Science.gov

Sample records for dwarf surf clam

  1. 50 CFR 648.72 - Minimum surf clam size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum surf clam size. 648.72 Section... Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.72 Minimum surf clam size. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 60622, Sept. 29, 2011. (a) Minimum length. The minimum length for surf clams is...

  2. 50 CFR 648.72 - Minimum surf clam size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum surf clam size. 648.72 Section 648.72 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.72 Minimum surf clam size. (a) Minimum length....

  3. The antioxidant potential of the New Zealand surf clams.

    PubMed

    Odeleye, Tinu; Li, Yan; White, William Lindsey; Nie, Shaoping; Chen, Shuping; Wang, Junqiao; Lu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The antioxidant action of three New Zealand surf clams was evaluated for the first time. Aqueous (cd) and ethanolic extracts from Diamond shell - Crassula aequilatera, Storm shell - Mactra murchisoni, and Tua tua - Paphies donacina were studied for their antioxidant potentials using two in vitro assays. The ethanolic extracts were further fractioned into four parts; petroleum ether (pe), ethyl acetate (ea), n-butanol (nb), and the final aqueous fraction (w). Comparing among all fractions tested, the ea fraction of P. donacina showed the strongest free radical scavenging power, with a radical scavenging activity of 76.14% at 20μg/mL. The ea fraction of C. aequilatera had the highest copper reducing activity with an absorbance of 1.596 at 20μg/mL. Results from this study suggest that some bioactive compounds with significant antioxidant effects may exist in the New Zealand surf clams, and could potentially reduce oxidative stress to deliver health benefits or to produce functional foods. PMID:26988487

  4. The influence of developmental stages and protective additives on cryopreservation of surf clam (Spisula sachalinensis) larvae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Hee; Lee, Jeong Yong; Chang, Young Jin

    2008-07-01

    This study was performed to find out the optimal larval stage and the most desirable protective additives for cryopreservation of surf clam, Spisula sachalinensis larvae. The survival rates of frozen-thawed larvae increased with post developmental stage. The highest value of 96.1 +/- 1.0% was achieved using umbo stage larva as developmental stage and 0.2 M sucrose as protective additive. PMID:19195381

  5. Transformation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in UK surf clams (Spisula solida) for targeted production of reference materials.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew D; Lewis, Adam M; O'Neil, Alison; Hatfield, Robert G

    2013-04-01

    The periodic occurrence of Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) toxins in UK surf clams and the recent move away from biological assays for PSP testing resulted in the need to determine method performance characteristics for the replacement analytical method in this species. With the requirement for laboratory reference materials to aid this validation together with known issues relating to toxin transformation in live clams and homogenised tissue, there was the need to assess the toxin transformation characteristics of PSP toxins in surf clam tissue. Initial work examined the rates of toxin transformation in UK surf clam tissue incubated with toxin standards, showing rapid transformation of N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins with slower transformation of carbamate toxins. Full transformational pathways were determined using a combination of three different analytical methods and confirmed the major expected transformations involving decarbamoylation, with some evidence for additional reaction pathways. Results obtained from the analysis of surf clam and oyster tissues incubated with varying concentrations of toxic Alexandrium algae highlighted expected transformation reactions, although significant differences were observed in the extent of the transformations amongst the range of toxins studied, with less efficient transformation of N-hydroxylated toxins as compared with other carbamate and N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins. Analysis of PSP-toxic incurred oyster, scallop and mussel tissues incubated with variable proportions of surf clam tissue showed large differences in the extent of the transformations. Total conversion of N-sulfocarbamoyl toxins was confirmed at low relative proportions of surf clam tissue in all three species, whereas transformation of carbamate toxins was found to occur only in the presence of higher proportions of surf clam tissue in oysters and mussels in comparison with scallops. Results enabled the production of three laboratory reference materials prepared following incubation of incurred homogenates with optimum proportions of surf clam tissue, resulting in materials containing a large number of PSP toxins. Stability experiments provided good preliminary evidence for the stability of these targeted materials under storage conditions. The work therefore provides both additional information relating to the transformational activity in UK surf clams and highlights a good potential method for the targeted production of reference materials which include a wider range of toxins than normally present in naturally incurred shellfish. PMID:23369833

  6. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Surf Clam

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, C.W.; Neves, R.J.; Pardue, G.B.

    1983-10-01

    The surf clam (Spisula solidissima) is a dominant clam species in the mid-Atlantic region, and contributed 71.8% of all clam meats consumed in the United States between 1970 and 1974; total landings in 1981 were 20.9 thousand metric tons (46.1 million lb). Surf clams live in the coastal zone from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; they are most common in the breaker zone, but occur to depths of 70 m (230 ft). They reach sexual maturity in 2 years and spawn in the mid-Atlantic region from mid-July through mid-October, often with two spawning peaks per year. Larval stages are planktonic; upon settlement, they metamorphose into juvenile clams. Adults live buried in sandy or gravel substrates, with siphons extended above the bottom for feeding and respiration. Surf clams may live up to 25 years and reach a size of 225 mm (8.9 inches). Larvae tolerate water temperatures of 14/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/F (57/sup 0/) to 86/sup 0/F), and salinities as low as 16 ppt. Adults tolerate 0/sup 0/ to 28/sup 0/C (32/sup 0/ to 82/sup 0/F) and 12.5 ppt salinity or higher. Depletion of dissolved oxygen in ocean bottom waters was the major cause for large-scale surf clam mortalities off New York and New Jersey over the last two decades. Sewage, sludge, and heavy metals often cause accumulation of toxic materials in surf clam meats and force closure of beds to fishing to prevent human consumption of these toxic materials. 98 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Toxicity of ammonia to surf clam (Spisula solidissima) larvae in saltwater and sediment elutriates.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, James A; Calesso, Diane F

    2011-04-01

    Ammonia is a natural component of sediments and has been identified as a common contributor to toxicity in marine sediment, elutriate and porewater testing. In our study, the role of ammonia as a possible toxicant in sediment toxicity tests was evaluated using larvae of the surf clam, Spisula solidissima. Elutriates were prepared and tested using six baseline sediment samples. Ammonia was then purged from aliquots of the baseline sediment samples prior to elutriate preparation. Finally, ammonia was spiked into aliquots of the purged elutriates to mimic ammonia concentrations measured in the baseline elutriates. Toxicity was present in all of the baseline samples and was removed in the ammonia purged samples. In most cases, toxicity was comparable in the ammonia spiked samples to levels measured in the baseline samples. Water only toxicity tests revealed that larvae of the surf clam are one of the more ammonia sensitive marine species. The LC50 for survival was 10.6 mg/L total ammonia (.53 mg/L unionized ammonia) and the EC50 for shell development was 2.35 mg/L total ammonia (.12 mg/L unionized ammonia). Toxicity endpoints calculated from the water only ammonia toxicity test were good predictors of effects observed in the sediment elutriate tests. PMID:21295341

  8. Performance Characteristics of AOAC Method 2005.06 for the Determination of Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in Manila Clams, European Otter Clams, Grooved Carpet Shell Clams, Surf Clams, and Processed King Scallops.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Alison; Turner, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    An approach was developed for the verification of method performance of the AOAC 2005.06 LC-fluorescence detector (FLD) method for determination of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in bivalve shellfish. This was developed following advice published by the Analytical Laboratory Accreditation Criteria Committee and applied to shellfish species that had not been previously subjected to a full single-laboratory validation scheme. The refined approach was developed following the need to assess performance in a number of shellfish species infrequently monitored through the UK statutory monitoring program, while reducing the impact and cost of the studies, most notably in terms of the use of valuable reference standards. The species assessed were manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum), European otter clams (Lutraria lutraria), grooved carpet shell clams (R. decussatus), surf clams (Spisula solida), and king scallops (Pecten maximus) presented as adductor only or adductor plus roe. The method was assessed for sensitivity in terms of LOD and LOQ, toxin recovery, and method precision in each species. It incorporated the PSP toxins deemed toxic and/or prevalent in UK samples and commercially available as certified reference standards. The toxins studied included GTX1-5, dcSTX, STX, C1&2, and NEO. The toxins dcGTX2&3 were included for surf clams due to the prevalence of these toxins in this species as a result of toxin decarbamoylation. Method performance targets were met for each of the characteristics investigated. Consequently, the method was deemed fit for purpose for the screening and quantification of these clam and scallop species for PSP toxins by AOAC Method 2005.06 LC-FLD. PMID:26024751

  9. The calibration of photographic and spectroscopic films. The utilization of the digital image processor in the determination of aging of the surf clam (Spisula solidissima)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Kevin A.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The age of the surf clam (Spisula solidissima) can be determined with the use of the Digital Image Processor. This technique is used in conjunction with a modified method for aging, refined by John Ropes of the Woods Hole Laboratory, Massachusetts. This method utilizes a thinned sectioned chondrophore of the surf clam which contains annual rings. The rings of the chondrophore are then counted to determine age. By digitizing the chondrophore, the Digital Image Processor is clearly able to separate these annual rings more accurately. This technique produces an easier and more efficient way to count annual rings to determine the age of the surf clam.

  10. Non-destructive detection of methionine sulfoxide in the resilium of a surf clam by solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Y; Tamiya, N; Nozawa, T; Hatano, M

    1982-07-01

    Methionine sulfoxide was detected in the resilium (internal hinge ligament) of a surf clam by high-resolution solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy involving cross-polarization and magic angle spinning, using no chemical procedure. The results support the previous report [Kikuchi, Y. and Tamiya, N. (1981) J. Biochem. (Tokyo) 89, 1975-1976] on a high content of methionine sulfoxide observed by chemical methods in the resilium protein of surf clam species. PMID:7117255

  11. Composition and Dynamics of the Nucleolinus, a Link between the Nucleolus and Cell Division Apparatus in Surf Clam (Spisula) Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Alliegro, Mark C.; Hartson, Steven; Alliegro, Mary Anne

    2012-01-01

    The nucleolinus is a little-known cellular structure, discovered over 150 years ago (Agassiz, L. (1857) Contributions to the Natural History of the United States of America, First Monograph, Part IIL, Little, Brown and Co., Boston) and thought by some investigators in the late 19th to mid-20th century to function in the formation of the centrosomes or spindle. A role for the nucleolinus in formation of the cell division apparatus has recently been confirmed in oocytes of the surf clam, Spisula solidissima (Alliegro, M. A., Henry, J. J., and Alliegro, M. C. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 13718–13723). However, we know so little about the composition and dynamics of this compartment, it is difficult to construct mechanistic hypotheses or even to be sure that prior reports were describing analogous structures in the cells of mammals, amphibians, plants, and other organisms where it was observed. Surf clam oocytes are an attractive model to approach this problem because the nucleolinus is easily visible by light microscopy, making it accessible by laser microsurgery as well as isolation by common cell fractionation techniques. In this report, we analyze the macromolecular composition of isolated Spisula nucleolini and examine the relationship of this structure to the nucleolus and cell division apparatus. Analysis of nucleolinar RNA and protein revealed a set of molecules that overlaps with but is nevertheless distinct from the nucleolus. The proteins identified were primarily ones involved in nucleic acid metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Monoclonal antibodies generated against isolated nucleolini revealed centrosomal forerunners in the oocyte cytoplasm. Finally, induction of damage to the nucleolinus by laser microsurgery altered the trafficking of α- and γ-tubulin after fertilization. These observations strongly support a role for the nucleolinus in cell division and represent our first clues regarding mechanism. PMID:22219192

  12. Population structure, growth and production of the surf clam Donax serra (Bivalvia, Donacidae) on two Namibian sandy beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, J.; Brey, T.; Arntz, W. E.

    2003-10-01

    Population structure, growth and production of the surf clam Donax serra (Bivalvia, Donacidae), inhabiting highly exposed sandy beaches of Namibia, were investigated between November 1997 and December 1999. From length-frequency distribution and tagging-recapture data, a von Bertalanffy growth function with an asymptotic length ( L ?) of 82 mm and a growth constant ( K) of 0.274 yr -1 was established. Regarding growth performance of Donacidae, D. serra fits in a group of species inhabiting cold temperate and upwelling regions. The intertidal biomass of the studied population ranged between 141 and 546 g ash-free dry mass (AFDM) m -2 yr -1. Individual production was maximal at 56.5 mm shell length (0.83 g AFDM ind. -1 yr -1), and annual production ranged between 167 and 637 g AFDM m -2 yr -1, resulting in productivity values (P/ B) between 1.167 and 1.589 yr -1. These data underline the importance of D. serra for the beach/surf ecosystem. Further, the findings of this study are crucial to support future aquaculture or exploitation activities and management.

  13. Identification of functional genes involved in Cd(2+) response of Chinese surf clam (Mactra chinensis) through transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Hongjun; Qin, Yanjie; Ye, Sheng; Liu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese surf clam Mactra chinensis is an economically important bivalve species in the coastal waters of Liaoning and Shandong Province, China. In this study, we carried out transcriptome sequencing to develop molecular resources for M. chinensis and conducted an acute test of Cd(2+) stimulation through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to analyze the relative expression of six functional genes. A total of 100,839 transcripts and 56,712 unigenes were obtained from 39.9 million filtered reads and 21,305 unigenes were annotated by hitting against NCBI database. According to the results of qRT-PCR, heat shock protein 22 (Hsp22) and cytochrome P450 (CYP450(2C31)) were inhibited in the low concentration, and induced in the high concentration of Cd(2+); thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx-A) was at normal level in low concentration, but induced in high concentration of Cd(2+); glutathione peroxidase A (GPA), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPA1) and Mn superoxide dismutase gene (MnSOD) were down-regulated when exposed to any treatment groups. Expression levels of the six functional genes following Cd(2+) exposure indicated that these genes were linked to environmental stress. Moreover, the present work enriched the molecule genetic data of M. chinensis. PMID:26674114

  14. Identification and expression of antioxidant and immune defense genes in the surf clam Mesodesma donacium challenged with Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Aguayo, W; Lafarga-De la Cruz, F; Gallardo-Escárate, C

    2015-02-01

    The immune system in marine invertebrates is mediated through cellular and humoral components, which act together to address the action of potential pathogenic microorganisms. In bivalve mollusks biomolecules implicated in oxidative stress and recognition of pathogens have been involved in the innate immune response. To better understand the molecular basis of the immune response of surf clam Mesodesma donacium, qPCR approaches were used to identify genes related to its immune response against Vibrio anguillarum infection. Genes related to oxidative stress response and recognition of pathogens like superoxide dismutase (MdSOD), catalase (MdCAT), ferritin (MdFER) and filamin (MdFLMN) were identified from 454-pyrosequencing cDNA library of M. donacium and were evaluated in mantle, adductor muscle and gills. The results for transcripts expression indicated that MdSOD, MdFLMN and MdFER were primarily expressed in the muscle, while MdCAT was more expressed in gills. Challenge experiments with the pathogen V. anguillarum had showed that levels of transcript expression for MdSOD, MdCAT, MdFER, and MdFLMN were positively regulated by pathogen, following a time-dependent expression pattern with significant statistical differences between control and challenge group responses (p<0.05). These results suggest that superoxide dismutase, catalase, ferritin and filamin, could be contributing to the innate immune response of M. donacium against the pathogen V. anguillarum. PMID:25481276

  15. Population subdivision of the surf clam Mactra chinensis in the East China Sea: Changjiang River outflow is not the sole driver.

    PubMed

    Ni, Gang; Li, Qi; Ni, Lehai; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The northwestern Pacific, characterized by unique tectonic and hydrological settings, has greatly intrigued marine phylogeographers. However, current studies mostly focus on the influence of Pleistocene isolation of sea basins in population structure of species in the region, leaving the contribution of other factors (such as freshwater outflow and environmental gradients) largely unexploited. Here we shed light on the question by investigating phylogeography of the surf clam Mactra chinensis in the East China Sea (ECS). Genetic information was acquired from 501 specimens collected from its main distribution in the region, represented by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and nine polymorphic microsatellite loci. A shallow and star-like phylogeny was revealed for all COI haplotypes, indicating the origin of populations from a single refugium. Although no divergent lineages existed, population subdivision was detected in both data sets. The most striking pattern was the significant differentiation between populations north and south of a biogeographic boundary-the Changjiang Estuary, suggesting a barrier effect of the freshwater outflow to gene flow. For the northern group, substructure was revealed by COI result as one southernmost population was significant different from other ones. Clear latitude gradations in allele frequencies were revealed by microsatellite analyses, likely influenced by environmental gradient factors such as temperature. Our results demonstrate that genetic subdivision can arise for populations within the ECS despite they have a single origin, and multiple mechanisms including Changjiang River outflow, environmental gradient factors and life-history traits may act in combination in the process. PMID:26468432

  16. Population subdivision of the surf clam Mactra chinensis in the East China Sea: Changjiang River outflow is not the sole driver

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Gang; Ni, Lehai; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The northwestern Pacific, characterized by unique tectonic and hydrological settings, has greatly intrigued marine phylogeographers. However, current studies mostly focus on the influence of Pleistocene isolation of sea basins in population structure of species in the region, leaving the contribution of other factors (such as freshwater outflow and environmental gradients) largely unexploited. Here we shed light on the question by investigating phylogeography of the surf clam Mactra chinensis in the East China Sea (ECS). Genetic information was acquired from 501 specimens collected from its main distribution in the region, represented by mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and nine polymorphic microsatellite loci. A shallow and star-like phylogeny was revealed for all COI haplotypes, indicating the origin of populations from a single refugium. Although no divergent lineages existed, population subdivision was detected in both data sets. The most striking pattern was the significant differentiation between populations north and south of a biogeographic boundary—the Changjiang Estuary, suggesting a barrier effect of the freshwater outflow to gene flow. For the northern group, substructure was revealed by COI result as one southernmost population was significant different from other ones. Clear latitude gradations in allele frequencies were revealed by microsatellite analyses, likely influenced by environmental gradient factors such as temperature. Our results demonstrate that genetic subdivision can arise for populations within the ECS despite they have a single origin, and multiple mechanisms including Changjiang River outflow, environmental gradient factors and life-history traits may act in combination in the process. PMID:26468432

  17. Delineation of surf scoter habitat in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland: macrobenthic and sediment composition of surf scoter feeding sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kidwell, D.M.; Perry, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Surveys of surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata) along the Atlantic coast of the United States have shown population declines in recent decades. The Chesapeake Bay has traditionally been a key wintering area for surf scoters. Past and present research has shown that bivalves constitute a major food item for seaducks in the Chesapeake Bay, with surf scoters feeding primarily on hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum) and dwarf surf clam (Mulinia lateralis). Degraded water quality conditions in the Chesapeake Bay have been well documented and have been shown to greatly influence the composition of benthic communities. Large concentrations of feeding surf scoters (>500 individuals) in the Bay were determined through monthly boat surveys. Locations consistently lacking surf scoters were also determined. Macrobenthos were seasonally sampled at 3 locations containing scoters and 3 locations without scoters. A 1 kilometer square grid was superimposed over each location using GIS and sampling sites within the square were randomly chosen. Benthos were sampled at each site using SCUBA and a meter square quadrat. Biomass and size class estimates were determined for all bivalves within each kilometer square. Results indicated that scoter feeding sites contained significantly greater biomass of M. lateralis, I. recurvum, and Gemma gemma than locations where no scoters were present. Substrate differences were also detected, with scoter feeding sites being composed of a sand/shell mix while non-scoter sites consisted primarily of mud. This data indicates that surf scoters in the Chesapeake Bay are selecting areas with high densities of preferred food items, potentially maximizing there foraging energetics. In addition, two scoter feeding sites also contained a patchwork of eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) and oyster shell, on which much of the I. recurvum was attached. This suggests the possibility that surf scoters utilize eastern oyster habitat and the dramatic depletion of oysters in the Bay could be a possible factor in surf scoter decline. More research is needed into the possible relationship between surf scoters and the eastern oyster.

  18. Molecular characterization of two kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor genes in the surf clam Mesodesma donacium exposed to Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Aguayo, Waleska; Núñez-Acuña, Gustavo; Valenzuela-Muñoz, Valentina; Chávez-Mardones, Jacqueline; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian

    2013-06-01

    This study reports two kazal-type serine protease inhibitors (KPI) identified in a cDNA library from the surf clam Mesodesma donacium, and characterized through Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). The KPIs, denoted as MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2, presented full sequences of 1139 bp and 781 bp respectively. MdSPI-1 had a 5'untranslated region (UTR) of 175 bp, a 3'UTR of 283 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 681 pb that encodes for 227 amino acids. MdSPI-2 showed a 5'UTR of 70 bp, a 3'UTR of 279 bp and an ORF of 432 bp that encodes for 144 amino acids. Both sequences presented two kazal-type tandem domains. Phylogenetic analysis of MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2 shows a main clade composed by other bivalve species and closely related crustaceans. Real time PCR analysis showed that MdSPI-1 is mainly up-regulated in mantle, foot, gills and muscle tissues, while MdSPI-2 is expressed principally in foot tissue. Moreover, to evaluate the immune response of MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2, infections with Vibrio anguillarum were performed. Herein, MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2 transcription expression were significantly up-regulated at 2 and 8 h post-challenge. Our results suggest that MdSPI-1 and MdSPI-2 are important humoral factors of innate immunity in M. donacium. PMID:23528874

  19. Surfing the photon noise: New techniques to find low-mass planets around M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escudé, G.; Butler, R. P.; Reiners, A.; Jones, H. R. A.; Tuomi, M.; Jenkins, J. S.; Barnes, J. R.; Vogt, S. S.; Zechmeister, M.

    2013-02-01

    The current precision radial velocities techniques to detect low mass planets in M dwarf are quickly reviewed. This includes high resolution spectroscopic observations made both in the optical and in the near infrared. We discuss that, given the current instrumental performance, optical RVs are still far ahead over other approaches. However, this situation might change soon with the advent of new spectrographs with red/nIR capabilities. We review a newly developed method to obtain precision RV measurements on stabilized spectrographs and how it is implemented to archival HARPS observations. In addition to get much closer to the photon noise, this approach allows us to identify and filter out wavelength dependent noise sources achieving unprecedented accuracy on G, K and specially M dwarfs. We show how including red/infrared observations is of paramount importance to efficiently and unambiguously detect very low mass planets around cool spectral types. As examples, we show new measurements on Barnard's star indicating that the star is stable down to 0.9 cm s^-1 over a time-span of 4 years and how RV signals correlated with activity indices disappear when using the reddest half of the HARPS wavelength range. To conclude, we present new results, detections and describe the implications in terms of planet/multi-planet abundances around cool stars.

  20. Surf Tourism, Artificial Surfing Reefs, and Environmental Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotkin, Michael H.; Chambliss, Karen; Vamosi, Alexander R.; Lindo, Chris

    2009-07-01

    This paper explores the confluence of surf tourism, artificial surfing reefs, and sustainability. Surfing is an ascendant recreational and tourism industry and artificial surfing reefs are a new and innovative technology and product. Presented within the context of Florida's Space Coast, empirical details on surf tourism are discussed along with the possible implications for sustainability.

  1. Surfing wave climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, Antonio; Losada, Iñigo J.; Méndez, Fernando J.

    2014-10-01

    International surfing destinations are highly dependent on specific combinations of wind-wave formation, thermal conditions and local bathymetry. Surf quality depends on a vast number of geophysical variables, and analyses of surf quality require the consideration of the seasonal, interannual and long-term variability of surf conditions on a global scale. A multivariable standardized index based on expert judgment is proposed for this purpose. This index makes it possible to analyze surf conditions objectively over a global domain. A summary of global surf resources based on a new index integrating existing wave, wind, tides and sea surface temperature databases is presented. According to general atmospheric circulation and swell propagation patterns, results show that west-facing low to middle-latitude coasts are more suitable for surfing, especially those in the Southern Hemisphere. Month-to-month analysis reveals strong seasonal variations in the occurrence of surfable events, enhancing the frequency of such events in the North Atlantic and the North Pacific. Interannual variability was investigated by comparing occurrence values with global and regional modes of low-frequency climate variability such as El Niño and the North Atlantic Oscillation, revealing their strong influence at both the global and the regional scale. Results of the long-term trends demonstrate an increase in the probability of surfable events on west-facing coasts around the world in recent years. The resulting maps provide useful information for surfers, the surf tourism industry and surf-related coastal planners and stakeholders.

  2. Medical Aspects of Surfing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renneker, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The medical aspects of surfing include ear and eye injuries and sprains and strains of the lower back and neck, as well as skin cancer from exposure to the sun. Treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of these problems are discussed. Surfing is recommended as part of an exercise program for reasonably healthy people. (Author/MT)

  3. Surfing on the Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apel, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Israel Paskowitz loves surfing. As a former competitive surfer, he has spent much of his life in the ocean and absorbed in a community of athletes that share a special connection with the water. Surfing is often thought of as a spiritual hobby that brings peace and relaxation to those who experience it. However, it was not until Israel's son,…

  4. SURF: Submm User Reduction Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Lightfoot, John

    2014-03-01

    SURF reduces data from the SCUBA instrument from the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Facilities are provided for reducing all the SCUBA observing modes including jiggle, scan and photometry modes. SURF uses the Starlink environment (ascl:1110.012).

  5. Shock-wave surfing

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence, Stuart J; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    A phenomenon referred to as shock-wave surfing , in which a body moves in such a way as to follow the shock wave generated by another upstream body, is investigated numerically and theoretically. This process can lead to the downstream body accumulating a significantly higher lateral velocity than would otherwise be possible, and thus is of importance in situations such as meteoroid fragmentation, in which the fragment separation behaviour following disruption is determined to a large extent by aerodynamic effects. The surfing effect is first investigated in the context of interactions between a sphere and a planar oblique shock. Numerical simulations are performed and a simple theoretical model is developed to determine the forces acting on the sphere. A phase-plane description is employed to elucidate features of the system dynamics. The theoretical model is then generalised to the more complex situation of aerodynamic interactions between two spheres, and, through comparisons with further computations, is shown to adequately predict, in particular, the final separation velocity of the surfing sphere in initially touching configurations. Both numerical simulations and theory indicate a strong influence of the body radius ratio on the separation process and predict a critical radius ratio for initially touching fragments that delineates entrainment of the smaller fragment within the larger fragment s shock from expulsion; this critical ratio also results in the most extended surfing. Further, these results show that an earlier prediction for the separation velocity to scale with the square root of the radius ratio does not accurately describe the separation behaviour. The theoretical model is then employed to investigate initial configurations with varying relative sphere positions and initial velocities. A phase-space description is also shown to be useful in elucidating the dynamics of the sphere-sphere system. With regard to meteoroid fragmentation, it is shown that a large fraction of the variation in the separation behaviour deduced by previous authors from an analysis of terrestrial crater fields can be explained by a combination of surfing and a modest rotation rate of the parent body. Finally, a selection effect for multiple fragments travelling together, e.g., immediately following atmospheric disruption, is predicted, whereby larger fragments repel one another whereas smaller fragments are entrained within the shocks of larger bodies.

