in the presence of VC-distributed plasmas. Indeed, the current balance equations are modified due to the streaming/nonequilibrium distributed negative ions. Numerically, it is assessed that the important plasma variable, for example, spectral index α, spectral index κ , negative ions streaming velocity (U0), and negative ions number density ( ρ ) , significantly influences the dust grain surface potential ( | ψ d | ) by: (i) increasing the value of spectral index kappa ( κ ) and negative ions density ( ρ ) , the magnitude of dust surface potential ( | ψ d | ) decreases and (ii) increasing the values of spectral index α and negative ions streaming velocity (U0), dust grains surface potential ( | ψ d | ) increases. The relevance to low-temperature research center in a non-equilibrium dusty (complex) plasma is precisely discussed by associating oxygen ions (negative and positive) species.

  18. Application of amplitude changes of monochromatic scattered light to investigation of dust grain composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkiewicz, Jozef; Chrzanowski, Janusz

    1999-07-01

    The light beam crossing the dust area meets with the loss of energy. We know by experience that the scattering indikatrix depends on the size of the dust particles. The measurement of the light energy scattered into given solid angle enables to identify and specification of the grain composition of the dust particles. Basis on the research a special head has been made to step change of the location of the photodetectors and in result to measure a specific or even desirable dust fraction for the sake of technology. In this paper the graphs of the grain dust distribution are presented with regard to the materials which are transported most frequently by Polish merchant marine.

  19. A bimodal dust grain distribution in the IC 434 H ii region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsendorf, B. B.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2015-04-01

    Context. Studies of dust evolution and processing in different phases of the interstellar medium (ISM) is essential to understanding the lifecycle of dust in space. Recent results have challenged the capabilities and validity of current dust models, indicating that the properties of interstellar dust evolve as it transits between different phases of the ISM. Aims: We characterize the dust content from the IC 434 H ii region, and present a scenario that results in the large-scale structure of the region seen to date. Methods: We conduct a multi-wavelength study of the dust emission from the ionized gas, and combine this with modeling, from large scales that provide insight into the history of the IC 434/L1630 region, to small scales that allow us to infer quantitative properties of the dust content inside the H ii region. Results: The dust enters the H ii region through momentum transfer with a champagne flow of ionized gas, set up by a chance encounter between the L1630 molecular cloud and the star cluster of σ Ori. We observe two clearly separated dust populations inside the ionized gas, that show different observational properties, as well as contrasting optical properties. Population A is colder (~25 K) than predicted by widely-used dust models, its temperature is insensitive to an increase of the impinging radiation field, it is momentum-coupled to the gas, and efficiently absorbs radiation pressure to form a dust wave at 1.0 pc ahead of σ Ori AB. Population B is characterized by a constant [20/30] flux ratio throughout the H ii region, heats up to ~75 K close to the star, and is less efficient in absorbing radiation pressure, forming a dust wave at 0.1 pc from the star. Conclusions: The dust inside IC 434 is bimodal. The characteristics of population A are remarkable and cannot be explained by current dust models. We argue that large porous grains or fluffy aggregates are potential candidates to explain much of the observational characteristics. Population B

  20. Cometary and interstellar dust grains - Analysis by ion microprobe mass spectrometry and other techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, E.

    1991-04-01

    A survey of microanalytical measurements on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and interstellar dust grains from primitive meteorites is presented. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry with its capability to determine isotopic compositions of many elements on a micron spatial scale has played a special role. Examples are measurements of H, N, and O isotopes and refractory trace elements in IDPs; C, N, Mg, and Si isotopes in interstellar SiC grains; and C and N isotopes and H, N, Al, and Si concentrations in interstellar graphite grains.

  1. Imaging Polarimetry of Young Stellar Objects with ACS and NICMOS: A study in dust grain evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Dean

    2004-07-01

    The formation of planetary systems is intimately linked to the dust population in circumstellar disks, thus understanding dust grain evolution is essential to advancing our understanding of how planets form. By combining {1} the high resolution polarimetric capabilities of ACS and NICMOS, {2} powerful 3-D radiative transfer codes, and {3} observations of objects known to span the earliest stellar evolutionary phases, we will gain crucial insight into the initial phases of dust grain growth: evolution away from an ISM distribution. Fractional polarization is a strong function of wavelength, therefore by comparing polarimetric images in the optical and infrared, we can sensitively constrain not only the geometry and optical depth of the scattering medium, but also the grain size distribution. By observing objects representative of the earliest evolutionary sequence of YSOs, we will be able to investigate how the dust population evolves in size and distribution during the crucial transition from a disk+envelope system to a disk+star system. The proposed study will help to establish the fundamental time scales for the initial depletion of ISM-like grains: the first step in understanding the transformation from small submicron sized dust grains, to large millimeter sized grains, and untimely to planetary bodies.

  2. Instrumentation for near-Earth measurement of orbital debris and cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, Anthony J.

    1992-01-01

    Dust instrumentation based on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust sensor arrays is described which will measure the masses, fluxes, velocities, and trajectories of orbital debris particles and natural micrometeoroids. Orbital debris particles are distinguished from natural particles (cosmic dust) by means of the velocity/trajectory information. The instrumentation will measure particle trajectory with a mean error of approximately 7 degrees (for isotropic flux) and is designed for measurements over the particle diameter range of approximately 2 to 200 micro-m. For future missions having Earth-return capabilities, arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the PVDF trajectory system would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust.

  3. Modified dust ion-acoustic surface waves in a semi-bounded magnetized plasma containing the rotating dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-05-01

    The dispersion relation for modified dust ion-acoustic surface waves in the magnetized dusty plasma containing the rotating dust grains is derived, and the effects of magnetic field configuration on the resonant growth rate are investigated. We present the results that the resonant growth rates of the wave would increase with the ratio of ion plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency as well as with the increase of wave number for the case of perpendicular magnetic field configuration when the ion plasma frequency is greater than the dust rotation frequency. For the parallel magnetic field configuration, we find that the instability occurs only for some limited ranges of the wave number and the ratio of ion plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency. The resonant growth rate is found to decrease with the increase of the wave number. The influence of dust rotational frequency on the instability is also discussed.

  4. Charge Fluctuation of Dust Grain and Its Impact on Dusty-Acoustic Wave Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Atamaniuk, B.; Zuchowski, K.

    2005-10-31

    We consider the influence of dust charge fluctuations on damping of the dust-ion-acoustic waves. It is assumed that all grains have equal masses but charges are not constant in time -- they may fluctuate in time. The dust charges are not really independent of the variations in the plasma potentials. All modes will influence the charging mechanism, and feedback will lead to several new interesting and unexpected phenomena. The charging of the grains depends on local plasma characteristics. If the waves disturb these characteristic, then charging of the grains is affected and the grain charge is modified, with a resulting feedback on the wave mode. In the case considered here, when the temperature of electrons is much greater than the temperature of the ions and the temperature of electrons is not great enough for further ionization of the ions, we show that attenuation of the acoustic wave depends only on one phenomenological coefficient.

  5. GIADA On-Board Rosetta: Early Dust Grain Detections and Dust Coma Characterization of Comet 67P/C-G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotundi, A.; Della Corte, V.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Sordini, R.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Fulle, M.; Bussoletti, E.; Crifo, J. F.; Esposito, F.; Green, S.; Grün, E.; Lamy, P. L.; McDonnell, T.; Mennella, V.; Molina, A.; Moreno, F.; Ortiz, J. L.; Palomba, E.; Perrin, J. M.; Rodrigo, R.; Weissman, P. R.; Zakharov, V.; Zarnecki, J.

    2014-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) flying on-board Rosetta is devoted to study the cometary dust environment of 67P/Churiumov-Gerasimenko. GIADA is composed of 3 sub-systems: the GDS (Grain Detection System), based on grain detection through light scattering; an IS (Impact Sensor), giving momentum measurement detecting the impact on a sensed plate connected with 5 piezoelectric sensors; the MBS (MicroBalances System), constituted of 5 Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), giving cumulative deposited dust mass by measuring the variations of the sensors' frequency. The combination of the measurements performed by these 3 subsystems provides: the number, the mass, the momentum and the velocity distribution of dust grains emitted from the cometary nucleus.No prior in situ dust dynamical measurements at these close distances from the nucleus and starting from such large heliocentric distances are available up to date. We present here the first results obtained from the beginning of the Rosetta scientific phase. We will report dust grains early detection at about 800 km from the nucleus in August 2014 and the following measurements that allowed us characterizing the 67P/C-G dust environment at distances less than 100 km from the nucleus and single grains dynamical properties. Acknowledgements. GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF-Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developped from a PI proposal supported by the University of Kent; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank the RSGS/ESAC, RMOC/ESOC & Rosetta Project

  6. Stability Dust-Ion-Acoustic Wave In Dusty Plasmas With Stream -Influence Of Charge Fluctuation Of Dust Grains

    SciTech Connect

    Atamaniuk, Barbara; Zuchowski, Krzysztof

    2006-01-15

    There is a quickly increasing wealth of experimental data on so-called dusty plasmas i. e. ionized gases or usual plasmas that contain micron sized charged particles. Interest in these structures is driven both by their importance in many astrophysical as well as commercial situations. Among them are linear and nonlinear wave phenomena. We consider the influence of dust charge fluctuations on stability of the ion-acoustic waves when the stream of particles is present. It is assumed that all grains of dust have equal masses but charges are not constant in time-they may fluctuate in time. The dust charges are not really independent of the variations of the plasma potentials. All modes will influence the charging mechanism, and feedback will lead to several new interesting and unexpected phenomena. The charging of the grains depends on local plasma characteristics. If the waves disturb these characteristic, then charging of the grains is affected and the grain charge is modified, with a resulting feedback on the wave mode. In case considering here, when temperature of electrons is much greater then the temperature of the ions and temperature of electrons is not great enough for further ionization of the ions, we show that stability of the acoustic wave depends only one phenomenological coefficient.

  7. Locations of stationary/periodic solutions in mean motion resonances according to the properties of dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pástor, P.

    2016-07-01

    The equations of secular evolution for dust grains in mean motion resonances with a planet are solved for stationary points. Non-gravitational effects caused by stellar radiation (the Poynting-Robertson effect and the stellar wind) are taken into account. The solutions are stationary in the semimajor axis, eccentricity and resonant angle, but allow the pericentre to advance. The semimajor axis of stationary solutions can be slightly shifted from the exact resonant value. The periodicity of the stationary solutions in a reference frame orbiting with the planet is proved analytically. The existence of periodic solutions in mean motion resonances means that analytical theory enables infinitely long capture times for dust particles. The stationary solutions are periodic motions to which the eccentricity asymptotically approaches and around which the libration occurs. Initial conditions corresponding to the stationary solutions are successfully found by numerically integrating the equation of motion. Numerically and analytically determined shifts of the semimajor axis from the exact resonance for the stationary solutions are in excellent agreement. The stationary solutions can be plotted by the locations of pericentres in the reference frame orbiting with the planet. The pericentres are distributed in space according to the properties of the dust particles.

  8. Are presolar dust grains from novae actually from supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nittler, L. R.; Hoppe, P.

    2005-05-01

    Meteorites contain presolar stardust grains that formed in prior generations of stars and exhibit large isotopic anomalies reflecting the nuclear processes that occurred in their individual parent stars. RGB and AGB stars and supernovae are well established as sources of many of these grains. Novae have been proposed as sources for a few SiC and graphite grains with low 12}C/{13C and 14}N/{15N ratios and unusual Si isotopic ratios (Amari et al., ApJ, 551, 1065). We have found three SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite with C and N isotopic ratios similar to the previously-reported putative nova grains. However, the isotopic signatures of Si, Ca, Al and Ti in one of the grains (334-2) clearly indicate a supernova origin, especially excess 28Si correlated with excess 44Ca. The latter signature is attributable to in situ decay of (half-life=50yr) 44Ti. Another 13C- and 15N-rich grain (151-4) has a large 47Ti enrichment. This signature is not expected for nova nucleosynthesis. Thus, the new isotopic data raise the possibility that the grains previously reported to have formed in novae actually formed in supernovae, and that novae have not left a record in the presolar grain populations that have been so far studied. Moreover, the results in grain 334-2 indicate that supernovae contain regions highly enriched in both 13C and 15N. This is not predicted by current models but may bear on the cosmic origin of 15N. This work was funded in part by NASA.

  9. The shadow of the Flying Saucer: A very low temperature for large dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilloteau, S.; Piétu, V.; Chapillon, E.; Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Henning, T.; Semenov, D.; Birnstiel, T.; Grosso, N.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Dust determines the temperature structure of protoplanetary disks, however, dust temperature determinations almost invariably rely on a complex modeling of the Spectral Energy Distribution. Aims: We attempt a direct determination of the temperature of large grains emitting at mm wavelengths. Methods: We observe the edge-on dust disk of the Flying Saucer, which appears in silhouette against the CO J = 2-1 emission from a background molecular cloud in ρ Oph. The combination of velocity gradients due to the Keplerian rotation of the disk and intensity variations in the CO background as a function of velocity allows us to directly measure the dust temperature. The dust opacity can then be derived from the emitted continuum radiation. Results: The dust disk absorbs the radiation from the CO clouds at several velocities. We derive very low dust temperatures, 5 to 7 K at radii around 100 au, which is much lower than most model predictions. The dust optical depth is >0.2 at 230 GHz, and the scale height at 100 au is at least 8 au (best fit 13 au). However, the dust disk is very flat (flaring index -0.35), which is indicative of dust settling in the outer parts.

  10. Photoelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. a.; Camata, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much different from the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approx. 0.09-5 micrometer radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with ultraviolet radiation at 120-160 nm wavelengths. The measured yields are found to be substantially higher than the bulk values given in the literature and indicate a size dependence with larger particles having order-of-magnitude higher values than for submicron-size grains.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR H{sub 2} FORMATION DRIVEN DUST GRAIN ALIGNMENT IN IC 63

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, B-G; De Buizer, J.; Charcos-Llorens, M.; Piirola, V.; Clemens, D. P.; Uomoto, A.; Geballe, T. R.; Lazarian, A.; Hoang, T.; Vornanen, T.

    2013-10-01

    In the interstellar medium (ISM), molecular hydrogen is expected to form almost exclusively on the surfaces of dust grains. Due to that molecule's large formation energy (–4.5 eV), several dynamical effects are likely associated with the process, including the alignment of asymmetric dust grains with the ambient magnetic field. Such aligned dust grains are, in turn, believed to cause the broadband optical/infrared polarization observed in the ISM. Here, we present the first observational evidence for grain alignment driven by H{sub 2} formation, by showing that the polarization of the light from stars behind the reflection nebula IC 63 appears to correlate with the intensity of H{sub 2} fluorescence. While our results strongly suggest a role for 'Purcell rockets' in grain alignment, additional observations are needed to conclusively confirm their role. By showing a direct connection between H{sub 2} formation and a probe of the dust characteristics, these results also provide one of the first direct confirmations of the grain-surface formation of H{sub 2}. We compare our observations to ab initio modeling based on Radiative Torque Alignment (RAT) theory.

  12. Effect of non-Maxwellian particle trapping and dust grain charging on dust acoustic solitary waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rubab, N.; Murtaza, G.; Mushtaq, A.

    2006-11-15

    The role of adiabatic trapped ions on a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic wave, including the effect of adiabatic dust charge variation, is investigated in an unmagnetized three-component dusty plasma consisting of electrons, ions and massive micron sized negatively charged dust particulates. We have assumed that electrons and ions obey (r,q) velocity distribution while the dust species is treated fluid dynamically. It is found that the dynamics of dust acoustic waves is governed by a modified r dependent Korteweg-de Vries equation. Further, the spectral indices (r,q) affect the charge fluctuation as well as the trapping of electrons and ions and consequently modify the dust acoustic solitary wave.

  13. The role of endotoxin in grain dust-induced lung disease.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, D A; Thorne, P S; Yagla, S J; Burmeister, L F; Olenchock, S A; Watt, J L; Quinn, T J

    1995-08-01

    To identify the role of endotoxin in grain dust-induced lung disease, we conducted a population-based, cross-sectional investigation among grain handlers and postal workers. The study subjects were selected by randomly sampling all grain facilities and post offices within 100 miles of Iowa City. Our study population consisted of 410 grain workers and 201 postal workers. Grain workers were found to be exposed to higher concentrations of airborne dust (p = 0.0001) and endotoxin (p = 0.0001) when compared with postal workers. Grain workers had a significantly higher prevalence of work-related (cough, phlegm, wheezing, chest tightness, and dyspnea) and chronic (usual cough or phlegm production) respiratory symptoms than postal workers. Moreover, after controlling for age, gender, and cigarette smoking status, work-related respiratory symptoms were strongly associated with the concentration of endotoxin in the bioaerosol in the work setting. The concentration of total dust in the bioaerosol was marginally related to these respiratory problems. After controlling for age, gender, and cigarette smoking status, grain workers were found to have reduced spirometric measures of airflow (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and FEF25-75) and enhanced airway reactivity to inhaled histamine when compared with postal workers. Although the total dust concentration in the work environment appeared to have little effect on these measures of airflow obstruction, higher concentrations of endotoxin in the bioaerosol were associated with diminished measures of airflow and enhanced bronchial reactivity. Our results indicate that the concentration of endotoxin in the bioaerosol may be particularly important in the development of grain dust-induced lung disease. PMID:7633714

  14. Experimental Investigations of the Physical and Optical Properties of Individual Micron/Submicron-Size Dust Grains in Astrophysical Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains constitute a significant component of matter in the universe, and play an important and crucial role in the formation and evolution of the stellar/planetary systems in interstellar dust clouds. Knowledge of physical and optical properties of dust grains is required for understanding of a variety of processes in astrophysical and planetary environments. The currently available and generally employed data on the properties of dust grains is based on bulk materials, with analytical models employed to deduce the corresponding values for individual small micron/submicron-size dust grains. However, it has been well-recognized over a long period, that the properties of individual smallsize dust grains may be very different from those deduced from bulk materials. This has been validated by a series of experimental investigations carried out over the last few years, on a laboratory facility based on an Electrodynamic Balance at NASA, which permits levitation of single small-size dust grains of desired composition and size, in vacuum, in simulated space environments. In this paper, we present a brief review of the results of a series of selected investigations carried out on the analogs of interstellar and planetary dust grains, as well as dust grains obtained by Apollo-l1-17 lunar missions. The selected investigations, with analytical results and discussions, include: (a) Direct measurements of radiation on individual dust grains (b) Rotation and alignments of dust grains by radiative torque (c) Charging properties of dust grains by: (i) UV Photo-electric emissions (ii) Electron Impact. The results from these experiments are examined in the light of the current theories of the processes involved.

  15. Dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma with dust grains having Gaussian distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Maitra, Sarit; Banerjee, Gadadhar

    2014-11-15

    The influence of dust size distribution on the dust ion acoustic solitary waves in a collisional dusty plasma is investigated. It is found that dust size distribution changes the amplitude and width of a solitary wave. A critical wave number is derived for the existence of purely damping mode. A deformed Korteweg-de Vries (dKdV) equation is obtained for the propagation of weakly nonlinear dust ion acoustic solitary waves and the effect of different plasma parameters on the solution of this equation is also presented.

  16. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 Angstroms, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approximately 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  17. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation of Micron Size Cosmic Dust Grains with Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E.; Weingartner, J.; Witherow, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment along the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in grain rotation and alignment has not been achieved. As there appears to be no experimental data available on this subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron size nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approx. 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low frequency (approx. 0-100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in the light of the current theories of alignment.

  18. The collision effect between dust grains and ions to the dust ion acoustic waves in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xue; Wang Canglong; Liu Congbo; Zhang Jianrong; Shi Yuren; Duan Wenshan; Yang Lei

    2012-10-15

    Damping solitary wave in dusty plasma is studied by considering the collision effect between dust grains and ions. It can be described by a KdV type equation in which a damping term of {phi}{sup 2} exist. It is found that both the amplitude and propagation velocity of the solitary wave decrease with time exponentially. Our results are compared with another KdV type equation with the damping term of {phi}. It is noted that the damping rate of the KdV type equation with the damping term of {phi}{sup 2} is larger than that with the term of {phi}. It is found that the damping rate is proportional to the collision frequency between dust grains and ions.

  19. Tracing the provenance of fine-grained dust deposited on the central Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Youbin; Tada, Ryuji; Chen, Jun; Liu, Qingsong; Toyoda, Shin; Tani, Atsushi; Ji, Junfeng; Isozaki, Yuko

    2008-01-01

    Eolian dust deposits in north China provide an excellent means of determining past variations in continental paleoclimate and atmospheric circulation. However, debate still exists on which deserts in east Asia are the dominant sources of Chinese loess and whether the dust provenance has shifted significantly at different time scales. Here we present new constraints on the provenance of fine-grained dust deposited on the central Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) by combining electron spin resonance signal intensity and crystallinity index of fine-grained quartz contained in samples from two loess-paleosol sequences. Our results show that the fine-grained dust deposits on the CLP originate mainly from the Gobi desert in southern Mongolia and the sandy deserts in northern China (primarily the Badain Juran and Tengger deserts), rather than from the Taklimakan desert in western China, at least during the last climatic cycle. The dominant source of fine-grained dust varied significantly, from southern Mongolia during cold periods, to northern China during warm periods. The glacial-interglacial provenance fluctuations are strongly coupled with changes in the intensity of the near-surface northwesterly winter monsoon.

  20. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for Dust Grain Evolution in Perseus Star-forming Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michael Chun-Yuan; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Mottram, J. C.; Kirk, H.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Pezzuto, S.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Schneider-Bontemps, N.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-07-01

    The dust emissivity spectral index, β, is a critical parameter for deriving the mass and temperature of star-forming structures and, consequently, their gravitational stability. The β value is dependent on various dust grain properties, such as size, porosity, and surface composition, and is expected to vary as dust grains evolve. Here we present β, dust temperature, and optical depth maps of the star-forming clumps in the Perseus Molecular Cloud determined from fitting spectral energy distributions to combined Herschel and JCMT observations in the 160, 250, 350, 500, and 850 μm bands. Most of the derived β and dust temperature values fall within the ranges of 1.0–2.7 and 8–20 K, respectively. In Perseus, we find the β distribution differs significantly from clump to clump, indicative of grain growth. Furthermore, we also see significant localized β variations within individual clumps and find low-β regions correlate with local temperature peaks, hinting at the possible origins of low-β grains. Throughout Perseus, we also see indications of heating from B stars and embedded protostars, as well evidence of outflows shaping the local landscape.

  1. Climatology of Dust Lifting As Observed By the Mars Orbiter Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzewich, S.; Kulowski, L.; Wang, H.; Toigo, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    We present a climatology of dust lifting events, locations and area from daily global maps produced with Mars Global Surveyor/Mars Orbiter Camera wide-angle images from Mars Year 24-27 (July, 1999 to January, 2005). Analysis includes both the "equatorial" daily global map (spanning 60°S-60°N) and the "polar" daily global maps (areas poleward of 60°). Dust lifting locations are identified through observational analysis of atmospheric dust morphology, color and albedo. Our results include statistics of lifting events by time of year, location, size and morphology. We compare our results to GCMs with active dust lifting parameterizations and concurrent Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer measurements of total column dust optical depth to determine the role, if any, between storm-scale dust lifting in the atmosphere with maintaining the background dust opacity.

  2. THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL MODELS FOR DERIVING DUST MASSES AND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. RADIATIVELY HEATED DUST IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-09-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 M{sub Sun }, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 {mu}m. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  3. The Importance of Physical Models for Deriving Dust Masses and Grain Size Distributions in Supernova Ejecta. I. Radiatively Heated Dust in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 Solar Mass, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 micron. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  4. Orbital-motion-limited theory of dust charging and plasma response

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Luca Delzanno, Gian

    2014-12-15

    The foundational theory for dusty plasmas is the dust charging theory that provides the dust potential and charge arising from the dust interaction with a plasma. The most widely used dust charging theory for negatively charged dust particles is the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) theory, which predicts the dust potential and heat collection accurately for a variety of applications, but was previously found to be incapable of evaluating the dust charge and plasma response in any situation. Here, we report a revised OML formulation that is able to predict the plasma response and hence the dust charge. Numerical solutions of the new OML model show that the widely used Whipple approximation of dust charge-potential relationship agrees with OML theory in the limit of small dust radius compared with plasma Debye length, but incurs large (order-unity) deviation from the OML prediction when the dust size becomes comparable with or larger than plasma Debye length. This latter case is expected for the important application of dust particles in a tokamak plasma.

  5. The Effect of Grain Size on Radon Exhalation Rate in Natural-dust and Stone-dust Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Raj; Kant, Krishan; Garg, Maneesha

    Radiation dose to human population due to inhalation of radon and its progeny contributes more than 50% of the total dose from the natural sources which is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. In the present work the dependence of radon exhalation rate on the physical sample parameters of stone dust and natural dust were studied. The samples under study were first crushed, grinded, dried and then passed through sieves with different pore sizes to get samples of various grain sizes (μm). The average value of radon mass exhalation rate is 5.95±2.7 mBqkg-1hr-1 and average value of radon surface exhalation rate is 286±36 mBqm-2 hr-1 for stone dust, and the average value of radon mass exhalation rate is 9.02±5.37 mBqkg-1hr-1 and average value of radon surface exhalation rate is 360±67 mBqm-2 hr-1 for natural dust. The exhalation rate was found to increase with the increase in grain size of the sample. The obtained values of radon exhalation rate for all the samples are found to be under the radon exhalation rate limit reported worldwide.

  6. Phototelectric Emission Measurements on the Analogs of Individual Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, D.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; LeClair, A.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Camata, R. P.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    The photoelectric emission process is considered to be the dominant mechanism for charging of cosmic dust grains in many astrophysical environments. The grain charge and the equilibrium potentials play an important role in the dynamical and physical processes that include heating of the neutral gas in the interstellar medium, coagulation processes in the dust clouds, and levitation and dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium and planetary surfaces and rings. An accurate evaluation of photoelectric emission processes requires knowledge of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of astrophysical composition as opposed to the values obtained from measurements on flat surfaces of bulk materials, as it is generally assumed on theoretical considerations that the yields for the small grains are much higher than the bulk values. We present laboratory measurements of the photoelectric yields of individual dust grains of silica, olivine, and graphite of approximately 0.09 to 8 microns radii levitated in an electrodynamic balance and illuminated with W radiation at 120 to 160 nm wavelengths. The measured values and the size dependence of the yields are found to be substantially different from the bulk values given in the literature.

  7. SPITZER survey of dust grain processing in stable discs around binary post-AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, C.; van Winckel, H.; Min, M.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Lloyd Evans, T.

    2008-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the mineralogy and dust processing in the circumbinary discs of binary post-AGB stars using high-resolution TIMMI2 and SPITZER infrared spectra. Methods: We perform a full spectral fitting to the infrared spectra using the most recent opacities of amorphous and crystalline dust species. This allows for the identification of the carriers of the different emission bands. Our fits also constrain the physical properties of different dust species and grain sizes responsible for the observed emission features. Results: In all stars the dust is oxygen-rich: amorphous and crystalline silicate dust species prevail and no features of a carbon-rich component can be found, the exception being EP Lyr, where a mixed chemistry of both oxygen- and carbon-rich species is found. Our full spectral fitting indicates a high degree of dust grain processing. The mineralogy of our sample stars shows that the dust is constituted of irregularly shaped and relatively large grains, with typical grain sizes larger than 2 μm. The spectra of nearly all stars show a high degree of crystallinity, where magnesium-rich end members of olivine and pyroxene silicates dominate. Other dust features of e.g. silica or alumina are not present at detectable levels. Temperature estimates from our fitting routine show that a significant fraction of grains must be cool, significantly cooler than the glass temperature. This shows that radial mixing is very efficient is these discs and/or indicates different thermal conditions at grain formation. Our results show that strong grain processing is not limited to young stellar objects and that the physical processes occurring in the discs are very similar to those in protoplanetary discs. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory (ESO), La Silla, observing program 072.D-0263, on observations made with the 1.2 m Flemish Mercator telescope at Roque de los Muchachos, Spain, the 1.2 m Swiss Euler telescope at La Silla

  8. Laboratory Experiments on Rotation and Alignment of the Analogs of Interstellar Dust Grains by Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; Gallagher, D. L.; West, E. A.; Weingartner, J. C.; Witherow, W. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2004-01-01

    The processes and mechanisms involved in the rotation and alignment of interstellar dust grains have been of great interest in astrophysics ever since the surprising discovery of the polarization of starlight more than half a century ago. Numerous theories, detailed mathematical models, and numerical studies of grain rotation and alignment with respect to the Galactic magnetic field have been presented in the literature. In particular, the subject of grain rotation and alignment by radiative torques has been shown to be of particular interest in recent years. However, despite many investigations, a satisfactory theoretical understanding of the processes involved in subject, we have carried out some unique experiments to illuminate the processes involved in the rotation of dust grains in the interstellar medium. In this paper we present the results of some preliminary laboratory experiments on the rotation of individual micron/submicron-sized, nonspherical dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance evacuated to pressures of approximately 10(exp -3) to 10(exp -5) torr. The particles are illuminated by laser light at 5320 A, and the grain rotation rates are obtained by analyzing the low-frequency (approximately 0 - 100 kHz) signal of the scattered light detected by a photodiode detector. The rotation rates are compared with simple theoretical models to retrieve some basic rotational parameters. The results are examined in light of the current theories of alignment.

  9. Laboratory simulations of chemical reactions on dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roser, Joseph E.

    Dust grains exert a major influence upon the chemical composition of the interstellar medium: photoelectrons emitted from the dust grains are the primary energy source for heating interstellar gas, dust grains in dense molecular clouds can accumulate layers of frozen interstellar gases that participate in solid phase chemical reactions, and the most abundant molecule in the Universe, molecular hydrogen, primarily forms from hydrogen atoms adsorbed onto grain surfaces. Molecular hydrogen influences the evolution of molecular clouds by acting as a coolant during the gravitational collapse of the cloud and serving as a precursor for the formation of many molecular species. A complete description of molecular hydrogen formation in molecular clouds requires an understanding of the efficiency of hydrogen atom recombination on ice surfaces. Observations of interstellar carbon dioxide ice have the potential for serving as a diagnostic sign of the evolution of interstellar ice layers but require a satisfactory explanation of the formation mechanisms of interstellar CO 2 . This work describes a series of investigations that were designed to study the properties of interstellar dust grains and to obtain and analyze data for astrophysically important chemical reactions. We measured the recombination efficiency of H atoms on the surface of amorphous H 2 O ices and measured the kinetics of H 2 formation and desorption on different morphologies of ice substrate. We demonstrated that the hydrogen atom recombination kinetics depend upon the morphology of the ice layer and that the recombination efficiency is consistent with observations of molecular clouds. We also demonstrated that CO and O can be trapped within an amorphous H 2 O ice layer at temperatures greater than their sublimation temperatures and that the reaction CO (ads) + O (ads) [arrow right] CO 2,(ads) can produce appreciable amounts of CO2 within an interstellar ice layer in the absence of ultraviolet or cosmic

  10. GIADA - Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator - Onboard Rosetta spacecraft: Extended calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Fulle, M.; Mazzotta-Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Morales, R.; Cosi, M.

    2016-09-01

    Despite a long tradition of dust instruments flown on-board space mission, the largest number of these can be considered unique as they used different detection techniques. GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator), is one of the dust instruments on-board the Rosetta spacecraft and is devoted to measure the dust dynamical parameters in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It couples two different techniques to measure the mass and speed of individual dust particles. We report here the results of an extended calibration activity carried-out, during the hibernation phase of the Rosetta mission, on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (PFM) operative in a clean room in our laboratory. The main aims of an additional calibration campaign are: to verify the algorithms and procedures for data calibration developed before Rosetta launch; to improve the comprehension of GIADA response after the increased knowledge on cometary dust, e.g. the composition of dust particles after Stardust mission. These calibration improvements implied a final step, which consisted in defining transfer functions to correlate the new calibration curves obtained for the GIADA PFM to those to be used for GIADA onboard the Rosetta spacecraft. The extended calibration activity allowed us to analyze GIADA data acquired in the 67P/C-G coma permitting to infer additional information on cometary dust particles, e.g. density and tensile strength.

  11. MEASUREMENT OF AIR ENTRAINMENT AND DUST EMISSION DURING SHELLED CORN RECEIVING OPERATIONS WITH SIMULATED HOPPER BOTTOM GRAIN TRAILERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust emissions from grain elevator operations can be a safety and health risk, and a nuisance. Dust emission and air entrainment data are needed for designing adequate and effective control methods. This study measured the dust emitted and air entrained during corn receiving operations at an eleva...

  12. Laboratory Studies of the Optical Properties and Condensation Processes of Cosmic Dust Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Craven, P. D.; Spann, J. F.; Tankosic, D.; LeClair, A.; West, E.; Sheldon, R.; Witherow, W. K.; Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory facility for conducting a variety of experiments on single isolated dust particles of astrophysical interest levitated in an electrodynamics balance has been developed at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The objective of the research is to employ this experimental technique for studies of the physical and optical properties of individual cosmic dust grains of 0.1-100 micron size in controlled pressure/temperatures environments simulating astrophysical conditions. The physical and optical properties of the analogs of interstellar and interplanetary dust grains of known composition and size distribution will be investigated by this facility. In particular, we will carry out three classes of experiments to study the micro-physics of cosmic dust grains. (1) Charge characteristics of micron size single dust grains to determine the photoelectric efficiencies, yields, and equilibrium potentials when exposed to UV radiation. (2) Infrared optical properties of dust particles (extinction coefficients and scattering phase functions) in the 1-30 micron region using infrared diode lasers and measuring the scattered radiation. (3) Condensation experiments to investigate the condensation of volatile gases on colder nucleated particles in dense interstellar clouds and lower planetary atmospheres. The condensation experiments will involve levitated nucleus dust grains of known composition and initial mass (or m/q ratio), cooled to a temperature and pressure (or scaled pressure) simulating the astrophysical conditions, and injection of a volatile gas at a higher temperature from a controlled port. The increase in the mass due to condensation on the particle will be monitored as a function of the dust particle temperature and the partial pressure of the injected volatile gas. The measured data will permit determination of the sticking coefficients of volatile gases and growth rates of dust particles of astrophysical interest. Some preliminary results based on

  13. PHOTOELECTRIC CHARGING OF DUST GRAINS IN THE ENVIRONMENT OF YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Andreas; Gomez de Castro, Ana I.

    2011-10-20

    The evolution of disks around young stellar objects (YSOs) is deeply affected by the YSOs' ultraviolet (UV) radiation field especially in the 500-1100 A spectral range. The two dominant processes are: the photodissociation of H{sub 2} molecules in the Werner and Lyman bands, and the emission of photoelectrons from dust grains when high energy photons are absorbed. Photoelectrons are an important source of gas heating. In this paper, dust grain charging when exposed to various possible UV fields in the YSOs' environment is investigated. Numerical simulations of the evolution of photoelectrons in the electric field created by the charged dust grains are carried out to obtain the charging profile of dust grains. From the simulations it appears that the different spectra produce significant quantitative and qualitative differences in the charging processes. Both the UV background and the Ae-Herbig star radiation field produce a relatively slow charging of dust grains due to the low fraction of sufficiently energetic photons. The radiation field of T Tauri stars (TTSs) is harder due to the release of magnetic energy in the dense magnetospheric environment. These numerical results have been used to propose a new simple analytical model for grain charging in the atmosphere of protostellar disks around TTSs susceptible to be used in any disk modeling. It has been found that the yield decreases exponentially with the dust charge and that two populations of photoelectrons are produced: a low energy population with mean kinetic energy E = 2.5 eV and a high energy population with E = 5.5-6 eV; the energy dispersion within the populations is {approx}1.3 eV (T {approx} 1.5 x 10{sup 4} K). The high energy population is susceptible of dissociating the H{sub 2} and ionizing some low ionization potential species, such as the Mg. These results add an additional role to dust on the chemistry of the layers just below the H{sub 2} photoionization front. This photoelectic yield has been

  14. Probing Interstellar Silicate Dust Grain Properties in Quasar Absorption Systems at Redshifts z<1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, M.; Kulkarni, V. P.; York, D. G.; Welty, D. E.; Vladilo, G.; Som, D.

    Absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars whose sightlines serendipitously pass through foreground galaxies provide a valuable tool to simultaneously probe the dust and gas compositions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. In particular, the damped and sub-damped Lyman- α (DLA/sub-DLA) absorbers trace gas-rich galaxies, independent of the intrinsic luminosities or star-formation rates of the associated galaxy stellar populations. The first evidence of silicate dust in a quasar absorption system was provided through our detection of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the z=0.52 DLA absorber toward the quasar AO 0235+164. We present results from 2 follow-up programs using archival Spitzer Space Telescope infrared spectra to study the interstellar silicate dust grain properties in a total of 13 quasar absorption systems at 0.1 < z < 1.4. We find clear detections of the 10 µ m silicate feature in the quasar absorption systems studied. In addition, we also detect the 18 µ m silicate feature in the sources with adequate spectral coverage. We find variations in the breadth, peak wavelength, and substructure of the 10 µ m interstellar silicate absorption features among the absorbers. This suggests that the silicate dust grain properties in these distant galaxies may differ relative to one another, and relative to those in the Milky Way. We also find suggestions in several sources, based on comparisons with laboratory-derived profiles from the literature, that the silicate dust grains may be significantly more crystalline than those in the amorphous Milky Way ISM. This is particularly evident in the z=0.89 absorber toward the quasar PKS 1830-211, where substructure near 10 µ m is consistent with a crystalline olivine composition. If confirmed, these grain property variations may have implications for both dust and galaxy evolution over the past 9 Gyrs, and for the commonly-made assumption that highredshift dust is similar to local dust. We also discuss

  15. Tracking eolian dust with helium and thorium: Impacts of grain size and provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, David; Winckler, Gisela; Borunda, Alejandra; Serno, Sascha; Anderson, Robert F.; Recasens, Cristina; Bory, Aloys; Gaiero, Diego; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Kaplan, Michael; McManus, Jerry F.; Revel, Marie; Sun, Youbin

    2016-02-01

    Reconstructions of the deposition rate of windblown mineral dust in ocean sediments offer an important means of tracking past climate changes and of assessing the radiative and biogeochemical impacts of dust in past climates. Dust flux estimates in ocean sediments have commonly been based on the operationally defined lithogenic fraction of sediment samples. More recently, dust fluxes have been estimated from measurements of helium and thorium, as rare isotopes of these elements (He-3 and Th-230) allow estimates of sediment flux, and the dominant isotopes (He-4 and Th-232) are uniquely associated with the lithogenic fraction of marine sediments. In order to improve the fidelity of dust flux reconstructions based on He and Th, we present a survey of He and Th concentrations in sediments from dust source areas in East Asia, Australia and South America. Our data show systematic relationships between He and Th concentrations and grain size, with He concentrations decreasing and Th concentrations increasing with decreasing grain size. We find consistent He and Th concentrations in the fine fraction (<5 μm) of samples from East Asia, Australia and Central South America (Puna-Central West Argentina), with Th concentrations averaging 14 μg/g and He concentrations averaging 2 μcc STP/g. We recommend use of these values for estimating dust fluxes in sediments where dust is dominantly fine-grained, and suggest that previous studies may have systematically overestimated Th-based dust fluxes by 30%. Source areas in Patagonia appear to have lower He and Th contents than other regions, as fine fraction concentrations average 0.8 μcc STP/g and 9 μg/g for 4He and 232Th, respectively. The impact of grain size on lithogenic He and Th concentrations should be taken into account in sediments proximal to dust sources where dust grain size may vary considerably. Our data also have important implications for the hosts of He in long-traveled dust and for the 3He/4He ratio used for

  16. Comparison of dust related respiratory effects in Dutch and Canadian grain handling industries: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Peelen, S J; Heederik, D; Dimich-Ward, H D; Chan-Yeung, M; Kennedy, S M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Four previously conducted epidemiological studies in more than 1200 grain workers were used to compare exposure-response relations between exposure to grain dust and respiratory health. METHODS: The studies included Dutch workers from an animal feed mill and a transfer grain elevator and Canadian workers from a terminal grain elevator and the docks. Relations between forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and exposure were analysed with multiple regression analysis corrected for smoking, age, and height. Exposure variables examined included cumulative and current dust exposure and the numbers of years a subject was employed in the industry. Sampling efficiencies of the Dutch and Canadian measurement techniques were compared in a pilot study. Results of this study were used to correct slopes of exposure-response relations for differences in dust fractions sampled by Dutch and Canadian personal dust samplers. RESULTS: Negative exposure-response relations were shown for regressions of FEV1 on cumulative and current exposure and years employed. Slopes of the exposure-response relations differed by a factor of three to five between industries, apart from results for cumulative exposure. Here the variation in slopes differed by a factor of 100, from -1 to -0.009 ml/mg.y/m3. The variation in slopes between industries reduced to between twofold to fivefold when the Dutch transfer elevator workers were not considered. There was evidence that the small exposure-response slope found for this group is caused by misclassification of exposure and a strong healthy worker effect. Alternative, but less likely explanations for the variation in slopes were differences in exposure concentrations, composition of grain dust, exposure characteristics, and measurement techniques. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, this study showed moderately similar negative exposure-response relations for four different populations from different countries, despite differences in methods of

  17. Airborne and Grain Dust Fungal Community Compositions Are Shaped Regionally by Plant Genotypes and Farming Practices.

