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Sample records for dutch elm disease

  1. Birds and Dutch elm disease control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.

    1958-01-01

    Brief, factual review of information on effect of DDT and other insecticides on birds. One program for control of elm disease caused 22% decrease in number of adult birds and 56% mortality of nestlings. Quail fed 3 oz. of DDT per ton of food had 16% reduction in young hatched and 500% increase in defective chicks. Quail fed same dosage during winter and breeding seasons had 30% decrease in fertile eggs and 800% increase in defective chicks. More than 90% of their chicks died in first 6 weeks although fed no insecticide. Almost equally bad results came from feeding Pheasants diets with about 1 oz. DDT per ton. Other common insecticides (chlorinated hydrocarbons) also caused lowered chick survival and higher percentages of crippled chicks. From field data we know that 2 lbs. DDT/acre can affect birds and has even worse effects on cold-blooded animals. Efforts to control elm disease have left as much as 196 lbs. DDT/acre in top 3 inches of soil. Earthworms concentrate DDT in their tissues. Thus the treated areas can be traps for birds and other animals. What can be done? 1) In control of elm disease, use minimum effective amount of insecticide; mist blowers use less than sprayers. 2) Avoid applications during migration and nesting seasons. It has been reported that adequate control can be obtained with dormant sprays and that foliar applications may not be required. Tables of this paper show effects of DDT on reproduction of Quail, relative toxicity to quail of 8 insecticides, and amounts of 7 insecticides required to cause 40% or more decrease in Quail reproduction. These comparisons demonstrate that Aldrin, Endrin, and Dieldrin are 20 to 200 times as toxic as DDT and that Heptachlor and Chlordane are only slightly less toxic than Dieldrin. Methoxychlor and Strobane are less toxic to Quail than is DDT.

  2. Leaf trait dissimilarities between Dutch elm hybrids with a contrasting tolerance to Dutch elm disease

    PubMed Central

    Ďurkovič, Jaroslav; Čaňová, Ingrid; Lagaňa, Rastislav; Kučerová, Veronika; Moravčík, Michal; Priwitzer, Tibor; Urban, Josef; Dvořák, Miloň; Krajňáková, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous studies have shown that Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, the causative agent of Dutch elm disease (DED), is able to colonize remote areas in infected plants of Ulmus such as the leaf midrib and secondary veins. The objective of this study was to compare the performances in leaf traits between two Dutch elm hybrids ‘Groeneveld’ and ‘Dodoens’ which possess a contrasting tolerance to DED. Trait linkages were also tested with leaf mass per area (LMA) and with the reduced Young's modulus of elasticity (MOE) as a result of structural, developmental or functional linkages. Methods Measurements and comparisons were made of leaf growth traits, primary xylem density components, gas exchange variables and chlorophyll a fluorescence yields between mature plants of ‘Groeneveld’ and ‘Dodoens’ grown under field conditions. A recently developed atomic force microscopy technique, PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical mapping, was used to reveal nanomechanical properties of the cell walls of tracheary elements such as MOE, adhesion and dissipation. Key Results ‘Dodoens’ had significantly higher values for LMA, leaf tissue thickness variables, tracheary element lumen area (A), relative hydraulic conductivity (RC), gas exchange variables and chlorophyll a fluorescence yields. ‘Groeneveld’ had stiffer cell walls of tracheary elements, and higher values for water-use efficiency and leaf water potential. Leaves with a large carbon and nutrient investment in LMA tended to have a greater leaf thickness and a higher net photosynthetic rate, but LMA was independent of RC. Significant linkages were also found between the MOE and some vascular traits such as RC, A and the number of tracheary elements per unit area. Conclusions Strong dissimilarities in leaf trait performances were observed between the examined Dutch elm hybrids. Both hybrids were clearly separated from each other in the multivariate leaf trait space. Leaf growth, vascular and gas

  3. Transgenic American elm shows reduced Dutch elm disease symptoms and normal mycorrhizal colonization.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, Andrew E; Schrodt, Franziska; Liang, Haiying; Maynard, Charles A; Powell, William A

    2007-07-01

    The American elm (Ulmus americana L.) was once one of the most common urban trees in eastern North America until Dutch-elm disease (DED), caused by the fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, eliminated most of the mature trees. To enhance DED resistance, Agrobacterium was used to transform American elm with a transgene encoding the synthetic antimicrobial peptide ESF39A, driven by a vascular promoter from American chestnut. Four unique, single-copy transgenic lines were produced and regenerated into whole plants. These lines showed less wilting and significantly less sapwood staining than non-transformed controls after O. novo-ulmi inoculation. Preliminary observations indicated that mycorrhizal colonization was not significantly different between transgenic and wild-type trees. Although the trees tested were too young to ensure stable resistance was achieved, these results indicate that transgenes encoding antimicrobial peptides reduce DED symptoms and therefore hold promise for enhancing pathogen resistance in American elm. PMID:17310333

  4. Do mites phoretic on elm bark beetles contribute to the transmission of Dutch elm disease?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, John C.; Konrad, Heino; Blomquist, Stacy R.; Kirisits, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED) is a destructive vascular wilt disease of elm ( Ulmus) trees caused by the introduced Ascomycete fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. In Europe, this DED pathogen is transmitted by elm bark beetles in the genus Scolytus. These insects carry phoretic mites to new, suitable habitats. The aim of this study was to record and quantify conidia and ascospores of O. novo-ulmi on phoretic mites on the three elm bark beetle species Scolytus multistriatus, Scolytus pygmaeus, and Scolytus scolytus. Spores of O. novo-ulmi were found on four of the ten mite species phoretic on Scolytus spp. These included Elattoma fraxini, Proctolaelaps scolyti, Pseudotarsonemoides eccoptogasteri, and Tarsonemus crassus. All four species had spores attached externally to their body surfaces. However, T. crassus carried most spores within its sporothecae, two paired pocket-like structures adapted for fungal transmission. Individuals of Pr. scolyti also had O. novo-ulmi conidia and ascospores frequently in their digestive system, where they may remain viable. While E. fraxini and P. eccoptogasteri rarely had spores attached to their bodies, large portions of Pr. scolyti and T. crassus carried significant numbers of conidia and/or ascospores of O. novo-ulmi. P. scolyti and T. crassus, which likely are fungivores, may thus contribute to the transmission of O. novo-ulmi, by increasing the spore loads of individual Scolytus beetles during their maturation feeding on twigs of healthy elm trees, enhancing the chance for successful infection with the pathogen. Only S. scolytus, which is the most efficient vector of O. novo-ulmi in Europe, carried high numbers of Pr. scolyti and T. crassus, in contrast to S. multistriatus and S. pygmaeus, which are known as less efficient vectors. The high efficiency of S. scolytus in spreading Dutch elm disease may be partly due to its association with these two mites and the hyperphoretic spores of O. novo-ulmi they carry.

  5. Dutch elm disease. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the spread and control of Dutch elm disease. Dutch elm disease is a lethal fungal disease in elm trees which is transmitted via bark beetles. Topics included methods to treat the disease and to control the disease-carrying beetle, biochemistry and genetic information on the disease fungus and its phytotoxin, ecological effects of the disease, evidence of fungicide tolerance by the disease fungus, and attempts to breed disease resistant elm trees. Distribution of Dutch elm disease in Iran, Scotland, the United States, Yugoslavia, and Sweden is described. This information is useful, for example, in the development of methods for detection and treatment of Dutch elm disease. (Contains a minimum of 128 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Resistance to Dutch Elm Disease Reduces Presence of Xylem Endophytic Fungi in Elms (Ulmus spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Juan A.; Witzell, Johanna; Blumenstein, Kathrin; Rozpedowska, Elzbieta; Helander, Marjo; Sieber, Thomas N.; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to introduce pathogen resistance into landscape tree species by breeding may have unintended consequences for fungal diversity. To address this issue, we compared the frequency and diversity of endophytic fungi and defensive phenolic metabolites in elm (Ulmus spp.) trees with genotypes known to differ in resistance to Dutch elm disease. Our results indicate that resistant U. minor and U. pumila genotypes exhibit a lower frequency and diversity of fungal endophytes in the xylem than susceptible U. minor genotypes. However, resistant and susceptible genotypes showed a similar frequency and diversity of endophytes in the leaves and bark. The resistant and susceptible genotypes could be discriminated on the basis of the phenolic profile of the xylem, but not on basis of phenolics in the leaves or bark. As the Dutch elm disease pathogen develops within xylem tissues, the defensive chemistry of resistant elm genotypes thus appears to be one of the factors that may limit colonization by both the pathogen and endophytes. We discuss a potential trade-off between the benefits of breeding resistance into tree species, versus concomitant losses of fungal endophytes and the ecosystem services they provide. PMID:23468900

  7. Bird mortality following DDT spray for Dutch elm disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wurster, D.H.; Wurster, C.F.; Strickland, W.N.

    1965-01-01

    Avian populations in Hanover, N. H., a town that has sprayed its elms with DDT for many years in an attempt to control Dutch elm disease, were compared with those in Norwich, Vt., a town 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Hanover that has never sprayed. Hanover applied 109 lb DDT/acre (2.1 kg/hectare) in April 1963, then used Methoxychlor in April 1964. Population surveys were taken regularly during spring and early summer of these years, dead birds were collected in both towns, and 106 birds were analyzed for DDT, DDE, and DDD. Severe mortality of both resident and migrant birds occurred in Hanover during spring 1963, and the evidence implicates DDT as its cause. Robin loss was estimated at 70% of the resident population, or 350 to 400 individuals, but mortality among other species of widely varied feeding habits was also substantial. Feeding habits suggest that some birds acquired the toxicant by eating living insects carrying DDT, presenting the paradox of survival of the intended DDT victims, and death, instead, of insectivorous birds. Organ and whole bird analyses are presented and criteria for establishing cause of death are discussed. Most of the DDT had been converted to DDE and DDD, and residues were found in all organs analyzed. Robin mortality was reduced, but not eliminated following Methoxychlor application in 1964; these losses were believed caused by residual DDT in the soil. There was no evidence DDT poisoning among other species in 1964, though the dead birds collected were not analyzed.

  8. Host responses and metabolic profiles of wood components in Dutch elm hybrids with a contrasting tolerance to Dutch elm disease

    PubMed Central

    Ďurkovič, Jaroslav; Kačík, František; Olčák, Dušan; Kučerová, Veronika; Krajňáková, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes occurring in the macromolecular traits of cell wall components in elm wood following attack by Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, the causative agent of Dutch elm disease (DED), are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to compare host responses and the metabolic profiles of wood components for two Dutch elm (Ulmus) hybrids, ‘Groeneveld’ (a susceptible clone) and ‘Dodoens’ (a tolerant clone), that have contrasting survival strategies upon infection with the current prevalent strain of DED. Methods Ten-year-old plants of the hybrid elms were inoculated with O. novo-ulmi ssp. americana × novo-ulmi. Measurements were made of the content of main cell wall components and extractives, lignin monomer composition, macromolecular traits of cellulose and neutral saccharide composition. Key Results Upon infection, medium molecular weight macromolecules of cellulose were degraded in both the susceptible and tolerant elm hybrids, resulting in the occurrence of secondary cell wall ruptures and cracks in the vessels, but rarely in the fibres. The 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra revealed that loss of crystalline and non-crystalline cellulose regions occurred in parallel. The rate of cellulose degradation was influenced by the syringyl:guaiacyl ratio in lignin. Both hybrids commonly responded to the medium molecular weight cellulose degradation with the biosynthesis of high molecular weight macromolecules of cellulose, resulting in a significant increase in values for the degree of polymerization and polydispersity. Other responses of the hybrids included an increase in lignin content, a decrease in relative proportions of d-glucose, and an increase in proportions of d-xylose. Differential responses between the hybrids were found in the syringyl:guaiacyl ratio in lignin. Conclusions In susceptible ‘Groeneveld’ plants, syringyl-rich lignin provided a far greater degree of protection from cellulose degradation than in ‘Dodoens’, but

  9. The pathogen causing Dutch elm disease makes host trees attract insect vectors

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Geoff; Gries, Regine; von Reuß, Stephan H; Rahe, James E; McIntosh, Rory; König, Wilfried A; Gries, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Dutch elm disease is caused by the fungal pathogen Ophiostoma novo-ulmi which is transmitted by the native elm bark beetle, Hylurgopinus rufipes. We have found that four semiochemicals (the monoterpene (−)-β-pinene and the sesquiterpenes (−)-α-cubebene, (+)-spiroaxa-5,7-diene and (+)-δ-cadinene) from diseased American elms, Ulmus americana, synergistically attract H. rufipes, and that sesquiterpene emission is upregulated in elm trees inoculated with O. novo-ulmi. The fungus thus manipulates host trees to enhance their apparency to foraging beetles, a strategy that increases the probability of transportation of the pathogen to new hosts. PMID:16271975

  10. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease

    PubMed Central

    Sherif , S. M.; Shukla, M. R.; Murch, S. J.; Bernier, L.; Saxena, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  11. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease.

    PubMed

    Sherif, S M; Shukla, M R; Murch, S J; Bernier, L; Saxena, P K

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  12. Bird mortality after spraying for Dutch elm disease with DDT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wurster, C.F.; Wurster, D.H.; Strickland, W.N.

    1965-01-01

    In Hanover, New Hampshire, where elms were sprayed with DDT, 151 dead birds were found; 10 dead birds were found in Norwich, Vermont, where no DDT was used. Chemical analyses of dead birds, observation of symptoms of DDT poisoning, and a population decline after spraying all indicate severe mortality among certain species in Hanover.

  13. Investigations of remote sensing techniques for early detection of Dutch elm disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammerschlag, R. S.; Sopstyle, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Several forms of aerial photography were pursued in quest of a technique which could provide early detection of Dutch elm disease. The two most promising techniques tested were multispectral photography with object enhancement and biband ratioing coupled with scanning microdensitometry. For practical purposes the multispectral system has the advantage of providing a readily interpretable image in a relatively short time. Laboratory studies indicated that less emphasis should be placed on the use of a red filter or the near infrared beyond 750 mm for early detection of stress within a single plant species. Color infrared film would be optimal when used for a long term detection of loss of plant vigor which results in a physical change in a plant canopy, but should find minimal practicality for early detection of specific sources of plant stress such as Dutch elm disease. Considerable discretion should be used when interpreting imagery on copy film because of loss of resolution and color definition.

  14. Effects on wildlife of DDT used for control of Dutch elm disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benton, A.H.

    1951-01-01

    During the summer of 1949 studies were conducted at Princeton, New Jersey, to determine the effects on wildlife of DDT used in the control of Dutch elm disease. Direct mortality was determined by intensive search for dead birds after spraying. Twenty-six songbirds, one bat, and one gray squirrel were found. Of 11 dead birds from a study area of approximately 20 acres only one was an adult. Songbird populations were determined by censuses before and after spraying on a study area and on a similar unsprayed check area. The number of all breeding birds showed a 19.6 percent decrease on both the study and check areas during the week immediately following spraying. About two weeks after spraying the population in the treated area began to increase and within another week was back to prespray level. When only those species common to both sprayed and unsprayed areas are considered a population decline of 22 percent was measured in the sprayed area while the check area showed a 6 percent increase in numbers over the same period. Nestling mortality was studied in both areas. Among 18 young found on the study area during and following spraying 8 (44%) survived. Death of two broods of catbirds occurred four days after spraying. Of 21 young found on the check area 15 (71%) survived.

  15. Diversity in yeast-mycelium dimorphism response of the Dutch elm disease pathogens: the inoculum size effect.

    PubMed

    Wedge, Marie-Ève; Naruzawa, Erika Sayuri; Nigg, Martha; Bernier, Louis

    2016-06-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED) is caused by the dimorphic fungi Ophiostoma ulmi, Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, and Ophiostoma himal-ulmi. A cell population density-dependent phenomenon related to quorum sensing was previously shown to affect the reversible transition from yeast-like to mycelial growth in liquid shake cultures of O. novo-ulmi NRRL 6404. Since the response to external stimuli often varies among DED fungal strains, we evaluated the effect of inoculum size on 8 strains of the 3 species of DED agents by determining the proportion of yeast and mycelium produced at different spore inoculum concentrations in defined liquid shake medium. The results show that not all DED fungi strains respond similarly to inoculum size effect, since variations were observed among strains. It is thus possible that the different strains belonging to phylogenetically close species use different signalling molecules or molecular signalling pathways to regulate their growth mode via quorum-sensing mechanisms. PMID:27068623

  16. Can vessel dimension explain tolerance toward fungal vascular wilt diseases in woody plants? Lessons from Dutch elm disease and esca disease in grapevine

    PubMed Central

    Pouzoulet, Jérôme; Pivovaroff, Alexandria L.; Santiago, Louis S.; Rolshausen, Philippe E.

    2014-01-01

    This review illuminates key findings in our understanding of grapevine xylem resistance to fungal vascular wilt diseases. Grapevine (Vitis spp.) vascular diseases such as esca, botryosphaeria dieback, and eutypa dieback, are caused by a set of taxonomically unrelated ascomycete fungi. Fungal colonization of the vascular system leads to a decline of the plant host because of a loss of the xylem function and subsequent decrease in hydraulic conductivity. Fungal vascular pathogens use different colonization strategies to invade and kill their host. Vitis vinifera cultivars display different levels of tolerance toward vascular diseases caused by fungi, but the plant defense mechanisms underlying those observations have not been completely elucidated. In this review, we establish a parallel between two vascular diseases, grapevine esca disease and Dutch elm disease, and argue that the former should be viewed as a vascular wilt disease. Plant genotypes exhibit differences in xylem morphology and resistance to fungal pathogens causing vascular wilt diseases. We provide evidence that the susceptibility of three commercial V. vinifera cultivars to esca disease is correlated to large vessel diameter. Additionally, we explore how xylem morphological traits related to water transport are influenced by abiotic factors, and how these might impact host tolerance of vascular wilt fungi. Finally, we explore the utility of this concept for predicting which V. vinifera cultivars are most vulnerable of fungal vascular wilt diseases and propose new strategies for disease management. PMID:24971084

  17. Massive sequencing of Ulmus minor's transcriptome provides new molecular tools for a genus under the constant threat of Dutch elm disease.

    PubMed

    Perdiguero, Pedro; Venturas, Martin; Cervera, María Teresa; Gil, Luis; Collada, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Elms, especially Ulmus minor and U. americana, are carrying out a hard battle against Dutch elm disease (DED). This vascular wilt disease, caused by Ophiostoma ulmi and O. novo-ulmi, appeared in the twentieth century and killed millions of elms across North America and Europe. Elm breeding and conservation programmes have identified a reduced number of DED tolerant genotypes. In this study, three U. minor genotypes with contrasted levels of tolerance to DED were exposed to several biotic and abiotic stresses in order to (i) obtain a de novo assembled transcriptome of U. minor using 454 pyrosequencing, (ii) perform a functional annotation of the assembled transcriptome, (iii) identify genes potentially involved in the molecular response to environmental stress, and (iv) develop gene-based markers to support breeding programmes. A total of 58,429 putative unigenes were identified after assembly and filtering of the transcriptome. 32,152 of these unigenes showed homology with proteins identified in the genome from the most common plant model species. Well-known family proteins and transcription factors involved in abiotic, biotic or both stresses were identified after functional annotation. A total of 30,693 polymorphisms were identified in 7,125 isotigs, a large number of them corresponding to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 27,359). In a subset randomly selected for validation, 87% of the SNPs were confirmed. The material generated may be valuable for future Ulmus gene expression, population genomics and association genetics studies, especially taking into account the scarce molecular information available for this genus and the great impact that DED has on elm populations. PMID:26257751

  18. Massive sequencing of Ulmus minor’s transcriptome provides new molecular tools for a genus under the constant threat of Dutch elm disease

    PubMed Central

    Perdiguero, Pedro; Venturas, Martin; Cervera, María Teresa; Gil, Luis; Collada, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Elms, especially Ulmus minor and U. americana, are carrying out a hard battle against Dutch elm disease (DED). This vascular wilt disease, caused by Ophiostoma ulmi and O. novo-ulmi, appeared in the twentieth century and killed millions of elms across North America and Europe. Elm breeding and conservation programmes have identified a reduced number of DED tolerant genotypes. In this study, three U. minor genotypes with contrasted levels of tolerance to DED were exposed to several biotic and abiotic stresses in order to (i) obtain a de novo assembled transcriptome of U. minor using 454 pyrosequencing, (ii) perform a functional annotation of the assembled transcriptome, (iii) identify genes potentially involved in the molecular response to environmental stress, and (iv) develop gene-based markers to support breeding programmes. A total of 58,429 putative unigenes were identified after assembly and filtering of the transcriptome. 32,152 of these unigenes showed homology with proteins identified in the genome from the most common plant model species. Well-known family proteins and transcription factors involved in abiotic, biotic or both stresses were identified after functional annotation. A total of 30,693 polymorphisms were identified in 7,125 isotigs, a large number of them corresponding to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 27,359). In a subset randomly selected for validation, 87% of the SNPs were confirmed. The material generated may be valuable for future Ulmus gene expression, population genomics and association genetics studies, especially taking into account the scarce molecular information available for this genus and the great impact that DED has on elm populations. PMID:26257751

  19. Functional Annotation of the Ophiostoma novo-ulmi Genome: Insights into the Phytopathogenicity of the Fungal Agent of Dutch Elm Disease

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, André M.; Dufour, Josée; Bouvet, Guillaume F.; Jacobi, Volker; Nigg, Martha; Henrissat, Bernard; Laroche, Jérôme; Levesque, Roger C.; Bernier, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi is responsible for the pandemic of Dutch elm disease that has been ravaging Europe and North America for 50 years. We proceeded to annotate the genome of the O. novo-ulmi strain H327 that was sequenced in 2012. The 31.784-Mb nuclear genome (50.1% GC) is organized into 8 chromosomes containing a total of 8,640 protein-coding genes that we validated with RNA sequencing analysis. Approximately 53% of these genes have their closest match to Grosmannia clavigera kw1407, followed by 36% in other close Sordariomycetes, 5% in other Pezizomycotina, and surprisingly few (5%) orphans. A relatively small portion (∼3.4%) of the genome is occupied by repeat sequences; however, the mechanism of repeat-induced point mutation appears active in this genome. Approximately 76% of the proteins could be assigned functions using Gene Ontology analysis; we identified 311 carbohydrate-active enzymes, 48 cytochrome P450s, and 1,731 proteins potentially involved in pathogen–host interaction, along with 7 clusters of fungal secondary metabolites. Complementary mating-type locus sequencing, mating tests, and culturing in the presence of elm terpenes were conducted. Our analysis identified a specific genetic arsenal impacting the sexual and vegetative growth, phytopathogenicity, and signaling/plant–defense–degradation relationship between O. novo-ulmi and its elm host and insect vectors. PMID:25539722

  20. RNAseq Analysis Highlights Specific Transcriptome Signatures of Yeast and Mycelial Growth Phases in the Dutch Elm Disease Fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Martha; Laroche, Jérôme; Landry, Christian R.; Bernier, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Fungal dimorphism is a complex trait and our understanding of the ability of fungi to display different growth morphologies is limited to a small number of model species. Here we study a highly aggressive dimorphic fungus, the ascomycete Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, which is a model in plant pathology and the causal agent of Dutch elm disease. The two growth phases that this fungus displays, i.e., a yeast phase and mycelial phase, are thought to be involved in key steps of disease development. We used RNAseq to investigate the genome-wide gene expression profiles that are associated with yeast and mycelial growth phases in vitro. Our results show a clear molecular distinction between yeast and mycelial phase gene expression profiles. Almost 12% of the gene content is differentially expressed between the two phases, which reveals specific functions related to each growth phase. We compared O. novo-ulmi transcriptome profiles with those of two model dimorphic fungi, Candida albicans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Few orthologs showed similar expression regulation between the two growth phases, which suggests that, globally, the genes associated with these two life forms are poorly conserved. This poor conservation underscores the importance of developing specific tools for emerging model species that are distantly related to the classical ones. Taken together, our results provide insights into transcriptome regulation and molecular specificity in O. novo-ulmi and offer a new perspective for understanding fungal dimorphism. PMID:26384770

  1. RNAseq Analysis Highlights Specific Transcriptome Signatures of Yeast and Mycelial Growth Phases in the Dutch Elm Disease Fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi.

    PubMed

    Nigg, Martha; Laroche, Jérôme; Landry, Christian R; Bernier, Louis

    2015-11-01

    Fungal dimorphism is a complex trait and our understanding of the ability of fungi to display different growth morphologies is limited to a small number of model species. Here we study a highly aggressive dimorphic fungus, the ascomycete Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, which is a model in plant pathology and the causal agent of Dutch elm disease. The two growth phases that this fungus displays, i.e., a yeast phase and mycelial phase, are thought to be involved in key steps of disease development. We used RNAseq to investigate the genome-wide gene expression profiles that are associated with yeast and mycelial growth phases in vitro. Our results show a clear molecular distinction between yeast and mycelial phase gene expression profiles. Almost 12% of the gene content is differentially expressed between the two phases, which reveals specific functions related to each growth phase. We compared O. novo-ulmi transcriptome profiles with those of two model dimorphic fungi, Candida albicans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Few orthologs showed similar expression regulation between the two growth phases, which suggests that, globally, the genes associated with these two life forms are poorly conserved. This poor conservation underscores the importance of developing specific tools for emerging model species that are distantly related to the classical ones. Taken together, our results provide insights into transcriptome regulation and molecular specificity in O. novo-ulmi and offer a new perspective for understanding fungal dimorphism. PMID:26384770

  2. Hybridization and introgression patterns between native red elm (Ulmus rubra Muhl.) and exotic, invasive Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila L.) examined using species-specific microsatellite markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ulmus pumila (Siberian elm) is an invasive elm species, non-native to the United States, which hybridizes with Ulmus rubra (red elm), a U.S. native. While Siberian elm is highly tolerant to Dutch elm disease (DED), red elm populations in North America have been decimated by DED. In order to study ...

  3. Hybridization and introgression between the exotic Siberian elm, Ulmus pumila, and the native Field elm, U. minor, in Italy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In response to the first Dutch elm disease (DED) pandemic, Siberian elm, Ulmus pumila, was planted to replace the native elm, U. minor, in Italy. The potential for hybridization between these two species is high and repeated hybridization could result in the genetic swamping of the native species an...

  4. Long-term impact of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi on leaf traits and transpiration of branches in the Dutch elm hybrid 'Dodoens'.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Roman; Urban, Josef; Gebauer, Roman; Dvořák, Miloň; Ďurkovič, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    To better understand the long-term impact of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi Brasier on leaf physiology in 'Dodoens', a Dutch elm disease-tolerant hybrid, measurements of leaf area, leaf dry mass, petiole anatomy, petiole hydraulic conductivity, leaf and branch water potential, and branch sap flow were performed 3 years following an initial artificial inoculation. Although fungal hyphae were detected in fully expanded leaves, neither anatomical nor morphological traits were affected, indicating that there was no impact from the fungal hyphae on the leaves during leaf expansion. In contrast, however, infected trees showed both a lower transpiration rate of branches and a lower sap flow density. The long-term persistence of fungal hyphae inside vessels decreased the xylem hydraulic conductivity, but stomatal regulation of transpiration appeared to be unaffected as the leaf water potential in both infected and non-infected trees was similarly driven by the transpirational demands. Regardless of the fungal infection, leaves with a higher leaf mass per area ratio tended to have a higher leaf area-specific conductivity. Smaller leaves had an increased number of conduits with smaller diameters and thicker cell walls. Such a pattern could increase tolerance towards hydraulic dysfunction. Measurements of water potential and theoretical xylem conductivity revealed that petiole anatomy could predict the maximal transpiration rate. Three years following fungal inoculation, phenotypic expressions for the majority of the examined traits revealed a constitutive nature for their possible role in Dutch elm disease tolerance of 'Dodoens' trees. PMID:26843210

  5. Sequence analysis of the chitin synthase A gene of the Dutch elm pathogen Ophiostoma novo-ulmi indicates a close association with the human pathogen Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Hintz, W E

    1999-09-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed according to conserved regions of the chitin synthase gene family and used to amplify a 621 basepair (bp) fragment from genomic DNA of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi, the causal agent of Dutch elm disease. The amplification product was used as a hybridization probe to screen a library of genomic DNA sequences and to retrieve a full-length chitin synthase gene (chsA). The putative coding region of the gene was 2619 bp long, lacked introns, and encoded a polypeptide of 873 amino acids. Based on the similarity of the predicted amino acid sequence to the full-length chsC gene of Aspergillus nidulans and chsA gene of Ampelomyces quisqualis, the O. novo-ulmi chsA was classified as a Class I chitin synthase. The phylogenies constructed, according to a subregion of all available chitin synthases, showed that O. novo-ulmi consistently clustered most closely with the human pathogen Sporothrix schenckii, recently classified as a member of the mitosporic Ophiostomataceae. Disruption of the chsA gene locus had no obvious effects on the growth or morphology of the fungus. PMID:10524253

  6. Elm leaf beetle performance on ozone-fumigated elm. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, J.H.; Hall, R.W.; Townsend, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    Leaves (1986) from elm hybrids ('Pioneer', 'Homestead', '970') previously fumigated in open-top chambers with ozone or with charcoal-filtered air (CFA) were evaluated for water and nitrogen content or were fed to adult elm leaf beetles (ELB), Xanthogaleruca = (Pyrrhalta) luteola (Muller), to determine host suitability for beetle fecundity and survivorship. ELB females fed ozone-fumigated leaves laid significantly fewer eggs than females fed CFA-fumigated leaves. Leaf nitrogen or water content was unaffected. Hybrid '970' (1988) was fumigated with CFA or with ozone concentrations to determine effects on ELB fecundity, leaf consumption, and survivorship. Significantly fewer eggs were laid at the higher concentration of ozone. Because higher levels of ozone are found in urban areas and because municipalities often replace American elms, Ulmus americana L., with Dutch elm disease-resistant elm hybrids that are susceptible to ELB defoliation, it is important to explore the relationships between ozone sensitivity of elm and susceptibility to ELB herbivory before recommending replacement use of these elms to municipal arborists. The study was conducted to determine whether ozone pollution influences host quality of elm for ELB and how ELB fecundity, leaf consumption rate, and survivorship are affected.

  7. Slippery Elm

    MedlinePlus

    Slippery elm is a tree. The inner bark (not the whole bark) is used as medicine. People take slippery elm for coughs, sore throat, colic, diarrhea, constipation, hemorrhoids, irritable bowel syndrome ( ...

  8. Conservation of genetic diversity in slippery elm (Ulmus rubra) in Wisconsin despite the devastating impact of Dutch elm disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Forest trees tend to be genetically diverse, a condition related to their longevity, outcrossing mating system and extensive gene flow that maintains high levels of genetic diversity within populations. Forest pest epidemics are responsible for many historic and contemporary population declines repo...

  9. Slippery Elm

    MedlinePlus

    ... as medicine. People take slippery elm for coughs, sore throat, colic, diarrhea, constipation, hemorrhoids, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), ... gout, rheumatism, cold sores, boils, abscesses, ulcers, toothaches, sore throat, and as a lubricant to ease labor. In ...

  10. PERKINELMER ELM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The PerkinElmer Elm (formerly the AirBase CanarIT) is a multi-sensor air quality monitoring device that measures particulate matter (PM), total volatile organic compounds (VOCs), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and several other atmospheric components. PM, VOCs, and NO2

  11. Influence of a Ceratocystis ulmi Toxin on Water Relations of Elm (Ulmus americana)

    PubMed Central

    Van Alfen, Neal K.; Turner, Neil C.