  6. Burrowing saves Lake Erie clams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    Freshwater unionid clams in North America have been virtually eliminated from waters that are colonized by zebra mussels. Near total mortality has been reported in western Lake Erie, but we have discovered a large population of native clams in a Lake Erie wetland that shows little sign of infestation. Field observations and laboratory experiments show that warm summer water temperatures and soft, silt-clay sediments trigger burowing by clams. This discourages infestation and physically removes any attached zebra mussels.

  7. 21 CFR 102.49 - Fried clams made from minced clams.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fried clams made from minced clams. 102.49 Section... Nonstandardized Foods § 102.49 Fried clams made from minced clams. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as fried clams, except that it is composed...

  8. Guide to Healthy Web Surfing

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/medlineplus/healthywebsurfing.html MedlinePlus Guide to Healthy Web Surfing To use the sharing features on this ... the site, use caution. Focus on quality--All Web sites are not created equal Does the site ...

  9. Surfing Electrons in Quantum Computers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomeau, Y.

    I take this opportunity of writing a piece of science for my friend Manuel G. Velarde to discuss things dear to his heart: surfing of electrons on acoustic waves. It has been claimed recently, but not by him, that transport of electrons by surf could be used to carry quantum information in quantum computers. This is physically impossible because this would require to maintain the quantum coherence linked to localisation, a coherence decaying very fastly in the real world.

  10. Movements of wintering surf scoters: Predator responses to different prey landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirk, M.; Esler, Daniel; Iverson, S.A.; Boyd, W.S.

    2008-01-01

    The distribution of predators is widely recognized to be intimately linked to the distribution of their prey. Foraging theory suggests that predators will modify their behaviors, including movements, to optimize net energy intake when faced with variation in prey attributes or abundance. While many studies have documented changes in movement patterns of animals in response to temporal changes in food, very few have contrasted movements of a single predator species naturally occurring in dramatically different prey landscapes. We documented variation in the winter movements, foraging range size, site fidelity, and distribution patterns of a molluscivorous sea duck, the surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata), in two areas of coastal British Columbia with very different shellfish prey features. Baynes Sound has extensive tidal flats with abundant clams, which are high-quality and temporally stable prey for scoters. Malaspina Inlet is a rocky fjord-like inlet where scoters consume mussels that are superabundant and easily accessible in some patches but are heavily depleted over the course of winter. We used radio telemetry to track surf scoter movements in both areas and found that in the clam habitats of Baynes Sound, surf scoters exhibited limited movement, small winter ranges, strong foraging site fidelity, and very consistent distribution patterns. By contrast, in mussel habitats in the Malaspina Inlet, surf scoters displayed more movement, larger ranges, little fidelity to specific foraging sites, and more variable distribution patterns. We conclude that features associated with the different prey types, particularly the higher depletion rates of mussels, strongly influenced seasonal space use patterns. These findings are consistent with foraging theory and confirm that predator behavior, specifically movements, is environmentally mediated. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  11. WATERSHED INFORMATION - SURF YOUR WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surf Your Watershed is both a database of urls to world wide web pages associated with the watershed approach of environmental management and also data sets of relevant environmental information that can be queried. It is designed for citizens and decision makers across the count...

  12. Lightcurve Analysis of 5181 Surf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes-Gehrke, Melissa N.; Afe, Adeseye; Cha, Daniel; Cotton, Ayana; Diedrick, Jasmine; Liu, Kevin; Livas, Matthew; Melone, Katelyn; Mistry, Samirbhai; Murphy, Jacob; Ren, Xin; Romano, Philip; Scearce, Michael; Smith, Andrew; Summers, Brian

    2015-10-01

    A lightcurve was determined for the main-belt asteroid 5181 SURF. The asteroid was observed for seven nights over the course of two months during 2015 March-April. The rotation period was found to be 6.111 ± 0.001 h.

  13. Experimental challenges of wild Manila clams with Perkinsus species isolated from naturally infected wild Manila clams.

    PubMed

    Waki, Tsukasa; Shimokawa, Jun; Watanabe, Shinji; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2012-09-15

    Manila clams, Ruditapes philippinarum, are widely harvested in the coastal waters in Japan. However, there have been significant decreases in the populations of Manila clams since the 1980s. It is thought that infection with the protozoan Perkinsus species has contributed to these decreases. A previous study demonstrated that high infection levels of a pure strain of Perkinsus olseni (ATCC PRA-181) were lethal to hatchery-raised small Manila clams, however, the pathogenicity of wild strain Perkinsus species to wild Manila clam is unclear. To address this, we challenged large (30-40 mm in shell length) and small (3-15 mm in shell length) wild Manila clams with Perkinsus species isolated from naturally infected wild Manila clams. We report high mortalities among the small clams, but not among the large ones. This is the first report to confirm the pathogenicity of wild isolate of Perkinsus species to wild Manila clams. PMID:22687350

  14. Composition, Shell Strength, and Metabolizable Energy of Mulinia lateralis and Ischadium recurvum as Food for Wintering Surf Scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)

    PubMed Central

    Wells-Berlin, Alicia M.; Perry, Matthew C.; Kohn, Richard A.; Paynter, Kennedy T.; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Decline in surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) waterfowl populations wintering in the Chesapeake Bay has been associated with changes in the availability of benthic bivalves. The Bay has become more eutrophic, causing changes in the benthos available to surf scoters. The subsequent decline in oyster beds (Crassostrea virginica) has reduced the hard substrate needed by the hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum), one of the primary prey items for surf scoters, causing the surf scoter to switch to a more opportune species, the dwarf surfclam (Mulinia lateralis). The composition (macronutrients, minerals, and amino acids), shell strength (N), and metabolizable energy (kJ) of these prey items were quantified to determine the relative foraging values for wintering scoters. Pooled samples of each prey item were analyzed to determine composition. Shell strength (N) was measured using a shell crack compression test. Total collection digestibility trials were conducted on eight captive surf scoters. For the prey size range commonly consumed by surf scoters (6–12 mm for M. lateralis and 18–24 mm for I. recurvum), I. recurvum contained higher ash, protein, lipid, and energy per individual organism than M. lateralis. I. recurvum required significantly greater force to crack the shell relative to M. lateralis. No difference in metabolized energy was observed for these prey items in wintering surf scoters, despite I. recurvum’s higher ash content and harder shell than M. lateralis. Therefore, wintering surf scoters were able to obtain the same amount of energy from each prey item, implying that they can sustain themselves if forced to switch prey. PMID:25978636

  15. Composition, Shell Strength, and Metabolizable Energy of Mulinia lateralis and Ischadium recurvum as Food for Wintering Surf Scoters (Melanitta perspicillata).

    PubMed

    Wells-Berlin, Alicia M; Perry, Matthew C; Kohn, Richard A; Paynter, Kennedy T; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Decline in surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) waterfowl populations wintering in the Chesapeake Bay has been associated with changes in the availability of benthic bivalves. The Bay has become more eutrophic, causing changes in the benthos available to surf scoters. The subsequent decline in oyster beds (Crassostrea virginica) has reduced the hard substrate needed by the hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum), one of the primary prey items for surf scoters, causing the surf scoter to switch to a more opportune species, the dwarf surfclam (Mulinia lateralis). The composition (macronutrients, minerals, and amino acids), shell strength (N), and metabolizable energy (kJ) of these prey items were quantified to determine the relative foraging values for wintering scoters. Pooled samples of each prey item were analyzed to determine composition. Shell strength (N) was measured using a shell crack compression test. Total collection digestibility trials were conducted on eight captive surf scoters. For the prey size range commonly consumed by surf scoters (6-12 mm for M. lateralis and 18-24 mm for I. recurvum), I. recurvum contained higher ash, protein, lipid, and energy per individual organism than M. lateralis. I. recurvum required significantly greater force to crack the shell relative to M. lateralis. No difference in metabolized energy was observed for these prey items in wintering surf scoters, despite I. recurvum's higher ash content and harder shell than M. lateralis. Therefore, wintering surf scoters were able to obtain the same amount of energy from each prey item, implying that they can sustain themselves if forced to switch prey. PMID:25978636

  16. Composition, shell strength, and metabolizable energy of Mulinia lateralis and Ischadium recurvum as food for wintering surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berlin, Alicia; Perry, Matthew; Kohn, R.A.; Paynter, K.T., Jr.; Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Decline in surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) waterfowl populations wintering in the Chesapeake Bay has been associated with changes in the availability of benthic bivalves. The Bay has become more eutrophic, causing changes in the benthos available to surf scoters. The subsequent decline in oyster beds (Crassostrea virginica) has reduced the hard substrate needed by the hooked mussel (Ischadium recurvum), one of the primary prey items for surf scoters, causing the surf scoter to switch to a more opportune species, the dwarf surfclam (Mulinia lateralis). The composition (macronutrients, minerals, and amino acids), shell strength (N), and metabolizable energy (kJ) of these prey items were quantified to determine the relative foraging values for wintering scoters. Pooled samples of each prey item were analyzed to determine composition. Shell strength (N) was measured using a shell crack compression test. Total collection digestibility trials were conducted on eight captive surf scoters. For the prey size range commonly consumed by surf scoters (6-12 mm for M. lateralis and 18-24 mm for I. recurvum), I. recurvum contained higher ash, protein, lipid, and energy per individual organism than M. lateralis. I. recurvum required significantly greater force to crack the shell relative to M. lateralis. No difference in metabolized energy was observed for these prey items in wintering surf scoters, despite I. recurvum's higher ash content and harder shell than M. lateralis. Therefore, wintering surf scoters were able to obtain the same amount of energy from each prey item, implying that they can sustain themselves if forced to switch prey.

  17. Asiatic clam invasion: causes and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.S.; Cairns, J.; Graney, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    The recent introduction and subsequent invasion of the Asiatic clam has offered a new problem of infestation in power plant intake systems that conventional intermittent chlorination procedures may not resolve. These clam invasions adversely affect intake systems and irrigation works by clogging the systems and causing erosion of pipes. Heated power plant discharges were found to be a source of thermal enrichment for the clams. Methods of temperature control followed by chlorination appear to offer short-term solutions; harvesting of the clams for protein and calcium contents present an additional solution.

  18. Ocean Reflectance Observed During CLAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, W.; Charlock, T. P.; Rutledge, K.; Gatebe, C. K.

    2002-05-01

    The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field campaign focused on validating Terra EOS data products. CLAMS was sponsored by CERES, MISR, MODIS-Atmospheres and the NASA/GEWEX Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). The centerpiece of CLAMS is the Chesapeake lighthouse sea platform 20 km east of Virginia Beach, at which NASA and NOAA make continuous, long-term measurements of radiation, meteorology, and ocean waves. CLAMS is a shortwave closure experiment and one of its objectives is to characterize the ocean optics in the vicinity of the lighthouse. The Schulz multi-wavelength spectral-photometer SP1A was deployed at the Chesapeake lighthouse to measure the upwelling radiances. SP1A scanned about 150 degrees of azimuth around sunglint area at 11 elevation angles: 2, 4, 7, 12, 22, 32, 42, 52, 62, 72 and 90 degrees. The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is a multi-wavelength scanning radiometer mounted on University of Washington's aircraft Convair-580 to measure the bi-directional reflectance of ocean surface under different sun angles and wind conditions. CAR measured upwelling radiances at Chesapeake lighthouse as well as at nearby buoys. Radiances measured by both SP1A and CAR were converted to spectral reflectances. The observed spectral reflectance distributions of SP1A (mounted on the lighthouse platform) and CAR (airborne) were compared with the "6S" (Second Simulation of Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum) model simulated reflectance distributions. 6S is a radiative transfer model based on the successive orders of scattering and uses the Cox-Munk distribution of wave slopes to parameterize the effect of wind on reflection by the sea. Reflectances produced by CAR at two remote NOAA ocean buoys were compared to the 6S simulated reflectances.

  19. 76 FR 65180 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application to Shuck Surf Clams/Ocean Quahogs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Quahog Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council prepared the FMP pursuant to the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (Magnuson- Stevens Act)....

  20. Depuration and anatomical distribution of domoic acid in the surf clam Mesodesma donacium.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Gonzalo; Uribe, Eduardo; Regueiro, Jorge; Martin, Helena; Gajardo, Teresa; Jara, Lorena; Blanco, Juan

    2015-08-01

    In northern Chile, domoic acid (DA) has been detected in several bivalve species. In Mesodesma donacium, one of the most important commercial species for local fishermen, no information is available on depuration, or on the anatomical distribution of this toxin and its potential use as a palliative measure to minimize the consequences of ASP outbreaks. Deputation of DA is very fast in M. donacium, and can be adequately described by means of a two-compartment model. The estimated rates for the first and second compartments were 1.27 d(-1) and 0.24 d(-1), respectively, with a transfer rate between compartments of 0.75. Having high depuration rates protects this species from being affected by Pseudo-nitzschia blooms for an extended period of time. Taking this into account, the time in which the bivalves are unsafe for consumers is very short, and therefore the economic losses that could result by the DA outbreaks in local fisheries should be moderate. In relation to anatomical distribution, at least during the uptake phase, the toxin was evenly distributed within the soft tissues, with a total toxin burden corresponding to 27%, 32% and 41% for Digestive Gland (DG), Foot (FT) and Other Body Fractions (OBF), respectively. Since the contribution of each organ to the toxin concentration is a function of both weight contribution and toxin burden, the pattern of toxin distribution showed the following trend: "all other body fractions" (OBF) > Foot (FT) > Digestive Gland (DG). Thus, the highest concentration of DA, with a contribution close to 72%, corresponds to the edible tissues (OBF + FT), while the DG (non-edible tissue) only contributes the remaining 28%. Consequently, in view of the anatomical distribution of domoic acid in M. donacium, the elimination of the digestive gland does not substantially reduce the toxicity of the final product and therefore selective evisceration would not improve their quality for human consumption. PMID:26003793

  1. Clam-associated vibriosis, USA, 1988-2010.

    PubMed

    Slayton, R B; Newton, A E; Depaola, A; Jones, J L; Mahon, B E

    2014-05-01

    Infections with Vibrio spp. have frequently been associated with consumption of bivalve molluscs, especially oysters, but illness associated with clams has also been well documented. We describe the 2312 domestically acquired foodborne Vibrio infections reported to the Cholera and Other Vibrio Illness Surveillance system from 1988 to 2010. Clams were associated with at least 4% (93 persons, 'only clams') and possibly as many as 24% (556 persons, 'any clams') of foodborne cases. Of those who consumed 'only clams', 77% of infections were caused by V. parahaemolyticus. Clam-associated illnesses were generally similar to those associated with other seafood consumption. Clams associated with these illnesses were most frequently harvested from the Atlantic coastal states and eaten raw. Our study describes the contribution of clams to the overall burden of foodborne vibriosis and indicates that a comprehensive programme to prevent foodborne vibriosis need to address the risks associated with clams. PMID:23920418

  2. Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington

    Three size classes of juvenile surf smelt collected in a beach seine by USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA. ...

  3. Multispectral measurements in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonmaker, Jon S.; Dirbas, Joseph; Gilbert, Gary

    2004-09-01

    Over the past year an index has been defined which quantifies the surf zone with respect to an electro-optical (EO) system"s ability to find targets. The purpose of this index is to both normalize the EO Mine Counter Measure (MCM) systems performance expectations to the environment in which it is tested and to assess the value of its performance in an operational environment. For example, if a given system has a Probability of Detection (PD) requirement of 90% in a clear water surf zone and is tested in murky waters the surf zone index of the murky water is used to determine what PD is required in the murky water to yield the 90% PD clear water requirement. The surf zone index is defined in this paper and expanded from the deterministic contrast transmittance as reported in earlier papers to a probabilistic approach. Examples of how to measure the index using readily available low cost spectral imagers such as PAR Government Systems Corporation"s Mission Adaptable Narrowband Tunable Imaging Spectrometer (MANTIS) system are given. Finally, the surf zone index usage is discussed and demonstrated.

  4. Hypertrichosis in patients with SURF1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Ostergaard, Elsebet; Bradinova, Irena; Ravn, Susanne Holst; Hansen, Flemming Juul; Simeonov, Emil; Christensen, Ernst; Wibrand, Flemming; Schwartz, Marianne

    2005-11-01

    We present three patients with SURF1 mutations. In addition to Leigh syndrome all patients had hypertrichosis, a clinical sign that is not usually associated with Leigh syndrome. The hypertrichosis was not congenital and it was mainly distributed on the extremities and forehead. In addition to our three patients, we have identified five patients in the literature with hypertrichosis and Leigh syndrome due to SURF1 mutations. Since most patients had onset of hypertrichosis before the diagnosis of Leigh syndrome was made, we suggest that clinicians consider Leigh syndrome in patients with, for example, psychomotor retardation or other unspecific symptoms in combination with hypertrichosis. PMID:16222681

  5. Surfing Global Change: Negotiating Sustainable Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    SURFING GLOBAL CHANGE (SGC) serves as a procedural shell for attaining sustainable solutions for any interdisciplinary issue and is intended for use in advanced university courses. The participants' activities evolve through five levels from individual argumentation to molding one's own views for the "common good." The paradigm of "ethics of…

  6. The Clam Trail: Blending Science Education, Public Art, and Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscio, Cara; Flimlin, Gef; Bushnell, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The Barnegat Bay Shellfish Restoration's Clam Trail is an award-winning scavenger hunt that combines science education, public art, and tourism. This family adventure has participants seeking out giant painted fiberglass clams, upweller clam nurseries, and points of interest in search of science facts to record on their forms. Upon returning these

  7. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  8. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay. 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay. The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  9. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay. 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay. The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  10. The Clam Trail: Blending Science Education, Public Art, and Tourism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscio, Cara; Flimlin, Gef; Bushnell, Rick

    2011-01-01

    The Barnegat Bay Shellfish Restoration's Clam Trail is an award-winning scavenger hunt that combines science education, public art, and tourism. This family adventure has participants seeking out giant painted fiberglass clams, upweller clam nurseries, and points of interest in search of science facts to record on their forms. Upon returning these…

  11. Dwarf novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladous, Constanze

    1993-01-01

    Dwarf novae are defined on grounds of their semi-regular brightness variations of some two to five magnitudes on time scales of typically 10 to 100 days. Historically several different classification schemes have been used. Today, dwarf novae are divided into three sub-classes: the U Geminorum stars, the SU Ursae Majoris stars, and the Z Camelopardalis stars. Outbursts of dwarf novae occur at semi-periodic intervals of time, typically every 10 to 100 days; amplitudes range from typically 2 to 5 mag. Within certain limits values are characteristic for each object. Relations between the outburst amplitude, or the total energy released during outburst, and the recurrence time have been found, as well as relations between the orbital period and the outburst decay time, the absolute magnitude during outburst maximum, and the widths of long and short outbursts, respectively. Some dwarf novae are known to have suspended their normal outburst activity altogether for a while. They later resumed it without having undergone any observable changes. The optical colors of dwarf novae all are quite similar during outburst, considerably bluer than during the quiescent state. During the outburst cycle, characteristic loops in the two color diagram are performed. At a time resolution on the order of minutes, strictly periodic photometric changes due to orbital motion become visible in the light curves of dwarf novae. These are characteristic for each system. Remarkably little is known about orbital variations during the course of an outburst. On time-scales of minutes and seconds, further more or less periodic types of variability are seen in dwarf novae. Appreciable flux is emitted by dwarf novae at all wavelengths from the X-rays to the longest IR wavelengths, and in some cases even in the radio. Most dwarf novae exhibit strong emission line spectra in the optical and UV during quiescence, although some have only very weak emissions in the optical and/or weak absorptions at UV wavelengths.

  12. SURF imaging for contrast agent detection.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rune; Angelsen, Bjørn A J

    2009-02-01

    A contrast agent detection method is presented that potentially can improve the diagnostic significance of ultrasound contrast agents. Second order ultrasound field (SURF) contrast imaging is achieved by processing the received signals from transmitted dual frequency band pulse complexes with overlapping high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) pulses. The transmitted HF pulses are used for image reconstruction, whereas the transmitted LF pulses are used to manipulate the scattering properties of the contrast agent. In the present paper, we discuss how SURF contrast imaging potentially can overcome problems and limitations encountered with available contrast agent detection methods, and we give a few initial examples of in vitro measurements. With SURF contrast imaging, the resonant properties of the contrast agent may be decoupled from the HF imaging pulses. This technique is thus especially interesting for imaging contrast bubbles above their resonance frequency. However, to obtain adequate specificity, it is typically necessary to estimate and correct for accumulative nonlinear effects in the forward wave propagation. PMID:19251515

  13. Multispectral observations of the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonmaker, Jon S.; Dirbas, Joseph; Gilbert, Gary

    2003-09-01

    Airborne multispectral imagery was collected over various targets on the beach and in the water in an attempt to characterize the surf zone environment with respect to electro-optical system capabilities and to assess the utility of very low cost, small multispectral systems in mine counter measures (MCM) and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance applications. The data was collected by PAR Government Systems Corporation (PGSC) at the Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility at Duck North Carolina and on the beaches of Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base in Southern California. PGSC flew the first two of its MANTIS (Mission Adaptable Narrowband Tunable Imaging Sensor) systems. Both MANTIS systems were flown in an IR - red - green - blue (700, 600, 550, 480 nm) configuration from altitudes ranging from 200 to 700 meters. Data collected has been lightly analyzed and a surf zone index (SZI) defined and calculated. This index allows mine hunting system performance measurements in the surf zone to be normalized by environmental conditions. The SZI takes into account water clarity, wave energy, and foam persistence.

  14. MISR Browse Images: Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-22

    ... Images: Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) These MISR Browse images provide ... the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field campaign. CLAMS focused on understanding pieces of the ...

  15. Clam-associated vibriosis, USA, 1988–2010

    PubMed Central

    Slayton, R. B.; Newton, A. E.; Depaola, A.; Jones, J. L.; Mahon, B. E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Infections with Vibrio spp. have frequently been associated with consumption of bivalve molluscs, especially oysters, but illness associated with clams has also been well documented. We describe the 2312 domestically acquired foodborne Vibrio infections reported to the Cholera and Other Vibrio Illness Surveillance system from 1988 to 2010. Clams were associated with at least 4% (93 persons, ‘only clams’) and possibly as many as 24% (556 persons, ‘any clams’) of foodborne cases. Of those who consumed ‘only clams’, 77% of infections were caused by V. parahaemolyticus. Clam-associated illnesses were generally similar to those associated with other seafood consumption. Clams associated with these illnesses were most frequently harvested from the Atlantic coastal states and eaten raw. Our study describes the contribution of clams to the overall burden of foodborne vibriosis and indicates that a comprehensive programme to prevent foodborne vibriosis need to address the risks associated with clams. PMID:23920418

  16. Uniaxial diffusion bonding of CLAM/CLAM steels: Microstructure and mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaosheng; Liu, Yongchang; Yu, Liming; Liu, Chenxi; Sui, Guofa; Yang, Jianguo

    2015-06-01

    By performing a two-step uniaxial diffusion bonding, the reliable joining between CLAM/CLAM steels has been attained. The microstructures at the vicinity of the joint region and in base material were respectively investigated through OM, SEM and TEM. The joint interface was integrated, and no microstructural defects were observed. In the base material, small amount of austenite is retained as thin films between martensite laths, which was suggested to be related to the compressive deformation in diffusion bonding. As a candidate structural material for the first wall in fusion energy systems, the radiation resistance of CLAM steel would be deteriorated by the retained austenite. Tensile and impact tests were carried out to assess the reliability of the joints subjected to post bond heat treatment. All the tensile specimens fractured in the base CLAM steel, meaning the good joining between CLAM steels. However, due to the low impact absorbed energy of the joints, efforts should still be made to optimize the bonding technology and the post bond heat treatment further.

  17. Sea-spray aerosol particles generated in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eijk, A. M. J.; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J. T.; Francius, M. J.; Tedeschi, G.; Piazzola, J.; Merritt, D. L.; Fontana, J. D.

    2011-10-01

    To assess the properties of aerosol particles generated over the surf zone, two experiments were held at the pier of Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), La Jolla CA, and at the pier of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (FRF) in Duck NC. On both sites concentrations of surf-generated sea spray particles, wave parameters and meteorological conditions were measured. The surf-aerosol concentrations in the diameter range 0.2-10 microns were obtained from the difference in aerosol size distributions measured upwind and downwind of the surf zone. It was found that the flux of surf-generated particles at diameters at formation can be expressed in terms of wave energy dissipation, which itself is related to the properties of the incoming wavefield and the bathymetry of the beach. Although the flux can also be modeled in terms of wind speed, this relation is considered to be not universal and limited to low- to medium wind speeds. In Duck NC, two transport experiments were performed under offshore flow conditions. In this case, the surf-aerosol concentrations were obtained from the differences in three aerosol size distributions, measured just before and just behind the surf zone and up to 16 km downwind (out to sea). No significant decrease in concentration was observed at the farthest range, which suggests that an appreciable amount of surf-generated aerosols is advected over tens of kilometers.

  18. Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington

    Juvenile sand lance collected in a beach seine by USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA.  Like surf smelt, sand lance are an important forage fish in Puget Sound.  ...

  19. User's Manual for Space Debris Surfaces (SD_SURF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elfer, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    A unique collection of computer codes, Space Debris Surfaces (SD_SURF), have been developed to assist in the design and analysis of space debris protection systems. SD_SURF calculates and summarizes a vehicle's vulnerability to space debris as a function of impact velocity and obliquity. An SD_SURF analysis will show which velocities and obliquities are the most probable to cause a penetration. This determination can help the analyst select a shield design which is best suited to the predominant penetration mechanism. The analysis also indicates the most suitable parameters for development or verification testing. The SD_SURF programs offer the option of either FORTRAN programs and Microsoft EXCEL spreadsheets and macros. The FORTRAN programs work with BUMPERII version 1.2a or 1.3 (Cosmic released). The EXCEL spreadsheets and macros can be used independently or with selected output from the SD_SURF FORTRAN programs.