    PubMed

    Pellissier, Loïc; Oppliger, Anne; Hirzel, Alexandre H; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Mbayo, Guilain; Mascher, Fabio; Kellenberger, Stefan; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène

    2016-04-01

    Chronic exposure to airborne fungi has been associated with different respiratory symptoms and pathologies in occupational populations, such as grain workers. However, the homogeneity in the fungal species composition of these bioaerosols on a large geographical scale and the different drivers that shape these fungal communities remain unclear. In this study, the diversity of fungi in grain dust and in the aerosols released during harvesting was determined across 96 sites at a geographical scale of 560 km(2) along an elevation gradient of 500 m by tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Associations between the structure of fungal communities in the grain dust and different abiotic (farming system, soil characteristics, and geographic and climatic parameters) and biotic (wheat cultivar and previous crop culture) factors were explored. These analyses revealed a strong relationship between the airborne and grain dust fungal communities and showed the presence of allergenic and mycotoxigenic species in most samples, which highlights the potential contribution of these fungal species to work-related respiratory symptoms of grain workers. The farming system was the major driver of the alpha and beta phylogenetic diversity values of fungal communities. In addition, elevation and soil CaCO3 concentrations shaped the alpha diversity, whereas wheat cultivar, cropping history, and the number of freezing days per year shaped the taxonomic beta diversity of these communities. PMID:26826229

  18. DUST PROPERTIES AND DISK STRUCTURE OF EVOLVED PROTOPLANETARY DISKS IN Cep OB2: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, GAS AND DUST MASS, AND INSIDE-OUT EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Henning, Thomas; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Bouwman, Jeroen; Sturm, Bernhard; Patel, Nimesh; Juhasz, Attila E-mail: aurora.sicilia@uam.es

    2011-11-20

    We present Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 31 T Tauri stars (TTS) and IRAM/1.3 mm observations for 34 low- and intermediate-mass stars in the Cep OB2 region. Including our previously published data, we analyze 56 TTS and 3 intermediate-mass stars with silicate features in Tr 37 ({approx}4 Myr) and NGC 7160 ({approx}12 Myr). The silicate emission features are well reproduced with a mixture of amorphous (with olivine, forsterite, and silica stoichiometry) and crystalline grains (forsterite, enstatite). We explore grain size and disk structure using radiative transfer disk models, finding that most objects have suffered substantial evolution (grain growth, settling). About half of the disks show inside-out evolution, with either dust-cleared inner holes or a radially dependent dust distribution, typically with larger grains and more settling in the innermost disk. The typical strong silicate features nevertheless require the presence of small dust grains, and could be explained by differential settling according to grain size, anomalous dust distributions, and/or optically thin dust populations within disk gaps. M-type stars tend to have weaker silicate emission and steeper spectral energy distributions than K-type objects. The inferred low dust masses are in a strong contrast with the relatively high gas accretion rates, suggesting global grain growth and/or an anomalous gas-to-dust ratio. Transition disks in the Cep OB2 region display strongly processed grains, suggesting that they are dominated by dust evolution and settling. Finally, the presence of rare but remarkable disks with strong accretion at old ages reveals that some very massive disks may still survive to grain growth, gravitational instabilities, and planet formation.

  19. Protostellar disc formation enabled by removal of small dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Caselli, Paola; Li, Zhi-Yun; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2016-08-01

    It has been shown that a realistic level of magnetization of dense molecular cloud cores can suppress the formation of a rotationally supported disc (RSD) through catastrophic magnetic braking in the axisymmetric ideal MHD limit. In this study, we present conditions for the formation of RSDs through non-ideal MHD effects computed self-consistently from an equilibrium chemical network. We find that removing from the standard MRN distribution the large population of very small grains (VSGs) of ˜ 10 Å to few 100 Å that dominate the coupling of the bulk neutral matter to the magnetic field increases the ambipolar diffusivity by ˜ 1-2 orders of magnitude at densities below 1010/cm-3. The enhanced ambipolar diffusion (AD) in the envelope reduces the amount of magnetic flux dragged by the collapse into the circumstellar disc-forming region. Therefore, magnetic braking is weakened and more angular momentum can be retained. With continuous high angular momentum inflow, RSDs of tens of au are able to form, survive, and even grow in size, depending on other parameters including cosmic ray ionization rate, magnetic field strength, and rotation speed. Some discs become self-gravitating and evolve into rings in our 2D (axisymmetric) simulations, which have the potential to fragment into (close) multiple systems in 3D. We conclude that disc formation in magnetized cores is highly sensitive to chemistry, especially to grain sizes. A moderate grain coagulation/growth to remove the large population of VSGs, either in the prestellar phase or during free-fall collapse, can greatly promote AD and help formation of tens of au RSDs.

  20. Fractal dust grains around R Coronae Borealis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Edward L.

    1989-01-01

    Discrete dipole approximation calculations of the optical properties of random fractal aggregates of graphite spheroids show a UV absorption feature that is too wide and centered at too long a wavelength to fit the observed interstellar 2200-A feature, but which is a good match to the 2400-A feature seen in the hydrogen-deficient R CrB stars reported by Hecht et al. (1984). Graphite fractal grains also match the UV bump and large long-wavelenvth extinction seen in laboratory studies of carbon smoke published by Bussoletti et al. (1987), which are usually attributed to amorphous carbon.

  1. Two key processes in dust/gas chemical modelling: photoprocessing of grain mantles and explosive desorption.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabiea, O. M.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1994-10-01

    Two models of the time dependent chemical evolution of stable dense and translucent clouds are presented: one for pure gas phase chemistry and the other in which solid grain chemistry is included along with the gas. Comparing the results using these two schemes for the theoretical abundances of certain key molecules shows that including the dust provides a significantly (often by orders of magnitude) better agreement with the observations than those derived by pure gas phase chemistry models. The initial atomic abundances are those given by observations and are not modified to suit the model. Moreover, the inclusion of grain chemistry appears to minimize the effects of uncertainties in some important gas phase reaction rates, which would otherwise strongly affect the results of pure gas phase models. The grain mantle composition and gas phase abundances have been investigated using a number of different physical assumptions for both dense and translucent cloud models, taking into consideration the accretion, photochemical processing and desorption mechanisms involving the dust grains. The use of triggered explosive desorption is critical to providing reasonable steady state abundances. The abundances of H_2_O, H_2_CO, CH_3_OH and NH_3_ have a particular relevance because they are more abundantly produced in dust than in the gas. The most abundant observed molecules in grain mantles are H_2_O and CO which, under irradiation by ultraviolet light, not only produce H_2_CO but the latter can in turn react with water ice producing CH_3_OH. The reversible transformation between formaldehyde and methanol in the dust affects their gas phase abundances in both translucent and dense clouds. Depth dependent calculations have been performed and it is found that the effects of solid state photochemical molecular production in the inner part of a dense cloud are much larger than in the outer part or in a translucent cloud. In addition to matching observed gas phase abundances

  2. Temperature Spectra of Interstellar Dust Grains Heated by Cosmic Rays. I. Translucent Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvāns, Juris

    2016-06-01

    Heating of whole interstellar dust grains by cosmic-ray (CR) particles affects the gas–grain chemistry in molecular clouds by promoting molecule desorption, diffusion, and chemical reactions on grain surfaces. The frequency of such heating, f T , s‑1, determines how often a certain temperature T CR, K, is reached for grains hit by CR particles. This study aims to provide astrochemists with a comprehensive and updated data set on CR-induced whole-grain heating. We present calculations of f T and T CR spectra for bare olivine grains with radius a of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 μm and such grains covered with ice mantles of thickness 0.1a and 0.3a. Grain shape and structure effects are considered, as well as 30 CR elemental constituents with an updated energy spectrum corresponding to a translucent cloud with A V = 2 mag. Energy deposition by CRs in grain material was calculated with the srim program. We report full T CR spectra for all nine grain types and consider initial grain temperatures of 10 K and 20 K. We also provide frequencies for a range of minimum T CR values. The calculated data set can be simply and flexibly implemented in astrochemical models. The results show that, in the case of translucent clouds, the currently adopted rate for heating of whole grains to temperatures in excess of 70 K is underestimated by approximately two orders of magnitude in astrochemical numerical simulations. Additionally, grains are heated by CRs to modest temperatures (20–30 K) with intervals of a few years, which reduces the possibility of ice chemical explosions.

  3. Dust grains in a hot gas. I - Basic physics. II - Astrophysical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. R.; Silk, J.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of graphite grains with a hot gas is investigated. Detailed computations, based on experimental data and simple theoretical models are presented of the energy transfer by gas particle collisions and of the sputtering rates and grain lifetimes, as functions of gas temperature and grain radius. The electric charge on the grains is calculated, and the effect of electric forces on mechanical stability is discussed. The rate at which the gas cools by this mechanism is evaluated. The results of the work on gas-grain cooling and sputtering rates are applied to various astrophysical environments where dust and hot gas may coexist. The effect is studied of swept-up interstellar grains on the evolution of young supernova remnants, and the infrared luminosity is computed as a function of the age of the remnant. An interpretation is proposed of far-infrared sources embedded in compact H II regions or dense clouds, in terms of the supernova phenomenon, with specific application to eta Carinae. The question of the existence of dust in intergalactic matter in galaxy clusters is also reexamined.

  4. Laboratory Measurements on Charging of Individual Micron-Size Apollo-11 Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-01-01

    Observations made during Apollo missions, as well as theoretical models indicate that the lunar surface and dust grains are electrostatically charged, levitated and transported. Lunar dust grains are charged by UV photoelectric emissions on the lunar dayside and by the impact of the solar wind electrons on the nightside. The knowledge of charging properties of individual lunar dust grains is important for developing appropriate theoretical models and mitigating strategies. Currently, very limited experimental data are available for charging of individual micron-size size lunar dust grains in particular by low energy electron impact. However, experimental results based on extensive laboratory measurements on the charging of individual 0.2-13 micron size lunar dust grains by the secondary electron emissions (SEE) have been presented in a recent publication. The SEE process of charging of micron-size dust grains, however, is found to be very complex phenomena with strong particle size dependence. In this paper we present some examples of the complex nature of the SEE properties of positively charged individual lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB), and show that they remain unaffected by the variation of the AC field employed in the above mentioned measurements.

  5. EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2011-09-10

    Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

  6. CURVED WALLS: GRAIN GROWTH, SETTLING, AND COMPOSITION PATTERNS IN T TAURI DISK DUST SUBLIMATION FRONTS

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Ingleby, L.; D'Alessio, P.; Espaillat, C.; Sargent, B.; Watson, D. M.; Hernández, J. E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: lingleby@umich.edu E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu

    2013-10-01

    The dust sublimation walls of disks around T Tauri stars represent a directly observable cross-section through the disk atmosphere and midplane. Their emission properties can probe the grain size distribution and composition of the innermost regions of the disk, where terrestrial planets form. Here we calculate the inner dust sublimation wall properties for four classical T Tauri stars with a narrow range of spectral types and inclination angles and a wide range of mass accretion rates to determine the extent to which the walls are radially curved. Best fits to the near- and mid-IR excesses are found for curved, two-layer walls in which the lower layer contains larger, hotter, amorphous pyroxene grains with Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.6 and the upper layer contains submicron, cooler, mixed amorphous olivine and forsterite grains. As the mass accretion rates decrease from 10{sup –8} to 10{sup –10} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, the maximum grain size in the lower layer decreases from ∼3 to 0.5 μm. We attribute this to a decrease in fragmentation and turbulent support for micron-sized grains with decreasing viscous heating. The atmosphere of these disks is depleted of dust with dust-gas mass ratios 1 × 10{sup –4} of the interstellar medium (ISM) value, while the midplane is enhanced to eight times the ISM value. For all accretion rates, the wall contributes at least half of the flux in the optically thin 10 μm silicate feature. Finally, we find evidence for an iron gradient in the disk, suggestive of that found in our solar system.

  7. Dust-grain fragmentation envisaged at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in view of potential ROSETTA COSIMA observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Hornung, K.; Rynö, J.; Fischer, H.; Silen, J.

    2014-07-01

    Dust grains lifted off the comet nucleus are subject to fragmentation processes. Observations and models on fragmentation are based on data collected several hundred kilometers off the comet nucleus. Rosetta will be the first spacecraft operated in near vicinity of a comet nucleus during its passage through the inner solar system, and will, on a few occasions, even pass through the dust acceleration region. In the forthcoming 2 years, the instrument COSIMA onboard ROSETTA will collect cometary grains at various distances off the nucleus and analyze cometary grains with a microscope and a secondary ion mass spectrometer. The instrument determines the organic and mineral composition as revealed on dust-grain surfaces. While break-up of dust grains on the collecting metal target foams are part of the COSIMA instrument function, fragmentation of grains prior to collection by COSIMA is part of the inner-coma physics to be studied with Rosetta. Grain collection and detection efficiencies of COSIMA are a function of grain size, shape, and optical and mechanical properties, and have been studied with the COSIMA reference laboratory model. Dust fragmentation prior to collection is due to interaction of grains with the coma, solar radiation and solar-wind plasma as well as the grain composition. Fragmentation might include the continuous seeding of tiny attogram dust grains as well as breaking up of grains into pieces of comparable sizes. We will discuss the potential fragmentation processes in view of the optimum COSIMA operation strategy and the impact of the inner-coma dust fragmentation on COSIMA mass-spectrometer data interpretation.

  8. Small vs. large dust grains in transitional disks: do different cavity sizes indicate a planet?. SAO 206462 (HD 135344B) in polarized light with VLT/NACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garufi, A.; Quanz, S. P.; Avenhaus, H.; Buenzli, E.; Dominik, C.; Meru, F.; Meyer, M. R.; Pinilla, P.; Schmid, H. M.; Wolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Context. Transitional disks represent a short stage of the evolution of circumstellar material. Studies of dust grains in these objects can provide pivotal information on the mechanisms of planet formation. Dissimilarities in the spatial distribution of small (μm-size) and large (mm-size) dust grains have recently been pointed out. Aims: Constraints on the small dust grains can be obtained by imaging the distribution of scattered light at near-infrared wavelengths. We aim at resolving structures in the surface layer of transitional disks (with particular emphasis on the inner 10-50 AU), thus increasing the scarce sample of high-resolution images of these objects. Methods: We obtained VLT/NACO near-IR high-resolution polarimetric differential imaging observations of SAO 206462 (HD 135344B). This technique allows one to image the polarized scattered light from the disk without any occulting mask and to reach an inner working angle of ~0.1″. Results: A face-on disk is detected in H and Ks bands between 0.1″ and 0.9″. No significant differences are seen between the H and Ks images. In addition to the spiral arms, these new data allow us to resolve for the first time an inner disk cavity for small dust grains. The cavity size (≃28 AU) is much smaller than what is inferred for large dust grains from (sub-)mm observations (39 to 50 AU). This discrepancy cannot be ascribed to any resolution effect. Conclusions: The interaction between the disk and potential orbiting companion(s) can explain both the spiral arm structure and the discrepant cavity sizes for small and large dust grains. One planet may be carving out the gas (and, thus, the small grains) at 28 AU, and generating a pressure bump at larger radii (39 AU), which holds back the large grains. We analytically estimate that, in this scenario, a single giant planet (with a mass between 5 and 15 MJ) at 17 to 20 AU from the star is consistent with the observed cavity sizes. Based on observations collected at the

  9. DELIVERY OF DUST GRAINS FROM COMET C/2013 A1 (SIDING SPRING) TO MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Tricarico, Pasquale; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Sykes, Mark V.; Li, Jian-Yang; Farnham, Tony L.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnocchia, Davide; Stevenson, Rachel; Bauer, James M.; Lock, Robert E.

    2014-06-01

    Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will have a close encounter with Mars on 2014 October 19. We model the dynamical evolution of dust grains from the time of their ejection from the comet nucleus to the close encounter with Mars, and determine the flux at Mars. Constraints on the ejection velocity from Hubble Space Telescope observations indicate that the bulk of the grains will likely miss Mars, although it is possible that a few percent of the grains with higher velocities will reach Mars, peaking approximately 90-100 minutes after the close approach of the nucleus, and consisting mostly of millimeter-radius grains ejected from the comet nucleus at a heliocentric distance of approximately 9 AU or larger. At higher velocities, younger grains from submillimeter to several millimeters can also reach Mars, although an even smaller fraction of grains is expected have these velocities, with negligible effect on the peak timing. Using NEOWISE observations of the comet, we can estimate that the maximum fluence will be of the order of 10{sup –7} grains m{sup –2}. We include a detailed analysis of how the expected fluence depends on the grain density, ejection velocity, and size-frequency distribution, to account for current model uncertainties and in preparation of possible refined model values in the near future.

  10. Computation of charge and ion drag force on multiple static spherical dust grains immersed in rf discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ikkurthi, V. R.; Matyash, K.; Schneider, R.; Melzer, A.

    2010-10-15

    Charging of multiple spherical dust grains located in presheath and sheath regions of an rf discharge has been studied using a three-dimensional particle-particle-particle-mesh (P{sup 3}M) code. First, dust charge, potential, and ion drag force on two dust particles for various interparticle separations are computed. It is found that for dust separations larger than the shielding length the dust parameters for the two dust particles match with the single particle values. As the dust separation is equal to or less than the shielding length, the transverse component of ion force increases which is due to dynamic shielding effect caused by neighboring dust particle. However, dust charge, potential, and ion drag are found not to be affected considerably. Further, dust charge and potential on an arrangement of nine dust particles are computed. The dust charge and potential do not differ much from the single particle values for the presheath. However the dust charges of multiple dust particles in the sheath are much less negative compared to the single dust case which is shown to be due to ion focusing.

  11. A fast and explicit algorithm for simulating the dynamics of small dust grains with smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Daniel J.; Laibe, Guillaume

    2015-07-01

    We describe a simple method for simulating the dynamics of small grains in a dusty gas, relevant to micron-sized grains in the interstellar medium and grains of centimetre size and smaller in protoplanetary discs. The method involves solving one extra diffusion equation for the dust fraction in addition to the usual equations of hydrodynamics. This `diffusion approximation for dust' is valid when the dust stopping time is smaller than the computational timestep. We present a numerical implementation using smoothed particle hydrodynamics that is conservative, accurate and fast. It does not require any implicit timestepping and can be straightforwardly ported into existing 3D codes.

  12. Transformation of short-periodic high-inclination orbits of circumsolar submillimeter dust

    SciTech Connect

    Bazei, A.A.; Kramer, E.N.

    1995-11-01

    Disintegration of short-periodic comets is one of the sources of cosmic dust in the Solar System. Initially dust particles move approximately in the orbits of parent comets, in particular, in high-inclination orbits. In a few million years, some of these particles (the smallest ones) go over to the short-periodic, high-inclination orbits due to the Poynting-Robertson effect. The numerical integration of the equations of motion at this stage of evolution gives rise to somewhat surprising results. For example, when integrating the equations of motion as far back as 6000 years from the time of meteor observation, the real meteor particle gains the perihelion distance smaller than the solar radius (!). Our calculations show that the time of falling onto the Sun is shorter for a article moving in a high-inclination orbit. This is due to the superposition of gravitational perturbation and radiation effects.

  13. Orbitally modulated dust formation by the WC7+O5 colliding-wind binary WR140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.; Marchenko, S. V.; Marston, A. P.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Varricatt, W. P.; Dougherty, S. M.; Kidger, M. R.; Morbidelli, L.; Tapia, M.

    2009-05-01

    We present high-resolution infrared (2-18 μm) images of the archetypal periodic dust-making Wolf-Rayet binary system WR140 (HD 193793) taken between 2001 and 2005, and multi-colour (J - [19.5]) photometry observed between 1989 and 2001. The images resolve the dust cloud formed by WR140 in 2001, allowing us to track its expansion and cooling, while the photometry allows tracking the average temperature and total mass of the dust. The combination of the two data sets constrains the optical properties of the dust, and suggests that they differ from those of the dust made by the WC9 dust-makers, including the classical `pinwheel', WR104. The photometry of individual dust emission features shows them to be significantly redder in (nbL'-[3.99]), but bluer in ([7.9]-[12.5]), than the binary, as expected from the spectra of heated dust and the stellar wind of a Wolf-Rayet star. The most persistent dust features, two concentrations at the ends of a `bar' of emission to the south of the star, were observed to move with constant proper motions of 324 +/- 8 and 243 +/- 7 mas yr-1. Longer wavelength (4.68 and 12.5 μm) images show dust emission from the corresponding features from the previous (1993) periastron passage and dust formation episode, showing that the dust expanded freely in a low-density void for over a decade, with dust features repeating from one cycle to the next. A third persistent dust concentration to the east of the binary (the `arm') was found to have a proper motion ~320 mas yr-1, and a dust mass about one-quarter that of the `bar'. Extrapolation of the motions of the concentrations back to the binary suggests that the eastern `arm' began expansion four to five months earlier than those in the southern `bar', consistent with the projected rotation of the binary axis and wind-collision region (WCR) on the sky. A comparison of model dust images and the observations constrains the intervals when the WCR was producing sufficiently compressed wind for dust

  14. Formation and Destruction Processes of Interstellar Dust: From Organic Molecules to carbonaceous Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Biennier, L.

    2004-01-01

    The study of the formation and destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. interstellar dust presents a continuous size distribution from large molecules, radicals and ions to nanometer-sized particles to micron-sized grains. The lower end of the dust size distribution is thought to be responsible for the ubiquitous spectral features that are seen in emission in the IR (UIBs) and in absorption in the visible (DIBs). The higher end of the dust-size distribution is thought to be responsible for the continuum emission plateau that is seen in the IR and for the strong absorption seen in the interstellar UV extinction curve. All these spectral signatures are characteristic of cosmic organic materials that are ubiquitous and present in various forms from gas-phase molecules to solid-state grains. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar chemistry and in the formation of organic molecules, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of dust. Recent space observations in the UV (HST) and in the IR (ISO) help place size constraints on the molecular component of carbonaceous IS dust and indicate that small (ie., subnanometer) PAHs cannot contribute significantly to the IS features in the UV and in the IR. Studies of large molecular and nano-sized IS dust analogs formed from PAH precursors have been performed in our laboratory under conditions that simulate diffuse ISM environments (the particles are cold -100 K vibrational energy, isolated in the gas phase and exposed to a high-energy discharge environment in a cold plasma). The species (molecules, molecular fragments, ions, nanoparticles, etc) formed in the pulsed discharge nozzle (PDN) plasma source are detected with a high-sensitivity cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). We will present new experimental results that indicate that nanoparticles are generated in the

  15. The photostablilty of organic matter on cometary grains: studies in ground laboratory and in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiagh, K.; Fray, N.; Chaput, D.; Cottin, H.

    2013-12-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects of the solar system and may provide key information on its formation. They are also thought to be a source of organic matter on Earth and then to be involved in the emergence of life. So far, the knowledge of the chemical composition of cometary nuclei has been inferred from measuring gases and from analyzing dust in cometary comae. During the ROSETTA mission, cometary dust will be notably analyzed by the COSIMA mass spectrometer. It will provide information on grain chemical component and its evolution as a function of heliocentric distance. In the frame of these measurements, it is crucial to understand dust chemical evolution between its ejection from the nucleus and its analysis by the COSIMA instrument. Such studies will help for the interpretation of spectra measured and then to the understanding of the comet chemical composition. Furthermore, this study is also relevant to assess the contribution of cometary grains to the formation of an available organic matter reservoir on Earth at the time of life's origin. The chemical evolution of these grains is notably linked to the photochemical stability of organic molecules in solar system conditions, i.e. submitted to energetic VUV/UV radiations (λ < 300 nm). To calculate photolysis constant in these wavelengths range, we can use different approaches: (i) direct measurements in the laboratory or in LEO and (ii) indirect measurements through cross section absorption spectra in the VUV domain. Such absorption spectra are very scarce for solid organic compounds in current literature. We will present our newly developed methodology to measure VUV cross section absorption spectra of thin organic films. Measurements of the VUV spectra for two purines, adenine and guanine, and a pyrimidine, uracil, will be presented. Photodissociation rates derived from such measurements will be compared to direct measurements with laboratory UV lamps, or measurements after direct

  16. Grain-size dependence of the magnetic properties of street dusts from Warsaw, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dytłow, Sylwia; Winkler, Aldo; Sagnotti, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, in connection with a substantial development of transportation in urban areas, vehicular traffic increased its importance as source of pollution and consequent cause of health problems in urban environments. In fact, it is well established that the concentration and size of pollution related particulate matter (PM) are important factors affecting human health. The aim of this study is to identify the variations of the magnetic properties and of the chemical composition of different granulometric fractions from street dusts collected at four locations in Warsaw: the city center, a suburb, a tramline and a big crossroad. Dust samples were mechanically sieved and classified using the laboratory shaker with a standard sieve set (0.5 mm, 0.25 mm, 0.1 mm and 0.071 mm). Data show a distribution of magnetic susceptibility (χ) in the wide range of 80-370 × 10-8 m3kg-1. Comparison of magnetic parameters shows that the street dust contains the pollution characteristics for air and soil. The samples were characterized by uniform magnetic mineralogy, typical for fine-grained magnetite, in a grain size range between pseudo-single-domain and fine multi-domain, with a small contribution from ultrafine superparamagnetic particles (~2-3.5 %). The street dust contains, as usual for the urban areas, spherical magnetic particles produced by fossil fuel combustion processes and mixture of irregular angular iron-oxides grains containing other elements. The magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis properties of the dusts have been analyzed in detail; the temperature variation of the saturation of remanent magnetization and of the magnetic susceptibility revealed that the main magnetic mineral, for all the fractions, is almost stoichiometric magnetite, with the finest fractions (d=0.1 mm, 0.071 mm and d

  17. A grain of sand or a handful of dust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Fabian

    2013-03-01

    The recent paper by Girod et al (2013) analyses the implications of stringent global GHG mitigation targets for the intensities of, inter alia , broad consumption categories like food, shelter and transport. This type of scenario modeling analysis and inverse reasoning helps us to better understand the potential or required contribution of changes in consumption patterns to mitigation. This is welcome because while there is a growing literature on the behavioral and consumption dimensions of mitigation, there is still no widely accepted framework for studying systematically the interactions between supply and demand, behavior and technology, production and consumption. So we are left with the question: what do we need to do exactly to stabilize GHG concentrations? Intuitively, we take our cue from Aristotelian logic: if A implies B, then in order to avoid B we had better prevent A. At this level it is clear that we need either to decarbonize our energy systems to start with, or to suck out CO2 from the atmosphere. When multiple causes are at work, however, our neat Aristotelian picture is no longer appropriate (Cartwright 2003). Leaving capturing and storage aside, we need to decarbonize our systems, but we also need to reduce the energy intensity, change our personal habits, eat less meat, use more public transportation, etc. What is the right balance between these factors? Can we do just one thing, say, eat less meat, but not another, and still achieve some pretty ambitious mitigation goals? In other words, what are necessary and what are sufficient sets of measures to reach these goals? Let us first look at the question of necessary measures. This gets tricky when applied to individual consumers: it is somewhat akin to the notorious question whether a heap of sand is still a heap when you take away one grain (Sainsbury 2011). If you are inclined to say yes, think once more. What happens when you take away another one, and another one, and another one, and so

  18. A grain of sand or a handful of dust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Fabian

    2013-03-01

    The recent paper by Girod et al (2013) analyses the implications of stringent global GHG mitigation targets for the intensities of, inter alia , broad consumption categories like food, shelter and transport. This type of scenario modeling analysis and inverse reasoning helps us to better understand the potential or required contribution of changes in consumption patterns to mitigation. This is welcome because while there is a growing literature on the behavioral and consumption dimensions of mitigation, there is still no widely accepted framework for studying systematically the interactions between supply and demand, behavior and technology, production and consumption. So we are left with the question: what do we need to do exactly to stabilize GHG concentrations? Intuitively, we take our cue from Aristotelian logic: if A implies B, then in order to avoid B we had better prevent A. At this level it is clear that we need either to decarbonize our energy systems to start with, or to suck out CO2 from the atmosphere. When multiple causes are at work, however, our neat Aristotelian picture is no longer appropriate (Cartwright 2003). Leaving capturing and storage aside, we need to decarbonize our systems, but we also need to reduce the energy intensity, change our personal habits, eat less meat, use more public transportation, etc. What is the right balance between these factors? Can we do just one thing, say, eat less meat, but not another, and still achieve some pretty ambitious mitigation goals? In other words, what are necessary and what are sufficient sets of measures to reach these goals? Let us first look at the question of necessary measures. This gets tricky when applied to individual consumers: it is somewhat akin to the notorious question whether a heap of sand is still a heap when you take away one grain (Sainsbury 2011). If you are inclined to say yes, think once more. What happens when you take away another one, and another one, and another one, and so

  19. Grain Size Distribution and Health Risk Assessment of Metals in Outdoor Dust in Chengdu, Southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengqin; Pi, Lu; Luo, Yan; Geng, Meng; Hu, Wenli; Li, Zhi; Su, Shijun; Gan, Zhiwei; Ding, Sanglan

    2016-04-01

    A total of 27 outdoor dust samples from roads, parks, and high spots were collected and analyzed to investigate the contamination of 11 metals (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Cd, Sb, and Pb) in Chengdu, China. The results showed that the samples from the high spots exhibited the highest heavy metal level compared with those from the roads and the parks, except for Ni, Cu, and Pb. The dust was classified into five grain size fractions. The mean loads of each grain size fraction of 11 determined metals displayed similar distribution, and the contribution of median size (63-125, 125-250, 250-500 μm) fractions accounted for more than 70 % of overall heavy metal loads. The health risk posed by the determined metals to human via dust ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation was investigated. Oral and respiratory bioaccessible parts of the metals in dust were extracted using simulated stomach solution and composite lung serum. The mean bioaccessibilities of 11 investigated metals in the gastric solution were much higher than those in the composite lung serum, especially Zn, Cd, and Pb. Ingestion was the most important exposure pathway with percentage greater than 70 % for both children and adults. Risk evaluation results illustrated that children in Chengdu might suffer noncarcinogenic risk when exposed to outdoor dust. Given that the cancer risk values of Pb and Cr larger than 1 × 10(-4), potential carcinogenic risk might occur for Chengdu residents through outdoor dust intake. PMID:26843369

  20. Summer insolation is the primary driver for orbital-scale dust storm variability in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serno, Sascha; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Kienast, Stephanie S.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2016-04-01

    Eolian dust plays an important role in the global climate system through its influence on radiation, albedo and precipitation properties, and through delivering micronutrients like iron to the oceans. Glacial periods of Earth's climate are recognized to be dustier than interglacials, but the conditions leading to greater dust mobilization are poorly defined. We present a high-resolution dust flux record based on 230Th-normalised 4He flux from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) site 882 in the Subarctic North Pacific covering the last 170,000 years. Today, dust storms in the vast dry regions of East Asia are almost exclusively springtime phenomena, due to a specific set of climate conditions driven by the seasonal evolution of the meridional temperature gradient between high and low latitudes. The dust flux record points to high dust storm activity in East Asia during cold periods, with highest dust flux during Marine Isotope Stages 4 and 5d. We interpret periods of higher dust supply as the result of an expansion of the dust season into the summer, primarily controlled by reduced summer insolation at high latitudes and resulting lower air temperatures in Siberia over orbital timescales. Changes in the extent of the large Northern Hemisphere ice sheets in North America and Fennoscandinavia, and atmospheric teleconnections, act as a secondary control. On millennial timescales, the occurrence of Heinrich Stadials 1 and 11 signals during the last two terminations in Subarctic North Pacific dust records indicates that dust flux variability over millennial timescales was influenced by climate changes in the North Atlantic.

  1. Ion drag force on a dust grain in a weakly ionized collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, I. L.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2013-01-15

    The problem of calculating the ion drag force acting on a dust grain immersed in a weakly ionized collisional plasma is studied using an approach based on the direct numerical solution of the Vlasov-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equations. A uniform subthermal flow of argon plasma past a spherical dust grain is considered. The numerical computations are performed for a wide range of plasma pressures. On the basis of the obtained results, the effect of ion-neutral collisions on the ion drag force is analyzed in a wide range of ion collisionality. In the collisionless limit, our results are shown to be in good agreement with the results obtained by the binary collision approach. As the ion collisionality increases, the ion drag force is found to decrease sharply and even become negative, i.e., directed oppositely to the plasma flow. A qualitative explanation of this effect is presented and a comparison of our results with those obtained using the drift diffusion approach is discussed. The velocity dependence of the ion drag force in the highly collisional regime is examined. The relationship between the ion and the neutral drag forces in the highly collisional limit is analyzed and the possibility of a superfluid-like behavior of dust grains is discussed.

  2. COMET 22P/KOPFF: DUST ENVIRONMENT AND GRAIN EJECTION ANISOTROPY FROM VISIBLE AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, Fernando; Pozuelos, Francisco; Aceituno, Francisco; Casanova, Victor; Sota, Alfredo

    2012-06-20

    We present optical observations and Monte Carlo models of the dust coma, tail, and trail structures of the comet 22P/Kopff during the 2002 and 2009 apparitions. Dust loss rates, ejection velocities, and power-law size distribution functions are derived as functions of the heliocentric distance using pre- and post-perihelion imaging observations during both apparitions. The 2009 post-perihelion images can be accurately fitted by an isotropic ejection model. On the other hand, strong dust ejection anisotropies are required to fit the near-coma regions at large heliocentric distances (both inbound at r{sub h} = 2.5 AU and outbound at r{sub h} = 2.6 AU) for the 2002 apparition. These asymmetries are compatible with a scenario where dust ejection is mostly seasonally driven, coming mainly from regions near subsolar latitudes at far heliocentric distances inbound and outbound. At intermediate to near-perihelion heliocentric distances, the outgassing would affect much more extended latitude regions, the emission becoming almost isotropic near perihelion. We derived a maximum dust production rate of 260 kg s{sup -1} at perihelion, and an averaged production rate over one orbit of 40 kg s{sup -1}. An enhanced emission rate, also accompanied by a large ejection velocity, is predicted at r{sub h} > 2.5 pre-perihelion. The model has also been extended to the thermal infrared in order to be applied to available trail observations of this comet taken with IRAS and Infrared Space Observatory spacecrafts. The modeled trail intensities are in good agreement with those observations, which is remarkable taking into account that those data are sensitive to dust ejection patterns corresponding to several orbits before the 2002 and 2009 apparitions.

  3. A Test of Dust Grain Alignment via Far-Infrared Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaillancourt, John E.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar dust grains are aligned with their physical and spin axes parallel to the ambient magnetic field. This fact is supported by polarization observations from ultraviolet to millimeter wavelengths. The radiative torque (RT) mechanism, by which the grains become aligned, has recently survived a number of specific observational tests. One such observation is the relation between the alignment efficiency and the angle between the magnetic field and the radiation responsible for the RTs. The interaction of light with irregularly shaped grains results in a net torque and spin-up of the grain, while magnetization arising within a spinning grain results in precession of the spin axis about the magnetic field. The combination of these two effects leads to alignment of the grain with the field and predicts a correlation between alignment efficiency and the angle between the radiation- and magnetic- field directions. Andersson et al. (2011, A&A, 534, A19) showed that the alignment efficiency, centered on the star HD 97300, varied with angle about the star with a 180-degree period, consistent with theory. While the geometry towards HD 97300 provides a strong test of the RT-vs.-angle prediction, finding such simple geometries for further tests is difficult. Here we identify a similar geometry towards the Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinmann-Low (BNKL) object in the Orion molecular cloud. Using polarized emission at 100, 350, and 850 micron we find a clear periodic signal in polarization vs. azimuth centered on BNKL, again, in agreement with RT theory predictions. Additionally, the signal is stronger at shorter wavelengths, as would be expected if the same photons providing the RTs are also heating the dust grains.The authors acknowledge support for this work from the National Science Foundation grant AST 11-09469.

  4. Laboratory Measurements on Charging of Individual Micron-Size Apollo-11 Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2012-03-01

    We present some examples of the complex nature of secondary electron emissions from lunar dust grains levitated in an electrodynamic balance, and show that the measurements are unaffected by the variation of the AC field employed in the experiments.

  5. Planck early results. XX. New light on anomalous microwave emission from spinning dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Dickinson, C.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Procopio, P.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reich, W.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Verstraete, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Ysard, N.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed by numerous experiments in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. Using Planck maps and multi-frequency ancillary data, we have constructed spectra for two known AME regions: the Perseus and ρ Ophiuchi molecular clouds. The spectra are well fitted by a combination of free-free radiation, cosmic microwave background, thermal dust, and electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The spinning dust spectra are the most precisely measured to date, and show the high frequency side clearly for the first time. The spectra have a peak in the range 20-40 GHz and are detected at high significances of 17.1σ for Perseus and 8.4σ for ρ Ophiuchi. In Perseus, spinning dust in the dense molecular gas can account for most of the AME; the low density atomic gas appears to play a minor role. In ρ Ophiuchi, the ~30 GHz peak is dominated by dense molecular gas, but there is an indication of an extended tail at frequencies 50-100 GHz, which can be accounted for by irradiated low density atomic gas. The dust parameters are consistent with those derived from other measurements. We have also searched the Planck map at 28.5 GHz for candidate AME regions, by subtracting a simple model of the synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We present spectra for two of the candidates; S140 and S235 are bright Hii regions that show evidence for AME, and are well fitted by spinning dust models. Corresponding author: C. Dickinson, Clive.Dickinson@manchester.ac.uk

  6. Coarse-grained cosmological perturbation theory: Stirring up the dust model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, Cora; Kopp, Michael

    2015-04-01

    We study the effect of coarse graining the dynamics of a pressureless self-gravitating fluid (coarse-grained dust) in the context of cosmological perturbation theory, in both the Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks. We obtain recursion relations for the Eulerian perturbation kernels of the coarse-grained dust model by relating them to those of the standard pressureless fluid model. The effect of the coarse graining is illustrated by means of power and cross spectra for the density and velocity, which are computed up to one-loop order. In particular, the large-scale vorticity power spectrum that arises naturally from a mass-weighted velocity is derived from first principles. We find qualitatively good agreement for the magnitude, shape, and spectral index of the vorticity power spectrum with recent measurements from N -body simulations and results from the effective field theory of large-scale structure. To lay the ground for applications in the context of Lagrangian perturbation theory, we finally describe how the kernels obtained in Eulerian space can be mapped to Lagrangian ones.