    1975-01-01

    Water-soluble glycopeptides isolated from cultures of Ceratocystis ulmi have been reported to be toxins involved in Dutch elm disease. The influence of the glycopeptides on the water relations of Ulmus americana seedlings was tested by placing cut stems in glycopeptide preparations. After 4 hours in 200 micrograms per milliliter toxin the stem conductance of the seedlings was reduced by 79% and the leaf water potential was reduced by 3 bars to that at which the seedlings wilted, the stomata closed, and transpiration decreased. Decrease in stem conductance as the mode of action of the toxin was further confirmed by forcing toxin through the stem and petiole of elm and measuring the effects on stem conductance. High molecular weight dextrans were found to mimic the action of toxin on stem and petiole conductance, and their ability to do so was found to be correlated with their molecular weight. As low as 4 micrograms of toxin or dextrans were found to measurably decrease the stem and petiole conductance of elms. Disruption of the water-conducting system of elms and other plants by small quantities of high molecular weight compounds may be a factor in diseases with wilting symptoms. PMID:16659073

  12. Compliance of Disease Awareness Campaigns in Printed Dutch Media with National and International Regulatory Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Leonardo Alves, Teresa; Martins de Freitas, Auramarina F.; van Eijk, Martine E. C.; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The European legislation prohibits prescription-only medicines' advertising but allows pharmaceutical companies to provide information to the public on health and diseases, provided there is no direct or indirect reference to a pharmaceutical product. Various forms of promotion have become increasingly common in Europe including “disease-oriented” campaigns. Objectives To explore examples of disease awareness campaigns by pharmaceutical companies in the Netherlands, by assessing their compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) Ethical Criteria for medicinal drug promotion and the Dutch guidelines for provision of information by pharmaceutical companies. Methods Materials referring to health/disease and treatments published in the most widely circulated newspapers and magazines were collected from March to May 2012. An evaluation tool was developed based on relevant underlying principles from the WHO ethical criteria and Dutch self-regulation guidelines. Collected disease awareness advertisements were used to pilot the evaluation tool and to explore the consistency of information provided with the WHO and Dutch criteria. Findings Eighty materials met our inclusion criteria; 71 were published in newspapers and 9 in magazines. The large majority were news items but 21 were disease awareness advertisements, of which 5 were duplicates. Fifteen out of the 16 disease awareness campaigns were non-compliant with current guidelines mainly due to lack of balance (n = 12), absence of listed author and/or sponsor (n = 8), use of misleading or incomplete information (n = 5) and use of promotional information (n = 5). None mentioned a pharmaceutical product directly. Conclusion Disease Awareness Campaigns are present in Dutch printed media. Although no brand names were mentioned, the lack of compliance of disease awareness campaigns with the current regulations is alarming. There were information deficiencies and evidence of information

  13. Inhibition of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis increases cell wall digestibility, protoplast isolation, and facilitates sustained cell division in American elm (Ulmus americana)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protoplast technologies offer unique opportunities for fundamental research and to develop novel germplasm through somatic hybridization, organelle transfer, protoclonal variation, and direct insertion of DNA. Applying protoplast technologies to develop Dutch elm disease resistant American elms (Ulmus americana L.) was proposed over 30 years ago, but has not been achieved. A primary factor restricting protoplast technology to American elm is the resistance of the cell walls to enzymatic degradation and a long lag phase prior to cell wall re-synthesis and cell division. Results This study suggests that resistance to enzymatic degradation in American elm was due to water soluble phenylpropanoids. Incubating tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) leaf tissue, an easily digestible species, in aqueous elm extract inhibits cell wall digestion in a dose dependent manner. This can be mimicked by p-coumaric or ferulic acid, phenylpropanoids known to re-enforce cell walls. Culturing American elm tissue in the presence of 2-aminoindane-2-phosphonic acid (AIP; 10-150 μM), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), reduced flavonoid content, decreased tissue browning, and increased isolation rates significantly from 11.8% (±3.27) in controls to 65.3% (±4.60). Protoplasts isolated from callus grown in 100 μM AIP developed cell walls by day 2, had a division rate of 28.5% (±3.59) by day 6, and proliferated into callus by day 14. Heterokaryons were successfully produced using electrofusion and fused protoplasts remained viable when embedded in agarose. Conclusions This study describes a novel approach of modifying phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to facilitate efficient protoplast isolation which has historically been problematic for American elm. This isolation system has facilitated recovery of viable protoplasts capable of rapid cell wall re-synthesis and sustained cell division to form callus. Further, isolated protoplasts survived electrofusion and viable

  14. Elm bark beetle in Holocene peat deposits and the northwest European elm decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Sarah H. E.; Edwards, Kevin J.

    2004-09-01

    The elm decline of 5000 14C yr ago has been the most widely discussed phenomenon in post-glacial vegetation history. This pan-European reduction of elm populations, echoed in the decimation of elmwoods in Europe during the twentieth century, has attracted a series of interrelated hypotheses involving climate change, human activity, disease and soil deterioration. The elm bark beetle (Scolytus scolytus L.) is an essential component of disease explanations. We present evidence for the presence of the beetle over a prolonged period (ca. 7950-4910 yr BP [8800-5660 cal. yr BP]) from a lowland raised mire deposit in northeast Scotland, with its final appearance at this site, and the first and only appearance in another mire of a single scolytid find, around the time of the elm decline. The subfossil S. scolytus finds are not only the first from Scotland, but they also represent the most comprehensive sequence of finds anywhere. Copyright

  15. VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  17. Domestic exposure to legionellae for Dutch Legionnaires' disease patients.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Linda P B; Yzerman, Ed P F; Bruin, Jacob P; Den Boer, Jeroen W

    2004-11-01

    The source of infection for travelers who develop Legionnaires' disease (LD) shortly after a journey abroad is difficult to ascertain. Infection is likely to have occurred abroad, but could also have occurred at the patient's own residence. The authors conducted a case-control study to determine risk for acquiring LD at home in the Netherlands after traveling abroad. They compared homes of 44 traveling LD patients with 44 homes of nontraveling LD patients, using logistic regression models. Geographic distribution was confounding the association between traveling and presence of Legionella spp. in residences; adjustment was necessary. In traveler's homes, legionellae were present more often, with crude and adjusted OR (95% CI) being 1.6 (0.5-5.0) and 1.4 (0.4-4.4), respectively. The authors' findings indicate that the patient's residence can be a potential source of infection after traveling. PMID:16599008

  18. Energy and resource allocation: a dynamic model of the Dutch disease. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.; Sachs, J.

    1982-01-01

    It is well known that a domestic-response discovery gives rise to wealth effects that cause a squeeze of the tradeable-good sector of an open economy. The decline of the manufacturing sector following an energy discovery has been termed the Dutch disease, and has been investigated in many recent studies. The authors' model extends the principally static analyses to date by allowing for: (1) short-run capital specificity and long-run capital mobility; (2) international capital flows; and (3) far-sighted intertemporal optimzing behavior by households and firms. The model is solved by numerical simulation. 9 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Alpha-chain disease with involvement of the respiratory tract in a Dutch child

    PubMed Central

    Stoop, J. W.; Ballieux, R. E.; Hijmans, W.; Zegers, B. J. W.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of an 8-year-old girl of pure Dutch extraction who, since age 4, has shown unclassifiable skin changes, marked eosinophilia and diffuse infiltrative pulmonary changes with enlarged mediastinal lymph glands, dyspnoea and impaired diffusion. The patient's serum contained a large amount of proteins related to the Fc-fragment of IgA. She developed a pharyngeal tumour with the histological characteristics of a paragranuloma. The mucosa of the lower air passages is regarded as a possible site of origin of the abnormal serum protein. The disease was therefore interpreted as a disorder of the secretory IgA system, and this patient could well represent the respiratory form of the alpha-chain disease, described so far. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:4111693

  20. Mutation of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid Gene in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage, Dutch Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Efrat; Carman, Mark D.; Fernandez-Madrid, Ivan J.; Power, Michael D.; Lieberburg, Ivan; van Duinen, Sjoerd G.; Bots, Gerard Th. A. M.; Luyendijk, Willem; Frangione, Blas

    1990-06-01

    An amyloid protein that precipitates in the cerebral vessel walls of Dutch patients with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis is similar to the amyloid protein in vessel walls and senile plaques in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Cloning and sequencing of the two exons that encode the amyloid protein from two patients with this amyloidosis revealed a cytosine-to-guanine transversion, a mutation that caused a single amino acid substitution (glutamine instead of glutamic acid) at position 22 of the amyloid protein. The mutation may account for the deposition of this amyloid protein in the cerebral vessel walls of these patients, leading to cerebral hemorrhages and premature death.

  1. CTLA4 +49 A/G and CT60 polymorphisms in Dutch coeliac disease patients.

    PubMed

    van Belzen, Martine J; Mulder, Chris J J; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pearson, Peter L; Houwen, Roderick H J; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2004-09-01

    Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disorder, characterised by villous atrophy of the small intestine, which results from a T-cell-mediated response to gluten-derived peptides. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) is involved in the regulation of T-cell activation and the CTLA4 +49 A/G polymorphism in exon 1 has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders, including coeliac disease. However, this polymorphism was recently excluded as being the causal variant in Graves' disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism and type I diabetes mellitus. This causal variant was mapped to the 3' region of CTLA4, with the CT60 polymorphism showing the strongest association. The aim of this study was to determine the role of the CTLA4 gene in coeliac disease in the Dutch population. The +49 A/G and CT60 polymorphisms were genotyped in a case-control cohort of 215 patients and controls. The frequency of the +49 G-allele was increased in cases, although not significantly. However, the frequency of the CT60 G-allele was increased with borderline significance in coeliac disease patients (P = 0.048), although the genotype distributions did not show a significant difference between cases and controls. These results indicate the involvement of the CTLA4 gene in coeliac disease development. The haplotype carrying the CT60 G-allele was shown to be associated with lower mRNA levels of the soluble CTLA-4 isoform, providing a possible mechanism for the T-cell-mediated destruction of the small intestine. PMID:15199380

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease, cancer and medication: Cancer risk in the Dutch population-based IBDSL cohort.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Tim R A; Wintjens, Dion S J; Jeuring, Steven F G; Wassink, Maartje H H; Romberg-Camps, Marielle J L; Oostenbrug, Liekele E; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Hameeteman, Wim H; Zeegers, Maurice P; Masclee, Ad A; Jonkers, Daisy M; Pierik, Marie J

    2016-09-15

    The management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has changed since the mid-1990s (e.g., use of thiopurines/anti-TNFα agents, improved surveillance programs), possibly affecting cancer risk. To establish current cancer risk in IBD, updates are warranted from cohorts covering this time span, and detailed enough to study associations with phenotype and medication. We studied intestinal-, extra-intestinal- and overall cancer risk in the Dutch population-based IBDSL cohort. In total, 1,157 Crohn's disease (CD) and 1,644 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were diagnosed between 1991 and 2011, and followed until 2013. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for CD and UC separately, as well as for gender-, phenotype-, disease duration-, diagnosis era- and medication groups. We found an increased risk for colorectal cancer in CD patients with colon involvement (SIR 2.97; 95% CI 1.08-6.46), but not in the total CD or UC population. In addition, CD patients were at increased risk for hematologic- (2.41; 1.04-4.76), overall skin- (1.55; 1.06-2.19), skin squamous cell- (SCC; 3.83; 1.83-7.04) and overall cancer (1.28; 1.01-1.60), whereas UC patients had no increased risk for extra-intestinal- and overall cancer. Finally, in a medication analysis on CD and UC together, long-term immunosuppression exposure (>12 months) was associated with an increased risk for hematologic cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, SCC and overall cancer, and this increase was mainly attributed to thiopurines. IBD patients with long-term immunosuppression exposure can be considered as having a higher cancer risk, and our data support the advice in recent IBD guidelines to consider skin cancer screening in these patients. PMID:27170593

  3. Establishment of invasive and non-invasive reporter systems to investigate American elm-Ophiostoma novo-ulmi interactions.

    PubMed

    Sherif, S; Jones, A M P; Shukla, M R; Saxena, P K

    2014-10-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by ascomycete fungi in the Ophiostoma genus, is the most devastating disease of American elm (Ulmus americana) trees. Cerato ulmin (CU), a hydrophobin secreted by the fungus, has been implicated in the development of DED, but its role in fungal pathogenicity and virulence remains uncertain and controversial. Here, we describe reporter systems based on the CU promoter and three reporter proteins (GFP, GUS and LUC), developed as research tools for quantitative and qualitative studies of DED in vitro, in vivo and in planta. A strain of the aggressive species Ophiostoma novo-ulmi was transformed with the reporter constructs using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and the fungal transformants, namely M75-GFP, M75-GUS and M75-LUC, were examined for mitotic stability after repeated subcultures. The intensity of GFP fluorescence was strong in M75-GFP spores and hyphae, allowing microscopic investigations of spore structure, fungal morphogenesis and fungal development. The interaction of M75-GFP and U. americana callus cells was explored with scanning laser confocal microscopy facilitating qualitative studies on fungal strategies for the invasion and penetration of elm cells. M75-GUS was generated to provide an invasive, yet quantitative approach to study fungal-plant interactions in vitro and in planta. The generation of M75-LUC transformants was aimed at providing a non-destructive quantitative approach to study the role of CU in vivo. The sensitivity, low background signal and linearity of LUC assays all predict a very reliable approach to investigate and re-test previously claimed roles of this CU in fungal pathogenicity. These reporter systems provide new tools to investigate plant-pathogen interactions in this complex pathosystem and may aid in better understanding the development of DED. PMID:25139300

  4. Inflation, employment, and the Dutch Disease in oil-exporting countries: a short-run disequilibrium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    van Wijnbergen, S.

    1984-05-01

    The author uses nontraded goods and labor shortages in the Gulf countries, the decline of the traded goods sector in oil producers (''Dutch Disease''), and the absence of employment benefits of higher oil revenues in Latin American oil producers. Higher oil revenues can be likened to a transfer putting pressure on non-oil traded (NT) goods prices and drawing resources out of the T sector. The slope of the wage indexation line determines whether classical unemployment or repressed inflation results. Various policy measures are analyzed. 3 references, 8 figures.

  5. A review of ELMs in divertor tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.N.

    1996-05-23

    This paper reviews what is known about edge localized modes (ELMs), with an emphasis on their effect on the scrape-off layer and divertor plasmas. ELM effects have been measured in the ASDEX-U, C-Mod, COMPASS-D, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M,JT-60U, and TCV tokamaks and are reported here. At least three types of ELMs have been identified and their salient features determined. Type-1 giant ELMs can cause the sudden loss of up to 10-15% of the plasma stored energy but their amplitude ({Delta}W/W) does not increase with increasing power. Type- 3 ELMs are observed near the H-mode power threshold and produce small energy dumps (1-3% of the stored energy). All ELMs increase the scrape- off layer plasma and produce particle fluxes on the divertor targets which are as much as ten times larger that the quiescent phase between ELMs. The divertor heat pulse is largest on the inner target, unlike that of L-Mode or quiescent H-mode; some tokamaks report radial structure in the heat flux profile which is suggestive of islands or helical structures. The power scaling of Type-1 ELM amplitude and frequency have been measured in several tokamaks and has recently been applied to predictions of the ELM Size in ITER. Concern over the expected ELM amplitude has led to a number of experiments aimed at demonstrating active control of ELMs. Impurity gas injection with feedback control on the radiation loss in ASDEX-U suggests that a promising mode of operation (the CDH-mode) with a very small type-3 ELMs can be maintained with heating power sell above the H-mode threshold, where giant type-1 ELMs can be maintained with heating power well above the H-mode threshold, where Giant type-1 ELMs are normally observed. While ELMs have many potential negative effects, the beneficial effect of ELMs in providing density control and limiting the core plasma impurity content in high confinement H- mode discharges should not be overlooked.

  6. Diseases of flounder ( Platichthys Flesus L.) in the Dutch Wadden Sea, and their relation to stress factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick Vethaak, A.

    In 1988 a survey was conducted on the occurrence of gross pathologies in flounder ( Platichthys flesus L.) in the Dutch Wadden Sea in relation to stress factors, especially near fresh-water drainage sluices. A total of 9608 flounder were collected from 16 sites in June and September. Diseases recorded were: skin ulcers (affecting 7.7% of fish); fin rot (2.8%; only included in the study in September); lymphocystis (3.7%); skeletal deformities (0.3%); liver nematode infections (5.0%); intestinal cysts of the parasite Glugea sp. (0.4%); and liver nodules (pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions) (< 0.1%). Prevalences of skin ulcers and fin rot in Wadden Sea flounder are considerably higher than in those captured off the Dutch North Sea coast or in the Elbe estuary in Germany. These high disease levels in the Wadden Sea, however, are largely due to extremely high prevalences of skin ulcers observed near the drainage sluices of Lake IJssel, indicating a localized effect. Fin rot occurs at relatively high prevalences over the whole study area, but the data should be interpreted with some caution, due to diagnostic problems. Associations with possible disease determinants were investigated and causal hypotheses formulated. In general fish seem to develop skin diseases at sites with strong salinity fluctuations. Nutritional deficiencies possibly related to strong salinity fluctuations, high bacterial loads in the environment and obstacles to fish migration through sluices are amongst the most likely factors determining the locally high levels of skin ulcers. Although not established, it is possible that pollution-related factors and contaminant bioavailability are important. The stress imposed by a combination of these factors may adversely affect the immune system, making the fish vulnerable to opportunistic bacterial infection.

  7. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta L E; van't Slot, Ruben; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P = 0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P = 3.6 × 10(-5), OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  8. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Slot, Ruben van't; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P=0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P=3.6 × 10−5, OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  9. Climate Change and Infectious Disease Risk in Western Europe: A Survey of Dutch Expert Opinion on Adaptation Responses and Actors

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Su-Mia; Martens, Pim; Huynen, Maud M.T.E.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence of climate change affecting infectious disease risk in Western Europe. The call for effective adaptation to this challenge becomes increasingly stronger. This paper presents the results of a survey exploring Dutch expert perspectives on adaptation responses to climate change impacts on infectious disease risk in Western Europe. Additionally, the survey explores the expert sample’s prioritization of mitigation and adaptation, and expert views on the willingness and capacity of relevant actors to respond to climate change. An integrated view on the causation of infectious disease risk is employed, including multiple (climatic and non-climatic) factors. The results show that the experts consider some adaptation responses as relatively more cost-effective, like fostering interagency and community partnerships, or beneficial to health, such as outbreak investigation and response. Expert opinions converge and diverge for different adaptation responses. Regarding the prioritization of mitigation and adaptation responses expert perspectives converge towards a 50/50 budgetary allocation. The experts consider the national government/health authority as the most capable actor to respond to climate change-induced infectious disease risk. Divergence and consensus among expert opinions can influence adaptation policy processes. Further research is necessary to uncover prevailing expert perspectives and their roots, and compare these. PMID:26295247

  10. Climate Change and Infectious Disease Risk in Western Europe: A Survey of Dutch Expert Opinion on Adaptation Responses and Actors.

    PubMed

    Akin, Su-Mia; Martens, Pim; Huynen, Maud M T E

    2015-08-01

    There is growing evidence of climate change affecting infectious disease risk in Western Europe. The call for effective adaptation to this challenge becomes increasingly stronger. This paper presents the results of a survey exploring Dutch expert perspectives on adaptation responses to climate change impacts on infectious disease risk in Western Europe. Additionally, the survey explores the expert sample's prioritization of mitigation and adaptation, and expert views on the willingness and capacity of relevant actors to respond to climate change. An integrated view on the causation of infectious disease risk is employed, including multiple (climatic and non-climatic) factors. The results show that the experts consider some adaptation responses as relatively more cost-effective, like fostering interagency and community partnerships, or beneficial to health, such as outbreak investigation and response. Expert opinions converge and diverge for different adaptation responses. Regarding the prioritization of mitigation and adaptation responses expert perspectives converge towards a 50/50 budgetary allocation. The experts consider the national government/health authority as the most capable actor to respond to climate change-induced infectious disease risk. Divergence and consensus among expert opinions can influence adaptation policy processes. Further research is necessary to uncover prevailing expert perspectives and their roots, and compare these. PMID:26295247

  11. Modelling of edge localised modes and edge localised mode control [Modelling of ELMs and ELM control

    SciTech Connect

    Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Chang, C. S.; Ferraro, N.; Sugiyama, L.; Waelbroeck, F.; Xu, X. Q.; Loarte, A.; Futatani, S.

    2015-02-07

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in ITER Q = 10 H-mode plasmas are likely to lead to large transient heat loads to the divertor. In order to avoid an ELM induced reduction of the divertor lifetime, the large ELM energy losses need to be controlled. In ITER, ELM control is foreseen using magnetic field perturbations created by in-vessel coils and the injection of small D2 pellets. ITER plasmas are characterised by low collisionality at a high density (high fraction of the Greenwald density limit). These parameters cannot simultaneously be achieved in current experiments. Thus, the extrapolation of the ELM properties and the requirements for ELM control in ITER relies on the development of validated physics models and numerical simulations. Here, we describe the modelling of ELMs and ELM control methods in ITER. The aim of this paper is not a complete review on the subject of ELM and ELM control modelling but rather to describe the current status and discuss open issues.

  12. Modelling of edge localised modes and edge localised mode control [Modelling of ELMs and ELM control

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Chang, C. S.; Ferraro, N.; Sugiyama, L.; Waelbroeck, F.; Xu, X. Q.; Loarte, A.; Futatani, S.

    2015-02-07

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) in ITER Q = 10 H-mode plasmas are likely to lead to large transient heat loads to the divertor. In order to avoid an ELM induced reduction of the divertor lifetime, the large ELM energy losses need to be controlled. In ITER, ELM control is foreseen using magnetic field perturbations created by in-vessel coils and the injection of small D2 pellets. ITER plasmas are characterised by low collisionality at a high density (high fraction of the Greenwald density limit). These parameters cannot simultaneously be achieved in current experiments. Thus, the extrapolation of the ELM properties andmore » the requirements for ELM control in ITER relies on the development of validated physics models and numerical simulations. Here, we describe the modelling of ELMs and ELM control methods in ITER. The aim of this paper is not a complete review on the subject of ELM and ELM control modelling but rather to describe the current status and discuss open issues.« less

  13. Study of the ELM fluctuation characteristics during the mitigation of type-I ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Classen, I. G. J.; Boom, J. E.; Donné, A. J. H.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Viezzer, E.; Schneider, P.; Manz, P.; Suttrop, W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2015-08-01

    Transitions from type-I to small edge localized modes (ELMs) and back are studied using the electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) diagnostic on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG). ECEI measurements show that the average poloidal velocity of temperature fluctuations of both type-I ELM onsets and small ELMs is the same and is close to 5-6 km s-1. Radially, the temperature fluctuations are distributed in the same narrow 2 cm region between 0.975≤slant {ρ\\text{pol}}≤slant 1.025 with associated poloidal mode numbers m=96+/- 18 and toroidal mode numbers n=16+/- 4 . The observed fluctuations related to both type-I ELMs and small ELMs vary over the transition simultaneously, however, showing slightly different behaviour. The similarities between type-I ELMs and small ELMs observed via AUG suggest that they have the same nature and evolve together. In the transition phase a temperature fluctuation mode (‘inter-ELM mode’) appears, which becomes continuous in the mitigated ELM phase and might cause the ELM mitigation. The mode characteristics (velocity, frequency and wave number) obtained in the analysis can be further used for direct comparison in various code simulations.

  14. 'A necessary evil that does not "really" cure disease': The domestication of biomedicine by Dutch holistic general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Raaphorst, Nadine; Houtman, Dick

    2016-05-01

    Against the background of studies about the domestication of complementary and alternative medicine into biomedical settings, this article studies how biomedicine is integrated into holistic settings. Data from 19 in-depth interviews with Dutch holistic general practitioners who combine complementary and alternative medicine with conventional treatments demonstrate that they do not believe that conventional biomedicine 'really' cures patients. They feel that it merely suppresses the physical symptoms of a disease, leaving the more fundamental and non-physical causes intact. As a consequence, they use conventional biomedicine for strictly practical and instrumental reasons. This is the case in life-threatening or acute situations, understood as non-physical causes of disease having been left untreated with complementary and alternative medicine for too long. More mundane reasons for its use are the need to take patients' demands for biomedical treatment seriously or to obey authoritative rules, regulations and protocols. The integration of biomedicine into complementary and alternative medicine, then, follows the same logic of domestication of complementary and alternative medicine into biomedicine: it is made subordinate to the prevailing model of health and illness and treated as a practical add-on that does not 'really' cure people. PMID:25944912

  15. Rabies in the Dutch East Indies a century ago - a spatio-temporal case study in disease emergence.

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael P

    2014-04-01

    Rabies continues to spread through the Indonesian archipelago. During the past 20 years, several islands - including Flores, Ambon and Bali - that had historically been free of rabies have become infected. However, the Dutch East Indies (a Dutch colony that became modern Indonesia following World War II) had been infected since the 1880s. The spread of rabies is a lesson in the emergence of an infectious disease. Reports of human cases treated for rabies and livestock rabies cases from the 1880s to 1917 were compiled. The spatial and temporal distribution of these cases was analyzed using maps, spatial statistics and time-series techniques. The first confirmed case of rabies was reported in 1889 from the Batavia [Jakarta] district (although disease suspicion was reported as early as 1884). During the 1890s rabies was already commonly reported from Java and the east coast of Sumatra, and by the late 1890s, from Celebes [Sulawesi]. Between 1900 and 1916, cases were reported from other parts of Java, Sumatra and Sulawesi, and from Borneo, the Moluccas and other outlying islands. Between 1897 and 1916, a total of 8826 human cases treated for rabies were reported and between 1908 and 1917, 1033 livestock cases were reported. Most (97.5%) human cases treated were attributed to rabid dogs. Increasing numbers of reports were observed during the period. Between 1908 and 1916 the correlation between human and livestock case reports was 64.2%, and at the district level it was 75.9%. Moderate correlations (>40%) were found between human cases and livestock cases reported up to six months previously. Based on year of first report from each district, human cases were strongly clustered (Moran's autocorrelation 0.47, P=0.005). The most likely spatio-temporal cluster of reported cases of humans treated for rabies originated from the west coast of Sumatra between 1899 and 1905, and other clusters were identified in west Java (1898-1899), the district of Batavia and in east Java

  16. Spoken Dutch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Leonard

    This course in spoken Dutch is intended for use in introductory conversational classes. The book is divided into five major parts, each containing five learning units and one unit devoted to review. Each unit contains sections including (1) basic sentences, (2) word study and review of basic sentences, (3) listening comprehension, and (4)…

  17. Reduction of ELM energy loss by pellet injection for ELM pacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, N.; Aiba, N.; Takizuka, T.; Oyama, N.

    2013-12-01

    The energy loss caused by the edge-localized mode (ELM) needs to be reduced for ITER operations with ELMy H-mode plasmas. The reduction in ELM energy loss by pellet injection for ELM pacing is studied by an integrated core/scrape-off layer/divertor transport code TOPICS-IB with a magnetohydrodynamic stability code and a pellet model taking account of the E × B drift of the pellet plasma cloud. It is found that the energy loss can be significantly reduced by a pellet injected to the pedestal plasma equivalent to that at the middle timing in the natural ELM cycle, whose pressure height is only about 5% lower than that of the natural ELM onset. In this case, pellet injection from the low-field side enables a small pellet, with about 1-2% of pedestal particle content and a speed high enough to approach the pedestal top, to reduce the energy loss significantly. With the above suitable conditions for ELM pacing, a pellet penetrates deep into the pedestal and triggers high-n ballooning modes with localized eigenfunctions near the pedestal top, where n is the toroidal mode number. Under suitable conditions, ELM pacing with reduced energy loss is successfully demonstrated in simulations, in which the gas puff reduction and the enhancement of divertor pumping can compensate for the core density increase due to additional particle fuelling by the pacing pellet.

  18. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELM CITY PLANT (A. FRANCIS WALKER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF ELM CITY PLANT (A. FRANCIS WALKER, 1905-07) FROM SECOND AVENUE ON OPPOSITE SIDE OF ENTRANCE. THIS STRUCTURE WAS ORIGINALLY BUILT AS THE ELM CITY COTTON MILL OF CALLAWAY MILLS. NOTE RESERVOIR IN FOREGROUND. THIS PHOTOGRAPH IS THE LEFT SIDE OF A PANORAMA VIEW THAT INCLUDES HAER Nos. GA-128-2 AND GA-128-3. - Elm City Cotton Mill, 1000 Elm Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  19. 2. CENTER PORTION OF PANORAMA VIEW OF REAR OF ELM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CENTER PORTION OF PANORAMA VIEW OF REAR OF ELM CITY PLANT FROM SECOND AVENUE. NOTE ORIGINAL WATER TANK TOWER IN CENTER AND NEWER ADDITIONS TO THIS STILL OPERATIONAL TEXTILE MILL. - Elm City Cotton Mill, 1000 Elm Street, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  20. ELMs and the H-Mode Pedestal in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, R; Sabbagh, S; Bush, C; Fredrickson, E; Menard, J; Stutman, D; Tritz, K; Bell, M; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Gates, D; Johnson, D; Kaita, R; Kaye, S; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T

    2004-06-04

    We report on the behavior of ELMs in NBI-heated H-mode plasmas in NSTX. It is observed that the size of Type I ELMs, characterized by the change in plasma energy, decreases with increasing density, as observed at conventional aspect ratio. It is also observed that the Type I ELM size decreases as the plasma equilibrium is shifted from a symmetric double-null toward a lower single-null configuration. Type III ELMs have also been observed in NSTX, as well as a high-performance regime with small ELMs which we designate Type V. These Type V ELMs are consistent with high bootstrap current operation and density approaching Greenwald scaling. The Type V ELMs are characterized by an intermittent n=1 MHD mode rotating counter to the plasma current. Without active pumping, the density rises continuously through the Type V phase. However, efficient in-vessel pumping should allow density control, based on particle containment time estimates.

  1. ELMs and the H-mode Pedestal in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Maingi; S.A. Sabbagh; C.E. Bush; E.D. Fredrickson; J.E. Menard; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.A. Boedo; D.A. Gates; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; D. Mueller; R. Raman; A.L. Roquemore; V.A. Soukhanovskii; T. Stevenson

    2004-07-16

    We report on the behavior of ELMs in NBI-heated H-mode plasmas in NSTX. It is observed that the size of Type I ELMs, characterized by the change in plasma energy, decreases with increasing density, as observed at conventional aspect ratio. It is also observed that the Type I ELM size decreases as the plasma equilibrium is shifted from a symmetric double-null toward a lower single-null configuration. Type III ELMs have also been observed in NSTX, as well as a high-performance regime with small ELMs which we designate Type V. These Type V ELMs are consistent with high bootstrap current operation and density approaching Greenwald scaling. The Type V ELMs are characterized by an intermittent n=1 MHD mode rotating counter to the plasma current. Without active pumping, the density rises continuously through the Type V phase. However, efficient in-vessel pumping should allow density control, based on particle containment time estimates.

  2. Disease prevalence in flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Dutch Wadden Sea as indicator of environmental quality: A summary of 1988-2005 surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vethaak, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 1988, epizootics of ulcer disease in the flatfish flounder in the Dutch Wadden Sea were reported near freshwater drainage sluices of IJsselmeer Lake, locally affecting up to 38.9% of fish. Other diseases such as fin rot and lymphocystis were less frequent, but followed a similar pattern. Results of follow-up surveys in the Wadden Sea in 1994-2005 confirm previous findings and also show significantly elevated ulcer prevalences at other smaller drainage works. The most likely stress factors that contributed to the development of the epizootics at these sites include osmotic stress, adverse water quality conditions including chemical contaminants, nutritional deficiencies, and obstruction to fish migration. It was shown that discharges of IJsselmeer Lake freshwater in 1988-96 had a wide effect on the prevalence and distribution of ulcers and lymphocystis in the western Wadden Sea. A general reduction in disease prevalence in flounder in the entire Dutch Wadden Sea was observed during 1988-2005, which was most likely due to a general improvement in water quality and locally improved habitat conditions for flounder near drainage sluices. Ulcer prevalences outside the two IJsselmeer Lake sluices (Den Oever and Kornwerderzand) declined in this period from approximately 30% to 10% for medium-sized fish. Other skin diseases have also displayed a downward trend at both sites in recent years, with prevalences falling sharply to below 1%. Elsewhere in the Wadden Sea and the Ems-Dollard estuary, disease prevalences have declined towards natural background levels (< 1%). It is concluded that skin diseases, especially ulcers, are useful indicators of environmental quality in the Wadden Sea.