  20. SURF1 deficiency causes demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Daniele; Chassagne, Maïté; Mayençon, Martine; Padet, Sylvie; Melchionda, Laura; Rouvet, Isabelle; Lannes, Béatrice; Bozon, Dominique; Latour, Philippe; Zeviani, Massimo; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether mutations in the SURF1 gene are a cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. Methods: We describe 2 patients from a consanguineous family with demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT disease (CMT4) associated with the homozygous splice site mutation c.107-2A>G in the SURF1 gene, encoding an assembly factor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV. This observation led us to hypothesize that mutations in SURF1 might be an unrecognized cause of CMT4, and we investigated SURF1 in a total of 40 unrelated patients with CMT4 after exclusion of mutations in known CMT4 genes. The functional impact of c.107-2A>G on splicing, amount of SURF1 protein, and on complex IV activity and assembly was analyzed. Results: Another patient with CMT4 was found to harbor 2 additional SURF1 mutations. All 3 patients with SURF1-associated CMT4 presented with severe childhood-onset neuropathy, motor nerve conduction velocities <25 m/s, and lactic acidosis. Two patients had brain MRI abnormalities, including putaminal and periaqueductal lesions, and developed cerebellar ataxia years after polyneuropathy. The c.107-2A>G mutation produced no normally spliced transcript, leading to SURF1 absence. However, complex IV remained partially functional in muscle and fibroblasts. Conclusions: We found SURF1 mutations in 5% of families (2/41) presenting with CMT4. SURF1 should be systematically screened in patients with childhood-onset severe demyelinating neuropathy and additional features such as lactic acidosis, brain MRI abnormalities, and cerebellar ataxia developing years after polyneuropathy. PMID:24027061

  1. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section 117.323 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of...

  2. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section 117.323 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of...

  3. INTEGRATED SYSTEM FOR MICROALGAE NURSERY SEED CLAM CULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A PC-controlled integrated system for the production of algae and culture of northern quahog seed was constructed. The diatom, Chaetoceros muelleri, was cultured in covered 550-liter tanks. The harvested alga was the food source for the land-based nursery seed clam system. The nursery clam system...

  4. Toxicity of fishery chemicals to the asiatic clam, Corbicula manilensis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chandler, Jack H.; Marking, L.L.

    1979-01-01

    The Asiatic clam (Corbicula manilensis), a species introduced into U. S. waters, has spread rapidly, and its ability to survive, reproduce, and spread has caused concern. Aquatic biologists suspect that the clams may crowd out indigenous mollusks, and the animals sometimes plug water intakes and leave shell deposits that interfere with sand and gravel operations. The toxicity of 20 commonly used fishery chemicals to the Asiatic clam was determined to evaluate hazards to a nontarget aquatic invertebrate and to assess the potential of the chemicals for controlling clam populations. Among six piscicides and two lampricides tested, antimycin was most toxic to the clam; the 96-h LC50 was 0.065 mg/L. Among three therapeutants and two disinfectants tested, nifurpirinol was the most toxic; the 96-h LC50 was 7.60 mg/L. All of the compounds were less toxic to the clam than to fish. As a nontarget organism, this clam would be safe in water treated with any of the tested fishery chemicals at recommended use pattern concentrations. None of the chemicals have potential for controlling unwanted populations of these clams.

  5. Gaia and white dwarf - brown dwarf binaries .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casewell, S. L.

    White dwarf-brown dwarf binaries are excellent benchmark systems, as the white dwarf provides an accurate (although model dependent) age calibrator for the brown dwarf. While these systems are rare, with authors suggesting the frequency to be between 0.5 and 2 %, they are being used to provide ages for the coolest brown dwarfs (e.g. WD0806-661) and also as testbeds for irradiated atmospheres. Gaia is estimated to detect ˜2000 of these systems using astrometry, enlarging the sample, and allowing limits to be placed on the brown dwarf desert.

  6. Uptake of 14C-chlorpyrifos by clams.

    PubMed

    Kale, S P; Sherkhane, P D; Murthy, N B K

    2002-11-01

    The uptake of 14C-chlorpyrifos by clams (Katalysia opima) was studied to determine the bioaccumulation potential over a period of five days. Chlorpyrifos was applied to a model ecosystem in beakers at the rate of 3 mg l(-1) of seawater. Clams showed a maximum uptake of 14C-chlorpyrifos in the first 8 hours of exposure. Subsequently these residues decreased significantly and at the end of 5 days about 1.5% of the applied activity could be recovered from the clam samples. The half-life of chlorpyrifos in this marine water system was about a day. However, after 5 days about 28% of the applied 14C-activity was present in water. This may be significant and could possibly play a role in finding the residue of this insecticide in water bodies. Clams brought about rapid degradation of chlorpyrifos in the first 48 hours. The stabilised residues in water were reflected later in clams. PMID:12472162

  7. The behaviour of giant clams (Bivalvia: Cardiidae: Tridacninae).

    PubMed

    Soo, Pamela; Todd, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Giant clams, the largest living bivalves, live in close association with coral reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific. These iconic invertebrates perform numerous important ecological roles as well as serve as flagship species-drawing attention to the ongoing destruction of coral reefs and their associated biodiversity. To date, no review of giant clams has focussed on their behaviour, yet this component of their autecology is critical to their life history and hence conservation. Almost 100 articles published between 1865 and 2014 include behavioural observations, and these have been collated and synthesised into five sections: spawning, locomotion, feeding, anti-predation, and stress responses. Even though the exact cues for spawning in the wild have yet to be elucidated, giant clams appear to display diel and lunar periodicities in reproduction, and for some species, peak breeding seasons have been established. Perhaps surprisingly, giant clams have considerable mobility, ranging from swimming and gliding as larvae to crawling in juveniles and adults. Chemotaxis and geotaxis have been established, but giant clams are not phototactic. At least one species exhibits clumping behaviour, which may enhance physical stabilisation, facilitate reproduction, or provide protection from predators. Giant clams undergo several shifts in their mode of acquiring nutrition; starting with a lecithotrophic and planktotrophic diet as larvae, switching to pedal feeding after metamorphosis followed by the transition to a dual mode of filter feeding and phototrophy once symbiosis with zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp.) is established. Because of their shell weight and/or byssal attachment, adult giant clams are unable to escape rapidly from threats using locomotion. Instead, they exhibit a suite of visually mediated anti-predation behaviours that include sudden contraction of the mantle, valve adduction, and squirting of water. Knowledge on the behaviour of giant clams will benefit conservation and restocking efforts and help fine-tune mariculture techniques. Understanding the repertoire of giant clam behaviours will also facilitate the prediction of threshold levels for sustainable exploitation as well as recovery rates of depleted clam populations. PMID:25414524

  8. Wave transformation across the inner surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, B.; Guza, R. T.; Elgar, Steve

    1996-11-01

    Sea and swell wave heights observed on transects crossing the mid and inner surf zone on three beaches (a steep concave-up beach, a gently sloped approximately planar beach, and a beach with an approximately flat terrace adjacent to a steep foreshore) were depth limited (i.e., approximately independent of the offshore wave height), consistent with previous observations. The wave evolution is well predicted by a numerical model based on the one-dimensional nonlinear shallow water equations with bore dissipation. The model is initialized with the time series of sea surface elevation and cross-shore current observed at the most offshore sensors (located about 50 to 120 m from the mean shoreline in mean water depths 0.80 to 2.10 m). The model accurately predicts the cross-shore variation of energy at both infragravity (nominally 0.004 < f < 0.05 Hz) and sea swell (here 0.05 < f ≤ 0.18 Hz) frequencies. In models of surf zone hydrodynamics, wave energy dissipation is frequently parameterized in terms of γs, the ratio of the sea swell significant wave height to the local mean water depth. The observed and predicted values of γs increase with increasing beach slope β and decreasing normalized (by a characteristic wavenumber k) water depth kh and are well correlated with β/kh, a measure of the fractional change in water depth over a wavelength. Errors in the predicted individual values of γs, are typically less than 20%. It has been suggested that infragravity motions affect waves in the sea swell band and hence γs, but this speculation is difficult to test with field observations. Numerical simulations suggest that for the range of conditions considered here, γs is insensitive to infragravity energy levels.

  9. From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues From the Director: Surfing the Web for Health Information Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... all information on the Internet is reliable. Some Web sites post inaccurate or biased medical information. Others ...

  10. A role for heparan sulfate in viral surfing

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Myung-Jin; Akhtar, Jihan; Desai, Prashant; Shukla, Deepak; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612

    2010-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) moieties on cell surfaces are known to provide attachment sites for many viruses including herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1). Here, we demonstrate that cells respond to HSV-1 infection by enhancing filopodia formation. Filopodia express HS and are subsequently utilized for the transport of HSV-1 virions to cell bodies in a surfing-like phenomenon, which is facilitated by the underlying actin cytoskeleton and is regulated by transient activation of a small Rho GTPase, Cdc42. We also demonstrate that interaction between a highly conserved herpesvirus envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and HS is required for surfing. A HSV-1 mutant that lacks gB fails to surf and quantum dots conjugated with gB demonstrate surfing-like movements. Our data demonstrates a novel use of a common receptor, HS, which could also be exploited by multiple viruses and quite possibly, many additional ligands for transport along the plasma membrane.

  11. Surf Zone Hyperbenthos of Belgian Sandy Beaches: Seasonal Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyst, B.; Buysse, D.; Dewicke, A.; Mees, J.

    2001-12-01

    Since surf zone hyperbenthos, although highly important in local food webs, has often been neglected and very little information is available, a survey of the Belgian sandy beaches was carried out from May 1996 until July 1997. Monthly samples were taken to give a complete record of hyperbenthic organisms occurring in the surf zone of Belgian sandy beaches and to evaluate the intensity by which this surf zone is used. In total 172 species were recorded. The number of species occurring in the surf zone is comparable to that of adjacent areas. As well as true hyperbenthic species, endobenthic and planktonic organisms were sampled. More than 75% of the average total sample composition consisted of mysids, mainly Mesopodopsis slabberi, Schistomysis spiritus and Schistomysis kervillei (holohyperbenthos). Apart from several resident species, active and passive seasonal migration towards the surf zone by a number of species is suggested. A large number of sporadic species adds to the composition of surf zone hyperbenthos. Within the merohyperbenthos, postlarval decapods and fish were the dominant organisms. During the year three recruitment peaks were observed. Average densities per month exceeded 1500 ind. 100 m -2. Yearly biomass averages ranged from 300 to over 3000 mg ADW 100 m -2. Densities of the common species are slightly higher in the surf zone than in other habitats, emphasising the importance of the area. Besides a possible nursery function, the surf zone may also be used as a transient area between different habitats. Finally, the influence of several abiotic factors on the hyperbenthic assemblages was evaluated. The main structuring variables determining the occurrence of most of the organisms are water temperature and hydrodynamic factors such as wave height and turbidity. The influence of wave height seems to be two-fold: several good swimmers such as mysids and some fish species are suggested to be able to actively avoid severe wave conditions, whereas other, more planktonic organisms, are passively transported towards the area if wave height increases.

  12. Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum as a biomonitor to metal pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huifeng; Ji, Chenglong; Wang, Qing; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jianmin; Feng, Jianghua

    2013-01-01

    The Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum is a good biomonitor/bioindicator to marine metal pollution and is frequently used in aquatic toxicology. Two dominant pedigrees (white and zebra) of clam are distributed in the Bohai Sea; however, little attention has been paid to potential biological differences between these two pedigrees. In this study, we tested the sensitivity of both pedigrees to marine metal (cadmium and zinc) pollution biomonitoring and marine environmental toxicology. Results demonstrate significant biological differences in gills of white and zebra clams based on metabolic profiles and antioxidant enzyme activities. In addition, we found that hypotaurine, malonate and homarine were relatively high in white clam gills, while alanine, arginine, glutamate, succinate, 4-aminobutyrate, taurine and betaine were high in zebra clam gills. Zebra clam gills were also more sensitive to a mixture of Cd and Zn, as shown by antioxidant enzyme activities and metabolic profiles, but white clam gills could accumulate more Zn. Therefore, we suggest that the white pedigree can be used as a biomonitor to marine Zn pollution, whereas the zebra pedigree can be used for toxicology studies on Cd and Zn mixed pollution.

  13. Naming Disney's Dwarfs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Robert T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses Disney's version of the folkloric dwarfs in his production of "Snow White" and weighs the Disney rendition of the dwarf figure against the corpus of traits and behaviors pertaining to dwarfs in traditional folklore. Concludes that Disney's dwarfs are "anthropologically true." (HOD)

  14. Brown Dwarf Companions to White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, Matt R.; Steele, Paul R.; Dobbie, Paul D.; Farihi, Jay; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Barstow, Martin A.; Jameson, Richard F.; Casewell, Sarah L.; Gaensicke, Boris T.; Marsh, Tom R.

    2011-03-01

    Brown dwarf companions to white dwarfs are rare, but recent infra-red surveys are slowly revealing examples. We present new observations of the post-common envelope binary WD0137-349, which reveals the effects of irradiation on the ~0.05Msolar secondary, and new observations of GD1400 which show that it too is a close, post-common envelope system. We also present the latest results in a near-infrared photometric search for unresolved ultra-cool companions and to white dwarfs with UKIDSS. Twenty five DA white dwarfs were identified as having photometric excesses indicative of a low mass companion, with 8-10 of these having a predicted mass in the range associated with brown dwarfs. The results of this survey show that the unresolved (<2'') brown dwarf companion fraction to DA white dwarfs is 0.3<=ƒWD+BD<=1.3%.

  15. Razor clam to RoboClam: burrowing drag reduction mechanisms and their robotic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Winter, A G; V; Deits, R L H; Dorsch, D S; Slocum, A H; Hosoi, A E

    2014-09-01

    Estimates based on the strength, size, and shape of the Atlantic razor clam (Ensis directus) indicate that the animal's burrow depth should be physically limited to a few centimeters; yet razor clams can dig as deep as 70 cm. By measuring soil deformations around burrowing E. directus, we have found the animal reduces drag by contracting its valves to initially fail, and then fluidize, the surrounding substrate. The characteristic contraction time to achieve fluidization can be calculated directly from soil properties. The geometry of the fluidized zone is dictated by two commonly-measured geotechnical parameters: coefficient of lateral earth pressure and friction angle. Calculations using full ranges for both parameters indicate that the fluidized zone is a local effect, occurring between 1-5 body radii away from the animal. The energy associated with motion through fluidized substrate-characterized by a depth-independent density and viscosity-scales linearly with depth. In contrast, moving through static soil requires energy that scales with depth squared. For E. directus, this translates to a 10X reduction in the energy required to reach observed burrow depths. For engineers, localized fluidization offers a mechanically simple and purely kinematic method to dramatically reduce energy costs associated with digging. This concept is demonstrated with RoboClam, an E. directus-inspired robot. Using a genetic algorithm to find optimal digging kinematics, RoboClam has achieved localized fluidization burrowing performance comparable to that of the animal, with a linear energy-depth relationship, in both idealized granular glass beads and E. directus' native cohesive mudflat habitat. PMID:24713848

  16. Clam predator protection is effective and necessary for food production.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Daphne; Kraeuter, John; Beal, Brian; Chew, Ken; Luckenbach, Mark; Peterson, Charles P

    2015-11-15

    Shellfish aquaculture is a widely practiced way of producing food for human consumption in coastal areas. When farming intertidal clams, farmers commonly protect young seedling clams from predatory losses by covering farmed plots with netting or screening. Recent discussion of the effectiveness of protective nets or screens and their environmental effects has raised questions concerning the utility of the practice. We provide data based on a review of more than 35 peer-reviewed articles, as well as our own research that demonstrates the efficacy of predator protection for clam farms in various habitats around the world. In addition, we evaluate the effects of screening on temperature, and comment on ancient practices of clam gardening as conducted in the Pacific Northwest. PMID:26433775

  17. Surf5: A gene in the tightly clustered mouse surfeit locus is highly conserved and transcribed divergently from the rpL7A (Surf3) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, K.; Duhig, T.; Armes, N.; Colombo, P.; Fried, M.

    1995-11-20

    The four previously characterized genes (Surf1 to 4) of the mouse Surfeit locus do not share any sequence homology, and the transcription of each gene alternates with respect to its neighbors. Adjacent Surfeit genes are separated by very small distances, and two of the genes overlap at their 3{prime} ends. In this work we have further defined the Surfeit gene cluster by the isolation of Surf5, a fifth gene of the locus, and determination of its relationship to the other Surfeit genes. Surf5 does not share any sequence homology with the four cloned Surfeit genes. The transcription of Surf5 is divergent with respect to its neighbor the Surf3 gene, and the 5{prime} ends of Surf5 and Surf3 are separated by only 159 bp, suggesting the presence of a second bidirectional promoter in the locus. The 3{prime} end of Surf5 maps only 68 bp away from the processed 3{prime} end of a pseudogene. The human and partial chicken Surf5 coding regions show greater than 95% identity, and a Caenorhabditis elegans homologue shows 38% identity and 56% similarity with the mouse Surf5 amino acid sequence. The 3.5-kb transcript of Surf5 encodes a small hydrophilic protein of 140 amino acid residues, which differs from the ribosomal protein L7a encoded by the Surf3 gene or the integral membrane protein encoded by the Surf4 gene. Subcellular fractionation located the Surf5 protein to the soluble fraction of the cytoplasm. The Surfeit locus appears to represent a novel type of gene cluster in which the genes are unrelated by sequence or function; however, their organization may play a role in their gene expression. 44 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Analysis of Radiative Measurements During CLAMS Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z.; Charlock, T.; Rutledge, K.; Smith Jr., W.; Cota, G.; Denn, F.; Madigan, J.

    2002-05-01

    The CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) is located at the Chesapeake Lighthouse, 25km due east of Virginia Beach. Intensive measurements of apparent and inherent optical properties of both the atmosphere and ocean were made around COVE during the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for satellites (CLAMS) field campaign in the summer of 2001. In this presentation, we analyse the broadband and spectral fluxes measured from COVE and from aircraft. We then investigate the influence of atmospheric and oceanic properties on these radiation fluxes. A coupled atmosphere-ocean radiative transfer model simulates the irradiances and the ocean surface albedo by using the measured properties of the atmosphere and the ocean as inputs. Finally, we compare the modeled radiation with satellite observations corresponding to the field campaign.

  19. Detection of multiple human sapoviruses from imported frozen individual clams.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Setsuko; Takai-Todaka, Reiko; Ohshiro, Hitoshi; Kitajima, Masaaki; Wang, Qiuhong; Saif, Linda J; Wakita, Takaji; Noda, Mamoru; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Oka, Tomoichiro

    2013-06-01

    Sapovirus (SaV), a member of the family Caliciviridae, is an important acute gastroenteritis pathogen in humans. Consumption of raw or inadequately cooked clams is one transmission route of human SaV. Sixty individual clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) were from market and tested for human SaVs using two nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, one of which was recently developed and effectively detected human SaV from environmental water samples. The nested RT-PCR effective for water samples showed a higher detection rate (68.3 %, 41 of 60 clams) than the other nested RT-PCR (43.3 %, 26 of 60 clams). Based on the sequence analysis of the partial capsid region, SaV strains detected in this study were classified into nine genotypes: GI.1, GI.3, GI.5, GI.6, GI.7, GII.3, GII.4, GIV.1, and GV.1. We demonstrated for the first time the presence of multiple genogroups and/or genotypes of SaV strains in the individual clams. Using a more sensitive assay such as we described to test individual clam samples will help to identify the source of a SaV-gastroenteritis outbreak. PMID:23526313

  20. Pathogenicity of missense mutations in SURF1 deficiency inducing the Leigh syndrome. Importance in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dubot, A; Hervouet, E; Mandon, G; Zabot, M T; Godinot, C

    2004-06-01

    Leigh syndrome with cytochrome oxidase (COX) deficiency has been associated with SURF1 mutations. For patient diagnosis, distinction between neutral polymorphisms and pathogenic missense SURF1 mutations in Leigh syndrome is essential. We show that several missense SURF1 mutations did not allow a stable protein to be expressed. Absence of immunologically reactive SURF1 is, therefore, helpful to demonstrate their pathogenicity. In addition, we show that out of two previously described missense mutations housed by the same allele, only one, the T737 C was pathogenic. Indeed, transfection of T737 C mutated SURF1 in SURF1-deficient cells did not restore normal SURF1 stability and COX activity. On the contrary, the G604 C-mutated SURF1 did it and, hence, is a neutral variant. PMID:16120373

  1. Stopover habitats of spring migrating surf scoters in southeast Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lok, E.K.; Esler, Daniel; Takekawa, J.Y.; De La Cruz, S.W.; Sean, Boyd W.; Nysewander, D.R.; Evenson, J.R.; Ward, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Habitat conditions and nutrient reserve levels during spring migration have been suggested as important factors affecting population declines in waterfowl, emphasizing the need to identify key sites used during spring and understand habitat features and resource availability at stopover sites. We used satellite telemetry to identify stopover sites used by surf scoters migrating through southeast Alaska during spring. We then contrasted habitat features of these sites to those of random sites to determine habitat attributes corresponding to use by migrating scoters. We identified 14 stopover sites based on use by satellite tagged surf scoters from several wintering sites. We identified Lynn Canal as a particularly important stopover site for surf scoters originating throughout the Pacific winter range; approximately half of tagged coastally migrating surf scoters used this site, many for extended periods. Stopover sites were farther from the mainland coast and closer to herring spawn sites than random sites, whereas physical shoreline habitat attributes were generally poor predictors of site use. The geography and resource availability within southeast Alaska provides unique and potentially critical stopover habitat for spring migrating surf scoters. Our work identifies specific sites and habitat resources that deserve conservation and management consideration. Aggregations of birds are vulnerable to human activity impacts such as contaminant spills and resource management decisions. This information is of value to agencies and organizations responsible for emergency response planning, herring fisheries management, and bird and ecosystem conservation. Copyright ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  2. Surfing the internet with a BCI mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Gu, Zhenghui

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present a new web browser based on a two-dimensional (2D) brain-computer interface (BCI) mouse, where our major concern is the selection of an intended target in a multi-target web page. A real-world web page may contain tens or even hundreds of targets, including hyperlinks, input elements, buttons, etc. In this case, a target filter designed in our system can be used to exclude most of those targets of no interest. Specifically, the user filters the targets of no interest out by inputting keywords with a P300-based speller, while keeps those containing the keywords. Such filtering largely facilitates the target selection task based on our BCI mouse. When there are only several targets in a web page (either an original sparse page or a target-filtered page), the user moves the mouse toward the target of interest using his/her electroencephalographic signal. The horizontal movement and vertical movement are controlled by motor imagery and P300 potential, respectively. If the mouse encounters a target of no interest, the user rejects it and continues to move the mouse. Otherwise the user selects the target and activates it. With the collaboration of the target filtering and a series of mouse movements and target selections/rejections, the user can select an intended target in a web page. Based on our browser system, common navigation functions, including history rolling forward and backward, hyperlink selection, page scrolling, text input, etc, are available. The system has been tested on seven subjects. Experimental results not only validated the efficacy of the proposed method, but also showed that free internet surfing with a BCI mouse is feasible.

  3. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake (SURF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesko, K. T.

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the Berkeley and CUBED low-background counters. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark matter experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability. These plans include a Generation-2 Dark Matter experiment and the US flagship neutrino experiment, LBNE.

  4. Australian surf life-saving and the "forgotten members".

    PubMed

    Jaggard, E

    1999-01-01

    The history and mythology of Australia's surf life-saving movement portray the surf life-saver as an inter and postwar national symbol, an image of manhood often regarded as the successor to that of the bushman and the digger. According to this viewpoint, women had no place on the beaches, being supportive fundraisers and social organisers. In fact, almost from surf life-saving's commencement in 1906, many women refused to be confined to these roles; they participated in their own competitions, were proficient in rescue techniques and were proud to belong to the movement, thus contradicting the widely shared belief that their active involvement began only in 1980 when they were granted full membership. PMID:19400020

  5. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake (SURF)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lesko, K. T.

    2015-03-24

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the Majorana Demonstrator neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the Berkeley and CUBED low-background counters. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark mattermore » experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability. These plans include a Generation-2 Dark Matter experiment and the US flagship neutrino experiment, LBNE.« less

  6. The Sanford Underground Research Facility at Homestake (SURF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lesko, K. T.

    2015-03-24

    The former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota is being transformed into a dedicated laboratory to pursue underground research in rare-process physics, as well as offering research opportunities in other disciplines. A key component of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) is the Davis Campus, which is in operation at the 4850-foot level (4300 m.w.e) and currently hosts three projects: the LUX dark matter experiment, the Majorana Demonstrator neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment and the Berkeley and CUBED low-background counters. Plans for possible future experiments at SURF are well underway and include long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, future dark matter experiments as well as nuclear astrophysics accelerators. Facility upgrades to accommodate some of these future projects have already started. SURF is a dedicated facility with significant expansion capability. These plans include a Generation-2 Dark Matter experiment and the US flagship neutrino experiment, LBNE.

  7. Ancient Clam Gardens Increased Shellfish Production: Adaptive Strategies from the Past Can Inform Food Security Today

    PubMed Central

    Groesbeck, Amy S.; Rowell, Kirsten; Lepofsky, Dana; Salomon, Anne K.

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining food production while sustaining productive ecosystems is among the central challenges of our time, yet, it has been for millennia. Ancient clam gardens, intertidal rock-walled terraces constructed by humans during the late Holocene, are thought to have improved the growing conditions for clams. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the beach slope, intertidal height, and biomass and density of bivalves at replicate clam garden and non-walled clam beaches in British Columbia, Canada. We also quantified the variation in growth and survival rates of littleneck clams (Leukoma staminea) we experimentally transplanted across these two beach types. We found that clam gardens had significantly shallower slopes than non-walled beaches and greater densities of L. staminea and Saxidomus giganteus, particularly at smaller size classes. Overall, clam gardens contained 4 times as many butter clams and over twice as many littleneck clams relative to non-walled beaches. As predicted, this relationship varied as a function of intertidal height, whereby clam density and biomass tended to be greater in clam gardens compared to non-walled beaches at relatively higher intertidal heights. Transplanted juvenile L. staminea grew 1.7 times faster and smaller size classes were more likely to survive in clam gardens than non-walled beaches, specifically at the top and bottom of beaches. Consequently, we provide strong evidence that ancient clam gardens likely increased clam productivity by altering the slope of soft-sediment beaches, expanding optimal intertidal clam habitat, thereby enhancing growing conditions for clams. These results reveal how ancient shellfish aquaculture practices may have supported food security strategies in the past and provide insight into tools for the conservation, management, and governance of intertidal seascapes today. PMID:24618748

  8. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  9. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  10. 40 CFR 408.230 - Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-shucked clam processing subcategory. 408.230 Section 408.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hand-Shucked Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.230 Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  11. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  12. 40 CFR 408.230 - Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-shucked clam processing subcategory. 408.230 Section 408.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hand-Shucked Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.230 Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  13. 40 CFR 408.230 - Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-shucked clam processing subcategory. 408.230 Section 408.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hand-Shucked Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.230 Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  14. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  15. 40 CFR 408.240 - Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... mechanized clam processing subcategory. 408.240 Section 408.240 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Mechanized Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.240 Applicability; description of the mechanized clam processing subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges...