  7. Size distribution of dust grains: A problem of self-similarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henning, TH.; Dorschner, J.; Guertler, J.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution functions describing the results of natural processes frequently show the shape of power laws, e.g., mass functions of stars and molecular clouds, velocity spectrum of turbulence, size distributions of asteroids, micrometeorites and also interstellar dust grains. It is an open question whether this behavior is a result simply coming about by the chosen mathematical representation of the observational data or reflects a deep-seated principle of nature. The authors suppose the latter being the case. Using a dust model consisting of silicate and graphite grains Mathis et al. (1977) showed that the interstellar extinction curve can be represented by taking a grain radii distribution of power law type n(a) varies as a(exp -p) with 3.3 less than or equal to p less than or equal to 3.6 (example 1) as a basis. A different approach to understanding power laws like that in example 1 becomes possible by the theory of self-similar processes (scale invariance). The beta model of turbulence (Frisch et al., 1978) leads in an elementary way to the concept of the self-similarity dimension D, a special case of Mandelbrot's (1977) fractal dimension. In the frame of this beta model, it is supposed that on each stage of a cascade the system decays to N clumps and that only the portion beta N remains active further on. An important feature of this model is that the active eddies become less and less space-filling. In the following, the authors assume that grain-grain collisions are such a scale-invarient process and that the remaining grains are the inactive (frozen) clumps of the cascade. In this way, a size distribution n(a) da varies as a(exp -(D+1))da (example 2) results. It seems to be highly probable that the power law character of the size distribution of interstellar dust grains is the result of a self-similarity process. We can, however, not exclude that the process leading to the interstellar grain size distribution is not fragmentation at all. It could be, e

  8. Carbon and silicate grains in the laboratory as analogues of cosmic dust.

    PubMed

    Mennella, V; Brucato, J R; Colangeli, L

    2001-03-15

    Carbon and silicate grains are the two main components of cosmic dust. There is increasing spectroscopic evidence that their composition varies according to the cosmic environment and the experienced processing. Irradiation from ultraviolet photons and cosmic rays, as well as chemical interactions with the interstellar gas play a crucial role for grain transformation. The study of 'laboratory analogues' represents a powerful tool to better understand the nature and evolution of cosmic materials. In particular, simulations of grain processing are fundamental to outline an evolutionary pathway for interstellar particles. In the present work, we discuss the ultraviolet and infrared spectral changes induced by thermal annealing, ultraviolet irradiation, ion irradiation and hydrogen atom bombardment in carbon and silicate analogue materials. The laboratory results give the opportunity to shed light on the long-standing problems of the attribution of ultraviolet and infrared interstellar spectral features. PMID:11345254

  9. On the Evolution of the Mass Distribution on Interstellar Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hee

    1995-01-01

    Mass distributions of interstellar dust grains have been determined using the objective maximum entropy method based on modeling the wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and polarization in various environments. For the extinction analysis, we adopted bare spherical silicate and graphite grains. The mass distributions found are qualitatively similar to a widely used power-law distribution, however they depart significantly to achieve a good fit to the data (the detailed structure depends on the chemical composition). We also show how the mass distribution falls off smoothly toward large sizes (radii > 0.3 μm). At small sizes (< 0.02 μm) only the total mass of grains can be constrained. Most of the analysis for the polarization is based on bare silicate grains. Infinite cylinders as well as spheroids are considered. The aligned grain mass distributions found bear little resemblance to a power law. Compared to the mass distribution based on extinction, there is a close similarity for large grains, but it is not necessary to have nearly as many small grains. An oblate shape is preferred to prolate. Among materials explored, silicate is the most satisfactory. An interesting problem arises in explaining the wavelength dependence of ultraviolet interstellar polarization, if the refractive index of "astronomical silicate is adopted, but the problem is much reduced if the rise of electronic absorption is simply shifted by about 1 mu m^{-1} to higher frequencies. While this is not unlike obsidian, a volcanic glass, laboratory measurements for many more amorphous silicates are needed. There is a systematic reduction in the relative number of small grains with a<0.1murm m in the more dense regions. On the other hand, there is not any noticeable variation for large grains. This suggests that aggregation plays a major role in the variation of the mass distribution as the medium becomes more dense (with shattering operating in reverse). Theoretical studies of

  10. Heavy metal speciation in various grain sizes of industrially contaminated street dust using multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Gülşen; Tokalıoğlu, Şerife

    2016-02-01

    A total of 36 street dust samples were collected from the streets of the Organised Industrial District in Kayseri, Turkey. This region includes a total of 818 work places in various industrial areas. The modified BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure was applied to evaluate the mobility and bioavailability of trace elements (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in street dusts of the study area. The BCR was classified into three steps: water/acid soluble fraction, reducible and oxidisable fraction. The remaining residue was dissolved by using aqua regia. The concentrations of the metals in street dust samples were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Also the effect of the different grain sizes (<38µm, 38-53µm and 53-74µm) of the 36 street dust samples on the mobility of the metals was investigated using the modified BCR procedure. The mobility sequence based on the sum of the first three phases (for <74µm grain size) was: Cd (71.3)>Cu (48.9)>Pb (42.8)=Cr (42.1)>Ni (41.4)>Zn (40.9)>Co (36.6)=Mn (36.3)>Fe (3.1). No significant difference was observed among metal partitioning for the three particle sizes. Correlation, principal component and cluster analysis were applied to identify probable natural and anthropogenic sources in the region. The principal component analysis results showed that this industrial district was influenced by traffic, industrial activities, air-borne emissions and natural sources. The accuracy of the results was checked by analysis of both the BCR-701 certified reference material and by recovery studies in street dust samples. PMID:26595510

  11. Determination of mineralogy and grain size of the magnetic fraction from outdoor and indoor urban dust from several Bulgarian cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Petar; Jordanova, Neli; Jordanova, Diana

    2014-05-01

    Dust is the most important factor determining urban air quality. The identification of magnetic minerals, carriers of magnetic signal of dust samples, is important for a correct interpretation of concentration, domain state and grain-size indicative parameters. The aim of the present study is to characterize magnetically indoor and outdoor dusts from six big cities in Bulgaria and to link them to degree of pollution of the environment. The aim is also to propose the most effective methods for characterization: thermomagnetic analysis of magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), hysteresis loops. Dust material was collected monthly during the period May 2009- November 2010. The main magnetic mineral in outdoor and indoor dust, identified by thermomagnetic analysis of magnetic susceptibility, is magnetite (Fe3O4). The dominant role of magnetite in determination of magnetic signal of the studied dusts allows the use of hysteresis parameters as proxies for the effective magnetic grain size of ferrimagnetic grains. The calculated ratios Mrs/Ms and Bcr/Bc vary in the intervals (0.055 - 0.1) and (3.08 - 5.14), respectively. The coercivity of magnetic fraction in indoor dust is lower compared to that of outdoor dust. This dependence probably shows that the main source of dust is the outside pollution with PM10. Higher values typical for outdoor dust in comparison with respective sample from indoor dust show that quantity of the paramagnetic minerals is higher in outdoor dust. Probable source of such particles is dust from erosion of soils in the area.

  12. Formation of Molecules on Cosmic Dust Grains:From H2 to Astrobiology Frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Jean Louis

    2014-06-01

    If the role of dust grains in the formation of molecules in the ISM is now well accepted (as suggested almost 50 years ago) numerous questions remain yet unresolved despite serious experimental and theoretical efforts. This is the case for H2 (after ~20 years research) and more recently for larger molecules. For the latter the topical hot problem is to find a link between astrophysics and astrobiology in search of the origin of life in the universe, obviously a key question of paramount interest and general fascination.Both laboratory experiments and theory are necessary to interpret the wealth of increasing observational results and their improvements through new instrumental developments. The aim is to derive from them the physical and chemical conditions (and/or their dynamic evolution) in the remote regions of the ISM. In the laboratory a variety of multi-disciplinary experimental approaches are used to study the large number of parameters involved in the catalytic role of dust grains in the formation process and its different stages.The first step is to manufacture analogs of a dust grain, using several techniques. The most important parameters of a dust surface (and volume) are its nature and morphology. Carbonaceous or siliceous grains are fabricated, either bare or covered by a variety of ices, which have to be well-characterized.The second step covers the study of the formation mechanism(s) of molecules on a dust surface. This will be illustrated with two examples: H2 and prebiotic molecules. The main interest in the case of H2 is to learn about the fate of the energy released 4.5 eV per H2) in the formation process, due to its determinant role in star formation. In the case of prebiotic molecules the main interest is that they can be considered as precursors of the formation of complex organic compounds (like amino acids) which are subsequently at the origin of more complex biological material.The third and particularly important step is to establish a

  13. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves in inhomogeneous four-component dusty plasma with opposite charge polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    El-Taibany, W. F.

    2013-09-15

    The reductive perturbation technique is employed to investigate the propagation properties of nonlinear dust acoustic (DA) waves in a four-component inhomogeneous dusty plasma (4CIDP). The 4CIDP consists of both positive- and negative-charge dust grains, characterized by different mass, temperature, and density, in addition to a background of Maxwellian electrons and ions. The inhomogeneity caused by nonuniform equilibrium values of particle densities, fluid velocities, and electrostatic potential leads to a significant modification to the nature of nonlinear DA solitary waves. It is found that this model reveals two DA wave velocities, one slow, λ{sub s}, and the other is fast, λ{sub f}. The nonlinear wave evolution is governed by a modified Kortweg-de Vries equation, whose coefficients are space dependent. Both the two soliton types; compressive and rarefactive are allowed corresponding to λ{sub s}. However, only compressive soliton is created corresponding to λ{sub f}. The numerical investigations illustrate the dependence of the soliton amplitude, width, and velocity on the plasma inhomogeneities in each case. The relevance of these theoretical results with 4CIDPs observed in a multi-component plasma configurations in the polar mesosphere is discussed.

  14. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  15. From Dust Grains to Planetesimals: The Importance of the Streaming Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Youdin, Andrew N.; Li, Rixin

    2016-01-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of protoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  16. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  17. Nonplanar dynamics of variable size dust grains in nonextensive dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behery, E. E.; Selim, M. M.; El-Taibany, W. F.

    2015-11-01

    The nonplanar propagation of variable size dust grains in an unmagnetized, collisionless nonplanar (cylindrical) dusty plasma is investigated. The plasma is composed of cold positive and negative dust fluids and nonextensively distributed ions and electrons. The dust size distribution (DSD) is proposed to obey a power law distribution function which is widely applicable in space plasmas. The reductive perturbation technique is employed, and a cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation, describing the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves (DAWs), is obtained. New solutions of this evolution equation (hyperbolic, trigeometrical, and rational) are obtained using G ' / G -expansion method. In addition, the proposed model permits the two soliton types, i.e., the rarefactive and compressive solitons. It is found that the DSD and nonextensive distributions have drastic effects on the basic properties of the nonlinear cylindrical DAWs; the phase velocity, the amplitude, and the width. The applications of the present findings in certain astrophysics environments (such as Jupiter's magnetosphere and Earth's mesosphere), where both of the DSD and the geometrical effects are important, are discussed.

  18. PRESOLAR GRAINS FROM NOVAE: EVIDENCE FROM NEON AND HELIUM ISOTOPES IN COMET DUST COLLECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Robert O.; Palma, Russell L.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Starrfield, Sumner

    2011-12-01

    Presolar grains in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles carry non-solar isotopic signatures pointing to origins in supernovae, giant stars, and possibly other stellar sources. There have been suggestions that some of these grains condensed in the ejecta of classical nova outbursts, but the evidence is ambiguous. We report neon and helium compositions in particles captured on stratospheric collectors flown to sample materials from comets 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup and 55P/Tempel-Tuttle that point to condensation of their gas carriers in the ejecta of a neon (ONe) nova. The absence of detectable {sup 3}He in these particles indicates space exposure to solar wind irradiation of a few decades at most, consistent with origins in cometary dust streams. Measured {sup 4}He/{sup 20}Ne, {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne, {sup 21}Ne/{sup 22}Ne, and {sup 20}Ne/{sup 21}Ne isotope ratios, and a low upper limit on {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He, are in accord with calculations of nucleosynthesis in neon nova outbursts. Of these, the uniquely low {sup 4}He/{sup 20}Ne and high {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios are the most diagnostic, reflecting the large predicted {sup 20}Ne abundances in the ejecta of such novae. The correspondence of measured Ne and He compositions in cometary matter with theoretical predictions is evidence for the presence of presolar grains from novae in the early solar system.

  19. Supernova dust formation and the grain growth in the early universe: the critical metallicity for low-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaki, Gen; Marassi, Stefania; Nozawa, Takaya; Yoshida, Naoki; Schneider, Raffaella; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the condition for the formation of low-mass second-generation stars in the early Universe. It has been proposed that gas cooling by dust thermal emission can trigger fragmentation of a low-metallicity star-forming gas cloud. In order to determine the critical condition in which dust cooling induces the formation of low-mass stars, we follow the thermal evolution of a collapsing cloud by a one-zone semi-analytic collapse model. Earlier studies assume the dust amount in the local Universe, where all refractory elements are depleted on to grains, and/or assume the constant dust amount during gas collapse. In this paper, we employ the models of dust formation and destruction in early supernovae to derive the realistic dust compositions and size distributions for multiple species as the initial conditions of our collapse calculations. We also follow accretion of heavy elements in the gas phase on to dust grains, i.e. grain growth, during gas contraction. We find that grain growth well alters the fragmentation property of the clouds. The critical conditions can be written by the gas metallicity Zcr and the initial depletion efficiency fdep,0 of gas-phase metal on to grains, or dust-to-metal mass ratio, as (Zcr/10-5.5 Z⊙) = (fdep,0/0.18)-0.44 with small scatters in the range of Zcr = [0.06-3.2] × 10-5 Z⊙. We also show that the initial dust composition and size distribution are important to determine Zcr.

  20. Direct Monte Carlo and multifluid modeling of the circumnuclear dust coma. Spherical grain dynamics revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crifo, J.-F.; Loukianov, G. A.; Rodionov, A. V.; Zakharov, V. V.

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the first computations of dust distributions in the vicinity of an active cometary nucleus, using a multidimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method (DSMC). The physical model is simplistic: spherical grains of a broad range of sizes are liberated by H 2O sublimation from a selection of nonrotating sunlit spherical nuclei, and submitted to the nucleus gravity, the gas drag, and the solar radiation pressure. The results are compared to those obtained by the previously described Dust Multi-Fluid Method (DMF) and demonstrate an excellent agreement in the regions where the DMF is usable. Most importantly, the DSMC allows the discovery of hitherto unsuspected dust coma properties in those cases which cannot be treated by the DMF. This leads to a thorough reconsideration of the properties of the near-nucleus dust dynamics. In particular, the results show that (1) none of the three forces considered here can be neglected a priori, in particular not the radiation pressure; (2) hitherto unsuspected new families of grain trajectories exist, for instance trajectories leading from the nightside surface to the dayside coma; (3) a wealth of balistic-like trajectories leading from one point of the surface to another point exist; on the dayside, such trajectories lead to the formation of "mini-volcanoes." The present model and results are discussed carefully. It is shown that (1) the neglected forces (inertia associated with a nucleus rotation, solar tidal force) are, in general, not negligible everywhere, and (2) when allowing for these additional forces, a time-dependent model will, in general, have to be used. The future steps of development of the model are outlined.

  1. Pseudopotential approach for dust acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with kappa-distributed ions and electrons and dust grains having power law size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Gadadhar; Maitra, Sarit

    2015-04-15

    Sagdeev's pseudopotential method is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude dust acoustic solitons in a dusty plasma with kappa distributed electrons and ions with dust grains having power law size distribution. The existence of potential well solitons has been shown for suitable parametric region. The criterion for existence of soliton is derived in terms of upper and lower limit for Mach numbers. The numerical results show that the size distribution can affect the existence as well as the propagation characteristics of the dust acoustic solitons. The effect of kappa distribution is also highlighted.

  2. A continuum model for the orbit evolution of self-propelled `smart dust' swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Colin R.

    2016-06-01

    A continuity equation is developed to model the evolution of a swarm of self-propelled `smart dust' devices in heliocentric orbit driven by solar radiation pressure. These devices are assumed to be MEMs-scale (micro-electromechanical systems) with a large area-to-mass ratio. For large numbers of devices it will be assumed that a continuum approximation can be used to model their orbit evolution. The families of closed-form solutions to the resulting swarm continuity equation then represent the evolution of the number density of devices as a function of both position and time from a set of initial data. Forcing terms are also considered which model swarm sources and sinks (device deposition and device failure). The closed-form solutions presented for the swarm number density provide insights into the behaviour of swarms of self-propelled `smart dust' devices an can form the basis of more complex mission design methodologies.

  3. A local dust storm in the Chryse region of Mars - Viking Orbiter observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, P. B.; Evans, N.

    1981-01-01

    A local dust storm was observed near the Viking Lander 1 site by Viking Orbiter 1 in September, 1977, when the areocentric longitude of the sun (L sub s) was 340 deg (shortly before vernal equinox). The orbiter observations, which consisted of a time sequence of pictures, show that the storm moved at about 50 m/sec to the ENE from the Lunae-Planum region into the Chryse basin. Both baroclinic waves and topography may have been associated with the generation of the storm.

  4. Tables of phase functions, opacities, albedos, equilibrium temperatures, and radiative accelerations of dust grains in exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaj, J.; Kocifaj, M.; Salmeron, R.; Hubeny, I.

    2015-11-01

    There has been growing observational evidence for the presence of condensates in the atmospheres and/or comet-like tails of extrasolar planets. As a result, systematic and homogeneous tables of dust properties are useful in order to facilitate further observational and theoretical studies. In this paper we present calculations and analysis of non-isotropic phase functions, asymmetry parameter (mean cosine of the scattering angle), absorption and scattering opacities, single scattering albedos, equilibrium temperatures, and radiative accelerations of dust grains relevant for extrasolar planets. Our assumptions include spherical grain shape, Deirmendjian particle size distribution, and Mie theory. We consider several species: corundum/alumina, perovskite, olivines with 0 and 50 per cent iron content, pyroxenes with 0, 20, and 60 per cent iron content, pure iron, carbon at two different temperatures, water ice, liquid water, and ammonia. The presented tables cover the wavelength range of 0.2-500 μm and modal particle radii from 0.01 to 100 μm. Equilibrium temperatures and radiative accelerations assume irradiation by a non-blackbody source of light with temperatures from 7000 to 700 K seen at solid angles from 2π to 10-6 sr. The tables are provided to the community together with a simple code which allows for an optional, finite, angular dimension of the source of light (star) in the phase function.

  5. Work-related asthma in a population exposed to grain, flour and other ingredient dusts.

    PubMed

    Smith, T A; Lumley, K P

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence and causation of work-related asthmatic symptoms in a population exposed to grain, flour and other ingredient dusts. Where workers complained of asthmatic symptoms which were the result of dust exposure, follow-up aimed to identify whether the symptoms were the result of sensitisation or of non-specific irritation. A questionnaire was presented to 3,450 workers who had exposure to dust during the course of flour milling (528), bread baking (1,756), cake baking (209) and other activities in food preparation (957). Those with positive responses were followed-up by taking a formal history, examination, skin prick testing and serial peak flow measurement. The overall prevalence of work-related asthmatic symptoms was 4.4% (153 out of 3,450). In the group who were followed-up (128 out of 153), non-specific respiratory irritation was thought to be the cause in 90 (2.6%), whilst sensitisation was responsible for symptoms in 12 (0.3%). Of the 12 cases due to sensitisation, the agents responsible were: fungal amylase (10 cases, all associated with bread baking), flour (one case, associated with flour packing), and grain (one case, associated with flour milling). Non-specific irritation is considerably more common than sensitisation as the cause of work-related asthmatic symptoms in flour milling, baking and other flour-based industries. The prevalence of sensitisation to flour is very low (less than 1 in 1,000) in all these industries. The principal sensitiser encountered in modern plant bakeries appears to be fungal amylase. The most important source of exposure to fungal amylase is probably the debagging, sieving, weighing and mixing of bread improvers. PMID:8672792

  6. Downwind changes in grain size of aeolian dust; examples from marine and terrestrial archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Prins, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust in the atmosphere may have a cooling effect when small particles in the high atmosphere block incoming solar energy (e.g., Claquin et al., 2003) but it may also act as a 'greenhouse gas' when larger particles in the lower atmosphere trap energy that was reflected from the Earth's surface (e.g., Otto et al., 2007). Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a good understanding of the particle-size distribution of aeolian dust in space and time. As wind is a very size-selective transport mechanism, the sediments it carries typically have a very-well sorted grain-size distribution, which gradually fines from proximal to distal deposition sites. This fact has been used in numerous paleo-environmental studies to both determine source-to-sink changes in the particle size of aeolian dust (e.g., Weltje and Prins, 2003; Holz et al., 2004; Prins and Vriend, 2007) and to quantify mass-accumulation rates of aeolian dust (e.g., Prins and Weltje 1999; Stuut et al., 2002; Prins et al., 2007; Prins and Vriend, 2007; Stuut et al., 2007; Tjallingii et al., 2008; Prins et al., 2009). Studies on modern wind-blown particles have demonstrated that particle size of dust not only is a function of lateral but also vertical transport distance (e.g., Torres-Padron et al., 2002; Stuut et al., 2005). Nonetheless, there are still many unresolved questions related to the physical properties of wind-blown particles like e.g., the case of "giant" quartz particles found on Hawaii (Betzer et al., 1988) that can only originate from Asia but have a too large size for the distance they travelled through the atmosphere. Here, we present examples of dust particle-size distributions from terrestrial (loess) as well as marine (deep-sea sediments) sedimentary archives and their spatial and temporal changes. With this contribution we hope to provide quantitative data for the modelling community in order to get a better grip on the role of wind-blown particles in the climate system. Cited

  7. Ice in space: surface science investigations of the thermal desorption of model interstellar ices on dust grain analogue surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daren J; Brown, Wendy A

    2010-06-21

    More than 140 different molecules have been identified in the interstellar medium (ISM) to date. Dust grain particles are also found in the ISM, and some of these molecules freeze out at the cold temperatures (10-20 K) to form molecular ices. Understanding the adsorption and desorption of these ices is crucially important in understanding the processes that lead to star and planet formation, and may even help to lead to an understanding of the origin of life itself. High sensitivity surface science techniques, including temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), are being increasingly used to investigate the interactions between dust grains and interstellar ices. This perspective provides an overview of the current level of understanding of the adsorption and desorption of astrophysically relevant molecules from a range of dust grain analogue surfaces. Whilst the focus of this review is on interstellar ices, the results discussed are equally valid to discussions of cometary and planetary ices. PMID:20520900

  8. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part II--Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens--focus on grain dust, other agricultural dusts and wood dust.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Skórska, Czesława; Góra-Florek, Anna; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans, a Gram-negative bacterium developing in a variety of plants as epiphyte or endophyte is particularly common in grain and grain dust, and has been identified by an interdisciplinary group from Lublin, eastern Poland, as a causative agent of work-related diseases associated with exposure to grain dust and other agricultural dusts. The concentration of P. agglomerans in grain as well as in the settled grain and flour dust was found to be high, ranging from 10(4)-10(8) CFU/g, while in the air polluted with grain or flour dust it ranged from 10(3)-10(5) CFU/m(3) and formed 73.2-96% of the total airborne Gram-negative bacteria. The concentration of P. agglomerans was also relatively high in the air of the facilities processing herbs and other plant materials, while it was lower in animal farms and in wood processing facilities. Pantoea agglomerans produces a biologically-potent endotoxin (cell wall lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The significant part of this endotoxin occurs in dusts in the form of virus-sized globular nanoparticles measuring 10-50 nm that could be described as the 'endotoxin super-macromolecules'. A highly significant relationship was found (R=0.804, P=0.000927) between the concentration of the viable P. agglomerans in the air of various agricultural and wood industry settings and the concentration of bacterial endotoxin in the air, as assessed by the Limulus test. Although this result may be interfered by the presence of endotoxin produced by other Gram-negative species, it unequivocally suggests the primary role of the P. agglomerans endotoxin as an adverse agent in the agricultural working environment, causing toxic pneumonitis (ODTS). Numerous experiments by the inhalation exposure of animals to various extracts of P. agglomerans strains isolated from grain dust, including endotoxin isolated with trichloroacetic acid (LPS-TCA), endotoxin nanoparticles isolated in sucrose gradient (VECN), and mixture of proteins and endotoxin obtained

  9. Collision velocity of dust grains in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-05-01

    We have conducted the first comprehensive numerical investigation of the relative velocity distribution of dust particles in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs with a view to assessing the viability of planetesimal formation via direct collapse in such environments. The viability depends crucially on the large sizes that are preferentially collected in pressure maxima produced by transient spiral features (Stokes numbers, St ˜ 1); growth to these size scales requires that collision velocities remain low enough that grain growth is not reversed by fragmentation. We show that, for a single-sized dust population, velocity driving by the disc's gravitational perturbations is only effective for St > 3, while coupling to the gas velocity dominates otherwise. We develop a criterion for understanding this result in terms of the stopping distance being of the order of the disc scaleheight. Nevertheless, the relative velocities induced by differential radial drift in multi-sized dust populations are too high to allow the growth of silicate dust particles beyond St ˜ 10- 2 or 10-1 (10 cm to m sizes at 30 au), such Stokes numbers being insufficient to allow concentration of solids in spiral features. However, for icy solids (which may survive collisions up to several 10 m s-1), growth to St ˜ 1 (10 m size) may be possible beyond 30 au from the star. Such objects would be concentrated in spiral features and could potentially produce larger icy planetesimals/comets by gravitational collapse. These planetesimals would acquire moderate eccentricities and remain unmodified over the remaining lifetime of the disc.

  10. Collision velocity of dust grains in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted the first comprehensive numerical investigation of the relative velocity distribution of dust particles in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs with a view to assessing the viability of planetesimal formation via direct collapse in such environments. The viability depends crucially on the large sizes that are preferentially collected in pressure maxima produced by transient spiral features (Stokes numbers, St ∼ 1); growth to these size scales requires that collision velocities remain low enough that grain growth is not reversed by fragmentation. We show that, for a single-sized dust population, velocity driving by the disc's gravitational perturbations is only effective for St > 3, while coupling to the gas velocity dominates otherwise. We develop a criterion for understanding this result in terms of the stopping distance being of the order of the disc scaleheight. Nevertheless, the relative velocities induced by differential radial drift in multi-sized dust populations are too high to allow the growth of silicate dust particles beyond St ∼ 10− 2 or 10−1 (10 cm to m sizes at 30 au), such Stokes numbers being insufficient to allow concentration of solids in spiral features. However, for icy solids (which may survive collisions up to several 10 m s−1), growth to St ∼ 1 (10 m size) may be possible beyond 30 au from the star. Such objects would be concentrated in spiral features and could potentially produce larger icy planetesimals/comets by gravitational collapse. These planetesimals would acquire moderate eccentricities and remain unmodified over the remaining lifetime of the disc. PMID:27346980

  11. Dust torus around Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Antal; Horanyi, Mihaly

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of small dust particles generated via the continuous micrometeoroid bombardment of the Martian moons. In addition to Mar's oblateness, we also consider the radiation pressure perturbation that is complicated by the planet's eccentric orbit and tilted rotational axis. Considering the production rates and the lifetimes of dust grains, we show that particles from Deimos with radii of about 15 micrometers are expected to dominate the population of a permanently present and tilted dust torus. This torus has an estimated peak number density of approximately equals 5 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm and an optical depth of approximately equals 4 x 10(exp -8).

  12. The Evolution of Dust in the Multiphase ISM: Grain Destruction Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfire, Mark

    1999-01-01

    This proposal covered year one of a long term project in which we acquired the necessary hardware and softwaxe needed to calculate grain destruction processes in the interstellar medium (ISM). The long term goal of this research is to develop a model for the dust evolution in the ISM capable of explaining observations of elemental depletions, the grain size distribution, and the emission characteristics of the ISM from the X-ray through the FIR. We purchased a SUN Ultra 10 workstation and peripheral devices including an Exabyte Tape drive, HP Laser Printer, and Seagate External Hard Disk. The PI installed the hardware and Solaris operating system on the workstation and integrated the hardware into the network. Software was also purchased to enable connections to the workstation from a PC (Hummingbird Exceed). Additional freeware required to carry out the proposed program was installed on the system including compilers (g77, gcc, g++), editors (emacs), a markup language (LaTeX), and display programs (WIP, XV, SAOtng). We have also successfully modified the required plot files to work with our system which display the results of grain processing.

  13. Identification of a Compound Spinel and Silicate Presolar Grain in a Chondritic Interplanetary Dust Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, A. N.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Kloeck, W.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) have undergone minimal parent body alteration and contain an assemblage of highly primitive materials, including molecular cloud material, presolar grains, and material that formed in the early solar nebula [1-3]. The exact parent bodies of individual IDPs are not known, but IDPs that have extremely high abundances of presolar silicates (up to 1.5%) most likely have cometary origins [1, 4]. The presolar grain abundance among these minimally altered CP IDPs varies widely. "Isotopically primitive" IDPs distinguished by anomalous bulk N isotopic compositions, numerous 15N-rich hotspots, and some C isotopic anomalies have higher average abundances of presolar grains (375 ppm) than IDPs with isotopically normal bulk N (<10 ppm) [5]. Some D and N isotopic anomalies have been linked to carbonaceous matter, though this material is only rarely isotopically anomalous in C [1, 5, 6]. Previous studies of the bulk chemistry and, in some samples, the mineralogy of select anhydrous CP IDPs indicate a link between high C abundance and pyroxene-dominated mineralogy [7]. In this study, we conduct coordinated mineralogical and isotopic analyses of samples that were analyzed by [7] to characterize isotopically anomalous materials and to establish possible correlations with C abundance.

  14. Modified Korteweg-de Vries soliton reflection in a magnetized plasma with dust grains and trapped electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravinder; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2013-03-15

    This article aims at studying the reflection of solitons in an inhomogeneous magnetized warm plasma having dust grains with positive or negative charge and trapped electrons (low temperature nonisothermal electrons). In order to study the soliton reflection, a coupled modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived and solved along with the use of incident soliton solution. The expressions for the reflected soliton amplitude, width, and reflection coefficient are obtained, and examined under different parameter regimes. The combined effect of the dust grain density with their charge polarity and trapping of the electrons is largely studied on the soliton reflection characteristics under the influence of magnetic field.

  15. Lambert targeting for on-orbit delivery of debris remediation dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Liam

    2012-07-01

    An idea proposed for the elimination of some small debris calls for the deployment of a dust that decreases the energy of the debris, in effect de-orbiting it partway. The delivery of that dust on-orbit is possible by pre-positioning on orbit a vehicle with the intended cargo. If the goal is to reach a specified point in inertial space to precede the return of another vehicle to that point using Lambert targeting, and there is a limit to the amount of delta v available, then some orbits are better choices than others. In the context of dispensing a dust to enhance drag for elimination of debris, I examine the combination of vehicles which gives the most coverage to treat the most populous altitude band of satellites. An idea proposed by Ganguli and coworkers for remediation of on-orbit small debris is to place in orbit a dusty plasma which acts as an artificial atmosphere, bringing down the debris, not immediately, but over months or years. The region of space that should be filled with dust is smaller if it can be applied as soon as possible after the fragmentation event that creates the debris (explosion or collision). It is very time consuming to prepare, launch and deliver a dust-bearing, or ``cleanup'' vehicle, and in that time, the initial delta v from the impact or explosion will spread the fragments over a large volume. If such a vehicle or vehicles are prepared and launched ahead of time, they will need a much shorter time to reach a region filled with debris fragments than a ground launch. The purpose of this study is to determine whether it is practical from an astrodynamics perspective to put a small number of cleanup vehicles on orbit in the most heavily populated neighborhood of low-earth orbit (500-1200 km altitude and 95°-105° inclination) such that if notified a short time after a fragmentation, at least one could reach a significant fraction of the compact debris field before it disperses. Each of the possible sources for orbital debris is

  16. Comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy): Orbit Determination, Outbursts, Disintegration of Nucleus, Dust-tail Morphology, and Relationship to New Cluster of Bright Sungrazers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Chodas, Paul W.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the physical and orbital properties of C/2011 W3. After surviving perihelion passage, the comet was observed to undergo major physical changes. The permanent loss of the nuclear condensation and the formation of a narrow spine tail were observed first at Malargue, Argentina, on December 20 and then systematically at Siding Spring, Australia. The process of disintegration culminated with a terminal fragmentation event on December 17.6 UT. The postperihelion dust tail, observed for ~3 months, was the product of activity over <2 days. The nucleus' breakup and crumbling were probably caused by thermal stress due to the penetration of the intense heat pulse deep into the nucleus' interior after perihelion. The same mechanism may be responsible for cascading fragmentation of sungrazers at large heliocentric distances. The delayed response to the hostile environment in the solar corona is at odds with the rubble-pile model, since the residual mass of the nucleus, estimated at ~1012 g (equivalent to a sphere 150-200 m across) just before the terminal event, still possessed nontrivial cohesive strength. The high production rates of atomic oxygen, observed shortly after perihelion, are compatible with a subkilometer-sized nucleus. The spine tail—the product of the terminal fragmentation—was a synchronic feature, whose brightest part contained submillimeter-sized dust grains, released at velocities of up to 30 m s-1. The loss of the nuclear condensation prevented an accurate orbital-period determination by traditional techniques. Since the missing nucleus must have been located on the synchrone, whose orientation and sunward tip have been measured, we compute the astrometric positions of this missing nucleus as the coordinates of the points of intersection of the spine tail's axis with the lines of forced orbital-period variation, derived from the orbital solutions based on high-quality preperihelion astrometry from the ground. The resulting orbit gives 698

  17. COMET C/2011 W3 (LOVEJOY): ORBIT DETERMINATION, OUTBURSTS, DISINTEGRATION OF NUCLEUS, DUST-TAIL MORPHOLOGY, AND RELATIONSHIP TO NEW CLUSTER OF BRIGHT SUNGRAZERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Chodas, Paul W. E-mail: Paul.W.Chodas@jpl.nasa.gov

    2012-10-01

    We describe the physical and orbital properties of C/2011 W3. After surviving perihelion passage, the comet was observed to undergo major physical changes. The permanent loss of the nuclear condensation and the formation of a narrow spine tail were observed first at Malargue, Argentina, on December 20 and then systematically at Siding Spring, Australia. The process of disintegration culminated with a terminal fragmentation event on December 17.6 UT. The postperihelion dust tail, observed for {approx}3 months, was the product of activity over <2 days. The nucleus' breakup and crumbling were probably caused by thermal stress due to the penetration of the intense heat pulse deep into the nucleus' interior after perihelion. The same mechanism may be responsible for cascading fragmentation of sungrazers at large heliocentric distances. The delayed response to the hostile environment in the solar corona is at odds with the rubble-pile model, since the residual mass of the nucleus, estimated at {approx}10{sup 12} g (equivalent to a sphere 150-200 m across) just before the terminal event, still possessed nontrivial cohesive strength. The high production rates of atomic oxygen, observed shortly after perihelion, are compatible with a subkilometer-sized nucleus. The spine tail-the product of the terminal fragmentation-was a synchronic feature, whose brightest part contained submillimeter-sized dust grains, released at velocities of up to 30 m s{sup -1}. The loss of the nuclear condensation prevented an accurate orbital-period determination by traditional techniques. Since the missing nucleus must have been located on the synchrone, whose orientation and sunward tip have been measured, we compute the astrometric positions of this missing nucleus as the coordinates of the points of intersection of the spine tail's axis with the lines of forced orbital-period variation, derived from the orbital solutions based on high-quality preperihelion astrometry from the ground. The

  18. SPINNING DUST EMISSION: EFFECTS OF IRREGULAR GRAIN SHAPE, TRANSIENT HEATING, AND COMPARISON WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Thiem; Lazarian, A.; Draine, B. T.

    2011-11-10

    Planck is expected to answer crucial questions on the early universe, but it also provides further understanding on anomalous microwave emission. Electric dipole emission from spinning dust grains continues to be the favored interpretation of anomalous microwave emission. In this paper, we present a method to calculate the rotational emission from small grains of irregular shape with moments of inertia I{sub 1} {>=} I{sub 2} {>=} I{sub 3}. We show that a torque-free rotating irregular grain with a given angular momentum radiates at multiple frequency modes. The resulting spinning dust spectrum has peak frequency and emissivity increasing with the degree of grain shape irregularity, which is defined by I{sub 1}:I{sub 2}:I{sub 3}. We discuss how the orientation of the dipole moment {mu} in body coordinates affects the spinning dust spectrum for different regimes of internal thermal fluctuations. We show that the spinning dust emissivity for the case of strong thermal fluctuations is less sensitive to the orientation of {mu} than in the case of weak thermal fluctuations. We calculate spinning dust spectra for a range of gas density and dipole moment. The effect of compressible turbulence on spinning dust emission is investigated. We show that the emission in a turbulent medium increases by a factor from 1.2 to 1.4 relative to that in a uniform medium, as the sonic Mach number M{sub s} increases from 2 to 7. Finally, spinning dust parameters are constrained by fitting our improved model to five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cross-correlation foreground spectra, for both the H{alpha}-correlated and 100-{mu}m-correlated emission spectra.

  19. Stochastic parameterization for light absorption by internally mixed BC/dust in snow grains for application to climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; He, C.; Yang, P.; Leung, L. R.; Gu, Y.; Lee, W. L.

    2014-06-01

    A stochastic approach has been developed to model the positions of BC (black carbon)/dust internally mixed with two snow grain types: hexagonal plate/column (convex) and Koch snowflake (concave). Subsequently, light absorption and scattering analysis can be followed by means of an improved geometric-optics approach coupled with Monte Carlo photon tracing to determine BC/dust single-scattering properties. For a given shape (plate, Koch snowflake, spheroid, or sphere), the action of internal mixing absorbs substantially more light than external mixing. The snow grain shape effect on absorption is relatively small, but its effect on asymmetry factor is substantial. Due to a greater probability of intercepting photons, multiple inclusions of BC/dust exhibit a larger absorption than an equal-volume single inclusion. The spectral absorption (0.2-5 µm) for snow grains internally mixed with BC/dust is confined to wavelengths shorter than about 1.4 µm, beyond which ice absorption predominates. Based on the single-scattering properties determined from stochastic and light absorption parameterizations and using the adding/doubling method for spectral radiative transfer, we find that internal mixing reduces snow albedo substantially more than external mixing and that the snow grain shape plays a critical role in snow albedo calculations through its forward scattering strength. Also, multiple inclusion of BC/dust significantly reduces snow albedo as compared to an equal-volume single sphere. For application to land/snow models, we propose a two-layer spectral snow parameterization involving contaminated fresh snow on top of old snow for investigating and understanding the climatic impact of multiple BC/dust internal mixing associated with snow grain metamorphism, particularly over mountain/snow topography.

  20. LDEF Interplanetary Dust Experiment - Techniques for identification and study of long-lived orbital debris clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, S. F.; Oliver, J. P.; Weinberg, J. L.; Cooke, W. J.; Montague, N. L.; Mulholland, J. D.; Wortman, J. J.; Kassel, P. C.; Kinard, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is a 12-sided, 4.3-m-diameter, 9.1-m-long cylinder designed and built by NASA Langley to carry experiments for extended periods in space. The LDEF was first placed in orbit by the Shuttle Challenger on 7 April 1984 and recovered by the Shuttle Columbia in January 1990, only days before it was expected to burn up in the earth's atmosphere. The Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) was designed to detect impacts of extra-terrestrial particles and orbital debris. The IDE detectors (which covered about 1 sq m of the surface of LDEF) were sensitive to particles ranging in size from about 0.2 to 100 microns. Data were recorded for 11.5 months before the supply of magnetic tape was exhausted. Examination of the LDEF IDE dataset shows that impacts often occurred in 'bursts', during which numerous impacts occurred in a short time (typically 3-5 min) at a rate much greater than the average impact rate. In several cases, such events reoccurred each time the LDEF returned to the same point in its orbit. Such multi-orbit event sequences were found to extend for as many as 25 or more orbits.

  1. A New Determination of the Binding Energy of Atomic Oxygen On Dust Grain Surfaces: Experimental Results and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiao; Shi, Jianming; Hopkins, Tyler; Vidali, Gianfranco; Kaufman, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    The energy to desorb atomic oxygen from an interstellar dust grain surface, Edes, is an important controlling parameter in gas-grain models; its value impacts the temperature range over which oxygen resides on a dust grain. However, no prior measurement has been done of the desorption energy. We report the first direct measurement of Edes for atomic oxygen from dust grain analogs. The values of Edes are 1660 ± 60 and 1850 ± 90 K for porous amorphous water ice and for a bare amorphous silicate film, respectively, or about twice the value previously adopted in simulations of the chemical evolution of a cloud. We use the new values to study oxygen chemistry as a function of depth in a molecular cloud. For n = 104 cm-3 and G0 = 102 (G0 = 1 is the average local interstellar radiation field), the main result of the adoption of the higher oxygen binding energy is that H2O can form on grains at lower visual extinction AV, closer to the cloud surface. A higher binding energy of O results in more formation of OH and H2O on grains, which are subsequently desorbed by far-ultraviolet radiation, with consequences for gas-phase chemistry. For higher values of n and G0, the higher binding energy can lead to a large increase in the column of H2O but a decrease in the column of O2.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR WATER FORMATION VIA OZONE HYDROGENATION ON DUST GRAINS AT 10 K

    SciTech Connect

    Mokrane, H.; Chaabouni, H.; Accolla, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.; Chehrouri, M.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2009-11-10

    The formation of water molecules from the reaction between ozone (O{sub 3}) and D-atoms is studied experimentally for the first time. Ozone is deposited on non-porous amorphous solid water ice (H{sub 2}O), and D-atoms are then sent onto the sample held at 10 K. HDO molecules are detected during the desorption of the whole substrate where isotope mixing takes place, indicating that water synthesis has occurred. The efficiency of water formation via hydrogenation of ozone is of the same order of magnitude as that found for reactions involving O-atoms or O{sub 2} molecules and exhibits no apparent activation barrier. These experiments validate the assumption made by models using ozone as one of the precursors of water formation via solid-state chemistry on interstellar dust grains.

  3. A multi-wavelength scattered light analysis of the dust grain population in the GG Tau circumbinary ring

    SciTech Connect

    Duchene, G; McCabe, C; Ghez, A; Macintosh, B

    2004-02-04

    We present the first 3.8 {micro}m image of the dusty ring surrounding the young binary system GG Tau, obtained with the W. M. Keck II 10m telescope's adaptive optics system. THis is the longest wavelength at which the ring has been detected in scattered light so far, allowing a multi-wavelength analysis of the scattering proiperties of the dust grains present in this protoplanetary disk in combination with previous, shorter wavelengths, HST images. We find that the scattering phase function of the dust grains in the disk is only weakly dependent on the wavelength. This is inconsistent with dust models inferred from observations of the interstellar medium or dense molecular clouds. In particular, the strongly forward-throwing scattering phase function observed at 3.8 {micro}m implies a significant increase in the population of large ({approx}> 1 {micro}m) grains, which provides direct evidence for grain growth in the ring. However, the grain size distribution required to match the 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m image of the ring is incompatible with its published 1 {micro}m polarization map, implying that the dust population is not uniform throughout the ring. We also show that our 3.8 {micro}m scattered light image probes a deeper layer of the ring than previous shorter wavelength images, as demonstrated by a shift in the location of the inner edge of the disk's scattered light distribution between 1 and 3.8 {micro}m. We therefore propose a stratified structure for the ring in which the surface layers, located {approx} 50 AU above the ring midplane, contain dust grains that are very similar to those found in dense molecular clouds, while the region of the ring located {approx} 25 AU from the midplane contains significantly larger grains. This stratified structure is likely the result of vertical

  4. Dust Diffusion and Settling in the Presence of Collisions: Trapping (sub)micron Grains in the Midplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijt, Sebastiaan; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2016-05-01

    In protoplanetary disks, the distribution and abundance of small (sub)micron grains are important for a range of physical and chemical processes. For example, they dominate the optical depth at short wavelengths and their surfaces are the sites of many important chemical reactions, such as the formation of water. Based on their aerodynamical properties (i.e., their strong dynamical coupling with the surrounding gas) it is often assumed that these small grains are well-mixed with the gas. Our goal is to study the vertical (re)distribution of grains taking into account settling, turbulent diffusion, and collisions with other dust grains. Assuming a fragmentation-limited background dust population, we developed a Monte Carlo approach that follows single monomers as they move through a vertical column of gas and become incorporated in different aggregates as they undergo sticking and fragmenting collisions. We find that (sub)micron grains are not necessarily well-mixed vertically, but can become trapped in a thin layer with a scale height that is significantly smaller than that of the gas. This collisional trapping occurs when the timescale for diffusion is comparable to or longer than the collision timescale in the midplane and its effect is strongest when the most massive particles in the size distribution show significant settling. Based on simulations and analytical considerations, we conclude that for typical dust-to-gas ratios and turbulence levels, the collisional trapping of small grains should be a relatively common phenomenon. The absence of trapping could then indicate a low dust-to-gas ratio, possibly because a large portion of the dust mass has been removed through radial drift or is locked up in planetesimals.