  3. Construct Validity of the Dutch Version of the 12-Item Partners in Health Scale: Measuring Patient Self-Management Behaviour and Knowledge in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lenferink, Anke; Effing, Tanja; Harvey, Peter; Battersby, Malcolm; Frith, Peter; van Beurden, Wendy; van der Palen, Job; Paap, Muirne C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The 12-item Partners in Health scale (PIH) was developed in Australia to measure self-management behaviour and knowledge in patients with chronic diseases, and has undergone several changes. Our aim was to assess the construct validity and reliability of the latest PIH version in Dutch COPD patients. Methods The 12 items of the PIH, scored on a self-rated 9-point Likert scale, are used to calculate total and subscale scores (knowledge; coping; recognition and management of symptoms; and adherence to treatment). We used forward-backward translation of the latest version of the Australian PIH to define a Dutch PIH (PIH(Du)). Mokken Scale Analysis and common Factor Analysis were performed on data from a Dutch COPD sample to investigate the psychometric properties of the Dutch PIH; and to determine whether the four-subscale solution previously found for the original Australian PIH could be replicated for the Dutch PIH. Results Two subscales were found for the Dutch PIH data (n = 118); 1) knowledge and coping; 2) recognition and management of symptoms, adherence to treatment. The correlation between the two Dutch subscales was 0.43. The lower-bound of the reliability of the total scale equalled 0.84. Factor analysis indicated that the first two factors explained a larger percentage of common variance (39.4% and 19.9%) than could be expected when using random data (17.5% and 15.1%). Conclusion We recommend using two PIH subscale scores when assessing self-management in Dutch COPD patients. Our results did not support the four-subscale structure as previously reported for the original Australian PIH. PMID:27564410

  4. Edge Localised Modes (ELMs): Experiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J. W.; Kirk, A.

    2008-05-14

    Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) are periodic disturbances of the plasma periphery occurring in tokamaks with an H-mode edge transport barrier. As a result, a fraction of the plasma energy present in the confined hot edge plasma is transferred to the open field lines in the divertor region, ultimately appearing at the divertor target plates. These events can result in high transient heat loads being deposited on the divertor target plates in large tokamaks, potentially causing damage in devices such as ITER. Consequently it is important to find means to mitigate their effects, either avoiding them or, at least, controlling them. This in turn means it is essential to understand the physics causing ELMs so that appropriate steps can be taken. It is generally agreed that ELMs originate as MHD instability caused by the steep plasma pressure gradients or edge plasma current present in H-mode, the so-called 'peeling-ballooning' model. Normally this is considered to be an ideal MHD instability but resistivity may be involved. Much less clear is the non-linear evolution of these instabilities and the mechanisms by which the confined edge plasma is transferred to the divertor plasma. There is evidence for the non-linear development of 'filamentary' structures predicted by theory, but the reconnection processes by which these are detached from the plasma core remain uncertain. In this paper the experimental and theoretical evidence for the peeling-ballooning model is presented, drawing data from a number of tokamaks, e.g. JET, DIII-D, ASDEX-Upgrade, MAST etc. Some theoretical models for the non-linear evolution of ELMs are discussed; as well as ones related to the 'peeling-ballooning' model, other candidate models for the ELM cycle are mentioned. The consequential heat loads on divertor target plates are discussed. Based on our current understanding of the physics of ELMs, means to avoid them, or mitigate their consequences, are described, e.g. the use of plasma shaping or

  5. Toward integrated multi-scale simulations for a full ELM cycle with ELM dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xueqiao

    2015-11-01

    The high-fidelity BOUT + + two-fluid and Gyro-Landau-Fluid code suites have demonstrated significant recent progresses toward integrated multi-scale simulations for a full ELM cycle with ELM dynamics. In order to improve the computational efficiency for a full ELM cycle with ELM dynamics, the basic set of dynamical equations has been separated into equations in the fluctuating and averaged parts over binormal direction. The two parts are advanced together in time but with different time steps, and dynamically exchange the turbulence fluxes and averaged profiles. Nonlinear ELM simulations show three stages of an ELM event: (1) a linear growing phase; (2) a fast crash phase; and (3) a slow inward propagation phase lasting until the core heating flux balances the ELM energy loss and the ELM is terminated. To better understand the inter-ELM pedestal dynamics during the pedestal recovery, BOUT + + simulations started from a kinetic equilibrium reconstruction using measured plasma profiles from DIII-D show that quasi-coherent fluctuations (QCFs) can provide the necessary transport to limit and saturate the H-mode pedestal gradient. The simulations predict that (1) QCFs are localized in the pedestal region as observed on DIII-D; (2) the QCFs are near marginal instability for ideal ballooning modes combined with drift-Alfven wave modes; (3) the dominant mode is around n =15, kθρi = 0.034, comparable to the measured value of 0.04; (4) the frequency of the mode is around 80kHz, close to that of the measured QCF; and (5) particle transport is smaller than the heat transport. BOUT + + simulations have also been performed to elucidate the nature and underlying physics mechanisms of the weakly-quasi-coherent mode (WCM) with higher collisionality, which causes particle transport in I-mode pedestals of Alcator C-Mod. Key simulation results are that (1) there is no ideal peeling-ballooning mode instability for the I-mode studied; (2) a strong instability exists at n >= 20; (3

  6. Patterns of Hybridization and Introgression Between Invasive Ulmus Pumila (Ulmaceae) and Native U. Rubra

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ulmus pumila (Siberian elm) is an invasive elm species, non-native to the United States, which hybridizes with Ulmus rubra (red elm), a U.S. native. While Siberian elm is highly tolerant to Dutch elm disease (DED), red elm populations in North America have been strongly affected by DED. Putative p...

  7. Advances in understanding and utilising ELM control in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; de la Luna, E.; Lang, P. T.; Liang, Y.; Alper, B.; Denner, P.; Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Ham, C. J.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Jachmich, S.; Kocsis, G.; Lennholm, M.; Lupelli, I.; Rimini, F. G.; Sips, A. C. C.; Contributors, JET

    2016-01-01

    Edge localised mode (ELM) control may be essential to develop ITER scenarios with a reasonable lifetime of divertor components, whilst ELM pacing may be essential to develop stationary ITER scenarios with a tungsten divertor. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) have mitigated ELMs in high collisionality plasmas in JET. The efficacy of RMPs in mitigating the ELMs is found to depend on plasma shaping, with the change in magnetic boundary achieved when non-axisymmetric fields are applied facilitating access to small ELM regimes. The understanding of ELM pacing by vertical kicks or pellets has also been improved in a range of pedestal conditions in JET ({{T}\\text{ped}}=0.7 –1.3 keV) encompassing the ITER-expected domain ({β\\text{N}}=1.4 –2.4, H 98(y, 2)  =  0.8–1.2, {{f}\\text{GW}}∼ 0.7 ). ELM triggering is reliable provided the perturbation is above a threshold which depends on pedestal parameters. ELM triggering is achieved even in the first 10% of the natural ELM cycle suggesting no inherent maximum frequency. At high normalised pressure, the peeling-ballooning modes are stabilised as predicted by ELITE, necessitating a larger perturbation from either kicks or pellets in order to trigger ELMs. Both kicks and pellets have been used to pace ELMs for tungsten flushing. This has allowed stationary plasma conditions with low gas injection in plasmas where the natural ELM frequency is such that it would normally preclude stationary conditions.

  8. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling.

    PubMed

    Budiman, Arif; Fanany, Mohamad Ivan; Basaruddin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM) and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM) by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM). It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER) and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect "underfitting" condition. PMID:27594879

  9. Adaptive Online Sequential ELM for Concept Drift Tackling

    PubMed Central

    Basaruddin, Chan

    2016-01-01

    A machine learning method needs to adapt to over time changes in the environment. Such changes are known as concept drift. In this paper, we propose concept drift tackling method as an enhancement of Online Sequential Extreme Learning Machine (OS-ELM) and Constructive Enhancement OS-ELM (CEOS-ELM) by adding adaptive capability for classification and regression problem. The scheme is named as adaptive OS-ELM (AOS-ELM). It is a single classifier scheme that works well to handle real drift, virtual drift, and hybrid drift. The AOS-ELM also works well for sudden drift and recurrent context change type. The scheme is a simple unified method implemented in simple lines of code. We evaluated AOS-ELM on regression and classification problem by using concept drift public data set (SEA and STAGGER) and other public data sets such as MNIST, USPS, and IDS. Experiments show that our method gives higher kappa value compared to the multiclassifier ELM ensemble. Even though AOS-ELM in practice does not need hidden nodes increase, we address some issues related to the increasing of the hidden nodes such as error condition and rank values. We propose taking the rank of the pseudoinverse matrix as an indicator parameter to detect “underfitting” condition. PMID:27594879

  10. [Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in the mentally retarded: guidelines of a multidisciplinary consensus work group. Dutch Association of Physicians in Care of Mentally Handicapped].

    PubMed

    Gimbel, H

    2000-06-10

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is more frequent among people with intellectual disability than among the intellectually normal population. Also GORD is more serious in this population. The diagnosis is often missed, because most intellectually disabled cannot express their complaints of GORD. For that reason a multidisciplinary working group of the Dutch Association of physicians active in the care of persons with a mental handicap has developed guidelines. The working group recommends endoscopy in case of a (alarm) symptoms: haematemesis, prolonged vomiting, irondeficiency anaemia e.c.i., and a 24 hour oesophageal pH test in case of b (aspecific) symptoms: recurrent pneumonia, refusal of food, regurgitation, rumination, dental erosions. In general most patients are cured with drug treatment (omeprazol or another proton pump inhibitor). If symptoms are not improved after 6 months of optimal treatment, surgical treatment may be considered. PMID:10876695

  11. Psychometric validation of the Dutch translation of the quality of life in reflux and dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire is one of the best-characterized disease-specific instruments that captures health-related problems and symptom-patterns in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This paper reports the psychometric validation of a Dutch translation of the QOLRAD questionnaire in gastroenterology outpatients with GERD. Methods Patients completed the QOLRAD questionnaire at visit 1 (baseline), visit 2 (after 2, 4 or 8 weeks of acute treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg once daily), and visit 4 (after 6 months with on-demand esomeprazole 40 mg once daily or continuous esomeprazole 20 mg once daily). Symptoms were assessed at each visit, and patient satisfaction was assessed at visits 2 and 4. Results Of the 1166 patients entered in the study, 97.3% had moderate or severe heartburn and 55.5% had moderate or severe regurgitation at baseline. At visit 2, symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation were mild or absent in 96.7% and 97.7%, respectively, and 95.3% of patients reported being satisfied with the treatment. The internal consistency and reliability of the QOLRAD questionnaire (range: 0.83-0.92) supported construct validity. Convergent validity was moderate to low. Known-groups validity was confirmed by a negative correlation between the QOLRAD score and clinician-assessed severity of GERD symptoms. Effect sizes (1.15-1.93) and standardized response means (1.17-1.86) showed good responsiveness to change. GERD symptoms had a negative impact on patients' lives. Conclusions The psychometric characteristics of the Dutch translation of the QOLRAD questionnaire were found to be satisfactory, with good reliability and responsiveness to change, although convergent validity was at best moderate. PMID:20716328

  12. ELM control strategies and tools: status and potential for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, P. T.; Loarte, A.; Saibene, G.; Baylor, L. R.; Becoulet, M.; Cavinato, M.; Clement-Lorenzo, S.; Daly, E.; Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Gribov, Y.; Horton, L. D.; Lowry, C.; Martin, Y.; Neubauer, O.; Oyama, N.; Schaffer, M. J.; Stork, D.; Suttrop, W.; Thomas, P.; Tran, M.; Wilson, H. R.; Kavin, A.; Schmitz, O.

    2013-04-01

    Operating ITER in the reference inductive scenario at the design values of Ip = 15 MA and QDT = 10 requires the achievement of good H-mode confinement that relies on the presence of an edge transport barrier whose pedestal pressure height is key to plasma performance. Strong gradients occur at the edge in such conditions that can drive magnetohydrodynamic instabilities resulting in edge localized modes (ELMs), which produce a rapid energy loss from the pedestal region to the plasma facing components (PFC). Without appropriate control, the heat loads on PFCs during ELMs in ITER are expected to become significant for operation in H-mode at Ip = 6-9 MA operation at higher plasma currents would result in a very reduced life time of the PFCs. Currently, several options are being considered for the achievement of the required level of ELM control in ITER; this includes operation in plasma regimes which naturally have no or very small ELMs, decreasing the ELM energy loss by increasing their frequency by a factor of up to 30 and avoidance of ELMs by actively controlling the edge with magnetic perturbations. Small/no ELM regimes obtained by influencing the edge stability (by plasma shaping, rotational shear control, etc) have shown in present experiments a significant reduction of the ELM heat fluxes compared to type-I ELMs. However, so far they have only been observed under a limited range of pedestal conditions depending on each specific device and their extrapolation to ITER remains uncertain. ELM control by increasing their frequency relies on the controlled triggering of the edge instability leading to the ELM. This has been presently demonstrated with the injection of pellets and with plasma vertical movements; pellets having provided the results more promising for application in ITER conditions. ELM avoidance/suppression takes advantage of the fact that relatively small changes in the pedestal plasma and magnetic field parameters seem to have a large stabilizing

  13. ELM-Induced Plasma Wall Interactions in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Rudakov, D L; Boedo, J A; Yu, J H; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Hollmann, E M; Lasnier, C J; McLean, A G; Moyer, R A; Stangeby, P C; Tynan, G R; Wampler, W R; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Wong, C C; Zeng, L; Bastasz, R J; Buchenauer, D; Whaley, J

    2008-05-14

    Intense transient fluxes of particles and heat to the main chamber components induced by edge localized modes (ELMs) are of serious concern for ITER. In DIII-D, plasma interaction with the outboard chamber wall is studied using Langmuir probes and optical diagnostics including a fast framing camera. Camera data shows that ELMs feature helical filamentary structures localized at the low field side of the plasma and aligned with the local magnetic field. During the nonlinear phase of an ELM, multiple filaments are ejected from the plasma edge and propagate towards the outboard wall with velocities of 0.5-0.7 km/s. When reaching the wall, filaments result in 'hot spots'--regions of local intense plasma-material interaction (PMI) where the peak incident particle and heat fluxes are up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those between ELMs. This interaction pattern has a complicated geometry and is neither toroidally nor poloidally symmetric. In low density/collisionality H-mode discharges, PMI at the outboard wall is almost entirely due to ELMs. In high density/collisionality discharges, contributions of ELMs and inter-ELM periods to PMI at the wall are comparable. A Midplane Material Evaluation Station (MiMES) has been recently installed in order to conduct in situ measurements of erosion/redeposition at the outboard chamber wall, including those caused by ELMs.

  14. Translation, validation, and norming of the Dutch language version of the SF-36 Health Survey in community and chronic disease populations.

    PubMed

    Aaronson, N K; Muller, M; Cohen, P D; Essink-Bot, M L; Fekkes, M; Sanderman, R; Sprangers, M A; te Velde, A; Verrips, E

    1998-11-01

    The primary objectives of this research were to translate, validate, and generate normative data on the SF-36 Health Survey for use among Dutch-speaking residents of the Netherlands. Translation of the SF-36 into Dutch followed the stepwise, iterative procedures developed by the IQOLA Project. Following extensive pilot testing, the SF-36 was administered to: (1) a random sample of adult residents of Amsterdam (n = 4172); (2) a random, nationwide sample of adults (n = 1742); (3) a sample of migraine sufferers (n = 423); and (4) a sample of cancer patients undergoing active anti-neoplastic treatment (n = 485). Data quality across the four studies was consistently high. The rates of missing data ranged from 1% to 5% at the item level, and from 1.2% to 2.6% at the scale level. Multitrait scaling analysis confirmed the hypothesized scale structure of the SF-36 and associated scale scoring in all four samples. Cronbach's alpha coefficients surpassed the 0.70 criterion for group comparisons in all but one case (the Social Functioning scale in the cancer sample), with a mean alpha coefficient across all scales and samples of 0.84. Known-group comparisons yielded consistent support for the validity of the SF-36. In the two community samples, statistically significant differences in SF-36 mean scale scores were observed as a function of age, gender, and the prevalence of chronic health conditions. In the migraine and cancer samples, mean SF-36 scale scores varied significantly as a function of various indicators of disease severity. The SF-36 profiles for the two community samples were highly similar. The cancer sample yielded the lowest SF-36 scores, with the migraine sample holding an intermediate position. On-going studies will generate data on the responsiveness of the SF-36 to within-group changes in health over time. Efforts are underway to translate and validate the questionnaire for use among ethnic minority groups in the Netherlands. PMID:9817123

  15. Microsatellite loci development for red elm (Ulmus rubra Muhl.) and cross-species amplification with Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ulmus pumila is an elm species, non-native to the United States which hybridizes with Ulmus rubra. In order to study the genetic structure and hybridization patterns between these two elm species, we developed fifteen primer pairs for microsatellite loci in U. rubra and tested their cross-amplifica...

  16. Dutch surgery in Japan.

    PubMed

    van Gulik, Thomas M; Nimura, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    An isolation policy was adopted in feudal Japan from 1639 to 1853 owing to the fear of foreign influence. During those 200 years of isolation, all foreigners were withheld from the country with the exception of the Dutch, who were permitted to establish a trading post on a small island in the Bay of Nagasaki, called Decima. Western culture and science reached the Japanese exclusively through the Dutch on Decima. Health care on Decima was provided by Dutch barber-surgeons, who introduced Western surgical practice in Japan. Official interpreters were the only Japanese allowed on Decima. It was from among these interpreters that the first Japanese surgeons arose who, having mastered the Dutch language, translated several Dutch anatomic and surgical texts. Genpaku Sugita translated a Dutch anatomy textbook into Japanese, which was completed in 1774. This book, entitled Kaitai Shinsho [New Book on Anatomy], was the first Western scientific monograph to be translated entirely into Japanese. Several Dutch surgical schools were founded through which Dutch surgery, known in Japan as "surgery of the red-haired" was propagated. According to the custom of the surgical guilds in Holland, certificates were granted to Japanese apprentices who had completed their training in Dutch surgery. About 60 Dutch surgeons had served on Decima up to 1850, providing the basis for surgery to develop in Japan. Among them, Philipp Franz von Siebold was an exceptional scholar who also had a great impact in making Japanese culture known to the Western world. PMID:15599736

  17. The ELM Survey. VI. Eleven New Double Degenerates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianninas, A.; Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Canton, Paul; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2015-10-01

    We present the discovery of 11 new double degenerate systems containing extremely low-mass white dwarfs (ELM WDs). Our radial velocity observations confirm that all of the targets have orbital periods ≤slant 1 day. We perform spectroscopic fits and provide a complete set of physical and binary parameters. We review and compare recent evolutionary calculations and estimate that the systematic uncertainty in our mass determinations due to differences in the evolutionary models is small (≈ 0.01 M⊙). Five of the new systems will merge due to gravitational wave radiation within a Hubble time, bringing the total number of merger systems found in the ELM Survey to 38. We examine the ensemble properties of the current sample of ELM WD binaries, including the period distribution as a function of effective temperature, and the implications for the future evolution of these systems. We also revisit the empirical boundaries of instability strip of ELM WDs and identify new pulsating ELM WD candidates. Finally, we consider the kinematic properties of our sample of ELM WDs and estimate that a significant fraction of the WDs from the ELM Survey are members of the Galactic halo. Based on observations obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  18. Patterns of ELM impacts on the JET wall components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Sarazin, Y.; Bécoulet, M.; Huysmans, G.; Benkadda, S.; Beyer, P.; Figarella, C.; Garbet, X.; Monier-Garbet, P.; JET Team

    2003-03-01

    Numerical analysis of the images in visible light from the JET tangential camera show that the edge localised mode (ELM) events are characterised by impacts on the low-field side components. The increase of emission is not restricted to the components closest to the plasma. One finds also that the deposition on the low-field side components does not exhibit any poloidal or toroidal symmetry and varies from ELM to ELM. Conversely the increase of emission on the divertor baffles, or the top protection tiles, is close to axisymmetric.

  19. Numerical Modelling of the Nonlinear ELM Cycle in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, A; Evans, T E; Lasnier, C J; Spatschek, K H

    2009-06-02

    A numerical model of the nonlinear evolution of edge localized modes (ELMs) in tokmaks is presented. In the model discussed here it is assumed that thermoelectric currents flow in short connection length flux tubes, initially established by error fields or other non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations. Magnetic perturbations resulting from the currents are incorporated into the magnetic topology. The predictions are compared to measurements at the DIII-D tokamak. Excellent agreement between the calculated magnetic structures on the vessel wall and camera observations during an ELM cycle is shown. The ELM collapse process is discussed.

  20. First Observation Of ELM Pacing With Vertical Jogs In A Spherical Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S P; Canik, J M; Maingi, R; Bell, R; Gates, d; Goldston, R; Hawryluk, R; Le Blanc, B P; Menard, J; Sontag, A C; Sabbagh, S

    2010-07-15

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies. __________________________________________________

  1. Pheromone Chemistry of the Smaller European Elm Bark Beetle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Keith

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the aggregation pheromone of the smaller European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), with emphasis on information that could be used in the classroom as a practical application of organic chemistry. (Author/GA)

  2. Comparison of ELM heat loads in snowflake and standard divertors

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T D; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D; Umansky, M V

    2012-05-08

    An analysis is given of the impact of the tokamak divertor magnetic structure on the temporal and spatial divertor heat flux from edge localized modes (ELMs). Two configurations are studied: the standard divertor where the poloidal magnetic field (B{sub p}) varies linearly with distance (r) from the magnetic null and the snowflake where B{sub p} varies quadratrically with r. Both one and two-dimensional models are used to analyze the effect of the longer magnetic field length between the midplane and the divertor plate for the snowflake that causes a temporal dilation of the ELM divertor heat flux. A second effect discussed is the appearance of a broad region near the null point where the poloidal plasma beta can substantially exceed unity, especially for the snowflake configuration during the ELM; such a condition is likely to drive additional radial ELM transport.

  3. 46. VIEW LOOKING EAST FROM THE OLMSTED ELM IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. VIEW LOOKING EAST FROM THE OLMSTED ELM IN THE SOUTH LAWN TO THE ROCK GARDEN. (NOTE: HISTORIC ENGLISH YEW ON RIGHT, CRAB APPLE IN CENTER VIEW). - Fairsted, 99 Warren Street, Brookline, Norfolk County, MA

  4. VIEW OF ELM DRIVE WITH FACILITY 708 ON LEFT. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM DRIVE WITH FACILITY 708 ON LEFT. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. VIEW OF ELM DRIVE WITH NORFOLK PINE ON RIGHT. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM DRIVE WITH NORFOLK PINE ON RIGHT. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. Resistance to Antibiotics and Antifungal Medicinal Products: Can Complementary and Alternative Medicine Help Solve the Problem in Common Infection Diseases? The Introduction of a Dutch Research Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Esther T.; Jong, Miek C.; Gravendeel, Barbara; Van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Baars, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    The increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, rising numbers of deaths and costs associated with this, and the fact that hardly any new antimicrobial drugs have been developed during the last decade have increased the interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapeutic interventions, if proven safe and effective. Observational studies on clinical CAM practices demonstrate positive effects of treatment of infections with CAM therapies (clinical effects, patient satisfaction) in combination with small percentages of antibiotics prescription. However, Cochrane reviews and other studies demonstrate that in most instances the quality of clinical trials on CAM treatment of infections is currently too low to provide sufficient evidence. Therefore a Dutch consortium on (in vitro and clinical) scientific research on CAM and antibiotic resistance has been formed. The aim and objective of the consortium is to establish an enduring partnership and to develop expertise to further develop and investigate safe and effective CAM treatments for infectious diseases of humans (and animals). A first ongoing project on the development of safe and effective biobased CAM antimycotics in women with (recurrent) vaginal candidiasis infection is introduced. PMID:26539227

  7. ELM induced tungsten melting and its impact on tokamak operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Arnoux, G.; Bazylev, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Jachmich, S.; Balboa, I.; Clever, M.; Dejarnac, R.; Coffey, I.; Corre, Y.; Devaux, S.; Frassinetti, L.; Gauthier, E.; Horacek, J.; Knaup, M.; Komm, M.; Krieger, K.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Pitts, R. A.; Puetterich, T.; Rack, M.; Stamp, M.; Sergienko, G.; Tamain, P.; Thompson, V.

    2015-08-01

    In JET-ILW dedicated melt exposures were performed using a sequence of 3MA/2.9T H-Mode JET pulses with an input power of PIN = 23 MW, a stored energy of ∼6 MJ and regular type I ELMs at ΔWELM = 0.3 MJ and fELM ∼ 30 Hz. In order to assess the risk of starting ITER operations with a full W divertor, one of the task was to measure the consequences of W transients melting due to ELMs. JET is the only tokamak able to produce transients/ ELMs large enough (>300 kJ per ELM) to facilitate melting of tungsten. Such ELMs are comparable to mitigated ELMs expected in ITER. By moving the outer strike point (OSP) onto a dedicated leading edge the base temperature was raised within ∼1 s to allow transient ELM-driven melting during the subsequent 0.5 s. Almost 1 mm (∼6 mm3) of W was moved by ∼ 150 ELMs within 5 subsequent discharges. Significant material losses in terms of ejections into the plasma were not observed. There is indirect evidence that some small droplets (∼ 80 μm) were ejected. The impact on the main plasma parameters is minor and no disruptions occurred. The W-melt gradually moved along the lamella edge towards the high field side, driven by j × B forces. The evaporation rate determined is 100 times less than expected from steady state melting and thus only consistent with transient melting during individual ELMs. IR data, spectroscopy, as well as melt modeling point to transient melting. Although the type of damage studied in these JET experiments is unlikely to be experienced in ITER, the results do strongly support the design strategy to avoid exposed edges in the ITER divertor. The JET experiments required a surface at normal incidence and considerable pre-heating to produce tungsten melting. They provide unique experimental evidence for the absence of significant melt splashing at events resembling mitigated ELMs on ITER and establish a unique experimental benchmark for the simulations being used to study transient shallow melting on ITER W

  8. Long-term time series prediction using OP-ELM.

    PubMed

    Grigorievskiy, Alexander; Miche, Yoan; Ventelä, Anne-Mari; Séverin, Eric; Lendasse, Amaury

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an Optimally Pruned Extreme Learning Machine (OP-ELM) is applied to the problem of long-term time series prediction. Three known strategies for the long-term time series prediction i.e. Recursive, Direct and DirRec are considered in combination with OP-ELM and compared with a baseline linear least squares model and Least-Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM). Among these three strategies DirRec is the most time consuming and its usage with nonlinear models like LS-SVM, where several hyperparameters need to be adjusted, leads to relatively heavy computations. It is shown that OP-ELM, being also a nonlinear model, allows reasonable computational time for the DirRec strategy. In all our experiments, except one, OP-ELM with DirRec strategy outperforms the linear model with any strategy. In contrast to the proposed algorithm, LS-SVM behaves unstably without variable selection. It is also shown that there is no superior strategy for OP-ELM: any of three can be the best. In addition, the prediction accuracy of an ensemble of OP-ELM is studied and it is shown that averaging predictions of the ensemble can improve the accuracy (Mean Square Error) dramatically. PMID:24365536

  9. What's Missing in Dutch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weverink, Meike

    An often-noted contrast between child and adult language is that young children produce sentences both with and without lexical subjects even if subjects are obligatory in the adult system. However, in Dutch, there is no such structural difference between the earliest stages of Dutch child grammar and the adult stage where subjects are concerned.…

  10. [Dutch government invests in existing biobanks].

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Margreet; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2010-01-01

    Modern research, aimed at discovering factors that influence health and disease, requires large collections of data and samples. Collaboration between biobanks is therefore essential. The Dutch hub in the network of biobanks, the Biobanking and Biomolecular Resources Research Infrastructure (BBMRI-NL), is one of the major Dutch biobanking initiatives. It is sponsored by the Dutch government through the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). BBMRI-NL sets up collaboration between approximately 150 existing clinical and population biobanks in the Netherlands, and forms the link with the European BBMRI initiative. BBMRI-NL aims at enrichment and harmonization of existing Dutch biobanks, at data management and analysis, and at laying the legal, social and ethical foundations, in order to improve access and inter-operability, and to render the information and organization up to date. Other major Dutch initiatives are String of Pearls and LifeLines. Together these will create the conditions needed for Dutch researchers to further develop their strong position in the international biobanking field. PMID:21029488

  11. Functional categorization of unique expressed sequence tags obtained from the yeast-like growth phase of the elm pathogen Ophiostoma novo-ulmi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The highly aggressive pathogenic fungus Ophiostoma novo-ulmi continues to be a serious threat to the American elm (Ulmus americana) in North America. Extensive studies have been conducted in North America to understand the mechanisms of virulence of this introduced pathogen and its evolving population structure, with a view to identifying potential strategies for the control of Dutch elm disease. As part of a larger study to examine the genomes of economically important Ophiostoma spp. and the genetic basis of virulence, we have constructed an expressed sequence tag (EST) library using total RNA extracted from the yeast-like growth phase of O. novo-ulmi (isolate H327). Results A total of 4,386 readable EST sequences were annotated by determining their closest matches to known or theoretical sequences in public databases by BLASTX analysis. Searches matched 2,093 sequences to entries found in Genbank, including 1,761 matches with known proteins and 332 matches with unknown (hypothetical/predicted) proteins. Known proteins included a collection of 880 unique transcripts which were categorized to obtain a functional profile of the transcriptome and to evaluate physiological function. These assignments yielded 20 primary functional categories (FunCat), the largest including Metabolism (FunCat 01, 20.28% of total), Sub-cellular localization (70, 10.23%), Protein synthesis (12, 10.14%), Transcription (11, 8.27%), Biogenesis of cellular components (42, 8.15%), Cellular transport, facilitation and routes (20, 6.08%), Classification unresolved (98, 5.80%), Cell rescue, defence and virulence (32, 5.31%) and the unclassified category, or known sequences of unknown metabolic function (99, 7.5%). A list of specific transcripts of interest was compiled to initiate an evaluation of their impact upon strain virulence in subsequent studies. Conclusions This is the first large-scale study of the O. novo-ulmi transcriptome. The expression profile obtained from the yeast

  12. Optimization of RMP Coils for ELM Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Someswar; Evans, T. E.; Orlov, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    Advanced DIII-D RMP coils with improved capabilities are studied using a vacuum island overlap width (VIOW) criterion. Changes in characteristics of the RMP field produced by different geometrical parameters using both ex-vessel (C- and O-) and in-vessel (I- and CP-) coils are discussed. By reducing the poloidal span of each coil, the spacing between them and varying the geometric angle between the coils and the plasma, the resonant field can be adjusted to optimize the edge VIOW criterion while minimizing core resonances. Three separate phase scans using a combination of the as built I-coils and proposed CP-coils are compared for three different equilibria. Two of these equilibria have different edge safety factors and the third one has a different gap between plasma and wall than the standard equilibrium scenario of DIII D. The scan results show that the VIOW correlation criterion is well satisfied in all three cases, resulting in a new way to optimize the RMP coils for the future reactors in order to achieve the ELM suppression criterion over a significantly wider range of fusion plasma operating scenarios. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under DE-FG02-05ER54809 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  13. Strengthening infectious disease surveillance in a Dutch-German crossborder area using a real-time information exchange system.

    PubMed

    ter Waarbeek, Henriëtte; Hoebe, Christian; Freund, Hermann; Bochat, Verena; Kara-Zaïtr, Chakib

    2011-06-01

    International outbreaks are occurring much faster than before and require rapid trans-national detection and response. Never before has there been a more urgent need for improved crossborder collaboration on harmonisation of surveillance and response systems despite varying legislations. In the Euregion Maas Rhine, the Public Health Services of South Limburg in the Netherlands and Aachen in Germany agreed to join forces to work on a collaborative tool for sharing real-time infectious disease data. Both units had already implemented an adapted version of HPZone (a web-based software suite for managing infectious diseases at the local level). The collaborative work was realised through finding solutions to five key challenges. First, Euregional disease protocols were agreed commensurate with national guidelines. Secondly, a minimal dataset for infectious disease exchange information was negotiated taking into consideration international health regulations and differences in legislation. Thirdly, a mature risk assessment model for infectious disease was augmented to account for transborder spread and Euregional impact. Fourthly, protocol alert rules were negotiated on triggers for early warning. Finally, a crossborder dashboard, as a component of HPVista and encapsulating the four previous deliverables into a secure web-based system, was developed. HPVista is the parent application to HPZone and enables wider incident command and control regionally, nationally and internationally. The dashboard has facilities for displaying what, when, where and how cases, contacts and outbreaks happen in the crossborder area. It also provides secure communications for further discussion and exchange of other key information not currently shared electronically. The collaborative work embedded in the modified HPZone and HPVista versions with real-time surveillance and geographical information system mapping readily facilitates the systematic analysis of crossborder health incidents in

  14. Features of spontaneous and pellet-induced ELMs on the HL-2A tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Liu, C. H.; Nie, L.; Feng, Z.; Ji, X. Q.; Yao, K.; Zhu, G. L.; Liu, Yi; Cui, Z. Y.; Yan, L. W.; Wang, Q. M.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Dong, J. Q.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-11-01

    The pellet pacing ELM mitigation concept is being tested in some tokamaks such as ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JET. By increasing the ELM frequency, the ELM size can be reduced and eventually suppressed to meet the lifetime requirements on ITER target plates. In the HL-2A tokamak, ELMy H-mode operation is routinely performed and small type-III ELMs with a high repetition rate and some type-I (or possibly large type-III) ELM events are observed. Large ELMs are often preceded by strong coherent magnetic oscillations, and produce obvious perturbations on plasma current Ip, electron density \\bar {n}_{edge} at the edge, stored energy WE, etc. The coherent magnetic oscillations before an ELM crash or during the ELM are measured by toroidal and poloidal Mirnov coils and analysed by the wavelet technique to study the spectral characteristics of the short time ELM events. Pellet injection experiments are performed in type-III ELMy H-mode plasmas and ELM-free H-mode plasmas to study the physics of pellet triggering ELM. The analyses of pellet-induced ELMs and spontaneous ELMs are presented. Because the pellet size is relatively large, it induces magnetic oscillations lasting longer than that of a natural ELM.