  16. Deployed bivalves (oysters and clams) as indicators of estuarine condition

    SciTech Connect

    Ringwood, A.H.; Holland, A.F.; Keppler, C.; Wert, M.; Hyland, J.

    1995-12-31

    Hatchery-reared bivalves, oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and clams (Mercenaria mercenaria), were deployed simultaneously at reference and degraded sites in SC estuaries for approximately 1 month. Juvenile bivalves with endogenously high growth rates were used because effects on growth can be detected in a short time frame. The effects on growth and bioaccumulation of metal contaminants, as well as two biochemical indices (expression of metallothioneins, MT, and multi-xenobiotic transporting proteins, {at}R) were evaluated. Metal concentrations of sediments were also measured. Adverse effects on growth of both species were observed at degraded sites. However, oysters tended to grow more rapidly than clams, and adverse effects on oysters were more pronounced than in clams. Many of the sediments were characterized by elevated concentrations of multiple metals (Cu, Pb, Cr, etc.). However, increases in metal concentrations of oyster tissues were observed primarily with Cu, suggesting that many of the other metals had low bioavailability. There was little evidence of bioconcentration of any metals in clams. There was a significant correlation between sediment Cu and Cu in oyster tissues, but not in clams. Alterations in MT and MXR expression were also observed in oysters deployed at degraded sites. These studies suggest that oysters may be better in-situ indicators of habitat condition because they have more rapid growth rates and greater bioaccumulation potentials.

  17. Toxicity of a traditional molluscicide to asian clam veligers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Layhee, Megan J.; Miho Yoshioka; Miho Yoshioka; Bahram Farokhkish; Bahram Farokhkish; Gross, Jackson A.; Sepulveda, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Aquaculture and hatchery industries are in need of effective control methods to reduce the risk of spreading aquatic invasive species, such as the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea, through aquaculture and hatchery activities. The planktonic nature of Asian clam veligers enables this life stage to enter water-based infrastructure undetected, including hatchery trucks used to stock fish. Once in hatchery trucks, veligers can disperse overland and establish in previously uninvaded habitats. As a result, there is a need to develop techniques that result in veliger mortality but do not harm fish. In September 2012, we conducted laboratory trials to determine if a molluscicide (750 mg/L potassium chloride and 25 mg/L formalin) commonly used to kill zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) veligers in hatchery trucks can also effectively kill Asian clam veligers. We exposed Asian clam veligers to this molluscicide for 1, 3, and 5 h in each of two water types: deionized water and filtered lake water. We found ,20% mortality at the 1-h exposure period and 100% mortality at both the 3-h and 5-h exposure periods, regardless of water type. This laboratory study represents an important step toward reducing the spread of Asian clams by aquaculture facilities.

  18. An efficient method of noroviruses recovery from oysters and clams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Deqing; Ma, Liping; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Lin; Su, Laijin; Li, Xinguang

    2013-03-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are widespread causes of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Outbreaks of NoVs caused diseases are commonly ascribed to the consumption of contaminated shellfish. The concentration and RNA extraction of NoVs are crucial steps of detecting NoVs in shellfish. This study aimed to select a simple, rapid and highly efficient recovery method of NoVs detection with real-time RT-PCR. Four methods of recovering GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs from spiked digestive tissues of oysters and clams, respectively, were compared, of them, the method involving proteinase K and PEG 8000 was found the most efficient. With this method, 9.3% and 13.1% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from oysters and 9.6% and 12.3% of GI.3 and GII.4 NoVs were recovered from clams, respectively. This method was further used to detect NoVs in 84 oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) and 86 clams ( Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from 10 coastal cities in China from Jan. 2011 to Feb. 2012. The NoVs isolation rates were 10.47% of clams (9/86) and 7.14% of oysters (6/84). All the detected NoVs belonged to genotype GII. The NoVs recovery method selected is efficient for NoVs detection in oysters and clams.

  19. Two variants of the assembly factor Surf1 target specific terminal oxidases in Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Freya A; Hoffmeier, Klaus; Ludwig, Bernd

    2008-10-01

    Biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) relies on a large number of assembly proteins, one of them being Surf1. In humans, the loss of Surf1 function is associated with Leigh syndrome, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. In the soil bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, homologous genes specifying Surf1 have been identified and located in two operons of terminal oxidases: surf1q is the last gene of the qox operon (coding for a ba(3)-type ubiquinol oxidase), and surf1c is found at the end of the cta operon (encoding subunits of the aa(3)-type cytochrome c oxidase). We introduced chromosomal single and double deletions for both surf1 genes, leading to significantly reduced oxidase activities in membrane. Our experiments on P. denitrificans surf1 single deletion strains show that both Surf1c and Surf1q are functional and act independently for the aa(3)-type cytochrome c oxidase and the ba(3)-type quinol oxidase, respectively. This is the first direct experimental evidence for the involvement of a Surf1 protein in the assembly of a quinol oxidase. Analyzing the heme content of purified cytochrome c oxidase, we conclude that Surf1, though not indispensable for oxidase assembly, is involved in an early step of cofactor insertion into subunit I. PMID:18582433

  20. Modeling surf zone-inner shelf exchange: Interaction of rip currents and stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.; Feddersen, F.

    2014-12-01

    Transient rip currents on alongshore uniform beaches develop from the coalescence of surf zone eddies, exchanging tracers between the surf zone and the potentially stratified inner shelf. The interaction of stratification and transient rip currents has not yet been investigated. Surf zone eddies responsible for transient rip currents are generated by short-crested wave breaking, a process included in wave-resolving (WR) Boussinesq models. However, WR models are depth-integrated and cannot account for stratification and vertically sheared flows. Wave-averaged (WA) models can simulate these processes, but cannot create surf zone eddies. A combination of WR and WA models is required to accurately simulate surf zone-inner shelf exchange. Here, WR depth-integrated Boussinessq model funwaveC is coupled to the stratification and depth-resolving WA Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) modeling system. The surf zone eddy generation forcing is extracted from a funwaveC simulation of normally incident waves on a planar beach, and provided to COAWST as a depth-uniform surf zone force. COAWST model simulations resolving the surf zone to mid-shelf are conducted with surf zone eddy forcing, idealistic surface heating/cooling, stratification, and Coriolis effects. These simulations provide three-dimensional evolution of velocity and temperature, diagnosed to quantify the role of surf zone eddy forcing in surf zone-inner shelf exchange. The impact of stratification on rip currents and exchange is studied by varying the stratification. Funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  1. Internet Surfing for Kindergarten Children: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    The Internet is an effective learning tool for gifted children because it allows them to independently select the areas in which they have talent. The Internet also enables children to discover and maximize their potential. However, younger children might not have a large enough vocabulary to surf the Internet, even if they are gifted. For

  2. Women's Recreational Surfing: A Patronising Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Rebecca; McCuaig, Louise; Phillips, Murray G.

    2015-01-01

    Research analysing the operation of power within sport and physical activity has exposed the marginalisation and exclusion of women's sport in explicit and institutionalised ways. However, for women in recreational and alternative physical activities like surfing, sporting experiences lie outside institutionalised structures, thus requiring

  3. CoBrowser: Surfing the Web Using a Standard Browser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maly, K.; Zubair, M.; Li, L.

    Co-browsing is a synchronous class of collaborative applications, which allows a group of users to surf the Web together. Such an application can be deployed in an education environment in several ways. One example of where it can be used would be in courses that are project-oriented. Students would be required to collectively research or explore…

  4. Women's Recreational Surfing: A Patronising Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Rebecca; McCuaig, Louise; Phillips, Murray G.

    2015-01-01

    Research analysing the operation of power within sport and physical activity has exposed the marginalisation and exclusion of women's sport in explicit and institutionalised ways. However, for women in recreational and alternative physical activities like surfing, sporting experiences lie outside institutionalised structures, thus requiring…

  5. Safety Strategies While Surfing Online in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirbilek, Muhammet; Cilesiz, Sebnem; Tozoglu, Dogan

    The Internet has become an indispensable medium of the 21st century. Millions of people are using the Internet for exchanging information, surfing for information on virtually any topic, communicating all over the world, participating in discussion groups, shopping, traveling, and many other online activities. The World Wide Web is constantly…

  6. "Surfing Global Change": How Didactic Visions Can Be Implemented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahamer, Gilbert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Aims to examine a negotiation-oriented and partly web-based game "Surfing Global Change" (SGC) invented by the author based on didactics of self-managed learning and successfully implemented in WebCT. Design/methodology/approach: Along three historic generations of web-based teaching (WBT), the key functionalities of any platform…

  7. Internet Surfing for Kindergarten Children: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    The Internet is an effective learning tool for gifted children because it allows them to independently select the areas in which they have talent. The Internet also enables children to discover and maximize their potential. However, younger children might not have a large enough vocabulary to surf the Internet, even if they are gifted. For…

  8. Assimilation of Remote Sensing Observations to Estimate Surf Zone Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G.; Özkan-Haller, H. T.; Holman, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The surf zone (defined as the coastal ocean region where wave breaking dominates the dynamics) is a highly energetic region with large spatial/temporal variability - a challenging environment for in-situ observation. Hence, remote sensing (usually land-based) plays an important role in surf zone research. Recent progress in surf zone remote sensing shows a trend towards increasingly quantitative data products, for example remotely sensed estimates of wavefield properties and time-averaged currents - data which can be directly compared to numerical model predictions. As these new products become mature, it is easy to envision them being integrated into forecasts of surf zone waves and currents. In particular, one wonders whether such data can help to reduce uncertainty in nearshore bathymetry, which is a key source of error in models due to its rapid evolution and complex physics. To that end, we have developed an ensemble-based sequential data assimilation system which corrects for bathymetric error by assimilating remote sensing observations of waves and currents. Data (both in-situ and remotely sensed) from a 2010 field experiment at Duck, NC, has been used to calibrate and test this system, showing it is capable of reducing bathymetric error over time and improving forecasts. We present these results, as well as the details of the modeling system and the data.

  9. The Evolution of Technology: A Decade of Surfing the Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    The world was a different place when "Understanding Our Gifted" introduced "Surfing the Net" in 1994 as a regular feature. Since then, technology and the Internet have become part of people's culture, permeating almost every aspect of their lives. The Internet has greatly changed the way they conduct business and communicate with friends, it helps…

  10. Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists identify fish collected in a beach seine while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA. Washington's Puget Sound is a complex ecosystem directly adjacent to a robust metropolitan area that scientists from the USGS Wester...

  11. Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists haul a beach seine over an eelgrass bed while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA. Washington's Puget Sound is a complex ecosystem directly adjacent to a robust metropolitan area that scientists from the USGS Western...

  12. Juvenile Surf Smelt Surveys in Central Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Western Fisheries Research Center scientists Lisa Gee, Collin Smith, and Ryan Tomka display a bycatch of perch collected in a beach seine while conducting a survey for juvenile surf smelt on Bainbridge Island, WA. Washington's Puget Sound is a complex ecosystem directly adjacent to a robust me...

  13. A Lagrangian stochastic model of surf zone drifter dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spydell, Matthew S.; Feddersen, Falk

    2012-03-01

    Drifter-derived cross-shore and alongshore surf zone diffusivities were previously estimated on an alongshore uniform beach over 1000 s for five Huntington Beach, California, 2006 (HB06) experiment release days. The cross-shore diffusivity Kx had a nonmonotonic time dependence, potentially due to the shoreline or to weaker diffusivity seaward of the surf zone. The alongshore diffusivities Ky were qualitatively consistent with shear dispersion but differed from the classic Taylor laminar theory. Here, modeled and analytic diffusivities for the five release days are derived from a Lagrangian stochastic model (LSM) that uses the drifter-derived bulk (cross-shore averaged) velocity variance and cross-shore-dependent mean alongshore current. The LSM modeled and analytic cross-shore diffusivities are nonmonotonic due to the shoreline and strongly suggest that the observed cross-shore diffusivity is shoreline affected. The LSM typically reproduce well the observed Kx with Lagrangian time scale between 75 and 200 s, consistent with surf zone eddy time scales. HB06 drifter trajectories were too short to observe the analytic long-time Kx limit, and weaker diffusivity seaward of the surf zone may be important at longer times (>1000 s). On all release days, the LSM model and analytic alongshore diffusivity reproduce well the observed Ky with alongshore Lagrangian time scales between 95 and 155 s. The isolated shear-induced diffusivity is very well represented by an analytic theory which incorporates a nonzero Lagrangian time scale. Many of the stochastic model parameters can be specified a priori with reasonable assumptions to predict surf zone dispersion of an initial value problem pollution spill.

  14. Occurrence of larval fishes in the surf zone of a northern Gulf of Mexico barrier island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruple, David L.

    1984-02-01

    Larval fishes were collected from the surf zone of Horn Island, Mississippi between March 1978 and April 1979. A standardized total of 39 435 larvae were taken from 222 collections in the inner and outer surf zone regions, representing fish in 69 taxa. Overall, considerably more larvae were collected in the outer surf zone (78·3%) than in the inner surf zone (21·7%). Engraulids, Chloroscombrus chrysurus and Symphurus spp. were the most abundant larvae taken from the outer surf zone while engraulids, Leiostomus xanthurus, Brevoortia patronus and Trinectes maculatus were the numerically dominant larvae in the inner surf zone. Seasonal peaks in abundance occurred at the outer surf zone stations during May and June and at the inner surf zone stations during December. Larval densities were significantly greater in night collections than in day collections. The occurrence of early larvae, late larvae and juveniles suggests that the surf zone habitat is important to several species of coastal marine fishes. Menticirrhus littoralis, Harengula jaguana and Trachinotus carolinus appear to most readily utilize the surf zone as a nursery area.

  15. White Dwarfs in UKIDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, P. R.; Burleigh, M. R.; Farihi, J.; Gänsicke, B.; Jameson, R. F.; Dobbie, P. D.; Barstow, M. A.

    We present a near-infrared photometric search for low mass stellar and substellar companions, and for debris disks around white dwarfs in the UKIDSS Large Area Survey DR5. A cross correlation of the SDSS DR4 and McCook and Sion catalogues of white dwarfs gave near-infrared photometry for 1,161 stars. Atmospheric models are fitted to the optical and near-infrared photometry of the matched stars to identify those with a photometric excess consistent with an unresolved companion or debris disk. In total 7 new potential white dwarf + brown dwarf binary candidates have been identified. We present follow-up spectroscopy of a previously identified candidate; PHL5038. We confirm that this system is a resolved white dwarf + L8 brown dwarf binary.

  16. Photosymbiotic giant clams are transformers of solar flux.

    PubMed

    Holt, Amanda L; Vahidinia, Sanaz; Gagnon, Yakir Luc; Morse, Daniel E; Sweeney, Alison M

    2014-12-01

    'Giant' tridacnid clams have evolved a three-dimensional, spatially efficient, photodamage-preventing system for photosymbiosis. We discovered that the mantle tissue of giant clams, which harbours symbiotic nutrition-providing microalgae, contains a layer of iridescent cells called iridocytes that serve to distribute photosynthetically productive wavelengths by lateral and forward-scattering of light into the tissue while back-reflecting non-productive wavelengths with a Bragg mirror. The wavelength- and angle-dependent scattering from the iridocytes is geometrically coupled to the vertically pillared microalgae, resulting in an even re-distribution of the incoming light along the sides of the pillars, thus enabling photosynthesis deep in the tissue. There is a physical analogy between the evolved function of the clam system and an electric transformer, which changes energy flux per area in a system while conserving total energy. At incident light levels found on shallow coral reefs, this arrangement may allow algae within the clam system to both efficiently use all incident solar energy and avoid the photodamage and efficiency losses due to non-photochemical quenching that occur in the reef-building coral photosymbiosis. Both intra-tissue radiometry and multiscale optical modelling support our interpretation of the system's photophysics. This highly evolved 'three-dimensional' biophotonic system suggests a strategy for more efficient, damage-resistant photovoltaic materials and more spatially efficient solar production of algal biofuels, foods and chemicals. PMID:25401182

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in clams Ruditapes decussatus (Linnaeus, 1758).

    PubMed

    Barreira, Luísa A; Mudge, Stephen M; Bebianno, Maria J

    2007-02-01

    The concentration of sixteen individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was measured in the clam Ruditapes decussatus whole soft tissues from several places of the Ria Formosa lagoon (Portugal). Total PAH (tPAH) concentrations were higher in the summer (August) and winter (January) than in the other months and the distribution pattern of the individual PAHs was generally dominated by the 4 aromatic ring PAHs, followed by the 2 + 3 aromatic rings PAHs. Benzo[a]anthracene and acenaphthene were the most representative PAHs of the two fractions. Principal components analysis (PCA) revealed that, in the Ria Formosa, seasonal variations are more important than spatial variations, due to changes in PAH source. These sources ranged from petrogenic to pyrolytic or a mixture of both. The origin of clam PAHs was also assessed by partial least squares (PLS) analysis using nineteen different PAH signatures, taken from the literature. It was possible to identify boat traffic, especially in the summer, as one of the most relevant PAH sources to the Ria Formosa. The influence of boat traffic was revealed by several signatures including diesel soot, oil and weathered oil and a mixture of different individual PAHs usually found in harbour sediments. Other relevant sources included combustion of organic matter such as forest fires and diverse domestic activities, occurring mainly in the summer. Most of the clams were considered safe for human consumption, except for some point samples, which presented unusually high PAH concentrations, suggesting the need for a regular survey of PAHs in clam tissues. PMID:17285162

  18. Development status of CLAM steel for fusion application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    The China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel is being developed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology (INEST) under wide collaboration within China. Significant R&D work on CLAM steel was carried out to help make it suitable for industrial applications. The effect of refining processes and thermal aging on composition, microstructures and mechanical properties were investigated. Material properties before irradiation including impact, fracture toughness, thermal aging, creep and fatigue properties etc. were assessed. A series of irradiation tests in the fission reactor HFETR in Chengdu up to 2 dpa and in the spallation neutron source SINQ in Paul Scherrer Institute up to 20 dpa were performed. PbLi corrosion tests for more than 10,000 h were done in the DRAGON-I and PICOLO loops. Fabrication techniques for a test blanket module (TBM) are being developed and a 1/3 scale TBM prototype is being fabricated with CLAM steel. Recent progresses on the development status of this steel are presented here. The code qualification of CLAM steel is under plan for its final application in ITER-TBM and DEMO in the future.

  19. Measurement and analysis of SHCCT diagram for CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuming; Chen, Xizhang; Shen, Zheng; Madigan, Bruce; Yucheng, Lei; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is a leading candidate material for construction of the Chinese fusion reactor Test Blanket Module. The Simulated HAZ Continuous Cooling Transformation (SHCCT) diagram is developed via physical simulation, and the effects of thermal history on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld coarse-grain heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) in CLAM steel are evaluated. The results of thermal cycle simulation show that grain size increases and hardness decreases gradually with increasing heat input. Under certain conditions, especially when cooling times from 800 °C to 500 °C (T8/5) are larger than 136 s, delta ferrite may form which is deleterious for the TBM application. The amounts of delta ferrite are given under different T8/5. A SHCCT diagram of CLAM steel is developed using dilatometry and it predicts the AC1, AC3 and the Ms temperatures. With decreased cooling rate (larger T8/5), martensite laths widen and carbide precipitates grow. The results indicate that welding heat input should be taken into consideration and controlled in practical CLAM steel welding process applications.

  20. Photosymbiotic giant clams are transformers of solar flux

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Amanda L.; Vahidinia, Sanaz; Gagnon, Yakir Luc; Morse, Daniel E.; Sweeney, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    ‘Giant’ tridacnid clams have evolved a three-dimensional, spatially efficient, photodamage-preventing system for photosymbiosis. We discovered that the mantle tissue of giant clams, which harbours symbiotic nutrition-providing microalgae, contains a layer of iridescent cells called iridocytes that serve to distribute photosynthetically productive wavelengths by lateral and forward-scattering of light into the tissue while back-reflecting non-productive wavelengths with a Bragg mirror. The wavelength- and angle-dependent scattering from the iridocytes is geometrically coupled to the vertically pillared microalgae, resulting in an even re-distribution of the incoming light along the sides of the pillars, thus enabling photosynthesis deep in the tissue. There is a physical analogy between the evolved function of the clam system and an electric transformer, which changes energy flux per area in a system while conserving total energy. At incident light levels found on shallow coral reefs, this arrangement may allow algae within the clam system to both efficiently use all incident solar energy and avoid the photodamage and efficiency losses due to non-photochemical quenching that occur in the reef-building coral photosymbiosis. Both intra-tissue radiometry and multiscale optical modelling support our interpretation of the system's photophysics. This highly evolved ‘three-dimensional’ biophotonic system suggests a strategy for more efficient, damage-resistant photovoltaic materials and more spatially efficient solar production of algal biofuels, foods and chemicals. PMID:25401182

  1. The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Charlock, Thomas; Wielicki, Bruce; Kahn, Ralph; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Gatebe, Charles; Hobbs, Peter V.; Purgold, G. Carl; Redemann, Jens; Remer, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    NASA has developed an Earth Observing System (EOS) consisting of a series of satellites designed to study global change from space. The EOS flagship is the EOS TERRA satellite, launched in December 1999, equipped with five unique sensors to monitor and study the Earth s heat budget and many of the key controlling variables governing the Earth's climate system. CLAMS, the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites field campaign was conducted from NASA Wallops Flight Facility and successfully executed over the middle Atlantic eastern seaboard from July 10 August 2, 2001. CLAMS is primarily a shortwave closure experiment designed to validate and improve EOS TERRA satellite data products being derived from three sensors: CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). CLAMS is jointly sponsored by the CERES, MISR and MODIS instrument teams and the NASA GEWEX Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). CLAMS primary objectives are to validate satellite-based retrievals of aerosol properties and vertical profiles of radiative flux, temperature and water vapor. Central to CLAMS measurement strategy is the Chesapeake Lighthouse, a stable sea platform located in the Atlantic Ocean, 13 miles east of Virginia Beach near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and the site of an ongoing CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE). Six research aircraft were deployed to make detailed measurements of the atmosphere and ocean surface in the vicinity of COVE, over the surrounding ocean, over nearby NOAA buoys and over a few land sites. The measurements are used to validate and provide ground truth for simultaneous products being derived from TERRA data, a key step toward an improved understanding and ability to predict changes in the Earth's climate. One of the two CERES instruments on-board TERRA was programmed for Rotating Azimuth Plane Scans (RAPS) during CLAMS, increasing the CERES coverage over COVE by a factor of 10. Nine coordinated aircraft missions and numerous additional sorties were flown under a variety of atmospheric conditions and aerosol loadings. On one golden day, July 17, all six aircraft flew coordinated patterns, vertically stacked between 100 ft and 65,000 ft over the COVE site as the TERRA satellite orbited overhead. A summary of CLAMS measurement campaign and a description of the platforms and measurements is given.

  2. Vesicomyid Clams Alter Biogeochemical Processes at Pacific Methane Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertics, V. J.; Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2007-12-01

    There exists a close relationship between fluid flow, biogeochemistry, and biota in seep sediments. Upwelling of methane and sulfide-rich fluids supports abundant macrofauna species harboring thiotrophic or methanotrophic symbionts. Variations in fluid flow, thus supply of methane and sulfide, are considered key factors controlling benthic communities. Vesicomyid clams harbor thiotrophic symbionts in their gills, which are supplied with oxygen from the surrounding water and hydrogen sulfide from the sediment. The clams are capable of extending their foot into the sediment to tap sulfide sources in deeper layers, consequently affecting water-sediment solute exchange. Because seep fluids are generally depleted in sulfate compared to seawater, this bioturbation activity may enhance the supply of sulfate to otherwise sulfate-limited sediments, thus boosting microbial activity of sulfate reduction (SR) coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The goal of this study was to investigate the activity of three species of vesicomyid clams ( Calyptogena pacifica, C. kilmeri, C. gigas) from three methane seep habitats (Eel River Basin, Hydrate Ridge, Monterey Bay Canyon) and to evaluate its effect on biogeochemical processes. Sediment cores and clams were collected using the submersible Alvin or the ROV Jason, during three cruises with the R/V Atlantis in July and October 2006 and July 2007 (AT 15-7, AT 15-11, and AT 15-20). We performed high-resolution measurements of geochemical gradients in intact sediment cores using microsensors (O2, H2S, pH, redox potential). The cores were then sliced (1 cm intervals) for detailed chemical and microbiological analyses. Parallel cores were used to determine microbial activity (AOM, SR) with radioactive tracers. For detailed laboratory investigations, clams were kept in narrow aquaria (15 cm x 20 cm x 5 cm) in the ship's cold room. The front of the aquaria was perforated with holes at 1 cm resolution. These silicone-filled holes served as sampling ports or for direct microsensor measurements. Vertical and horizontal microprofiles were measured, pore water samples were extracted, and small sediment cores were taken along the length of the aquaria for microbial rate measurements and chemical and microbiological analyses. We documented different bioturbation activity for the three species of vesicomyid clam that related to distinct geochemical gradients and differences in microbial activity. Sulfate reduction, thus sulfide production, was significantly enhanced in the presence of clams compared to the control.