  5. Analytical electron microscopy of fine-grained phases in primitive interplanetary dust particles and carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackinnon, Ian D. R.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Mckay, David S.

    1987-01-01

    In order to describe the total mineralogical diversity within primitive extraterrestrial materials, individual interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the stratosphere as part of the JSC Cosmic Dust Curatorial Program were analyzed using a variety of AEM techniques. Identification of over 250 individual grains within one chondritic porous (CP) IDP shows that most phases could be formed by low temperature processes and that heating of the IDP during atmospheric entry is minimal and less than 600 C. In a review of the mineralogy of IDPs, it was suggested that the occurrence of other silicates such as enstatite whiskers is consistent with the formation in an early turbulent period of the solar nebula. Experimental confirmation of fundamental chemical and physical processes in a stellar environment, such as vapor phase condensation, nucleation, and growth by annealing, is an important aspect of astrophysical models for the evolution of the Solar System. A detailed comparison of chondritic IDP and carbonaceous chondrite mineralogies shows significant differences between the types of silicate minerals as well as the predominant oxides.

  6. Effects of particle optical properties on grain size measurements of aeolian dust deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, György; Újvári, Gábor; Kovács, János; Szalai, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Particle size data are holding crucial information on the sedimentary environment at the time the aeolian dust deposits were accumulated. Various aspects of aeolian sedimentation (wind strength, distance to source(s), possible secondary source regions and modes of sedimentation and transport) can be reconstructed from proper grain size distribution data. Laser diffraction methods provide much more accurate and reliable information on the major granulometric properties of wind-blown sediments compared to the sieve and pipette methods. The Fraunhofer and Mie scattering theories are generally used for laser diffraction grain size measurements. () The two different approaches need different 'background' information on the medium measured. During measurements following the Fraunhofer theory, the basic assumption is that parcticles are relatively large (over 25-30 µm) and opaque. The Mie theory could offer more accurate data on smaller fractions (clay and fine silt), assuming that a proper, a'priori knowledge on refraction and absorption indices exists, which is rarely the case for polymineral samples. This study is aimed at determining the effects of different optical parameters on grain size distributions (e.g. clay-content, median, mode). Multiple samples collected from Hungarian red clay and loess-paleosol records have been analysed using a Malvern Mastersizer 3000 laser diffraction particle sizer (with a Hydro LV unit). Additional grain size measurements have been made on a Fritsch Analysette 22 Microtec and a Horiba Partica La-950 v2 instrument to investigate possible effects of the used laser sources with different wavelengths. XRF and XRD measurements have also been undertaken to gain insight into the geochemical/mineralogical compositions of the samples studied. Major findings include that measurements using the Mie theory provide more accurate data on the grain size distribution of aeolian dust deposits, when we use a proper optical setting. Significant

  7. GEMS and New Pre-Accretionally Irradiated RELICT Grains in Interplanetary Dust - The Plot Thickens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J.

    1995-09-01

    The hypothesis that GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) might be the long-sought interstellar silicate grains is undergoing close scrutiny [1-3]. GEMS are proposed to be interstellar because: (a) they are abundant in cometary IDPs; (b) they were irradiated prior to incorporation into IDPs; (c) both their size distribution and Oamorphous silicate" microstructures are consistent with those of interstellar silicates; (d) they contain nanometer-sized (superparamagnetic) alpha-iron inclusions, which provides a simple explanation for the observed interstellar grain alignment and polarization [4,5]. Challenges to the GEMS hypothesis include the following: (a) GEMS may have formed and been irradiated in the solar nebula rather than a presolar interstellar environment; (b) non-solar isotope abundances have yet to be measured in GEMS; (c) the irradiation regime required to produce the observed effects in GEMS might be incompatible with the interstellar medium; (b) relationships between GEMS and carbon (e.g. core/mantle) need clarification; (c) major element abundances in GEMS should be consistent with observed interstellar gas phase depletions [2,3]. GEMS may indeed have formed in the solar nebula, in which case they would be the oldest known solar nebula solids [2]. An interstellar origin for GEMS does not require detection of non-solar isotope abundances [6]. Irradiation experiments are in progress to simulate the properties of GEMS. The petrographic relationship between GEMS and carbon in IDPs is being investigated (by examining IDPs embedded and thin-sectioned in carbon-free media). Major element abundances in GEMS are being evaluated in terms on interstellar gas phase abundances. For example, sulfur is not highly depleted in the interstellar gas, implying that it must be significantly depleted in interstellar grains [3]. GEMS are significantly depleted in sulfur relative to solar abundances. Analytical electron

  8. GROWTH OF DUST GRAINS IN A LOW-METALLICITY GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON THE CLOUD FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki, Gen; Yoshida, Naoki; Nozawa, Takaya

    2013-03-01

    In a low-metallicity gas, rapid cooling by dust thermal emission is considered to induce cloud fragmentation and play a vital role in the formation of low-mass stars ({approx}< 1 M{sub Sun }) in metal-poor environments. We investigate how the growth of dust grains through accretion of heavy elements in the gas phase onto grain surfaces alters the thermal evolution and fragmentation properties of a collapsing gas cloud. We directly calculate grain growth and dust emission cooling in a self-consistent manner. We show that MgSiO{sub 3} grains grow sufficiently at gas densities n{sub H} = 10{sup 10}, 10{sup 12}, and 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} for metallicities Z = 10{sup -4}, 10{sup -5}, and 10{sup -6} Z{sub Sun }, respectively, where the cooling of the collapsing gas cloud is enhanced. The condition for efficient dust cooling is insensitive to the initial condensation factor of pre-existing grains within the realistic range of 0.001-0.1, but sensitive to metallicity. The critical metallicity is Z{sub crit} {approx} 10{sup -5.5} Z{sub Sun} for the initial grain radius r{sub MgSiO{sub 3,0}}{approx}<0.01 {mu}m and Z{sub crit} {approx} 10{sup -4.5} Z{sub Sun} for r{sub MgSiO{sub 3,0}}{approx}>0.1 {mu}m. The formation of a recently discovered low-mass star with extremely low metallicity ({<=}4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Z{sub Sun }) could have been triggered by grain growth.

  9. The size distribution of dust grains in single clouds. I. The analysis of extinction using multicomponent mixtures of bare spherical grains.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, V. G.; Krełowski, J.; Wegner, W.

    1996-12-01

    We demonstrate that the method of regularization designed to resolve inverse problems may be successfully applied in analysis of interstellar extinction. The absolute extinction curves of apparently single clouds, seen towards the stars HD 147165, 179406 and 202904, have been derived and modelled using multicomponent bare spherical dust grain mixtures containing graphite, silicates, various types of amorphous carbon, SiC and water ice. We find that the grain size distributions are essentially different from the Mathis, Rumpl and Nordsieck (1977) power law and may be multimodal. From more recent data about reduced (˜2/3 solar) cosmic abundances, it has been shown that a mixture of graphite, silicate and ice grains explains quite satisfactorily the extinction towards the stars under analysis whereas a traditional mixture of graphite and silicate grains fails.

  10. Separation of mycotoxin-containing sources in grain dust and determination of their mycotoxin potential.

    PubMed Central

    Palmgren, M S; Lee, L S

    1986-01-01

    Two distinct reservoirs of mycotoxins exist in fungal-infected cereal grains--the fungal spores and the spore-free mycelium-substrate matrix. Many fungal spores are of respirable size and the mycelium-substrate matrix can be pulverized to form particles of respirable size during routine handling of grain. In order to determine the contribution of each source to the level of mycotoxin contamination of dust, we developed techniques to harvest and separate mycelium-substrate matrices from spores of fungi. Conventional quantitative chromatographic analyses of separated materials indicated that aflatoxin from Aspergillus parasiticus, norsolorinic acid from a mutant of A. parasiticus, and secalonic acid D from Penicillium oxalicum were concentrated in the mycelium-substrate matrices and not in the spores. In contrast, spores of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigatus contained significant concentrations of aurasperone C and fumigaclavine C, respectively; only negligible amounts of the toxins were detected in the mycelium-substrate matrices of these two fungi. PMID:3709472

  11. Separation of mycotoxin-containing sources in grain dust and determination of their mycotoxin potential.

    PubMed

    Palmgren, M S; Lee, L S

    1986-04-01

    Two distinct reservoirs of mycotoxins exist in fungal-infected cereal grains--the fungal spores and the spore-free mycelium-substrate matrix. Many fungal spores are of respirable size and the mycelium-substrate matrix can be pulverized to form particles of respirable size during routine handling of grain. In order to determine the contribution of each source to the level of mycotoxin contamination of dust, we developed techniques to harvest and separate mycelium-substrate matrices from spores of fungi. Conventional quantitative chromatographic analyses of separated materials indicated that aflatoxin from Aspergillus parasiticus, norsolorinic acid from a mutant of A. parasiticus, and secalonic acid D from Penicillium oxalicum were concentrated in the mycelium-substrate matrices and not in the spores. In contrast, spores of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus fumigatus contained significant concentrations of aurasperone C and fumigaclavine C, respectively; only negligible amounts of the toxins were detected in the mycelium-substrate matrices of these two fungi. PMID:3709472

  12. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  13. Smoke in the Pipe Nebula: dust emission and grain growth in the starless core FeSt 1-457

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Lada, Charles J.; Lombardi, Marco; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Alves, João

    2015-08-01

    Context. The availability of submillimeter dust emission data in an unprecedented number of bands provides us with new opportunities to investigate the properties of interstellar dust in nearby clouds. Aims: The nearby Pipe Nebula is an ideal laboratory to study starless cores. We here aim to characterize the dust properties of the FeSt 1-457 core, as well as the relation between the dust and the dense gas, using Herschel, Planck, 2MASS, ESO Very Large Telescope, APEX-Laboca, and IRAM 30 m data. Methods: We derive maps of submillimeter dust optical depth and effective dust temperature from Herschel data that were calibrated against Planck. After calibration, we then fit a modified blackbody to the long-wavelength Herschel data, using the Planck-derived dust opacity spectral index β, derived on scales of 30' (or ~1 pc). We use this model to make predictions of the submillimeter flux density at 850 μm, and we compare these in turn with APEX-Laboca observations. Our method takes into account any additive zeropoint offsets between the Herschel/Planck and Laboca datasets. Additionally, we compare the dust emission with near-infrared extinction data, and we study the correlation of high-density-tracing N2H+ emission with the coldest and densest dust in FeSt 1-457. Results: A comparison of the submillimeter dust optical depth and near-infrared extinction data reveals evidence for an increased submillimeter dust opacity at high column densities, interpreted as an indication of grain growth in the inner parts of the core. Additionally, a comparison of the Herschel dust model and the Laboca data reveals that the frequency dependence of the submillimeter opacity, described by the spectral index β, does not change. A single β that is only slightly different from the Planck-derived value is sufficient to describe the data, β = 1.53 ± 0.07. We apply a similar analysis to Barnard 68, a core with significantly lower column densities than FeSt 1-457, and we do not find

  14. Stochastic Parameterization for Light Absorption by Internally Mixed BC/dust in Snow Grains for Application to Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; He, Cenlin; Yang, P.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Gu, Y.; Lee, W- L.

    2014-06-27

    A stochastic approach to model the positions of BC/dust internally mixed with two snow-grain types has been developed, including hexagonal plate/column (convex) and Koch snowflake (concave). Subsequently, light absorption and scattering analysis can be followed by means of an improved geometric-optics approach coupled with Monte Carlo photon tracing to determine their single-scattering properties. For a given shape (plate, Koch snowflake, spheroid, or sphere), internal mixing absorbs more light than external mixing. The snow-grain shape effect on absorption is relatively small, but its effect on the asymmetry factor is substantial. Due to a greater probability of intercepting photons, multiple inclusions of BC/dust exhibit a larger absorption than an equal-volume single inclusion. The spectral absorption (0.2 – 5 um) for snow grains internally mixed with BC/dust is confined to wavelengths shorter than about 1.4 um, beyond which ice absorption predominates. Based on the single-scattering properties determined from stochastic and light absorption parameterizations and using the adding/doubling method for spectral radiative transfer, we find that internal mixing reduces snow albedo more than external mixing and that the snow-grain shape plays a critical role in snow albedo calculations through the asymmetry factor. Also, snow albedo reduces more in the case of multiple inclusion of BC/dust compared to that of an equal-volume single sphere. For application to land/snow models, we propose a two-layer spectral snow parameterization containing contaminated fresh snow on top of old snow for investigating and understanding the climatic impact of multiple BC/dust internal mixing associated with snow grain metamorphism, particularly over mountains/snow topography.

  15. Kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous, partially magnetized plasma with both positively and negatively charged grains

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Poedts, S.

    2010-08-15

    A purely kinetic instability of the dust acoustic mode in inhomogeneous plasmas is discussed. In the presence of a magnetic field, electrons and ions may be magnetized while at the same time dust grains may remain unmagnetized. Although the dynamics of the light species is strongly affected by the magnetic field, the dust acoustic mode may still propagate in practically any direction. The inhomogeneity implies a source of free energy for an instability that develops through the diamagnetic drift effects of the magnetized species. It is shown that this may be a powerful mechanism for the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The analysis presented in the work is also directly applicable to plasmas containing both positive and negative ions and electrons, provided that at least one of the two ion species is unmagnetized.

  16. DIRECT IMAGING CONFIRMATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A DUST-ENSHROUDED CANDIDATE EXOPLANET ORBITING FOMALHAUT

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Thayne; Debes, John; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Burrows, Adam; Itoh, Yoichi; Fukagawa, Misato; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kuchner, Marc; Matsumura, Soko

    2012-12-01

    We present Subaru/IRCS J-band data for Fomalhaut and a (re)reduction of archival 2004-2006 HST/ACS data first presented by Kalas et al. We confirm the existence of a candidate exoplanet, Fomalhaut b, in both the 2004 and 2006 F606W data sets at a high signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, we confirm the detection at F814W and present a new detection in F435W. Fomalhaut b's space motion may be consistent with it being in an apsidally aligned, non-debris ring-crossing orbit, although new astrometry is required for firmer conclusions. We cannot confirm that Fomalhaut b exhibits 0.7-0.8 mag variability cited as evidence for planet accretion or a semi-transient dust cloud. The new, combined optical spectral energy distribution and IR upper limits confirm that emission identifying Fomalhaut b originates from starlight scattered by small dust, but this dust is most likely associated with a massive body. The Subaru and IRAC/4.5 {mu}m upper limits imply M < 2 M{sub J} , still consistent with the range of Fomalhaut b masses needed to sculpt the disk. Fomalhaut b is very plausibly 'a planet identified from direct imaging' even if current images of it do not, strictly speaking, show thermal emission from a directly imaged planet.

  17. Benchmarking the calculation of stochastic heating and emissivity of dust grains in the context of radiative transfer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, Peter; Misselt, Karl; Bianchi, Simone; Lunttila, Tuomas; Pinte, Christophe; Natale, Giovanni; Juvela, Mika; Fischera, Joerg; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gordon, Karl; Baes, Maarten; Steinacker, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Context. Thermal emission by stochastically heated dust grains (SHGs) plays an important role in the radiative transfer (RT) problem for a dusty medium. It is therefore essential to verify that RT codes properly calculate the dust emission before studying the effects of spatial distribution and other model parameters on the simulated observables. Aims: We define an appropriate problem for benchmarking dust emissivity calculations in the context of RT simulations, specifically including the emission from SHGs. Our aim is to provide a self-contained guide for implementors of such functionality and to offer insight into the effects of the various approximations and heuristics implemented by the participating codes to accelerate the calculations. Methods: The benchmark problem definition includes the optical and calorimetric material properties and the grain size distributions for a typical astronomical dust mixture with silicate, graphite, and PAH components. It also includes a series of analytically defined radiation fields to which the dust population is to be exposed and instructions for the desired output. We processed this problem using six RT codes participating in this benchmark effort and compared the results to a reference solution computed with the publicly available dust emission code DustEM. Results: The participating codes implement different heuristics to keep the calculation time at an acceptable level. We study the effects of these mechanisms on the calculated solutions and report on the level of (dis)agreement between the participating codes. For all but the most extreme input fields, we find agreement within 10% across the important wavelength range 3 μm ≤ λ ≤ 1000 μm. Conclusions: We conclude that the relevant modules in RT codes can and do produce fairly consistent results for the emissivity spectra of SHGs. This work can serve as a reference for implementors of dust RT codes, and it will pave the way for a more extensive benchmark effort

  18. On performing exobiology experiments on an earth-orbital platform with the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, Judith L.; Fogleman, Guy

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory simulations of gas-dust interactions performed on Space Station Freedom in the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) are considered for studying the nature of bodies in the solar system. The GGSF includes a 4-10 liter chamber for experiments with the capability for environmental control, measurement, levitation, and energy. The simulations can provide low gas pressure and dust density in a microgravitational environment.

  19. Analysis of "Midnight" Tracks in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector: Possible Discovery of a Contemporary Interstellar Dust Grain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajit, S.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Cody, G.; Ferrior, T.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Hoppe, P.; Hudson, B.; Kearsley, A.; Lai, B.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2) day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques.

  20. LAD-C: A Large Area Cosmic Dust and Orbital Debris Collector on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, J.-C.; Giovane, F.; Corsaro, R.; Stansbery, E.

    2007-01-01

    A 10 m^2 aerogel and acoustic sensor system has been under development by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) with main collaboration from the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office at Johnson Space Center. This Large Area Debris Collector (LAD-C) is tentatively scheduled to be deployed by the U.S. Department of Defense Space Test Program (STP) on the International Space Station (ISS) in late 2007. The system will be retrieved, after one to two years of data and sample collection, for post-flight analysis. In addition to cosmic dust and orbital debris sample return, the acoustic sensors will record impact characteristics for potential orbit determination of some of the collected samples. Source identification based on their dynamical signatures may be possible. The LAD-C science return will benefit orbital debris, cosmic dust, and satellite safety communities. This paper presents an overview of the mission objectives, basic configuration, deployment consideration, and science return of the experiment.

  1. Three-dimensional dust-ion-acoustic rogue waves in a magnetized dusty pair-ion plasma with nonthermal nonextensive electrons and opposite polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan

    2014-08-15

    Dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) rogue waves are investigated in a three-dimensional magnetized plasma containing nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution, both positive and negative ions, and immobile dust grains having both positive and negative charges. Via the reductive perturbation method, a (3 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation is derived to govern the dynamics of the DIA wave packets. The modulation instability of DIA waves described by the (3 + 1)-dimensional NLS equation is investigated. By means of the similarity transformation and symbolic computation, both the first- and second-order rogue wave solutions of the (3 + 1)-dimensional NLS equation are constructed in terms of rational functions. Moreover, the dynamics properties and the effects of plasma parameters on the nonlinear structures of rogue waves are discussed in detail. The results could be useful for understanding the physical mechanism of rogue waves in laboratory experiments where pair-ion plasmas with electrons and dust grains can be found.

  2. An LDEF 2 dust instrument for discrimination between orbital debris and natural particles in near-Earth space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuzzolino, A. J.; Simpson, J. A.; Mckibben, R. B.; Voss, H. D.; Gursky, H.

    1993-01-01

    The characteristics of a space dust instrument which would be ideally suited to carry out near-Earth dust measurements on a possible Long Duraction Exposure Facility reflight mission (LDEF 2) is discussed. As a model for the trajectory portion of the instrument proposed for LDEF 2, the characteristics of a SPAce DUSt instrument (SPADUS) currently under development for flight on the USA ARGOS mission to measure the flux, mass, velocity, and trajectory of near-Earth dust is summarized. Since natural (cosmic) dust and man-made dust particles (orbital debris) have different velocity and trajectory distributions, they are distinguished by means of the SPADUS velocity/trajectory information. The SPADUS measurements will cover the dust mass range approximately 5 x 10(exp -12) g (2 microns diameter) to approximately 1 x 10(exp -5) g (200 microns diameter), with an expected mean error in particle trajectory of approximately 7 deg (isotropic flux). Arrays of capture cell devices positioned behind the trajectory instrumentation would provide for Earth-based chemical and isotopic analysis of captured dust. The SPADUS measurement principles, characteristics, its role in the ARGOS mission, and its application to an LDEF 2 mission are summarized.

  3. Study of the Effects of the Electric Field on Charging Measurements on Individual Micron-size Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging process in Astrophysical, Planetary, and the Lunar environments. Low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available theoretical models for the calculation of SEE yield applicable for neutral, planar or bulk surfaces are generally based on Sternglass Equation. However, viable models for charging of individual dust grains do not exist at the present time. Therefore, the SEE yields have to be obtained by some experimental methods at the present time. We have conducted experimental studies on charging of individual micron size dust grains in simulated space environments using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) facility at NASA-MSFC. The results of our extensive laboratory study of charging of individual micron-size dust grains by low energy electron impact indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a very complex process expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. It was found that the incident electrons may lead to positive or negative charging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration. In this paper we give a more elaborate discussion about the possible effects of the AC field in the EDB on dust charging measurements by comparing the secondary electron emission time-period (tau (sub em) (s/e)) with the time-period (tau (sub ac) (ms)) of the AC field cycle in the EDB that we have briefly addressed in our previous publication.

  4. Time-fractional Schamel-KdV equation for dust-ion-acoustic waves in pair-ion plasma with trapped electrons and opposite polarity dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; He, Yaling; Li, Yibao

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear propagation of dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) waves is investigated in a one-dimensional, unmagnetized plasma containing positive ions, negative ions, trapped electrons featuring vortex-like distribution, and immobile dust grains having both positive and negative charges. Via reductive perturbation method, Agrawal's method, and Euler-Lagrange equation, the time-fractional Schamel-KdV equation under the sense of Riesz fractional derivative is derived to describe nonlinear behavior of DIA waves. The approximate solution of the time-fractional Schamel-KdV equation is constructed in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions by variational iteration method. The effect of the plasma parameters on the DIA solitary waves is also discussed in detail.

  5. Empirical approximation for the ion current to the surface of a dust grain in a weakly ionized gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vaulina, O. S.; Repin, A. Yu.; Petrov, O. F.

    2006-06-15

    The results from numerical simulation of the dust grain charging process in a weakly ionized gasdischarge plasma are analyzed. An empirical approximate formula for the ion current to the grain surface under conditions close to those in laboratory experiments with dusty plasmas is derived. Investigations show that the approximation proposed greatly simplifies determination of the grain charge by avoiding laborious calculations for different grain sizes and different parameters of the surrounding plasma.

  6. The Large-Grained Dust Coma of 174P/Echeclus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, James M.; Choi, Young-Jun; Weissman, Paul R.; Stansberry, John A.; Fernandez, Yanga R.; Roe, Henry G.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Sung, Hyun-Il

    2008-01-01

    On 2005 December 30, Y.-J. Choi and P. R. Weissman discovered that the formerly dormant Centaur 2000 EC98 was in strong outburst. Previous observations by P. Rousselot et al. spanning a 3-year period indicated a lack of coma down to the 27 mag arcsec 2 level.We present Spitzer Space Telescope MIPS observations of this newly active Centaur--now known as 174P/Echeclus (2000 EC98)--or 60558 Echeclus--taken in 2006 late February. The images show strong signal at both the 24 and 70 micron bands and reveal an extended coma about 2' in diameter. Analyses yield estimates of the coma signal contribution that are in excess of 90% of the total signal in the 24 micron band. Dust production estimates ranging from 1.7-4 x 10(exp 2) kg/s are on the order of 30 times that seen in other Centaurs. Simultaneous visible-wavelength observations were also obtained with Palomar Observatory's 200-inch telescope, the 1.8-m Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope, the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO) 1.8-m telescope, and Table Mountain Observatory's 0.6-m telescope, revealing a coma morphology nearly identical to the mid-IR observations. The grain size distribution derived from the data yields a log particle mass power-law with slope parameter (alpha) = -0.87 +/- 0.07, and is consistent with steady cometary-activity, such as that observed during the Stardust spacecraft's encounter at 81P/Wild 2, and not with an impact driven event, such as that caused by the Deep Impact experiment.

  7. On the effect of ion-neutral collisions on dust grain screening in a low-pressure gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, I. L.; Zagorodny, A. G.; Krivtsun, I. V.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of ion-neutral collisions on charging of micrometer-sized dust grains immersed in a low-pressure argon discharge plasma is studied on the basis of the Vlasov-Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook kinetic equations. The equations are solved numerically using the method described in our previous work [I. L. Semenov et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 103707 (2011)]. A modified version of the numerical method is proposed to reduce the required computational time. Numerical calculations are carried out for typical plasma parameters used in laboratory investigations of dusty plasma. On the basis of the obtained results, the influence of collisions on the ion flux and grain charge is analyzed. A comparison of our results with those obtained using different analytical models proposed earlier is presented. In addition, applicability of simple kinetic models describing the influence of collisions on the electric potential around a dust grain [S. A. Khrapak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225003 (2008); A. G. Zagorodny et al. Ukr. J. Phys. 54, 1089 (2009)] is examined. The influence of ion-neutral collisions on the distribution of plasma macroparameters near the grain surface is also demonstrated.

  8. Relevance of Respiratory Symptoms and Signs to Ventilatory Capacity Changes after Exposure to Grain Dust and Phosphate Rock Dust

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, Bryan; Ritchie, Blair

    1966-01-01

    Ventilatory capacity was measured before and after exposure to high concentrations of wheat dust in 24 men, 18 of whom were similarly studied while working with calcium phosphate rock. Changes in ventilatory capacity were examined in relation to respiratory symptoms as commonly elicited in occupational surveys, and to the presence or absence of a productive cough on request and under observation. A significant decrease in the forced expiratory volume at one second was observed within half an hour of beginning work in the wheat dust, and this decrease was maintained throughout the work shift. A smaller significant decrease was found on exposure to phosphate rock over several hours, no significant change occurring within the first half-hour. Greater or more consistent decreases were recorded in those men who gave a history of persistent cough and sputum, and more particularly in those who had a productive cough on request, than in those without these features. A history of symptoms on exposure failed to define a group showing any more severe ventilatory reaction on exposure to wheat dust than the average. Some of the factors influencing the history of symptoms in occupational populations are reviewed, and the advantage of an objective sign, as provided by a deliberate cough, is indicated in defining an `abnormal' group within such a population. PMID:5946127

  9. An attempt to detect the dust disk of VEGA by photopolarimetry, and constraints on the grain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauron, N.; Dole, H.

    1998-09-01

    We report on a first attempt to detect Vega's disk through optical scattered light by using linear photopolarimetry. Polarization measurements on the aureole of Vega were carried out between 7'' and 30'' from the star with a 10'' diameter hole and down to polarization level of ~ 10(-4) . No signal reliably attributable to circumstellar dust was detected, and an upper limit to the polarized surface brightness of the disk is derived. This upper limit for Vega's disk is about 200 times lower than the polarized brightness observed around beta Pic, at an angular offset of 15'' from the stars. The upper limit is also compared to a simple model, in which one assumes a plausible total dust mass of 2 10(-8) Msun, and a pole-on oriented disk with a typical radius of ~ 20'' as favoured by far-infrared and submillimetric experiments. We also suppose that the grains are spherical (Mie) particles. Our analysis can exclude that a major part of dust mass would consist of grains of 0.01-0.3 mu m, as in the interstellar medium. If a single size is assumed, the observational upper limit favours radii of at least 5-10 mu m or larger. If a size distribution including large particles ( ~ 300 mu m) is assumed, the data suggests that only a very small fraction ( ~ 1/1000 ) of the dust mass is in 0.01-0.3 mu m grains. Based on observations made at the 2-m telescope of Pic-du-Midi, operated by Observatoire Midi Pyrénées (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique \\& Université Paul Sabatier de Toulouse, France)

  10. Re-evaluation of the chemistry of dust grains in the coma of Comet Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhin, L.; Dolnikov, G.; Evlanov, E.; Fomenkova, M.; Prilutsky, O.; Sagdeev, R.

    1991-04-01

    The chemical composition of individual grains in the coma of Comet Halley are evaluated here as a function of their mass based on data from the PUMA 1 and 2 mass spectrometers on the Vega mission. It is found that the compositions of heavy and light grains are very different, with light grains being Mg-rich, whereas the mean Mg(+)/SI(+) ratio in heavy grains is similar to CI chrondritic. The marked difference in composition between light and heavy grains indicates that the origin of the two grain populations might be different.

  11. Dust agglomeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  12. DUST PRODUCTION FACTORIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: FORMATION OF CARBON GRAINS IN RED-SUPERGIANT WINDS OF VERY MASSIVE POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nozawa, Takaya; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Maeda, Keiichi; Kozasa, Takashi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Langer, Norbert

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the formation of dust in a stellar wind during the red-supergiant (RSG) phase of a very massive Population III star with a zero-age main sequence mass of 500 M {sub ☉}. We show that, in a carbon-rich wind with a constant velocity, carbon grains can form with a lognormal-like size distribution, and that all of the carbon available for dust formation finally condenses into dust for wide ranges of the mass-loss rate ((0.1-3) × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) and wind velocity (1-100 km s{sup –1}). We also find that the acceleration of the wind, driven by newly formed dust, suppresses the grain growth but still allows more than half of the gas-phase carbon to finally be locked up in dust grains. These results indicate that, at most, 1.7 M {sub ☉} of carbon grains can form during the RSG phase of 500 M {sub ☉} Population III stars. Such a high dust yield could place very massive primordial stars as important sources of dust at the very early epoch of the universe if the initial mass function of Population III stars was top-heavy. We also briefly discuss a new formation scenario of carbon-rich ultra-metal-poor stars, considering feedback from very massive Population III stars.

  13. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  14. Heliotropic dust rings for Earth climate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewick, R.; Lücking, C.; Colombo, C.; Sanchez, J. P.; McInnes, C. R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper examines the concept of a Sun-pointing elliptical Earth ring comprised of dust grains to offset global warming. A new family of non-Keplerian periodic orbits, under the effects of solar radiation pressure and the Earth's J2 oblateness perturbation, is used to increase the lifetime of the passive cloud of particles and, thus, increase the efficiency of this geoengineering strategy. An analytical model is used to predict the orbit evolution of the dust ring due to solar-radiation pressure and the J2 effect. The attenuation of the solar radiation can then be calculated from the ring model. In comparison to circular orbits, eccentric orbits yield a more stable environment for small grain sizes and therefore achieve higher efficiencies when the orbit decay of the material is considered. Moreover, the novel orbital dynamics experienced by high area-to-mass ratio objects, influenced by solar radiation pressure and the J2 effect, ensure the ring will maintain a permanent heliotropic shape, with dust spending the largest portion of time on the Sun facing side of the orbit. It is envisaged that small dust grains can be released from a circular generator orbit with an initial impulse to enter an eccentric orbit with Sun-facing apogee. Finally, a lowest estimate of 1 × 1012 kg of material is computed as the total mass required to offset the effects of global warming.

  15. Contingency Trajectory Design for a Lunar Orbit Insertion Maneuver Failure by the Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genova, Anthony L.; Loucks, Michael; Carrico, John

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this extended abstract is to present results from a failed lunar-orbit insertion (LOI) maneuver contingency analysis for the Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission, managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, CA. The LADEE spacecrafts nominal trajectory implemented multiple sub-lunar phasing orbits centered at Earth before eventually reaching the Moon (Fig. 1) where a critical LOI maneuver was to be performed [1,2,3]. If this LOI was missed, the LADEE spacecraft would be on an Earth-escape trajectory, bound for heliocentric space. Although a partial mission recovery is possible from a heliocentric orbit (to be discussed in the full paper), it was found that an escape-prevention maneuver could be performed several days after a hypothetical LOI-miss, allowing a return to the desired science orbit around the Moon without leaving the Earths sphere-of-influence (SOI).

  16. Orbital motion of dust particles in an rf magnetron discharge. Ion drag force or neutral atom wind force

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, A. F.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Dyatko, N. A.; Starostin, A. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2012-03-15

    Microparticles with sizes up to 130 {mu}m have been confined and the velocity and diameter of particles in a plasma trap of an rf magnetron discharge with an arc magnetic field have been simultaneously measured. The motion of the gas induced by electron and ion cyclotron currents has been numerically simulated using the Navier-Stokes equation. The experimental and numerical results confirm the mechanism of the orbital motion of dust particles in the magnetron discharge plasma that is associated with the orbital motion of the neutral gas accelerated by electron and ion drift flows in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  17. Orbital properties of micron-size dust determined using the Arecibo 430 MHz dual-beam radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego; Meisel, David D.; Nolan, Michael C.; Bartlett, Brent D.; Mathews, John D.; Zhou, Qihou H.; Moser, Danielle E.

    Orbital results derived from radar observations of micron-size dust entering the earth's atmosphere are presented and discussed. These observations are performed using the 430 MHz Arecibo Observatory (AO) dual-beam radar system in Puerto Rico - a unique ground-base tool for the study of dust. The AO radar daily daily thousands of decelerating particles in the size range 0.5-100 microns for which precise altitude; instantaneous Doppler velocity and (linear) deceleration are obtained. These results help bridge the gap between spacecraft dust measurements and traditional meteor radar capabilities. During 2002, monthly micrometeor radar observations were performed. Each month, a minimum of one, 14 hour interval of observations (18:00-08:00 hrs LT) were carried out. During this year-long observing campaign, the antenna line feed was pointing vertically while the Gregorian feed was pointed at a zenith angle of 15 degrees. The off-vertical radar beam was initially placed pointing north and every 30 minutes was rotated 180 degrees. Preliminary results show an assymetry on the orbital properties of dust at 1 AU and indicate that the traditional idea of sporadic meteor sources may be too simplistic to describe the sporadic micrometeor complex, at least for the particle sizes detected by AO.

  18. Grain physics and infrared dust emission in active galactic nucleus environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ciotti, Luca

    2014-07-01

    We study the effects of a detailed dust treatment on the properties and evolution of early-type galaxies containing central black holes, as determined by active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We find that during cooling flow episodes, radiation pressure on the dust in and interior to infalling shells of cold gas can greatly impact the amount of gas able to be accreted and therefore the frequency of AGN bursts. However, the overall hydrodynamic evolution of all models, including mass budget, is relatively robust to the assumptions on dust. We find that IR re-emission from hot dust can dominate the bolometric luminosity of the galaxy during the early stages of an AGN burst, reaching values in excess of 10{sup 46} erg s{sup –1}. The AGN-emitted UV is largely absorbed, but the optical depth in the IR does not exceed unity, so the radiation momentum input never exceeds L {sub BH}/c. We constrain the viability of our models by comparing the AGN duty cycle, broadband luminosities, dust mass, black hole mass, and other model predictions to current observations. These constraints force us towards models wherein the dust to metals ratios are ≅ 1% of the Galactic value, and only models with a dynamic dust to gas ratio are able to produce both quiescent galaxies consistent with observations and high obscured fractions during AGN 'on' phases. During AGN outbursts, we predict that a large fraction of the FIR luminosity can be attributed to warm dust emission (≅ 100 K) from dense dusty gas within ≤1 kpc reradiating the AGN UV emission.

  19. Analysis of the Organic Matter in Interplanetary Dust Particles: Clues to the Organic Matter in Comets, Asteroids, and Interstellar Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.

    2003-01-01

    Reflection spectroscopy suggests the C- , P-, and D-types of asteroids contain abundant carbon, but these Vis-nearIR spectra are featureless, providing no information on the type(s) of carbonaceous matter. Infrared spectroscopy demonstrates that organic carbon is a significant component in comets and as grains or grain coatings in the interstellar medium. Most of the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) recovered from the Earth s stratosphere are believed to be fragments from asteroids or comets, thus characterization of the carbon in IDPs provides the opportunity to determine the type(s) and abundance of organic matter in asteroids and comets. Some IDPs exhibit isotopic excesses of D and N-15, indicating the presence of interstellar material. The characterization of the carbon in these IDPs, and particularly any carbon spatially associated with the isotopic anomalies, provides the opportunity to characterize interstellar organic matter.

  20. Bistable intrinsic charge fluctuations of a dust grain subject to secondary electron emission in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shotorban, B.

    2015-10-01

    A master equation was formulated to study intrinsic charge fluctuations of a grain in a plasma as ions and primary electrons are attached to the grain through collisional collection, and secondary electrons are emitted from the grain. Two different plasmas with Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian distributions were considered. The fluctuations could be bistable in either plasma when the secondary electron emission is present, as two stable macrostates, associated with two stable roots of the charge net current, may exist. Metastablity of fluctuations, manifested by the passage of the grain charge between two macrostates, was shown to be possible.

  1. THE STRUCTURE OF PRE-TRANSITIONAL PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. II. AZIMUTHAL ASYMMETRIES, DIFFERENT RADIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF LARGE AND SMALL DUST GRAINS IN PDS 70 {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, J.; Wisniewski, J.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Brown, J. M.; Dong, R.; Muto, T.; Zhu, Z.; Ohashi, N.; Kudo, T.; Egner, S.; Guyon, O.; Kusakabe, N.; Akiyama, E.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Carson, J.; Feldt, M.; Brandt, T.; Currie, T.; Grady, C. A.; and others

    2015-01-20

    The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-μm size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and {sup 12}CO J = 2 → 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of ∼65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of ∼80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk in small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.

  2. The Structure of Pre-Transitional Protoplanetary Disks. II Azimuthal Asymmetries, Different Radial Distributions of Large and Small Dust Grains in PDS 70

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, J.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Brown, J. M.; Dong, R.; Muto, T.; Zhu, Z.; Wisniewski, J.; Ohashi, N.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Abe, L.; Akiyama, E.; Brandner, W.; Brandt, T.; Carson J.; Currie, T.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Henning, T.; Hodapp, K.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Janson, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G.; Kuzuhara, M.; Kwon, J.; Matsuo, T.; McElwain, M. W.; Mayama, S.

    2015-01-01

    The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-micron size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and CO-12 J = 2 yields 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of approx. 65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of approx. 80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk in small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.

  3. The Structure of Pre-transitional Protoplanetary Disks. II. Azimuthal Asymmetries, Different Radial Distributions of Large and Small Dust Grains in PDS 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, J.; Tsukagoshi, T.; Brown, J. M.; Dong, R.; Muto, T.; Zhu, Z.; Wisniewski, J.; Ohashi, N.; kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Abe, L.; Akiyama, E.; Brandner, W.; Brandt, T.; Carson, J.; Currie, T.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Grady, C. A.; Guyon, O.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Henning, T.; Hodapp, K.; Ishii, M.; Iye, M.; Janson, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G.; Kuzuhara, M.; Kwon, J.; Matsuo, T.; McElwain, M. W.; Mayama, S.; Mede, K.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Moro-Martin, A.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.-S.; Serabyn, G.; Suenaga, T.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, M.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Thalmann, C.; Tomono, D.; Turner, E. L.; Watanabe, M.; Yamada, T.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2015-01-01

    The formation scenario of a gapped disk, i.e., transitional disk, and its asymmetry is still under debate. Proposed scenarios such as disk-planet interaction, photoevaporation, grain growth, anticyclonic vortex, eccentricity, and their combinations would result in different radial distributions of the gas and the small (sub-μm size) and large (millimeter size) dust grains as well as asymmetric structures in a disk. Optical/near-infrared (NIR) imaging observations and (sub-)millimeter interferometry can trace small and large dust grains, respectively; therefore multi-wavelength observations could help elucidate the origin of complicated structures of a disk. Here we report Submillimeter Array observations of the dust continuum at 1.3 mm and 12CO J = 2 → 1 line emission of the pre-transitional protoplanetary disk around the solar-mass star PDS 70. PDS 70, a weak-lined T Tauri star, exhibits a gap in the scattered light from its disk with a radius of ~65 AU at NIR wavelengths. However, we found a larger gap in the disk with a radius of ~80 AU at 1.3 mm. Emission from all three disk components (the gas and the small and large dust grains) in images exhibits a deficit in brightness in the central region of the disk, in particular, the dust disk in small and large dust grains has asymmetric brightness. The contrast ratio of the flux density in the dust continuum between the peak position to the opposite side of the disk reaches 1.4. We suggest the asymmetries and different gap radii of the disk around PDS 70 are potentially formed by several (unseen) accreting planets inducing dust filtration.