  15. Titration of Marek's disease cell-associated vaccine virus (CVI 988) of reconstituted vaccine and vaccine ampoules from Dutch hatcheries.

    PubMed

    Landman, W J M; Verschuren, S B E

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-one outbreaks of Marek's disease (MD) were reported in the Netherlands and retrospectively analyzed. The outbreaks occurred mostly in vaccinated commercial layer and a few breeder flocks of several breeds; however, the cause of the outbreaks could not be established. Therefore, in a prospective study, the occurrence of true vaccine failures was assessed onfive hatcheries. The plaque-forming units (PFU) of MD vaccine per chicken dose were determined through in vitro assays on vacine ampoules (2 to 5 per hatchery) and samples of reconstituted vaccine (approximately 22 per hatchery). All forty reconstituted vaccine samples of hatcheries 1 and 4 showed PFU doses <10(3). In hatchery 4, 14 samples showed extreme low PFU (< or = 10 PFU). In hatcheries 2, 3, and 5, the numbers of MD vaccine suspensions with a titer > or = 10(3) PFU, which is the standard required, were 1 (5%), 17 (77%), and 3 (14%), respectively. Some vaccine ampoules showed < 10(3) PFU per chicken dose. This study shows the usefulness to assess the PFU per chicken dose of reconstituted MD vaccine and vaccine ampoules to unravel true vaccine failures, which could result in disease outbreaks in the field. PMID:14708997

  16. The position of the Dutch Farmers' Union on lessons learned and future prevention and control of foot and mouth disease.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, M P; Osinga, K J

    2002-12-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has devastated animal husbandry in The Netherlands frequently in the past and still constitutes a threat. The use of vaccination reduced the number of outbreaks in The Netherlands in the 20th Century. However, the desire of some member states of the European Community not to use vaccination led to a new strategy based on stamping-out of infected and contagious farms and to strict transportation regulations. In 2001, this proved very disruptive to the wider rural economy, such as the recreational and tourism sectors. The policy also caused severe animal welfare problems and psychological problems among farmers and their families. This raised questions about the wider, and not only veterinary or agricultural, implications of control strategies of foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). The technology seems to be in place for a return to the use of protective vaccination against FMDV during an outbreak, provided the Office International des Epizooties (OIE: World organisation for animal health) and European Commission (EC) receive data that substantiate the reliability of differentiating tests such as the 3ABC enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for use in individual animals. Research is in progress but may not be able to produce these data until 2003 or 2004. High potency vaccines should be used to elicit sufficient immunity within three to four days. During an FMD crisis, farmers should be assisted to find markets for products from areas affected by FMDV. The human dimension of any FMD outbreak must be dealt with sufficiently in any contingency plan. PMID:12523719

  17. Scaling Relationships for ELM Diverter Heat Flux on DIII D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. A.; Makowski, M. A.; Leonard, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) are periodic plasma instabilities that occur during H-mode operation in tokamaks. Left unmitigated, these instabilities result in concentrated particle and heat fluxes at the divertor and stand to cause serious damage to the plasma facing components of tokamaks. The purpose of this research is to find scaling relationships that predict divertor heat flux due to ELMs based on plasma parameters at the time of instability. This will be accomplished by correlating characteristic ELM parameters with corresponding plasma measurements and analyzing the data for trends. One early assessment is the effect of the heat transmission coefficient ? on the in/out asymmetry of the calculated ELM heat fluxes. Using IR camera data, further assessments in this study will continue to emphasize in/out asymmetry in ELMs, as this has important implications for ITER operation. Work supported in part by the US DOE, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC02-04ER54698, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  18. ELM: the status of the 2010 eukaryotic linear motif resource

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Cathryn M.; Diella, Francesca; Via, Allegra; Puntervoll, Pål; Gemünd, Christine; Chabanis-Davidson, Sophie; Michael, Sushama; Sayadi, Ahmed; Bryne, Jan Christian; Chica, Claudia; Seiler, Markus; Davey, Norman E.; Haslam, Niall; Weatheritt, Robert J.; Budd, Aidan; Hughes, Tim; Paś, Jakub; Rychlewski, Leszek; Travé, Gilles; Aasland, Rein; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Linding, Rune; Gibson, Toby J.

    2010-01-01

    Linear motifs are short segments of multidomain proteins that provide regulatory functions independently of protein tertiary structure. Much of intracellular signalling passes through protein modifications at linear motifs. Many thousands of linear motif instances, most notably phosphorylation sites, have now been reported. Although clearly very abundant, linear motifs are difficult to predict de novo in protein sequences due to the difficulty of obtaining robust statistical assessments. The ELM resource at http://elm.eu.org/ provides an expanding knowledge base, currently covering 146 known motifs, with annotation that includes >1300 experimentally reported instances. ELM is also an exploratory tool for suggesting new candidates of known linear motifs in proteins of interest. Information about protein domains, protein structure and native disorder, cellular and taxonomic contexts is used to reduce or deprecate false positive matches. Results are graphically displayed in a ‘Bar Code’ format, which also displays known instances from homologous proteins through a novel ‘Instance Mapper’ protocol based on PHI-BLAST. ELM server output provides links to the ELM annotation as well as to a number of remote resources. Using the links, researchers can explore the motifs, proteins, complex structures and associated literature to evaluate whether candidate motifs might be worth experimental investigation. PMID:19920119

  19. Power deposition in the JET divertor during ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, S.; Chankin, A.; Ciric, D.; Coad, J. P.; Falter, J.; Gauthier, E.; Lingertat, J.; Puppin, S.

    The power deposited in the JET divertor during ELMs has been evaluated using an infrared camera specifically designed for fast measurements. The first results [E. Gauthier, A. Charkin, S. Clement et al., Proc. 24th Euro. conf. on contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Berchtesgaden, 1997 (European Physical Society, 1998), vol. 21A, p. 61.] indicated that during type I ELMs, surface temperatures in excess of 2000°C were measured, leading to peak power fluxes in the order of 4 GW/m 2. The time integrated power flux exceeded the measured plasma energy loss per ELM by a factor of four. The reasons for this discrepancy are studied in this paper. Redeposited carbon layers of up to 40 μm have been found on the divertor surface in the places where the highest temperatures are measured. The impact of such layers on the power flux evaluation has been studied with numerical calculations, and a controlled simulation of ELM heating has been performed in the JET neutral beam test facility. It is found that neglecting the existence of layers on the surface in a 2D calculation can lead to overestimating the power by a factor of 3, whereas the error in the calculation of the energy is much smaller. An energy based calculation reduces the peak power during type I ELMs to values around 1.2 GW/m 2.

  20. Stability and ELM Characterization in I-Mode Pedestals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walk, J. R.; Hughes, J. W.; Snyder, P. B.; Hubbard, A. E.; Terry, J. L.; White, A. E.; Whyte, D. G.; Baek, S. G.; Cziegler, I.; Edlund, E.

    2014-10-01

    The I-mode is a novel high-confinement regime explored on Alcator C-Mod, notable for its formation of an H-mode-like temperature pedestal without the accompanying density pedestal, maintaining L-mode particle confinement. I-mode exhibits a number of desirable properties for a reactor regime: among them, it naturally lacks large ELMs, avoiding the need for externally-applied ELM suppression. However, under certain conditions small, intermittent ELM-like events are seen. These events exhibit a range of phenomena in terms of edge and pedestal behavior, particularly for the ELM trigger - the majority of events are synchronized with the sawtooth heat pulse reaching the edge. The stationary pedestal structure is stable against peeling-ballooning MHD as calculated by ELITE in all cases, necessitating treatment of transient pedestal modification to characterize these events. We characterize these ELM events in terms of edge behavior, particularly the modification of the temperature pedestal, edge turbulence and fluctuations, and peeling-ballooning MHD stability. This work is supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  1. Syntactic Persistence in Dutch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartsuiker, Robert J.; Kolk, Herman H. J.

    1998-01-01

    Three experiments are reported that showed effects of "structure priming," the tendency to repeat syntactic structure across successive sentences. These effects were demonstrated in Dutch, a previously untested language. All experiments studied spoken sentence production. (Author/JL)

  2. Perspectives and experiences of Dutch multiple sclerosis patients and multiple sclerosis-specialized neurologists on injectable disease-modifying treatment

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Leo H; Heerings, Marco A; Jongen, Peter J; van der Hiele, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background The adherence to treatment with injectable disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) in multiple sclerosis (MS) may benefit from adequate information provision and management of expectations. The communication between patients and physicians is very important in this respect. The current study investigated the perspectives and experiences of the MS patients and neurologists concerning the choice and course of treatment with DMDs in the Netherlands. Methods The MS patients (aged 18–60 years; diagnosed with MS at least a year ago, currently treated with injectable DMD treatment) and MS-specialized neurologists (practicing for ≥3 years, treating ≥15 MS patients/month on average, and spending >60% of their time in clinical practice) were asked to complete semistructured Internet-based questionnaires. The neurologists in this study were not necessarily the treating neurologists of the participating MS patients. Results In all, 107 MS patients and 18 MS-specialized neurologists completed the questionnaires. The MS-specialized neurologists in this study reported discussing most of the suggested treatment goals with their patients. The MS patients indicated that certain important treatment goals, ie, reduction in disease progression, reduction or prolongation of time to long-term disability, and reduction in new magnetic resonance imaging lesions, were not discussed with them. More than one-quarter of the patients (27%) would appreciate more information about their treatment. We found evidence for suboptimal patient adherence to MS therapy (23% indicated taking a treatment break) due to diverse side effects, lack of efficacy, or practical issues. As compared to these patient reports, the scale of poor adherence was overestimated by more than half of the neurologists (on average, 30% estimated treatment breaks). Conclusion The MS patients and MS-specialized neurologists in this study differ in their experiences and perspectives on information provision and adherence

  3. Ethnicity Modifies Associations between Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Disease Severity in Parallel Dutch and Singapore Coronary Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Gijsberts, Crystel M.; Seneviratna, Aruni; de Carvalho, Leonardo P.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Vidanapthirana, Puwalani; Sorokin, Vitaly; Stella, Pieter; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Richards, A. Mark; Low, Adrian F.; Lee, Chi-Hang; Tan, Huay Cheem; Hoefer, Imo E.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.; Chan, Mark Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2020 the largest number of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) will be found in Asia. Published epidemiological and clinical reports are overwhelmingly derived from western (White) cohorts and data from Asia are scant. We compared CAD severity and all-cause mortality among 4 of the world’s most populous ethnicities: Whites, Chinese, Indians and Malays. Methods The UNIted CORoNary cohort (UNICORN) simultaneously enrolled parallel populations of consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography or intervention for suspected CAD in the Netherlands and Singapore. Using multivariable ordinal regression, we investigated the independent association of ethnicity with CAD severity and interactions between risk factors and ethnicity on CAD severity. Also, we compared all-cause mortality among the ethnic groups using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Results We included 1,759 White, 685 Chinese, 201 Indian and 224 Malay patients undergoing coronary angiography. We found distinct inter-ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, the associations of gender and diabetes with severity of CAD were significantly stronger in Chinese than Whites. Chinese (OR 1.3 [1.1–1.7], p = 0.008) and Malay (OR 1.9 [1.4–2.6], p<0.001) ethnicity were independently associated with more severe CAD as compared to White ethnicity. Strikingly, when stratified for diabetes status, we found a significant association of all three Asian ethnic groups as compared to White ethnicity with more severe CAD among diabetics, but not in non-diabetics. Crude all-cause mortality did not differ, but when adjusted for covariates mortality was higher in Malays than the other ethnic groups. Conclusion In this population of individuals undergoing coronary angiography, ethnicity is independently associated with the severity of CAD and modifies the strength of association between certain risk factors and CAD severity. Furthermore, mortality differs among ethnic groups

  4. ELM mitigation via rotating resonant magnetic perturbations on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, A. J.; Kirk, A.; Cahyna, P.; Chapman, I. T.; Fishpool, G.; Harrison, J. R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Kripner, L.; Peterka, M.

    2015-08-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) produces splitting of the divertor strike point due to the interaction of the RMP field and the plasma field. The application of a rotating RMP field causes the strike point splitting to rotate, distributing the particle and heat flux evenly over the divertor. The RMP coils in MAST have been used to generate a rotating perturbation with a toroidal mode number n = 3. The ELM frequency is doubled with the application of the RMP rotating field, whilst maintaining the H mode. During mitigation, the ELM peak heat flux is seen to be reduced by 50% for a halving in the ELM energy and motion of the strike point, consistent with the rotation of the applied RMP field, is seen using high spatial resolution (1.5 mm at the target) heat flux profiles measured using infrared (IR) thermography.

  5. Structure and evolution of ELMs in the edge and SOL of NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda, R. J.; Maingi, R.; Bush, C. E.; Tritz, K.; Ahn, J.-W.; Boedo, J. A.; Kubota, S.; Fredrickson, E.; Zweben, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) are routinely seen during H-mode operation in NSTX. These ELMs have been characterized as large-sized Type I, medium-sized Type III, and small Type V ELMs. Recently, an experiment was dedicated to characterize the structure and evolution of these 3 ELM Types in NSTX utilizing multiple diagnostics. These diagnostics include: fast-framing digital cameras, soft X-ray arrays, edge probes (both tile-embedded and reciprocating), reflectometers and Mirnov arrays. In general, the ELM evolves from a perturbation of the edge topology that quickly develops (<30 μs) into strong filamentation that propagates both radially and poloidally/toroidally in the SOL. This ELM filamentation is then followed by an increased level of edge turbulence (and blobs) resembling, momentarily, that observed during L-mode phases. This later blob filamentation is clearly distinct from the initial ELM structures. The characteristics and differences observed in all 3 ELM Types will be presented.

  6. TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD,AW; OSBORNE,TH; FENSTERMACHER,ME; GROEBNER,RJ; GROTH,M; LASNIER,CJ; MAHDAVI,MA; PETRIE,TW; SNYDER,PB; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L

    2002-11-01

    A271 TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D. The reduction in size of Type I edge localized models (ELMs) with increasing density is explored in DIII-D for the purpose of studying the underlying transport of ELM energy. The separate convective and conductive transport of energy due to an ELM is determined by Thomson scattering measurements of electron density and temperature in the pedestal. The conductive transport from the pedestal during an ELM decreases with increasing density, while the convective transport remains nearly constant. The scaling of the ELM energy loss is compared with an edge stability model. The role of the divertor sheath in limiting energy loss from the pedestal during an ELM is explored. Evidence of outward radial transport to the midplane wall during an ELM is also presented.

  7. Investigation of dynamics of ELM crashes and their mitigation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pankin, Alexei Y.

    2015-08-14

    The accurate prediction of H-mode pedestal dynamics is critical for planning experiments in existing tokamaks and in the design of future tokamaks such as ITER and DEMO. The main objective of the proposed research is to advance the understanding of the physics of H-mode pedestal. Through advances in coupled kinetic-MHD simulations, a new model for H-mode pedestal and ELM crashes as well as an improved model for the bootstrap current will be developed. ELMmitigation techniques will also be investigated. The proposed research will help design efficient confinement scenarios and reduce transient heat loads on the divertor and plasma facing components. During the last two years, the principal investigator (PI) of this proposal actively participated in physics studies related to the DOE Joint Research Targets. These studies include the modeling of divertor heat load in the DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod, and NSTX tokamaks in 2010, and the modeling of H-mode pedestal structure in the DIII-D tokamak in 2011. It is proposed that this close collaboration with experimentalists from major US tokamaks continue during the next funding period. Verification and validation will be a strong component of the proposed research. During the course of the project, advances will be made in the following areas; Dynamics of the H-mode pedestal buildup and recovery after ELM crashes – The effects of neutral fueling, particle and thermal pinches will be explored; Dynamics of ELM crashes in realistic tokamak geometries – Heat loads associated with ELM crashes will be validated against experimental measurements. An improved model for ELM crashes will be developed; ELM mitigation – The effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on ELMs stability and their evolution will be investigated; Development of a new bootstrap current model – A reduced model for will be developed through careful verification of existing models for bootstrap current against first-principle kinetic neoclassical simulations

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The ELM survey. VI. 11 new ELM WD binaries (Gianninas+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianninas, A.; Kilic, M.; Brown, W. R.; Canton, P.; Kenyon, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    We used the 6.5m MMT telescope equipped with the Blue Channel spectrograph, the 200 inch Hale telescope equipped with the Double spectrograph, the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4m telescope equipped with the R-C spectrograph, and more recently with Kitt Peak Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph (KOSMOS), to obtain spectroscopy of our 11 targets in several observing runs. We have also been obtaining radial-velocity measurements for candidates from other sources including the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Spectroscopy Telescope (LAMOST). Those 11 new Extremely low-mass white dwarf (ELM WD) binaries bring the total of ELM WDs identified by the ELM Survey up to 73. (4 data files).

  9. ELM: an Algorithm to Estimate the Alpha Abundance from Low-resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Yude; Zhao, Gang; Pan, Jingchang; Bharat Kumar, Yerra

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated a novel methodology using the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm to determine the α abundance of stars. Applying two methods based on the ELM algorithm—ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices—to the stellar spectra from the ELODIE database, we measured the α abundance with a precision better than 0.065 dex. By applying these two methods to the spectra with different signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) and different resolutions, we found that ELM+spectra is more robust against degraded resolution and ELM+Lick indices is more robust against variation in S/N. To further validate the performance of ELM, we applied ELM+spectra and ELM+Lick indices to SDSS spectra and estimated α abundances with a precision around 0.10 dex, which is comparable to the results given by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. We further applied ELM to the spectra of stars in Galactic globular clusters (M15, M13, M71) and open clusters (NGC 2420, M67, NGC 6791), and results show good agreement with previous studies (within 1σ). A comparison of the ELM with other widely used methods including support vector machine, Gaussian process regression, artificial neural networks, and linear least-squares regression shows that ELM is efficient with computational resources and more accurate than other methods.

  10. VIEW FROM CENTER OF ELM AVENUE, LOOKING WEST INTO SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM CENTER OF ELM AVENUE, LOOKING WEST INTO SECTION L. AT LEFT STANDS THE PONDEROUS MCDANIEL MAUSOLEUM, WHICH SHOWS THE INFLUENCE OF FRANK FURNESS ON H. Q. FRENCH’S 1887 DESIGN - Woodlands Cemetery, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. THE ELM SURVEY. IV. 24 WHITE DWARF MERGER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Heinke, Craig O.; Agueeros, M. A.; Kleinman, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    We present new radial velocity and X-ray observations of extremely low mass (ELM, {approx}0.2 M{sub Sun }) white dwarf (WD) candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 area. We identify seven new binary systems with 1-18 hr orbital periods. Five of the systems will merge due to gravitational wave radiation within 10 Gyr, bringing the total number of merger systems found in the ELM Survey to 24. The ELM Survey has now quintupled the known merger WD population. It has also discovered the eight shortest period detached binary WD systems currently known. We discuss the characteristics of the merger and non-merger systems observed in the ELM Survey, including their future evolution. About half of the systems have extreme mass ratios. These are the progenitors of the AM Canum Venaticorum systems and Type Ia supernovae. The remaining targets will lead to the formation of extreme helium stars, subdwarfs, or massive WDs. We identify three targets that are excellent gravitational wave sources. These should be detected by the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna like missions within the first year of operation. The remaining targets are important indicators of what the Galactic foreground may look like for gravitational wave observatories.

  12. Impact and Implementation Analyses of the ELM Kindergarten Mathematics Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doabler, Christian; Baker, Scott K.; Smolkowski, Keith; Fien, Hank; Clarke, Ben; Cary, Mari Strand; Chard, David

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this 4-year efficacy trial, funded by IES under the Mathematics and Science Education topic, is to study the efficacy of a (Tier 1) core kindergarten math curriculum, "Early Learning in Mathematics" (ELM), when implemented under rigorous experimental conditions. In the first year of this study (2008-09), kindergarten classrooms…

  13. 65. VIEW OF THE OLMSTED ELM, SOUTH LAWN, AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. VIEW OF THE OLMSTED ELM, SOUTH LAWN, AND WEST SLOPE. SHOWN IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND ARE THE RESTORED LAWN EDGE AND THE HISTORIC ENGLISH YEW. (DUPLICATE OF HABS No. MA-1168-31) - Fairsted, 99 Warren Street, Brookline, Norfolk County, MA

  14. 75. VIEW LOOKING EAST FROM THE OLMSTED ELM IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    75. VIEW LOOKING EAST FROM THE OLMSTED ELM IN THE SOUTH LAWN TO THE ROCK GARDEN. VIEW INCLUDES HISTORIC ENGLISH YEW ON RIGHT, CRAB APPLE IN CENTER. (DUPLICATE OF HABS No. MA-1168-46) - Fairsted, 99 Warren Street, Brookline, Norfolk County, MA

  15. VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #4 NEAR ELM CIRCLE, SHOWING PICNIC TABLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PLAYGROUND #4 NEAR ELM CIRCLE, SHOWING PICNIC TABLE. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. VIEW OF ELM CIRCLE, FROM BETWEEN FACILITIES 750 AND 750. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM CIRCLE, FROM BETWEEN FACILITIES 750 AND 750. VIEW FACING EAST/NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  17. Characteristics of pre-ELM structures during ELM control experiment on JET with n  =  2 magnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Rack, M.; Liang, Y.; Sieglin, B.; Denner, P.; Contributors, JET

    2016-09-01

    Radially propagating pre-ELM (edge localized mode) structures in the heat flux profile on the outer divertor have been observed both with and without magnetic perturbations on Joint European Torus. Recently pre-ELM structures over 80% of the ELM cycle are observed. The effects of n  =  2 fields on pre-ELM structures are presented and analysed in detail. Redistribution of the inter-ELM heat load with the appearances of pre-ELM structures suggest that a wider energy wetted area could be achieved by the application of n  =  2 fields. The influences of q 95 and gas puffing position on the change of pre-ELM structures are studied. Pre-ELM structures are normally long lived (several milliseconds) and appear consecutively with n  =  2 fields, but do not necessarily lead to an ELM crash. The experimental observations suggest that the changed magnetic topology might be a possible explanation for the propagating structures.

  18. On Equivalence of FIS and ELM for Interpretable Rule-Based Knowledge Representation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shen Yuong; Yap, Keem Siah; Yap, Hwa Jen; Tan, Shing Chiang; Chang, Siow Wee

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy extreme learning machine (F-ELM) that embeds fuzzy membership functions and rules into the hidden layer of extreme learning machine (ELM). Similar to the concept of ELM that employed the random initialization technique, three parameters of F-ELM are randomly assigned. They are the standard deviation of the membership functions, matrix-C (rule-combination matrix), and matrix-D [don't care (DC) matrix]. Fuzzy if-then rules are formulated by the rule-combination Matrix of F-ELM, and a DC approach is adopted to minimize the number of input attributes in the rules. Furthermore, F-ELM utilizes the output weights of the ELM to form the target class and confidence factor for each of the rules. This is to indicate that the corresponding consequent parameters are determined analytically. The operations of F-ELM are equivalent to a fuzzy inference system. Several benchmark data sets and a real world fault detection and diagnosis problem have been used to empirically evaluate the efficacy of the proposed F-ELM in handling pattern classification tasks. The results show that the accuracy rates of F-ELM are comparable (if not superior) to ELM with distinctive ability of providing explicit knowledge in the form of interpretable rule base. PMID:25134093

  19. ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    FENSTERMACHER,ME; LEONARD,AW; SNYDER,PB; BOEDO,JA; COLCHIN,RJ; GROEBNER,RJ; GRAY,DS; GROTH,M; HOLLMANN,E; LASNIER,CJ; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; RUDAKOV,DL; TAKAHASHI,H; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L

    2003-04-01

    A271 ELM PARTICLE AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D. Results from a series of dedicated experiments measuring the effect of particle and energy pulses from Type-I Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in the DIII-D scrape-off layer (SOL) and divertor are compared with a simple model of ELM propagation in the boundary plasma. The simple model asserts that the propagation of ELM particle and energy perturbations is dominated by ion parallel convection along SOL fields lines and the recovery from the ELM perturbation is determined by recycling physics. Time scales associated with the initial changes of boundary plasma parameters are expected to be on the order of the ion transit time from the outer midplane, where the ELM instability is initiated, to the divertor targets. To test the model, the ion convection velocity is changed in the experiment by varying the plasma density. At moderate to high density, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} = 0.5-0.8, the delays in the response of the boundary plasma to the midplane ELM pulses, the density dependence of those delays and other observations are consistent with the model. However, at the lowest densities, n{sub e}/n{sub Gr} {approx} 0.35, small delays between the response sin the two divertors, and changes in the response of the pedestal thermal energy to ELM events, indicate that additional factors including electron conduction in the SOL, the pre-ELM condition of the divertor plasma, and the ratio of ELM instability duration to SOL transit time, may be playing a role. The results show that understanding the response of the SOL and divertor plasmas to ELMs, for various pre-ELM conditions, is just as important to predicting the effect of ELM pulses on the target surfaces of future devices as is predicting the characteristics of the ELM perturbation of the core plasma.

  20. Extensive statistical analysis of ELMs on JET with a carbon wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Pisano, F.; Vega, J.; Cannas, B.; Fanni, A.; Gonzalez, S.; Gelfusa, M.; Grosso, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-11-01

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) are bursts of instabilities which deteriorate the confinement of H mode plasmas and can cause damage to the divertor of next generation of devices. On JET individual discharges can exhibit hundreds of ELMs but typically in the literature, mainly due to the lack of automatic analysis tools, single papers investigate only the behaviour of tens of individual ELMs. In this paper, an original tool, the universal event locator (UMEL), is applied to the problem of automatically identifying the time location of ELMs. With this approach, databases of hundreds of thousands of ELMs can be built with reasonable effort. The analysis has then been focused on the investigation of the statistical distribution of the inter-ELM intervals at steady state for type I ELMs. Numerous probability distributions have been tested to perform the data analysis and different distributions provide a best fit for sets of data from different experiments. This result constitutes robust experimental confirmation that type I ELMs are not all necessarily the same type of instability. Moreover, the most likely distributions are not memoryless, meaning that the waiting time, from a particular instant until the next ELM, does depend on the time elapsed from the previous event. These properties, confirmed by this investigation on JET, pose important constraints on the models aimed at describing the ELM dynamics. This work also demonstrates the widespread applicability of the UMEL tool.

  1. Progress in the Peeling-Ballooning Model of ELMs: Numerical Studies of 3D Nonlinear ELM Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, P B; Wilson, H R; Xu, X Q

    2004-12-13

    Nonlinear simulations with the 3D electromagnetic two-fluid BOUT code are employed to study the dynamics of edge localized modes (ELMs) driven by intermediate wavelength peeling-ballooning modes. It is found that the early behavior of the modes is similar to expectations from linear, ideal peeling-ballooning mode theory, with the modes growing linearly at a fraction of the Alfven frequency. In the non-linear phase, the modes grow explosively, forming a number of extended filaments which propagate rapidly from the outer closed flux region into the open flux region toward the outer wall. Similarities to non-linear linear ballooning theory, as well as additional complexities are observed. Comparison to observations reveals a number of similarities. Implications of the simulations and proposals for the dynamics of the full ELM crash are discussed.

  2. PROGRESS IN THE PEELING-BALLOONING MODEL OF ELMS: NUMERICAL STUDIES OF 3D NONLINEAR ELM DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    SNYDER,P.B; WILSON,H.R; XU,X.Q

    2004-11-01

    Nonlinear simulations with the 3D electromagnetic two-fluid BOUT code are employed to study the dynamics of edge localized modes (ELMs) driven by intermediate wavelength peeling-ballooning modes. It is found that the early behavior of the modes is similar to expectations from linear, ideal peeling-ballooning mode theory, with the modes growing linearly at a fraction of the Alfven frequency. In the nonlinear phase, the modes grow explosively, forming a number of extended filaments which propagate rapidly from the outer closed flux region into the open flux region toward the outboard wall. Similarities to non-linear ballooning theory, as well as additional complexities are observed. Comparison to observations reveals a number of similarities. Implications of the simulations and proposals for the dynamics of the full ELM crash are discussed.

  3. Dutch euthanasia revisited.

    PubMed

    Fenigsen, R

    1997-01-01

    The results of a follow-up study of euthanasia by the Dutch government, five years after the first study, were published on November 26, 1996. This article provides a detailed review of the two reports comparing and contrasting the statistics cited therein. The author notes that the "rules of careful conduct" proposed by the courts and by the Royal Dutch Society of Medicine were frequently disregarded. Special topics included for the first time in the second study were the notification and non-prosecution procedure, euthanasia of newborns and infants, and assisted suicide in psychiatric practice. The authors of the follow-up report state that it would be desirable to reduce the number of "terminations of life without patients' request," but this must be the common responsibility of the doctor and the patient. They suggest that the person who does not wish to have his life terminated should declare this clearly, in advance, verbally and in writing, preferably in the form of a living will. Involuntary euthanasia was rampant in 1990 and equally rampant in 1995. The author concludes that Dutch doctors who practice euthanasia are not on the slippery slope. From the very beginning, they have been at the bottom. PMID:9479883

  4. QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES

    SciTech Connect

    LAO,LL; SNYDER,PB; LEONARD,AW; OIKAWA,T; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; FERRON,JR; GROEBNER,RJ; HORTON,LD; KAMADA,Y; MURAKAMI,M; SAARELMA,S; STJOHN,HE; TURNBULL,AD; WILSON,HR

    2003-03-01

    A271 QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALOONING MODES. Several testable features of the working model of edge localized modes (ELMs) as intermediate toroidal mode number peeling-ballooning modes are evaluated quantitatively using DIII-D and JT-60U experimental data and the ELITE MHD stability code. These include the hypothesis that ELM sizes are related to the radial widths of the unstable MHD modes, the unstable modes have a strong ballooning character localized in the outboard bad curvature region, and ELM size generally becomes smaller at high edge collisionality. ELMs are triggered when the growth rates of the unstable MHD modes become significantly large. These testable features are consistent with many ELM observations in DIII-D and JT-60U discharges.

  5. ELM mitigation by means of supersonic molecular beam and pellet injection on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Li, C. Z.; Zhen, X. W.; Li, J. G.; Guo, H. Y.; Li, J. H.; Wang, L.; Gan, K. F.; Chen, Y.; Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Yao, X. J.; Hu, L. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Wan, B. N.; Zou, X. L.; Mansfield, D. K.; Liang, Y. F.; Vinyar, I.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we will present experimental results from EAST on the mitigation of edge localized modes (ELMs) using recently developed deuterium/lithium pellet injections as well as supersonic molecular beam injections (SMBI). Using a Laval nozzle, ELM mitigation with SMBI has been demonstrated in EAST in quasi-steady state. Using a D2 pellet injector, a giant ELM appears followed by a burst of high frequency ELMs at ∼300 Hz with duration of a few tens of milliseconds. Furthermore, for the first time, a novel technology using a simple rotating impeller to inject sub-millimeter size lithium (Li) granules at speeds of a few tens of meters per second was successfully used to pace ELMs. These experiments indicate that, on EAST, several technologies can contribute to the database supporting ELMs control in future fusion devices, such as ITER.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The ELM survey. VII. 15 new ELM white dwarf cand. (Brown+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. R.; Gianninas, A.; Kilic, M.; Kenyon, S. J.; Allende Prieto, C.