  3. Monitoring system specifications: retrieval of surf from a salt repository

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    The task of developing specifications for a reference monitoring system determined by repository environmental conditions, retrieval operations, and federal regulatory criteria is discussed. The monitoring system specified in this report is capable of measuring (1) package position and orientation, (2) vault deformation, (3) brine accumulation, (4) spent fuel dissolution, (5) temperature, (6) nuclear radiation, and (7) package condition with sufficient accuracy to provide data input to a general risk assessment model. In order to define a monitoring system which can provide probabilistic data on radiological risk to operating personnel and the general public for a salt mine repository, the following information is required: (1) a complete design of the salt SURF repository including inventory, density and waste package design details; (2) probalistic failure rate data on containment integrity of the SURF waste package; (3) probabilistic failure rate data on the monitoring system components (i.e., monitoring procedure, instrumentation, data acquisition, data processing and data interpretation).

  4. Distinguishing high surf from volcanic long-period earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, John J.; Haney, Matthew M.; Fee, David; Paskievitch, John F.

    2014-02-01

    Repeating long-period (LP) earthquakes are observed at active volcanoes worldwide and are typically attributed to unsteady pressure fluctuations associated with fluid migration through the volcanic plumbing system. Nonvolcanic sources of LP signals include ice movement and glacial outburst floods, and the waveform characteristics and frequency content of these events often make them difficult to distinguish from volcanic LP events. We analyze seismic and infrasound data from an LP swarm recorded at Pagan volcano on 12-14 October 2013 and compare the results to ocean wave data from a nearby buoy. We demonstrate that although the events show strong similarity to volcanic LP signals, the events are not volcanic but due to intense surf generated by a passing typhoon. Seismo-acoustic methods allow for rapid distinction of volcanic LP signals from those generated by large surf and other sources, a critical task for volcano monitoring.

  5. Ultraviolet degradation study of photomultiplier tubes at SURF III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hum, Lindsay; Shaw, Ping-Shine; Li, Zhigang; Lykke, Keith R.; Bishop, Michael L.

    2009-05-01

    Photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are used in biological detection systems in order to detect the presence of biological warfare agents. To ensure proper operation of these biological detection systems, the performance of PMTs must be characterized in terms of their responsivity and long-term stability. We report a technique for PMT calibration at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). SURF III provides synchrotron radiation with a smooth and continuous spectrum covering the entire UV range for accurate PMT measurements. By taking advantage of the ten decade variability in the flux of the synchrotron radiation, we studied properties of commercial PMTs such as the linearity, spatial uniformity, and spectral responsivity. We demonstrate the degradation of PMTs by comparing new PMTs with PMTs that were used and operated in a biological detection system for a long period of time. The observed degradation is discussed.

  6. Stern-Gerlach surfing in laser wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Stephen P.; Burton, David A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the effects of a Stern-Gerlach-type addition to the Lorentz force on electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator. The Stern-Gerlach-type terms are found to generate a family of trajectories describing electrons that 'surf' along the plasma density wave driven by a laser pulse. Such trajectories could lead to an increase in the size of an electron bunch, which may have implications for attempts to exploit such bunches in future free electron lasers.

  7. SURF IA Conflict Detection and Resolution Algorithm Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Chartrand, Ryan C.; Wilson, Sara R.; Commo, Sean A.; Barker, Glover D.

    2012-01-01

    The Enhanced Traffic Situational Awareness on the Airport Surface with Indications and Alerts (SURF IA) algorithm was evaluated in a fast-time batch simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. SURF IA is designed to increase flight crew situation awareness of the runway environment and facilitate an appropriate and timely response to potential conflict situations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of the SURF IA algorithm under various runway scenarios, multiple levels of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) system equipage, and various levels of horizontal position accuracy. This paper gives an overview of the SURF IA concept, simulation study, and results. Runway incursions are a serious aviation safety hazard. As such, the FAA is committed to reducing the severity, number, and rate of runway incursions by implementing a combination of guidance, education, outreach, training, technology, infrastructure, and risk identification and mitigation initiatives [1]. Progress has been made in reducing the number of serious incursions - from a high of 67 in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 to 6 in FY2010. However, the rate of all incursions has risen steadily over recent years - from a rate of 12.3 incursions per million operations in FY2005 to a rate of 18.9 incursions per million operations in FY2010 [1, 2]. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) also considers runway incursions to be a serious aviation safety hazard, listing runway incursion prevention as one of their most wanted transportation safety improvements [3]. The NTSB recommends that immediate warning of probable collisions/incursions be given directly to flight crews in the cockpit [4].

  8. A real-time FPGA-based architecture for OpenSURF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaoxiu; Yong, Huang; Zhong, Sheng; Yan, Luxin

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes a low-cost FPGA architecture of Speed-Up Robust Features (SURF) algorithm based on OpenSURF. It optimizes the computing architecture for the steps of feature detection and feature description involved in SURF to reduce the resource utilization and improve processing speed. As a result, this architecture can detect feature and extract descriptor from video streams of 800x600 resolutions at 60 frames per second (60fps). Extensive experiments have demonstrated its efficiency and effectiveness.

  9. Fluid Impact as a Source Mechanism for Surf Infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fee, D.; Garces, M.; McNamara, S.; Aucan, J.; Merrifield, M.

    2006-12-01

    The ability to provide infrasonic estimates of breaking ocean wave height and period in shallow reefs, steep rocky coastlines, and sand beaches has been demonstrated in previous work. Yet defining the source process and isolating the source pressure function remained elusive because of ambiguity introduced by complex coastlines and multiple breaker zones. Due to the steep bathymetry and its proximity to land, the Temae reef in the northeast coast of Moorea island, French Polynesia, provided a well constrained experimental environment where individual breaking waves could be identified and recorded. Synchronous wave height, infrasonic, seismic, and visual recordings of individual waves breaking against the shallow reef ledge were made and correlated. We characterize a possible fluid impact source mechanism for surf infrasound, demonstrate the capability to acoustically track alongshore traveling (peeling) plunging waves, and confirm a relationship between ocean wave height and infrasonic amplitude. Depending on the swell and coastal conditions, estimates of ocean wave period are also possible. We also present preliminary results on near-real-time remote infrasonic monitoring of the surf zone on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawaii, during the 2006-07 Winter high surf season.

  10. Patterns in Clam Excurrent Siphon Velocity According to External Environmental Cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; Delavan, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    This study attempts to determine the patterns and/or randomness of the excurrent velocity of actively feeding clams, Mercenaria mercenaria. We hypothesize that clams alter their feeding current velocity patterns or randomness according to external cues in the environment such as hydrodynamic characteristics, density of the clam patch, and presence of predators in the upstream flow. A PIV system measured vector fields for two-dimensional planes that bisect the clam excurrent siphons, and time records were extracted at the siphon exit position. Fractal and lacunarity analysis of the jet velocity time records revealed that clams alter their jet excurrent velocity unsteadiness according to the horizontal crossflow velocity. The results also reveal that the effect of clam patch density on the feeding activity was dependent on the size of the organism. This size/density dependent relationship suggests that predation by blue crabs dominates the system since larger clams are no longer susceptible to blue crab predation, whereas clams of all sizes are susceptible to whelk predation. Finally, clams increase the randomness of their excurrent jet velocity values when predator cues are located in the upstream flume flow. This suggests that the presence of predators elicits clam behavior that promotes the mixing and dilution of their chemical metabolites.

  11. Characterization of heme-binding properties of Paracoccus denitrificans Surf1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Hannappel, Achim; Bundschuh, Freya A; Ludwig, Bernd

    2011-05-01

    Biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a highly complex process involving >30 chaperones in eukaryotes; those required for the incorporation of the copper and heme cofactors are also conserved in bacteria. Surf1, associated with heme a insertion and with Leigh syndrome if defective in humans, is present as two homologs in the soil bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, Surf1c and Surf1q. In an in vitro interaction assay, the heme a transfer from purified heme a synthase, CtaA, to Surf1c was followed, and both Surf proteins were tested for their heme a binding properties. Mutation of four strictly conserved amino acid residues within the transmembrane part of each Surf1 protein confirmed their requirement for heme binding. Interestingly the mutation of a tryptophan residue in transmembrane helix II (W200 in Surf1c and W209 in Surf1q) led to a drastic switch in the heme composition, with Surf1 now being populated mostly by heme o, the intermediate in the heme a biosynthetic pathway. This tryptophan residue discriminates between the two heme moieties, apparently coordinates the formyl group of heme a, and most likely presents the cofactor in a spatial orientation suitable for optimal transfer to its target site within subunit I of cytochrome c oxidase. PMID:21418525

  12. SURF_ER—surface electron spin resonance (ESR) of the surface domain of large objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrling, Th.; Rehberg, J.; Jung, K.; Groth, N.

    2002-04-01

    SURF_ER is a method for spectral and spatial electron spin resonance measurements on the surface of large objects which extension is only restricted by the width of the pole gap of the magnet and the homogeneity of the magnetic field and not by the cavity dimensions. The application of several techniques like SURF_ER for spectroscopic measurements, SURF_ERM for spatial scanning and SURF_ERI for spatial measurements of the depth of the surface region are discussed and represented for the skin of a human being as an example.

  13. Astrophysics: Illuminating brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.

    2016-05-01

    Objects known as brown dwarfs are midway between stars and planets in mass. Observations of a hot brown dwarf irradiated by a nearby star will help to fill a gap in our knowledge of the atmospheres of fluid planetary objects. See Letter p.366

  14. Tissue- and species-specific differences in cytochrome c oxidase assembly induced by SURF1 defects.

    PubMed

    Kovářová, Nikola; Pecina, Petr; Nůsková, Hana; Vrbacký, Marek; Zeviani, Massimo; Mráček, Tomáš; Viscomi, Carlo; Houštěk, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial protein SURF1 is a specific assembly factor of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), but its function is poorly understood. SURF1 gene mutations cause a severe COX deficiency manifesting as the Leigh syndrome in humans, whereas in mice SURF1(-/-) knockout leads only to a mild COX defect. We used SURF1(-/-) mouse model for detailed analysis of disturbed COX assembly and COX ability to incorporate into respiratory supercomplexes (SCs) in different tissues and fibroblasts. Furthermore, we compared fibroblasts from SURF1(-/-) mouse and SURF1 patients to reveal interspecies differences in kinetics of COX biogenesis using 2D electrophoresis, immunodetection, arrest of mitochondrial proteosynthesis and pulse-chase metabolic labeling. The crucial differences observed are an accumulation of abundant COX1 assembly intermediates, low content of COX monomer and preferential recruitment of COX into I-III2-IVn SCs in SURF1 patient fibroblasts, whereas SURF1(-/-) mouse fibroblasts were characterized by low content of COX1 assembly intermediates and milder decrease in COX monomer, which appeared more stable. This pattern was even less pronounced in SURF1(-/-) mouse liver and brain. Both the control and SURF1(-/-) mice revealed only negligible formation of the I-III2-IVn SCs and marked tissue differences in the contents of COX dimer and III2-IV SCs, also less noticeable in liver and brain than in heart and muscle. Our studies support the view that COX assembly is much more dependent on SURF1 in humans than in mice. We also demonstrate markedly lower ability of mouse COX to form I-III2-IVn supercomplexes, pointing to tissue-specific and species-specific differences in COX biogenesis. PMID:26804654

  15. Tissue- and species-specific differences in cytochrome c oxidase assembly induced by SURF1 defects

    PubMed Central

    Kovářová, Nikola; Pecina, Petr; Nůsková, Hana; Vrbacký, Marek; Zeviani, Massimo; Mráček, Tomáš; Viscomi, Carlo; Houštěk, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial protein SURF1 is a specific assembly factor of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), but its function is poorly understood. SURF1 gene mutations cause a severe COX deficiency manifesting as the Leigh syndrome in humans, whereas in mice SURF1−/− knockout leads only to a mild COX defect. We used SURF1−/− mouse model for detailed analysis of disturbed COX assembly and COX ability to incorporate into respiratory supercomplexes (SCs) in different tissues and fibroblasts. Furthermore, we compared fibroblasts from SURF1−/− mouse and SURF1 patients to reveal interspecies differences in kinetics of COX biogenesis using 2D electrophoresis, immunodetection, arrest of mitochondrial proteosynthesis and pulse-chase metabolic labeling. The crucial differences observed are an accumulation of abundant COX1 assembly intermediates, low content of COX monomer and preferential recruitment of COX into I–III2–IVn SCs in SURF1 patient fibroblasts, whereas SURF1−/− mouse fibroblasts were characterized by low content of COX1 assembly intermediates and milder decrease in COX monomer, which appeared more stable. This pattern was even less pronounced in SURF1−/− mouse liver and brain. Both the control and SURF1−/− mice revealed only negligible formation of the I–III2–IVn SCs and marked tissue differences in the contents of COX dimer and III2–IV SCs, also less noticeable in liver and brain than in heart and muscle. Our studies support the view that COX assembly is much more dependent on SURF1 in humans than in mice. We also demonstrate markedly lower ability of mouse COX to form I–III2–IVn supercomplexes, pointing to tissue-specific and species-specific differences in COX biogenesis. PMID:26804654

  16. Star Formation in Dwarf-Dwarf Mergers: Fueling Hierarchical Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierwalt, Sabrina; Johnson, K. E.; Kallivayalil, N.; Patton, D. R.; Putman, M. E.; Besla, G.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We present early results from the first systematic study a sample of isolated interacting dwarf pairs and the mechanisms governing their star formation. Low mass dwarf galaxies are ubiquitous in the local universe, yet the efficiency of gas removal and the enhancement of star formation in dwarfs via pre-processing (i.e. dwarf-dwarf interactions occurring before the accretion by a massive host) are currently unconstrained. Studies of Local Group dwarfs credit stochastic internal processes for their complicated star formation histories, but a few intriguing examples suggest interactions among dwarfs may produce enhanced star formation. We combine archival UV imaging from GALEX with deep optical broad- and narrow-band (Halpha) imaging taken with the pre- One Degree Imager (pODI) on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope and with the 2.3-m Bok telescope at Steward Observatory to confirm the presence of stellar bridges and tidal tails and to determine whether dwarf-dwarf interactions alone can trigger significant levels of star formation. We investigate star formation rates and global galaxy colors as a function of dwarf pair separation (i.e. the dwarf merger sequence) and dwarf-dwarf mass ratio. This project is a precursor to an ongoing effort to obtain high spatial resolution HI imaging to assess the importance of sequential triggering caused by dwarf-dwarf interactions and the subsequent affect on the more massive hosts that later accrete the low mass systems.

  17. Hsp 70 in the soft shell clam (Mya arenaria): Potential as a biomarker of field contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, M.E.; Dworak, H.A.; McDowell, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    Soft shell clams (Mya arenaria) were collected from 2 contaminated and 2 control sites in Massachusetts at 4 time periods, extending over a 30{degree}C temperature range. Populations at New Bedford Harbor were exposed to PCBs, PAHs, and heavy metals and populations at the Cotuit Bay Shores Beach Club were exposed to an unknown quantity and composition of petroleum hydrocarbons. Heat shock protein (hsp) 70 was measured in the gill of 20 clams per site by ELISA, using a commercially available monoclonal antibody. Expression of hsp 70 was variable between individual clams collected from the same site. Significance of the variables site and month was tested by one-way and two-way ANOVA; site, month, and site by month interaction were all significant. The significant interaction term meant that it was necessary to hold the month variable constant in order to test the hypothesis that clams from the contaminated sites contained more heat shock proteins than clams from the corresponding control sites. In general, the contaminated clams contained a higher concentration of hsp 70 than clams from the control sites, with New Bedford Harbor exhibiting the highest levels. Seasonal differences which could be responsible for the month effect include heat shock, food availability, and reproductive condition. In order to use heat shock protein expression as a biomarker of exposure to contaminants in the field, it is necessary to compare clams from contaminated sites to clams from control sites sampled at the same time.

  18. M dwarfs: Theoretical work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, Dermott J.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical work on the atmospheres of M dwarfs has progressed along lines parallel to those followed in the study of other classes of stars. Such models have become increasingly sophisticated as improvements in opacities, in the equation of state, and in the treatment of convection were incorporated during the last 15 to 20 years. As a result, spectrophotometric data on M dwarfs can now be fitted rather well by current models. The various attempts at modeling M dwarf photospheres in purely thermal terms are summarized. Some extensions of these models to include the effects of microturbulence and magnetic inhomogeneities are presented.

  19. When White Dwarfs Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, Wendy Phyllis

    3D models of white dwarf collisions are used to assess the likelihood of double-degenerate mergers as progenitors for Type Ia supernovae (henceforth SNIa) and to identify observational signatures of double-degenerate collisions. Observations of individual SNIa, SNIa rates in different galaxy types, and double white dwarf binary systems suggest that mergers or collisions between two white dwarfs play a role in the overall SNIa population. Given the possibility of two progenitor systems (single-degenerate and double-degenerate), the sample of SNIa used in cosmological calcula- tions needs to be carefully examined. To improve calculations of cosmological parameters, the development of calibrated diagnostics for double-degenerate progenitor SNIa is essential. Head-on white dwarf collision simulations are used to provide an upper limit on the 56Ni production in white dwarf collisions. In chapter II, I explore zero impact parameter collisions of white dwarfs using the Eulerian grid code FLASH. The initial 1D white dwarf profiles are created assuming hydrostatic equilibrium and a uniform composition of 50% 12C and 50% 16O. The masses range from 0.64 to 0.81 solar masses and have an isothermal temperature of 107 K. I map these 1D models onto a 3D grid, where the dimensions of the grid are each eight times the white dwarf radius, and the dwarfs are initially placed four white dwarf radii apart (center to center). To provide insight into a larger range of physical possibilities, I also model non-zero impact parameter white dwarf collisions (Chapter III). Although head-on white dwarf collisions provide an upper limit on 56Ni production, non-zero impact parameter collisions provide insight into a wider range of physical scenarios. The initial conditions (box size, initial separation, composition, and initial temperature) are identical to those used for the head-on collisions (Chapter II) for the same range of masses. For each mass pair- ing, collision simulations are carried out at impact parameters b=1 and b=2 (grazing). Finally, I will address future work to be performed (Chapter IV).

  20. The Ocean as a Unique Therapeutic Environment: Developing a Surfing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily D.; Armitano, Cortney N.; Lamont, Linda S.; Audette, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Educational aquatic programming offers necessary physical activity opportunities to children with disabilities and the benefits of aquatic activities are more pronounced for children with disabilities than for their able-bodied peers. Similar benefits could potentially be derived from surfing in the ocean. This article describes an adapted surfing

  1. Downscaling surfing conditions in nearshore areas: seasonal, interannual and long term variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, I.; Espejo, A.; Mendez, F.

    2012-12-01

    During the last years several artificial surf reefs have been constructed. Most of them have had slight effect on improving surf quality and in some cases the results have not been enough satisfactory. One cause of this lack of success can be blamed to an incipient design and construction technique but also because the location of these structures responds to socio-economic principles rather than in oceanographic ones. This work describes a hybrid downscaling method used to get detailed tracing spectral wave and wind data in order to determine historical surf quality time series in a regional (10-200 km) or a local scale. Our assessment is conducted by means of an objective and standardized index on the basis of expert judgment that takes into account the multivariate character of the surf resource. The availability of long hourly time series (more than 60 years) of the surf quality allows the statistical analysis at any particular spot. Thus, we offer a reliable tool for identifying optimum reef location, and determining spatial patterns of surf consistency in terms of seasonal, interannual and long term variability. This method have been applied in the north-eastern coast of Spain identifying world class spots like Mundaka and other places where in spite of occurring good wave-wind conditions there is no bathymetric anomalies able to produce peeling waves. This method provides the decision making process when planning an artificial surf reef construction and at the same time offers useful information for coastal management and surf related stakeholders.

  2. Social Networking Sites' Influence on Travelers' Authentic Experience a Case Study of Couch Surfing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    This study explored travelers' experiences in the era of network hospitality 2.0 using CouchSurfing.org as a case study. The following research questions guided this study: 1) what experience does CouchSurfing create for travelers before, during and after their travel? 2) how does couch surfers' experience relate to authenticity in context of…

  3. The effects of surfing behaviour on the development of external auditory canal exostosis.

    PubMed

    Alexander, V; Lau, A; Beaumont, E; Hope, A

    2015-07-01

    To examine how individual surfing behaviour affects the development of external auditory canal exostosis and to produce a model to predict exostosis severity. A standardised questionnaire was completed and each participant underwent an otoscopic examination. Surfers were recruited from August to October 2011 from surfing competitions and from colleges in the South West of England. 207 surfers were included, 53 % had evidence of external auditory canal; exostosis: grade 1, 23%; grade 2, 16%, grade 3, 16%. This risk of exostosis significantly increased with (1) surfing for 6 or more years, (2) surfing in the winter months, (3) surfing five or more times per month in the winter and (4) reported ear symptoms. Interestingly, participation in other water sports and wearing earplugs or a hood reduced the risk of developing exostosis. Surfers who surf in England are at significant risk of exostosis. A probability model was designed, incorporating different surfing behaviours and ear symptoms, the first of its kind in exostosis research. This model will be a useful tool for raising awareness of external ear canal exostosis in the surfing community and in assessing individual need for surgical intervention. PMID:24619201

  4. Liquid-bubble Interaction under Surf Zone Breaking Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhti, M.; Kirby, J. T., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Liquid-bubble interaction, especially in complex two-phase bubbly flow under breaking waves, is still poorly understood. Derakhti and Kirby (2014a,b) have recently studied bubble entrainment and turbulence modulation by dispersed bubbles under isolated unsteady breaking waves along with extensive model verifications and convergence tests. In this presentation, we continue this examination with attention turned to the simulation of periodic surf zone breaking waves. In addition, the relative importance of preferential accumulation of dispersed bubbles in coherent vortex cores is investigated. Heavier-than-liquid particles, i.e. sediment, tend to accumulate in regions of high strain rate and avoid regions of intense vorticity. In contrast, lighter-than-liquid particles such as bubbles tend to congregate in vortical regions. We perform a three dimensional (3D) large-eddy simulation (LES) using a Navier-Stokes solver extended to incorporate entrained bubble populations, using an Eulerian-Eulerian formulation for the polydisperse bubble phase. The volume of fluid (VOF) method is used for free surface tracking. The model accounts for momentum exchange between dispersed bubbles and liquid phase as well as bubble-induced dissipation. We investigate the formation and evolution of breaking-induced turbulent coherent structures (BTCS) under both plunging and spilling periodic breaking waves as well as BTCS's role on the intermittent 3D distributions of bubble void fraction in the surf zone. We particularly examine the correlation between bubble void fractions and Q-criterion values to quantify this interaction. Also, the vertical transport of dispersed bubbles by downburst type coherent structures in the transition region is compared to that by obliquely descending eddies. All the results are summarized at different zones from outer to inner surf zone.

  5. Brown dwarfs and planets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.

    The connection between brown-dwarfs and planets and the definition of giant planets themselves have been a matter of debate for more than a decade now. We summarize our current understanding of their respective formation mechanisms and associated physical properties. We then address the question of planetary formation around brown-dwarfs. Signs of disk evolution (accretion, outflows, grain growth) for young brown-dwarfs suggest that planetary formation may be on-going in the substellar regime. In this context, we report recent results of surveys targeting brown-dwarfs and very low mass stars to search for planetary mass companions and ultimately planets, using various observing techniques (imaging, radial velocity, microlensing, and astrometry). We also highlight the technical and observational challenges of observing such faint targets. Finally, we conclude with the perspectives offered by the new generation of telescopes and instruments in the coming years.

  6. Habitat use by larval fishes in a temperate South African surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt-Pringle, Peter; Strydom, Nadine A.

    2003-12-01

    Larval fishes were sampled in the Kwaaihoek surf zone on the south east coast of South Africa. On six occasions between February and May 2002, larval fishes were collected in two habitat types identified in the inner surf zone using a modified beach-seine net. The surf zone habitats were classified as either sheltered trough areas or adjacent exposed surf areas. Temperature, depth and current measurements were taken at all sites. Trough habitats consisted of a depression in surf topography characterised by reduced current velocities and greater average depth than adjacent surf areas. In total, 325 larval fishes were collected. Of these, 229 were collected in trough and 96 in surf habitats. At least 22 families and 37 species were represented in the catch. Dominant families were the Mugilidae, Sparidae, Atherinidae, and Engraulidae. Dominant species included Liza tricuspidens and Liza richardsonii (Mugilidae), Rhabdosargus holubi and Sarpa salpa (Sparidae), Atherina breviceps (Atherinidae) and Engraulis japonicus (Engraulide). Mean CPUE of postflexion larvae of estuary-dependent species was significantly greater in trough areas. The proportion of postflexion larval fishes in trough habitat was significantly greater than that of preflexion stages, a result that was not apparent in surf habitat sampled. CPUE of postflexion larvae of estuary-dependent fishes was negatively correlated with current magnitude and positively correlated with habitat depth. Mean body length of larval fishes was significantly greater in trough than in surf habitats. These results provide evidence that the CPUE of postflexion larvae of estuary-dependent fishes is higher in trough habitat in the surf zone and this may be indicative of active habitat selection for areas of reduced current velocity/wave action. The implications of this behaviour for estuarine recruitment processes are discussed.

  7. Characteristics of vesicomyid clams and their environment at the Blake Ridge cold seep, South Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heyl, Taylor P.; Gilhooly, William P.; Chambers, Randolph M.; Gilchrist, George W.; Macko, Stephen A.; Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Van Dover, Cindy L.

    2007-01-01

    Spatial distributions and patchiness of dominant megafaunal invertebrates in deep-sea seep environments may indicate heterogeneities in the flux of reduced chemical compounds. At the Blake Ridge seep off South Carolina, USA, the invertebrate assemblage includes dense populations of live vesicomyid clams (an undescribed species) as well as extensive clam shell beds (i.e. dead clams). In the present study, we characterized clam parameters (density, size-frequency distribution, reproductive condition) in relation to sulfur chemistry (sulfide and sulfate concentrations and isotopic compositions, pyrite and elemental sulfur concentrations) and other sedimentary metrics (grain size, organic content). For clams >5 mm, clam density was highest where the total dissolved sulfide concentration at 10 cm depth (ΣH2S10cm) was 0.4 to 1.1 mmol l–1; juvenile clams (2S10cm was lowest. Clams were reproductively capable across a broad range of ΣH2S10cm (0.1 to 6.4 mmol l–1), and females in the sampled populations displayed asynchronous gametogenesis. Sulfide concentrations in porewaters at the shell–sediment interface of cores from shell beds were high, 3.3 to 12.1 mmol l–1, compared to –1 sulfide concentrations at the clam–sediment interface in live clam beds. Concentration profiles for sulfide and sulfate in shell beds were typical of those expected where there is active microbial sulfate reduction. In clam beds, profiles of sulfide and sulfate concentrations were also consistent with rapid uptake of sulfide by the clams. Sulfate in shell beds was systematically enriched in 34S relative to that in clam beds due to microbial fractionation during sulfate reduction, but in clam beds, sulfate δ34S matched that of seawater (~20‰). Residual sulfide values in clam and shell beds were correspondingly depleted in 34S. Based on porewater sulfide concentrations in shell beds at the time of sampling, we suggest that clam mortality may have been due to an abrupt increase in sulfide concentration and sulfide toxicity, but other alternatives cannot be eliminated.