  4. Vertical settling and radial segregation of large dust grains in the circumstellar disk of the Butterfly Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, C.; Wolf, S.; Guilloteau, S.; Dutrey, A.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Sauter, J.

    2013-05-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks are considered to be the environment for the formation of planets. The growth of dust grains in these disks is the first step in the core accretion-gas capture planet formation scenario. Indicators and evidence of disk evolution can be traced in spatially resolved images and the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these objects. Aims: We develop a model for the dust phase of the edge-on oriented circumstellar disk of the Butterfly Star which allows one to fit observed multi-wavelength images and the SED simultaneously. Methods: Our model is based on spatially resolved high angular resolution observations at 1.3 mm, 894 μm, 2.07 μm, 1.87 μm, 1.60 μm, and 1.13 μm and an extensively covered SED ranging from 12 μm to 2.7 mm, including a detailed spectrum obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope in the range from 12 μm to 38 μm. A parameter study based on a grid search method involving the detailed analysis of every parameter was performed to constrain the disk parameters and find the best-fit model for the independent observations. The individual observations were modeled simultaneously, using our continuum radiative transfer code. Results: We derived a model that is capable of reproducing all of the observations of the disk at the same time. We find quantitative evidence for grain growth up to ~100 μm-sized particles, vertical settling of larger dust grains toward the disk midplane, and radial segregation of the latter toward the central star. Within our best-fit model the large grains have a distribution with a scale height of 3.7 AU at 100 AU and a radial extent of 175 AU compared to a hydrostatic scale height of 6.9 AU at 100 AU and an outer disk radius of 300 AU. Our results are consistent with current theoretical models for the evolution of circumstellar disks and the early stages of planet formation.

  5. Impact experiments of exotic dust grain capture by highly porous primitive bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takaya; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kurosawa, Kosuke; Ikezaki, Katsutoshi; Tsuchiyama, Akira

    2013-05-01

    Small primitive bodies were presumably highly porous when they formed and some still have low densities that are indicative of a high pore content. Therefore, after their formation, interplanetary dust impacting on their surface may have been captured because of their porous structure. The mechanism of dust penetration is thus of importance to understand the evolution of small bodies and the origin of their internal dust particles. Impact experiments of sintered glass-bead targets characterized by 80%, 87%, and 94% bulk porosity were conducted using metal and basalt projectiles at impact velocities ranging from 1.6 to 7.2 km s-1. Track morphology and penetration processes were analyzed using both X-ray tomography and a flash X-ray system. Two types of track were observed, as previously also found in the Stardust aerogel: a thin and long track (carrot-shaped track), and a "bulb" with tails (bulb-shaped track). The track shape changed with initial dynamic pressure. We found that the transition between "carrot" and "bulb" occurred at a pressure of roughly 20 times the projectile's tensile strength. The deceleration process of projectiles without severe deformation and fragmentation was reproduced by a drag equation composed of an inertia drag that was proportional to the square of the projectile's velocity and a constant drag proportional to the target's compressive strength. We applied this deceleration equation to silicate dust penetrating into hypothetical porous icy bodies which were homogeneous on much smaller scales than the impacting dust particles. The penetration depth was approximately 100 times the projectile diameter for the bodies with 90% porosity.

  6. The influence of the surface conductivity on the local electric fields and the motion of charged dust grains on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, N.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-11-01

    It is investigated how finite regolith conductivity influences the magnitude of strong electric fields required for lofting dust grains above the surface. It is shown that even very weak conductivity typical for the lunar regolith restricts the maximum values of the local electric fields formed near mini-craters or mini-hills on the dark side of the Moon. As a result the lofting of dust grains from the surface of the Moon is suppressed significantly. The effect depends on the regolith conductivity, parameters of the solar wind plasma, and the steepness of the slopes of the mini-crater or mini-hill.

  7. What can we learn about cosmic Dust Grains from light scattering measurements?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, O.; Moreno, F.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    Irregular dust particles exist in a wide variety of space environments ranging from planetary and cometary atmospheres in the Solar System and beyond, interplanetary medium, reflection nebulae, circumstellar disks, etc.. Those dust particles play an important role in the radiative balance of the body under study. Light scattering properties of spherical particles can be easily computed from Lorenz-Mie theory. However, in the majority of the mentioned cases, the assumption of spherical particles is highly unrealistic for light scattering computations. Nowadays, even with ever-increasing computer power and sophistication of algorithms, the characterization of small dust particles from the observed scattered light remains an extremely difficult task due to the complicated morphology of those particles. Consequently, controlled experimental studies of light scattering by irregular dust particles, remain an important tool for interpreting space- and ground-based observations. For that purpose, in the last few decades a significant number of experimental scattering matrices as functions of the scattering angle have been produced in Amsterdam. After the closing down of the Dutch scattering apparatus, we have constructed a modernized and improved descendant, the IAA Cosmic Dust Laboratory (CoDuLab), at the Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA) in Granada, Spain. With the experimental setups in Amsterdam and Granada all elements of the scattering matrix could be measured and not just one or two. This has several advantages. For example, it is then possible to identify experimental errors by using all theoretical relationships valid for the elements of the scattering matrix. Moreover, the experimental data can be used to perform multiple scattering calculations in thick scattering media or to to check the validity of advanced computational techniques for scattering by ensembles of small irregular particles. The samples of small irregular particles studied in Amsterdam

  8. Exploring the wake of a dust particle by a continuously approaching test grain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Asnaz, Oguz Han; Carstensen, Jan; Piel, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The structure of the ion wake behind a dust particle in the plasma sheath of an rf discharge is studied in a two-particle system. The wake formation leads to attractive forces between the negatively charged dust and can cause a reduction of the charge of a particle. By evaluating the dynamic response of the particle system to small external perturbations, these quantities can be measured. Plasma inherent etching processes are used to achieve a continuous mass loss and hence an increasing levitation height of the lower particle, so that the structure of the wake of the upper particle, which is nearly unaffected by etching, can be probed. The results show a significant modification of the wake structure in the plasma sheath to one long potential tail.

  9. Exploring the wake of a dust particle by a continuously approaching test grain

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hendrik Greiner, Franko; Asnaz, Oguz Han; Piel, Alexander; Carstensen, Jan

    2015-05-15

    The structure of the ion wake behind a dust particle in the plasma sheath of an rf discharge is studied in a two-particle system. The wake formation leads to attractive forces between the negatively charged dust and can cause a reduction of the charge of a particle. By evaluating the dynamic response of the particle system to small external perturbations, these quantities can be measured. Plasma inherent etching processes are used to achieve a continuous mass loss and hence an increasing levitation height of the lower particle, so that the structure of the wake of the upper particle, which is nearly unaffected by etching, can be probed. The results show a significant modification of the wake structure in the plasma sheath to one long potential tail.

  10. First Detection of a Dust Disk around Iota Horologii, a Southern Star Orbitted by an Extrasolar Giant Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantin, E.; Els, S.; Marchis, F.; Endl, M.; Kürster, M.; Sterzik, M.

    2000-12-01

    The link between the presence of debris dust disks (Vega phenomenon) and planetary formation is still unclear; are they: excluding children, siamese twins, or just casual neighbours? Recenly, Trilling et al. (1999), thanks to coronograph observations in the Northern hemisphere, showed that 3 out of 6 stars with known planetary companions harbour a tenuous dust disk, probably some precursors to the analogues of our Solar System Kuiper belt and zodiacal disk. We have started to conduct a similar program in the southern hemisphere at the ESO 3.6m telescope using the adaptive optics system ADONIS. H band images taken in coronographic mode during good observing conditions reveal the presence of a tenuous dust disk around the star Iota Horologii. This star is know to have a planetary companion of 2.26 M.sin i Jupiter masses on a 1 AU orbit, revealed by radial velocities analysis. The ADONIS images show that the disk has an inclination with a tilt angle of 40 degrees with respect to the edge-on configuration. This information allows to remove the degeneracy on the estimation of the mass of the planet due to the unknown inclination of the orbit. Taking this value into account, we find that the planet mass is 3.41 Jupiter masses. In our ADONIS observations, the disk extends 3.7 arcsec from the star, i.e. about 65 AU taking into account the distance of 17 parcsecs of this system. Modelling of light scattering by dust particles are shown and compared to the observations in order to deduce the disk density profile. This density profile is compared to previous results on disks around Beta Pic and HD 100546.

  11. Comet C2012 S1 (ISON): Observations of the Dust Grains From SOFIA and of the Atomic Gas From NSO Dunn and Mcmath-Pierce Solar Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Woodward, Charles E.; Harker, David E.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Sitko, Michael; Reach, William T.; De Pater, Imke; Gehrz, Robert D.; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Cochran, Anita L.; McKay, Adam J.; Reardon, Kevin; Cauzzi, Gianna; Tozzi, Gian Paolo; Christian, Damian J.; Jess, David B.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Lisse, Carey Michael; Morgenthaler, Jeffrey P.; Knight, Matthew Manning

    2013-01-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) is unique in that it is a dynamically new comet derived from the Oort cloud reservoir of comets with a sun-grazing orbit. Infrared (IR) and visible wavelength observing campaigns were planned on NASA's Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and on National Solar Observatory Dunn (DST) and McMath-Pierce Solar Telescopes, respectively. We highlight our SOFIA (+FORCAST) mid- to far-IR images and spectroscopy (approx. 5-35 microns) of the dust in the coma of ISON are to be obtained by the ISON-SOFIA Team during a flight window 2013 Oct 21-23 UT (r_h approx. = 1.18 AU). Dust characteristics, identified through the 10 micron silicate emission feature and its strength, as well as spectral features from cometary crystalline silicates (Forsterite) at 11.05-11.2 microns, and near 16, 19, 23.5, 27.5, and 33 microns are compared with other Oort cloud comets that span the range of small and/or highly porous grains (e.g., C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) and C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) to large and/or compact grains (e.g., C/2007 N4 (Lulin) and C/2006 P1 (McNaught)). Measurement of the crystalline peaks in contrast to the broad 10 and 20 micron amorphous silicate features yields the cometary silicate crystalline mass fraction, which is a benchmark for radial transport in our protoplanetary disk. The central wavelength positions, relative intensities, and feature asymmetries for the crystalline peaks may constrain the shapes of the crystals. Only SOFIA can look for cometary organics in the 5-8 micron region. Spatially resolved measurements of atoms and simple molecules from when comet ISON is near the Sun (r_h< 0.4 AU, near Nov-20-Dec-03 UT) were proposed for by the ISON-DST Team. Comet ISON is the first comet since comet Ikeya-Seki (1965f) suitable for studying the alkalai metals Na and K and the atoms specifically attributed to dust grains including Mg, Si, Fe, as well as Ca. DST's Horizontal Grating Spectrometer (HGS) measures 4 settings: Na I, K, C2 to

  12. 2-DUST: Dust radiative transfer code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Meixner, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    2-DUST is a general-purpose dust radiative transfer code for an axisymmetric system that reveals the global energetics of dust grains in the shell and the 2-D projected morphologies of the shell that are strongly dependent on the mixed effects of the axisymmetric dust distribution and inclination angle. It can be used to model a variety of axisymmetric astronomical dust systems.

  13. Ulysses dust measurements near Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Grün, E; Zook, H A; Baguhl, M; Fechtig, H; Hanner, M S; Kissel, J; Lindblad, B A; Linkert, D; Linkert, G; Mann, I B

    1992-09-11

    Submicrometer- to micrometer-sized particles were recorded by the Ulysses dust detector within 40 days of the Jupiter flyby. Nine impacts were recorded within 50 Jupiter radii with most of them recorded after closest approach. Three of these impacts are consistent with particles on prograde orbits around Jupiter and the rest are believed to have resulted from gravitationally focused interplanetary dust. From the ratio of the impact rate before the Jupiter flyby to the impact rate after the Jupiter flyby it is concluded that interplanetary dust particles at the distance of Jupiter move on mostly retrograde orbits. On 10 March 1992, Ulysses passed through an intense dust stream. The dust detector recorded 126 impacts within 26 hours. The stream particles were moving on highly inclined and apparently hyperbolic orbits with perihelion distances of >5 astronomical units. Interplanetary dust is lost rather quickly from the solar system through collisions and other mechanisms and must be almost continuously replenished to maintain observed abundances. Dust flux measurements, therefore, give evidence of the recent rates of production from sources such as comets, asteroids, and moons, as well as the possible presence of interstellar grains. PMID:11538054

  14. Dust in circumstellar disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodmann, Jens

    2006-02-01

    This thesis presents observational and theoretical studies of the size and spatial distribution of dust particles in circumstellar disks. Using millimetre interferometric observations of optically thick disks around T Tauri stars, I provide conclusive evidence for the presence of millimetre- to centimetre-sized dust aggregates. These findings demonstrate that dust grain growth to pebble-sized dust particles is completed within less than 1 Myr in the outer disks around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars. The modelling of the infrared spectral energy distributions of several solar-type main-sequence stars and their associated circumstellar debris disks reveals the ubiquity of inner gaps devoid of substantial amounts of dust among Vega-type infrared excess sources. It is argued that the absence of circumstellar material in the inner disks is most likely the result of the gravitational influence of a large planet and/or a lack of dust-producing minor bodies in the dust-free region. Finally, I describe a numerical model to simulate the dynamical evolution of dust particles in debris disks, taking into account the gravitational perturbations by planets, photon radiation pressure, and dissipative drag forces due to the Poynting-Robertson effect and stellar wind. The validity of the code it established by several tests and comparison to semi-analytic approximations. The debris disk model is applied to simulate the main structural features of a ring of circumstellar material around the main-sequence star HD 181327. The best agreement between model and observation is achieved for dust grains a few tens of microns in size locked in the 1:1 resonance with a Jupiter-mass planet (or above) on a circular orbit.

  15. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves in a quantum degenerate warm plasma with dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A. E.; Kolotkov, D. Yu.; Sazonkin, M. A.

    2011-01-15

    A study is made of the propagation of ion acoustic waves in a collisionless unmagnetized dusty plasma containing degenerate ion and electron gases at nonzero temperatures. In linear theory, a dispersion relation for isothermal ion acoustic waves is derived and an exact expression for the linear ion acoustic velocity is obtained. The dependence of the linear ion acoustic velocity on the dust density in a plasma is calculated. An analysis of the dispersion relation reveals parameter ranges in which the problem has soliton solutions. In nonlinear theory, an exact solution to the basic equations is found and examined. The analysis is carried out by Bernoulli's pseudopotential method. The ranges of the phase velocities of periodic ion acoustic waves and the velocities of solitons are determined. It is shown that these ranges do not overlap and that the soliton velocity cannot be lower than the linear ion acoustic velocity. The profiles of the physical quantities in a periodic wave and in a soliton are evaluated, as well as the dependence of the critical velocity of solitons on the dust density in a plasma.

  16. The magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma with nanosize dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdipour, H.; Foroutan, G.

    2010-08-15

    The magnetized sheath of a dusty plasma is investigated via numerical simulations of stationary multifluid equations by taking into account the electric, magnetic, gravitational, ion drag, neutral drag, and thermophoretic forces. Dependence of the sheath properties on the characteristics of the magnetic field and plasma parameters is explored. The sheath dynamics is mainly governed by the electric and ion drag forces and the effect of gravitation is negligible. The sheath demonstrates a nonmonotonic behavior against variations of the magnetic intensity and its angle of incidence. The sheath thickness and the maximum of dust density distribution decrease with increasing the ion to electron density ratio at the sheath edge, but increase with growing electron temperature and the positive temperature gradient of the neutrals. The effects of ion drag are similar to those of the gravitational force as both of them accelerate the dust to the wall. By a suitable configuration of the temperature gradient in the neutral gas, thermophoretic force can be utilized to deposit the building units of nanostructures on a substrate or remove any unwanted contaminant from its neighborhood.

  17. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-06-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  18. In situ 3-D mapping of pore structures and hollow grains of interplanetary dust particles with phase contrast X-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z. W.; Winarski, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Unlocking the 3-D structure and properties of intact chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in nanoscale detail is challenging, which is also complicated by atmospheric entry heating, but is important for advancing our understanding of the formation and origins of IDPs and planetary bodies as well as dust and ice agglomeration in the outer protoplanetary disk. Here, we show that indigenous pores, pristine grains, and thermal alteration products throughout intact particles can be noninvasively visualized and distinguished morphologically and microstructurally in 3-D detail down to ~10 nm by exploiting phase contrast X-ray nanotomography. We have uncovered the surprisingly intricate, submicron, and nanoscale pore structures of a ~10-μm-long porous IDP, consisting of two types of voids that are interconnected in 3-D space. One is morphologically primitive and mostly submicron-sized intergranular voids that are ubiquitous; the other is morphologically advanced and well-defined intragranular nanoholes that run through the approximate centers of ~0.3 μm or lower submicron hollow grains. The distinct hollow grains exhibit complex 3-D morphologies but in 2-D projections resemble typical organic hollow globules observed by transmission electron microscopy. The particle, with its outer region characterized by rough vesicular structures due to thermal alteration, has turned out to be an inherently fragile and intricately submicron- and nanoporous aggregate of the sub-μm grains or grain clumps that are delicately bound together frequently with little grain-to-grain contact in 3-D space.

  19. Quaternary dust sources on the Chinese Loess Plateau: a view from single zircon grains, heavy minerals and quartz luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, T.; Carter, A.; Vermeesch, P.; Bird, A.; Rittner, M.; Lu, H.; Andò, S.; Garzanti, E.; Nie, J.; Adamiec, G.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, H.; Xu, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The origin of loess deposits on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), one of the most valuable Cenozoic climate archives on land, is the subject of considerable debate. A large number of sources have been proposed for the vast quantity of dust that forms the up to 400 m thick loess sequences that cover the c. 640,000 km2 the CLP, including deserts, alluvial fans and mountain regions. There is also debate over whether sources shift across the CLP, within loess units, between units and across the Quaternary/Pliocene boundary. Furthermore, the role of river systems in sediment supply to the CLP has not previously been substantively addressed. Geochemical analysis of bulk sediment from loess is limited by mixing of different source influences and so here we apply a variety of techniques to Quaternary sequences on the CLP. We use single-grain based techniques on zircons and heavy mineral analyses in an attempt to discriminate between potential multiple sources and to test the influence of proximal deserts and major rivers on CLP dust. In addition, we utilise information from detailed optically stimulated luminescence dating of quartz from loess to identify rapid shifts in source region on the CLP. Provenance signatures from samples from the eastern Mu Us and the Tengger deserts can be explained by local sources and recycling of the underlying Cretaceous rock. However, the western Mu Us desert as well as Quaternary loess shows different zircon U-Pb age spectra and heavy mineral distributions, indicative of strong influence from northeastern Tibet. Further, samples from the Yellow River are close to identical to these western Mu Us samples and crucially, also to Quaternary samples from the Loess Plateau. This suggests that the Tibetan-derived sediments are unlikely to have been transported from Tibet by wind, but rather may have been delivered by the Yellow River. This provides the first evidence of a possible genetic link between the Yellow River and the CLP. However, there

  20. Circumstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    1986-01-01

    The presence of dust in the general interstellar medium is inferred from the extinction, polarization, and scattering of starlight; the presence of dark nebulae; interstellar depletions; the observed infrared emission around certain stars and various types of interstellar clouds. Interstellar grains are subject to various destruction mechanisms that reduce their size or even completely destroy them. A continuous source of newly formed dust must therefore be present for dust to exist in the various phases of the interstellar medium (ISM). The working group has the following goals: (1) review the evidences for the formation of dust in the various sources; (2) examine the clues to the nature and composition of the dust; (3) review the status of grain formation theories; (4) examine any evidence for the processing of the dust prior to its injection into the interstellar medium; and (5) estimate the relative contribution of the various sources to the interstellar dust population.

  1. A comparative study of the grain-size distribution of surface dust and stormwater runoff quality on typical urban roads and roofs in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhenyao; Liu, Jin; Aini, Guzhanuer; Gong, Yongwei

    2016-02-01

    The deposition of pollutants on impervious surfaces is a serious problem associated with rapid urbanization, which results in non-point-source pollution. Characterizing the build-up and wash-off processes of pollutants in urban catchments is essential for urban planners. In this paper, the spatial variation and particle-size distributions of five heavy metals and two nutrients in surface dust were analyzed, and the runoff water first-flush effect (FF30) and event-mean concentrations (EMCs) of 10 common constituents were characterized. The relationships between runoff variables and stormwater characteristics were examined from three typical urban impervious surfaces in Beijing, China. Dust on road surfaces with smaller grain sizes had higher pollutant concentrations, whereas concentrations of Mn, Zn, Fe, and TP in roof surface dust increased with grain size. Particles with grain sizes of 38-74 and 125-300 μm contributed most to the total pollutant load in roads, while particles with the smallest grain sizes (<38 μm) contributed most on roofs (23.46-41.71 %). Event-mean concentrations (EMCs) and FF30 values for most runoff pollutants tended to be higher on roofs than on roads. The maximum intensity (I max) and the antecedent dry days (ADD) were critical parameters for EMCs in roads, while ADD was the only dominant parameter for EMCs on our studied roof. The rainfall intensity (RI) and maximum intensity (I max) were found to be the parameters with the strongest correlation to the first-flush effect on both roads and roofs. Significant correlations of total suspended solids (TSS) concentration in runoff with grain-size fractions of surface dust indicated that coarser particles (74-300 μm) are most likely to contribute to the solid-phase pollutants, and finer particles (<38 μm) are likely the main source of dissolved pollutants. PMID:26438368

  2. On the dissipation of the rotation energy of dust grains in interstellar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoular, R.

    2016-04-01

    A new mechanism is described, analysed and visualized, for the dissipation of suprathermal rotation energy of molecules in magnetic fields, a necessary condition for their alignment. It relies upon the Lorentz force perturbing the motion of every atom of the structure, as each is known to carry its own net electric charge because of spatial fluctuations in electron density. If the molecule is large enough that the frequency of its lowest frequency phonon lies near or below the rotation frequency, then the rotation couples with the molecular normal modes and energy flows from the former to the latter. The rate of this exchange is very fast, and the vibrational energy is radiated away in the IR at a still faster rate, which completes the removal of rotation energy. The energy decay rate scales like the field intensity, the initial angular velocity, the number of atoms in the grain and the inverse of the moment of inertia. It does not depend on the susceptibility. Here, the focus is on carbon-rich molecules which are diamagnetic. The same process must occur if the molecule is paramagnetic or bathes in an electric field instead. A semi-empirical method of chemical modelling was used extensively to illustrate and quantify these concepts as applied to a hydrocarbon molecule. The motion of a rotating molecule in a field was monitored in time so as to reveal the energy transfer and visualize the evolution of its orientation towards the stable configuration.

  3. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  4. Ultrahigh charging of dust grains by the beam-plasma method for creating a compact neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Yu. S.; Karal'nik, V. B.; Petryakov, A. V.; Starostin, A. N.; Trushkin, N. I.; Filippov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of high-voltage high-current electron beams in a low-pressure ( P = 0.1-1 Torr) gas discharge is studied experimentally as a function of the discharge voltage and the sort and pressure of the plasma-forming gas. The density of the plasma formed by a high-current electron beam is measured. Experiments on ultrahigh charging of targets exposed to a pulsed electron beam with an energy of up to 25 keV, an electron current density of higher than 1 A/cm2, a pulse duration of up to 1 μs, and a repetition rate of up to 1 kHz are described. A numerical model of ultrahigh charging of dust grains exposed to a high-energy electron beam is developed. The formation of high-energy positive ions in the field of negatively charged plane and spherical targets is calculated. The calculations performed for a pulse-periodic mode demonstrate the possibility of achieving neutron yields of higher than 106 s-1 cm-2 in the case of a plane target and about 109 s-1 in the case of 103 spherical targets, each with a radius of 250 μm.

  5. Searching for Active Dust Devils in Gusev Crater from Orbit by Mars Express and the Ground from Spirit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelley, P. L.; Greeley, R.; Neakrase, L. D.; Thompson, S. D.; Foley, D. J.; Landis, G. A.; Squyres, S.; Neukum, G.; Athena Science Team,.; Mars Express HRSC Science Team

    2004-12-01

    Prior to the landing of the Mars Exploration Rover, Spirit, orbital data revealed numerous low albedo features in the Gusev crater landing ellipse attributed to the passage of dust devils (DD), and it was anticipated that active DD would be seen during Spirit operations. Spirit landed on a linear dark feature considered to be a DD track. Mars Express images taken after the landing were compared to images taken just before the landing; results show that many of the dark DD tracks in the area had faded over one martian year (inferred to be the result of dust settling on the surface) and that new tracks had formed in areas north and west of the final Spirit landing site. The three camera systems on Spirit (Pancam, Hazcam, Navcam) were used to search for active DD in a campaign similar to that used successfully during the Mars Pathfinder mission. However, thus far no active DD have been seen from the surface. We attribute this result to one or more of the following: 1) no DD formed within sight of Spirit, 2) observations were not taken at the time or place of DD activity, 3) camera filters/compression values were insufficient to image active DD, or 4) current image processing techniques are inadequate for detecting active DD. As Spirit continues operations, additional searches will be made when resources allow.

  6. Dust accelerator tests of the LDEX laboratory model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. W.; Bugiel, S.; Hofmann, B.; Horanyi, M.; Sternovsky, Z.; Srama, R.

    2015-10-01

    The LDEX (Lunar Dust EXperiment) sensor onboard lunar orbiter LADEE (Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer) was designed to characterize the size and spatial distributions of micron and sub-micron sized dust grains. Recent results of the data analysis showed strong evidence for the existence of a dust cloud around the moon. LDEX performs in situ measurements of dust impacts along the LADEE or-bit. The impact speed of the observed dust grains is close to 1.7 km/s (the speed of the spacecraft), since the dust grains are considered on bound orbits close to the maximum height of their ballistic motion. LDEX is an impact ionization dust detector for in situ measurements. The detection of a dust grains is based on measuring the charge generated by high speed impacts (>1km/s) on a rhodium coated target. The impact charge Q is a function of both the speed v and the mass m of the impacting dust particle. The characteristic values are dependent on the instrument geometry, the impact surface properties (material), the impact geometry (impact angle) and the particle properties (material, density, speed, mass, shape). In our tests we used PPy-coated olivine and PPy-coated ortho-pyroxene with impact speeds around 1.7 km/s. A LDEX laboratory model was designed and manufactured by the University of Stuttgart. The model is used to support calibration activities of the Univ. of Colorado and to perform special tests (impact angle and impact location variations) at the dust accelerator facility at MPI-K (Heidelberg) which is operated by the IRS of the University of Stuttgart.

  7. Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX): First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Gagnard, Sam; Gathright, David; Gruen, Eberhard; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Lankton, Mark; Srama, Ralf; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Szalay, Jamey

    2014-05-01

    The lunar dust environment is expected to be dominated by submicron-sized dust particles released from the Moon due to the continual bombardment by micrometeoroids, and possibly due to UV radiation and plasma-induced near-surface intense electric fields. The Lunar Dust EXperiment (LDEX) instrument is designed to map the spatial and temporal variability of the dust size and density distributions in the lunar environment onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission [1, 2] orbiting the Moon since 10/6/2013. LDEX is an impact detector, capable of reliably detecting and measuring the mass of submicron and micron sized dust grains. LDEX also measures the collective currents from low-energy ions and from the impacts of dust grains that are below the detection threshold for single dust impacts; hence it can search for the putative population of grains with radii ~ 0.1 μm lofted over the terminator regions by plasma effects. This talk will summarize the preliminary analysis of the observations to date: 1) LDEX identified the dust ejecta cloud that is maintained by micrometeoroid bombardment. As predicted, the density of the dust ejecta cloud rapidly increases toward the surface, and it also shows strong temporal variability, most likely related to the stochastic nature of the meteoroid impacts. 2) LDEX, as of yet, has not confirmed the existence of levitated dust clouds. This puts strict new upper limits on the density of small lofted grains, especially during periods of low ion fluxes entering the instrument. [1] Elphic et al., Proc. Lunar. Sci. Conf. 44th, 1719 (2013) [2] Horanyi et al., Proc. Lunar. Sci. Conf. 43th, 1659 (2012).

  8. Stochastics In Circumplanetary Dust Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, F.; Krivov, A. V.; Sremcevic, M.; Schwarz, U.; Kurths, J.

    Charged dust grains in circumplanetary environments experience, beyond various de- terministic forces, also stochastic perturbations: E.g., fluctuations of the magnetic field, the charge of the grains etc. Here, we investigate the dynamics of a dust population in a circular orbit around the planet which is perturbed by a stochastic magnetic field B , modeled by an isotropi- cally Gaussian white noise. The resulting perturbation equations give rise to a modi- 2 fied diffusion of the inclinations and eccentricities ­ x D [t +/- sin[2nt]/(2n)] (x - alias for eccentricity e and the inclination i, t - time). The diffusion coefficient is found to be D = [G]2/n, where the gyrofrequency and the orbital frequency are denoted by G, and n, respectively. This behavior has been checked by numerical experiments. We have chosen dust grains (1µm in radius) initially moving in circular orbits around a planet (Jupiter) and integrated numerically their trajectories over their typical lifetimes (100 years). The particles were exposed to a Gaussian fluctuating magnetic field B obeying the same statistical properties as in the analytical treatment. In this case, the theoretical 2 findings have been confirmed according to x D t with a diffusion coefficient of D G/n. 2 The theoretical studies showed the statistical properties of B being of decisive im- portance. To this aim, we analyzed the magnetic field data measured by the Galileo magnetometer at Jupiter and found almost Gaussian fluctuations of about 5 % of the mean field and exponentially decaying correlations. This results in a diffusion in the space of orbital elements of at least 1...5 % (variations of inclinations and eccentric- ity) over the lifetime of the dust grains. For smaller dusty motes stochastics might well dominate the dynamics.

  9. Capture of interplanetary and interstellar dust by the jovian magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Colwell, J E; Horányi, M; Grün, E

    1998-04-01

    Interplanetary and interstellar dust grains entering Jupiter's magnetosphere form a detectable diffuse faint ring of exogenic material. This ring is composed of particles in the size range of 0. 5 to 1.5 micrometers on retrograde and prograde orbits in a 4:1 ratio, with semimajor axes 3 < a < 20 jovian radii, eccentricities 0. 1 < e < 0.3, and inclinations i less, similar 20 degrees or i greater, similar 160 degrees. The size range and the orbital characteristics are consistent with in situ detections of micrometer-sized grains by the Galileo dust detector, and the measured rates match the number densities predicted from numerical trajectory integrations. PMID:9525863

  10. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Ruka; Bernard, Jean-Philippe

    Measuring precisely the faint polarization of the Far-Infrared and sub-millimetre sky is one of the next observational challenges of modern astronomy and cosmology. In particular, detection of the B-mode polarization from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may reveal the inflationary periods in the very early universe. Such measurements will require very high sensitivity and very low instrumental systematic effects. As for measurements of the CMB intensity, sensitive measurements of the CMB polarization will be made difficult by the presence of foreground emission from our own Milky Way, which is orders of magnitude stronger than the faint polarized cosmological signal. Such foreground emission will have to be understood very accurately and removed from cosmological measurements. This polarized emission is also interesting in itself, since it brings information relevant to the process of star formation, about the orientation of the magnetic field in our Galaxy through the alignment of dust grains. I will first summarize our current knowledge in this field, on the basis of extinction and emission measurements from the ground and airborne experiments and in the context of the recent measurements with the Planck satellite. I will then describe the concept and science goals of the PILOT balloon-borne experiment project (http://pilot.irap.omp.eu). This project is funded by the French space agency (CNES: “Centre National des Etudes Spatiales”) and currently under final assembly and tests. The experiment is dedicated to measuring precisely the linear polarization of the faint interstellar diffuse dust emission in the Far-Infrared in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies. It is composed of a 0.83 m diameter telescope and a Helium 4 deware accommodating the rest of the optics and 2 focal plane arrays with a total of 2048 individual bolometers cooled to 300 mK, developed for the PACS instruments on board the Hershel satellite. It will be operating in two broad photometric

  11. Circumstellar dust in symbiotic novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, Tomislav; Kotnik-Karuza, Dubravka

    2015-08-01

    Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding evolution of symbiotic binaries. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the two symbiotic novae, RR Tel and HM Sge, based on the long-term near-IR photometry, infrared ISO spectra and mid-IR interferometry. Pulsation properties and long-term variabilities were found from the near-IR light curves. The dust properties were determined using the DUSTY code which solves the radiative transfer. No changes in pulsational parameters were found, but a long-term variations with periods of 20-25 years have been detected which cannot be attributed to orbital motion.Circumstellar silicate dust shell with inner dust shell temperatures between 900 K and 1300 K and of moderate optical depth can explain all the observations. RR Tel showed the presence of an optically thin CS dust envelope and an optically thick dust region outside the line of sight, which was further supported by the detailed modelling using the 2D LELUYA code. Obscuration events in RR Tel were explained by an increase in optical depth caused by the newly condensed dust leading to the formation of a compact dust shell. HM Sge showed permanent obscuration and a presence of a compact dust shell with a variable optical depth. Scattering of the near-IR colours can be understood by a change in sublimation temperature caused by the Mira variability. Presence of large dust grains (up to 4 µm) suggests an increased grain growth in conditions of increased mass loss. The mass loss rates of up to 17·10-6 MSun/yr were significantly higher than in intermediate-period single Miras and in agreement with longer-period O-rich AGB stars.Despite the nova outburst, HM Sge remained enshrouded in dust with no significant dust destruction. The existence of unperturbed dust shell suggests a small influence of the hot component and strong dust shielding from the UV flux. By the use

  12. Formation of SiC Grains in Pulsation-enhanced Dust-driven Wind around Carbon-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Yuki; Kozasa, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation of silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the framework of dust-driven wind around pulsating carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-rich AGB) stars to reveal not only the amount but also the size distribution. Two cases are considered for the nucleation process: one is the local thermal equilibrium (LTE) case where the vibration temperature of SiC clusters T v is equal to the gas temperature as usual, and another is the non-LTE case in which T v is assumed to be the same as the temperature of small SiC grains. The results of the hydrodynamical calculations for a model with stellar parameters of mass M * = 1.0 M ⊙, luminosity L * = 104 L ⊙, effective temperature T eff = 2600 K, C/O ratio = 1.4, and pulsation period P = 650 days show the following: in the LTE case, SiC grains condense in accelerated outflowing gas after the formation of carbon grains, and the resulting averaged mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains of ~10-8 is too small to reproduce the value of 0.01-0.3, which is inferred from the radiative transfer models. On the other hand, in the non-LTE case, the formation region of the SiC grains is more internal and/or almost identical to that of the carbon grains due to the so-called inverse greenhouse effect. The mass ratio of SiC to carbon grains averaged at the outer boundary ranges from 0.098 to 0.23 for the sticking probability αs = 0.1-1.0. The size distributions with the peak at ~0.2-0.3 μm in radius cover the range of size derived from the analysis of the presolar SiC grains. Thus, the difference between the temperatures of the small cluster and gas plays a crucial role in the formation process of SiC grains around C-rich AGB stars, and this aspect should be explored for the formation process of dust grains in astrophysical environments.

  13. Multi-Epoch Observations of Dust Formed around WR140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Ohsawa, R.; Asano, K.; Mori, T. I.; Onaka, T.; Nozawa, T.; Kozasa, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.

    2012-08-01

    We present results of the mid-infrared multi-epoch observations of periodically dust-making Wolf-Rayet binary WR140 with Subaru/COMICS. Based on the N- and Q-bands photometric observations, the mass evolution of dust in the expanding concentric arc structures formed during the 2001 and 2009 periastron events is investigated. Our results show that at most 1.0×10-8M⊙ of dust survives per periastron later than an orbital phase, suggesting that such WR binary systems may not be the major dust budget in the early universe unless the grain growth later on should not take place.

  14. Measurements of micron-scale meteoroids and orbital debris with the Space Dust (SPADUS) instrument on the upcoming ARGOS P91-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKibben, R. B.; Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    The space dust (SPADUS) experiment, to be launched into a sun-synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 833 km onboard the USAF ARGOS P91-1 mission, will provide time-resolved measurements of the intensity, size spectrum and geocentric trajectories of dust particles encountered during the nominal three year mission. The experiment uses polyvinylidene fluoride dust sensors with a total detector area of 576 sq cm. The SPADUS will measure particle sizes between 2 and 200 microns, particle velocities between 1 and 10 km/s to better than 4 percent, and the direction of incidence with a mean error of 7 percent. These data will identify the particles as being debris or of natural origin.

  15. Will Organic Synthesis Within Icy Grains or on Dust Surfaces in the Primitive Solar Nebula Completely Erase the Effects of Photochemical Self Shielding?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    There are at least 3 separate photochemical self-shielding models with different degrees of commonality. All of these models rely on the selective absorption of (12))C(16)O dissociative photons as the radiation source penetrates through the gas allowing the production of reactive O-17 and O-18 atoms within a specific volume. Each model also assumes that the undissociated C(16)O is stable and does not participate in the chemistry of nebular dust grains. In what follows we will argue that this last, very important assumption is simply not true despite the very high energy of the CO molecular bond.

  16. Search for Dust Around Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-Y.; Nathues, A.; Mottola, S.; Sykes, M. V.; Polanskey, C. A.; Joy, S.; Mastrodemos, N.; McFadden, L. A.; Skillman, D.; Memarsadeghi, N.; Hoffmann, M.; Schröder, S. E.; Carsenty, U.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    Since the first but ambiguous evidence of water sublimation activity on Ceres was reported more than two decades ago [1] and the negative results in a number of follow up observations [2], water vapor has recently been unambiguously detected by the Herschel Space Observatory observations [3]. The mechanism of water sublimation on Ceres is still unclear, but the most probable mechanisms include cometary-like sublimation and cryovolcanism. Such sublimation activity could entrain dust grains in the outgassing, resulting in either a dust envelope or dust plumes above the surface of Ceres. Given the much higher escape velocity of ~0.5 km/s on the surface of Ceres compared to those on comets (a few m/s), any dust around Ceres might be short-lived, and/or close to the surface of Ceres. The implications of possible dust around Ceres motivated NASA's Dawn mission to perform a high-sensitivity, high-resolution search for dust around Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft, during its first science orbit around Ceres, will have an excellent opportunity to search for dust at a pixel scale of 1.4 km/pixel from the night-side of Ceres looking close to the direction of the Sun. This observing geometry is the most favorable to search for dust around Ceres due to the significant increase of dust brightness and decrease in the surface brightness of Ceres towards high solar phase angle. Here we report the results of this search for dust around Ceres with Dawn's Framing Camera (FC) [4].

  17. VERY LARGE TELESCOPE/NACO POLARIMETRIC DIFFERENTIAL IMAGING OF HD100546-DISK STRUCTURE AND DUST GRAIN PROPERTIES BETWEEN 10 AND 140 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Schmid, Hans Martin; Meyer, Michael R.; Geissler, Kerstin; Henning, Thomas; Brandner, Wolfgang; Wolf, Sebastian

    2011-09-01

    We present polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) data of the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD100546 obtained with Very Large Telescope/NACO. We resolve the disk in polarized light in the H and K{sub s} filter between {approx}0.''1 and 1.''4 (i.e., {approx}10-140 AU). The innermost disk regions are directly imaged for the first time and the mean apparent disk inclination and position angle are derived. The surface brightness along the disk major axis drops off roughly with S(r){proportional_to}r {sup -3} but has a maximum around 0.''15 suggesting a marginal detection of the main disk inner rim at {approx}15 AU. We find a significant brightness asymmetry along the disk minor axis in both filters with the far side of the disk appearing brighter than the near side. This enhanced backward scattering and a low total polarization degree of the scattered disk flux of 14{sup +19}{sub -8}% suggest that the dust grains on the disk surface are larger than typical interstellar medium grains. Empirical scattering functions reveal the backward scattering peak at the largest scattering angles and a second maximum for the smallest scattering angles. This indicates a second dust grain population preferably forward scattering and smaller in size. It shows that, relatively, in the inner disk regions (40-50 AU) a higher fraction of larger grains is found compared to the outer disk regions (100-110 AU). Finally, our images reveal distinct substructures between 25 and 35 AU physical separation from the star and we discuss the possible origin for the two features in the context of ongoing planet formation.

  18. Interstellar Dust: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. (Editor); Allamandola, Louis J. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A coherent picture of the dust composition and its physical characteristics in the various phases of the interstellar medium was the central theme. Topics addressed included: dust in diffuse interstellar medium; overidentified infrared emission features; dust in dense clouds; dust in galaxies; optical properties of dust grains; interstellar dust models; interstellar dust and the solar system; dust formation and destruction; UV, visible, and IR observations of interstellar extinction; and quantum-statistical calculations of IR emission from highly vibrationally excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules.