    2016-05-01

    We present observations of 15 new extremely low-mass white dwarf (ELM WD) candidates. Ten objects are selected by color for our targeted spectroscopic ELM Survey program as described in Brown et al. (2012ApJ...744..142B). Five objects come from follow-up spectroscopy of the completed Hypervelocity Star survey. We acquire spectra for the 15 ELM WD candidates using the Blue Channel spectrograph on the 6.5m MMT telescope. We configured the Blue Channel spectrograph to obtain 3650-4500Å spectral coverage with 1.0Å spectral resolution. We acquire additional spectra for 5 objects using the KOSMOS spectrograph on the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4m Mayall telescope on program numbers 2014B-0119 and 2015A-0082. We configured the KOSMOS spectrograph to obtain 3500-6200Å spectral coverage with 2.0Å spectral resolution. We also acquire spectra for objects with g<17mag using the FAST spectrograph on the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory 1.5m Tillinghast telescope. We configured the FAST spectrograph to obtain 3500-5500Å spectral coverage with 1.7Å spectral resolution. (3 data files).

  7. Will Dutch Become Flemish? Autonomous Developments in Belgian Dutch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Velde, Hans; Kissine, Mikhail; Tops, Evie; van der Harst, Sander; van Hout, Roeland

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a series of studies of standard Dutch pronunciation in Belgium and the Netherlands is presented. The research is based on two speech corpora: a diachronic corpus of radio speech (1935-1995) and a synchronic corpus of Belgian and Netherlandic standard Dutch from different regions at the turn of the millennium. It is shown that two…

  8. Pennsylvania Dutch Crafts and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    Many people hold two common misconceptions about the Pennsylvania Dutch: first, that these people live exclusively in the state of Pennsylvania; second, that their ancestors came from Holland. However, neither assumption is correct. One can find large Pennsylvania Dutch communities in Mary land, West Virginia, Virginia, the Carolinas, Ohio,…

  9. Observations of the effect of lower hybrid waves on ELM behaviour in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Xu, G. S.; Liang, Y.; Wang, H. Q.; Zhou, C.; Liu, A. D.; Wang, L.; Qian, J. P.; Gan, K. F.; Yang, J. H.; Duan, Y. M.; Li, Y. L.; Ding, S. Y.; Wu, X. Q.; Yan, N.; Chen, L.; Shao, L. M.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Zhao, N.; Liu, S. C.; Kong, D. F.; Gong, X. Z.

    2015-03-01

    Dedicated experiments focusing on the influence of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) on edge-localized modes (ELMs) were first performed during the 2012 experimental campaign of EAST, via modulating the input power of LHWs in the high-confinement-mode (H-mode) plasma mainly sustained by ion cyclotron resonant heating. Natural ELMs are effectively mitigated (ELM frequency increases, while its intensity decreases dramatically) as the LHW is applied, observed over a fairly wide range of plasma current or edge safety factor. By scanning the modulation frequency (fm) of LHW injected power in a target plasma dominated by the so-called small ELMs, we conclude that large ELMs with markedly larger amplitudes and lower frequencies are reproduced at low modulation frequencies (fm < 100 Hz). Analysis of the evolution of edge extreme ultraviolet radiation signals further indicates that plasma fluctuations at the pedestal region indistinctively respond to rapid modulation (fm ⩾ 100 Hz) of LHW injected power. This is proposed as the mechanism responsible for the observed fm dependence of the mitigation effect induced by LHWs on large ELMs. In addition, a critical threshold of LHW input power PLHW is estimated as PLHWthr≃800 kW , beyond which the impact of applied LHWs on ELM behaviours can be achieved. Finally, Langmuir probe measurements suggest that, rather than the concentration of free energy into a narrowband quasi-coherent precursor commonly observed growing until the ELM crash, the continuous development of broadband turbulence during the ELM-absent phase with the application of LHWs might contribute to the avoidance of ELM crashes. These results present new insights into existing experiments, and also provide some foundations and references for the next-step research about exploring in more depth and improving this new attractive method to effectively control the ELM-induced very large transient heat and particle flux.

  10. Impurity radiation and the theory of ELMs in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, D.K.; Roitman, A.V.

    1994-11-01

    A modification of the theory proposed by Kukharkin, Osipenko, and Pogutse is presented. An account of impurity radiation allows the authors to explain the absence of ELMs in the VH-mode of operation, and their arising during the transition to the ordinary H-mode. It is demonstrated that the radiation, whose intensity and temperature dependence are functions of the base gas neutral atom concentration, plays an essential destabilizing role. In the VH-mode, when the neutral atom concentration is low, the flute mechanism of the instability is suppressed, the radiation does not play a substantial role, and the mode is stable. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  11. ELM-ART--An Interactive and Intelligent Web-Based Electronic Textbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Gerhard; Brusilovsky, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper present provides a broader view on ELM-ART, one of the first Web-based Intelligent Educational systems that offered a creative combination of two different paradigms--Intelligent Tutoring and Adaptive Hypermedia technologies. The unique dual nature of ELM-ART contributed to its long life and research impact and was a result of…

  12. Structure, Stability and ELM Dynamics of the H-Mode Pedestal in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Leonard, A W; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Thomas, D M; Boedo, J A; Casper, T A; Colchin, R J; Groebner, R J; Groth, M; Kempenaars, M H; Loarte, A; Saibene, G; VanZeeland, M A; Zeng, L; Xu, X Q

    2004-10-13

    Experiments are described that have increased understanding of the transport and stability physics that set the H-mode edge pedestal width and height, determine the onset of Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), and produce the nonlinear dynamics of the ELM perturbation in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL). Predictive models now exist for the n{sub e} pedestal profile and the p{sub e} height at the onset of Type-I ELMs, and progress has been made toward predictive models of the T{sub e} pedestal width and nonlinear ELM evolution. Similarity experiments between DIII-D and JET suggested that neutral penetration physics dominates in the relationship between the width and height of the n{sub e} pedestal while plasma physics dominates in setting the T{sub e} pedestal width. Measured pedestal conditions including edge current at ELM onset agree with intermediate-n peeling-ballooning (P-B) stability predictions. Midplane ELM dynamics data show the predicted (P-B) structure at ELM onset, large rapid variations of the SOL parameters, and fast radial propagation in later phases, similar to features in nonlinear ELM simulations.

  13. THE ELM SURVEY. III. A SUCCESSFUL TARGETED SURVEY FOR EXTREMELY LOW MASS WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kilic, Mukremin; Allende Prieto, Carlos E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: callende@iac.es

    2012-01-10

    Extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarfs (WDs) with masses < 0.25 M{sub Sun} are rare objects that result from compact binary evolution. Here, we present a targeted spectroscopic survey of ELM WD candidates selected by color. The survey is 71% complete and has uncovered 18 new ELM WDs. Of the seven ELM WDs with follow-up observations, six are short-period binaries and four have merger times less than 5 Gyr. The most intriguing object, J1741+6526, likely has either a pulsar companion or a massive WD companion making the system a possible supernova Type Ia or an Ia progenitor. The overall ELM survey has now identified 19 double degenerate binaries with <10 Gyr merger times. The significant absence of short orbital period ELM WDs at cool temperatures suggests that common envelope evolution creates ELM WDs directly in short period systems. At least one-third of the merging systems are halo objects, thus ELM WD binaries continue to form and merge in both the disk and the halo.

  14. Co-occurence of Two Invasive Species: The Banded and European Elm Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invasive European elm bark beetle, Scolytus multistriatus (Marsham), was first detected a century ago and now occurs in most of the continental United States. The invasive banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov, native to Asia, was discovered in the United States in 2003 and is now...

  15. ELM--Eye Light Monitor: Assessment in a World of Hybrid Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaniv, Hanan

    2008-01-01

    This paper is an instrumental case study of an alternative assessment method, using a tool called ELM (Eye Light Monitor). ELM proposes a way to keep a finger on the pulse of every child, being attentive to emerging transitions in various parameters of his/her well-being that might affect his/her classroom behaviour and work, and might assist in…

  16. The Relationships Between ELM Suppression, Pedestal Profiles, and Lithium Wall Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Boyle, R. Maingi, P.B. Snyder, J. Manickam, T.H. Osborne, R.E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, and the NSTX Team

    2012-08-17

    Recently in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), increasing lithium wall coatings suppressed edge localized modes (ELMs), gradually but not quite monotonically. This work details profile and stability analysis as ELMs disappeared throughout the lithium scan. While the quantity of lithium deposited between discharges did not uniquely determine the presence of ELMs, profile analysis demonstrated that lithium was correlated to wider density and pressure pedestals with peak gradients farther from the separatrix. Moreover, the ELMy and ELM-free discharges were cleanly separated by their density and pedestal widths and peak gradient locations. Ultimately, ELMs were only suppressed when lithium caused the density pedestal to widen and shift inward. These changes in the density gradient were directly reflected in the pressure gradient and calculated bootstrap current. This supports the theory that ELMs in NSTX are caused by peeling and/or ballooning modes, as kink/peeling modes are stabilized when the edge current and pressure gradient shift away from the separatrix. Edge stability analysis using ELITE corroborated this picture, as reconstructed equilibria from ELM-free discharges were generally farther from their kink/peeling stability boundaries than ELMy discharges. We conclude that density profile control provided by lithium is the key first step to ELM suppression in NSTX

  17. THE ELM SURVEY. II. TWELVE BINARY WHITE DWARF MERGER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, Mukremin; Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, S. J.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Agueeros, M. A.; Heinke, Craig

    2011-01-20

    We describe new radial velocity and X-ray observations of extremely low-mass white dwarfs (ELM WDs, {approx}0.2 M{sub sun}) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 and the MMT Hypervelocity Star survey. We identify four new short period binaries, including two merger systems. These observations bring the total number of short period binary systems identified in our survey to 20. No main-sequence or neutron star companions are visible in the available optical photometry, radio, and X-ray data. Thus, the companions are most likely WDs. Twelve of these systems will merge within a Hubble time due to gravitational wave radiation. We have now tripled the number of known merging WD systems. We discuss the characteristics of this merger sample and potential links to underluminous supernovae, extreme helium stars, AM CVn systems, and other merger products. We provide new observational tests of the WD mass-period distribution and cooling models for ELM WDs. We also find evidence for a new formation channel for single low-mass WDs through binary mergers of two lower mass objects.

  18. Can the Non-linear Ballooning Model describe ELMs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberg, S. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-11-01

    The explosive, filamentary plasma eruptions described by the non-linear ideal MHD ballooning model is tested quantitatively against experimental observations of ELMs in MAST. The equations describing this model were derived by Wilson and Cowley for tokamak-like geometry which includes two differential equations: the linear ballooning equation which describes the spatial distribution along the field lines and the non-linear ballooning mode envelope equation, which is a two-dimensional, non-linear differential equation which can involve fractional temporal-derivatives, but is often second-order in time and space. To employ the second differential equation for a specific geometry one has to evaluate the coefficients of the equation which is non-trivial as it involves field line averaging of slowly converging functions. We have solved this system for MAST, superimposing the solutions of both differential equations and mapping them onto a MAST plasma. Comparisons with the evolution of ELM filaments in MAST will be reported in order to test the model. The support of the EPSRC for the FCDT (Grant EP/K504178/1), of Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018 (No 633053) and of the RCUK Energy Programme [grant number EP/I501045] is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Melatonin enhances the recovery of cryopreserved shoot tips of American elm (Ulmus americana L.).

    PubMed

    Uchendu, Esther E; Shukla, Mukund R; Reed, Barbara M; Saxena, Praveen K

    2013-11-01

    Climate change and global migrations of people and goods have exposed trees to new diseases and abiotic challenges that threaten the survival of species. In vitro germplasm storage via cryopreservation is an effective tool to ensure conservation of tree species, but plant cells and tissues are exposed to multiple stresses during the cryopreservation process. The current study was designed to evaluate the potential of melatonin to improve survival through the process of cryopreservation. Shoot tips of in vitro-grown plantlets and dormant winter buds of American elm were successfully cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen (LN) at -196°C under controlled environmental conditions following melatonin treatment and cold acclimation with either vitrification or encapsulation–vitrification protocols. Explants had optimal regrowth following cryopreservation when treated with the plant vitrification solution#2 (PVS2) for 10 min. Supplementation of both preculture and regrowth media with melatonin significantly enhanced regrowth of frozen shoots compared with the untreated control (P < 0.05). Approximately 80–100% of shoot explants grew under optimized conditions using melatonin-enriched media. Shoot tips of dormant winter buds consistently produced nearly 100% regrowth with both techniques. The main steps of the optimized protocol are14-day cold-acclimated cultures exposed to preculture medium with 0.1–0.5 lM melatonin for 24 hr, application of PVS2 for 10 min, rapid cooling in LN, rapid rewarming, removal of cryoprotectants, and recovery on a medium supplemented with 0.1–0.5 lM melatonin. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of the antioxidant melatonin for long-term storage of naturally resistant elm germplasm. PMID:24117864

  20. Modelling ELM heat flux deposition on the ITER main chamber wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kočan, M.; Pitts, R. A.; Lisgo, S. W.; Loarte, A.; Gunn, J. P.; Fuchs, V.

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of ELM filaments with the ITER beryllium first wall panels (FWPs) is studied using a simple ad-hoc fluid model of the filament parallel transport, taking into account the full, three-dimensional structure of the FWPs, including magnetic shadowing effects. The calculated ELM surface heat loads are used as input to the RACLETTE heat transfer code to estimate the FWP surface temperature rise. The results indicate that controlled ELMs in ITER during burning plasma operation (ΔWELM ≈ 0.6 M J) will not lead to melting or significant evaporation of the beryllium surfaces, even in the case of high ELM broadening and the minimum allowable distance between the primary and secondary separatrices. The ELM-averaged steady-state heat load also stays below the maximum power handling capability of the FWPs.

  1. Biology of the invasive banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), in the western United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The invasive banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi Semenov, native to Asia, was detected in the United States in 2003 and is now known to occur in 28 states and four Canadian Provinces. S. schevyrewi infests the same elm hosts as the long-established invasive, and smaller European elm bark be...

  2. The Dutch experience.

    PubMed

    Hendin, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    Euthanasia has been legally sanctioned in the Netherlands by a series of court decisions going back to the 1970s. The author discusses the cultural and historical factors that may have contributed to this development. In the past decade, studies sanctioned by the Dutch government reveal that guidelines established for the regulation of euthanasia--a voluntary, well-considered, persistent request, intolerable suffering that cannot be relieved, consultation with a colleague, and reporting of cases--are consistently violated. Of greatest concern is the number of patients who are put to death without their consent--there are more involuntary than voluntary cases. Euthanasia intended originally for the exceptional case has become an accepted way of dealing with the physical and mental distress of serious or terminal illness. In the process palliative care has become one of the casualties while hospice care lags behind that of other countries. Case examples are given. PMID:11925835

  3. Demonstration of ELM pacing by Pellet Injection on DIII-D and Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, Thomas C; Parks, P. B.; Evans, T.E.; Osborne, T. H.; Strait, E. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R.A.; Yu, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Demonstration of ELM pacing by pellet injection on DIII-D and extrapolation to ITER<#_ftn1>* L.R. Baylor1, N. Commaux1, T.C. Jernigan1, P.B. Parks2, T.E. Evans2, T.H. Osborne2, E.J. Strait2, M.E. Fenstermacher3, C.J. Lasnier3, R.A. Moyer4, J.H. Yu4 1Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA 2General Atomics, San Diego, CA, USA 3 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA 4University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Deuterium pellet injection has been used in experiments on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the possibility of triggering small rapid edge localized modes (ELMs) in reactor relevant plasma regimes. ELMs have been observed to be triggered from small 1.8 mm pellets injected from all available locations and under all H-mode operating scenarios in DIII-D. Experimental details have shown that the ELMs are triggered before the pellets reach the top of the H-mode pedestal, implying that very small shallow penetrating pellets are sufficient to trigger ELMs. Fast camera images of the pellet entering the plasma from the low field side show a single plasma filament becoming visible near the pellet cloud and striking the outer vessel wall within 200 ms. Additional ejected filaments are then observed to subsequently reach the wall. The plasma stored energy loss from the pellet triggered ELMs is a function of the elapsed time after a previous ELM. Pellet ELM pacing has been proposed as a method to prevent large ELMs that can damage the ITER plasma facing components [1]. A demonstration of pacing of ELMs on DIII-D was made by injecting slow 14 Hz pellets on the low field side in an ITER shape plasma with low natural ELM frequency and a normalized b of 1.8. The non-pellet discharge natural ELM frequency was ~5 Hz with ELM energy losses up to 85 kJ (>10% of total stored energy) while the case with pellets was able to demonstrate >20 Hz ELMs with an average ELM energy loss less than 22 kJ (<3% of the total). The resulting ELM frequency

  4. Transition to ELM-free improved H-mode by lithium deposition on NSTX graphite divertor surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D K; Kugel, H W; Maingi, R; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Kaita, R; Kallman, J; Kaye, S; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V A; Timberlake, J; Wilgen, J; Zakharov, L

    2009-02-17

    Lithium evaporated onto plasma facing components in the NSTX lower divertor has made dramatic improvements in discharge performance. As lithium accumulated, plasmas previously exhibiting robust Type 1 ELMs gradually transformed into discharges with intermittent ELMs and finally into continuously evolving ELM-free discharges. During this sequence, other discharge parameters changed in a complicated manner. As the ELMs disappeared, energy confinement improved and remarkable changes in edge and scrape-off layer plasma properties were observed. These results demonstrate that active modification of plasma surface interactions can preempt large ELMs.

  5. Langmuir-magnetic probe measurements of ELMs and dithering cycles in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, N.; Naulin, V.; Xu, G. S.; Rasmussen, J. J.; Wang, H. Q.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, L.; Liang, Y.; Nielsen, A. H.; Madsen, J.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.

    2014-09-01

    Measurements of the dynamical behavior associated with edge localized modes (ELMs) have been carried out in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) by direct probing near the separatrix and far scrape-off layer (SOL) using electrostatic as well as magnetic probes. Type-III ELMs and dithering cycles have been investigated near the threshold power for the transition from the low confinement mode (L-mode) to the high confinement mode (H-mode). A precursor is observed prior to type-III ELM events with chirping frequency (130-70 kHz). It is located inside the separatrix and does not lead to considerable particle transport into the SOL. Distinct from type-III ELMs, no precursor modes precede the dithering cycles. It is evident from our measurements that the absence of precursor activity is a good indicator to distinguish the dithering cycles from type-III ELMs. A number of distinct current filaments are identified slightly inside the separatrix, both during type-III ELM events and dithering cycles. The characteristic current topology in these filaments is still ambiguous in our investigations. Furthermore, small ELMs are observed in type-I ELMy-like H-mode discharge regimes on EAST, in which solitary monopolar current filaments are observed to propagate in the SOL.

  6. THE ELM SURVEY. V. MERGING MASSIVE WHITE DWARF BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Warren R.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Kilic, Mukremin; Gianninas, A.; Allende Prieto, Carlos E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: alexg@nhn.ou.edu

    2013-05-20

    We present the discovery of 17 low-mass white dwarfs (WDs) in short-period (P {<=} 1 day) binaries. Our sample includes four objects with remarkable log g {approx_equal} 5 surface gravities and orbital solutions that require them to be double degenerate binaries. All of the lowest surface gravity WDs have metal lines in their spectra implying long gravitational settling times or ongoing accretion. Notably, six of the WDs in our sample have binary merger times <10 Gyr. Four have {approx}>0.9 M{sub Sun} companions. If the companions are massive WDs, these four binaries will evolve into stable mass transfer AM CVn systems and possibly explode as underluminous supernovae. If the companions are neutron stars, then these may be millisecond pulsar binaries. These discoveries increase the number of detached, double degenerate binaries in the ELM Survey to 54; 31 of these binaries will merge within a Hubble time.

  7. ELM-resolved divertor erosion in the JET ITER-Like Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Harder, N.; Brezinsek, S.; Pütterich, T.; Fedorczak, N.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.; Van Rooij, G. J.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten erosion in H-mode plasmas is quantified in the outer divertor of the JET ITER-Like Wall environment with optical emission spectroscopy on the 400.9 nm atomic neutral tungsten line. A novel cross-calibration procedure is developed to link slow, high spectral resolution spectroscopy and fast photomultiplier tube measurements in order to obtain ELM-resolved photon fluxes. Inter-ELM W erosion is exclusively impurity sputtering by beryllium because of the high sputter threshold for deuterons. Low beryllium concentrations resulted in low inter-ELM sputter yields of around 10-4 with respect to the total flux. Intra-ELM W sources, which dominate the total W tungsten source, vary independently from the inter-ELM source. The amount of W erosion could only be partly explained by beryllium sputtering, indicating that during ELMs sputtering by fuel species is important. The total W outer divertor source is found to linearly increase with the power crossing the separatrix, whilst excessive divertor fueling can break this trend. The influence of the W source rate on the tungsten content of the core plasma is investigated using soft x-ray emission to determine the tungsten content. At low source rates the content is determined by the source, but at higher source rates, other phenomena determine the total tungsten content. Indications of impurity flushing by ELMs is seen at ELM frequencies above approximately 40 Hz. The inner/outer divertor asymmetry of the W source during ELMs is investigated, and the outer divertor W source is larger by a factor of 1.8+/- 0.7 .

  8. Real-time control of ELM and sawtooth frequencies: similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennholm, M.; Frigione, D.; Graves, J. P.; Beaumont, P. S.; Blackman, T.; Carvalho, I. S.; Chapman, I.; Dumont, R.; Felton, R.; Garzotti, L.; Goniche, M.; Goodyear, A.; Grist, D.; Jachmich, S.; Johnson, T.; Lang, P.; Lerche, E.; de la Luna, E.; Monakhov, I.; Mooney, R.; Morris, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Reich, M.; Rimini, F.; Sips, G.; Sheikh, H.; Sozzi, C.; Tsalas, M.; Contributors, JET

    2016-01-01

    ELMs and Sawteeth, located in different parts of the plasma, are similar from a control engineering point of view. Both manifest themselves through quiescent periods interrupted by periodic collapses. For both, large collapses, following long quiescent periods, have detrimental effects while short periods are associated with decreased confinement. Following the installation of the all metal ‘ITER like wall’ on JET, sawteeth and ELMs also play an important role by expelling tungsten from the core and edge of the plasma respectively. Control of tungsten has therefore been added to divertor heat load reduction, NTM avoidance and helium ash removal as reasons for requiring ELM and sawtooth control. It is therefore of interest to implement control systems to maintain the sawtooth and ELM frequencies in the desired ranges. On JET, ELM frequency control uses radial field ‘kicks’ and pellet and gas injection as actuators, while sawtooth control uses ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). JET experiments have, for the first time, established feedback control of the ELM frequency, via real time variation of the injected gas flow [1]. Using this controller in conjunction with pellet injection allows the ELM frequency to be kept as required despite variations in pellet ELM triggering efficiency. JET Sawtooth control experiments have, for the first time, demonstrated that low field side ICRH, as foreseen for ITER, can shorten sawteeth lengthened by central fast ions [2]. The development of ELM and sawtooth control could be key to achieve stable high performance JET discharges with minimal tungsten content. Integrating such schemes into an overall control strategy will be required in future tokamaks and gaining experience on current tokamaks is essential.

  9. ELM 2016--data update and new functionality of the eukaryotic linear motif resource.

    PubMed

    Dinkel, Holger; Van Roey, Kim; Michael, Sushama; Kumar, Manjeet; Uyar, Bora; Altenberg, Brigitte; Milchevskaya, Vladislava; Schneider, Melanie; Kühn, Helen; Behrendt, Annika; Dahl, Sophie Luise; Damerell, Victoria; Diebel, Sandra; Kalman, Sara; Klein, Steffen; Knudsen, Arne C; Mäder, Christina; Merrill, Sabina; Staudt, Angelina; Thiel, Vera; Welti, Lukas; Davey, Norman E; Diella, Francesca; Gibson, Toby J

    2016-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Linear Motif (ELM) resource (http://elm.eu.org) is a manually curated database of short linear motifs (SLiMs). In this update, we present the latest additions to this resource, along with more improvements to the web interface. ELM 2016 contains more than 240 different motif classes with over 2700 experimentally validated instances, manually curated from more than 2400 scientific publications. In addition, more data have been made available as individually searchable pages and are downloadable in various formats. PMID:26615199

  10. ELM 2016—data update and new functionality of the eukaryotic linear motif resource

    PubMed Central

    Dinkel, Holger; Van Roey, Kim; Michael, Sushama; Kumar, Manjeet; Uyar, Bora; Altenberg, Brigitte; Milchevskaya, Vladislava; Schneider, Melanie; Kühn, Helen; Behrendt, Annika; Dahl, Sophie Luise; Damerell, Victoria; Diebel, Sandra; Kalman, Sara; Klein, Steffen; Knudsen, Arne C.; Mäder, Christina; Merrill, Sabina; Staudt, Angelina; Thiel, Vera; Welti, Lukas; Davey, Norman E.; Diella, Francesca; Gibson, Toby J.

    2016-01-01

    The Eukaryotic Linear Motif (ELM) resource (http://elm.eu.org) is a manually curated database of short linear motifs (SLiMs). In this update, we present the latest additions to this resource, along with more improvements to the web interface. ELM 2016 contains more than 240 different motif classes with over 2700 experimentally validated instances, manually curated from more than 2400 scientific publications. In addition, more data have been made available as individually searchable pages and are downloadable in various formats. PMID:26615199

  11. Hydrologic data for Little Elm Creek, Trinity River basin, Texas, 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slade, R.M., Jr.; Hays, T.H.; Schoultz, C.T.

    1976-01-01

    This report contains rainfall, runoff, and storage data collected during the 1976 water year for a 75.5 sq mi area above the stream-gaging station Little Elm Creek near Aubrey, Texas. Floodflows from 35.7 sq mi of the area are regulated by 16 floodwater-retarding structures constructed by the Soil Conservation Service. During the 1976 water year, five storm periods were selected for detailed computations and analyses. Beginning with the 1975 water year, water-quality data is given for Little Elm Creek. Investigations in the Little Elm Creek watershed were terminated on September 30, 1976. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. ELM behaviour and linear MHD stability of edge ECRH heated ASDEX Upgrade plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burckhart, A.; Dunne, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; McDermott, R.; Viezzer, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-05-01

    In order to test the peeling–ballooning ELM model, ECRH heating was applied to the edge of ASDEX Upgrade type-I ELMy H-mode plasmas to alter the pedestal pressure and current density profiles. The discharges were analysed with respect to ideal MHD stability. While the ELM frequency increased and the pedestal gradients relaxed with edge ECRH, the MHD stability boundary did not change. The results indicate that the peeling–ballooning model is insufficient to fully explain the triggering of ELM instabilities in the presence of edge ECRH heating.

  13. The spindle position checkpoint is coordinated by the Elm1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jeffrey K.; Chudalayandi, Prakash; Heil-Chapdelaine, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    How dividing cells monitor the effective transmission of genomes during mitosis is poorly understood. Budding yeast use a signaling pathway known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPC) to ensure the arrival of one end of the mitotic spindle in the nascent daughter cell. An important question is how SPC activity is coordinated with mother–daughter polarity. We sought to identify factors at the bud neck, the junction between mother and bud, which contribute to checkpoint signaling. In this paper, we show that the protein kinase Elm1 is an obligate regulator of the SPC, and this function requires localization of Elm1 to the bud neck. Furthermore, we show that Elm1 promotes the activity of the checkpoint kinase Kin4. These findings reveal a novel function for Elm1 in the SPC and suggest how checkpoint activity may be linked to cellular organization. PMID:21041444

  14. ELM Suppression in Low Edge Collisionality H-Mode Discharges Using n=3 Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K H; Evans, T E; Doyle, E J; Fenstermacher, M E; Groebner, R J; Leonard, A W; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Snyder, P B; Thomas, P R; West, W P; Boedo, J A; Garofalo, A M; Gohil, P; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Lasnier, C J; Reimerdes, H; Rhodes, T L; Scoville, J T; Solomon, W M; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; Zeng, L

    2005-07-11

    Using resonant magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n = 3, we have produced H-mode discharges without edge localized modes (ELMs) which run with constant density and radiated power for periods up to about 2550 ms (17 energy confinement times). These ELM suppression results are achieved at pedestal collisionalities close to those desired for next step burning plasma experiments such as ITER and provide a means of eliminating the rapid erosion of divertor components in such machines which could be caused by giant ELMs. The ELM suppression is due to an enhancement in the edge particle transport which reduces the edge pressure gradient and pedestal current density below the threshold for peeling-ballooning modes. These n = 3 magnetic perturbations provide a means of active control of edge plasma transport.

  15. ELM-related fluctuations in PBX-M H-modes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.; Hahm, T.S.; Sesnic, S.; Tang, W.; Roney, P.; Davis, W.; Dunlap, J.L.; Harris, J.H.

    1994-04-01

    Edge Localized Modes, or ELMs, are at the same time both disadvantageous and advantageous features of H-modes. ELMs can cause energy and particle losses from the plasma, with instantaneous energy losses reaching 40% of the total stored energy in the case of large-amplitude ELMs. The energy loss from these ELMs, or closely spaced smaller ELMs, may result in what is known as a beta-collapse, an event in which energy is lost over a substantial duration of the discharge. On the other hand, if controlled, the ELM related energy and, especially, impurity losses can lead to near steady-state discharge conditions with relatively low radiative power losses. The importance of ELMs in the development of the H-phase has led to numerous studies which attempt to uncover their nature. The purpose of the present work is to present additional observations of, most notably, high frequency magnetic fluctuations associated with ELMS. There are some observations here that are consistent with previously reported ones, namely the appearance of high frequency ({ge}250 kHz) activity prior to the D{sub {alpha}} increase, suggesting again that the rise in D{sub {alpha}} is some delayed response to an instability occurring farther inside the plasma edge. While this high frequency activity is global, with high coherence for all coil pairs both on the inside and outside midplane, there is no identifiable mode structure. Reported here for the first time are observations of a very intense outward ballooning feature that appears simultaneously with the D{sub {alpha}} increase and lasts for about 5 msec. The toroidal mode structure of this feature is clearly identifiable, consisting of a series of toroidal harmonics from n=3 to 8, at frequencies given by f{sub n}=f{sub 0}+n{Delta}f, with f{sub 0}=30 to 50 kHz and A{Delta}=20 to 30 kHz.

  16. Hydrologic data for Little Elm Creek, Trinity River basin, Texas, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slade, R.M.; Taylor, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    This report contains rainfall, runoff, and storage data collected during the 1975 water year for a 75.5 sq mi area above the stream-gaging station Little Elm Creek near Aubrey, Texas. Floodflows from 35.7 sq mi of the area are regulated by 16 floodwater-retarding structures constructed by the Soil Conservation Service. Six storm periods were selected for detailed computations and analyses. Water-quality data is given for Little Elm Creek. (Woodard-USGS)

  17. Diffusion-trapping modelling of hydrogen recycling in tungsten under ELM-like heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, K.

    2016-02-01

    The recycling of D ions impinging onto a W divertor surface is a key input parameter into the power and momentum balance at the target boundary during SOL modeling. It is described by the ratio R of the flux of recombining D2 molecules to the non-reflected incident ion flux. In steady-state plasmas where the surface is in equilibrium with the incident flux, R equals one due to particle conservation. However, during transient events such as edge localized modes (ELMs) the evolution of R with time is not straightforward to predict. Therefore, detailed diffusion-trapping calculations were performed taking into account the variations in power influx and particle energy during an ELM. They showed that in contrast to the naive expectation, that the ELM would deplete the surface and subsequently lead to ‘pumping’ (R \\ll 1) of the incident flux by the empty surface, R ≈ 1 or even R \\gt 1 occurs. This paper will first describe how the ELM was approximated in the 1D diffusion-trapping code and then discuss the evolution of R during an ELM and in the inter ELM phase. Also, an analytical picture of R will be developed which allows qualitatively understanding the evolution of R as calculated by the diffusion-trapping code.

  18. The Effect of ELMs on HHFW Heating of NBI Generated H-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosea, J. C.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S.; Gray, T. K.; Green, D. L.; Jaeger, E. F.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; McLean, A.; Phillips, C. K.; Roquemore, L.; Ryan, P. M.; Sabbagh, S.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Wilgen, J.; Wilson, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    ELMs reduce the stored energy achieved with HHFW heating compared with the ELM free case as also occurs for NBI heating alone. This reduction can be attributed both to direct ELM ejection of stored energy and to an increase in edge density with ELMs that exceeds the onset density for perpendicular wave propagation near the antenna [1,2], and leads to significantly more edge RF power deposition. This latter effect causes a more intense RF "hot" zone in the lower divertor scrape off region due to an increase in edge RF power propagating to the divertor from the antenna region along the magnetic field lines. Fast IR measurements of the direct ELM heat deposition at the lower divertor shows it to be peaked in the vicinity of the outer strike radius and to fall off strongly as the "hot" zone is approached, indicating little direct ELM effect on the "hot" zone heating. Physics studies of the "hot" zone have begun with sweeping the RF "hot" zone spiral over Rogowski instrumented divertor region tiles to show that the tile currents track the location of the zone. The relation of the results here to the AORSA RF code simulations including the SOL region is pointed out.