  8. Clamming up: environmental forces diminish the perceptive ability of bivalve prey.

    PubMed

    Smee, Delbert L; Weissburg, Marc J

    2006-06-01

    The lethal and nonlethal impacts of predators in marine systems are often mediated via reciprocal detection of waterborne chemical signals between consumers and prey. Local flow environments can enhance or impair the chemoreception ability of consumers, but the effect of hydrodynamics on detection of predation risk by prey has not been investigated. Using clams as our model organism, we investigated two specific questions: (1) Can clams decrease their mortality by responding to predators? (2) Do fluid forces affect the ability of clams to detect approaching predators? Previous research has documented a decrease in clam feeding (pumping) in response to a neighboring predator. We determined the benefits of this behavior to survivorship by placing clams in the field with knobbed whelk or blue crab predators caged nearby and compared mortality between these clams and clams near a cage-only control. Significantly more clams survived in areas containing a caged predator, suggesting that predator-induced alterations in feeding reduce clam mortality in the field. We ascertained the effect of fluid forces on clam perception of predators in a laboratory flume by comparing the feeding (pumping) behavior of clams in response to crabs and whelks in flows of 3 and 11 cm/s. Clams pumped significantly less in the presence of predators, but their reaction to blue crabs diminished in the higher velocity flow, while their response to whelks remained constant in both flows. Thus, clam reactive distance to blue crabs was affected by fluid forces, but hydrodynamic effects on clam perceptive distance was predator specific. After predators were removed, clams exposed to whelks took significantly longer to resume feeding than those exposed to blue crabs. Our results suggest that prey perception of predators can be altered by physical forces. Prey detection of predators is the underlying mechanism for trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs), and recent research has documented the importance of TMIIs to community structure. Since physical forces can influence prey perception, the prevalence of TMIIs in communities may, in part, be related to the sensory ability of prey, physical forces in the environment that impact sensory performance, and the type of predator detected. PMID:16869434

  9. Dwarfs in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Chahira

    2006-02-15

    Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced and productive civilizations in antiquity, spanning 3000 years before the "Christian" era. Ancient Egyptians built colossal temples and magnificent tombs to honor their gods and religious leaders. Their hieroglyphic language, system of organization, and recording of events give contemporary researchers insights into their daily activities. Based on the record left by their art, the ancient Egyptians documented the presence of dwarfs in almost every facet of life. Due to the hot dry climate and natural and artificial mummification, Egypt is a major source of information on achondroplasia in the old world. The remains of dwarfs are abundant and include complete and partial skeletons. Dwarfs were employed as personal attendants, animal tenders, jewelers, and entertainers. Several high-ranking dwarfs especially from the Old Kingdom (2700-2190 BCE) achieved important status and had lavish burial places close to the pyramids. Their costly tombs in the royal cemeteries and the inscriptions on their statutes indicate their high-ranking position in Egyptian society and their close relation to the king. Some of them were Seneb, Pereniankh, Khnumhotpe, and Djeder. There were at least two dwarf gods, Ptah and Bes. The god Ptah was associated with regeneration and rejuvenation. The god Bes was a protector of sexuality, childbirth, women, and children. He was a favored deity particularly during the Greco-Roman period. His temple was recently excavated in the Baharia oasis in the middle of Egypt. The burial sites and artistic sources provide glimpses of the positions of dwarfs in daily life in ancient Egypt. Dwarfs were accepted in ancient Egypt; their recorded daily activities suggest assimilation into daily life, and their disorder was not shown as a physical handicap. Wisdom writings and moral teachings in ancient Egypt commanded respect for dwarfs and other individuals with disabilities. PMID:16380966

  10. CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TESTING WITH THE BIVLVE, MULINIA LATERLALIS: CULTURE REFINEMENT FOR ORGANISM AVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Availability of test species for estuarine benthic assessment is limited; therefore, a method was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for utilizing the dwarf surf clam, Mulinia lateralis, to identify adverse biological effects of bulk estuarine sediments. A mult...

  11. CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT TESTING WITH THE BIVALVE, MULINA LATERALIS: CULTURE REFINEMENT FOR ORGANISM AVAILABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Availability of test species for estuarine benthic assessment is limited; therefore, a method was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for using the dwarf surf clam (Mulinia lateralis) to identify adverse biological effects of bulk estuarine sediments. A multilab...

  12. Information surfing with the JHU/APL coherent imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratto, Christopher R.; Shipley, Kara R.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Wolfe, Kevin C.

    2015-05-01

    The ability to perform remote forensics in situ is an important application of autonomous undersea vehicles (AUVs). Forensics objectives may include remediation of mines and/or unexploded ordnance, as well as monitoring of seafloor infrastructure. At JHU/APL, digital holography is being explored for the potential application to underwater imaging and integration with an AUV. In previous work, a feature-based approach was developed for processing the holographic imagery and performing object recognition. In this work, the results of the image processing method were incorporated into a Bayesian framework for autonomous path planning referred to as information surfing. The framework was derived assuming that the location of the object of interest is known a priori, but the type of object and its pose are unknown. The path-planning algorithm adaptively modifies the trajectory of the sensing platform based on historical performance of object and pose classification. The algorithm is called information surfing because the direction of motion is governed by the local information gradient. Simulation experiments were carried out using holographic imagery collected from submerged objects. The autonomous sensing algorithm was compared to a deterministic sensing CONOPS, and demonstrated improved accuracy and faster convergence in several cases.

  13. Wave Acceleration Induced Sediment Transport in the Surf Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefel, F.; Elgar, S.

    2002-12-01

    A bedload sediment transport formulation (Drake and Calantoni, 2001) that accounts for the effects of near-bottom wave-orbital velocity acceleration skewness predicts onshore sandbar migration observed near Duck, NC. Including acceleration effects in an energetics sediment transport model results in improved skill in reproducing cross-shore sandbar migration patterns observed over a 40 day period during which the bar moved both offshore in storms and onshore between storms. These results suggest that skewed acceleration time series, associated with the pitched forward shapes of nearly breaking and broken waves, play an important role in wave-induced sediment transport in the surf zone. The passage of steep wave fronts results in spikes in acceleration when orbital velocities are directed onshore, producing strong horizontal pressure gradient forces that act on the sediment. In contrast to velocity skewness, which remains approximately constant across the surf zone, acceleration skewness is observed to increase from small values offshore to a maximum near the bar crest, and then to decrease toward the shoreline, producing cross-shore spatial gradients in acceleration-driven transport that are consistent with erosion offshore and accretion onshore of the bar crest. As the sandbar migrates shoreward, the maximum of acceleration skewness also moves onshore, causing a positive feedback mechanism that promotes continued onshore sediment transport motion provided the forcing remains constant. Funded by ARO, ONR, and NOPP.

  14. Factors affecting growth and survival of the asiatic clam Corbicula sp. under controlled laboratory conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Double, D.D.; Daly, D.S.; Abernethy, C.S.

    1983-04-01

    Growth of Corbicula sp. was determined in relation to food supply, water temperature, and clam size as an aid to researchers conducting chronic effects toxicity studies. Water temperatures for the two 84-day test series were 10, 20, and 30/sup 0/C. Linear models provided good relationships (r/sup 2/ > 0.90) between clam shell length (SL), total weight (TW), and wet/dry tissue weights. Clam growth was minimal during low phytoplankton densities (approx. 300 cells/ml), and all three size groups lost weight at 20 and 30/sup 0/C. Mortality of small clams at 30/sup 0/C was 100% after 71 days. At phytoplankton densities > 1000 cells/ml, overall differences in growth with respect to clam size and temperature were detectable at p < 0.01; growth of all clam groups was greatest at 30/sup 0/C. Small clams exhibited the greatest absolute increase in mean shell length at all test temperatures, and weight gains were similar to those of medium and large clams.

  15. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. 17.45 Section 17.45 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—snails and clams....

  16. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. 17.45 Section 17.45 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—snails and clams....

  17. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. 17.45 Section 17.45 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—snails and clams....

  18. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. 17.45 Section 17.45 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Special rules—snails and clams....

  19. GERMINOMAS AND TERATOID SIPHON ANOMALIES IN SOFTSHELL CLAMS, MYA ARENARIA, ENVIRONMENTALLY EXPOSED TO HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seminomas and dysgerminomas are episodic in softshell clams, Mya arenaria, from three Maine estuaries contaminated with herbicides. he first epizootic was discovered in 22% of clams collected as Searsport near Long Cove Brook and three culverts that conveyed heating oil and jet f...

  20. 40 CFR 408.230 - Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Applicability; description of the hand... SOURCE CATEGORY Hand-Shucked Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.230 Applicability; description of the hand... from existing hand-shucked clam processing facilities which process more than 1816 kg (4000 lbs) of...

  1. 40 CFR 408.230 - Applicability; description of the hand-shucked clam processing subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability; description of the hand... SOURCE CATEGORY Hand-Shucked Clam Processing Subcategory § 408.230 Applicability; description of the hand... from existing hand-shucked clam processing facilities which process more than 1816 kg (4000 lbs) of...

  2. Mercury accumulation in the clam, Galatea paradoxa (Born 1778) at the Volta estuary, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Obirikorang, K A; Amisah, S; Adjei-Boateng, D; Madkour, H A; Otchere, F A

    2010-11-01

    The concentration of mercury in the tissues of the clam, Galatea paradoxa at in the Volta estuary, Ghana, were analysed over an 18-month period, from March 2008 to August 2009. The concentrations were well below the International Human Consumption Advisory Limit of THg (0.5 μg/g wet weight). The concentrations in the tissues of the different clam size classes were between 6 and 18 times lower than the WHO Safety Reference Standard. Variation in the mean mercury concentration in the different clam size classes was not significant (p > 0.05) for clams from Aveglo but were highly significant (p < 0.0001) for clams from Ada, indicating a possible effect of size on accumulation. G. paradoxa is therefore suitable for human consumption based on the WHO Safety Reference Standards. PMID:20972534

  3. Leigh syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster: morphological and biochemical characterization of Surf1 post-transcriptional silencing.

    PubMed

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-10-17

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LS(Surf1) patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS based on the post-transcriptional silencing of CG9943, the Drosophila homolog of SURF1. Knockdown of Surf1 was induced ubiquitously in larvae and adults, which led to lethality; in the mesodermal derivatives, which led to pupal lethality; or in the central nervous system, which allowed survival. A biochemical characterization was carried out in knockdown individuals, which revealed that larvae unexpectedly displayed defects in all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and in the F-ATP synthase, while adults had a COX-selective impairment. Silencing of Surf1 expression in Drosophila S2R(+) cells led to selective loss of COX activity associated with decreased oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve. We conclude that Surf1 is essential for COX activity and mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster, thus providing a new tool that may help clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of LS. PMID:25164807

  4. Global assessment of surfing conditions: seasonal, interannual and long-term variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espejo, A.; Losada, I.; Mendez, F.

    2012-12-01

    International surfing destinations owe a great debt to specific combinations of wind-wave, thermal conditions and local bathymetry. As surf quality depends on a vast number of geophysical variables, a multivariable standardized index on the basis of expert judgment is proposed to analyze surf resource in a worldwide domain. Data needed is obtained by combining several datasets (reanalyses): 60-year satellite-calibrated spectral wave hindcast (GOW, WaveWatchIII), wind fields from NCEP/NCAR, global sea surface temperature from ERSST.v3b, and global tides from TPXO7.1. A summary of the global surf resource is presented, which highlights the high degree of variability in surfable events. According to general atmospheric circulation, results show that west facing low to middle latitude coasts are more suitable for surfing, especially those in Southern Hemisphere. Month to month analysis reveals strong seasonal changes in the occurrence of surfable events, enhancing those in North Atlantic or North Pacific. Interannual variability is investigated by comparing occurrence values with global and regional climate patterns showing a great influence at both, global and regional scales. Analysis of long term trends shows an increase in the probability of surfable events over the west facing coasts on the planet (i.e. + 30 hours/year in California). The resulting maps provide useful information for surfers and surf related stakeholders, coastal planning, education, and basic research.; Figure 1. Global distribution of medium quality (a) and high quality surf conditions probability (b).

  5. Surf zone diatoms: A review of the drivers, patterns and role in sandy beaches food chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odebrecht, Clarisse; Du Preez, Derek R.; Abreu, Paulo Cesar; Campbell, Eileen E.

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of high biomass of diatoms in the surf zone is a characteristic feature of some sandy beaches where the wave energy is sufficiently high. A few species of diatoms, called surf diatoms, thrive in this harsh environment. The main processes driving the spatial and temporal distribution of surf diatoms as well as their standing biomass and growth were described twenty to thirty years ago based on studies conducted on the western coast of the United States of America and South African beaches. Since then, over fifty locations around the world have been reported to have surf diatom accumulations with most (three-quarters) of these being in the southern hemisphere. Their occurrence is controlled by physical and chemical factors, including wave energy, beach slope and length, water circulation patterns in the surf zone and the availability of nutrients to sustain the high biomass. The main forces driving the patterns of temporal variability of surf diatom accumulations are meteorological. In the short term (hours), the action of wind stress and wave energy controls the diatom accumulation. In the intermediate time scale (weeks to months), seasonal onshore winds of sufficient strength, as well as storm events are important. Furthermore, anthropogenic disturbances that influence the beach ecosystem as well as large-scale events, such as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, may lead to significant changes in surf diatom populations in the long term (inter-annual). Surf diatoms form the base of a short and very productive food chain in the inshore of the sandy beaches where they occur. However, the role of surf diatoms in the microbial food web is not clear and deserves further studies.

  6. Mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of CLAM Steel in tube fabrication and test blanket module assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo; Huang, Qunying; Li, Yanfen; Li, Chunjing; Wu, Qingsheng; FDS Team

    2013-11-01

    The first wall of the China dual functional lithium lead-test blanket module (DFLL-TBM) will be assembled with China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel rectangular tubes and plates by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) - diffusion welding. The objective of this study is to evaluate CLAM rectangular tubes and investigate mechanical property and microstructure evolution of CLAM steel in tube fabrication and TBM assembly. In this work, CLAM rectangular tubes with lengths of 1500 mm were fabricated, and the dimensional accuracy met the requirement for HIP joining. In the tube fabrication process, the CLAM steel was annealed to improve its ductility. In addition, the anisotropy in mechanical properties and microstructure introduced by tube rolling was eliminated according to the simulation of HIP heat treatment in TBM preparation. The tensile strength of the CLAM tubes with final heat treatment was slightly higher than that of CLAM steel with the published standard heat treatment, while the total elongation was reduced. This revealed that a post-HIP heat treatment was required before the final heat treatment. An annealing treatment at 1253 K transformed martensite to ferrite, decreased the tensile strength, and increase the ductility; Rolling deformation introduced microstructural anisotropy, increased the Vickers hardness, and created an inhomogeneous hardness distribution; A simulated HIP heat treatment schedule removed these differences in hardness and tensile strength due to the anisotropy; The tensile strength of CLAM tube material given the published standard heat treatment (with the simulated HIP heat treatment) was higher than that of previously published CLAM steel results and the elongation was reduced. Therefore, a post-HIP heat treatment for CLAM tube material appears to be required before applying a final heat treatment based on the prior standard heat treatment in order to preserve the overall tensile elongation.

  7. Declining populations of the fingernail clam Musculium transversum in the upper Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, D.M.; Naimo, T.J.; Weiner, J.G.; Anderson, R.V.; Sandheinrich, M.B.; Sparks, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    We examined recent temporal trends in the abundance of fingernail clams Musculium transversum (formerly Sphaerium transversum) in the upper Mississippi River. Historical data on densities of fingernail clams were obtained from regional scientists and published literature. We also sampled benthos in six navigation pools in summer 1991, finding very few fingernail clams. The combined data set, including historical data and sampling results, extended from 1973 to 1992 and was sufficient to statistically evaluate trends in densities of fingernail clams in eight pools. Populations of fingernail clams declined significantly in five of the eight pools examined (Pools 2, 5, 7, 9, and 19), which spanned a 700-km reach of river from St. Paul, Minnesota, to Keokuk, Iowa. Densities in Pool 19, which had the longest historical record on fingernail clam abundance, averaged 30 000 m super(-2) in 1985 and progressively declined to zero in 1990. Combined data from all eight pools showed a significant decline in abundance of fingernail clams. An evaluation of potential causal factors led us to hypothesize that the population declines in Pools 2 to 9 were linked to point-source pollution rather than to dredging activity or commercial navigation traffic. In Pool 19, the declines of fingernail clams may have resulted from low-flow conditions during drought periods, but the causal mechanisms by which low flow influences fingernail clam abundance are unclear. The decrease in fingernail clam populations may adversely affect certain fish and wildlife, such as migrating lesser scaup Aythya affinis, which feed heavily on the small mollusk. Moreover, the decreases in populations of this pollution-sensitive mollusk may signal a large-scale deterioration in the health of this riverine ecosystem.

  8. Biodeposition, respiration, and excretion rates of an introduced clam Mercenaria mercenaria in ponds with implications for potential competition with the native clam Meretrix meretrix in Shuangtaizi estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Anguo; Yuan, Xiutang; Hou, Wenjiu; Li, Xiaodong; Zhao, Kai; Chen, Weixin; Su, Xiurong

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential impacts of an introduced clam Mercenaria mercenaria on estuarine ecosystem, and implications for the niche competition with a native clam Meretrix meretrix. The biodeposition, respiration, and excretion rates of M. mercenaria were determined seasonally using a sediment trap and a closed respirator in field. The biodeposition rates of M. mercenaria were 0.06-0.37 g/ (ind.·d), and the respiration rates were 0.31-14.66 mg/(ind.·d). The ammonia and phosphate excretion rates were 0.18-36.70 and 1.44-14.87 μg/(ind.·d), respectively. The hard clam M. mercenaria may discharge dry deposits up to 2.1×105 t, contribute 18.3 t ammonia and 9.0 t phosphate to culture ponds, and consume 7.9×103 t O2 from ponds annually. It suggested that the hard clam M. mercenaria might play an important role in pelagic-benthic coupling in pond ecosystem through biodeposition and excretion. A comparison of the key physiological parameters of the introduced clam M. mercenaria and the native clam Meretrix meretrix suggested that M. mercenaria had a niche similar to that of Meretrix meretrix in Shuangtaizi estuary and might have a potential competition with Meretrix meretrix for habitat and food if M. mercenaria species escaped from the culture pond or artificially released in estuarine ecosystem.

  9. Environmental cadmium exposure impacts physiological responses in Manila clams.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqiang; Zhang, Yu; Liang, Jian; Xu, Xian; Wang, Hua; Yang, Feng; Yan, Xiwu

    2014-06-01

    The physiological responses of marine bivalves to chronic cadmium (Cd) exposure at sub-lethal concentrations have been well documented. As of now, few studies have examined the effect of Cd exposure and subsequent recovery period at environmentally realistic concentrations. In this study, environmentally, Cd exposures were performed to assess the physiological responses of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum. The clams were exposed to waterborne Cd at two environmentally realistic concentrations (4 and 40 μg L(-1)) for 35 days and then allowed to recover for another 35 days. The accumulation and elimination of Cd in R. philippinarum were tissue-specific and dose- and time-dependent. Cd accumulation increased sharply in the digestive gland, and Cd elimination was rapid in the gill. Major physiological responses, including clearance rate, absorption efficiency, respiration rate, excretion rate, oxygen to nitrogen ratio, and scope for growth, were significantly affected by Cd exposure. Yet, the clams exposed to 4-μg L(-1) Cd were able to quickly recover their normal physiological processes and clearly exhibited catch-up growth once they were transferred to clean seawater. Hence, R. philippinarum can exhibit good physiological plasticity when confronted with moderately environmental Cd exposure. All physiological responses measured exhibited a highly significant and generally predictable correlation with tissue Cd concentration, which in turn, reflected environmentally realistic exposure conditions. Our results further confirm that the measurement of physiological responses is a sensitive method for assessing stress at environmentally realistic metal concentrations. PMID:24771311

  10. Asteroseismology of White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Carl J.

    1997-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation has been to study various aspects of multimode pulsations in variable white dwarfs. In particular, nonlinear interactions among pulsation modes in white dwarfs (and, to some extent, in other variable stars), analysis of recent observations where such interactions are important, and preliminary work on the effects of crystallization in cool white dwarfs are reported.

  11. PCDD/F and dioxin-like PCB bioaccumulation by Manila clam from polluted areas of Venice lagoon (Italy).

    PubMed

    Sfriso, Adriano; Facca, Chiara; Raccanelli, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    POP bioaccumulation pathways in the clam Tapes philippinarum were examined for two years from juveniles to adult size. Two polluted sites, one with sandy sediment, the other muddy were compared with a reference site characterized by low contamination levels. Juvenile clams coming from a hatchery were reared both on the sediment and in nets suspended at 30 cm from the bottom. POP changes in clam tissue were related to the concentrations recorded in sediments and in the particulate matter during the entire fattening period. Results provided interesting data on the relationships between environmental contamination and bioaccumulation. Contrary to studies on the decontamination times of the clams collected in polluted areas, this work investigates the preferential clam bioaccumulation pathways during growth under different environmental conditions. In general POP bioaccumulation resulted to be correlated to concentrations in SPM rather than in sediments and was higher in S-clams rather than in B-clams. PMID:24077257

  12. Comparative investigations on the biological effects of As (III) and As (V) in clam Ruditapes philippinarum using multiple biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Xu, Hai'e; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known pollutant with two chemical forms, arsenite (As (III)) and arsenate (As (V)), in marine environment. Clam Ruditapes philippinarum is an important fishery species along the Bohai coast. In this study, the biological effects induced by the two arsenic chemical forms (arsenite and arsenate) were compared using multiple biochemical indices in the digestive glands of clam R. philippinarum. The production of reactive oxygen species, antioxidant enzyme activities and metabolic responses exhibited that both As (III) and As (V) induced immune, oxidative and osmotic stresses in clam digestive glands. The differential metabolic biomarkers, histidine and taurine, indicated the differential responsive mechanisms in osmotic regulation in clam digestive glands. In addition, both arsenic treatments enhanced the anaerobiosis metabolism in clam digestive glands. Overall, this work illustrated that arsenite and arsenate induced similar biological effects in clams, which might be accounted for the biological transformation of arsenate to arsenite in clams. PMID:26327115

  13. Droplets move over viscoelastic substrates by surfing a ridge

    PubMed Central

    Karpitschka, S.; Das, S.; van Gorcum, M.; Perrin, H.; Andreotti, B.; Snoeijer, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid drops on soft solids generate strong deformations below the contact line, resulting from a balance of capillary and elastic forces. The movement of these drops may cause strong, potentially singular dissipation in the soft solid. Here we show that a drop on a soft substrate moves by surfing a ridge: the initially flat solid surface is deformed into a sharp ridge whose orientation angle depends on the contact line velocity. We measure this angle for water on a silicone gel and develop a theory based on the substrate rheology. We quantitatively recover the dynamic contact angle and provide a mechanism for stick–slip motion when a drop is forced strongly: the contact line depins and slides down the wetting ridge, forming a new one after a transient. We anticipate that our theory will have implications in problems such as self-organization of cell tissues or the design of capillarity-based microrheometers. PMID:26238436

  14. Human behavior during Flash Crowd in web surfing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Junshan; Hu, Hanping; Liu, Ying

    2014-11-01

    This paper focuses on human behavior in web surfing during the special stage called Flash Crowd (FC) period. Some statistical properties of human behavior are investigated. A moving approximate entropy (ApEn) method is provided to precisely locate the FC stage at first. Then the multiscale entropy (MSE) method is applied to study the difference of behaviors between the FC stage and the Normal stage. The lower entropy value may imply that collective behavior in the FC stage tends to be more consistent and follows a process with self-similarity. Further investigation by MSE and interval time distribution on the collective level and the individual level reveals that the origin of FC formation is not due to the increasing number of users, but more likely the change of dynamic mechanism of individual behavior.

  15. Droplets move over viscoelastic substrates by surfing a ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpitschka, S.; Das, S.; van Gorcum, M.; Perrin, H.; Andreotti, B.; Snoeijer, J. H.

    2015-08-01

    Liquid drops on soft solids generate strong deformations below the contact line, resulting from a balance of capillary and elastic forces. The movement of these drops may cause strong, potentially singular dissipation in the soft solid. Here we show that a drop on a soft substrate moves by surfing a ridge: the initially flat solid surface is deformed into a sharp ridge whose orientation angle depends on the contact line velocity. We measure this angle for water on a silicone gel and develop a theory based on the substrate rheology. We quantitatively recover the dynamic contact angle and provide a mechanism for stick-slip motion when a drop is forced strongly: the contact line depins and slides down the wetting ridge, forming a new one after a transient. We anticipate that our theory will have implications in problems such as self-organization of cell tissues or the design of capillarity-based microrheometers.

  16. Droplets move over viscoelastic substrates by surfing a ridge.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, S; Das, S; van Gorcum, M; Perrin, H; Andreotti, B; Snoeijer, J H

    2015-01-01

    Liquid drops on soft solids generate strong deformations below the contact line, resulting from a balance of capillary and elastic forces. The movement of these drops may cause strong, potentially singular dissipation in the soft solid. Here we show that a drop on a soft substrate moves by surfing a ridge: the initially flat solid surface is deformed into a sharp ridge whose orientation angle depends on the contact line velocity. We measure this angle for water on a silicone gel and develop a theory based on the substrate rheology. We quantitatively recover the dynamic contact angle and provide a mechanism for stick-slip motion when a drop is forced strongly: the contact line depins and slides down the wetting ridge, forming a new one after a transient. We anticipate that our theory will have implications in problems such as self-organization of cell tissues or the design of capillarity-based microrheometers. PMID:26238436

  17. ON PREDICTING INFRAGRAVITY ENERGY IN THE SURF ZONE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger,, Asbury H., Jr.; Holman, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Flow data were obtained in the surf zone across a barred profile during a storm. RMS cross-shore velocities due to waves in the intragravity band (wave periods greater than 20 s) had maxima in excess of 0. 5 m/s over the bar crest. For comparison to measured spectra, synthetic spectra of cross-shore flow were computed using measured nearshore profiles. The structure, in the infragravity band, of these synthetic spectra corresponded reasonably well with the structure of the measured spectra. Total variances of measured cross-shore flow within the infragravity band were nondimensionalized by dividing by total infragravity variances of synthetic spectra. These nondimensional variances were independent of distance offshore and increased with the square of the breaker height. Thus, cross-shore flow due to infragravity waves can be estimated with knowledge of the nearshore profile and incident wave conditions. Refs.