  19. Dynamics and distribution of Jovian dust ejected from the Galilean satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Sachse, Manuel; Spahn, Frank; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the dynamical analysis of the Jovian dust originating from the four Galilean moons is presented. High-accuracy orbital integrations of dust particles are used to determine their dynamical evolution. A variety of forces are taken into account, including the Lorentz force, solar radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag, solar gravity, the satellites' gravity, plasma drag, and gravitational effects due to nonsphericity of Jupiter. More than 20,000 dust particles from each source moon in the size range from 0.05 μm to 1 cm are simulated over 8000 (Earth) years until each dust grain hits a sink (moons, Jupiter, or escape from the system). Configurations of dust number density in the Jovicentric equatorial inertial frame are calculated and shown. In a Jovicentric frame rotating with the Sun the dust distributions are found to be asymmetric. For certain small particle sizes, the dust population is displaced towards the Sun, while for certain larger sizes, the dust population is displaced away from the Sun. The average lifetime as a function of particle size for ejecta from each source moon is derived, and two sharp jumps in the average lifetime are analyzed. Transport of dust between the Galilean moons and to Jupiter is investigated. Most of the orbits for dust particles from Galilean moons are prograde, while, surprisingly, a small fraction of orbits are found to become retrograde mainly due to solar radiation pressure and Lorentz force. The distribution of orbital elements is also analyzed.

  20. Tribocharging and charged interaction in same-material, microscopic grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, S.; Lee, V.; Jaeger, H.

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally address the causes and consequences of charging between same-material, microscopic grains. We confirm quantitatively that differences in grain size alone drive charging. By comparing our data to independent thermoluminescence measurements, we show that trapped electrons are not the charged species being transferred. We observe and quantify a zoology of interactions between grains, including attractive orbits and repulsive slingshot events, cluster growth and annihilation via collisions, and granular molecule formation. Our results highlight the important role played by grain polarizability in aggregation and have implications for the dynamics of dust particles in protoplanetary disks.

  1. In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Gruen, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-04-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 70 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  2. Galileo in-situ dust measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Grün, E.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Jupiter's ring system -- the archetype of ethereal ring systems -- consists of at least three components: the main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s). The small moonlets Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring region and structure in the intensity obtained from imaging observations indicates that these moons are the dominant sources of the gossamer ring material. The current picture implies that particles ejected from a source moon evolve inward under the Poynting-Robertson drag. Beyond Thebe's orbit, a very faint outward extension of the gossamer ring has also been observed which is not yet explained. Typical grain radii derived from optical imaging are a few micrometers. In November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed the gossamer ring for the first time and had a close flyby at Amalthea. With the in-situ dust detector on board, dust measurements were collected throughout the gossamer ring and close to Amalthea. Several hundred impacts of dust grains were recorded and the data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly provide dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. This allows to test and refine current models of ring particle dynamics (see D. P. Hamilton et al., this conference). In particular, the direct measurement of grain sizes and dust spatial density in different regions of the gossamer ring allow to better constrain the forces dominating the grains' dynamics. The Galileo measurements in Jupiter's gossamer ring pave the way towards the in-situ dust measurements with Cassini in Saturn's E ring beginning in 2004.

  3. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination X: Impact speeds and directions of interstellar grains on the Stardust dust collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle J.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Altobelli, Nicolas; Grün, Eberhard; Hillier, Jon K.; Postberg, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron S.; Bassim, Nabil; Bechtel, Hans A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Butterworth, Anna L.; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Frank, David; Gainsforth, Zack; Heck, Philipp R.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, S. A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Simionovici, Alexandre; Solé, Vicente A.; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Korff, Joshua Von; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    On the basis of an interstellar dust model compatible with Ulysses and Galileo observations, we calculate and predict the trajectories of interstellar dust (ISD) in the solar system and the distribution of the impact speeds, directions, and flux of ISD particles on the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector during the two collection periods of the mission. We find that the expected impact velocities are generally low (<10 km s-1) for particles with the ratio of the solar radiation pressure force to the solar gravitational force β > 1, and that some of the particles will impact on the cometary side of the collector. If we assume astronomical silicates for particle material and a density of 2 g cm-3, and use the Ulysses measurements and the ISD trajectory simulations, we conclude that the total number of (detectable) captured ISD particles may be on the order of 50. In companion papers in this volume, we report the discovery of three interstellar dust candidates in the Stardust aerogel tiles. The impact directions and speeds of these candidates are consistent with those calculated from our ISD propagation model, within the uncertainties of the model and of the observations.

  4. Grain dust originating from organic and conventional farming as a potential source of biological agents causing respiratory diseases in farmers

    PubMed Central

    Cholewa, Grażyna; Krasowska, Ewelina; Chmielewska-Badora, Jolanta; Zwoliński, Jacek; Sobczak, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Agricultural producers are exposed to a number of different health risks associated with their work environment. Aim The objective of the study was to assess the degree of colonization by fungi in terms of quantity and in terms of variety of species the samples taken from the settled dust from combine threshing of rye cultivation from organic and conventional farms in the Province of Lublin. Material and methods This paper is a preliminary quantitative assessment of the species of fungi colonizing the samples of settled dust collected during combine threshing from organic and conventional farms in the Province of Lublin. One of the stages of the project was the classification of biosafety BSL (biosafety level) of selected isolates and API ZYM tests to evaluate the potential ability of isolates to cause adverse health effects. To determine the concentration and composition of fungi in collected samples plate dilution method was used with two media: Malt Agar and Potato Dextrose Agar. Results Most commonly isolated fungi in settled dust samples collected during combine threshing from organic farms, on PDA medium were: Alternaria alternata and Aureobasidium pullulans. Cultures on MA medium were dominated by Alternaria alternata, Mycelia sterilia and Fusarium poae. In samples of dust from conventional crops, the predominant species was Alternaria alternata on PDA medium and on MA medium. Conclusions The obtained results show a potential risk of people involved in agricultural work. PMID:24493998

  5. LACK OF INTERACTION BETWEEN THE DUST GRAINS AND THE ANOMALOUS RADIO JET IN THE NEARBY SPIRAL GALAXY NGC 4258

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, Seppo; Krause, Marita; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S.; Siopis, Christos E-mail: mkrause@mpifr-bonn.mpg.d E-mail: christos.siopis@ulb.ac.b

    2010-10-15

    We obtained Spitzer/IRAC 3.6-8 {mu}m images of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 4258 to study possible interactions between dust and the radio jet. In our analysis, we also included high-resolution radio continuum, H{alpha}, CO, and X-ray data. Our data reveal that the 8 {mu}m emission, believed to originate largely from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and hot dust, is an excellent tracer of the normal spiral structure in NGC 4258, and hence it originates from the galactic plane. We investigated the possibility of dust destruction by the radio jet by calculating correlation coefficients between the 8 {mu}m and radio continuum emissions along the jet in two independent ways, namely, (1) from wavelet-transformed maps of the original images at different spatial scales and (2) from one-dimensional intensity cuts perpendicular to the projected path of the radio jet on the sky. No definitive sign of a correlation (or anticorrelation) was detected on relevant spatial scales with either approach, implying that any dust destruction must take place at spatial scales that are not resolved by our observations.

  6. A STUDY OF DUST AND GAS AT MARS FROM COMET C/2013 A1 (SIDING SPRING)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnham, Tony L.; Bodewits, Dennis; Tricarico, Pasquale; Farnocchia, Davide

    2014-09-01

    Although the nucleus of comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will safely pass Mars in 2014 October, the dust in the coma and tail will more closely approach the planet. Using a dynamical model of comet dust, we estimate the impact fluence. Based on our nominal model no impacts are expected at Mars. Relaxing our nominal model's parameters, the fluence is no greater than ∼10{sup –7} grains m{sup –2} for grain radii larger than 10 μm. Mars-orbiting spacecraft are unlikely to be impacted by large dust grains, but Mars may receive as many as ∼10{sup 7} grains, or ∼100 kg of total dust. We also estimate the flux of impacting gas molecules commonly observed in comet comae.

  7. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements in Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Gruen, E.

    Jupiter's ring system consists of at least three components: the inner main ring, the vertically extended halo and the gossamer ring(s) further out. The small moons Thebe and Amalthea orbit Jupiter within the gossamer ring and are believed to be the sources of gossamer ring material. A very faint ring extension has also been observed beyond Thebe's orbit. On 5 November 2002 the Galileo spacecraft traversed Jupiter's gossamer ring system for the first time. High-resolution dust data were obtained with the dust detector on board down to 2.33 R_J , i.e. well inside Amalthea's orbit. A second ring passage occurred on 21 September 2003, a few hours before Galileo impacted Jupiter. This time, dust data were successfully received down to Amalthea's orbit at 2.5 R_J , however, with much reduced time-resolution. Several thousand dust impacts were counted during both ring passages, and the full data sets (impact charges, rise times, impact directions, etc.) of about 90 dust impacts were transmitted to Earth. In-situ dust measurements provide information about the physical properties of the dust environment not accessible with imaging techniques. They directly measure dust spatial densities along the spacecraft trajectory as well as grain sizes and impact speeds. Our as yet preliminary analysis %of the gossamer ring data implies particle sizes in the sub-micron and micron range. The size distribution -- increasing towards smaller particles -- is similar in the Thebe ring and the ring's outer extension, whereas in the Amalthea ring it is steeper. Dust number densities are about 104 - 106 km-3 . Our dust data allow for the first time to compare in-situ measurements with the results optical obtained from the inversion of optical images. It appears that small sub-micron grains dominate the number density whereas larger particles with at least a few micron radii contribute most to the optical depth. The dust density shows previously unrecognised fine-structure in the ring between

  8. The dynamics of submicron-sized dust particles lost from Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Tatrallyay, M.; Juhasz, A.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamics of submicron-sized dielectric particles lost from the Martian moon Phobos are studied in connection with the possible detection of dust by the Phobos 2 spacecraft. The motion of these small dust grains is influenced not only by gravity but also by solar radiation pressure and electromagnetic forces. The plasma environment of Mars is described by applying a hybrid gasdynamic-cometary model. Some of the submicron-sized grains ejected at speeds on the order of a few tens meters per second can stay in orbit around Mars for several months forming a nonuniform and time-dependent dust halo.

  9. Gas and dust hydrodynamical simulations of massive lopsided transition discs - II. Dust concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruteau, Clément; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of large dust grains in massive lopsided transition discs via 2D hydrodynamical simulations including both gas and dust. Our simulations adopt a ring-like gas density profile that becomes unstable against the Rossby-wave instability and forms a large crescent-shaped vortex. When gas self-gravity is discarded, but the indirect force from the displacement of the star by the vortex is included, we confirm that dust grains with stopping times of order the orbital time, which should be typically a few centimetres in size, are trapped ahead of the vortex in the azimuthal direction, while the smallest and largest grains concentrate towards the vortex centre. We obtain maximum shift angles of about 25°. Gas self-gravity accentuates the concentration differences between small and large grains. At low to moderate disc masses, the larger the grains, the farther they are trapped ahead of the vortex. Shift angles up to 90° are reached for 10 cm-sized grains, and we show that such large offsets can produce a double-peaked continuum emission observable at mm/cm wavelengths. This behaviour comes about because the large grains undergo horseshoe U-turns relative to the vortex due to the vortex's gravity. At large disc masses, since the vortex's pattern frequency becomes increasingly slower than Keplerian, small grains concentrate slightly beyond the vortex and large grains form generally non-axisymmetric ring-like structures around the vortex's radial location. Gas self-gravity therefore imparts distinct trapping locations for small and large dust grains, which may be probed by current and future observations.

  10. Stability of Charged Grains in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, D.; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts of interplanetary micrometeoroids with orbiting ring particles generate dusty debris of all sizes. These ejecta particles become electrically charged by interactions with orbiting plasma and solar photons. Accordingly, they experience both gravity and Lorentz forces, whose combined effects cause interesting and complex dynamics. For simplicity, we initially model the magnetic field of Saturn as a centered and aligned dipole and investigate the stability of motion for grains launched from circularly-orbiting parent bodies. In this approximation, the magnetic equator and the ring-plane coincide. We begin with numerical models, determining the stability of dust grain trajectories in both the radial and vertical directions as a function of launch distance from the planet, and over all charge-to-mass ratios from ions to rocks. We find that positively-charged sub-micron dust grains over a limited range in size are radially unstable, colliding with the planet if launched from within synchronous orbit and escaping entirely if launched from outside this distance. Escaping grains have been observed as high-velocity dust streams at Saturn and at Jupiter. In addition, positively and negatively-charged smaller grains are vertically unstable and spiral up magnetic field lines to sustain non-linear vertical oscillations or to collide with the planet at high latitude. We then undertake local and global stability analyses and derive stability criteria that match our numerical data extremely well. Our work builds upon studies led by Burns, Hamilton, Horanyi, Howard, Mendis, Mitchell, Northrop, Schaffer, and others. We confirm that for charged dust grains launched at the Kepler speed, planetary gravity cannot be ignored, even in the limit of electromagnetically-dominated grains. Some stability boundaries can be obtained analytically while others require more complicated semianalytic methods. Our solutions are general and can be applied wherever an aligned

  11. Cometary science. Dust measurements in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko inbound to the Sun.

    PubMed

    Rotundi, Alessandra; Sierks, Holger; Della Corte, Vincenzo; Fulle, Marco; Gutierrez, Pedro J; Lara, Luisa; Barbieri, Cesare; Lamy, Philippe L; Rodrigo, Rafael; Koschny, Detlef; Rickman, Hans; Keller, Horst Uwe; López-Moreno, José J; Accolla, Mario; Agarwal, Jessica; A'Hearn, Michael F; Altobelli, Nicolas; Angrilli, Francesco; Barucci, M Antonietta; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bertini, Ivano; Bodewits, Dennis; Bussoletti, Ezio; Colangeli, Luigi; Cosi, Massimo; Cremonese, Gabriele; Crifo, Jean-Francois; Da Deppo, Vania; Davidsson, Björn; Debei, Stefano; De Cecco, Mariolino; Esposito, Francesca; Ferrari, Marco; Fornasier, Sonia; Giovane, Frank; Gustafson, Bo; Green, Simon F; Groussin, Olivier; Grün, Eberhard; Güttler, Carsten; Herranz, Miguel L; Hviid, Stubbe F; Ip, Wing; Ivanovski, Stavro; Jerónimo, José M; Jorda, Laurent; Knollenberg, Joerg; Kramm, Rainer; Kührt, Ekkehard; Küppers, Michael; Lazzarin, Monica; Leese, Mark R; López-Jiménez, Antonio C; Lucarelli, Francesca; Lowry, Stephen C; Marzari, Francesco; Epifani, Elena Mazzotta; McDonnell, J Anthony M; Mennella, Vito; Michalik, Harald; Molina, Antonio; Morales, Rafael; Moreno, Fernando; Mottola, Stefano; Naletto, Giampiero; Oklay, Nilda; Ortiz, José L; Palomba, Ernesto; Palumbo, Pasquale; Perrin, Jean-Marie; Rodríguez, Julio; Sabau, Lola; Snodgrass, Colin; Sordini, Roberto; Thomas, Nicolas; Tubiana, Cecilia; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Weissman, Paul; Wenzel, Klaus-Peter; Zakharov, Vladimir; Zarnecki, John C

    2015-01-23

    Critical measurements for understanding accretion and the dust/gas ratio in the solar nebula, where planets were forming 4.5 billion years ago, are being obtained by the GIADA (Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator) experiment on the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft orbiting comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Between 3.6 and 3.4 astronomical units inbound, GIADA and OSIRIS (Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System) detected 35 outflowing grains of mass 10(-10) to 10(-7) kilograms, and 48 grains of mass 10(-5) to 10(-2) kilograms, respectively. Combined with gas data from the MIRO (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter) and ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) instruments, we find a dust/gas mass ratio of 4 ± 2 averaged over the sunlit nucleus surface. A cloud of larger grains also encircles the nucleus in bound orbits from the previous perihelion. The largest orbiting clumps are meter-sized, confirming the dust/gas ratio of 3 inferred at perihelion from models of dust comae and trails. PMID:25613898

  12. Grain-size distribution and heavy metal contamination of road dusts in urban parks and squares in Changchun, China.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Liu; Yang, Wang; Jingshuang, Liu; Quanying, Wang; Mingying, Zou

    2015-02-01

    Due to rapid urbanization and the scarcity of land, most of the urban parks and squares in cities are built close to major roads or industrial areas, where they are subject to many potential pollution sources, including vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions. The aims of this study were to determine the concentrations of selected metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd) in road dusts collected in urban parks and squares in Changchun, China, on June 1, 2013 (International Children's Day) and to estimate the pollution sources. The mean Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and Cd contents (70.89, 60.30, 43.56, 23.16, 170.80, and 0.3111 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) in urban dusts were higher than their corresponding natural background values, particularly Pb, Cu, Zn, and Cd, which had about 2.5, 1.4, 1.9, and 2.6-fold higher levels, respectively. The results of principal component analysis indicated that Cr and Ni concentrations were mainly of natural origin, while Pb, Cu and Zn were derived from anthropogenic activities, and Cd tended to be from both sources. The geoaccumulation index (I geo) of these metals in the urban dusts under study indicates that they are uncontaminated with Cr and Ni; uncontaminated to moderately contaminated with Cu and Zn; and moderately contaminated with Pb and Cd. In addition, five particle sizes were analyzed separately for heavy metal concentrations. In all studied areas, there are large differences in the metal-loading percentage of different particle-size fractions among the samples, and the particles in 250-2,000-μm fraction are dominant in the total metal loading. PMID:25049053

  13. Copious amounts of hot and cold dust orbiting the main sequence a-type stars HD 131488 and HD 121191

    SciTech Connect

    Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, B.; Rhee, Joseph H.; Song, Inseok; Murphy, Simon J.; Bessell, Michael S.

    2013-11-20

    We report two new dramatically dusty main sequence stars: HD 131488 (A1 V) and HD 121191 (A8 V). HD 131488 is found to have substantial amounts of dust in its terrestrial planet zone (L {sub IR}/L {sub bol} ≈ 4 × 10{sup –3}), cooler dust farther out in its planetary system, and an unusual mid-infrared spectral feature. HD 121191 shows terrestrial planet zone dust (L {sub IR}/L {sub bol} ≈ 2.3 × 10{sup –3}), hints of cooler dust, and shares the unusual mid-infrared spectral shape identified in HD 131488. These two stars belong to sub-groups of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association and have ages of ∼10 Myr. HD 131488 and HD 121191 are the dustiest main sequence A-type stars currently known. Early-type stars that host substantial inner planetary system dust are thus far found only within the age range of 5-20 Myr.

  14. Physical Alteration of Martian Dust Grains, Its Influence on Detection of Clays and Identification of Aqueous Processes on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Drief, Ahmed; Dyar, Darby

    2003-01-01

    Clays, if present on Mars, have been illusive. Determining whether or not clay minerals and other aqueous alteration species are present on Mars provides key information about the extent and duration of aqueous processes on Mars. The purpose of this study is to characterize in detail changes in the mineral grains resulting from grinding and to assess the influence of physical processes on clay minerals on the surface of Mars. Physical alteration through grinding was shown to greatly affect the structure and a number of properties of antigorite and kaolinite. This project builds on an initial study and includes a combination of SEM, HRTEM, reflectance and M ssbauer spectroscopies. Grain size was found to decrease, as expected, with grinding. In addition, nanophase carbonate, Si-OH and iron oxide species were formed.

  15. Space dust and debris; Proceedings of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission B (Meetings B2, B3, and B5) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J. (Editor); Zarnecki, J. C. (Editor); Matson, D. L. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference on space dust and debris encompasses orbital debris, in situ measurements and laboratory analysis of space-dust particles, comparative studies of comets, asteroids, and dust, the protection and maneuvering of spacecraft in space-debris environments, and the out-of-elliptic distribution of interplanetary dust derived from near-earth flux. Specific issues addressed include asteroid taxonomy, the optical properties of dust from cometary and interplanetary grains, light scattering by rough surfaces on asteroidal/lunar regoliths, and the first results of particulate impacts and foil perforations on the Long Duration Exposure Facility. Also addressed are collision probability and spacecraft disposition in the geostationary orbit, a flash on the moon caused by orbital debris, the limits of population growth in low earth orbit due to collisional cascading, and the simulation of cosmic man-made dust effects on space-vehicle elements in rocket and laboratory experiments.

  16. A stochastic model and Monte Carlo algorithm for fluctuation-induced H2 formation on the surface of interstellar dust grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabelfeld, K. K.

    2015-09-01

    A stochastic algorithm for simulation of fluctuation-induced kinetics of H2 formation on grain surfaces is suggested as a generalization of the technique developed in our recent studies [1] where this method was developed to describe the annihilation of spatially separate electrons and holes in a disordered semiconductor. The stochastic model is based on the spatially inhomogeneous, nonlinear integro-differential Smoluchowski equations with random source term. In this paper we derive the general system of Smoluchowski type equations for the formation of H2 from two hydrogen atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains with physisorption and chemisorption sites. We focus in this study on the spatial distribution, and numerically investigate the segregation in the case of a source with a continuous generation in time and randomly distributed in space. The stochastic particle method presented is based on a probabilistic interpretation of the underlying process as a stochastic Markov process of interacting particle system in discrete but randomly progressed time instances. The segregation is analyzed through the correlation analysis of the vector random field of concentrations which appears to be isotropic in space and stationary in time.

  17. Interstellar Dust Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Drake, K.; Collette, A.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Postberg, F.; Krueger, H.; Auer, S.

    2010-10-01

    Interstellar grains traversing the inner planetary system have been identified by the Ulysses dust detector. Space dust detectors on other missions confirmed this finding. Analysis of the Stardust collectors is under way to search for and analyze such exotic grains. Interstellar dust particles can be detected and analyzed in the near-Earth space environment. New instrumentation has been developed to determine the origin of dust particles and their elemental composition. A Dust Telescope is a combination of a Dust Trajectory Sensor (DTS, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 084501, 2008) together with a high mass resolution mass analyzer for the chemical composition of dust particles in space. Dust particles' trajectories are determined by the measurement of induced electric signals when a charged grain flies through a position sensitive electrode system. A modern DTS can measure dust particles as small as 0.2 micron in radius and dust speeds up to 100 km/s. Large area chemical analyzers of 0.1 m2 sensitive area have been tested at a dust accelerator and it was demonstrated that they have sufficient mass resolution to resolve ions with atomic mass number up to >100 (Earth, Moon and Planets, DOI: 10.1007/s11038-005-9040-z, 2005; Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 014501, 2007). The advanced Dust Telescope is capable of identifying interstellar and interplanetary grains, and measuring their mass, velocity vector, charge, elemental and isotopic compositions. An Active Dust Collector combines a DTS with an aerogel or other dust collector materials, e.g. like the ones used on the Stardust mission. The combination of a DTS with a dust collector provides not only individual trajectories of the collected particles but also their impact time and position on the collector which proves essential in finding collected sub-micron sized grains on the collector.

  18. Sheath formation under collisional conditions in presence of dust

    SciTech Connect

    Moulick, R. Goswami, K. S.

    2014-08-15

    Sheath formation is studied for collisional plasma in presence of dust. In common laboratory plasma, the dust acquires negative charges because of high thermal velocity of the electrons. The usual dust charging theory dealing with the issue is that of the Orbit Motion Limited theory. However, the theory does not find its application when the ion neutral collisions are significantly present. An alternate theory exists in literature for collisional dust charging. Collision is modeled by constant mean free path model. The sheath is considered jointly with the bulk of the plasma and a smooth transition of the plasma profiles from the bulk to the sheath is obtained. The various plasma profiles such as the electrostatic force on the grain, the ion drag force along with the dust density, and velocity are shown to vary spatially with increasing ion neutral collision.

  19. PILOT: a balloon-borne experiment to measure the polarized FIR emission of dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, J.-Ph.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Bautista, L.; Bray, N.; Bernardis, P. de; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P.; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Longval, Y.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Mot, B.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-08-01

    Future cosmology space missions will concentrate on measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background, which potentially carries invaluable information about the earliest phases of the evolution of our universe. Such ambitious projects will ultimately be limited by the sensitivity of the instrument and by the accuracy at which polarized foreground emission from our own Galaxy can be subtracted out. We present the PILOT balloon project, which aims at characterizing one of these foreground sources, the polarized continuum emission by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The PILOT experiment also constitutes a test-bed for using multiplexed bolometer arrays for polarization measurements. This paper presents the instrument and its expected performances. Performance measured during ground calibrations of the instrument and in flight will be described in a forthcoming paper.

  20. Exobiological implications of dust aggregation in planetary atmospheres: An experiment for the gas-grain simulation facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntington, J. L.; Schwartz, D. E.; Marshall, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) will provide a microgravity environment where undesirable environmental effects are reduced, and thus, experiments involving interactions between small particles and grains can be more suitably performed. Slated for flight aboard the Shuttle in 1992, the ESA glovebox will serve as a scientific and technological testbed for GGSF exobiology experiments as well as generating some basic scientific data. Initial glovebox experiments will test a method of generating a stable, mono-dispersed cloud of fine particles using a vibrating sprinkler system. In the absence of gravity and atmospheric turbulence, it will be possible to determine the influence of interparticle forces in controlling the rate and mode of aggregation. The experimental chamber can be purged of suspended matter to enable multiple repetitions of the experiments. Of particular interest will be the number of particles per unit volume of the chamber, because it is suspected that aggregation will occur extremely rapidly if the number exceeds a critical value. All aggregation events will be recorded on high-resolution video film. Changes in the experimental procedure as a result of surprise events will be accompanied by real-time interaction with the mission specialist during the Shuttle flight.

  1. H2, CO and Dust Emission Around Low Mass Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We model the thermal balance, the chemistry, and the radiative transfer in dusty disks orbiting young, low mass stars. These models are motivated by observations of infrared and ultraviolet transitions of H2 from protoplanetary disks, as well as millimeter and submillimeter observations of other molecules such as CO, and infrared continuum observations of the dust. The dust grains are heated primarily by the stellar radiation and the infrared radiation field produced by the dust itself. The gas is heated by collisions with warmer dust grains, X-rays from the region close to the stellar surface, UV (ultraviolet) pumping of hydrogen molecules, and the grain photoelectric heating mechanism initiated by UV photons from the central star. We treat cases where the gas to dust ratio is high, because the dust has settled to the midplane and coagulated into relatively large objects. We discuss situations in which the infrared emission from H2 can be detected, and how the comparison of the observations with our models can deduce physical parameters such as the mass and the density and temperature distribution of the gas.

  2. H2, CO and Dust Emission Around Low Mass Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We model the thermal balance, the chemistry, and the radiative transfer in dusty disks orbiting young, low mass stars. These models are motivated by observations of infrared and ultraviolet transitions of H2 from protoplanetary disks, as well as millimeter and submillimeter observations of other molecules such as CO, and infrared continuum observations of the dust. The dust grains are heated primarily by the stellar radiation and the infrared radiation field produced by the dust itself. The gas is heated by collisions with warmer dust grains, X-rays from the region close to the stellar surface, UV pumping of hydrogen molecules, and the grain photoelectric heating mechanism initiated by UV photons from the central star. We treat cases where the gas to dust ratio is high, because the dust has settled to the midplane and coagulated into relatively large objects. We discuss situations in which the infrared emission from H2 can be detected, and how the comparison of the observations with our models can deduce physical parameters such as the mass and the density and temperature distribution of the gas.

  3. Lyman-α driven molecule formation on SiO2 surfaces-connection to astrochemistry on dust grains in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajappan, M.; Yuan, C.; Yates, J. T.

    2011-02-01

    As a model for silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium, we have used high area amorphous SiO2 as a surface on which to carry out Lyman-α (10.2 eV) photodecomposition of adsorbed N2O at 71 K and at a coverage of ~0.3 monolayer. The N2O molecules are adsorbed by hydrogen bonding to surface Si-OH groups. Transmission IR spectroscopy measurements permit the observation of the consumption of adsorbed N2O and the production of various photoproducts. It is observed that in comparison to N2O consumption, the relative rate of formation of the products NO2 and N2O4 made by combination reactions is enhanced significantly on the SiO2 surface. Reactions between photogenerated radicals themselves or between radicals and parent N2O on the SiO2 surface exceed the relative rates observed in the gas phase by factors of up to ~20. As the complexity of the combination product increases, its relative production rate, compared to the gas phase, increases due to the involvement of multiple surface-combination elementary steps. It is proposed that the enhancement of combination reactions on the SiO2 surface is due to the surface's ability to absorb excess energy evolved during the chemical-bond-forming events on the surface. This principle is probably significant on grain surfaces supporting photochemical processes of astrochemical interest, and indeed is expected. The cross section for adsorbed N2O photodecomposition on the porous SiO2 surface is about 7 × 10-20 cm2 and the quantum yield for the adsorbed molecule decomposition is about 0.006, compared to a quantum yield of 1.46 in the gas phase. This decrease in photon efficiency is attributed to absorption and scattering of Lyman-α radiation by the SiO2 particles.

  4. Optical/Near-infrared Polarization Survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic Fields, Dense Cloud Fragmentations, and Anomalous Dust Grain Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Reis, Wilson; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak AV between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region. Based on observations collected at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (CTIO, Chile) and Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA/MCT, Brazil).

  5. Optical/near-infrared polarization survey of Sh 2-29: Magnetic fields, dense cloud fragmentations, and anomalous dust grain sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Fábio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Reis, Wilson; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G. E-mail: franco@fisica.ufmg.br E-mail: roman@dfuls.cl

    2014-03-01

    Sh 2-29 is a conspicuous star-forming region marked by the presence of massive embedded stars as well as several notable interstellar structures. In this research, our goals were to determine the role of magnetic fields and to study the size distribution of interstellar dust particles within this turbulent environment. We have used a set of optical and near-infrared polarimetric data obtained at OPD/LNA (Brazil) and CTIO (Chile), correlated with extinction maps, Two Micron All Sky Survey data, and images from the Digitized Sky Survey and Spitzer. The region's most striking feature is a swept out interstellar cavity whose polarimetric maps indicate that magnetic field lines were dragged outward, piling up along its borders. This led to a higher magnetic strength value (≈400 μG) and an abrupt increase in polarization degree, probably due to an enhancement in alignment efficiency. Furthermore, dense cloud fragmentations with peak A{sub V} between 20 and 37 mag were probably triggered by its expansion. The presence of 24 μm point-like sources indicates possible newborn stars inside this dense environment. A statistical analysis of the angular dispersion function revealed areas where field lines are aligned in a well-ordered pattern, seemingly due to compression effects from the H II region expansion. Finally, Serkowski function fits were used to study the ratio of the total-to-selective extinction, revealing a dual population of anomalous grain particle sizes. This trend suggests that both effects of coagulation and fragmentation of interstellar grains are present in the region.

  6. MIDAS - the dust counter and imager on Rosetta mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Arends, H.; Romstedt, J.; Midas Team

    1999-12-01

    The MIDAS instrument (Micro Imaging Dust Analysis System) has been selected as payload on the international Rosetta mission to comet Wirtanen. The instrument is based on the technology of atomic force microscopy. This technique is well introduced in laboratory studies, but as a space application it has to match many crucial criteria to withstand the harsh conditions of space flight. The advanced design of the flight model consists of four major functional units, (1) the microscope (2) the system for collection and transport of the dust grains, (3) a microvibration damping unit and (4) the control electronics and computing facilities. The MIDAS instrument will be mounted on the orbiting spacecraft. Over the mission period it will collect small dust particles that are released from the cometary nucleus. The dust collection system consists of 64 especially coated facets, which can be individually exposed to the cometary environment. A shutter that closes the funnel from the instrument to the outside of the spacecraft controls the exposure time. Eventually the loaded collector surface presents the dust grains to the actual atomic force microscope. The high-resolution capabilities of MIDAS allow to observe a grain size range from 4 nanometer up to 5 micrometer, thus it covers the smallest grain size, which has been observed ever in a space environment. The results of the analysis of the data cover the following fields: (1) dust counting statistics (2) true three-dimensional images of dust particles and (3) dust characterisation. The unique approach of Rosetta mission to monitor a comet from the low active phase far away from the sun to the high active phase at perihelion gives an exceptional opportunity for all instruments to observe different stages in a life of a comet that might be expressed in drastic changes of material properties.

  7. Dust inventory through the Solar System: From Earth to Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, M. R.; Horanyi, M.; Stern, A.; Bagenal, F.; Szalay, J.; Poppe, A. R.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Student Dust Counter (SDC) is an impact dust detector onboard the New Horizons spacecraft, observing the dust density distribution since April 2006 across the Solar System. SDC measures the mass of dust grains in the range of 10-12 < m < 10-9 g, covering an approximate size range of 0.5-10 um in particle radius. The measurements can be compared to model predictions following the orbital evolution of dust grains originating from the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt and migrating inward due to Poynting-Robertson drag. SDC's results, as well as data taken by the Pioneer 10 dust detector, are compared to model predictions to estimate the mass production rate and the ejecta size distribution power law exponent. On July 14, 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft passed through the Pluto system and is now continuing to take measurements in the solar system's third zone, the Kuiper Belt. The measurements SDC has taken throughout the solar system, including in the Pluto-Charon system, will be discussed in this presentation, as well as predictions for the dust distribution it will measure as it explores the Kuiper Belt.

  8. The interaction of hydrogen with the {010} surfaces of Mg and Fe olivine as models for interstellar dust grains: a density functional theory study

    PubMed Central

    Downing, C. A.; Ahmady, B.; Catlow, C. R. A.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    There is no consensus as yet to account for the significant presence of water on the terrestrial planets, but suggested sources include direct hydrogen adsorption from the parent molecular cloud after the planets’ formation, and delivery of hydrous material via comets or asteroids external to the zone of the terrestrial planets. Alternatively, a more recent idea is that water may have directly adsorbed onto the interstellar dust grains involved in planetary formation. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory to investigate and compare the bulk and {010} surface structures of the magnesium and iron end-members of the silicate mineral olivine, namely forsterite and fayalite, respectively. We also report our results on the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the mineral surfaces, where our calculations show that there is no activation barrier to the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at these surfaces. Furthermore, different surface sites activate the atom to form either adsorbed hydride or proton species in the form of hydroxy groups on the same surface, which indicates that these mineral surfaces may have acted as catalytic sites in the immobilization and reaction of hydrogen atoms to form dihydrogen gas or water molecules. PMID:23734054

  9. The interaction of hydrogen with the {010} surfaces of Mg and Fe olivine as models for interstellar dust grains: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Downing, C A; Ahmady, B; Catlow, C R A; de Leeuw, N H

    2013-07-13

    There is no consensus as yet to account for the significant presence of water on the terrestrial planets, but suggested sources include direct hydrogen adsorption from the parent molecular cloud after the planets' formation, and delivery of hydrous material via comets or asteroids external to the zone of the terrestrial planets. Alternatively, a more recent idea is that water may have directly adsorbed onto the interstellar dust grains involved in planetary formation. In this work, we use electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory to investigate and compare the bulk and {010} surface structures of the magnesium and iron end-members of the silicate mineral olivine, namely forsterite and fayalite, respectively. We also report our results on the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at the mineral surfaces, where our calculations show that there is no activation barrier to the adsorption of atomic hydrogen at these surfaces. Furthermore, different surface sites activate the atom to form either adsorbed hydride or proton species in the form of hydroxy groups on the same surface, which indicates that these mineral surfaces may have acted as catalytic sites in the immobilization and reaction of hydrogen atoms to form dihydrogen gas or water molecules. PMID:23734054

  10. DISCOVERY OF THE METHOXY RADICAL, CH{sub 3}O, TOWARD B1: DUST GRAIN AND GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY IN COLD DARK CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cernicharo, J.; Jimenez-Escobar, A.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Marcelino, N.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.

    2012-11-10

    We report on the discovery of the methoxy radical (CH{sub 3}O) toward the cold and dense core B1-b based on the observation, with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope, of several lines at 3 and 2 mm wavelengths. Besides this new molecular species we also report on the detection of many lines arising from methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), formic acid (HCOOH), propynal (HCCCHO), acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), dimethyl ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}), methyl formate (CH{sub 3}OCOH), and the formyl radical (HCO). The column density of all these species is {approx_equal}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, corresponding to abundances of {approx_equal}10{sup -11}. The similarity in abundances for all these species strongly suggest that they are formed on the surface of dust grains and ejected to the gas phase through non-thermal desorption processes, most likely cosmic rays or secondary photons. Nevertheless, laboratory experiments indicate that the CH{sub 3}O isomer released to the gas phase is CH{sub 2}OH rather than the methoxy one. Possible gas-phase formation routes to CH{sub 3}O from OH and methanol are discussed.

  11. Upper limits for a lunar dust exosphere from far-ultraviolet spectroscopy by LRO/LAMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; Glenar, David A.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Retherford, Kurt D.; Randall Gladstone, G.; Miles, Paul F.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Kaufmann, David E.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Alan Stern, S.

    2014-05-01

    Since early 2012, the Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) far-ultraviolet spectrograph on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft has carried out a series of limb observations from within lunar shadow to search for the presence of a high altitude dust exosphere via forward-scattering of sunlight from dust grains. Bright “horizon-glow” was observed from orbit during several Apollo missions and interpreted in terms of dust at altitudes of several km and higher. However, no confirmation of such an exosphere has been made since that time. This raises basic questions about the source(s) of excess brightness in the early measurements and also the conditions for producing observable dust concentrations at km altitudes and higher. Far-ultraviolet measurements between 170 and 190 nm, near the LAMP long wavelength cutoff, are especially sensitive to scattering by small (0.1-0.2 μm radius) dust grains, since the scattering cross-section is near-maximum, and the solar flux is rising rapidly with wavelength. An additional advantage of ultraviolet measurements is the lack of interference by background zodiacal light which must be taken into account at longer wavelengths. As of July 2013, LAMP has completed several limb-observing sequences dedicated to the search for horizon glow, but no clear evidence of dust scattering has yet been obtained. Upper limits for vertical dust column abundance have been estimated at less than 10 grains cm-2 (0.1 μm grain radius), by comparing the measured noise-equivalent brightness with the results of Mie scattering simulations for the same observing geometries. These results indicate that Lunar Atmosphere Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) UVS lunar dust observations will be considerably more challenging than planned.

  12. Origin of the solar system dust bands discovered by IRAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Nicholson, P. D.; Burns, J. A.; Houck, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that distinctive longitudinal variations in thermal flux and mean latitude can be used to determine the typical orbits of the grains comprising the Solar System bands. In particular, how the bands should vary if they are debris associated with the three principal asteroid families is predicted. Based on these ideas, IRAS observations may allow discrimination between asteroidal and cometary origins of the dust bands and, perhaps, of the entire zodiacal cloud.

  13. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2008-09-01

    Galileo was the first articfiial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The highly sensitive impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage { on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter - dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2:33RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2:5RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth (Krüger et al, Icarus, submitted). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are approximately 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle ux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits with inclinations up to 20°. Finally, the faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to

  14. The lunar dust pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Farrell, William M.; Stubbs, Timothy J.

    2013-07-01

    An analytic model for the motion of a positively charged lunar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum is presented. It is shown that the dust grain executes oscillatory trajectories, and an expression is derived for the period of oscillation. Simulations used to verify the analytic expression also show that because the trajectories are unstable, dust grains are either ejected from the crater's vicinity or deposited into the crater forming "dust ponds." The model also applies to other airless bodies in the solar system, such as asteroids, and predicts that under certain conditions, particularly near lunar sunset, oscillating dust "canopies" or "swarms" will form over negatively charged craters.

  15. Dust escape from Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  16. Chemistry and mineralogy of Martian dust: An explorer's primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of chemical and mineralogical properties of Martian surface dust is offered for the benefit of engineers or mission planners who are designing hardware or strategies for Mars surface exploration. For technical details and specialized explanations, references should be made to literature cited. Four sources used for information about Martian dust composition: (1) Experiments performed on the Mars surface by the Viking Landers 1 and 2 and Earth-based lab experiments attempting to duplicate these results; (2) Infrared spectrophotometry remotely performed from Mars orbit, mostly by Mariner 9; (3) Visible and infrared spectrophotometry remotely performed from Earth; and (4) Lab studies of the shergottite nakhlite chassignite (SNC) clan of meteorites, for which compelling evidence suggests origin on Mars. Source 1 is limited to fine grained sediments at the surface whereas 2 and 3 contain mixed information about surface dust (and associated rock) and atmospheric dust. Source 4 has provided surprisingly detailed information but investigations are still incomplete.

  17. A novel aspect of dust in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N.L.; Murtaza, G.; Ehsan, Z.

    2006-02-15

    Nonlinear screening of the dust grains immersed in a homogenous fully ionized electron-ion plasma is investigated. Assuming conservation of entropy, an important relation is obtained between the maximum potential (and therefore the charge) of the dust grain and the temperature of the electrons. The Thomas-Fermi equation is derived for the potential of a dust grain in a nondegenerate plasma suggesting the existence of dust atom with a well defined atomic radius. Furthermore, based on the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the notion of a dust-grain molecule is introduced in which the protons act like a kind of 'glue' which binds two negatively charged dust grains together, and the motion of the grains have little influence on that binding force. Finally, considering the weak interaction between the proton clouds of two dust grains, an expression of exchange energy is obtained.

  18. Simulating Dust Cycling during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.; Mahowald, N. M.; Soreghan, G. S.; Soreghan, M. J.; Shields, C. A.; Albani, S.