  19. Divertor heat loads in RMP ELM controlled H-mode plasmas on DIII-D*

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, M; Lasnier, C; Schmitz, O; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Watkins, J; Eich, T; Moyer, R; Wolf, R; Baylor, L; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; Frerichs, H; deGrassie, J; Gohil, P; Joseph, I; Lehnen, M; Leonard, A; Petty, C; Pinsker, R; Reiter, D; Rhodes, T; Samm, U; Snyder, P; Stoschus, H; Osborne, T; Unterberg, B; West, W

    2008-10-13

    In this paper the manipulation of power deposition on divertor targets at DIII-D by application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is analyzed. It has been found that heat transport shows a different reaction to the applied RMP depending on the plasma pedestal collisionality. At pedestal electron collisionality above 0.5 the heat flux during the ELM suppressed phase is of the same order as the inter-ELM in the non-RMP phase. Below this collisionality value we observe a slight increase of the total power flux to the divertor. This can be caused by much more negative potential at the divertor surface due to hot electrons reaching the divertor surface from the pedestal area and/or so called pump out effect. In the second part we discuss modification of ELM behavior due to the RMP. It is shown, that the width of the deposition pattern in ELMy H-mode depends linearly on the ELM deposited energy, whereas in the RMP phase of the discharge those patterns seem to be controlled by the externally induced magnetic perturbation. D{sub 2} pellets injected into the plasma bulk during ELM-free RMP H-mode lead in some cases to a short term small transients, which have very similar properties to ELMs in the initial RMP-on phase.

  20. RMP ELM Suppression in DIII-D Plasmas with ITER Similar Shapes and Collisionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Watkins, J. G.; Gohil, P.; Joseph, I.; Schaffer, M. J.; Baylor, Larry R; Becoulet, M.; Boedo, J.A.; Burrell, K. H.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Finken, K. H.; Jernigan, Thomas C; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Lonnroth, J.; Nardon, E.; Parail, V.; Unterberg, B.; West, W.P.

    2008-01-01

    Large Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) are completely eliminated with small n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) in low average triangularity, = 0.26, plasmas and in ITER similar shaped (ISS) plasmas, = 0.53, with ITER relevant collisionalities ve 0.2. Significant differences in the RMP requirements and in the properties of the ELM suppressed plasmas are found when comparing the two triangularities. In ISS plasmas, the current required to suppress ELMs is approximately 25% higher than in low average triangularity plasmas. It is also found that the width of the resonant q95 window required for ELM suppression is smaller in ISS plasmas than in low average triangularity plasmas. An analysis of the positions and widths of resonant magnetic islands across the pedestal region, in the absence of resonant field screening or a self-consistent plasma response, indicates that differences in the shape of the q profile may explain the need for higher RMP coil currents during ELM suppression in ISS plasmas. Changes in the pedestal profiles are compared for each plasma shape as well as with changes in the injected neutral beam power and the RMP amplitude. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of requirements for optimal ELM control coil designs and for establishing the physics basis needed in order to scale this approach to future burning plasma devices such as ITER.

  1. Effect of Island Overlap on ELM Suppression by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Evans, T E; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Aldan, M P; deGrassie, J S; Gohil, P; Joseph, I; Moyer, R A; Snyder, P B; Groebner, R J; Jakubowski, M; Leonard, A W; Schmitz, O

    2007-11-08

    Recent DIII-D [J.L. Luxon, et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 1813 (2003)] experiments show a correlation between the extent of overlap of magnetic islands induced in the edge plasma by perturbation coils and complete suppression of Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in plasmas with ITER-like electron pedestal collisionality {nu}*{sub e} {approx} 0.1, flux surface shape and low edge safety factor (q{sub 95} {approx} 3.6). With fixed n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) strength, ELM suppression is obtained only in a finite window in the edge safety factor (q{sub 95}) consistent with maximizing the resonant component of the applied helical field. ELM suppression is obtained over an increasing range of q{sub 95} by either increasing the n = 3 RMP strength, or by adding n = 1 perturbations to 'fill in' gaps between islands across the edge plasma. The suppression of Type-I ELMs correlates with a minimum width of the edge region having magnetic islands with Chirikov parameter >1.0, based on vacuum calculations of RMP mode components excluding the plasma response or rotational shielding. The fraction of vacuum magnetic field lines that are lost from the plasma, with connection length to the divertor targets comparable to an electron-ion collisional mean free path, increases throughout the island overlap region in the ELM suppressed case compared with the ELMing case.

  2. Suppression of type-I ELMs with reduced RMP coil set on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, D. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Evans, T. E.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Ferraro, N. M.; Nazikian, R.; deGrassie, J. S.; Grierson, B. A.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; King, J. D.; Logan, N. C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Maingi, R.; Snyder, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Wingen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated that having a toroidally-monochromatic spectral content of edge-resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is not a necessary condition for suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs). Robust ELM suppression has been reproducibly obtained on DIII-D during experiments in which various non-axisymmetric coil loops were turned off pseudo-randomly producing a variety of n=1 , n= 2 , and n= 3 spectral contributions. It was shown that RMP ELM suppression could be achieved with as few as 5 out of 12 internal coil loops (I-coils) on DIII-D at similar coil currents and with good plasma confinement. Linear MHD plasma response (m3dc1, ipec, mars) and vacuum (surfmn, trip3d) modelling have been performed in order to understand the effects of the perturbation spectrum on the plasma response and ELM suppression. The results suggest that reduction of the dominant n= 3 perturbation field is compensated by increased n= 2 field in the plasma that may lead to RMP ELM suppression at lower levels of n= 3 perturbative magnetic flux from the I-coils. These results provide additional confidence that ITER may be capable of RMP ELM suppression in the event of multiple internal coil failures.

  3. Identification and control of nonlinear system based on Laguerre-ELM Wiener model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yinggan; Han, Zhenzhen; Liu, Fucai; Guan, Xinping

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a new Wiener model is presented for identification and control of single-input single-output (SISO) nonlinear systems. The proposed Wiener model consists of a linear Laguerre filter in cascaded with an extreme learning machine (ELM) neural network (called Laguerre-ELM Wiener model). Laguerre filter can approximate a stable linear system to any degree of accuracy with a small number of Laguerre filters, which provides a parsimony structure and high level accuracy simultaneously. To determine the appropriated number of Laguerre filters in Laguerre-ELM Wiener model, Lipschitz quotient criterion is adapted to determine the order of linear part. A generalized ELM algorithm is proposed to estimate the parameters of Laguerre-ELM Wiener model. Once the unknown nonlinear system is identified using Laguerre-ELM Wiener model, a generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm is designed for control of nonlinear system. The advantage of the proposed control method is that it transfers a nonlinear control problem to a linear one by inserting the inverse of static nonlinear section. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed identification and control algorithms.

  4. Utilizing solid impurity granules for ELM pacing in NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunsford, Robert; Roquemore, L.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Maingi, R.; NSTX-U Team

    2015-11-01

    Periodic edge localized modes (ELMs) rapidly transport stored energy from the edge plasma to the divertor. These events result in abrupt heating of the plasma facing components (PFCs) which reduces their effective lifetime as well as generating a strong impurity influx. If the frequency of these ELMs can be increased through controlled triggering, also known as pacing, then the inverse relationship between the peak heat flux and the frequency of the ELMs can be utilized to prevent material damage that could result from otherwise unmitigated ELMs. At NSTX, the ability of small (300 - 1000 micron) impurity granules to trigger and pace these ELMs is being explored. In these experiments, ELMs are triggered by seeding a density perturbation within the edge-pedestal region through low speed injection and ablation of impurity granules, thus generating a localized instability. Granules are dropped from a reservoir and transit a vertical flight tube at which point a rotating impeller imparts horizontal momentum into the falling granules. This drives them into the edge of the discharge at speeds ranging from 50-150 m/s and average injection frequencies of up to 200 Hz depending upon the settings of the injector. Results from the initial laboratory injection tests of lithium, boron carbide (B4C) and vitreous carbon granules and their subsequent implementation in NSTX-U experiments will be discussed. Work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Suppression of type-I ELMs with reduced RMP coil set on DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Orlov, D. M.; Moyer, R. A.; Evans, T. E.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Ferraro, N. M.; Nazikian, R.; deGrassie, John S.; Grierson, Brian A.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, Max E.; et al

    2016-02-19

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated that having a toroidally-monochromatic spectral content of edge-resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is not a necessary condition for suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs). Robust ELM suppression has been reproducibly obtained on DIII-D during experiments in which various non-axisymmetric coil loops were turned off pseudo-randomly producing a variety of n=1 , n=2, and n=3 spectral contributions. It was demonstrated that RMP ELM suppression could be achieved with as few as 5 out of 12 internal coil loops (I-coils) on DIII-D at similar coil currents and with good plasma confinement. Linear MHD plasma response (M3DC1, IPEC,more » MARS) and vacuum (SURFMN, TRIP3D) modelling have been performed in order to understand the effects of the perturbation spectrum on the plasma response and ELM suppression. The results suggest that reduction of the dominant n=3 perturbation field is compensated by increased n=2 field in the plasma that may lead to RMP ELM suppression at lower levels of n=3 perturbative magnetic flux from the I-coils. In conclusion, these results provide additional confidence that ITER may be capable of RMP ELM suppression in the event of multiple internal coil failures.« less

  6. ELM triggering by energetic particle driven mode in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Aiba, N.; Shinohara, K.; Asakura, N.; Isayama, A.; Oyama, N.; the JT-60 Team

    2013-07-01

    In the JT-60U high-β plasmas above the no-wall β limit, a triggering of an edge localized mode (ELM) by an energetic particle (EP)-driven mode has been observed. This EP-driven mode is thought to be driven by trapped EPs and it has been named EP-driven wall mode (EWM) on JT-60U (Matsunaga et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 045001). When the EWM appears in an ELMy H-mode phase, ELM crashes are reproducibly synchronized with the EWM bursts. The EWM-triggered ELM has a higher repetition frequency and less energy loss than those of the natural ELM. In order to trigger an ELM by the EP-driven mode, some conditions are thought to be needed, thus an EWM with large amplitude and growth rate, and marginal edge stability. In the scrape-off layer region, several measurements indicate an ion loss induced by the EWM. The ion transport is considered as the EP transport through the edge region. From these observations, the EP contributions to edge stability are discussed as one of the ELM triggering mechanisms.

  7. Impact of the Pedestal Plasma Density on ELM Dynamics and Energy Loss Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.; BOUT++ Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The latest BOUT + + studies show an emerging understanding of ELM dynamics and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELM energy losses with ITPA multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT + + simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELM energy losses vs collisionality via a density scan, while keeping the plasma cross-sectional shape, total stored energy, total plasma current, pressure profiles fixed. The neoclassical collisionality at peak gradient position increases by a factor of 3262 from 0.0019 to 6.197. The critical trend of linear simulations emerges as a transition from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collsionality with decreasing density. Nonlinear BOUT + + simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward turbulence spreading as void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELM energy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. This work was performed for USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD project 12-ERD-022 and the China Natural Science Foundation under Contract No. 10721505. LLNL-ABS-656793.

  8. RMP ELM suppression in DIII-D plasmas with ITER similar shapes and collisionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Moyer, R. A.; Osborne, T. H.; Watkins, J. G.; Gohil, P.; Joseph, I.; Schaffer, M. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Bécoulet, M.; Boedo, J. A.; Burrell, K. H.; de Grassie, J. S.; Finken, K. H.; Jernigan, T.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Lonnroth, J.; Nardon, E.; Parail, V.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, B.; West, W. P.

    2008-02-01

    Large Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) are completely eliminated with small n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) in low average triangularity, \\bar {\\delta }=0.26 , plasmas and in ITER similar shaped (ISS) plasmas, \\bar {\\delta }=0.53 , with ITER relevant collisionalities v_e^\\ast \\le 0.2 . Significant differences in the RMP requirements and in the properties of the ELM suppressed plasmas are found when comparing the two triangularities. In ISS plasmas, the current required to suppress ELMs is approximately 25% higher than in low average triangularity plasmas. It is also found that the width of the resonant q95 window required for ELM suppression is smaller in ISS plasmas than in low average triangularity plasmas. An analysis of the positions and widths of resonant magnetic islands across the pedestal region, in the absence of resonant field screening or a self-consistent plasma response, indicates that differences in the shape of the q profile may explain the need for higher RMP coil currents during ELM suppression in ISS plasmas. Changes in the pedestal profiles are compared for each plasma shape as well as with changes in the injected neutral beam power and the RMP amplitude. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of requirements for optimal ELM control coil designs and for establishing the physics basis needed in order to scale this approach to future burning plasma devices such as ITER.

  9. Challenges to prevention in Dutch general practice.

    PubMed

    Drenthen, T

    1997-06-01

    In the Netherlands the general practitioner (GP) plays an important role in prevention. Every Dutch citizen has to be registered with one GP and GPs know their patients well. Face-to-face contact is a relatively effective means of influencing behavior; if preventive advice is related to a patient's state of health, compliance may be stimulated. However, Dutch GPs have shown reluctance toward preventive work. Curing rather than preventing disease is emphasized in medical school. Many GPs doubt that they are entitled to interfere with a patients' lifestyle unless asked. Some GPs are aware of their limited knowledge of nutrition. Preventive work requires some reorganization of medical practice and can lead to an increased workload, without financial compensation. Then there is the "prevention paradox": preventive actions that have a demonstrable effect on the whole population bring only small benefits for individuals. Since 1989 the Dutch College of General Practitioners has published 60 standards for general practice. Several of these include advice on lifestyle and diet, eg, for non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, peptic ulcer, and heart failure. Prevention work in general practice must use only interventions proved to be effective and they must be feasible in the context of general practice. A trial collaboration of 118 GPs and 5 public health authorities between 1988 and 1990 for screening and lifestyle management of hypertension was a limited success. It brought to light the practical problems of this type of work in general practice. Present government priorities for GP-public health collaboration are influenza vaccination and cervical screening. PMID:9174499

  10. Experimental Demonstration of High Frequency ELM Pacing by Pellet Injection on DIII-D and Extrapolation to ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Commaux, Nicolas JC; Jernigan, Thomas C; Meitner, Steven J; Brooks, N. H.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.; Strait, E. J.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Loarte, A.

    2012-01-01

    . The injection of high repetition rate deuterium pellets is shown to trigger high-frequency edge localized modes (ELMs) in otherwise low natural ELM frequency H-mode deuterium discharges in the DIII-D tokamak. The resulting triggered ELMs have significantly lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor than the natural ELMs. The plasma global energy confinement and density are not strongly affected by the pellet perturbations. The plasma core impurity density is strongly reduced with the application of the pellets. These experiments were performed in plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape and normalized operation with input power just above the H-mode power threshold. This strongly reduced ELM intensity shows promise for exploitation in ITER to control ELM size while maintaining high plasma purity and performance.

  11. Dutch museum marks Einstein anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Calmthout, Matijn

    2016-01-01

    A new painting of Albert Einstein's field equation from his 1915 general theory of relativity was unveiled in a ceremony in November 2015 by the Dutch physicist Robbert Dijkgraaf, who is director of the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study in the US.

  12. Ulmus americana is a polyploid complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The elms (the genus Ulmus) are one of the most important tree crops for the $4.7-billion per year nursery industry. The commercial importance of the genus centers on the American elm, Ulmus americana. Once decimated by Dutch Elm Disease, the recent introduction of cultivars resistant to the diseas...

  13. The Extent of Hybridization and Its Impact on the Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of an Invasive Tree, Ulmus Pumila (Ulmaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila L.), native to East Asia, was introduced in the U.S. in the 1900’s because of its high tolerance to Dutch elm disease (DED). Siberian elm has spread following its introduction and has now become one of the most invasive woody species in the U.S., alongside Russian olive a...

  14. SOLPS5 simulations of Type I ELMing H-mode at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulejová, B.; Pitts, R. A.; Coster, D.; Bonnin, X.; Beurskens, M.; Jachmich, S.; Kallenbach, A.; contributors to the EFDA-JET workprogramme

    2009-06-01

    This paper aims to contribute both to the ongoing process of scrape-off layer code-experiment and code-code benchmarking. Results are presented from SOLPS5 simulations of two high power JET H-modes with similar magnetic configuration, concentrating in the first case on the ELM-free phase of high Ip, ˜8 MJ stored energy plasmas with ELMs approaching 1 MJ, modeled for the first time with this code package. A second pulse, with lower stored energy and smaller ELMs, originally considered in detail by Kallenbach with the EDGE2D-NIMBUS code package [Kallenbach et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fus. 46 (2004) 431], has been modeled as a benchmarking exercise featuring a high level of complexity including carbon impurities and the full ELM cycle. Good agreement is found between the code results. The SOLPS5 results are used to analyse the energy balance during the ELM cycle. In both H-mode discharges, a strong inward particle pinch in the pedestal region is found to be necessary to match measured upstream profiles.

  15. Broadening of divertor heat flux profile with increasing number of ELM filaments in NSTX

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ahn, J. -W.; Maingi, R.; Canik, J. M.; Gan, K. F.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A. G.

    2014-11-13

    Edge localized modes (ELMs) represent a challenge to future fusion devices, owing to cyclical high peak heat fluxes on divertor plasma facing surfaces. One ameliorating factor has been that the heat flux characteristic profile width has been observed to broaden with the size of the ELM, as compared with the inter-ELM heat flux profile. In contrast, the heat flux profile has been observed to narrow during ELMs under certain conditions in NSTX. Here we show that the ELM heat flux profile width increases with the number of filamentary striations observed, i.e., profile narrowing is observed with zero or very fewmore » striations. Because NSTX often lies on the long wavelength current-driven mode side of ideal MHD instabilities, few filamentary structures can be expected under many conditions. Lastly, ITER is also projected to lie on the current driven low-n stability boundary, and therefore detailed projections of the unstable modes expected in ITER and the heat flux driven in ensuing filamentary structures is needed.« less

  16. Testing RMP ELM suppression models in low torque ITER Baseline Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, R. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Groebner, R. J.; La Haye, R. J.; Luce, T. C.; Osborne, T. H.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Grierson, B. A.; Nazikian, R.; Solomon, W. M.; Rhodes, T. L.; Zeng, L.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Hanson, J. M.; Turco, F.; Mordijck, S.; Fenstermacher, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    RMP ELM suppression experiments in low torque (Tinj) ITER Baseline Scenario provide an excellent test of our emerging model of ELM suppression when the edge plasma bifurcates to tearing response. In 2-fluid theory, this bifurcation occurs where the electron perpendicular rotation Ω⊥e ~ 0 , where Ω⊥e is the sum of the E × B and electron diamagnetic rotation ΩDe frequencies. To extend RMP ELM suppression to Tinj ~ 1 Nm, we reduced Tinj from 5 to 3.5 Nm, which produced lower core radial electric field and loss of ELM suppression as the Ω⊥e ~ 0 point moved deeper into the core. We also varied ΩDe at high Tinj by reducing the edge electron density, which led to ELM suppression. These results will be compared with expectations from 2-fluid theory. Supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FG02-08ER54984, DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-SC0007880, DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. ELM Suppression in DIII-D ITER-like Plasmas Using n = 2 Magnetic Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazikian, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Tobias, B. J.; Eldon, D.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Strait, E. J.; Haskey, S. R.; King, J. D.; McKee, G. R.; Moyer, R. A.; Orlov, D. M.; Shafer, M. W.

    2014-10-01

    A robust window of edge localized mode (ELM) suppression was observed at elevated magnetic safety factor (q95 ~ 4.1) in ITER-like plasmas with even parity n = 2 resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) using the internal I-coils. Variation of the upper and lower I-coil phasing was used to explore the importance of pitch alignment vs kink alignment for ELM suppression. Both the pedestal density and ELM suppression were strongly dependent on I-coil phasing and a large variation in the plasma response amplitude was measured on multiple diagnostics. Surprisingly, toroidal rotation of the even parity n = 2 RMP led to the loss of ELM suppression, indicating that components of the residual error field orthogonal to the kink mode may be important near the threshold for ELM suppression. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-06OR23100, DE-FG02-89ER53296, DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-FG02-07ER54917, and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  18. TRANSPORT OF ELM ENERGY AND PARTICLES INTO THE SOL AND DIVERTOR OF DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD, A.W.; BOEDO, J.A.; FENSTERMACHER, M.E.; GROEBNER, R.J.; GROTH, M.; LASNIER, C.J.; MAHDAVI, M.A.; OSBORNE, T.H.; RUDAKOV, D.L.; PETRIE, T.W.; WATKINS, J.G.

    2002-06-01

    We report on DIII-D data that reveal the underlying processes responsible for transport of energy and particles from the edge pedestal to the divertor target during edge-localized modes (ELMs). The separate convective and conductive transport of energy due to an ELM is determined by Thomson scattering measurements of electron density and temperature in the pedestal. Conductive transport is measured as a drop in pedestal temperature and decreases with increasing density. The convective transport of energy, measured as a loss of density from the pedestal, however, remains constant as a function of density. From the SOL ELM energy is quickly carried to the divertor target. An expected sheath limit to the ELM heat flux set by the slower arrival of pedestal ions is overcome by additional ionization of neutrals generated from the divertor target as evidenced by a fast, {approx}100 {micro}s, rise in divertor density. A large in/out asymmetry of the divertor ELM heat flux is observed at high density, but becomes nearly symmetric at low density.

  19. ELM Behavior in High- βp EAST-Demonstration Plasmas on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Garofalo, A. M.; Lao, L. L.; Meneghini, O.; Snyder, P. B.; Ren, Q. L.; Ding, S. Y.; Guo, W. F.; Qian, J. P.; Wan, B. N.; Xu, G. S.; Holcomb, C. T.; Solomon, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    In the DIII-D high- βp EAST-demonstration experiment, for several similar discharges when the experimental parameters such as the toroidal magnetic field or ECH power are varied slightly, the changes in ELM frequency response are observed to be much larger. Kinetic EFIT equilibrium reconstructions for these discharges have been performed, which suggest that the ELM frequency changes are likely due to the variations of pedestal width, height, and edge current density. Kinetic profile analyses further indicate that the strong ITB that are located at large minor radii (rho=0.6 ~0.7) in these discharges are affecting the pedestal structure. The ITB could broaden the pedestal width and decrease the pedestal height, thus changing the ELM frequency and size. With the GATO and ELITE MHD codes, the linear growth rates and mode structures of these ELMs are analyzed. The impact of ITB on the ELMs behavior will be discussed. Work supported by China MOST under 2014GB106001 and 2015GB102001 and US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG03-95ER54309.

  20. Comparison of Plasma Parameters Between QH and ELMing Phases of the Same Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Lasnier, C; West, W; Burrell, K; deGrassie, J; Doyle, E; Osborne, T

    2004-05-24

    H-mode confinement is observed for many energy confinement times without edge localized modes (ELMs) in QH (quiescent high-confinement)-mode discharges in DIII-D. To find critical differences between ELMing and QH modes we compared electron temperature (T{sub e}), density (n{sub e}), and ion temperature (T{sub i}), in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL) for a group of discharges. We also compared the electron pressures P{sub ped}, and maximum pressure gradients P{sub e,ped,max grad} because of their importance in confinement and stability. Experimental results show that the core line averaged density, median T{sub e} (pedestal), SOL T{sub e}, and T{sub e} pedestal width, and SOL T{sub i} are nearly the same in QH mode as that during ELMs. The n{sub e} (average pedestal), n{sub e} pedestal width, P{sub ped}, and P{sub e,ped,max grad} are similar to corresponding values in QH mode and at various times between ELMs. However, the pedestal T{sub i} is 1.6 times higher in QH mode than during ELMing.

  1. A novel classification method based on ICA and ELM: a case study in lie detection.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yijun; Luo, Yu; Huang, Wentao; Zhang, Wenjia; Yang, Yong; Gao, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    The classification of EEG tasks has drawn much attention in recent years. In this paper, a novel classification model based on independent component analysis (ICA) and Extreme learning machine (ELM) is proposed to detect lying. Firstly, ICA and its topography information were used to automatically identify the P300 ICs. Then, time and frequency-domain features were extracted from the reconstructed P3 waveforms. Finally, two classes of feature samples were used to train ELM, Back-propagation network (BPNN) and support vector machine (SVM) classifiers for comparison. The optimal number of P3 ICs and the values of classifier parameter were optimized by the cross-validation procedures. Experimental results show that the presented method (ICA_ELM) achieves the highest training accuracy of 95.40% with extremely less training and testing time on detecting P3 components for the guilty and the innocent subjects. The results indicate that the proposed method can be applied in lie detection. PMID:24211917

  2. Pellet Fueling, ELM pacing, and Disruption Mitigation Technology Development for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, Larry R; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; Jernigan, Thomas C; Meitner, S. J.; Parks, P. B.; Caughman, John B; Maruyama, S.; Qualls, A L; Rasmussen, David A; ThomasJr., C. E.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma fueling with pellet injection, pacing of edge localized modes (ELMs) by small frequent pellets, and disruption mitigation with gas jets or injected pellets are some of the most important technological capabilities needed for successful operation of ITER. Tools are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that can be employed on ITER to provide the necessary core pellet fueling and the mitigation of ELMs and disruptions. Here we present progress on the development of the technology to provide reliable high throughput inner wall pellet fueling, pellet ELM pacing with high frequency small pellets, and disruption mitigation with gas jets and pellets. Examples of how these tools can be employed on ITER are discussed.

  3. Design of Tokamak ELM Coil Support in High Nuclear Heat Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shanwen; Song, Yuntao; Wang, Zhongwei; Ji, Xiang; Daly, E.; Kalish, M.; Lu, Su; Du, Shuangsong; Liu, Xufeng; Feng, Changle; Yang, Hong; Wang, Songke

    2014-03-01

    In Tokomak, the support of the ELM coil, which is close to the plasma and subject to high radiation level, high temperature and high magnetic field, is used to transport and bear the thermal load due to thermal expansion and the alternating electromagnetic force generated by high magnetic field and AC current in the coil. According to the feature of ITER ELM coil, the mechanical performance of rigid and flexible supports under different high nuclear heat levels is studied. Results show that flexible supports have more excellent performance in high nuclear heat condition than rigid supports. Concerning thermal and electromagnetic (EM) loads, optimized results further prove that flexible supports have better mechanical performance than rigid ones. Through these studies, reasonable support design can be provided for the ELM coils or similar coils in Tokamak based on the nuclear heat level.

  4. Enhancement of ELM by Clustering Discrimination Manifold Regularization and Multiobjective FOA for Semisupervised Classification

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Pan, Hao; Liu, Changhua

    2015-01-01

    A novel semisupervised extreme learning machine (ELM) with clustering discrimination manifold regularization (CDMR) framework named CDMR-ELM is proposed for semisupervised classification. By using unsupervised fuzzy clustering method, CDMR framework integrates clustering discrimination of both labeled and unlabeled data with twinning constraints regularization. Aiming at further improving the classification accuracy and efficiency, a new multiobjective fruit fly optimization algorithm (MOFOA) is developed to optimize crucial parameters of CDME-ELM. The proposed MOFOA is implemented with two objectives: simultaneously minimizing the number of hidden nodes and mean square error (MSE). The results of experiments on actual datasets show that the proposed semisupervised classifier can obtain better accuracy and efficiency with relatively few hidden nodes compared with other state-of-the-art classifiers. PMID:26180525

  5. Radial Particle Flux in the SOL of DIII-D During ELMing H-Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, A W; Boedo, J A; Groth, M; Lipschultz, B L; Porter, G D; Rudakov, D L; Whyte, D G

    2006-06-01

    The radial particle flux in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) during ELMing H-mode is examined in DIII-D as a function of density. The global radial particle flux in the outboard far SOL is determined by a window frame technique. Between ELMs the outboard far SOL particle flux increases strongly with density but remains similar to the particle flux across the separatrix as estimated by the pedestal density and temperature gradients. At low density the steep density gradient of the pedestal extends up to 2 cm outside the separatrix. At high density the density gradient flattens just outside the separatrix making this region critical for assessment of the far SOL particle flux. During ELMs the far SOL particle flux becomes localized to the outboard midplane and the assumptions for the window frame analysis break down. Implications for scaling of main chamber wall particle flux and pedestal fueling are explored.

  6. EXB-Drift, Current, and Kinetic Effects on Divertor Plasma Profiles During ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T.D.; Shimada, M.

    2002-05-23

    The transient heat load on divertor surfaces from Edge-Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamaks can be very large and thus of concern for a large device such as ITER. Models for kinetic modifications to fluid models are discussed that should allow them to reasonably describe the long mean-free path regime encountered owing to the high electron and ion temperatures in the SOL during large ELMs. A set of two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the dynamic response of the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma to an ELM is presented. The role of plasma currents and E x B motion is emphasized, which cause large changes in the response compared to models neglecting them.

  7. Sleep apnoea episodes recognition by a committee of ELM classifiers from ECG signal.

    PubMed

    Sadr, Nadi; de Chazal, Philip; van Schaik, Andre; Breen, Paul

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a system for the recognition of sleep apnoea episodes from ECG signals using a committee of extreme learning machine (ELM) classifiers. RR-interval parameters (heart rate variability) have been used as the identifying features as they are directly affected by sleep apnoea. The MIT PhysioNet Apnea-ECG database was used. A committee of five ELM classifiers has been employed to classify one-minute epochs of ECG into normal or apnoeic epochs. Our results show that the classification performance from the committee of networks was superior to the results of a single ELM classifier for fan-outs from 1 to 100. Classification performance reached a plateau at a fan-out of 10. The maximum accuracy was 82.5% with a sensitivity of 81.9% and a specificity of 82.8%. The results were comparable to other published research with the same input data. PMID:26738070

  8. QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALLOONING MODES

    SciTech Connect

    LAO, LL; SNYDER, PB; LEONARD, AW; OSBORNE, TH; PETRIE, TW; FERRON, JR; GROEBNER, RJ; HORTON, LD; KAMADA, Y; MURAKAMI, M; OIKAWA, T; PEARLSTEIN, LD; SAARELMA, S; STJOHN, HE; THOMAS, DM; TURNBULL, AD; WILSON, HR

    2002-07-01

    OAK A271 QUANTITATIVE TESTS OF ELMS AS INTERMEDIATE N PEELING-BALLOONING MODES. Two of the major issues crucial for the design of the next generation tokamak burning plasma devices are the predictability of the edge pedestal height and control of the divertor heat load in H-mode configurations. Both of these are strongly impacted by edge localized modes (ELMs) and their size. A working model for ELMs is that they are intermediate toroidal mode number, n {approx} 5-30, peeling-ballooning modes driven by the large edge pedestal pressure gradient P{prime} and the associated large edge bootstrap current density J{sub BS}. the interplay between P{prime} and J{sub BS} as a discharge evolves can excite peeling-ballooning modes over a wide spectrum of n. The pedestal current density plays a dual role by stabilizing the high n ballooning modes via opening access to second stability but providing free energy to drive the intermediate n peeling modes. This makes a systematic evaluation of this model particularly challenging. This paper describes recent quantitative tests of this model using experimental data from the DIII-D and the JT-60U tokamaks. These tests are made possible by recent improvements to the ELITE MHD stability code, which allow an efficient evaluation of the unstable peeling-ballooning modes, as well as by improvements to other diagnostic and analysis techniques. Some of the key testable features of this model are: (1) ELMs are triggered when the growth rates of intermediate n MHD modes become significantly large; (2) ELM sizes are related to the radial widths of the unstable modes; (3) the unstable modes have a strong ballooning character localized in the outboard bad curvature region; (4) at high collisionality, ELM size generally becomes smaller because J{sub BS} is reduced.

  9. Pedestal Characterization and Stability of Small-ELM Regimes in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Aaron C; Canik, John; Maingi, Rajesh; Manickam, J.; Snyder, P.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Kubota, S.; LaBlanc, B. P.; Mueller, D.; Osborne, T.; Tritz, K.