  18. Surfing Plasma Waves: A New Paradigm for Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chandrashekhar

    Accelerator-based experiments have produced key breakthroughs in our understanding of the physical world. New accelerators, to explore the frontiers of Tera-scale Physics, appear possible, based on concepts developed over the last three decades in multi-disciplinary endeavors. The Plasma-Based Particle Accelerator is one concept that has made spectacular advances in the last few years. In this scheme, electrons or positrons gain energy by surfing the electric field of a plasma wave that is produced by the passage of an intense laser pulse or an electron beam through the plasma. This talk reviews the principles of this new technique and prognosticates how it is likely to impact science and technology in the future.

  19. White Dwarf Stars (With 37 figures)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaler, Steven D.

    Introduction White Dwarfs as Useful Stars Origins: the Clue of White Dwarf Masses The Main Channel Why Such a Narrow Mass Distribution? Observed Properties of White Dwarfs Discovery of White Dwarfs Finding White Dwarfs White Dwarf Colors and the White Dwarf Luminosity Function White Dwarf Optical Spectra Distribution of Spectral Types with Effective Temperatures Magnetic White Dwarfs Pulsating White Dwarfs Physics of White Dwarf Interiors Equation of State Heat Transport in Degenerate Matter Nonideal Effects Specific Heat White Dwarf Formation and Early Cooling Thermal Pulses on the AGB Departure from the AGB The PNN Phase Nuclear Shutdown and Neutrino Cooling Chemical Evolution of White Dwarfs Diffusive Processes Accretion of "Fresh" ISM vs. Mass Loss Convection Chemical Evolution Scenarios White Dwarf Cooling and the White Dwarf Luminosity Function A Simplified Cooling Model Complications: Neutrinos and Crystallization Realistic Cooling Calculations Construction of Theoretical Luminosity Functions The Age of the Galactic Disk Nonradial Oscillations of White Dwarfs: Theory Review of Observations Hydrodynamic Equations Local Analysis and the Dispersion Relation g-mode Period Spacings Mode Trapping Rotational and Magnetic Splitting The Seismological Toolbox Pulsating White Dwarfs The Whole Earth Telescope PG 1159 Stars and Pulsating PNNs GD 358: A Pulsating DB White Dwarf The ZZ Ceti Stars Astrophysical Applications of White Dwarfs Stellar Evolution as a Spectator Sport The White Dwarf Luminosity Function and Our Galaxy White Dwarfs and Cluster Ages The Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function and Galaxy Distances Driving and Damping of Pulsations and Convective Efficiency in - White Dwarfs Ceti Stars Final Thoughts References

  20. Military personnel recognition system using texture, colour, and SURF features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irhebhude, Martins E.; Edirisinghe, Eran A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents an automatic, machine vision based, military personnel identification and classification system. Classification is done using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) on sets of Army, Air Force and Navy camouflage uniform personnel datasets. In the proposed system, the arm of service of personnel is recognised by the camouflage of a persons uniform, type of cap and the type of badge/logo. The detailed analysis done include; camouflage cap and plain cap differentiation using gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) texture feature; classification on Army, Air Force and Navy camouflaged uniforms using GLCM texture and colour histogram bin features; plain cap badge classification into Army, Air Force and Navy using Speed Up Robust Feature (SURF). The proposed method recognised camouflage personnel arm of service on sets of data retrieved from google images and selected military websites. Correlation-based Feature Selection (CFS) was used to improve recognition and reduce dimensionality, thereby speeding the classification process. With this method success rates recorded during the analysis include 93.8% for camouflage appearance category, 100%, 90% and 100% rates of plain cap and camouflage cap categories for Army, Air Force and Navy categories, respectively. Accurate recognition was recorded using SURF for the plain cap badge category. Substantial analysis has been carried out and results prove that the proposed method can correctly classify military personnel into various arms of service. We show that the proposed method can be integrated into a face recognition system, which will recognise personnel in addition to determining the arm of service which the personnel belong. Such a system can be used to enhance the security of a military base or facility.

  1. Surfing through Hyperspace - Understanding Higher Universes in Six Easy Lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1999-09-01

    Do a little armchair time-travel, rub elbows with a four-dimensional intelligent life form, or stretch your mind to the furthest corner of an uncharted universe. With this astonishing guidebook, Surfing Through Hyperspace , you need not be a mathematician or an astrophysicist to explore the all-but-unfathomable concepts of hyperspace and higher-dimensional geometry.No subject in mathematics has intrigued both children and adults as much as the idea of a fourth dimension. Philosophers and parapsychologists have meditated on this mysterious space that no one can point to but may be all around us. Yet this extra dimension has a very real, practical value to mathematicians and physicists who use it every day in their calculations. In the tradtion of Flatland , and with an infectious enthusiasm, Clifford Pickover tackles the problems inherent in our 3-D brains trying to visualize a 4-D world, muses on the religious implications of the existence of higher-dimensional consciousness, and urges all curious readers to venture into "the unexplored territory lying beyond the prison of the obvious." Pickover alternates sections that explain the science of hyperspace with sections that dramatize mind-expanding concepts through a fictional dialogue between two futuristic FBI agents who dabble in the fourth dimension as a matter of national security. This highly accessible and entertaining approach turns an intimidating subject into a scientific game open to all dreamers.Surfing Through Hyperspace concludes with a number of puzzles, computer experiments and formulas for further exploration, inviting readers to extend their minds across this inexhaustibly intriguing scientific terrain.

  2. Surfing through Hyperspace - Understanding Higher Universes in Six Easy Lessons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    2001-05-01

    Do a little armchair time-travel, rub elbows with a four-dimensional intelligent life form, or stretch your mind to the furthest corner of an uncharted universe. With this astonishing guidebook, Surfing Through Hyperspace , you need not be a mathematician or an astrophysicist to explore the all-but-unfathomable concepts of hyperspace and higher-dimensional geometry.No subject in mathematics has intrigued both children and adults as much as the idea of a fourth dimension. Philosophers and parapsychologists have meditated on this mysterious space that no one can point to but may be all around us. Yet this extra dimension has a very real, practical value to mathematicians and physicists who use it every day in their calculations. In the tradition of Flatland , and with an infectious enthusiasm, Clifford Pickover tackles the problems inherent in our 3-D brains trying to visualize a 4-D world, muses on the religious implications of the existence of higher-dimensional consciousness, and urges all curious readers to venture into "the unexplored territory lying beyond the prison of the obvious." Pickover alternates sections that explain the science of hyperspace with sections that dramatize mind-expanding concepts through a fictional dialogue between two futuristic FBI agents who dabble in the fourth dimension as a matter of national security. This highly accessible and entertaining approach turns an intimidating subject into a scientific game open to all dreamers.Surfing Through Hyperspace concludes with a number of puzzles, computer experiments and formulas for further exploration, inviting readers to extend their minds across this inexhaustibly intriguing scientific terrain.

  3. Image characterization and target recognition in the surf zone environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevis, Andrew J.

    1996-05-01

    The surf zone environment represents a very difficult challenge for electro-optic surveillance programs. Data from these programs have been shown to contain dense clutter from vegetation, biological factors (fish), and man-made objects, and is further complicated by the water to land transition which has a significant impact on target signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Also, targets can be geometrically warped from the sea surface and by occlusion from sand and breaking waves. The Program Executive Office Mine Warfare (PMO-210) recently sponsored a test under the Magic Lantern Adaptation (MLA) program to collect surf zone data. Analysis of the data revealed a dilemma for automatic target recognition algorithms; threshold target features high enough to reduce high false alarm rates from land clutter or low enough to detect and classify underwater targets. Land image typically have high SNR clutter with crisp edges while underwater images have lower SNR clutter with blurred edges. In an attempt to help distinguish between land and underwater images, target feature thresholds were made to vary as a function of the SNR of image features within images and as a function of a measure of the edge crispness of the image features. The feasibility of varying target feature thresholds to reduce false alarm rates was demonstrated on a target recognition program using a small set of MLA data. Four features were developed based on expected target shape and resolution: a contrast difference measure between circular targets and their local backgrounds, a signal-to-noise ratio, a normalized correlation, and a target circularity measure. Results showed a target probability of detection and classification (Pdc) of 50 - 78% with false alarms per frame of less than 4%.

  4. Predicting coexistence and predominance patterns between the introduced Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) and the European native clam (Ruditapes decussatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidegain, Gorka; Bárcena, Javier Francisco; García, Andrés; Juanes, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In several European estuaries, the introduced Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) has become a widespread and predominating species supplanting the native carpet shell clam (Ruditapes decussatus) whereas in other estuaries such as the Bay of Santander (Gulf of Biscay) this pattern has not been detected. Using this estuary as a case study, the potential coexistence/predominance patterns between these two species were explored with the objective of providing insight into the capacity of expansion of R. philippinarum. Firstly, the Ecological Niche Factor Analysis (ENFA) was applied to determine the niches of both species, using seven contemporary environmental variables, i.e. salinity, water depth, current velocity, and sediment sand, gravel, silt and organic matter content. Secondly, ENFA-derived habitat-suitability (HS) maps were simultaneously treated, using geospatial techniques and following HS index-based criteria, to determine the potential distribution patterns. Both species models performed well according to the cross-validation evaluation method. The environmental variables that most determined the presence of both clams were depth, current velocity and salinity. ENFA factors showed that R. philippinarum habitat differs more from the mean environmental conditions over the estuary (i.e. higher marginality) and has less narrow requirements (i.e. lower specialization). R. philippinarum dominated areas, determined by relatively lower current velocities and percentages of sand, higher organic matter contents and slightly shallower depths, were very reduced (i.e. 2.0% of the bay surface) compared to coexistence (47%) and R. decussatus predominance areas (7.4%). These results suggest that HS may regulate the expansion of R. philippinarum. ENFA, together with geospatial analysis of HS index, seems to be a valuable approach to explore the expansion potential of estuarine invasive or introduced species and thus support conservation decisions regarding native species.

  5. Ultracool Companions to White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, P. R.; Burleigh, M. R.; Barstow, M. A.; Jameson, R. F.; Dobbie, P. D.

    2010-11-01

    We present the latest results in a near-infrared photometric search for unresolved ultra-cool companions and debris disks to white dwarfs in UKIDSS. Twenty five DA white dwarfs were identified as having multiple excesses indicative of a low mass companion, with 8-10 of these having a predicted mass in the range associated with brown dwarfs. The results of this survey show that the unresolved (<2'') brown dwarf companion fraction to DA white dwarfs is 0.3<=fWD+BD<=1.3%.

  6. [HemoSurf--an interactive hematology atlas on the world wide web].

    PubMed

    Woermann, U; Montandon, M; Tobler, A

    1998-10-17

    Microscopic examination of blood films is essential in clinical medicine despite automatic cell counters. To acquire this skill takes time, an adequate technical infrastructure and experienced instructors. In many cases all these things are not readily available. A computer-based learning program such as "HemoSurf" helps to supply these needs. In its learning part, "HemoSurf" allows the user to develop pattern recognition by offering more than 2000 images of blood and bone marrow films. In a stepwise manner the learner is enabled to differentiate leukocytes and recognize qualitative alterations to blood cells. In the reference part the user can look up blood films and some of the corresponding bone marrow films of over 30 diseases. In the World Wide Web "HemoSurf" is accessible via the following URL: [http./(/)www.aum.iawf.unibe.ch/VLZ/ BWL/HemoSurf/Index.htm]. A publication on CD-ROM with different language versions is in preparation. PMID:9824891

  7. The effects of surfing and the natural environment on the well-being of combat veterans.

    PubMed

    Caddick, Nick; Smith, Brett; Phoenix, Cassandra

    2015-01-01

    Although researchers have identified the benefits of physical activity on well-being, there is little evidence concerning the effects of nature-based physical activity. We investigated the effect of one nature-based activity-surfing-on the well-being of combat veterans experiencing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We conducted interviews and participant observations with a group of combat veterans belonging to a United Kingdom-based veterans' surfing charity. Our primary analytical approach was dialogical narrative analysis. Based on our rigorous analysis and findings, we suggest that surfing facilitated a sense of respite from PTSD. Respite was a fully embodied feeling of release from suffering that was cultivated through surfing and shaped by the stories veterans told of their experiences. We significantly extend previous knowledge on physical activity, combat veterans, and PTSD by highlighting how nature-based physical activity, encapsulated in the conceptual notion of the "blue gym," can promote well-being among combat veterans. PMID:25189537

  8. Origins, Evolution, and Fate of Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Research related to the origins, evolution and fate of brown dwarfs is presented. The topics include: 1) Imaging surveys for brown dwarfs; 2) Companion detection techniques; 3) Measurements of fundamental properties of brown dwarfs; 4) Classification schemes for ultracool dwarfs; 5) Origins and evolution of brown dwarfs; 6) Ultracool atmospheres and interiors; 7) Time variable phenomena in brown dwarfs; 8) Comparisons between brown dwarfs and planets; 9) Substellar mass functions; and 10) Future facilities.

  9. Bacciger bacciger (Trematoda: Fellodistomidae) infection effects on wedge clam Donax trunculus condition.

    PubMed

    de Montaudouin, Xavier; Bazairi, Hocein; Mlik, Karima Ait; Gonzalez, Patrice

    2014-10-16

    Wedge clams Donax trunculus inhabit high-energy environments along sandy coasts of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Two sites were sampled monthly, one in Morocco (Mehdia), where the density was normal, and one in France (Biscarosse), where the density was very low. We tested the hypothesis that the difference in density between the sites was related to infection by the trematode parasite Bacciger bacciger. Identity of both the parasite and the host were verified using anatomical and molecular criteria. Parasite prevalence (i.e. the percentage of parasitized clams) was almost 3 times higher at Biscarosse. At this site, overall prevalence reached 32% in July and was correlated with the migration of several individuals (with a prevalence of 88%) to the sediment surface. After this peak, prevalence decreased rapidly, suggesting death of parasitized clams. The deleterious effect of B. bacciger on wedge clams was also supported by our calculations indicating that the weight of the parasite made up to 56% of the total weight of the parasitized clams. However, condition indices of trematode-free clams were also lower in Biscarosse than in Mehdia or other sites, suggesting that other factors such as pollutants or microparasites (Microcytos sp.) may alter wedge clam population fitness in Biscarosse. PMID:25320038

  10. Experimental evaluation of the pathogenicity of Perkinsus olseni in juvenile Manila clams Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Jun; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuo

    2010-11-01

    We evaluated the pathogenicity of Perkinsus olseni towards the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, by an experimental challenge. For production of prezoosporangia of P. olseni, we injected uninfected Manila clams with cells of a pure strain of P. olseni and reared them for 7d. Prezoosporangia were isolated from the soft tissue of the injected clams after culturing in Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium. Hatchery-reared, uninfected juvenile clams (3-10 mm shell length) were challenged by immersion in one of two concentrations of a prezoosporangial suspension of P. olseni for 6d. The challenged clams had significantly higher mortality at both the concentrations than the unchallenged clams. The mortality due to infection dose-dependently began approximately 4 weeks and 7 weeks after challenge in the higher and lower concentrations, respectively. This is the first experimental evidence that P. olseni causes direct mortality in Manila clams. The lethal level of infection was estimated at approximately 10⁷ pathogen cells/g soft tissue weight. PMID:20807538

  11. Recovery of intertidal hardshelled clams in Prince William Sound from Exxon Valdez oiling and shoreline treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, J.P.; Lees, D.C.; Driskell, W.B.

    1994-12-31

    Native little neck (Protothaca staminea) and butter clams (Saxidomus giganteus) were quantitatively surveyed from 1989 through 1993 to evaluate effects from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Hydraulic washing of sand and gravel beaches altered beach morphology by transporting material down slope from upper elevations, often burying the lower beach in several centimeters of sediment having a relatively low content of fines and organic carbon. Hydraulically washed beaches showed significant reductions in clam densities in 1989 and 1990. Recruitment of clams was very limited on these beaches through 1993; as a result, clam densities on these hydraulically washed beaches remain very depressed compared to those on beaches that were unoiled or oiled but not washed. Littlenecks transplanted from a reference site to a heavily oiled but untreated site showed significant patterns of increased mortality, decreased growth, and increased bioaccumulation of PAH in response to a gradient in sediment PAH, This same heavily oiled site has consistently had among the highest rates of hardshelled clam recruitment of any of the sites sampled. Littlenecks also were transplanted to another heavily oiled beach that had been hydraulically washed and had little remaining hydrocarbons. These clams showed very high survival, yet this beach has had very little clam recruitment. It is hypothesized that recruitment at this site may be inhibited by the low level of finer sediments and low organic content remaining after washing.

  12. Great Lakes clams find refuge from zebra mussels in restored, lake-connected marsh (Ohio)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, S. Jerrine; Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, more than 95 percent of the freshwater clams once found in Lake Erie have died due to the exotic zebara mussel (Dreissena polymorpha). Zebra mussels attach themselves to native clams in large numbers, impeding the ability of the clams to eat and burrow. However, in 1996, we discovered a population of native clams in Metzger Marsh in western Lake Erie (about 50 miles [80 km] east of Toledo) that were thriving despite the longtime presence of zebra mussel in surrounding waters. At that time, Metzger Marsh was undergoing extensive restoration, including construction of a dike to replace the eroded barrier beach and of a water-control structure to maintain hydrologic connections with the lake (Wilcox and Whillans 1999). The restoration plan called for a drawdown of water levels to promote plant growth from the seedbank -- a process that would also destroy most of the clam population. State and federal resource managers recommended removing as many clams as possible to a site that was isolated from zebra mussels, and then returning them to the marsh after it was restored. We removed about 7,000 native clams in 1996 and moved them back to Metzger Marsh in 1999.

  13. Early reproductive success of the hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria) from Five Sites in Long Island Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, S.; Choromanski, J.; Nelson, D.; Miller, J.; Greig, R.; Sennefelder, G. )

    1991-09-01

    Early reproductive success of hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) in Long Island Sound was measured to determine whether pollution may have adverse effects on fragile recruitment to fisheries. Clams were collected at five sites in 1987 when ready to spawn naturally, along with water from within 39 cm of the bottom. Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), copper, and cadmium were measured in the mature gonad and were found to be generally low. Clams were spawned and the gametes were collected and cultured both in their respective site waters and in reference laboratory seawater. In both site and reference seawater, embryos of clams from the most highly industrialized area (Bridgeport) with higher contaminant levels exhibited more irregularity in chromosome numbers and greater larval abnormality, possible indicators of long-term sublethal effects. Fertilization and early meiotic success at 1 to 1 1/2 h were significantly lower for clams from Norwalk than for those from Greenwich. At 48 h, mortality was lowest for Greenwich larvae and highest for Norwalk larvae in their respective site waters, but the mortality for these two sites was significantly lower than for other sites in reference water. This suggests sporadically poor environmental quality. Milford larvae also had significant mortality. Population-level significance of pollution effects on clam reproduction will depend on how contaminated the environment is over the entire reproductive season of the clams in Long Island Sound, and over how large a portion of the spawning grounds.

  14. Effects of permethrin on biomarkers in Mediterranean clams (Ruditapes decussatus).

    PubMed

    Sellami, B; Khazri, A; Louati, H; Boufahja, F; Dellali, M; Sheehan, D; Aissa, P; Driss, M Ridha; Mahmoudi, E; Beyrem, H

    2014-05-01

    The present study was focused on the assessment of Catalase (CAT) and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities in Mediterranean clams (Ruditapes decussatus) exposed to 50, 100 and 150 μg/L of Permethrin for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 days. In water, the measured concentrations of Permethrin in the treated aquariums were respectively 16.66, 38.24 and 55.61 μg/L. Results showed that CAT activity was increased after 5 days of exposure to high concentration reaching maximum value of 10.14 μmol/min/mg proteins after 25 days. However, no significant changes in AChE activity after 5 days of exposure were detected in all treated groups. AChE activity was significantly inhibited after 10 days with 100 and 150 μg/L and still depending on concentration and time. Maximum inhibition of AChE activity was reached after 25 days with the highest concentration of Permethrin. Our data indicated that exposure to Permethrin modifies biomarker profiles inducing oxidative stress and reducing AChE activity in Mediterranean clams. PMID:24519478

  15. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Retrieval over the Ocean during CLAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, R. C.; Remer, L. A.; Martins, J. V.; Fattori, A. P.; Holben, B. N.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P.; Schuster, G. L.; Rodriquez, W. J.; Rutledge, K.; Kleidman, R.; Kaufman, Y. J.

    2002-05-01

    The Chesapeake Lighthouse Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) took place from 10 July to 2 Aug 2001, over and around the Chesapeake Lighthouse, some 25 kilometers off the coast of Virginia Beach, Virginia, and the Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) near Chincoteague, Virginia. This experiment was designed mainly for validating instruments and algorithms aboard the Terra satellite platform, including the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Over ocean pixels, MODIS retrieved optical depths (AOD) at seven wavelengths and an estimate of the aerosol size distribution. Temporally coincident measurements of aerosol properties were made with sunphotometers from sites near WFF, from the Chesapeake Lighthouse, and airborne in a variety of locations just above Atlantic ocean surface. This suite of sunphotometer measurements include: standard visible wavelength AOD and size from three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) instruments, standard visible and new infrared wavelength AOD from six Microtops handheld instruments, infrared wavelength AOD from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14), and unique hyperspectral AOD from a Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) FieldSpec spectrometer. In this study, we compare AOD retrieved from MODIS with measurements from the surface, paying special attention to the new infrared wavelength validation data. A detailed evaluation of the CLAMS spectral optical depth combined with retrieved size distributions will be a first step toward improvement of the aerosol models used in the MODIS retrieval.

  16. Sandy beach surf zones: An alternative nursery habitat for 0-age Chinook salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin Jarrin, J. R.; Miller, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The role of each habitat fish use is of great importance to the dynamics of populations. During their early marine residence, Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), an anadromous fish species, mostly inhabit estuaries but also use sandy beach surf zones and the coastal ocean. However, the role of surf zones in the early life history of Chinook salmon is unclear. We hypothesized that surf zones serve as an alternative nursery habitat, defined as a habitat that consistently provides a proportion of a population with foraging and growth rates similar to those experienced in the primary nursery. First, we confirmed that juvenile Chinook salmon cohorts are simultaneously using both habitats by combining field collections with otolith chemical and structural analysis to directly compare size and migration patterns of juveniles collected in two Oregon (USA) estuaries and surf zones during three years. We then compared juvenile catch, diet and growth in estuaries and surf zones. Juveniles were consistently caught in both habitats throughout summer. Catches were significantly higher in estuaries (average ± SD = 34.3 ± 19.7 ind. 100 m-2) than surf zones (1.0 ± 1.5 ind. 100 m-2) and were positively correlated (r = 0.92). Size at capture (103 ± 15 mm fork length, FL), size at marine entry (76 ± 13 mm FL), stomach fullness (2 ± 2% body weight) and growth rates (0.4 ± 0.0 mm day-1) were similar between habitats. Our results suggest that when large numbers of 0-age Chinook salmon inhabit estuaries, juveniles concurrently use surf zones, which serve as an alternative nursery habitat. Therefore, surf zones expand the available rearing habitat for Chinook salmon during early marine residence, a critical period in the life history.

  17. The Rate of Beneficial Mutations Surfing on the Wave of a Range Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Lehe, Rmi; Hallatschek, Oskar; Peliti, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Many theoretical and experimental studies suggest that range expansions can have severe consequences for the gene pool of the expanding population. Due to strongly enhanced genetic drift at the advancing frontier, neutral and weakly deleterious mutations can reach large frequencies in the newly colonized regions, as if they were surfing the front of the range expansion. These findings raise the question of how frequently beneficial mutations successfully surf at shifting range margins, thereby promoting adaptation towards a range-expansion phenotype. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the surfing statistics of recurrent beneficial mutations on wave-like range expansions in linear habitats. We show that the rate of surfing depends on two strongly antagonistic factors, the probability of surfing given the spatial location of a novel mutation and the rate of occurrence of mutations at that location. The surfing probability strongly increases towards the tip of the wave. Novel mutations are unlikely to surf unless they enjoy a spatial head start compared to the bulk of the population. The needed head start is shown to be proportional to the inverse fitness of the mutant type, and only weakly dependent on the carrying capacity. The precise location dependence of surfing probabilities is derived from the non-extinction probability of a branching process within a moving field of growth rates. The second factor is the mutation occurrence which strongly decreases towards the tip of the wave. Thus, most successful mutations arise at an intermediate position in the front of the wave. We present an analytic theory for the tradeoff between these factors that allows to predict how frequently substitutions by beneficial mutations occur at invasion fronts. We find that small amounts of genetic drift increase the fixation rate of beneficial mutations at the advancing front, and thus could be important for adaptation during species invasions. PMID:22479175

  18. Distribution and winter survival health of Asian clams, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, John R. P., III; Schloesser, Don W.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the distribution and winter survival of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River from the fall of 1988 to the spring of 1990. Between fall of 1988 and spring of 1989, distribution of Corbicula was extended from 5.5 to 11.5 km downstream from an electric power plant. However, total abundance of clams decreased during the winter. By fall of 1989, Corbicula was found 14.5 km from the power plant, and the mean density of clams was 27 individuals/m2. Between fall of 1989 and spring of 1990, distribution was reduced to 7.5 km from the power plant and abundance decreased 97%. During the winter of 1988-1989, we collected clams monthly from one station 2.2 km from the power plant, and we observed that clams survived the harsh winter for two months after the water temperature dropped about 1.5°C below the reported lethal level for Corbicula in midwinter. During the winer of 1989-1990, we held clams at the sediment-water interface in enclosures, and we observed that condition indices (dry body weight; dry shell weight) of clams remained stable (mean = 0.05 ± 0.01) in December and January and then declined significantly (p < 0.05) to 0.04 ± 0.01 in February. All clams perished by late March. The deteriorating physiological state of clams, as indicated by declining condition index, seemingly is a factor in late winter mortalities of Corbicula in the St. Clair River. In contrast to the rapid geographic spread and population increases in the southern United States, Corbicula likely will not spread rapidly throughout the Great Lakes beyond shoreline thermal refugia of heated-water discharge plumes from power plants.