    2012-12-01

    Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian strata preserve evidence for significant deposition of mineral dust, an aerosol with strong potential influence on the climate. Some equatorial marine carbonate records from this interval appear to record massive influxes of fine dust (diameter < 10 μm) after rapid sea level fall, suggesting that the pacing of dust deposition was connected to the expansion and contraction of ice sheets during the important icehouse climate interval of Carboniferous and Permian time. Nearby continental strata record high accumulations of coarse dust (loess) during periods of increasing aridity (apparent glacial intervals) and of fine dust (paleosols) during periods of increasing humidity (apparent interglacial intervals), though the pacing of this deposition may be more strongly associated with orbital forcing than ice sheet dynamics. Significant dust deposition continued in many of these areas during the emergence of the Earth's climate from icehouse conditions during Middle Permian time. Understanding the dynamics of dust cycling during the depths of the icehouse is the first step to investigating dust records from the most recent icehouse termination of Earth's history. Here, we attempt to reconstruct the cycling and some of the potential climate impacts of mineral dust during this interval, using version 3 of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3) and the best available records of dust deposition. Modeled sensitivity simulations suggest that climatic controls on dust cycling that act on relatively short timescales (primarily meteorological and vegetation-related) cannot explain the large variability in dust deposition rates inferred from marine carbonate records. Processes acting on longer timescales, particularly those that control the availability of wind-erodible sediment, likely are more important. We also consider whether exposure of sedimentary basins during sea level fall and glaciogenic dust production could modulate dust

  19. Dusts and Molds

    MedlinePlus

    ... of dust can result in sensitization. Symptoms include chills, fever, cough, chest congestion, fatigue, and shortness of ... grain and forage products. Symptoms include cough, fever, chills, body aches, and fatigue. These symptoms appear from ...

  20. The dynamics of charged dust in the tail of Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Mendis, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical simulation has been performed to calculate the distributions of dust particles of various sizes down the tail of comet P/Giacobini-Zinner. When the electrostatic charging of the grains in the plasma and radiative environment of the comet is taken into account, it is found that the distribution of the grains (particularly at the lowest end of the mass spectrum) in a plane normal to the orbital plane is entirely different from what is expected had the grains been uncharged. Although the NASA-ICE spacecraft, which will fly through the tail of this comet almost normal to its orbital plane on September 11, 1985, has no dedicated dust experiments, it is expected that the plasma wave instrument will serve as an indirect detector, even of the smallest grains, via the plasma clouds created by the high-velocity dust impacts. Knowledge of the spatial variation of the grain sizes encountered along the flight path of the spacecraft will provide us with the information necessary to calculate the electrostatic potential of the grains, which in turn will lead to an estimation of the role of the electromagnetic forces on the dynamics of such grains.

  1. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  2. MicroMED: a dust particle counter for the characterization of airborne dust close to the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzolino, Fabio; Esposito, Francesca; Molfese, Cesare; Cortecchia, Fausto; Saggin, Bortolino; D'amato, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of airborne dust is very important in planetary climatology. Indeed, dust absorbs and scatter solar and thermal radiation, severely affecting atmospheric thermal structure, balance and dynamics (in terms of circulations). Wind-driven blowing of sand and dust is also responsible for shaping planetary surfaces through the formation of sand dunes and ripples, the erosion of rocks, and the creation and transport of soil particles. Dust is permanently present in the atmosphere of Mars and its amount varies with seasons. During regional or global dust storms, more than 80% of the incoming sunlight is absorbed by dust causing an intense atmospheric heating. Airborne dust is therefore a crucial climate component on Mars which impacts atmospheric circulations at all scales. Main dust parameters influencing the atmosphere heating are size distribution, abundance, albedo, single scattering phase function, imaginary part of the index of refraction. Moreover, major improvements of Mars climate models require, in addition to the standard meteorological parameters, quantitative information about dust lifting, transport and removal mechanisms. In this context, two major quantities need to be measured for the dust source to be understood: surface flux and granulometry. While many observations have constrained the size distribution of the dust haze seen from the orbit, it is still not known what the primary airborne dust (e.g. the recently lifted dust) is made of, size-wise. MicroMED has been designed to fill this gap. It will measure the abundance and size distribution of dust, not in the atmospheric column, but close to the surface, where dust is lifted, so to be able to monitor dust injection into the atmosphere. This has never been performed in Mars and other planets exploration. MicroMED is an Optical Particle Counter, analyzing light scattered from single dust particles to measure their size and abundance. A proper fluid-dynamic system, including a pump and a

  3. Circumstellar grain formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draine, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Dust formation around cool giant and supergiant stars is examined in terms of grain formulation. Optical properties of small clusters, molecular physics of cluster nucleation and growth, circumstellar mass flows, and their application to alpha Ori are discussed.

  4. Summary of the results from the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment (LADEE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horanyi, Mihaly

    2016-07-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission (9/2013 - 4/2014) discovered a permanently present dust cloud engulfing the Moon. The size, velocity, and density distributions of the dust particles are consistent with ejecta clouds generated from the continual bombardment of the lunar surface by sporadic interplanetary dust particles. Intermittent density enhancements were observed during several of the annual meteoroid streams, especially during the Geminids. LDEX found no evidence of the expected density enhancements over the terminators where electrostatic processes were predicted to efficiently loft small grains. LDEX is an impact ionization dust detector, it captures coincident signals and full waveforms to reliably identify dust impacts. LDEX recorded average impact rates of approximately 1 and 0.1 hits/minute of particles with impact charges of q > 0.5 and q > 5 fC, corresponding to particles with radii of a > 0.3 and a> 0.7~μm, respectively. Several of the yearly meteor showers generated sustained elevated levels of impact rates, especially if their radiant direction intersected the lunar surface near the equatorial plane, greatly enhancing the probability of crossing their ejecta plumes. The characteristic velocities of dust particles in the cloud are on the order of ~100 m/s which we neglect compared to the typical spacecraft speeds of 1.6 km/s. Hence, with the knowledge of the spacecraft orbit and attitude, impact rates can be directly turned into particle densities as functions of time and position. LDEX observations are the first to identify the ejecta clouds around the Moon sustained by the continual bombardment of interplanetary dust particles. Most of the dust particles generated in impacts have insufficient energy to escape and follow ballistic orbits, returning to the surface, 'gardening' the regolith. Similar ejecta clouds are expected to engulf all airless planetary objects, including

  5. Fluffy dust forms icy planetesimals by static compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Wada, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Context. Several barriers have been proposed in planetesimal formation theory: bouncing, fragmentation, and radial drift problems. Understanding the structure evolution of dust aggregates is a key in planetesimal formation. Dust grains become fluffy by coagulation in protoplanetary disks. However, once they are fluffy, they are not sufficiently compressed by collisional compression to form compact planetesimals. Aims: We aim to reveal the pathway of dust structure evolution from dust grains to compact planetesimals. Methods: Using the compressive strength formula, we analytically investigate how fluffy dust aggregates are compressed by static compression due to ram pressure of the disk gas and self-gravity of the aggregates in protoplanetary disks. Results: We reveal the pathway of the porosity evolution from dust grains via fluffy aggregates to form planetesimals, circumventing the barriers in planetesimal formation. The aggregates are compressed by the disk gas to a density of 10-3 g/cm3 in coagulation, which is more compact than is the case with collisional compression. Then, they are compressed more by self-gravity to 10-1 g/cm3 when the radius is 10 km. Although the gas compression decelerates the growth, the aggregates grow rapidly enough to avoid the radial drift barrier when the orbital radius is ≲6 AU in a typical disk. Conclusions: We propose a fluffy dust growth scenario from grains to planetesimals. It enables icy planetesimal formation in a wide range beyond the snowline in protoplanetary disks. This result proposes a concrete initial condition of planetesimals for the later stages of the planet formation.

  6. Search for a high-altitude lunar dust exosphere using Clementine navigational star tracker measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenar, David A.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Hahn, Joseph M.; Wang, Yongli

    2014-12-01

    During the 1994 Clementine lunar mapping mission, portions of 25 orbits were dedicated to a search for lunar horizon glow (LHG) using the spacecraft star tracker navigation cameras. Previous putative detections of LHG were believed to result from forward scattering of sunlight by exospheric dust grains with radii ≈ 0.1 µm, observable above the limb from within the shadow of the Moon near orbital sunrise or sunset. We have examined star tracker image sequences from five Clementine orbits in which the limb occulted the Sun, and was at least partially shadowed from earthshine, minimizing the chance of stray light contamination. No LHG appears in the image data, or in any of the net brightness images, after subtraction of a reference zodiacal light model. However, some of the images display faint excess limb brightness that appears to be solar streamer structure. Therefore, we derive upper limits for the amount of dust in the lunar exosphere that could be hidden by these brightness fluctuations using a dust-scattering simulation code and simple exponential dust profiles defined by surface concentration n0 and scale height H. Simulations using grains of radius 0.1 µm show that fluctuations in the observed excess brightness can be matched by a dust exosphere with a vertical column abundance n0H of 5-30 cm-2 and overlying mass <10-12 g cm-2. These dust upper limit estimates are highly dependent on assumed grain size due to the rapid increase in per-grain brightness with grain radius.

  7. Dynamics of a dust crystal with positive and negative dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kourakis, Ioannis; Shukla, Padma Kant; Morfill, Gregor

    2005-10-31

    A dust crystal consisting of charged dust grains of alternating charge sign (.../+/-/+/-/+/...) and mass is considered. Considering the equations of longitudinal motion, a linear dispersion relation is derived from first principles, and then analyzed. Two modes are obtained, including an acoustic mode and an inverse-dispersive optic-like one. The nonlinear aspects of longitudinal dust grain motion are also briefly addressed, via a Boussineq and Korteweg- de Vries description.

  8. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  9. A Fractal Model for the Capacitance of Lunar Dust and Lunar Dust Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Keller, John W.; Farrell, William M.; Marshall, John; Richard, Denis Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lunar dust grains and dust aggregates exhibit clumping, with an uneven mass distribution, as well as features that span many spatial scales. It has been observed that these aggregates display an almost fractal repetition of geometry with scale. Furthermore, lunar dust grains typically have sharp protrusions and jagged features that result from the lack of aeolian weathering (as opposed to space weathering) on the Moon. A perfectly spherical geometry, frequently used as a model for lunar dust grains, has none of these characteristics (although a sphere may be a reasonable proxy for the very smallest grains and some glasses). We present a fractal model for a lunar dust grain or aggregate of grains that reproduces (1) the irregular clumpy nature of lunar dust, (2) the presence of sharp points, and (3) dust features that span multiple scale lengths. We calculate the capacitance of the fractal lunar dust analytically assuming fixed dust mass (i.e. volume) for an arbitrary number of fractal levels and compare the capacitance to that of a non-fractal object with the same volume, surface area, and characteristic width. The fractal capacitance is larger than that of the equivalent non-fractal object suggesting that for a given potential, electrostatic forces on lunar dust grains and aggregates are greater than one might infer from assuming dust grains are sphericaL Consequently, electrostatic transport of lunar dust grains, for example lofting, appears more plausible than might be inferred by calculations based on less realistic assumptions about dust shape and associated capacitance.

  10. Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON): Observations of the Dust Grains from SOFIA and of the Atomic Gas from NSO Dunn and McMath-Pierce Solar Telescopes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Woodward, C. E.; Harker, D. E.; Kelley, M. S.; Sitko, M.; Reach, W. T.; De Pater, I.; Gehrz, R. D.; Kolokolova, L.; Cochran, A. L.; McKay, A. J.; Reardon, K.; Cauzzi, G.; Tozzi, G.; Christian, D. J.; Jess, D. B.; Mathioudakis, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Morgenthaler, J. P.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) is unique in that it is a dynamically new comet derived from the Oort cloud reservoir of comets with a sun-grazing orbit. Infrared (IR) and visible wavelength observing campaigns were planned on NASA's Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and on National Solar Observatory Dunn (DST) and McMath-Pierce Solar Telescopes, respectively. We highlight our early results. SOFIA (+FORCAST [1]) mid- to far-IR images and spectroscopy (~5-35 μm) of the dust in the coma of ISON are to be obtained by the ISON-SOFIA Team during a flight window 2013 Oct 21-23 UT (r_h≈1.18 AU). Dust characteristics, identified through the 10 μm silicate emission feature and its strength [2], as well as spectral features from cometary crystalline silicates (Forsterite) at 11.05-11.2 μm, and near 16, 19, 23.5, 27.5, and 33 μm are compared with other Oort cloud comets that span the range of small and/or highly porous grains (e.g., C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) [3,4,5] and C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) [6]) to large and/or compact grains (e.g., C/2007 N4 (Lulin) [7] and C/2006 P1 (McNaught) [8]). Measurement of the crystalline peaks in contrast to the broad 10 and 20 μm amorphous silicate features yields the cometary silicate crystalline mass fraction [9], which is a benchmark for radial transport in our protoplanetary disk [10]. The central wavelength positions, relative intensities, and feature asymmetries for the crystalline peaks may constrain the shapes of the crystals [11]. Only SOFIA can look for cometary organics in the 5-8 μm region. Spatially resolved measurements of atoms and simple molecules from when comet ISON is near the Sun (r_h< 0.4 AU, near Nov-20--Dec-03 UT) were proposed for by the ISON-DST Team. Comet ISON is the first comet since comet Ikeya-Seki (1965f) [12,13] suitable for studying the alkalai metals Na and K and the atoms specifically attributed to dust grains including Mg, Si, Fe, as well as Ca. DST's Horizontal Grating Spectrometer (HGS) measures

  11. COSMIC DUST AGGREGATION WITH STOCHASTIC CHARGING

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.; Shotorban, Babak

    2013-10-20

    The coagulation of cosmic dust grains is a fundamental process which takes place in astrophysical environments, such as presolar nebulae and circumstellar and protoplanetary disks. Cosmic dust grains can become charged through interaction with their plasma environment or other processes, and the resultant electrostatic force between dust grains can strongly affect their coagulation rate. Since ions and electrons are collected on the surface of the dust grain at random time intervals, the electrical charge of a dust grain experiences stochastic fluctuations. In this study, a set of stochastic differential equations is developed to model these fluctuations over the surface of an irregularly shaped aggregate. Then, employing the data produced, the influence of the charge fluctuations on the coagulation process and the physical characteristics of the aggregates formed is examined. It is shown that dust with small charges (due to the small size of the dust grains or a tenuous plasma environment) is affected most strongly.

  12. Galileo In-Situ Dust Measurements and the Physics of Jupiter's Gossamer Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Moissl, R.; Gruen, E.

    2007-12-01

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter, the Galileo spacecraft flew twice through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During the ring passages, the Galileo impact-ionization dust detector counted a few thousand impacts but only about 100 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. The instrument verified the outward extension of the gossamer ring beyond Thebe's orbit and measured a major reduction in particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring material is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2007). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. Finally, Galileo also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. Recent modelling (Hamilton & Krueger, Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically

  13. Observations of the White Light Corona from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, R. A.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Korendyke, C. M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Linton, M. G.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Velli, M. M.; Mikic, Z.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The SoloHI instrument on Solar Orbiter and the WISPR instrument on Solar Probe+ will make white light coronagraphic images of the corona as the two spacecraft orbit the Sun. The minimum perihelia for Solar Orbiter is about 60 Rsun and for SP+ is 9.5 Rsun. The wide field of view of the WISPR instrument (about 105 degrees radially) corresponds to viewing the corona from 2.2 Rsun to 20 Rsun. Thus the entire Thomson hemisphere is contained within the telescope's field and we need to think of the instrument as being a traditional remote sensing instrument and then transitioning to a local in-situ instrument. The local behavior derives from the fact that the maximum Thomson scattering will favor the electron plasma close to the spacecraft - exactly what the in-situ instruments will be sampling. SoloHI and WISPR will also observe scattered light from dust in the inner heliosphere, which will be an entirely new spatial regime for dust observations from a coronagraph, which we assume to arise from dust in the general neighborhood of about half way between the observer and the Sun. As the dust grains approach the Sun, they evaporate and do not contribute to the scattering. A dust free zone has been postulated to exist somewhere inside of 5 Rsun where all dust is evaporated, but this has never been observed. The radial position where the evaporation occurs will depend on the precise molecular composition of the individual grains. The orbital plane of Solar Orbiter will gradually increase up to about 35 degrees, enabling a very different view through the zodiacal dust cloud to test the models generated from in-ecliptic observations. In this paper we will explore some of the issues associated with the observation of the dust and will present a simple model to explore the sensitivity of the instrument to observe such evaporations.

  14. Light Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 October 2004 Many Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images exhibit wild patterns of dark streaks thought to have formed by the passage of many dust devils. The dust devils disrupt the dust coating the martian surface, leaving behind a streak. However, not all dust devils make streaks, and not all dust devil streaks are dark. Some are light---it simply depends upon which is darker, the substrate or the dust that the spinning vortex disrupts. The example of light-toned dust devil streaks shown here is located in southern Schiaparelli Basin near 5.3oS, 343.3oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/upper left.

  15. Interstellar and Cometary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathis, John S.

    1997-01-01

    'Interstellar dust' forms a continuum of materials with differing properties which I divide into three classes on the basis of observations: (a) diffuse dust, in the low-density interstellar medium; (b) outer-cloud dust, observed in stars close enough to the outer edges of molecular clouds to be observed in the optical and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum, and (c) inner-cloud dust, deep within the cores of molecular clouds, and observed only in the infrared by means of absorption bands of C-H, C=O, 0-H, C(triple bond)N, etc. There is a surprising regularity of the extinction laws between diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. The entire mean extinction law from infrared through the observable ultraviolet spectrum can be characterized by a single parameter. There are real deviations from this mean law, larger than observational uncertainties, but they are much smaller than differences of the mean laws in diffuse- and outer-cloud dust. This fact shows that there are processes which operate over the entire distribution of grain sizes, and which change size distributions extremely efficiently. There is no evidence for mantles on grains in local diffuse and outer-cloud dust. The only published spectra of the star VI Cyg 12, the best candidate for showing mantles, does not show the 3.4 micro-m band which appreciable mantles would produce. Grains are larger in outer-cloud dust than diffuse dust because of coagulation, not accretion of extensive mantles. Core-mantle grains favored by J. M. Greenberg and collaborators, and composite grains of Mathis and Whiffen (1989), are discussed more extensively (naturally, I prefer the latter). The composite grains are fluffy and consist of silicates, amorphous carbon, and some graphite in the same grain. Grains deep within molecular clouds but before any processing within the solar system are presumably formed from the accretion of icy mantles on and within the coagulated outer-cloud grains. They should contain a mineral

  16. Will New Horizons See Dust Clumps in the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitense, Christian; Krivov, Alexander V.; Löhne, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Debris disks are thought to be sculptured by neighboring planets. The same is true for the Edgeworth-Kuiper debris disk, yet no direct observational evidence for signatures of giant planets in the Kuiper Belt dust distribution has been found so far. Here we model the dust distribution in the outer solar system to reproduce the dust impact rates onto the dust detector on board the New Horizons spacecraft measured so far and to predict the rates during the Neptune orbit traverse. To this end, we take a realistic distribution of trans-Neptunian objects to launch a sufficient number of dust grains of different sizes and follow their orbits by including radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag, as well as the perturbations of four giant planets. In a subsequent statistical analysis, we calculate number densities and lifetimes of the dust grains in order to simulate a collisional cascade. In contrast to the previous work, our model not only considers collisional elimination of particles but also includes production of finer debris. We find that particles captured in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune build clumps that are not removed by collisions, because the depleting effect of collisions is counteracted by production of smaller fragments. Our model successfully reproduces the dust impact rates measured by New Horizons out to ≈23 AU and predicts an increase of the impact rate of about a factor of two or three around the Neptune orbit crossing. This result is robust with respect to the variation of the vaguely known number of dust-producing scattered disk objects, collisional outcomes, and the dust properties.

  17. Will new horizons see dust clumps in the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt?

    SciTech Connect

    Vitense, Christian; Krivov, Alexander V.; Löhne, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Debris disks are thought to be sculptured by neighboring planets. The same is true for the Edgeworth-Kuiper debris disk, yet no direct observational evidence for signatures of giant planets in the Kuiper Belt dust distribution has been found so far. Here we model the dust distribution in the outer solar system to reproduce the dust impact rates onto the dust detector on board the New Horizons spacecraft measured so far and to predict the rates during the Neptune orbit traverse. To this end, we take a realistic distribution of trans-Neptunian objects to launch a sufficient number of dust grains of different sizes and follow their orbits by including radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag, as well as the perturbations of four giant planets. In a subsequent statistical analysis, we calculate number densities and lifetimes of the dust grains in order to simulate a collisional cascade. In contrast to the previous work, our model not only considers collisional elimination of particles but also includes production of finer debris. We find that particles captured in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune build clumps that are not removed by collisions, because the depleting effect of collisions is counteracted by production of smaller fragments. Our model successfully reproduces the dust impact rates measured by New Horizons out to ≈23 AU and predicts an increase of the impact rate of about a factor of two or three around the Neptune orbit crossing. This result is robust with respect to the variation of the vaguely known number of dust-producing scattered disk objects, collisional outcomes, and the dust properties.

  18. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV) wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness), the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution), a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014). 2nd Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  19. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lunar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however, the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  20. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lnnar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however. the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  1. Long-term microparticle flux variability indicated by comparison of Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) timed impacts for LDEF's first year in orbit with impact data for the entire 5.77-year orbital lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.; Mulholland, J. Derral; Oliver, John P.; Cooke, William J.; Kassel, Philip C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The electronic sensors of the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) recorded precise impact times and approximate directions for submicron to approximately 100 micron size particles on all six primary sides of the spacecraft for the first 346 days of the LDEF orbital mission. Previously-reported analyses of the timed impact data have established their spatio-temporal features, including the demonstration that a preponderance of the particles in this regime are orbital debris and that a large fraction of the debris particles are encountered in megameter-size clouds. Short-term fluxes within such clouds can rise several orders of magnitude above the long-term average. These unexpectedly large short-term variations in debris flux raise the question of how representative an indication of the multi-year average flux is given by the nearly one year of timed data. One of the goals of the IDE was to conduct an optical survey of impact sites on detectors that remained active during the entire LDEF mission, to obtain full-mission fluxes. We present here the comparisons and contrasts among the new IDE optical survey impact data, the IDE first-year timed impact data, and impact data from other LDEF micrometeoroid and debris experiments. The following observations are reported: (1) the 5.77 year long-term integrated microparticle impact fluxes recorded by IDE detectors matched the integrated impact fluxes measured by other LDEF investigators for the same period; (2) IDE integrated microparticle impact fluxes varied by factors from 0.5 to 8.3 for LDEF days 1-346, 347-2106 and 1-2106 (5.77 years) on rows 3 (trailing edge, or West), 6 (South side), 12 (North side), and the Earth and Space ends; and (3) IDE integrated microparticle impact fluxes varied less than 3 percent for LDEF days 1-346, 347-2106 and 1-2106 (5.77 years) on row 9 (leading edge, or East). These results give further evidence of the accuracy and internal consistency of the recorded IDE impact data. This leads to

  2. Grain optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanner, Martha

    1988-01-01

    The optical properties of small grains provide the link between the infrared observations presented in Chapter 1 and the dust composition described in Chapter 3. In this session, the optical properties were discussed from the viewpoint of modeling the emission from the dust coma and the scattering in order to draw inference about the dust size distribution and composition. The optical properties are applied to the analysis of the infrared data in several ways, and these different uses should be kept in mind when judging the validity of the methods for applying optical constants to real grains.

  3. The Dust Environment of Comet Austin 1990 V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulle, M.; Bosio, S.; Cremonese, G.; Cristaldi, S.; Liller, W.; Pansecchi, L.

    1993-05-01

    We analyse 12 Schmidt plates concerning the dust tail of comet Austin 1990V taken at the Observatories of Catania, Cerro Tololo, ESO and Siding Spring during May and June, 1990. The absolute calibration of the images was performed by means of some standard fields of the Guide Star Photometric Catalogue I (Lasker et al. 1988) detected on the same plates containing the comet images. At the beginning of June the predicted Neck-Line Structure (Fulle & Pansecehi 1990) was detected and well observed as a streamer superimposed on the dust tail and an opposite sunward spike. We apply the inverse Monte- Carlo dust tail model (Fulle 1989) to two different sets of images, which provide results in reciprocal close agreement even if in the two sets the dust tail has a very different shape. We analyse dust grains of diameters between 10 μm and 10 cm ejected during the time interval -160 d < t < +60 d (days related to perihelion). The ejection velocity of millimeter-sized dust grains reaches its maximum value of 0.1 km s-1 at t = +10 d. The mass loss rate reaches a broad maximum of at least 3 l07 g s-1 a few days before perihelion. The power index of the time-averaged size distribution is -3.0±0.2. Strongly anisotropic dust ejections from the nucleus surface are incompatible with the observed shape of the dust tail. Further, the results of the photometry of the Neck-Line concerning the size dependence of the dust velocity and the observed length of the sunward spike indicate that the classical power index of the size dependence of the dust velocity u = -½ cannot account for all the observations. On the contrary, significantly higher index, u = -⅙, allows to reproduce very closely all the available data of the C/1990V dust tail. Also the size distribution and the mass loss rate given by the Neck- Line photometry agree with the results of the inverse Monte-Carlo model, thus supplying the first example of complete agreement between the two models. Although C/1990V was a new

  4. Dust in Interplanetary Space and in the Local Galactic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grün, E.; Dikarev, V.; Frisch, P. C.; Graps, A.; Kempf, S.; Krüger, H.; Landgraf, M.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Srama, R.

    2004-05-01

    The solar system is a natural laboratory, accessible by a variety of methods, for studying the astrophysics of dust. Astronomical measurements mostly at visible and infrared wavelengths, yield the large-scale distribution of dust and its average composition. Examining natural surfaces deployed to the space environment, and assessing those surfaces' micro-crater distributions, reveals the size distribution of dust. Meteor observations and their corresponding measurements provide orbital information of dust grains and their genetic interrelation to the larger bodies in our solar system: comets and asteroids. From analyses of meteorites and interplanetary dust particles collected in the stratosphere, we have a comprehensive understanding of the isotopic, elemental, and mineralogical composition of this primordial material. Finally, in situ dust analysis via dust detectors located in interplanetary space, the most versatile method, have been providing data to determine the dust particles' mass, speed, trajectory, and chemical composition. An assortment of dust exhibiting a variety of dynamical processes has been identified in interplanetary space. In Jupiter's proximity, intense streams have been observed of nanometer-sized ash particles, which are emitted from the volcanoes of Jupiter's moon Io. These particles are accelerated by the powerful Jovian magnetic field to speeds of several 100 km/s, and are propelled further into interplanetary and interstellar space by the solar wind magnetic field. In interplanetary space, concentrations of collisional debris in the asteroid belt have been identified by infrared observations. The Poynting-Robertson effect drags these particles in towards the Earth and the Sun, where they sublimate. If the giant planets did not block their inward drift, a similar fate is expected for the dust assortment that is generated by collisions in the Kuiper belt. Another dust population is the mostly sub-micron-sized dust from comets, released

  5. Cometary dust composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Hanner, M. S.

    1988-01-01

    The earth based measurements and in situ sampling of Comet Halley have provided new data about the chemical composition of cometary grains. Recent progress in laboratory studies of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) complement the comet data, allowing inferences about the mineralogy and physical structure of the comet dust to be drawn from the observed elemental composition and infrared spectra. The in situ dust composition measurements at Halley, the composition of IDPs and their relation to comet dust, and the origin of the 3.4 micron hydrocarbon feature is discussed. Related discussion is also presented on aromatic components in comets and the 3.4 micron feature. These topics are briefly summarized.

  6. Dust charging in the dense Enceladus torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroshenko, Victoria; Lühr, Hermann; Morfill, Gregor

    2013-04-01

    The key parameter of the dust-plasma interactions is the charge carried by a dust particle. The grain electrostatic potential is usually calculated from the so called orbit-motion limited (OML) model [1]. It is valid for a single particle immersed into collisionless plasmas with Maxwellian electron and ion distributions. Apparently, such a parameter regime cannot be directly applied to the conditions relevant for the Enceladus dense neutral torus and plume, where the plasma is multispecies and multistreaming, the dust density is high, sometimes even exceeding the plasma number density. We have examined several new factors which can significantly affect the grain charging in the dust loaded plasma of the Enceladus torus and in the plume region and which, to our knowledge, have not been investigated up to now for such plasma environments. These include: (a) influence of the multispecies plasma composition, namely the presence of two electron populations with electron temperatures ranging from a few eV up to a hundred eV [2], a few ion species (e.g. corotating water group ions, and protons, characterized by different kinetic temperatures), as well as cold nonthermalized new-born water group ions which move with Kepler velocity [3]; (b) effect of the ion-neutral collisions on the dust charging in the dense Enceladus torus and in the plume; (c) effect of high dust density, when a grain cannot be considered as an isolated particle any more (especially relevant for the plume region, where the average negative dust charge density according to Cassini measurements is of the order or even exceeds the plasma number density [4,5]). It turns out that in this case, the electrostatic potential and respective dust charge cannot be deduced from the initial OML formalism and there is a need to incorporate the effect of dust density into plasma fluxes flowing to the grain surface to calculate the grain equilibrium charge; (e) since the dust in the planetary rings comes in a wide

  7. Model of Dust Thermal Emission of Comet 67p-Churyumov-Gerasimenko for the Rosetta-MIRO Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gicquel, Adeline; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Leyrat, Cedric; Zakharov, Vladimir; Crovisier, Jacques; Biver, Nicolas; Gulkis, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    The ESA's Rosetta spacecraft will arrive at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2014. The study of gas and dust emission is primary objective of several instruments on the Rosetta spacecraft, including the Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter (MIRO). We developed a model of dust thermal emission to estimate the detectability of dust in the vicinity of the nucleus with MIRO. Our model computes the power received by the MIRO antenna in limb viewing as a function of the geometry of the observations and the physical properties of the grains. We show that detection in the millimeter and submillimeter channels can be achieved near perihelion.

  8. Long-term particle flux variability indicated by comparison of Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) timed impacts for LDEF's first year in orbit with impact data for the entire 5.75-year orbital lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulholland, J. Derral; Simon, Charles G.; Cooke, William J.; Oliver, John P.; Misra, V.

    1992-01-01

    The electronic sensors of the Interplanetary Dust Experiment (IDE) recorded precise impact times and approximate directions for submicron to approximately 100-micron size particles on all six primary sides of the spacecraft for the first 346 days of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) orbital mission. Previously-reported analyses of the timed impact data have established their spatio-temporal features, including the demonstration that a preponderance of the particles in this regime are orbital debris and that a large fraction of the debris particles are encountered as megameter-size clouds, some of which persist for long times. Short-term fluxes within such clouds can rise several orders of magnitude above the long-term average. These finding are consistent with the results of the first catastrophic hypervelocity laboratory impacts on a real satellite, recently reported in the press. Analysis continues on the geometric and evolutionary characteristics of these clouds, as well as on the isolation and characterization of the natural micrometeoroid component in the IDE data, but the unexpectedly large short-term variations in debris flux raises the question of how representative an indication of the multi-year average flux is given by the nearly one year of timed data. It has, therefore, always been one of the goals of IDE to conduct an optical survey of the craters on the IDE detectors, to obtain full-mission fluxes for comparisons with the timed data. This work is underway, and the results presently in hand are significant. Optical scanning of the ram and wake (East and West) panels is complete, and it is clear that the first year was in some respects not representative of the subsequent years. The 5.75-year average flux on East panel was 90 percent of the value predicted by the average flux recorded during the first year, while it was only 34 percent on West panel. This suggests that western hemisphere spacecraft launches are a major contributor to the long

  9. Molecular imprint of dust evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimkin, Vitaly; Zhukovska, Svitlana; Wiebe, Dmitri; Semenov, Dmitry; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav; Vasyunin, Anton; Birnstiel, Til; Henning, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Evolution of sub-micron grains is an essential process during early stages of planet formation. The dust growth and sedimentation to the midplane affect a spectral energy distribution. At the same time dust evolution can alter significantly the distribution of gas that is a factor of 100 more massive than dust and can be traced with molecular line observations. We present simulations of protoplanetary disk structure with grain evolution using the ANDES code ("AccretioN disk with Dust Evolution and Sedimentation"). ANDES comprises (1) a 1+1D frequency-dependent continuum radiative transfer module, (2) a module to calculate the chemical evolution using an extended gas-grain chemical network with UV/X-ray-driven processes and surface reactions, (3) a module to calculate the gas thermal energy balance, and (4) a 1+1D module that simulates dust grain evolution. Such a set of physical processes allows us to assess the impact of dust evolution on the gas component, which is primarily related to radiation field and total available surface for chemical reactions. Considering cases of (i) evolved dust (2 Myr of grain coagulation, fragmentation and sedimentation) and (ii) pristine dust (well- mixed 0.1 micron grains), we found a sufficient changes in disk physical and chemical structure caused by the dust evolution. Due to higher transparency of the evolved disk model UV-shielded molecular layer is shifted closer to the midplane. The presence of big grains in the disk midplane delays the freeze-out of volatile gas-phase species such as CO, while the depletion is still effective in adjacent upper layers. Molecular concentrations of many species are enhanced in the disk model with dust evolution (CO2, NH2CN, HNO, H2O, HCOOH, HCN, CO) which provides an opportunity to use these molecules as tracers of dust evolution.

  10. Modelling of dust around the symbiotic Mira RR Telescopii during obscuration epochs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkic, T.; Kotnik-Karuza, D.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Symbiotic Miras represent a class of peculiar binaries whose nature is still not well understood. Physical properties of the circumstellar dust and associated physical mechanisms play an important role in understanding the evolution of symbiotic binaries and the interaction between their components. We present a model of inner dust regions around the cool Mira component of the symbiotic nova RR Tel based on the near-IR terrestrial photometry and infrared ISO spectra. Aims: Our goal is to find a comprehensive and consistent model of the circumstellar inner dust regions around the Mira component that can explain the observed photometric and spectroscopic features in the near- and mid-infrared. Methods: Available JHKL photometric observations from South African Astronomical Observatory were collected and corrected for Mira pulsations as well as for interstellar reddening to follow temporal changes of the near-infrared colours. Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from 1 to 13 μm during obscuration epoch were reconstructed with the simultaneously available ISO/SWS spectra and JHKL magnitudes. The dust properties were determined by modelling both the reconstructed SEDs and the near-IR colours using the DUSTY numerical code. This 1D code solves radiative transfer through the circumstellar dust by calculating the dust temperature profile assuming spherical symmetry. Results: The Mira pulsation period of 387 days was found and confirmed with two independent fitting methods. A long-term variation of ~7000 days, which cannot be attributed to orbital motion, was obtained from the analysis of the near-IR magnitudes. Reconstructed infrared SEDs were modelled successfully by a single dust shell with dust distribution enhanced by radiatively driven stellar winds. Mira temperature, dust sublimation temperature, grain diameter, density distribution, and optical depth have been obtained. Our model shows a maximum dust grain diameter of 4 μm, which is larger than expected

  11. Bright Dust Devil Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    9 June 2004 Martian dust devils sometimes disrupt thin coatings of surface dust to create dark streak patterns on the surface. However, not all dust devils make streaks, and not all dust devil streaks are dark. In Syria Planum, the streaks are lighter than the surrounding plains. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an example from Syria near 8.8oS, 103.6oW. The thin coating of surface dust in this region is darker than the substrate beneath it. This is fairly unusual for Mars, because most dust is bright. This image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/lower left.

  12. Grain Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Our fundamental knowledge of interstellar grain composition has grown substantially during the past two decades thanks to significant advances in two areas: astronomical infrared spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics. The opening of the mid-infrared, the spectral range from 4000-400 cm(sup -1) (2.5-25 microns), to spectroscopic study has been critical to this progress because spectroscopy in this region reveals more about a materials molecular composition and structure than any other physical property. Infrared spectra which are diagnostic of interstellar grain composition fall into two categories: absorption spectra of the dense and diffuse interstellar media, and emission spectra from UV-Vis rich dusty regions. The former will be presented in some detail, with the latter only very briefly mentioned. This paper summarized what we have learned from these spectra and presents 'doorway' references into the literature. Detailed reviews of many aspects of interstellar dust are given.

  13. Dust discs around low-mass main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolstencroft, R. D.; Walker, Helen J.

    1988-01-01

    The current understanding of the formation of circumstellar disks as a natural accompaniment to the process of low-mass star formation is examined. Models of the thermal emission from the dust disks around the prototype stars Alpha Lyr, Alpha PsA, Beta Pic, and Epsilon Eri are discussed, which indicate that the central regions of three of these disks are almost devoid of dust within radii ranging between 17 and 26 AU, with the temperature of the hottest zone lying between about 115 and 210 K. One possible explanation of the dust-free zones is the presence of a planet at the inner boundary of each cloud which sweeps up grains crossing its orbit.

  14. The gravito-electrodynamics of charged dust in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Houpis, H. L. F.; Hill, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The orbital dynamics of small electrically charged dust grains within the corotating regions of planetary magnetospheres is considered. Equations are derived for the elliptical epicyclic motion of positively and negatively charged particles about the guiding center in an equilibrium circular orbit under the influence of small perturbations. Those orbits that are stable to the perturbations are found to have a ratio of the semiaxes of the epicycle between 1/2 and 1, depending on the specific charge, and a gyration frequency about the guiding center between the Kepler frequency and the grain gyrofrequency in a nonrotating frame. In the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, where the grains are expected to be negatively charged and move in a prograde sense, the guiding centers are predicted to have speeds intermediate to the Kepler speed and the corotation speed and thus may undergo a 1:1 magneto-gravitational resonance with a neighboring satellite. Results may be used in the interpretation of the waves in the F ring of Saturn in terms of the dust size distribution.

  15. The gravito-electrodynamics of charged dust in planetary magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Houpis, H. L. F.; Hill, J. R.

    1982-05-01

    The orbital dynamics of small electrically charged dust grains within the corotating regions of planetary magnetospheres is considered. Equations are derived for the elliptical epicyclic motion of positively and negatively charged particles about the guiding center in an equilibrium circular orbit under the influence of small perturbations. Those orbits that are stable to the perturbations are found to have a ratio of the semiaxes of the epicycle between 1/2 and 1, depending on the specific charge, and a gyration frequency about the guiding center between the Kepler frequency and the grain gyrofrequency in a nonrotating frame. In the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, where the grains are expected to be negatively charged and move in a prograde sense, the guiding centers are predicted to have speeds intermediate to the Kepler speed and the corotation speed and thus may undergo a 1:1 magneto-gravitational resonance with a neighboring satellite. Results may be used in the interpretation of the waves in the F ring of Saturn in terms of the dust size distribution.

  16. Comet Dust: The Story of Planet Formation as Told by the Tiniest of Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2005-01-01

    Our planetary system formed out of a gas-rich disk-shaped nebula with the early Sun at its center. Many small icy bodies were consumed by the formation of the giant planets. However, many km-size icy bodies were tossed out of the giant-planet region to the cold, distant reaches of our solar system. Comets remained in their places of cold storage until perturbed into orbits that carry them into the inner solar system where they pass relatively close to the Sun. Comets are warmed by the Sun and shed material from their outer layers. The ices and gases shed by comets reveal simple and complex organic molecules were present at the time and in the region of the formation of the giant planets. Where the Earth was forming was too hot and had too intense sunlight for many of these ices and molecules to survive. The dust shed by comets tells us that some stardust survived unaltered but much of the dust was heated and crystallized before becoming part of the comet. Therefore, comet dust grains tell of large radial migrations from the cold outer reaches near Neptune into the hot regions near the forming Sun, and then back out to the cold regions where icy comets were accreting and forming. On 2005 July 4, the NASA Deep Impact Mission hit a comet and ejected primitive materials fiom its interior. These materials were not released into the comet s coma during normal activity. Despite the many passages of this comet close to the Sun, these primitive volatile gases and dust grains survived in its interior. Comet dust grains show that cold and hot materials were mixed into the same tiny particle very early in the formation of the solar system, and these aggregate dust grains never saw high temperatures again. The survival of primitive materials in comet nuclei suggests comets could have delivered organic molecules and primitive dust grains to early Earth.

  17. An optimum opportunity for interstellar dust measurements by the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Kempf, S.; Krüger, H.; Soja, R. H.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.

    2012-09-01

    The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) is an ESA L-class mission concept designed to explore the Galilean satellites of the Jovian system. Although the mission science goals do not include any astronomical observations, we find by modeling the Interstellar Dust (ISD) trajectories that the planned period of the JUICE mission is optimal for in-situ observations of Interstellar Dust, due to highly increased flux levels at that time at the orbit of Jupiter. If JUICE would carry a dust detector, this could lead to exclusive highresolution mass spectra of ISD grains. Such compositional information on the ISD grains is important for understanding the origins of of solar/planetary systems, and therefore could represent a valuable addition to the core JUICE mission science.