    2010-01-01

    An instability near the plasma edge known as the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO) is thought to enable access to the ELM-free quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) in tokamaks, which is a highly desirable operational regime for ITER because of the avoidance of periodic ELM heat loads. The EHO has been hypothesized to be a saturated kink driven unstable by toroidal rotational shear that provides sufficient transport near the plasma edge to keep the edge plasma below the peeling-ballooning stability limit. NSTX has observed unstable modes with similar characteristics to the EHO coincident with transition to a small-ELM regime (called Type-V). These small ELMs do not have a measurable effect on the plasma stored energy (< 1%). Transition to this regime is associated with a downward biased plasma as evidenced by drsep < -5 mm. Soft x-ray emission indicates that these modes are localized just inside the pedestal and are correlated with increased density fluctuations in the pedestal as measured by microwave reflectometry. The lowest order mode rotates at the plasma rotation frequency, indicating n=1, and harmonics up to n=6 have been observed simultaneously with the n=1, as determined by the rotation frequency of the higher harmonics. Increased edge collisionality is required to access Type-V ELMs. Stability analysis during the observed modes indicates instability to n=1-3 with n=3 having the highest growth rate and unstable mode eigenfunctions peaked near the plasma edge. Discharges with Type-V and Type-I ELMs are both calculated to be on the peeling unstable side of the peeling ballooning stability curve, with the Type-V case at higher normalized pressure gradient.

  10. Numerical Analysis of the Effects of Normalized Plasma Pressure on RMP ELM Suppression in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, D. M.; Moyer, R.A.; Evans, T. E.; Mordijck, S.; Osborne, T. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Snyder, P. B.; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2010-01-01

    The effect of normalized plasma pressure as characterized by normalized pressure parameter (beta(N)) on the suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) using resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is studied in low-collisionality (nu* <= 0.2) H-mode plasmas with low-triangularity ( = 0.25) and ITER similar shapes ( = 0.51). Experimental results have suggested that ELM suppression by RMPs requires a minimum threshold in plasma pressure as characterized by beta(N). The variations in the vacuum field topology with beta(N) due to safety factor profile and island overlap changes caused by variation of the Shafranov shift and pedestal bootstrap current are examined numerically with the field line integration code TRIP3D. The results show very small differences in the vacuum field structure in terms of the Chirikov (magnetic island overlap) parameter, Poincare sections and field line loss fractions. These differences do not appear to explain the observed threshold in beta(N) for ELM suppression. Linear peeling-ballooning stability analysis with the ELITE code suggests that the ELMs which persist during the RMPs when beta(N) is below the observed threshold are not type I ELMs, because the pedestal conditions are deep within the stable regime for peeling-ballooning modes. These ELMs have similarities to type III ELMs or low density ELMs.

  11. Semiochemical-MediatedFlight Strategies of Two Invasive Elm Bark Beetles: A Potential Factor in Competitive Displacement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent seven-state survey revealed that the newly invasive banded elm bark beetle, Scolytus schevyrewi, was abundant in areas of Colorado and Wyoming, USA, whereas the long-established European elm bark beetle, S. multistriatus was not as abundant. Behavioral trials were conducted by hanging sm...

  12. Preliminary investigations of equilibrium reconstruction quality during ELMy and ELM-free phases on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfusa, M.; Murari, A.; Peluso, E.; Gaudio, P.; Orsitto, F. P.; Gerasimov, S.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-08-01

    On JET, the magnetic topology is normally derived from the code EFIT, which solves the Grad-Shafranov equation with constraints imposed by the available measurements, typically the pick-up coils. Both the code and the measurements are expected to perform worse during ELMs. To assess this hypothesis, various statistical indicators, based on the values of the residuals and their probability distribution, have been calculated. They all show that the quality of EFIT reconstructions is clearly better in absence of ELMs. How the responsibility, for the lower quality of the reconstructions, is shared between the measurements and EFIT is a subject under investigation. 2001 Elsevier Science.

  13. Advances in the Understanding of ELM Suppression by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in DIII-D and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have expanding the operating window for RMP ELM suppression to higher q95 with dominant electron heating and fully non-inductive current drive relevant to advanced modes of ITER operation. Robust ELM suppression has also been obtained with a reduced coil set, mitigating the risk of coil failure in maintaining ELM suppression in ITER. These results significantly expand the operating space and reduce risk for obtaining RMP ELM suppression in ITER. Efforts have also been made to search for 3D cause of ELM suppression. No internal non-axisymmetric structure is detected at the top of the pedestal, indicating that the dominant effect of the RMP is to produce an n=0 transport modification of the profiles. Linear two fluid MHD simulations using M3D-C1 indicate resonant field penetration and significant magnetic stochasticity at the top of the pedestal, consistent with the absence of detectable 3D structure in that region. A profile database was developed to compare the scaling of the pedestal and global confinement with the applied 3D field strength in ELM suppressed and ELM mitigated plasmas. The EPED pedestal model accurately predicts the measured pedestal pressure at the threshold of ELM suppression, increasing confidence in theoretical projections to ITER pedestal conditions. Both the H-factor (H(sub)98y2) and thermal energy confinement time do not degrade substantially with applied RMP fields near the threshold of ELM suppression, enhancing confidence in the compatibility of ITER high performance operation with RMP ELM suppression.

  14. Hybrid Couplers On The JET ICRF System: Commissioning And First Results on ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I.; Walden, T.; Blackman, T.; Graham, M.; Mailloux, J.; Nigthingale, M.; Ongena, J.

    2007-09-28

    During the 2004-2005 shutdown, hybrid 3 dB couplers were installed between the A2 ICRF antennas A and B. The goal was to free one of the generators to power the new ITER-like ICRF antenna, but also to use the coupler properties to increase the ICRF power on ELMs. Furthermore, the fast data acquisition system was upgraded in order to monitor the forward and reflected voltage amplitudes with a time resolution up to 4 {mu}s. As expected, the first tests showed that the reflected powers during ELMs was successfully directed to the coupler dummy load instead of the generators and that a clear improvement in the averaged coupled power in the presence of the ELMs could be obtained. However, the existing levels of the VSWR protection against arcs appeared not satisfactory for ELM-tolerant operation and had to be re-assessed. Moreover, evidence of parasitic low-VSWR activity in the vacuum transmission lines was found, emphasizing the importance of developing VSWR independent arc detection systems.

  15. Some Guides to Discovery About Elm Trees, Owls, Cockroaches, Earthworms, Cement and Concrete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    The introduction emphasizes the need for environmental and conservation education, and advocates an inquiry approach. Outdoor resources available to every school are listed. Detailed suggestions are made for investigating cement and concrete, cockroaches, earthworms, elm trees, and owls. In each case general background information and a list of…

  16. H-mode Characteristics and ELM Dynamics at Near-Unity Aspect Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K. E.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    Ohmic H-mode is achieved at near-unity aspect ratio in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment through the use of high-field-side fueling in both limited and diverted geometries. This regime is characterized by: increased edge rotation shear; increased central heating; and measured energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling. In limited plasmas the power threshold is ~ 10 × higher than predicted by the high- A empirical tokamak scaling for nG = 0 . 1- 0 . 6 . No significant reduction in the power threshold has been observed in favorable ∇B SN plasma when compared to limited plasmas. Two classes of ELMs have been identified to date by their proximity to the power threshold and measured n spectra. Small, Type III-like ELMs are present at input power POH ~Pth and have n <= 4 . At POH >>Pth , they transition to large, Type-I-like ELMs with intermediate 5 < n < 15. These general mode numbers are opposite those seen at large A and reflect the increased peeling drive present at low A . The unique operating characteristics available at A ~ 1 in Pegasus allow long-sought measurements of the time evolution of the Jedge (R) pedestal collapse during an ELM event. They show a complex, multimodal pedestal collapse and the subsequent ejection of a current-carrying filament. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  17. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  18. High Frequency ELM Pacing by Lithium Pellet Injection on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Lunsford, R.; Jackson, G. L.; Osborne, T. H.; Parks, P. B.

    2015-11-01

    Full-shot, high-frequency pacing of edge localized modes (ELM) by lithium pellet injection has been demonstrated in DIII-D. A Lithium Granule Injector (LGI), recently installed on DIII-D to study pacing efficiency dependence on granule size and velocity, was tested in different ELMy scenarios (βN = 1.2-2.0) injecting granules of nominal diameter 0.3-0.9 mm, with injection speed 50-120 m/s and injection rates up to 500 Hz. Robust ELM pacing was documented on time windows up to 3.5 s, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9 mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes and weakly dependent on granule velocity. Paced ELM frequencies up to 100 Hz were achieved, with a 2-5 fold increase over the natural ELM frequency and a consequent reduction of divertor peak heat flux. Overall, LGI high frequency pacing appeared to be compatible with high plasma performance, in terms of global confinement and pedestal characteristics. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  19. ELM suppression in high-purity DIII-D helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R. J.; Osborne, T. H.; Loarte, A.; Unterberg, E.; Grierson, B.; Fenstermacher, M.

    2015-11-01

    ELM suppression in He plasmas with D core concentrations of less than 20 % have been obtained in ECR heated, ITER Similar Shaped plasmas with low pedestal toroidal rotation (vϕ < 10 km/s). Here, n=3 RMP fields are used to suppress large type-I ELMs at power levels marginally above the PL-H threshold (PECRH=2.9 MW). ELM suppression in He plasmas has also been obtained using balanced co- and counter-Ip injected D neutral beams, with PNBI=1.7 MW which is near the PL-H threshold, resulting in vϕ ~ 0. The electron perpendicular rotation frequency during ELM suppression does not cross zero, assuming no uncertainty in the measurement, but remains slightly negative, with an average frequency of -5 krad/s, between 0.80 and 0.94 in normalized poloidal flux. This suggests that magnetic island screening is weak or nonexistent from the top of the H-mode pedestal inward to surfaces relatively deep in the core plasma. Work supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. The Desire for Structure: A Deconstructive Analysis of "Desire under the Elms."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Joel K.; Bowman, Michael S.

    A brief reading of "Desire under the Elms" by Eugene O'Neill illustrates how a conventional Oedipal reading of the playscript opens up spaces within the text for deconstructive free-play. In this case, a tension is identified and foregrounded between this conventional application of the Oedipal complex and Freud's interpretation of the Oedipal…

  1. Pedestal density fluctuation dynamics during the inter-ELM cycle in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Z.; McKee, G. R.; Groebner, R. J.; Snyder, P. B.; Osborne, T. H.; Burrell, K. H.; Beurskens, M. N.

    2011-05-15

    Detailed 2D measurements of long-wavelength density fluctuations in the pedestal region with beam emission spectroscopy during the period between edge localized modes (ELMs) indicate two distinct bands of fluctuations propagating in opposite poloidal directions in the plasma frame: one lower frequency band (50-150 kHz) advects in the ion-diamagnetic drift direction (ion mode) and a higher frequency band (200-400 kHz) advects in the electron diamagnetic drift direction (electron mode). The ion mode amplitude is modulated with the ELM cycle: it increases rapidly after an ELM and then saturates, similar to the evolution of the pedestal electron pressure and density gradients. The electron mode, in contrast, has no significant time evolution between ELMs. The decorrelation time of the ion mode is <5 {mu}s[{tau}{sub c}(c{sub s}/c{sub s}aa){<=}1], the radial correlation length is of order 10 {rho}{sub i} and has poloidal wave-number k{sub {theta}{rho}i{approx}}0.1, and the mode advects at near the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma frame. These spatiotemporal dynamics are qualitatively similar to features predicted for kinetic ballooning modes.

  2. Electron temperature fluctuations changes associated with ELM suppression by RMP in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; Wang, G.; Rhodes, T.; Peebles, W.

    2015-11-01

    New results in this presentation show an increase in broadband electron temperature fluctuations (T~e) during ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP). This measurement is obtained via correlation ECE (CECE) near the top of the pedestal (ρ ~ 0.9 - 0.96). This T~e increase is significant, (>40%), and occurs after the ELM suppression but not between ELMS. This may imply an increase in thermal transport facilitated by the increased T~e levels. Considering that the changes in gradient scale length during ELMs with RMP are complicated, it is possible that the mechanism responsible for changing T~e is different compared to previously observed changes in ñe [G. R. McKee et al NF 2013]. This possibility, and the nature of the T~e , will be studied through profile analysis and linear gyrokinetic analysis using TGLF [J. E. Kinsey et al PoP 2008]. In addition, the relation between the T~e and an observed low frequency coherent mode will be investigated. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. VIEW FROM EAST SIDE OF ELM DRIVE/BIRCH CIRCLE BLOCK, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM EAST SIDE OF ELM DRIVE/BIRCH CIRCLE BLOCK, SHOWING SLOPING TOPOGRAPHY. VIEW FACING WEST. - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. An elm EST database for identifying leaf beetle egg-induced defense genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants can defend themselves against herbivorous insects prior to the onset of larval feeding by responding to the eggs laid on their leaves. In the European field elm (Ulmus minor), egg laying by the elm leaf beetle ( Xanthogaleruca luteola) activates the emission of volatiles that attract specialised egg parasitoids, which in turn kill the eggs. Little is known about the transcriptional changes that insect eggs trigger in plants and how such indirect defense mechanisms are orchestrated in the context of other biological processes. Results Here we present the first large scale study of egg-induced changes in the transcriptional profile of a tree. Five cDNA libraries were generated from leaves of (i) untreated control elms, and elms treated with (ii) egg laying and feeding by elm leaf beetles, (iii) feeding, (iv) artificial transfer of egg clutches, and (v) methyl jasmonate. A total of 361,196 ESTs expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified which clustered into 52,823 unique transcripts (Unitrans) and were stored in a database with a public web interface. Among the analyzed Unitrans, 73% could be annotated by homology to known genes in the UniProt (Plant) database, particularly to those from Vitis, Ricinus, Populus and Arabidopsis. Comparative in silico analysis among the different treatments revealed differences in Gene Ontology term abundances. Defense- and stress-related gene transcripts were present in high abundance in leaves after herbivore egg laying, but transcripts involved in photosynthesis showed decreased abundance. Many pathogen-related genes and genes involved in phytohormone signaling were expressed, indicative of jasmonic acid biosynthesis and activation of jasmonic acid responsive genes. Cross-comparisons between different libraries based on expression profiles allowed the identification of genes with a potential relevance in egg-induced defenses, as well as other biological processes, including signal transduction, transport and

  5. [Dutch parliament legitimizes harmful quackery].

    PubMed

    van Dam, Frits S A M; Renckens, Cees N M

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch parliament has recently accepted a tax law in which certain groups of alternative therapists can be exempt from VAT. To be eligible for this VAT exemption, the disciplines to which the therapists belong have to meet certain training requirements. In this article it is contended, in agreement with the Royal College of Physicians in the UK, that statutory regulation is inappropriate for disciplines whose therapies are neither of proved benefit nor appropriately tested. It legitimizes harmful therapies. This is illustrated by two serious accidents, previously described in this journal, caused by a chiropractor and a craniosacral therapist. PMID:20298623

  6. Impurity Particle Transport in High Confinement Regimes Without ELMs on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grierson, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D using trace levels of fluorine gas injection have shown that high confinement regimes without ELMs can achieve rapid transport of impurity ions. Much attention has recently been given to regimes with H-mode energy confinement without edge-localized modes (ELMs), accessed either through Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) or MHD such as edge harmonic oscillations or quasi-coherent edge oscillations. Experiments on DIII-D have used gas puffing of trace levels of fluorine to introduce this fully-stripped, non-intrinsic and non-recycling impurity that can be easily measured with charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Trace fluorine is used because the time-history of the fluorine density profile permits direct extraction of the confinement time, particle diffusivity and convective velocity without relying on atomic modeling or assumptions about the source recycling. Results indicate impurity accumulation is more pronounced in RMP ELM suppressed plasmas with a pure n = 3 spectrum compared with mixed n = 1 and n = 3 RMP fields with reduced number of control coils. In cases where strong central carbon impurity accumulation occurs, trace fluorine analysis reveals a strong inward impurity pinch. Conversely, in plasmas with weak central carbon accumulation, the fluorine pinch is significantly lower. These measurements of impurity influx are consistent with TGLF modeling of the ELM-suppressed phase of the discharge revealing that strong impurity influx occurs when the ratio V/D is between -1 to -3. In this work, the dependencies of impurity transport on local driving gradients will be presented, and the means of increasing the impurity diffusion to recover high purity plasmas will be discussed providing a basis for achieving low-dilution, stationary ELM-free operation in ITER and future devices. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC0-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-05ER54698.

  7. Effect of Aspect Ratio on H-mode and ELM Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K. E.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Kriete, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    The H-mode confinement regime is achieved at near-unity aspect ratio (A < 1 . 2) in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment via high-field-side fueling and low edge recycling. Ohmic H-mode is attained in both limited and diverted magnetic topologies. This regime is characterized by: reduced Dα emissions; increased core rotation; increased central heating; formation of edge current and pressure pedestals; and measured energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling. The H-mode power threshold, PLH , behaves quite differently at low- A when compared with high- A operations. PLH /PLH_ITPA 08 increases sharply as A is lowered and no difference in PLH for limited and diverted plasmas is observed at A ~ 1 . 2 . No minimum in PLH with density is observed. Some of these results are consistent with the FM3 model for the L-H transition. Two classes of ELMs have been observed. Small, Type III-like ELMs are present at low input power and have n <= 4 . At POH >>PLH , they transition to large, Type-I-like ELMs with intermediate 5 < n < 15 . The Type III ELM magnetic structures behave opposite that of high- A plasmas, with n much higher, presumably due to the naturally higher J / B peeling mode drive at low- A . Long-sought measurements of the Jedge (R , t) pedestal collapse during an ELM event show a complex, multimodal pedestal collapse and the subsequent ejection of a current-carrying filament. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  8. Hybrid H-mode scenario with nitrogen seeding and type III ELMs in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corre, Y.; Joffrin, E.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Andrew, Y.; Arnoux, G.; Beurskens, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Buttery, R.; Coffey, I.; Crombe, K.; de La Luna, E.; Felton, R.; Giroud, C.; Hacquin, S.; Hobirk, J.; Huber, A.; Imbeaux, F.; Jachmich, S.; Kempenaars, M.; Litaudon, X.; Leggate, H.; Loarer, T.; Maddison, G.; Rachlew, E.; Rapp, J.; Sauter, O.; Savchkov, A.; Telesca, G.; Widdowson, A.; Zastrow, K. D.; Zimmermann, O.; collaborators, JET-EFDA

    2008-11-01

    The performance of the 'hybrid' H-mode regime (long pulse operation with high neutron fluency) has been extensively investigated in JET during the 2005-2007 experimental campaign up to normalized pressure βN = 3, toroidal magnetic field Bt = 1.7 T, with type I ELMs plasma edge conditions. The optimized external current drive sources, self-generated non-inductive bootstrap current and plasma core stability properties provide a good prospect of achieving a high fusion gain at reduced plasma current for long durations in ITER. One of the remaining issues is the erosion of the divertor target plates associated with the type I ELM regime. A possible solution could be to operate with a plasma edge in the type III ELM regime (reduced transient and stationary heat loads) obtained with impurity seeding. An integrated hybrid type III ELM regime with a normalized pressure βN = 2.6 (PNBI ~ 20-22 MW) and a thermal confinement factor of H_{98}^\\ast (y,2)\\sim 0.83 has been recently successfully developed on JET with nitrogen seeding. This scenario shows good plasma edge condition (compatible with the future ITER-like wall on JET) and moderate MHD activity. In this paper, we report on the experimental development of the scenario (with plasma current Ip = 1.7 MA and magnetic field Bt = 1.7 T) and the trade-off between heat load reduction at the target plates and global confinement due to nitrogen seeding and type III ELM working conditions.

  9. Tree and stand transpiration in a Midwestern bur oak savanna after elm encroachment and restoration thinning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asbjornsen, H.; Tomer, M.D.; Gomez-Cardenas, M.; Brudvig, L.A.; Greenan, C.M.; Schilling, K.

    2007-01-01

    Oak savannas, once common in the Midwest, are now isolated remnants within agricultural landscapes. Savanna remnants are frequently encroached by invasive trees to become woodlands. Thinning and prescribed burning can restore savanna structure, but the ecohydrological effects of managing these remnants are poorly understood. In this study, we measured sap flow (Js) to quantify transpiration in an Iowa bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa) savanna woodland encroached by elms (Ulmus americana), and in an adjacent restored savanna after thinning to remove elms, during summer 2004. Savanna oaks had greater mean daily Js (35.9 L dm-2 day-1) than woodland oaks (20.7 L dm-2 day-1) and elms (12.4 L dm-2 day-1). The response of Js to vapor pressure deficit (D) was unexpectedly weak, although oaks in both stands showed negative correlation between daily Js and D for D > 0.4 kPa. An earlier daily peak in Js in the elm trees showed a possible advantage for water uptake. As anticipated, the woodland's stand transpiration was greater (1.23 mm day-1) than the savanna's (0.35 mm day-1), yet the savanna achieved 30% of the woodland's transpiration with only 11% of its sapwood area. The difference in transpiration influenced water table depths, which were 2 m in the savanna and 6.5 m in the woodland. Regionally, row-crop agriculture has increased groundwater recharge and raised water tables, providing surplus water that perhaps facilitated elm encroachment. This has implications for restoration of savanna remnants. If achieving a savanna ecohydrology is an aim of restoration, then restoration strategies may require buffers, or targeting of large or hydrologically isolated remnants. ?? 2007.

  10. An Efficient Leave-One-Out Cross-Validation-Based Extreme Learning Machine (ELOO-ELM) With Minimal User Intervention.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Er, Meng Joo; Wang, Ning

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the architecture of the extreme learning machine (ELM) significantly affects its performance and how to determine a suitable set of hidden neurons is recognized as a key issue to some extent. The leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) is usually used to select a model with good generalization performance among potential candidates. The primary reason for using the LOO-CV is that it is unbiased and reliable as long as similar distribution exists in the training and testing data. However, the LOO-CV has rarely been implemented in practice because of its notorious slow execution speed. In this paper, an efficient LOO-CV formula and an efficient LOO-CV-based ELM (ELOO-ELM) algorithm are proposed. The proposed ELOO-ELM algorithm can achieve fast learning speed similar to the original ELM without compromising the reliability feature of the LOO-CV. Furthermore, minimal user intervention is required for the ELOO-ELM, thus it can be easily adopted by nonexperts and implemented in automation processes. Experimentation studies on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed ELOO-ELM algorithm can achieve good generalization with limited user intervention while retaining the efficiency feature. PMID:26259254

  11. Dutch translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the PROMIS® physical function item bank and cognitive pre-test in Dutch arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Patient-reported physical function is an established outcome domain in clinical studies in rheumatology. To overcome the limitations of the current generation of questionnaires, the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) project in the USA has developed calibrated item banks for measuring several domains of health status in people with a wide range of chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to translate and cross-culturally adapt the PROMIS physical function item bank to the Dutch language and to pretest it in a sample of patients with arthritis. Methods The items of the PROMIS physical function item bank were translated using rigorous forward-backward protocols and the translated version was subsequently cognitively pretested in a sample of Dutch patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Results Few issues were encountered in the forward-backward translation. Only 5 of the 124 items to be translated had to be rewritten because of culturally inappropriate content. Subsequent pretesting showed that overall, questions of the Dutch version were understood as they were intended, while only one item required rewriting. Conclusions Results suggest that the translated version of the PROMIS physical function item bank is semantically and conceptually equivalent to the original. Future work will be directed at creating a Dutch-Flemish final version of the item bank to be used in research with Dutch speaking populations. PMID:22390734

  12. Rational pharmacotherapy in The Netherlands: formulary management in Dutch hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fijn, R; de Jong-van den Berg, L T; Brouwers, J R

    1999-04-01

    A survey regarding the management of rational pharmacotherapy was conducted among all Dutch general hospitals in 1998. The response was 99% (n = 120). The presence of a drugs and therapeutics committee and antibiotic policies in Dutch general hospitals appears independent of hospital characteristics. However, formulary agreements and treatment guidelines are less likely to be present in hospitals that employ only 1 pharmacist or those served by community pharmacies. More than half of the hospitals claim to have restrictive formulary agreements. Large hospitals, hospitals in the eastern and southern provinces and those served by hospital pharmacies more often tend to have restrictive agreements compared to small hospitals, hospitals in the northern, central, and western provinces, and those served by community pharmacies. Various methods to impose restriction and ensure formulary compliance are mentioned. It must be noted that hospitals tend to operate rather solely regarding the large number of different formularies. Surprisingly just a small majority of pharmacists evaluates formulary agreements positively as a management tool. Many drawbacks appear to be present. The results of this survey indicate that in the future Dutch hospitals will favour disease management (treatment guidelines) over drug management (formulary agreements) in the management of rational pharmacotherapy and that information technology will be used to influence clinicians' prescribing behaviour. PMID:10380234

  13. Characterization of ELMs and Their Effects on NSTX Using Multi-color Ultrasoft X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Finikenthal, M.; Maingi, R.

    2004-11-01

    A variety of ELM phenomena is observed in NSTX, ranging from large "Type I" to less perturbative "Type III" and the recently identified "Type V". The effects these ELMs have on the plasma temperature and density profiles are assessed using multiple ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) arrays operated in a multi-color' (multi-energy) configuration. 1-D flux surface inversion is used to obtain the local emissivity, which is then modeled using perturbed Te, and density profiles. Fitting the multi-color' USXR data enables separately constraining the Te and ne x nZ perturbation and for instance propagating' the equilibrium Thompson temperature and density profiles over an ELM event. Additionally, 2-D tomographic inversion is used to assess poloidal asymmetries in the perturbations. Large Type I ELMs typically result in a crash in the SXR emission throughout the bulk plasma on a few ms timescale, which contrasts with the faster, edge-localized nature of the Type V perturbation.

  14. Observation of Abrupt- and Fast-rising SOL Current during Trigger Phase of ELMs in DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    H. Takahashi; E.D. Fredrickson; M.J. Schaffer; M.E. Austin; N.H. Brooks; T.E. Evans; G.L. Jackson; L.L. Lao; J.G. Watkins

    2005-06-27

    Extensive studies to date of edge localized modes (ELMs) have sought their origin inside the separatrix, i.e., MHD instability from steep gradients in the plasma edge, and examined their consequences outside the separatrix, i.e., transport of heat and particles in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) and divertors. Recent measurement by a high-speed scrape-off-layer current (SOLC) diagnostic may indicate that the ELM trigger process lies, in part, in the SOL. Thermoelectrically driven SOLC precedes, or co-evolves with, other parameters of the ELM process, and thus can potentially play a causal role: error field generated by non-axisymmetric SOLC, flowing in the immediate vicinity (approximately 1 cm) of the plasma edge, may contribute toward destabilizing MHD modes. The SOLC, observed concurrently with MHD activity, including ELMs, has been reported elsewhere.

  15. COMPARISON OF ELM PULSE PROPAGATION IN THE DIII-D SOL AND DIVERTORS WITH AN ION CONVECTION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    FENSTERMACHER,ME; PORTER,GD; LEONARD,AW; BROOKS,NH; BOEDO,JA; COLCHIN,RJ; GRAY,DS; GROEBNER,RJ; GROTH,M; HOGAN,JT; HOLLMANN,EM; LASNIER,CJ; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; RUDAKOV,DL; SNYDER,PB; TAKAHASHI,H; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L; DIII-D TEAM

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 Results from dedicated ELM experiments, performed in DIII-D with fast diagnostics to measure the evolution of Type-I ELM effects in the SOL and divertor, are compared with a simple ion convection model and with initial time-dependent UEDGE simulations. Delays between ELM effects observed in the inner versus the outer divertor regions in the experiments scale, as a function of density, with the difference in ion convection time along field lines from the outer midplane to the divertor targets. The ELM perturbation was modeled as an instantaneous radially uniform increase of diffusion coefficients from the top of the pedestal to the outer SOL. The perturbation was confined to a low field side poloidal zone {+-} 40{sup o} from the outer midplane. The delays in the simulations are similar to those observed in the experiments.

  16. Recent progress in understanding the processes underlying the triggering of and energy loss associated with type I ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, A.; Dunai, D.; Dunne, M.; Huijsmans, G.; Pamela, S.; Becoulet, M.; Harrison, J. R.; Hillesheim, J.; Roach, C.; Saarelma, S.

    2014-11-01

    The type I ELMy H-mode is the baseline operating scenario for ITER. While it is known that the type I edge-localized mode (ELM) ultimately results from the peeling-ballooning instability, there is growing experimental evidence that a mode grows up before the ELM crash that may modify the edge plasma, which then leads to the ELM event due to the peeling-ballooning mode. The triggered mode results in the release of a large number of particles and energy from the core plasma but the precise mechanism by which these losses occur is still not fully understood and hence makes predictions for future devices uncertain. Recent progress in understanding the processes that trigger type I ELMs and the size of the resultant energy loss are reviewed and compared to experimental data and ideas for further development are discussed.

  17. A case against Dutch euthanasia.

    PubMed

    Fenigsen, Richard

    1989-01-01

    The growing acceptance of voluntary active euthanasia by the Dutch is examined in relation to the plastic cards requesting active euthanasia carried by many people in The Netherlands, public opinion polls, and support by leading medical figures of the movement to legalize euthanasia. The author draws upon his experience as a hospital doctor to condemn the practice of active euthanasia, arguing that its voluntariness is often counterfeit and always questionable, that it is inseparable from overtly involuntary forms of euthanasia, and that its promise of sparing the sick person agony is false. "Voluntary" euthanasia also brings an ominous change in society because of the message it sends to the elderly and sick, the weak and the dependent; because the fallibility of medical judgments are inconsistent with the irreversibility of the act; and because the fallacious reasoning of the philosophy threatens to cause irreparable damage to the medical profession. PMID:11650123

  18. [Teledermatology within Dutch nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Lubeek, Satish F K; Mommers, Roland J M; van der Geer, Eric R; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; Gerritsen, Marie-Jeanne Rianne P

    2016-06-01

    Skin problems are common within the nursing home population and could have a significant impact on quality of life. As a form of long-distance consultation teledermatology offers several potential benefits within this frail population. In this review we discuss several aspects of teledermatology, especially in relation to the nursing home population. Several studies demonstrated that teledermatology is a cost-effective and easy-to-use consultation method, which could significantly reduce the amount of hospital visits. However, teledermatology is only used in a limited number of Dutch nursing homes in daily practice due to several factors. For the optimal implementation of teledermatological consultation there are some important logistical, legal and financial framework conditions. In conclusion, teledermatology has a lot to offer within the nursing home population and therefore teledermatology will hopefully be increasingly used in daily practice within the near future. PMID:27098424

  19. A review of a new Dutch guideline for management of recurrent varicose veins.

    PubMed

    Lawson, James A; Toonder, Irwin M

    2016-03-01

    In 2013, the new Dutch guideline for "Venous Pathology" was published. The guideline was a revision and update from the guideline "Diagnostics and Treatment of Varicose Veins" from 2009 and the guideline "Venous Ulcer" from 2005. A guideline for "Deep Venous Pathology" and one for "Compression Therapy" was added to the overall guideline "Venous Pathology." The chapter about treatment of recurrent varicose veins after initial intervention was recently updated in 2015 and is reviewed here. The Dutch term "recidief varices" or the French "récidive de varices" should be used analogous to the English term "recurrent varicose veins." The DCOP Guideline Development Group Neovarices concluded that "recidief" in Dutch actually suggests recurrence after apparent successful treatment and ignores the natural progression of venous disease in its own right. So the group opted to use the term "neovarices." In the Dutch guideline, neovarices is meant to be an all embracing term for recurrent varicose veins caused by technical or tactical failure, evolvement from residual refluxing veins or natural progression of varicose vein disease at different locations of the treated leg after intervention. This report reviews the most important issues in the treatment of varicose vein recurrence, and discusses conclusions and recommendations of the Dutch Neovarices Guideline Committee. PMID:26916778

  20. ELM - A SIMPLE TOOL FOR THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF SOLID-CORE NUCLEAR ROCKET FUEL ELEMENTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    ELM is a simple computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in nuclear thermal rockets. Written for the nuclear propulsion project of the Space Exploration Initiative, ELM evaluates the various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations available for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition. In the past, these correlations were found in different reactor analysis codes, but now comparisons are possible within one program. The logic of ELM is based on the one-dimensional conservation of energy in combination with Newton's Law of Cooling to determine the bulk flow temperature and the wall temperature across a control volume. Since the control volume is an incremental length of tube, the corresponding pressure drop is determined by application of the Law of Conservation of Momentum. The size, speed, and accuracy of ELM make it a simple tool for use in fuel element parametric studies. ELM is a machine independent program written in FORTRAN 77. It has been successfully compiled on an IBM PC compatible running MS-DOS using Lahey FORTRAN 77, a DEC VAX series computer running VMS, and a Sun4 series computer running SunOS UNIX. ELM requires 565K of RAM under SunOS 4.1, 360K of RAM under VMS 5.4, and 406K of RAM under MS-DOS. Because this program is machine independent, no executable is provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ELM is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. ELM was developed in 1991. DEC, VAX, and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. Sun4 and SunOS are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  1. Scrape-off layer ion temperature measurements at the divertor target during type III and type I ELMs in MAST measured by RFEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, S.; Allan, S. Y.; Fishpool, G.; Kirk, A.; Thornton, A. J.; Walkden, N. R.; Harrison, J. R.; the MAST Team

    2016-06-01

    In future nuclear fusion reactors high heat load events, such as edge-localised modes (ELMs), can potentially damage divertor materials and release impurities into the main plasma, limiting plasma performance. The most difficult to handle are type I ELMs since they carry the largest fraction of energy from the plasma and therefore deposit the largest heat flux at the target and on first wall materials. Knowing the temperature of the ions released from ELM events is important since it determines the potential sputtering they would cause from plasma facing materials. To make measurements of T i by retarding field energy analyser (RFEA) during type I ELMs a new operational technique has been used to allow faster measurements to be made; this is called the fast swept technique (FST). The FST method allows measurements to be made within the time of the ELM event which has previously not been possible with T i measurements. This new technique has been validated by comparing it with a slower average measurement previously used to make ion temperature measurements of ELMs. Presented here are the first T i measurements during Type I ELMs made at a tokamak divertor. Temperatures as high as 20 eV are measured more than 15 cm from the peak heat flux of an ELM, in a region where no inter-ELM current is measured by the RFEA; showing that ELM events cause hot ions to reach the divertor target far into the scrape off layer. Fast camera imaging has been used to investigate the type of ELM filaments that have been measured by the divertor RFEA. It is postulated that most of the ion temperatures measured in type I ELMs are from secondary ELM filaments which have not been previously identified in MAST plasmas.