  18. Reexamination of Lunar Exospheric Dust Estimates Using Discrete Dipole Scattering Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Glenar, D. A.; Richard, D. T.; Feldman, P. D.; Retherford, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of Apollo regolith samples showed that lunar dust grains consist of a diverse set of shapes. Consequently, the optical scattering properties of these grains will differ from those predicted using the Mie approximation, which strictly applies only for spheres. Because it is analytically convenient and without shape ambiguity, Mie theory has been used routinely to estimate the concentration of dust or it's upper limits in the lunar exosphere from brightness measurements acquired during orbital dust searches. Utilizing the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA), we have computed a more realistic set of scattering parameters for a collection of sub-micron grain shapes that represents the ultra-fine fraction of lunar soil. Included in this suite are spheroids (oblate and prolate) and irregular geometries resembling isolated grains observed in Apollo samples. A subset of these models includes the addition of nanophase iron, in order to examine the influence of space weathering. Wavelength coverage of the DDA scattering computations extends from far-UV to near-IR. This range is diagnostic of grain size and shape, since scattering efficiency depends on both of these parameters. This collection of grain scattering models is used, together with an observing simulation code, to reexamine some prior estimates of exospheric dust concentration derived from Apollo-era limb brightness measurements (e.g., Apollo 15 coronal photography), as well as the subsequent Clementine star tracker search and a search for lunar horizon glow by LRO Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP). We compare our revised estimates of exospheric dust abundance with the results of these previous dust searches.

  19. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Interplanetary Dust and Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: Isotopically Primitive Interplanetary Dust Particles of Cometary Origin: Evidence from Nitrogen Isotopic Compositions. The Solar Nebula s First Accretionary Particles (FAPs) Are They Preserved in Collected Interplanetary Dust Samples? On the Origin of GEMS. An Analytical SuperSTEM for Extraterrestrial Materials Research. Sub-Micrometer Scale Minor Element Mapping in Interplanetary Dust Particles: A Test for Stratospheric Contamination. First Report of Taenite in an Asteroidal Interplanetary Dust Particle: Flash-heating Simulates Nebular Dust Evolution. FTIR Analyses of IDPs: Comparison with the InfraRed Spectra of the Interstellar Medium. Mineralogical Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Focused Ion Beam Recovery and Analysis of Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) and Stardust Analogues. Technique for Concentration of Carbonaceous Material from Aerogel Collectors Using HF-Vapor Etching. Synchrotron X-Ray Analysis of Captured Particle Residue in Aerogel. In-Situ Analyses of Earth Orbital Grains Trapped in Aerogel, Using Synchrotron X-Ray Microfluorescence Techniques. Igneous Rims on Micrometeorites and the Sizes of Chondrules in Main Belt Asteroids.

  20. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A.; Sano, T.

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 mum or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface

  1. Atmospheric entry survival and the possibility of stratospheric collection of modern interstellar dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George J.

    1997-03-01

    Taylor et al. (1996) detected the ion trails of dust particles, estimated to range from 15 to 45 microns in diameter, entering the Earth's atmosphere with velocities of about 100 km/s. Since this velocity significantly exceeds the solar system escape velocity, these particles were identified as interstellar. Taylor et al. observed a seasonal peak in the detected flux, and interpreted this peak to indicate the time of year when the Earth, in its heliocentric orbit, is moving directly towards a stream of incoming interstellar dust, increasing the geocentric velocity of the particles so that particles as small as 15 to 45 microns in diameter produce micrometeors detectable by Taylor et al.'s radar system. Six months later, when the Earth's heliocentric motion is directly opposite the direction of the interstellar flux, the atmospheric entry velocity of these interstellar grains will be reduced by twice the Earth's orbital velocity, and, instead of producing ion trails, some of these interstellar grains may enter the Earth's atmosphere without melting or vaporizing. Those interstellar grains which enter the atmosphere without melting will settle into the Earth's stratosphere in the same manner as the interplanetary dust particles, which are routinely collected by NASA stratospheric sampling aircraft. Thus, interstellar dust particles in the 5-20 micron size range may be present on the NASA stratospheric collection surfaces flown during the favorable collection season.

  2. The MIDAS atomic force microscope for cometary dust: technical highlights and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Riedler, W.; Romstedt, J.; Jeszenszky, H.; Steller, M.; Arends, H.

    2003-04-01

    The instrument MIDAS (Micro-Imaging Dust Analysis System) aboard the Rosetta Orbiter is to produce three-dimensional images of dust grain samples from the cometary coma at a resolution down to a few nanometers. Images at this resolution will help to understand the formation processes of cometary material. The instrument will also provide statistical information on the dust population, including size distribution, shapes and flux. MIDAS combines a system for dust collection and target manipulation with an atomic force microscope. The instrument has been developed to a flight model which is ready for launch. The paper reviews the capabilities of the instrument in the upcoming mission, and highlights the most advanced technical solutions to achieve the high requirements on resolution, accuracy and reliability.

  3. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: the dust coma as seen through Rosetta/OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubiana, Cecilia; Bertini, Ivano; Güttler, Carsten; Sierks, Holger

    2016-04-01

    OSIRIS, the Optical, Spectroscopic, and Infrared Remote Imaging System onboard Rosetta, is imaging the nucleus and the coma of 67/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since the beginning of post-hibernation operations in March 2014. We focus here on dust studies performed with OSIRIS. Images obtained in different filters in the visible wavelength range are used to study the unresolved coma, investigating its diurnal and seasonal variations and providing insights into the dust composition. Individual grains are characterized in terms of color, size, distance, light curves, orbits. Images acquired spanning the phase angle range 0-165 deg are used to determine the dust phase function in different colors and to investigate the intimate nature of cometary dust particles by solving the inverse scattering problem.

  4. Galileo in-situ dust measurements in Jupiter’s gossamer rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2009-09-01

    Galileo was the first artificial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage—on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter—dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2.33 RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2.5 RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth. Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging [Showalter, M.R., de Pater, I., Verbanac, G., Hamilton, D.P., Burns, J.A., 2008. Icarus 195, 361-377; de Pater, I., Showalter, M.R., Macintosh, B., 2008. Icarus 195, 348-360]. The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle flux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits

  5. The Zodiacal Dust Cloud Populations at Saturn: signs of Centaurs activity ? The point of view of CASSINI-CDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altobelli, Nicolas; Kempf, Sascha; Moragas, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    We present a preliminary analysis of the entrance charge grid (EG) subsystem data of the CASSINI-Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA). This subsystem can detect micron to tens of micron-sized particles through the electrostatic charge induced on a grid of conductive wires located at the entrance of the CDA instrument. An analysis of the induced electric signals on the wires allow us to retrieve the direction and speed of dust grains with a precision higher than any other CDA subsystems. We have identified and analyzed all CDA-EG events identified at 2 Saturn Radii from Saturn's equatorial plane and all events beyond Titan's orbit, looking specifically for the signature of particles on hyperbolic orbit with respect to Saturn (and hence, of exogenous origin). The exogenous origin could be confirmed for a fraction of the EG events and their heliocentric orbital elements derived, at the time they crosses the Hill's sphere boundary, by performing a backward propagation of their trajectory in the Saturn's system. The values of the grain orbital elements suggest a connection with parent bodies like Centaurs objects, while Jupiter Family Comets can only explain a minority of the detected dust grains. Centaur objects have been recently the focus of observation campaigns, as cometary-like activity was identified for a few of them, and hence, are a potential significant source of dust in the outer Solar System. We discuss our results, trying in particular to understand how other expected dust grain populations like Kuiper belt collisional products could also contribute to our data set.

  6. The origin and evolution of the Uranian dust rings

    SciTech Connect

    Colwell, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The numerous dust bands discovered by Voyager 2 at Uranus have lifetimes on the order of 100 years against orbital decay by exospheric drag. A system of low optical depth rings of 10 meter to 1 km sized bodies (moonlet belts) are proposed as continuing sources of the dust particles. The ring system is modeled as a Markov Chain consisting of states through which dust particle evolve with time. Physical processes included in the model are orbit decay by exospheric drag and Poynting-Robertson light drag; destruction of grains by meteoroid impact; transport of dust through the classical rings and moonlet belts; creation of dust particles from meteoroid impacts onto rings, moons, and moonlet belts; liberation of regolith material through ring and moonlet belt particle collisions; and sweepup of ejecta by ring and moonlet belt particles. The optical depth profiles for the main rings from Voyager 2 Photopolarimeter Subsystem (PPS) occultation observation are used in modeling the transport of dust through the rings. Simulations of the Uranus ring system show that this model reproduces the observed characteristics of the Uranus dust rings. The moonlet belt model is applied to the rings of Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune, and is capable of reproducing some of the observed characteristics of those ring systems. The moonlet belt objects fit on a collisionally derived power-law size distribution with the other components of the ring moon systems. Since the rings and moonlet belts have lifetimes due to viscous spreading less than the age of the solar system, a net model of planetary rings emerges in which the rings are continually created from the disruption of small satellites by meteoroid bombardment.

  7. Loire Dust Devil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an active dust devil making its way across the rugged terrain of the Loire Vallis system. The dust devil, seen as a fuzzy, nearly-circular bright feature near the center of the picture, is casting a shadow toward the right/upper right (east/northeast). Unlike some martian dust devils, this one did not make a dark streak on the ground. Many more dust devils occur on Mars than there are dust devil streaks observed on the planet's surface.

    Location near: 18.2oS, 16.5oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Spring

  8. Isidis Dust Devil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 March 2004 This arrow in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image points to an active dust devil observed in Isidis Planitia near 18.3oN, 268.9oW. The columnar shadow of the dust devil is visible, as is a pencil-thin (at least, pencil-thin at the scale of the image) line created by the vortex as it disrupted the dust that coats the surface. The streak indicates that the dust devil had already traveled more than 3 kilometers (1.9 miles), over craters, large ripples, and ridges, before the MOC took this picture. The dust devil was moving from the northeast (upper right) toward the southwest (lower left). Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left; the image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  9. Origins of GEMS Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Walker, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth s stratosphere contain high abundances of submicrometer amorphous silicates known as GEMS grains. From their birth as condensates in the outflows of oxygen-rich evolved stars, processing in interstellar space, and incorporation into disks around new stars, amorphous silicates predominate in most astrophysical environments. Amorphous silicates were a major building block of our Solar System and are prominent in infrared spectra of comets. Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) thought to derive from comets contain abundant amorphous silicates known as GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfides) grains. GEMS grains have been proposed to be isotopically and chemically homogenized interstellar amorphous silicate dust. We evaluated this hypothesis through coordinated chemical and isotopic analyses of GEMS grains in a suite of IDPs to constrain their origins. GEMS grains show order of magnitude variations in Mg, Fe, Ca, and S abundances. GEMS grains do not match the average element abundances inferred for ISM dust containing on average, too little Mg, Fe, and Ca, and too much S. GEMS grains have complementary compositions to the crystalline components in IDPs suggesting that they formed from the same reservoir. We did not observe any unequivocal microstructural or chemical evidence that GEMS grains experienced prolonged exposure to radiation. We identified four GEMS grains having O isotopic compositions that point to origins in red giant branch or asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae. Based on their O isotopic compositions, we estimate that 1-6% of GEMS grains are surviving circumstellar grains. The remaining 94-99% of GEMS grains have O isotopic compositions that are indistinguishable from terrestrial materials and carbonaceous chondrites. These isotopically solar GEMS grains either formed in the Solar System or were completely homogenized in the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the

  10. eblur/dust: a modular python approach for dust extinction and scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-03-01

    I will present a library of python codes -- github.com/eblur/dust -- which calculate dust scattering and extinction properties from the IR to the X-ray. The modular interface allows for custom defined dust grain size distributions, optical constants, and scattering physics. These codes are currently undergoing a major overhaul to include multiple scattering effects, parallel processing, parameterized grain size distributions beyond power law, and optical constants for different grain compositions. I use eblur/dust primarily to study dust scattering images in the X-ray, but they may be extended to applications at other wavelengths.

  11. Dust in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gall, Christa

    2012-07-01

    Dust grains are an essential component influencing the formation and evolution history of stars and galaxies in the early Universe. Large amounts of dust detected in sub-millimeter galaxies and quasars at high redshift, where the epoch of cosmic evolution was only about 1 Gyr, bear witness to a rapid production of dust. However, the origin of these large dust masses remains unclear. Massive stars ending their lives as either asymptotic giant branch stars or supernovae have been contemplated as the prime sources of dust. Stars more massive than ~3 Msun are short-lived but whether their dust production efficiency is sufficient to account for the large dust masses is unknown. I shall address the challenge of reproducing current dust mass estimates arising from the strong sensitivity to the overall dust productivity of the sources involved, the initial mass function and star formation history. I will discuss the contribution of the stellar dust sources and alternatives, such as grain growth in the interstellar medium, to the dust budget in the high redshift as well as Local Group galaxies.

  12. LADEE Search for a Dust Exosphere: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenar, D. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Elphic, R.

    2014-01-01

    The LADEE search for exospheric dust is strongly motivated by putative detections of forward-scattered sunlight from exospheric dust grains which were observed during the Apollo era. This dust population, if it exists, has been associated with charging and transport of dust near the terminators. It is likely that the concentration of these dust grains is governed by a saltation mechanism originated by micrometeoroid impacts, which are the source of the more tenuous ejecta cloud.

  13. Investigation of the Ejection and Physical Properties of Large Comet Dust Grains and Their Interaction with Earth's Atmosphere During the 2002 Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Russell, R. W.; Yano, H.; Plane, J. M. C.; Murray, I. S.; Taylor, M. J.; Borovicka, J.; Kuenzi, K.; Smith, W. H.; Rairden, R. L.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Betlem, H.; Martinez-Frias, J.

    2003-05-01

    In November 2002, the Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign had its final mission to explore the Leonid meteor storms for what they can tell us about comets, meteors, and how they may have contributed prebiotic compounds to the origin of life. The mission provided an airborne platform to 36 researchers of seven countries. The storms were caused by Earth's crossing of the 1767 and 1866 dust ejecta of comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. The Center for Astrobiology (CAB) hosted the mission at Torrejon AB in Spain. In a westward flight back to Omaha, Nebraska, the aircraft encountered the first storm at 04:06 UT on Nov. 19, with rates of ZHR 2,300 /hr, and the second peak at 10:47 UT, when rates increased again to ZHR 2,600 /hr. The wealth of faint meteors made the showers difficult to observe from the ground. The narrow and slightly asymmetric flux profiles add to a three-dimensional map of the dust density in 55P/Tempel-Tuttle's one-revolution dust trail. Meteoroid composition and morphology were measured for numerous individual particles. The first near-IR spectra of meteors were recorded. High frame-rate imaging confirmed the formation of a shock-like feature in bright Leonids, adding to a new understanding of the physical conditions in the rarefied flow of meteors. The interaction of meteors with the atmosphere was investigated at optical and sub-mm wavelengths. Optical and mid-IR emissions of persistent trains were recorded. We will briefly review these first results and their implication for comet dust ejection and evolution in the interplanetary and Earth environment. The 2002 Leonid MAC mission was supported by NASA's Astrobiology and Planetary Astronomy programs, by ESA, and by CAB. NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory was operated by NASA DFRC and the NKC-135 "FISTA" aircraft by Edwards AFB. Leonid MAC was organized by the SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center.

  14. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko sheds dust coat accumulated over the past four years.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Rita; Hilchenbach, Martin; Langevin, Yves; Kissel, Jochen; Silen, Johan; Briois, Christelle; Engrand, Cecile; Hornung, Klaus; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anaïs; Cottin, Hervé; Fischer, Henning; Fray, Nicolas; Godard, Marie; Lehto, Harry; Le Roy, Léna; Merouane, Sihane; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Siljeström, Sandra; Stenzel, Oliver; Thirkell, Laurent; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris

    2015-02-12

    Comets are composed of dust and frozen gases. The ices are mixed with the refractory material either as an icy conglomerate, or as an aggregate of pre-solar grains (grains that existed prior to the formation of the Solar System), mantled by an ice layer. The presence of water-ice grains in periodic comets is now well established. Modelling of infrared spectra obtained about ten kilometres from the nucleus of comet Hartley 2 suggests that larger dust particles are being physically decoupled from fine-grained water-ice particles that may be aggregates, which supports the icy-conglomerate model. It is known that comets build up crusts of dust that are subsequently shed as they approach perihelion. Micrometre-sized interplanetary dust particles collected in the Earth's stratosphere and certain micrometeorites are assumed to be of cometary origin. Here we report that grains collected from the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko come from a dusty crust that quenches the material outflow activity at the comet surface. The larger grains (exceeding 50 micrometres across) are fluffy (with porosity over 50 per cent), and many shattered when collected on the target plate, suggesting that they are agglomerates of entities in the size range of interplanetary dust particles. Their surfaces are generally rich in sodium, which explains the high sodium abundance in cometary meteoroids. The particles collected to date therefore probably represent parent material of interplanetary dust particles. This argues against comet dust being composed of a silicate core mantled by organic refractory material and then by a mixture of water-dominated ices. At its previous recurrence (orbital period 6.5 years), the comet's dust production doubled when it was between 2.7 and 2.5 astronomical units from the Sun, indicating that this was when the nucleus shed its mantle. Once the mantle is shed, unprocessed material starts to supply the developing coma, radically changing its dust

  15. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko sheds dust coat accumulated over the past four years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Rita; Hilchenbach, Martin; Langevin, Yves; Kissel, Jochen; Silen, Johan; Briois, Christelle; Engrand, Cecile; Hornung, Klaus; Baklouti, Donia; Bardyn, Anaïs; Cottin, Hervé; Fischer, Henning; Fray, Nicolas; Godard, Marie; Lehto, Harry; Le Roy, Léna; Merouane, Sihane; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Paquette, John; Rynö, Jouni; Siljeström, Sandra; Stenzel, Oliver; Thirkell, Laurent; Varmuza, Kurt; Zaprudin, Boris

    2015-02-01

    Comets are composed of dust and frozen gases. The ices are mixed with the refractory material either as an icy conglomerate, or as an aggregate of pre-solar grains (grains that existed prior to the formation of the Solar System), mantled by an ice layer. The presence of water-ice grains in periodic comets is now well established. Modelling of infrared spectra obtained about ten kilometres from the nucleus of comet Hartley 2 suggests that larger dust particles are being physically decoupled from fine-grained water-ice particles that may be aggregates, which supports the icy-conglomerate model. It is known that comets build up crusts of dust that are subsequently shed as they approach perihelion. Micrometre-sized interplanetary dust particles collected in the Earth's stratosphere and certain micrometeorites are assumed to be of cometary origin. Here we report that grains collected from the Jupiter-family comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko come from a dusty crust that quenches the material outflow activity at the comet surface. The larger grains (exceeding 50 micrometres across) are fluffy (with porosity over 50 per cent), and many shattered when collected on the target plate, suggesting that they are agglomerates of entities in the size range of interplanetary dust particles. Their surfaces are generally rich in sodium, which explains the high sodium abundance in cometary meteoroids. The particles collected to date therefore probably represent parent material of interplanetary dust particles. This argues against comet dust being composed of a silicate core mantled by organic refractory material and then by a mixture of water-dominated ices. At its previous recurrence (orbital period 6.5 years), the comet's dust production doubled when it was between 2.7 and 2.5 astronomical units from the Sun, indicating that this was when the nucleus shed its mantle. Once the mantle is shed, unprocessed material starts to supply the developing coma, radically changing its dust

  16. Model for the accumulation of solar wind radiation damage effects in lunar dust grains, based on recent results concerning implantation and erosion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, J.; Bibring, J.P.; Cowsik, G.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.

    1983-02-15

    In this paper we present our most recent results on ion implantation and erosion effects, intended to reproduce the superficial amorphous layers of radiation damage observed with a high voltage electron microscope on ..mu..m-sized grains extracted from the lunar regolith and which result from the exposure of the grains to the solar wind. We next outline theoretical computations which yield the thickness distribution of such amorphous layers as a function of the exposure time of the grains at the surface of the moon, the He/H ratio, and the speed distribution in the solar wind. From this model, the position of the peak in the solar wind speed distribution is the major parameter controlling the thickness of the amorphous layer.

  17. Stratospheric Collection of Dust from Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Walker, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere are unique materials that are compositionally distinct from meteorites. Astronomical observations and dynamical models indicate that both asteroids and short-period comets are significant sources of IDPs. IDPs having fragile, porous structures, unequilibrated, anhydrous mineralogy, and high atmospheric entry velocities are thought to derive from comets, whereas asteroidal IDPs are identified by their compact structure, hydrated mineralogy and low atmospheric entry velocities. Uncertainty remains in the classification of asteroidal and cometary IDPs owing to our limited sampling of comets and the asteroid belt and the complex dynamical histories of most IDPs in space. Most IDPs spend thousands of years in space prior to being accreted by the Earth. During this time, dust particles undergo orbital evolution, including gradual reduction in their perihelion and eccentricity as a result of Poynting-Robertson drag. Planetary encounters may also significantly change their orbital parameters. Consequently, it is generally not possible to identify the specific parent body of a given IDP. However, it has been proposed that it is possible to identify dust from comets that have formed Earth-crossing dust trails. In this case, the dust particles have been in space for such a short period of time (a few decades or less) that their orbits have not significantly changed. Furthermore, these fresh IDPs could be identified in the laboratory from their short space-exposure histories (low solar noble gas abundance and lack of solar flare tracks). NASA flew several dedicated IDP collection missions attempting to collect dust from comet 26P/Grigg-Skjellerup, the best candidate identified. Remarkably, many particles from those collectors exhibit unusual properties, including low abundances of solar noble gases and high abundances of presolar grains. These observations are consistent with the dust particles originating from

  18. Highlights and discoveries of the Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) during its 15 years of exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Kempf, S.; Postberg, F.; Albin, T.; Auer, S.; Altobelli, N.; Beckmann, U.; Bugiel, S.; Burton, M.; Economou, T.; Fliege, K.; Grande, M.; Gruen, E.; Guglielmino, M.; Hillier, J. K.; Schilling, A.; Schmidt, J.; Seiss, M.; Spahn, F.; Sterken, V.; Trieloff, M.

    2014-04-01

    The interplanetary space probe Cassini/Huygens reached Saturn in July 2004 after seven years of cruise phase. Today, the German-lead Cosmic Dust Analyser (CDA) is operated continuously for 10 years in orbit around Saturn. During the cruise phase CDA measured the interstellar dust flux at one AU distance from the Sun, the charge and composition of interplanetary dust grains and the composition of the Jovian nanodust streams. The first discovery of CDA related to Saturn was the measurement of nanometer sized dust particles ejected by its magnetosphere to interplanetary space with speeds higher than 100 km/s. Their origin and composition was analysed and an their dynamical studies showed a strong link to the conditions of the solar wind plasma flow. A recent surprising result was, that stream particles stem from the interior of Enceladus. Since 2004 CDA measured millions of dust impacts characterizing the dust environment of Saturn. The instrument showed strong evidence for ice geysers located at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus in 2005. Later, a detailed compositional analysis of the salt-rich water ice grains in Saturn's E ring system lead to the discovery of liquid water below the icy crust connected to an ocean at depth feeding the icy jets. CDA was even capable to derive a spatially resolved compositional profile of the plume during close Enceladus flybys. A determination of the dust-magnetosphere interaction and the discovery of the extended E ring allowed the definition of a dynamical dust model of Saturn's E ring describing the observed properties. The measured dust density profiles in the dense E ring revealed geometric asymmetries. Cassini performed shadow crossings in the ring plane and dust grain charges were measured in shadow regions delivering important data for dust-plasma interaction studies. In the last years, dedicated measurement campaigns were executed by CDA to monitor the flux of interplanetary and interstellar dust particles reaching

  19. ORIGIN OF DUST AROUND V1309 SCO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Chunhua; Lü, Guoliang; Wang, Zhaojun

    2013-11-01

    The origin of dust grains in the interstellar medium is still an unanswered problem. Nicholls et al. found the presence of a significant amount of dust around V1309 Sco, which may originate from the merger of a contact binary. We investigate the origin of dust around V1309 Sco and suggest that these dust grains are produced in the binary-merger ejecta. By means of the AGBDUST code, we estimate that ∼5.2 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} dust grains are produced with a radii of ∼10{sup –5} cm. These dust grains are mainly composed of silicate and iron grains. Because the mass of the binary merger ejecta is very small, the contribution of dust produced by binary merger ejecta to the overall dust production in the interstellar medium is negligible. However, it is important to note that the discovery of a significant amount of dust around V1309 Sco offers a direct support for the idea that common-envelope ejecta provides an ideal environment for dust formation and growth. Therefore, we confirm that common envelope ejecta can be important source of cosmic dust.

  20. Canyon Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03682 Canyon Dust

    These dust slides are located on the wall of Thithonium Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -4.1N, Longitude 275.7E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Dust Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03677 Linear Clouds

    Dust slides are common in the dust covered region called Lycus Sulci. A large fracture is also visible in this image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 28.1N, Longitude 226.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. The effect of a dust size distribution on electrostatic sheaths in unmagnetized dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Benlemdjaldi, D.; Tahraoui, A.; Hugon, R.; Bougdira, J.

    2013-04-15

    In this work, the structure of plasma sheaths in presence of dust particles with different sizes is investigated numerically in a multifluid framework, where the dust size distribution is modeled by Gauss' law. For this, we have established a 1D, stationary, unmagnetized, and weakly collisional electronegative dusty plasma sheath model. The electrons and negative ions are considered in a local thermodynamic equilibrium, therefore, described by a Boltzmann distribution. On the other hand, positive ions and dust grains are described by fluid equations. The charging process is described by the orbit motion limited model. It is shown that taking into account dust grains with different sizes reduces considerably the sheath thickness. The behavior of dust surface potential is not affected, but the dust charge number is reduced, as well as the electrostatic force. It results in a decrease of layered structure. The presence of negative ions makes the structure of the electrostatic potential more oscillatory. The other physical parameters are also analyzed and discussed.

  3. How the Enceladus dust plume forms Saturn's E ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, S.; Beckmann, U.; Schmidt, J.

    2009-04-01

    Before Cassini, dynamical models of Saturn's E ring (Horanyi et al., 1992) failed to reproduce its peculiar vertical structure inferred from earth-bound observations (de Pater et al., 2004). After the discovery of an active ice-volcanism in the south pole terrain of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus the relevance of this particle source for the vertical ring structure was swiftly recognised (Juhasz et al., 2007, Kempf et al., 2008). However, ad-hoc models for the plume particle injection predict too a small vertical ring thickness and overestimate the amount of the injected dust. Here we report on numerical simulations of the particle ejection into the ring. We run a large number of dynamical simulations including gravity and Lorentz force to investigate the earliest phase of the ring particle life span. The evolution of electrostatic charge carried by the initially uncharged grains is treated selfconsistently. Freshly ejected plume particles are moving in almost circular orbits because Enceladus' orbital speed exceeds the particles' ejection speeds by far. Only a small number of the ejected grains survives against re-collision with the moon after their first orbit. Thus, the flux and the size distribution of those plume particles replenishing the E ring differs significantly from the size distribution and flux in the plume itself. Our numerical simulations reproduce the vertical ring profile measured by the Cassini dust instrument CDA (Kempf et al., 2008a) and it is consistent with edge-on images obtained by the Cassini camera ISS (Burns et al., 2005).

  4. Lorentz forces on the dust in Jupiter's ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consolmagno, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The paths of dust particles in the Jovian ring are investigated using a numerical integration program, including the acceleration due to gravity and the Lorentz and drag accelerations arising from the motions of the charged dust through the Jovian plasma. It is determined that the orbit of a 2.5 micron radius spherical dust particle with a density of 2 g/cu cm -10V will become significantly perturbed. The ring will tend to warp northwards near 130-160 deg longitude, with the maximum excursion of the Jupiter ring grains equalling about 0.1 deg (consistent with a distance of 220 km above the equatorial plane). It is found that either the particles are larger or the voltages on them less than what has been determined by previous investigators, while the plasma near the ring may be considerably cooler than was estimated. Calculations show that particles of 0.3 micron with -10 V potentials are spread from 1.68-1.98 of the radius of Jupiter and inclined up to 7 deg out of the equatorial plane. The paths of these particles do not follow Keplerian orbits, and the particle positions are not symmetric about the equatorial plane. Particles of 0.4 micron radius have less asymmetric orbits than 0.3 micron particles, while particles less than 0.2 micron are perturbed into Jupiter cloudtops within a few tens of hours.

  5. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the significance of planetary shadowing in shaping Jupiter's gossamer ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Gruen, Eberhard

    During its late orbital mission about Jupiter in 2002 and 2003, the Galileo spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The dusty ring material is produced when interplanetary impactors collide with embedded moonlets. Optical images imply that the rings are constrained both horizontally and vertically by the orbits of the moons Amalthea and Thebe, with the exception of a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe Extension. During both ring passages the impact ionisation dust detector on board Galileo successfully recorded dust impacts and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages but only 110 complete data sets of dust impacts (i.e. impact time, impact speed, mass, impact direction, etc.) were successfully transmitted to Earth. Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 4 micron, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The particle size distribution increases towards smaller grains, showing a much higher proportion of small particles in the Amalthea gossamer ring than in the Thebe ring and the Thebe Extension. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are about 4 micron in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The instrument also detected some micron and sub-micron grains on highly inclined orbits with inclinations up to 20 degrees. The faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to at least 5 RJ (Jovian radius RJ = 71, 492 km), indicating that grains attain higher eccentricities than previously thought. Finally, Galileo measured a major reduction in

  6. Whither Cometary Dust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisse, Carey M.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper I will discuss recent findings that have important implications for our understanding of the formation and evolution of primitive solar system dust, including: - Nesvorny et al. (2010), following up on their dynamical analyses of the zodiacal dust bands as sourced by the breakup of the Karin (5Mya) and Veritas (8Mya) asteroid families, argue that over 90% of the interplanetary dust cloud at 1 AU comes from JFC comets with near-circularized, low inclination orbits. This implies that the noted IPD collections of anhydrous and hydrous dust particles are likely to be from Oort cloud and JFC comets, respectively, not from asteroids and comets as thought in the past. Hydrous dust particles from comets like 85P/Wild2 and 9P/Tempel 1 would be consistent with results from the STARDUST and Deep Impact experiments. - Estimates of the dust particle size distributions (PSDs) in the comae of 85P/Wild2 (Green et al. 2004, 2007) and 73P/SW-3 (Sitko et al. 2010, Vaubaillon & Reach 2010) and in the trails of comets (Reach et al. 2007) have broken power law structure, with a plateau enhancement of particles of 1 mm - 1 cm in size. This size is also the size of most chondritic inclusions, and the predicted size range of the "aggregational barrier", where collisions between dust particles become destructive. - Studies of the albedo and polarization properties of cometary dust (Kolokolova et al. 2007) suggest there are 2 major groupings, one with low scattering capability and one with high. While these families could possibly have been explained by systematics in the PSDs of the emitted dust, independent work by Lisse et al. (2008) on the mineralogy of a number of highly dusty comets has shown evidence for one family of comets with highly crystalline dust and another with highly amorphous dust.

  7. A new analysis of Galileo dust data near Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, R. H.; Hamilton, D. P.; Altobelli, N.

    2015-05-01

    The Galileo Dust Detection System (DDS) detected a population of micron-sized grains in and amongst the orbits of Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto. Previous studies, using roughly 50% of the data now available, concluded that the dominant sources for the impacts were magnetospherically captured interplanetary particles largely on retrograde orbits (Colwell et al., 1998b; Thiessenhusen et al., 2000) and impact-generated ejecta from the Galilean satellites (Krüger et al., 1999b; Krivov et al., 2002a). Here we revisit the problem with the full data set and broaden our consideration to include four additional source populations: debris from the outer satellites, interplanetary and interstellar grains and particles accelerated outwards from Io and the jovian rings. We develop a model of detectable orbits at each Galileo position and we find that about 10% of the impact data require non-circular orbits with eccentricities greater than 0.1. In addition, ~3% of impacts require orbital solutions with eccentricities in excess of 0.7. Using the spatial distribution of particles, we are able to exclude, as dominant sources, all the additional source populations except for outer satellite particles. A study of DDS directional information demonstrates that none of the six standard sources fit the data well and thus a combination of sources is necessary. There are insufficient data to uniquely identify the relative strengths of the various contributions. However, we find an excess of large particles that is consistent with retrograde trajectories.

  8. Study of correlation of deuterium content in a-C:D dust induced by laser irradiation from the co-deposited surface with the grain size and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegre, Daniel; Bergsåker, Henric; Bykov, Igor; Gąsior, Paweł; Kubkowska, Monika; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, Ewa; Petersson, Per; Tabares, Francisco L.

    2014-05-01

    In the study described here, the laser ablation method was applied to clean thick (40-60 μm) a-C:D co-deposits on the ALT-II limiter blade from the TEXTOR tokamak, and at the same time to characterize the ejected particles formed during ablation and measure the amount of fuel carried by them. Ablation was accomplished by ˜ 3.5 ns, 0.5 J Nd:YAG laser pulses in either vacuum or an O2 atmosphere at different pressures. Fast camera tracking of the process provided an estimate of the population and velocity of up to 100 m s-1 for larger dust particles. In the same experiment, the dust particles were caught using ultra-light Si aerogel collectors placed in front of the ablation target. SEM analysis of aerogel surfaces verified the speed estimate, providing the trapped particles’ size distribution and particle yield during ablation. The D/C atomic concentration ratio was measured with the 3HE ion beam nuclear reaction analysis method in deposited layers before ablation and with a micro-ion beam in individual particles on aerogel collectors. This indicated that most of the D was thermally released during ablation, leaving no more than 5% of its original amount in the particles. The effect of ablation conditions on the acceleration of ejected particles, their population, composition and D content is the main subject of this paper.

  9. LADEE UVS Observations of Atoms and Dust in the Lunar Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Colaprete, Anthony; Cook, Amanda M.; Shirley, Mark H.; Vargo, Kara E.; Elphic, Richard C.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Glenar, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) was a lunar orbiter launched in September 2013 that investigated the composition and temporal variation of the tenuous lunar exosphere and dust environment. A major goal of the mission was to characterize the dust exosphere prior to future lunar exploration activities, which may alter the lunar environment. The Ultraviolet/Visible Spectrometer (UVS) onboard LADEE addresses this goal, utilizing two sets of optics: a limbviewing telescope, and a solar-viewing telescope. We report on spectroscopic (approximately 280 - 820 nm) observations viewing down the lunar wake or along the 'lunar tail' from lunar orbit. Prior groundbased studies have observed the emission from neutral sodium atoms extended along the lunar tail, so often this region is referred to as the lunar sodium tail. UVS measurements were made on the dark side of the moon, with the UVS limb-viewing telescope pointed outward in the direction of the Moon's wake (almost anti-sun), during different lunar phases. These UVS observation activities sample a long column and allow the characterization of scattered light from dust and emission lines from atoms in the lunar tail. Observations in this UVS configuration show the largest excess of scattered blue light in our data set, indicative of the presence of small dust grains in the tail. Once lofted, nanoparticles may become charged and picked up by the solar wind, similar to the phenomena witnessed above Enceladus's northern hemisphere or by the STEREO/WAVES instrument while close to Earth's orbit. The UVS data show that small dust grains as well as atoms become entrained in the lunar tail.

  10. Ares Vallis Dust Devil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 May 2004 When it was operating in the Ares/Tiu Valles region of Chryse Planitia, Mars, in 1997, Mars Pathfinder detected dust devils that passed over and near the lander. From orbit, no images of dust devils at the Mars Pathfinder site have yet been acquired, but this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime dust devil near the rim of a 610-meter (670 yards)-diameter impact crater in the same general region as the Mars Pathfinder site. This scene is near 19.6oN, 32.9oW, in part of the Ares Vallis system. The dust devil in this case is not making a streak, as dust devils tend to do in some regions of Mars. The dark feature to the right (east) of the dust devil is its shadow. This picture covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  11. Dust in the galactic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittet, D. C. B.

    An overview of dust in the galactic environment is given which covers general concepts, methods of investigation, important results and their significance, relevant literature, and suggestions for future research. The general topics addressed include: element abundances and depletions, interstellar extinction and scattering, interstellar polarization and grain alignment, spectral absorption features, continuum and line emission, and the origin and evolution of interstellar grains.

  12. Big Dust Devils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    28 January 2004 Northern Amazonis Planitia is famous for its frequent, large (> 1 km high) dust devils. They occur throughout the spring and summer seasons, and can be detected from orbit, even at the 240 meters (278 yards) per pixel resolution of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle instruments. This red wide angle image shows a plethora of large dust devils. The arrow points to an example. Shadows cast by the towering columns of swirling dust point away from the direction of sunlight illumination (sun is coming from the left/lower left). This December 2004 scene covers an area more than 125 km (> 78 mi) across and is located near 37oN, 154oW.

  13. Gusev Dust Devil, Sol 543

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    One dust devil scoots across the center of the view in this movie clip showing a few dust devils inside Mars' Gusev Crater. The clip consists of frames taken by the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 543rd martian day, or sol (July 13, 2005).

    Spirit began seeing dust devil activity around the beginning of Mars' spring season. Activity increased as spring continued, but fell off again for about two weeks during a dust storm. As the dust storm faded away, dust devil activity came back. In the mid-afternoons as the summer solstice approached, dust devils were a very common occurrence on the floor of Gusev crater. The early-spring dust devils tended to move southwest-to-northeast, across the dust devil streaks in Gusev seen from orbit. Increasingly as the season progresses, the dust devils are seen moving northwest-to-southeast, in the same direction as the streaks. Scientists are watching for the big dust devils that leave those streaks.

    In this clip, contrast has been enhanced for anything in the images that changes from frame to frame, that is, for the dust moved by wind. The total time elapsed during the taking of these frames was 8 minutes, 21 seconds.

  14. Gravito-electrodynamics of charged dust in planetary magnetospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Mendis, D.A.; Houpis, H.L.F.; Hill, J.R.

    1982-05-01

    The dynamics of small electrically charged dust grains within the rigidly corotating regions of planetary magnetospheres such as those of Jupiter and Saturn is considered. Depending on whether one is inside or outside the synchronous orbit, it is possible to have different populations of both positively and negatively charged particles moving in equilibrium circular orbits either in the prograd or retrograd sense. Not all these are stable, however, to small perturbations, such as would be produced by the gravitational tug of a neighboring satellite. The stable perturbed grains will perform a motion that can be described as an elliptical gyration about a guiding center which is in uniform circular motion. For different values of the specific charge, the ratio of the semiaxes of this ''epicyclic'' ellipse lies between 1/2 and 1, while the gyration frequency ..omega.. of the grain about the guiding center lies between the Kepler frequency ..cap omega../sub K/ and ..omega../sub 0/ In the environments of Jupiter and Saturn, where the grains are expected to be negatively charged both in the sunlit side and in the shadow and which move in the prograde sense, their guiding centers must have speeds intermediate to the Kepler speed and the corotation speed. Such particles with a unique specific charge could have a 1:1 magneto-gravitational resonance with a neighboring satellite. A dispersion relation between ..omega.. and the wavelength lambda of the perturbed orbits in the frame of the perturbed satellite has been derived. This result has been used to discuss the appearance and disappearance of the waves in the F ring of Saturn elsewhere. We merely point out here that, while the existence of a single well-defined wavelength implies a dust size distribution sharply peaked at a diameter of about 1 ..mu.., the present theory also anticipates this situation.

  15. Dust Effects on Surface Charging in Plasmas: Laboratory and Numerical Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, K.; Wang, J.; Yu, W.; Han, D.

    2014-12-01

    There are many situations that a spacecraft surface would be covered by a layer of dusts, such as that around a comet and and on the surfaces of the Moon and asteroids. Previous studies of surface charging in plasmas have mostly considered a "clean" conducting or dielectric surface. On the other hand, studies of dust charging in plasmas have mostly considered that of single, isolated dust grains (the "dust-in-plasma" condition), where a dust grain is electrically isolated from its neighboring dusts. This paper considers the charging of a surface covered by a layer of dust grains (the "dusty-surface" condition), where the inter-dust distance is almost zero but the dust grains do not form a solid surface. Under such a condition, the sheath of each individual dust particles overlap to form one single sheath and the charging of individual dust grains is strongly affected by that of the neighboring dust grains and the surface. Experiments and numerical simulations are carried out to understand the charging of both conducting and dielectric dusty surfaces. Surface charging measurements will be presented for different dust layer thickness, dust grain size, dust density, and different ambient plasma conditions. The effect of the existence of a dusty layer on surface potential as well as the difference between charging of a single dust-in-plasma and that of a dust grain as part of a dusty surface will also be discussed.

  16. The Galileo dust detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, E.; Fechtig, H.; Hanner, M. S.; Kissel, J.; Lindblad, B. A.; Linkert, D.; Maas, D.; Morfill, G. E.; Zook, H. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Galileo Dust Detector is intended to provide direct observations of dust grains with masses between 10(sup -19) kg and 10(sup -9) kg in interplanetary space and in the Jovian system, to investigate their physical and dynamical properties as functions of the distances to the Sun, to Jupiter and to its satellites, to study its interaction with the Galilean satellites and the Jovian magnetosphere. Surface phenomena of the satellites (like albedo variations), which might be effects of meteoroid impacts will be compared with the dust environment. Electric charges of particulate matter in the magnetosphere and its consequences will be studied; e.g. the effects of the magnetic field on the trajectories of dust particles and fragmentation of particles due to electrostatic disruption. The investigation is performed with an instrument