  2. The latest results from ELM-simulation experiments in plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garkusha, I. E.; Arkhipov, N. I.; Klimov, N. S.; Makhlaj, V. A.; Safronov, V. M.; Landman, I.; Tereshin, V. I.

    2009-12-01

    Recent results of ELM-simulation experiments with quasi-stationary plasma accelerators (QSPAs) Kh-50 (Kharkov, Ukraine) and QSPA-T (Troitsk, Russia) as well as experiments in the pulsed plasma gun MK-200UG (Troitsk, Russia) are discussed. Primary attention in Troitsk experiments has been focused on investigating the carbon-fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten erosion mechanisms, their onset conditions and the contribution of various erosion mechanisms (including droplet splashing) to the resultant surface damage at varying plasma heat flux. The obtained results are used for validating the numerical codes PEGASUS and MEMOS developed in FZK. Crack patterns and residual stresses in tungsten targets under repetitive edge localized mode (ELM)-like plasma pulses are studied in simulation experiments with QSPA Kh-50. Statistical processing of the experimental results on crack patterns after different numbers of QSPA Kh-50 exposures as well as those on the dependence of cracking on the heat load and surface temperature is performed.

  3. Target Plate Profiles During ELM Suppression Experiments on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Evans, T. E.; Murphy, C. J.; Martin, M. J.; Nelson, A.; Jakubowski, M.; Joseph, I.; Moyer, R. A.; Lasnier, C. J.; Fenstermacher, M. E.

    2007-11-01

    Radial profiles of target plate plasma conditions during ELM suppressed conditions have been measured with the new DIII-D lower divertor Langmuir probe array. ELM suppression was accomplished using n=3 resonant magnetic perturbations [1]. Evidence of the n=3 mode structure of the perturbation can be seen most clearly in the Vf profile on the target plate. The spacing of the multiple peaks in the Vf profile is similar to predictions of the TRIP3D field line integration code. Te values >100 eV and Vf values down to --150 V were measured. We observe resonant behavior of the target plate parameters near the q95 value for maximum magnetic perturbation. Heat flux from the Langmuir probe measurements will be compared with infrared cameras and thermocouples. The resulting sheath power transmission factor profile will be shown. [1] T.E. Evans, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 235003 (2004).

  4. Mariannaea samuelsii Isolated from a Bark Beetle-Infested Elm Tree in Korea.

    PubMed

    Tang, Longqing; Hyun, Min Woo; Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Kim, Seong Hwan; Sung, Gi-Ho; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2012-06-01

    During an investigation of fungi from an elm tree infested with bark beetles in Korea, one isolate, DUCC401, was isolated from elm wood. Based on morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer and 28S rDNA (large subunit) sequences, the isolate, DUCC401, was identified as Mariannaea samuelsii. Mycelia of the fungus grew faster on malt extract agar than on potato dextrose agar and oatmeal agar media. Temperature and pH for optimal growth of fungal mycelia were 25℃ and pH 7.0, respectively. The fungus demonstrated the capacity to degrade cellobiose, starch, and xylan. This is the first report on isolation of Mariannaea samuelsii in Korea. PMID:22870050

  5. Evolution of Edge Pedestal Current in Type-1 ELM and ITER Baseline Scenario Discharges on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, D. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Stoschus, H.; Chen, X.; Kaplan, K. E.

    2013-10-01

    Based on recent improvements to the DIII-D LIBEAM diagnostic, we have measured the evolution of the edge plasma current density, j, in the pedestal region during the Type 1 ELM cycle, as well as during variations in pedestal pressure in ITER baseline scenario as the inter-ELM temperature and density evolve separately. Conditional averaging of our signals along with other diagnostics over multiple Type 1 ELMs improves the sensitivity and time resolution of this technique. New methods of accounting for varying background light during the pedestal rise help to reduce the systematic error in the measurement. Initial analysis shows that the current peak can relax by about a factor of two within a few ms after an ELM, consistent with resistive decay times in the edge. Changes in the current amplitude for high frequency ELM conditions are consistent with damping of the neoclassical current at the higher collisionality typically associated with higher edge densities and lowered edge temperatures. These results are in accord with our emerging picture of ELM physics and pedestal formation. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC05-06OR23100, SC-G903402, & a National Undergraduate Fellowship in Fusion Science & Engineering.

  6. External kink modes as a model for MHD activity associated with ELMs

    SciTech Connect

    Manickam, J.

    1992-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas in the high confinement mode of operation are known to exhibit edge localized activity referred to as ELMs. A model is proposed for the underlying cause in terms of the external kink mode. The build up of the current density near the plasma edge is shown to decrease the shear in the safety-factor, q, profile and lead to destabilization of the kink mode. The role of the plasma geometry and equilibrium profiles is discussed.

  7. Dutch research reforms cause a stir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Calmthout, Martijn

    2015-02-01

    All 69 winners of the Spinoza prize - the highest award in Dutch science - have signed a petition against proposed reforms to the country's leading funding agency, the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  8. Power Law Regression Analysis of Heat Flux Width in Type I ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, C. D.; Makowski, M. A.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-10-01

    In this project, a database of Type I ELM characteristics has been assembled and will be used to investigate possible dependencies of the heat flux width on physics and engineering parameters. At the edge near the divertor, high impulsive heat loads are imparted onto the surface. The impact of these ELMs can cause a reduction in divertor lifetime if the heat flux is great enough due to material erosion. A program will be used to analyze data, extract relevant, measurable quantities, and record the quantities in the table. Care is taken to accurately capture the complex space/time structure of the ELM. Then correlations between discharge and equilibrium parameters will be investigated. Power law regression analysis will be used to help determine the dependence of the heat flux width on these various measurable quantities and parameters. This will enable us to better understand the physics of heat flux at the edge. Work supported in part by the National Undergraduate Fellowship Program in Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Sciences and the US DOE under DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. Sensing a bud in the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint: a role for Elm1.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hui; Tsygankov, Denis; Lew, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Bud formation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae must be coordinated with the nuclear cycle to enable successful proliferation. Many environmental stresses temporarily disrupt bud formation, and in such circumstances, the morphogenesis checkpoint halts nuclear division until bud formation can resume. Bud emergence is essential for degradation of the mitotic inhibitor, Swe1. Swe1 is localized to the septin cytoskeleton at the bud neck by the Swe1-binding protein Hsl7. Neck localization of Swe1 is required for Swe1 degradation. Although septins form a ring at the presumptive bud site before bud emergence, Hsl7 is not recruited to the septins until after bud emergence, suggesting that septins and/or Hsl7 respond to a "bud sensor." Here we show that recruitment of Hsl7 to the septin ring depends on a combination of two septin-binding kinases: Hsl1 and Elm1. We elucidate which domains of these kinases are needed and show that artificial targeting of those domains suffices to recruit Hsl7 to septin rings even in unbudded cells. Moreover, recruitment of Elm1 is responsive to bud emergence. Our findings suggest that Elm1 plays a key role in sensing bud emergence. PMID:27053666

  10. Sensing a bud in the yeast morphogenesis checkpoint: a role for Elm1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hui; Tsygankov, Denis; Lew, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Bud formation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae must be coordinated with the nuclear cycle to enable successful proliferation. Many environmental stresses temporarily disrupt bud formation, and in such circumstances, the morphogenesis checkpoint halts nuclear division until bud formation can resume. Bud emergence is essential for degradation of the mitotic inhibitor, Swe1. Swe1 is localized to the septin cytoskeleton at the bud neck by the Swe1-binding protein Hsl7. Neck localization of Swe1 is required for Swe1 degradation. Although septins form a ring at the presumptive bud site before bud emergence, Hsl7 is not recruited to the septins until after bud emergence, suggesting that septins and/or Hsl7 respond to a “bud sensor.” Here we show that recruitment of Hsl7 to the septin ring depends on a combination of two septin-binding kinases: Hsl1 and Elm1. We elucidate which domains of these kinases are needed and show that artificial targeting of those domains suffices to recruit Hsl7 to septin rings even in unbudded cells. Moreover, recruitment of Elm1 is responsive to bud emergence. Our findings suggest that Elm1 plays a key role in sensing bud emergence. PMID:27053666

  11. Elm Creek: NSP establishes new 345 kV substation in Twin Cities area

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, B.; Spaulding, P.; Olson, D.

    1996-11-01

    Northern States Power Company (NSP) has proposed to expand the existing Elm Creek substation located in the City of Maple Grove for 345 kV development. The planned expansion will not require acquisition of any new 345 kV transmission line right-of-way. The northwestern metropolitan area of Twin Cities (Minneapolis/St. Paul) has been experiencing significant growth in the residential, commercial and industrial sectors. This necessitates substantial transmission and distribution system improvements in the near future involving millions of dollars of capital investment, to ensure adequate load serving capability and maintain the desired reliability. Relaxing thermal transmission limitations in this area will be achieved by strategic establishment of a new 345 kV source at the existing Elm Creek site in year 2000. The central location of the station in relation to the area experiencing rapid load development makes it an excellent choice for the desired 345 kV source establishment. One 115 kV circuit from Elm Creek to Champlin substation is being constructed in 1997 which will act as an additional transmission outlet from the 345 kV source. Recently completed Long-Range Geographic Planning Study results strongly reinforce the need for such prudent improvements.

  12. The Rock Elm meteorite impact structure, Wisconsin: Geology and shock-metamorphic effects in quartz

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, B.M.; Cordua, W.S.; Plescia, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    The Rock Elm structure in southwest Wisconsin is an anomalous circular area of highly deformed rocks, ???6.5 km in diameter, located in a region of virtually horizontal undeformed sedimentary rocks. Shock-produced planar microstructures (PMs) have been identified in quartz grains in several lithologies associated with the structure: sandstones, quartzite pebbles, and breccia. Two distinct types of PMs are present: P1 features, which appear identical to planar fractures (PFs or cleavage), and P2 features, which are interpreted as possible incipient planar deformation features (PDFs). The latter are uniquely produced by the shock waves associated with meteorite impact events. Both types of PMs are oriented parallel to specific crystallographic planes in the quartz, most commonly to c(0001), ??112??2, and r/z101??1. The association of unusual, structurally deformed strata with distinct shock-produced microdeformation features in their quartz-bearing rocks establishes Rock Elm as a meteorite impact structure and supports the view that the presence of multiple parallel cleavages in quartz may be used independently as a criterion for meteorite impact. Preliminary paleontological studies indicate a minimum age of Middle Ordovician for the Rock Elm structure. A similar age estimate (450-400 Ma) is obtained independently by combining the results of studies of the general morphology of complex impact structures with estimated rates of sedimentation for the region. Such methods may be applicable to dating other old and deeply eroded impact structures formed in sedimentary target rocks.

  13. Lithium granule ablation and penetration during ELM pacing experiments at DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lunsford, R.; Bortolon, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Maingi, R.; Parks, P. B.; Jackson, G.; Gilson, E.; Chrobak, C. P.

    2016-05-25

    At DIII-D, lithium granules were radially injected into the plasma at the outer midplane to trigger and pace edge localized modes (ELMs). Granules ranging in size from 300 to 1000 microns were horizontally launched into H-mode discharges with velocities near 100 m/s, and granule to granule injection frequencies less than 500 Hz. While the smaller granules were only successful in triggering ELMs approximately 20% of the time, the larger granules regularly demonstrated ELM triggering efficiencies of greater than 80%. A fast visible camera looking along the axis of injection observed the ablation of the lithium granules. We used the durationmore » of ablation as a benchmark for a neutral gas shielding calculation, and approximated the ablation rate and mass deposition location for the various size granules, using measured edge plasma profiles as inputs. In conclusion, this calculation suggests that the low triggering efficiency of the smaller granules is due to the inability of these granules to traverse the steep edge pressure gradient region and reach the top of the pedestal prior to full ablation.« less

  14. Gyrokinetic study of ASDEX Upgrade inter-ELM pedestal profile evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, D. R.; Told, D.; Jenko, F.; Doerk, H.; Dunne, M. G.; Wolfrum, E.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; Pueschel, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    The gyrokinetic GENE code is used to study the inter-ELM H-mode pedestal profile evolution for an ASDEX Upgrade discharge. Density gradient driven trapped electron modes are the dominant pedestal instability during the early density-buildup phase. Nonlinear simulations produce particle transport levels consistent with experimental expectations. Later inter-ELM phases appear to be simultaneously constrained by electron temperature gradient (ETG) and kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) turbulence. The electron temperature gradient achieves a critical value early in the ELM cycle, concurrent with the appearance of both microtearing modes and ETG modes. Nonlinear ETG simulations demonstrate that the profiles lie at a nonlinear critical gradient. The nominal profiles are stable to KBM, but moderate increases in β are sufficient to surpass the KBM threshold. Certain aspects of the dynamics support the premise of KBM-constrained pedestal evolution; the density and temperature profiles separately undergo large changes, but in a manner that keeps the pressure profile constant and near the KBM limit.

  15. An Expert Diagnosis System for Parkinson Disease Based on Genetic Algorithm-Wavelet Kernel-Extreme Learning Machine.

    PubMed

    Avci, Derya; Dogantekin, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a major public health problem all around the world. This paper proposes an expert disease diagnosis system for Parkinson disease based on genetic algorithm- (GA-) wavelet kernel- (WK-) Extreme Learning Machines (ELM). The classifier used in this paper is single layer neural network (SLNN) and it is trained by the ELM learning method. The Parkinson disease datasets are obtained from the UCI machine learning database. In wavelet kernel-Extreme Learning Machine (WK-ELM) structure, there are three adjustable parameters of wavelet kernel. These parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons play a major role in the performance of ELM. In this study, the optimum values of these parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons of ELM were obtained by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is evaluated using statical methods such as classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity analysis, and ROC curves. The calculated highest classification accuracy of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is found as 96.81%. PMID:27274882

  16. An Expert Diagnosis System for Parkinson Disease Based on Genetic Algorithm-Wavelet Kernel-Extreme Learning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Avci, Derya; Dogantekin, Akif

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease is a major public health problem all around the world. This paper proposes an expert disease diagnosis system for Parkinson disease based on genetic algorithm- (GA-) wavelet kernel- (WK-) Extreme Learning Machines (ELM). The classifier used in this paper is single layer neural network (SLNN) and it is trained by the ELM learning method. The Parkinson disease datasets are obtained from the UCI machine learning database. In wavelet kernel-Extreme Learning Machine (WK-ELM) structure, there are three adjustable parameters of wavelet kernel. These parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons play a major role in the performance of ELM. In this study, the optimum values of these parameters and the numbers of hidden neurons of ELM were obtained by using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is evaluated using statical methods such as classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity analysis, and ROC curves. The calculated highest classification accuracy of the proposed GA-WK-ELM method is found as 96.81%. PMID:27274882

  17. Study: Longer-Term Antibiotics Won't Ease 'Chronic Lyme Disease'

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158042.html Study: Longer-Term Antibiotics Won't Ease 'Chronic Lyme Disease' Dutch trial ... are unlikely to find relief from longer-term antibiotic therapy, according to a new Dutch study. Although ...

  18. Ethnic Identity, Externalizing Problem Behaviour and the Mediating Role of Self-Esteem among Dutch, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wissink, Inge B.; Dekovic, Maja; Yagmur, Sengul; Stams, Geert Jan; de Haan, Mariette

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined whether self-esteem mediates the relationship between two aspects of ethnic identity (i.e. ethnic identity exploration and ethnic identity commitment-affirmation) and externalizing problem behaviour in Dutch, Turkish-Dutch and Moroccan-Dutch adolescents living in the Netherlands. A total number of 345 adolescents (115…

  19. Intermediate-k density and magnetic field fluctuations during inter-ELM pedestal evolution in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Dickinson, D.; Roach, C. M.; Saarelma, S.; Scannell, R.; Kirk, A.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.; Meyer, H.; the MAST Team

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of local density and magnetic field fluctuations near the pedestal top, conditionally averaged over the edge localized mode (ELM) cycle, have been made in Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). A Doppler backscattering (DBS) system installed at MAST was used to measure intermediate-k ≤ft({{k}\\bot}{ρi}≈ 3~\\text{to}~4\\right) density fluctuations at the top of the pedestal. A novel diagnostic technique combining DBS with cross-polarization scattering (CP-DBS) enabled magnetic field fluctuations to also be locally measured at similar wave numbers. Polarization isolation and other effects for CP-DBS are discussed. Both measurements were used in a series of high-β ≤ft({βn}≈ 4.0\\right. –4.5) MAST plasmas with large type-I ELMs with an ∼ 8~\\text{to}~9~\\text{ms} period where microtearing modes (MTMs) had been predicted to be unstable in similar conditions (Dickinson 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 135002). The measured density fluctuation level increased by a factor of about 4 between 2 and 4 ms after the ELM, which was correlated with the recovery of the density profile while the temperature pedestal height continued to increase slowly. Magnetic field fluctuations showed different temporal behaviors, slowly increasing throughout the ELM cycle as the local β increased. Linear GS2 calculations show both MTM and electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes unstable at similar wave numbers as the measurements (although with more overlap between ETG wave numbers and diagnostic spectral resolution) at the top of the pedestal, along with kinetic ballooning modes are unstable lower in the pedestal (at larger wavelengths). The inferred ratio of fluctuation levels from experiment was ≤ft(δ B/B\\right)/≤ft(δ n/n\\right)≈ 1/20 . The comparable ratios from GS2 were ≤ft(δ B/B\\right)/≤ft(δ n/n\\right)≈ 0.4 for the MTM and ≤ft(δ B/B\\right)/≤ft(δ n/n\\right)≈ 0.02 for the ETG. Both the experimental wave number range and the fluctuation

  20. HIGH TIME-RESOLVED, 2-D IMAGING OF TYPE-1 ELMs IN DIII-D USING A IMAGE-INTENSIFIED CID CAMERA

    SciTech Connect

    GROTH, M.; FENSTERMACHER, M.E.; BOEDO, J.A.; BROOKS,N.H.; GRAY, D.S.; LASNIER, C.J.; LEONARD, A.W.; PORTER, G.D.; WATKINS, J.G.

    2002-06-01

    The evolution of 2-D emission profiles of D{sub {alpha}} and C III during type-I ELMs has been investigated in DIII-D using a tangentially viewing gated, intensified charge-injected device (CID) camera. The measured CIII emission profiles indicate transient inner leg attachment with the arrival of the ELM heat pulse. The measured D{sub {alpha}} emission profiles during an ELM cycle show enhanced deuterium recycling during the deposition of the ELM particle pulse at the target, which suggests the detachment of the divertor plasma from the target plates. Measurements taken in ELMy H-mode discharges at densities of 50% and 90% of the Greenwald density limit are compared utilizing the CID camera system and a comprehensive set of other divertor diagnostics. An ELM model based on fluid and PIC simulations is used to discuss the observation on the response of the divertor plasma to the ELM heat and particle pulse.

  1. [Mental illness in the former Dutch Indies--four psychiatric syndromes: amok, latah, koro and neurasthenia].

    PubMed

    Bartelsman, M; Eckhardt, P P

    2007-12-22

    --At the beginning of the 20th century Dutch psychiatrists in the former Dutch Indies encountered exotic psychiatric syndromes and variant expressions of psychopathological diseases that were also prevalent in Europe. --The amok and latah syndromes were reported relatively frequently and were considered typical endemic psychopathologies. Amok is an acute condition of insanity in which the affected individual, a man, attempts to kill others. Latah is a shock-like condition in which the affected individual, a woman, mimics the movements and sounds of those nearby against her will. --The koro syndrome is considered a typical but rare psychosis seen primarily among the Chinese population of the former Dutch Indies. Patients have a recurring fear of the penis retracting into the body. --A diagnosis of 'tropical neurasthenia' was frequently made in Europeans for what today would be referred to as dysthymic disorder or minor depressive disorder. PMID:18237055

  2. Suppression of Type-I ELMs with a Reduced I-coil Set in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, D. M.

    2013-10-01

    Recent experiments in DIII-D have demonstrated that Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in a tokamak can be controlled with a reduced number of magnetic perturbation coils, demonstrating an important role of spectral sidebands, and showing promise of the technique for future fusion devices, where ELMs risk potentially damaging heat loads. The ELMs can be controlled with external magnetic perturbation used to regulate pressure gradients and maintain stability. The new results show that the coil currents required for ELM suppression with the reduced coil sets are comparable to what is typically required for the full set. This counterintuitive result provides an important validation of recent modeling of the physical mechanisms involved. This modeling shows that the spectral sidebands introduced by deactivating individual coils can often increase the magnetic stochasticity within the plasma, thereby increasing transport and facilitating ELM suppression. Deactivating individual coils results not only in the reduction of the dominant n = 3 component of the perturbation field, but also in a significant increase in the amplitudes of n = 1 and n = 2 sidebands. These sidebands may also be amplified by the plasma response. Application to ITER finds that the ITER ELM coils may be able to tolerate a loss of up to five of its 27 coils, while leaving a sufficient margin of current in the remaining coils to still meet the DIII-D ELM suppression criterion. Further, the new experiments show that the presence of the spectral sidebands does not adversely affect the plasma rotation or confinement. Both vacuum and two-fluid modeling are used to interpret and understand these results. Supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-05ER54809 & DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. Connection between plasma response and resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppression in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingen, A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Shafer, M. W.; Unterberg, E. A.; Canik, J. M.; Evans, T. E.; Hillis, D. L.; Hirshman, S. P.; Seal, S. K.; Snyder, P. B.; Sontag, A. C.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the plasma response to applied non-axisymmetric fields in several DIII-D discharges show that predicted displacements depend strongly on the edge current density. This result is found using both a linear two-fluid-MHD model (M3D-C1) and a nonlinear ideal-MHD model (VMEC). Furthermore, it is observed that the probability of a discharge being edge localized mode (ELM)-suppressed is most closely related to the edge current density, as opposed to the pressure gradient. It is found that discharges with a stronger kink response are closer to the peeling-ballooning stability limit in ELITE simulations and eventually cross into the unstable region, causing ELMs to reappear. Thus for effective ELM suppression, the RMP has to prevent the plasma from generating a large kink response, associated with ELM instability. Experimental observations are in agreement with the finding; discharges which have a strong kink response in the MHD simulations show ELMs or ELM mitigation during the RMP phase of the experiment, while discharges with a small kink response in the MHD simulations are fully ELM suppressed in the experiment by the applied resonant magnetic perturbation. The results are cross-checked against modeled 3D ideal MHD equilibria using the VMEC code. The procedure of constructing optimal 3D equilibria for diverted H-mode discharges using VMEC is presented. Kink displacements in VMEC are found to scale with the edge current density, similar to M3D-C1, but the displacements are smaller. A direct correlation in the flux surface displacements to the bootstrap current is shown.

  4. Experimental estimation of tungsten impurity sputtering due to Type I ELMs in JET-ITER-like wall using pedestal electron cyclotron emission and target Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Borodkina, I.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode and will be achieved with a tungsten (W) divertor. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during mitigated ELMs are expected to be the dominant source in ITER. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of the target W source due to sputtering during ELMs and inter-ELMs is important and can be helped by experimental measurements with improved precision. It has been established that the ELMy target ion impact energy has a simple linear dependence with the pedestal electron temperature measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE). It has also been shown that Langmuir Probes (LP) ion flux measurements are reliable during ELMs due to the surprisingly low electron temperature. Therefore, in this paper, LP and ECE measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) unseeded Type I ELMy H-mode experiments have been used to estimate the W sputtering flux from divertor targets in ELM and inter-ELM conditions. Comparison with similar estimates using W I spectroscopy measurements shows a reasonable agreement for the ELM and inter-ELM W source. The main advantage of the method involving LP measurements is the very high time resolution of the diagnostic (˜10 μs) allowing very precise description of the W sputtering source during ELMs.

  5. Findings of pre-ELM structures through the observation of divertor heat load patterns at JET with applied n = 2 perturbation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, M.; Sieglin, B.; Eich, T.; Pearson, J.; Liang, Y.; Balboa, I.; Jachmich, S.; Wingen, A.; Pamela, S. J. P.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    Resonant magnetic perturbation experiments at JET with the ITER-like wall have shown the formation of radially propagating pre-ELM structures in the heat flux profile on the outer divertor. These appear a few milliseconds before the major divertor heat load, caused by type-I edge-localized modes (ELMs). The formation of the pre-ELM structures is accompanied by an increase in the Dα emission. For some pronounced examples, the propagation appears to end at the positions where an increased heat load is seen during the ELM crash a few milliseconds later. These observations are presented and discussed along with a comparison of a thermoelectric edge currents model.

  6. Observation of edge turbulence spread by ECEI on the ELM-crash-suppressed plasmas in the KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Choi, Minjun; Yun, Gunsu; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Luhmann, Neville C., Jr.

    2015-11-01

    The structure and dynamics of the ELM and edge turbulence modified by n = 1 RMP have been studied during the ELM-crash-suppression phase by applying correlation analysis techniques on the measured ECEI signals. The ECEI shows that filamentary modes remained at theedge with frequent bursts during ELM-crash-suppression phase. The filamentary mode fluctuates in the range of 20 kHz and the dynamics of the mode seems to be violent and complex compared to the ELMing H-mode phase. Correlation analysis shows corresponding fluctuations have long poloidal wavelength (or small poloidal wavenumber kθ < 1 cm-1) with smaller size compared to the filamentary mode, and average group velocity of ~ 3 km/s along the electron diamagnetic direction, parallel wavelengths in the range of 2 <λ| | < 8 m. The characteristic size in the order of kθρs ~ 0 . 1 and velocimetry analysis suggest the resistive ballooning mode is a strong candidate for edge fluctuation in the ELM-crash-suppression phase. This work is supported by the NRF of Korea under Contract No. NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029881 and NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029865 and U.S. DoE grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54524.

  7. DNA barcoding of Dutch birds

    PubMed Central

    Aliabadian, Mansour; Beentjes, Kevin K.; Roselaar, C.S. (Kees); van Brandwijk, Hans; Nijman, Vincent; Vonk, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) can serve as a fast and accurate marker for the identification of animal species, and has been applied in a number of studies on birds. We here sequenced the COI gene for 387 individuals of 147 species of birds from the Netherlands, with 83 species being represented by > 2 sequences. The Netherlands occupies a small geographic area and 95% of all samples were collected within a 50 km radius from one another. The intraspecific divergences averaged 0.29% among this assemblage, but most values were lower; the interspecific divergences averaged 9.54%. In all, 95% of species were represented by a unique barcode, with 6 species of gulls and skua (Larus and Stercorarius) having at least one shared barcode. This is best explained by these species representing recent radiations with ongoing hybridization. In contrast, one species, the Lesser Whitethroat Sylvia curruca showed deep divergences, averaging 5.76% and up to 8.68% between individuals. These possibly represent two distinct taxa, S. curruca and S. blythi, both clearly separated in a haplotype network analysis. Our study adds to a growing body of DNA barcodes that have become available for birds, and shows that a DNA barcoding approach enables to identify known Dutch bird species with a very high resolution. In addition some species were flagged up for further detailed taxonomic investigation, illustrating that even in ornithologically well-known areas such as the Netherlands, more is to be learned about the birds that are present. PMID:24453549

  8. Health-related quality of life in epidermolysis bullosa: Validation of the Dutch QOLEB questionnaire and assessment in the Dutch population.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Wing Yan; Frew, John W; Veerman, Kelly; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Murrell, Dedee F; Jonkman, Marcel F

    2014-07-01

    Defining the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients suffering from the heritable blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is important in assessing the efficacy of new treatments. The quality of life in EB questionnaire (QOLEB) is an English 17-item EB-specific HRQoL measurement tool. The aim of this study was to develop a validated and reliable QOLEB in Dutch and assess the HRQoL in Dutch EB patients. The QOLEB was translated to Dutch according to protocol. Fifty-five adult patients across 4 EB subtypes participated. The QOLEB had excellant correlation with the Skindex-29 (ρs = 0.86), good correlation with the SF-36 physical score (ρs = -0.75), and moderate correlation with the SF-36 mental score (ρs = -0.43). The discriminative validity between the 4 different EB subtypes was significant (p = 0.002). The internal consistency was excellent (α = 0.905), and the test-retest reliability strong (ρs = 0.88). In conclusion, the Dutch QOLEB is a reliable and valid instrument for the assessment of the HRQoL in adult EB patients. PMID:24337132

  9. Perceived antecedents of marital satisfaction among Turkish, Turkish-Dutch, and Dutch couples.

    PubMed

    Celenk, Ozgur; van de Vijver, Fons J R

    2013-01-01

    We studied mainstream couples in The Netherlands and Turkey as well as Turkish-Dutch immigrant couples to address cultural factors associated with marital satisfaction. A total of 13 Turkish (mainstream couples living in Turkey), 19 Turkish-Dutch (Turkish immigrant couples living in The Netherlands), and 17 Dutch (mainstream couples living in The Netherlands) married dyads (total of 98 individuals) were independently interviewed about positive and negative characteristics of marriages, determinants of general marital satisfaction and dissatisfaction, spousal communication, marital conflict, and marital roles. Multivariate tests revealed ethnic group differences on all marriage-related domains except the conflict resolution strategies. However, univariate analyses showed differences in few themes within domains; main differences were assessed between the Turkish/Turkish-Dutch (who put more emphasis on children and economical aspects) and Dutch couples (who put more emphasis on behavior, and personality of the spouse, reciprocity, emotional sharing, and psychological roles). Turkish-Dutch couples were more similar to Turkish than to Dutch couples. Results were discussed in light of the socioeconomic development and cultural value theories, which are believed to provide a useful framework for understanding the role of culture in marital satisfaction. PMID:23126343

  10. EFQM approach and the Dutch Quality Award.

    PubMed

    Nabitz, U W; Klazinga, N S

    1999-01-01

    Different approaches to improve quality are used in organizations delivering health care. Donabedian introduced structure, process and outcome, from which other approaches like self-assessment, accreditation, visitation, International Standards Organisation (ISO) and European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) can be aligned. The EFQM model is one such approach that has been adopted and adapted by the Dutch Institute for Quality Management. This article describes the background and progress relating to the use of the EFQM business excellence model within Dutch health care organizations. In addition the process for applying for the European Quality Award and the Dutch Quality Award are described in detail. Finally, the reader is enlightened regarding the work of the European ExPeRT research group who are promoting the use of quality models within health care. PMID:10537859