  19. Age, growth, and population structure of the smooth clam Callista chione in the eastern Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezgeta-Balić, Daria; Peharda, Melita; Richardson, Christopher A.; Kuzmanić, Marina; Vrgoč, Nedo; Isajlović, Igor

    2011-12-01

    The age, growth, and population structure of the smooth clam Callista chione were determined from samples collected by hydraulic dredge and SCUBA at four locations in the eastern Adriatic during 2007 and 2008. The age of 436 clam shells was determined from internal growth lines present in shell sections, and the timing of growth line formation was ascertained from monthly collections of clams to occur between August and September when sea water temperatures were maximal. In addition, age of 30 older individuals was verified with acetate peels of polished and etched shell sections. Differences were apparent in the age structure and growth rates of clams collected from the four locations studied. Von Bertalanffy growth (VBG) curves obtained for clams from these locations were L t = 72.4 (1-e-0.25(t - 2.68)) (Rab Island), L t = 74.5 (1-e-0.15(t + 0.57)) (Pag Bay), L t = 79.3 (1-e-0.34(t - 0.97)) (Cetina estuary), and L t = 82.5 (1-e-0.11(t + 2.88)) (Kaštela Bay). The age of the clams ranged between 3 and 44 years; median clam ages were similar at three of the four locations (14, 12, and 12 years, respectively), but was significantly lower in the Cetina estuary (4 years). The VBG growth constants recorded from clams were within the range of values obtained for this species by previous authors. The observed local differences in population structure indicate different levels of exploitation and illustrate the need to establish long-term strategies for a sustainable exploitation of smooth clams in the Croatian Adriatic.

  20. Dwarf Eye Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Johns Hopkins researchers at the Wilmer Eye Institute have discovered what appears to be the first human gene mutation that causes extreme farsightedness. The researchers report that nanophthalmos, Greek for "dwarf eye," is a rare, potentially blinding disorder caused by an alteration in a gene called MFRP that helps control eye growth and…

  1. Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow dwarf (BYD) is the most widespread and economically important virus disease of cereals. The viruses causing BYD were initially grouped based on common biological properties, including persistent and often strain-specific transmission by aphids and induction of yellowing symptoms. The...

  2. Barley Yellow Dwarf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley yellow dwarf is the most economically important virus disease affecting most cereal crops world wide. This manuscript summarizes the current knowledge of the disease etiology, epidemiology and management. This information is incorporated into the latest revision of the American Phytopathologi...

  3. Proto-brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc William

    1994-01-01

    We develop a new technique to find the progenitors of brown dwarfs, or 'proto-brown dwarfs,' in nearby molecular clouds. By using mm-wave telescopes, this method can achieve greater mass sensitivity than traditional approaches such as astrometry and infrared imaging. Our method can distinguish between various forms of the low-mass (less than 0.2 solar mass) stellar initial mass function (IMF), which currently is not well-constrained. We present results of a search for proto-brown dwarfs in two types of molecular cloud - those at high galactic latitudes, and those in the disk which are forming stars. The high latitude clouds (HLC's) have relatively low densities, and are apparently not forming stars. Our analysis of several HLC's gives little evidence for self-gravitating objects of any mass, although there are clumps with masses as low as 3 M(Jupiter). In molecular line and continuum searches in the Ophiuchus B and Barnard 18 star-forming regions, we find no clear-cut evidence of any proto-brown dwarfs. This lack of proto-brown dwarfs is surprising; even if the IMF slope were flat, we would expect to have found approx. 10 objects. We do find a few candidate objects near our detection limit (approx. 0.02 solar mass) which deserve further scrutiny. We find fewer low-mass clumps (approx. less than O.l solar mass) than expected from extrapolation of any reasonable mass function. If the IMF follows the clump mass spectrum below 0.08 solar mass, as it seems to at higher masses, our results imply that, unless some undetermined process causes the production of many more low-mass clumps, the IMF is falling at masses below 0.08 solar mass, even if all our candidate objects turn out to be true proto-brown dwarfs. We therefore predict that future searches for brown dwarfs will find very few, regardless of the depth of the searches. We present analyses of two HLC's, MBM 12 and MBM 41-44. The properties of 400 clumps - position, size, mass, line width, brightness temperature - are measured. We find the clump mass spectrum in MBM 12 deviates below 0.3 solar mass from the 'universal' GMC mass spectrum N(Mf) approx. M-0 5. This is the first molecular cloud known which has a mass spectrum which differs significantly and unambiguously from the GMC spectrum.

  4. Surfing depth on a behaviour change website: predictors and effects on behaviour.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nele; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Claes, Neree

    2010-03-01

    The primary objectives of the present study were to gain insight into website use and to predict the surfing depth on a behaviour change website and its effect on behaviour. Two hundred eight highly educated adults from the intervention condition of a randomised trial received access to a medical intervention, individual coaching (by e-mail, post, telephone or face-to-face) and a behaviour change website. Website use (e.g. surfing depth, page view duration) was registered. Online questionnaires for physical activity and fat intake were filled out at baseline and after 6 months. Hierarchical linear regression was used to predict surfing depth and its effect on behaviour. Seventy-five per cent of the participants visited the website. Fifty-one and fifty-six per cent consulted the physical activity and fat intake feedback, respectively. The median surfing depth was 2. The total duration of interventions by e-mail predicted deeper surfing (beta=0.36; p<0.001). Surfing depth did not predict changes in fat intake (beta=-0.07; p=0.45) or physical activity (beta=-0.03; p=0.72). Consulting the physical activity feedback led to more physical activity (beta=0.23; p=0.01). The findings from the present study can be used to guide future website development and improve the information architecture of behaviour change websites. PMID:20726734

  5. Qualitative Task Analysis to Enhance Sports Characterization: A Surfing Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Miguel; Peixoto, César

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a Matrix of Analysis for Sports Tasks (MAST), regardless of the sports activity, based on practice classification and task analysis. Being this a qualitative research our main question was: in assessing sports’ structure is it possible to make the characterization of any discipline through context and individuals’ behaviours? The sample was within a surf discipline in a competition flowing having 5 of the top 16 Portuguese surfers training together. Based on a qualitative method, studying the surf as the main activity was an interpretative study case. The MAST was applied in four phases: taxonomy; tasks and context description; task analysis; teaching and performance strategies. Its application allowed the activities’ characterization through the observation, surfer’s opinions and bibliographical support. The triangulation of the data was used as an information data treatment. The elements were classified by the challenges proposed to the practitioners and the taxonomy was constituted by the sport activities, group, modality and discipline. Surf is a discipline of surfing which is a sliding sport modality, therefore, a nature sport. In the context description, we had the wave’s components and constraints and the surfboards’ qualities. Through task analysis we obtained a taxonomy of surf manoeuvres. The structural and functional analysis allowed finding solutions for learning of surf techniques with trampoline and skateboards because these fit in sliding sports. MAST makes possible the development of strategies that benefit teaching and performance intervention. PMID:25414757

  6. Increased longevity and refractoriness to Ca(2+)-dependent neurodegeneration in Surf1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Dell'agnello, Carlotta; Leo, Sara; Agostino, Alessandro; Szabadkai, György; Tiveron, Cecilia; Zulian, Alessandra; Prelle, Alessandro; Roubertoux, Pierre; Rizzuto, Rosario; Zeviani, Massimo

    2007-02-15

    Leigh syndrome associated with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is a mitochondrial disorder usually caused by mutations of SURF1, a gene encoding a putative COX assembly factor. We present here a Surf1-/- recombinant mouse obtained by inserting a loxP sequence in the open reading frame of the gene. The frequency of -/-, +/+ and +/- genotypes in newborn mice followed a mendelian distribution, indicating that the ablation of Surf1 is compatible with postnatal survival. The biochemical and assembly COX defect was present in Surf1(loxP)-/- mice, but milder than in humans. Surprisingly, not only these animals failed to show spontaneous neurodegeneration at any age, but they also displayed markedly prolonged lifespan, and complete protection from Ca(2+)-dependent neurotoxicity induced by kainic acid. Experiments on primary neuronal cultures showed markedly reduced rise of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in Surf1(loxP)-/- neurons, and reduced mortality, compared to controls. The mitochondrial membrane potential was unchanged in KO versus wild-type neurons, suggesting that the effects of the ablation of Surf1 on Ca(2+) homeostasis, and possibly on longevity, may be independent, at least in part, from those on COX assembly and mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:17210671

  7. SURF1-associated Leigh syndrome: a case series and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inn-Chi; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Wang, Jing; Li, Fang-Yuan; Weng, Shao-Wen; Craigen, William J; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2012-08-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a mitochondrial disease that typically presents in infancy with subacute neurodegenerative encephalopathy. It is genetically heterogeneous, but mutations in the complex IV assembly genes, particularly SURF1, are an important cause. In this study, SURF1 gene was sequenced in 590 patients with clinical suspicion of LS, complex IV deficiency, or clinical features of mitochondrial disorders. We identified 21 patients with clinical features of LS who are either homozygous or compound heterozygous for SURF1 mutations. Twenty-two different mutations were identified, including 13 novel mutations. Of the 42 mutant alleles, 36 (86%) are null mutations (frameshift, splicing, or nonsense) and 6 (14%) are missense. We have also reviewed the previously reported SURF1 mutations and observed a clustering of mutation in exon 8 of SURF1, suggesting a vital function for this region. Although mutations in SURF1 have been mainly associated with typical LS, five of the patients in this report had an atypical course of LS. There is no definite genotype-phenotype correlation; however, frameshift mutations resulting in protein truncation closer to the C-terminus may carry a better prognosis. PMID:22488715

  8. Qualitative task analysis to enhance sports characterization: a surfing case study.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Miguel; Peixoto, César

    2014-09-29

    The aim of this study was to develop a Matrix of Analysis for Sports Tasks (MAST), regardless of the sports activity, based on practice classification and task analysis. Being this a qualitative research our main question was: in assessing sports' structure is it possible to make the characterization of any discipline through context and individuals' behaviours? The sample was within a surf discipline in a competition flowing having 5 of the top 16 Portuguese surfers training together. Based on a qualitative method, studying the surf as the main activity was an interpretative study case. The MAST was applied in four phases: taxonomy; tasks and context description; task analysis; teaching and performance strategies. Its application allowed the activities' characterization through the observation, surfer's opinions and bibliographical support. The triangulation of the data was used as an information data treatment. The elements were classified by the challenges proposed to the practitioners and the taxonomy was constituted by the sport activities, group, modality and discipline. Surf is a discipline of surfing which is a sliding sport modality, therefore, a nature sport. In the context description, we had the wave's components and constraints and the surfboards' qualities. Through task analysis we obtained a taxonomy of surf manoeuvres. The structural and functional analysis allowed finding solutions for learning of surf techniques with trampoline and skateboards because these fit in sliding sports. MAST makes possible the development of strategies that benefit teaching and performance intervention. PMID:25414757

  9. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepler, S. O.

    2014-10-01

    White dwarfs are the evolutionary endpoint for nearly 95% of all stars born in our Galaxy, the final stages of evolution of all low- and intermediate mass stars, i.e., main sequence stars with masses below (8.5± 1.5) M_{odot}, depending on metallicity of the progenitor, mass loss and core overshoot. Massive white dwarfs are intrinsically rare objects, tand produce a gap in the determination of the initial vs. final mass relation at the high mass end (e.g. Weidemann 2000 A&A, 363, 647; Kalirai et al. 2008, ApJ, 676, 594; Williams, Bolte & Koester 2009, ApJ, 693, 355). Main sequences stars with higher masses will explode as SNII (Smartt S. 2009 ARA&A, 47, 63), but the limit does depend on the metallicity of the progenitor. Massive white dwarfs are probably SNIa progenitors through accretion or merger. They are rare, being the final product of massive stars (less common) and have smaller radius (less luminous). Kepler et al. 2007 (MNRAS, 375, 1315), Kleinman et al. 2013 (ApJS, 204, 5) estimate only 1-2% white dwarfs have masses above 1 M_{odot}. The final stages of evolution after helium burning are a race between core growth and loss of the H-rich envelope in a stellar wind. When the burning shell is exposed, the star rapidly cools and burning ceases, leaving a white dwarf. As they cool down, the magnetic field freezes in, ranging from a few kilogauss to a gigagauss. Peculiar type Ia SN 2006gz, SN 2007if, SN 2009dc, SN 2003fg suggest progenitors in the range 2.4-2.8 M_{odot}, and Das U. & Mukhopadhyay B. (2012, Phys. Rev. D, 86, 042001) estimate that the Chandrasekhar limit increases to 2.3-2.6 M_{odot} for extremely high magnetic field stars, but differential rotation induced by accretion could also increase it, according to Hachisu I. et al. 2012 (ApJ, 744, 69). García-Berro et al. 2012, ApJ, 749, 25, for example, proposes double degenerate mergers are the progenitors of high-field magnetic white dwarfs. We propose magnetic fields enhance the line broadening in WDs, causing an overestimated surface gravity, and ultimately determine if these magnetic fields are likely developed through the star's own surface convection zone, or inherited from massive Ap/Bp progenitors. We discovered around 20 000 spectroscopic white dwarfs with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), with a corresponding increase in relatively rare varieties of white dwarfs, including the massive ones (Kleinman et al. 2013, ApJS, 204, 5, Kepler et al. 2013, MNRAS, 439, 2934). The mass distributions of the hydrogen-rich (DA) measured from fitting the spectra with model atmospheres calculated using unidimensinal mixing lenght-theory (MLT) shows the average mass (as measured by the surface gravity) increases apparently below 13 000K for DAs (e.g. Bergeron et al. 1991, ApJ, 367, 253; Tremblay et al. 2011, ApJ, 730, 128; Kleinman et al. 2013). Only with the tridimensional (3D) convection calculations of Tremblay et al. 2011 (A&A, 531, L19) and 2013 (A&A, 552, 13; A&A, 557, 7; arXiv 1309.0886) the problem has finally been solved, but the effects of magnetic fields are not included yet in the mass determinations. Pulsating white dwarf stars are used to measure their interior and envelope properties through seismology, and together with the luminosity function of white dwarf stars in clusters and around the Sun are valuable tools for the study of high density physics, and the history of stellar formation.

  10. The asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea (Müller), in the tidal Potomac River, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dresler, Paul V.; Cory, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    The Asiatic clam,Corbicula fluminea (Müller), has extended its range to include the tidal fresh-water portion of the Potomac River, Maryland. Though patchily distributed, the clams have attained densities of 665 m−2. Size-class distributions indicate that the clams first appeared in 1975. About 90% of the population belong to year-class I and were less than 12 mm in length. Elsewhere, this species has created severe water quality problems; it should be closely watched in the Potomac.

  11. Non-linear control of the ''clam'' wave energy device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    A promising wave energy device being currently investigated is the ''clam'' device. The clam extracts energy by pumping air through a specially designed (Wells) turbine. Although operation of the Wells turbine does not require a rectified air flow, some additional control will be necessary to optimize the phase of the clam motion for good efficiencies. An examination of the equation of motion in the time domain suggests the possibility of non-linear phase control by mechanical, power take-off, or pneumatic latching. Latching can be shown to increase the efficiency of the device in the longer wavelengths of the wave spectrum, i.e. those of high incident wave power.

  12. [THE CONTENT OF MERCURY IN SEDIMENTS AND THE CLAMS UNIO PICTORUM FROM THE URAL RIVER].

    PubMed

    Solovykh, G N; Osinkina, V V; Vereshchagin, N N; Belomestnova, V G; Vodyanitskaya, O V; Kamaukhova, I V

    2015-01-01

    There was investigated the mercury total content in bottom sediments and some bodies of clams from the area of the middle reach of the Ural river near the Orenburg city. In bottom sediments there was revealed an excess of the ecological standard for mercury. There was noted the uneven distribution of toxicant in bodies of clams: the maximal contents was detected in hepatopancreas, minimal--in "foot", that apparently is determined by the unequal metabolitic activity of these tissues. The highest concentration of mercury in the tissues of clams was noted at the station "Ural river above the camp" Dubki". PMID:26625617

  13. Fatty acid composition, sarcoplasmic reticular lipid oxidation, and immunity of hard clam (Meretrix lusoria) fed different dietary microalgae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu-Mei; Tseng, Kai-Yi; Huang, Chen-Huei

    2015-07-01

    Fatty acid profiles, activities of biomembrane lipid peroxidation, and immunity of a seawater clam (Meretrix lusoria) fed three species of dietary microalgae were investigated. Clams of a marketable size (25 g mean weight) were fed Tetraselmis chui, Chaetoceros muelleri, or Isochrysis galbana for 8 weeks. Fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in the polar lipid fractions of clams reflected those of the dietary algae species. Clams fed with T. chui and C. muelleri contained higher proportion of non-methylene interrupted (NMI) fatty acids than those fed I. galbana. Proportion of DHA in lipids of the clams fed with I. galbana was the highest among test groups. The NADH-dependent sarcoplasmic reticular lipid peroxidation activity of clams fed I. galbana was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than that of clams fed T. chui or C. muelleri. The hemocyte adhesion capacity of clams fed C. muelleri or I. galbana was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of clams fed T. chui. No significant differences (p ≥ 0.05) in total hemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, clearance efficiency hemocyte and phagocytosis were detected among clams fed different microalgae. PMID:25707599

  14. 50 CFR 648.73 - Closed areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.73 Closed areas. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 60623... surf clam and ocean quahog fishing because of adverse environmental conditions. These areas will remain... small surf clams. Areas may be closed because they contain small surf clams. (1) Closure. The...

  15. Detection of the White Dwarf Companions of Barium Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Richard O.; Corbally, C. J.; Griffin, E.; McGahee, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The Barium dwarfs are chemically peculiar F- and G-type stars that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements such as strontium and barium. They are believed to have derived their chemical peculiarities via mass transfer from a former AGB companion, now a white dwarf. These WD companions should be detectable in the far-ultraviolet if their effective temperatures exceed 10,000K. However, despite dedicated IUE searches, no WD companion has been directly detected. We have observed 4 Ba dwarfs with the GALEX ultraviolet space telescope (2 newly discovered Ba dwarfs have archival observations), and report here on the first unequivocal direct detection of a WD companion of a Ba dwarf, HD 15306, the hottest Ba dwarf known (F4 V). This WD companion is detected through a clear far-ultraviolet excess. Detection of the putative WD companions of the other observed Ba dwarfs is somewhat more problematical, as those stars have cooler effective temperatures and chromospheric activity can significantly affect their FUV fluxes. The disentanglement of WD FUV fluxes from FUV emission due to chromospheric activity requires comparison of the observed Ba dwarfs with F- and G-type dwarfs with archival GALEX photometry. We have selected a set of 68 F- and G-type dwarfs from the NStars program (Gray et al. 2003, 2006) that have good quality archival GALEX photometry and show a wide range of chromospheric activity. A comparison of these stars with the 5 remaining GALEX-observed Ba dwarfs suggests that one and perhaps two of these Ba dwarfs have detectable WD companions.

  16. Copper and silver accumulation in transplanted and resident clams (Macoma balthica) in South San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, D.J.; Luoma, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Accumulation of Cu and Ag by soft tissues of the deposit-feeding clam Macoma balthica was less than half in clams transplanted to a contaminated area than in clams native to that area. During a period of tissue growth, the transplants retained 50% and 90%, respectively, of the net Cu and Ag accumulated, but loss of metals from soft tissue by the resident population equalled net accumulation. Copper accumulation in the transplants did not occur during some periods when increases in the metal body burden of the resident population indicated that environmental exposures were high. The difference in metal accumulation of the two groups of clams may be the result of past environmental exposures. The results illustrate some limitations of using transplants as indicators of pollution events or of pollutant impact upon resident populations.

  17. Total reflection X-ray spectrometry (TXRF) for trace elements assessment in edible clams.

    PubMed

    Marguí, Eva; de Fátima Marques, Alexandra; de Lurdes Prisal, Maria; Hidalgo, Manuela; Queralt, Ignasi; Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The present contribution presents a preliminary investigation of the chemical composition with respect to major, minor, trace, and ultratrace elements in several clam species that are frequently used for human consumption in Portuguese markets and worldwide. In order to use a simple and rapid analytical methodology for clam analysis, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry were selected as analytical techniques. The analytical capabilities of TXRF spectrometry were evaluated for the determination of minor and trace elements in commercial edible clams. We compared the direct analysis of powdered suspensions (using different sample amounts and dispersant agents) with the analysis of the digested samples for trace element determination. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of clam digests was also performed to evaluate the analytical possibilities of TXRF spectrometry for trace and ultratrace analysis. PMID:25286343

  18. A theoretical individual-based model of Brown Ring Disease in Manila clams, Venerupis philippinarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paillard, Christine; Jean, Fred; Ford, Susan E.; Powell, Eric N.; Klinck, John M.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    An individual-based mathematical model was developed to investigate the biological and environmental interactions that influence the prevalence and intensity of Brown Ring Disease (BRD), a disease, caused by the bacterial pathogen, Vibrio tapetis, in the Manila clam (Venerupis (= Tapes, = Ruditapes) philippinarum). V. tapetis acts as an external microparasite, adhering at the surface of the mantle edge and its secretion, the periostracal lamina, causing the symptomatic brown deposit. Brown Ring Disease is atypical in that it leaves a shell scar that provides a unique tool for diagnosis of either live or dead clams. The model was formulated using laboratory and field measurements of BRD development in Manila clams, physiological responses of the clam to the pathogen, and the physiology of V. tapetis, as well as theoretical understanding of bacterial disease progression in marine shellfish. The simulation results obtained for an individual Manila clam were expanded to cohorts and populations using a probability distribution that prescribed a range of variability for parameters in a three dimensional framework; assimilation rate, clam hemocyte activity rate (the number of bacteria ingested per hemocyte per day), and clam calcification rate (a measure of the ability to recover by covering over the symptomatic brown ring deposit), which sensitivity studies indicated to be processes important in determining BRD prevalence and intensity. This approach allows concurrent simulation of individuals with a variety of different physiological capabilities (phenotypes) and hence by implication differing genotypic composition. Different combinations of the three variables provide robust estimates for the fate of individuals with particular characteristics in a population that consists of mixtures of all possible combinations. The BRD model was implemented using environmental observations from sites in Brittany, France, where Manila clams routinely exhibit BRD signs. The simulated annual cycle of BRD prevalence and intensity agrees with observed disease cycles in cultured clam populations from this region, with maximum disease prevalence and intensity occurring from December to April. Sensitivity analyses of modeled physiological processes showed that the level of hemocyte activity is the primary intrinsic determinant of recovery of infected clams. Simulations designed to investigate environmental effects on BRD suggested that the outcome of the host-parasite interaction is dependent on food supply (high values being favorable for the host) and temperature. Results of simulations illustrate the complex interaction of temperature effects on propagation and viability of the bacterium, on the phagocytic activity of the hemocytes, and on other physiological processes of the host clam. Simulations using 1 °C and 2 °C increases in temperature generally favored disease development, indicating that climate warming might favor the spread of BRD.

  19. Sediment-contact and survival of fingernail clams: Implications for conducting short-term laboratory tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naimo, T.J.; Cope, W.G.; Bartsch, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Porewater toxicity tests have been used as indicators of whole sediment toxicity. However, many species commonly tested in porewater predominately reside in the water column and otherwise have little to no direct contact with sediment and associated porewater. We assessed the feasibility of porewater toxicity tests with fingernail clams Musculium transversum, a benthic macroinvertebrate that inhabits soft bottom sediments and feeds by filtering surface and porewater. Fingernail clams were exposed to water or sediment in a 96 h laboratory test with a 5 x 2 factorial experimental design. The five treatments included sediments from four sites in the Mississippi River and one sediment-free control (well water). In all treatments, clams were exposed to the sediments or water either directly (no enclosure) or indirectly (enclosure, suspended above the sediment surface). There were three replicates for each of the ten treatment combinations. Overall, survival of fingernail clams did not vary among the five treatments (p = 0.36). In treatments without enclosures, survival of clams in the sediment-free control was not significantly different (p = 0.34) from the sediment-containing treatments. Survival of clams in the sediment-free control averaged 85 - suggesting that direct sediment contact is not necessary for survival in short-term tests. In contrast, survival of clams in the sediment-containing treatments differed significantly (p = 0.03) between exposures with (mean, 77) and without (mean, 89) enclosures. Thus, fingernail clams may provide an alternative species for evaluating benthic macroinvertebrates in short-term laboratory porewater tests. However, more information on their physiological requirements and the development of sublethal endpoints is recommended before their use in tests of longer duration. (C) 2000 by John Wiley and Sons, Inc.

  20. Ozone depuration of Vibrio vulnificus from the southern quahog clam, Mercenaria campechiensis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.R.; Steslow, F.S.; Sierra, F.S.; Rodrick, G.E.; Noss, C.I. )

    1991-03-01

    Southern quahog clams, Mercenaria campechiensis, were dosed with Vibrio vulnificus and placed in a pilot-scale depuration system using ozonated recirculated artificial seawater. Twenty-four hours of treatment with ozone-treated recirculating artificial seawater reduced the numbers of V. vulnificus in the shellfish meats by an average of 2 log units when compared to natural die-off in control clams. The oxidant levels (up to 3 mg/liter) did not adversely affect shellfish pumping during the depuration process.

  1. Reproducibility of the Most Probable Numbers Technique for Determining the Sanitary Quality of Clams1

    PubMed Central

    Lear, Donald W.

    1962-01-01

    The reproducibility of most probable numbers results in the bacteriological examination of clam meats, using the tentatively recommended procedure, is less than has been indicated in use with water analysis. Entrapped air bubbles in ground clam meats contribute to the variability of results by (i) lowering the density of the sample material, producing inaccurate aliquots for inocula, and (ii) interfering with the attainment of homogeneity in the brei. PMID:14463247

  2. Complex IV Deficient Surf1−/− Mice Initiate Mitochondrial Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, Daniel A.; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S.; Liu, Yuhong; Hill, Shauna; Lin, Ai-Ling; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Shi, Yun; Sloane, Lauren; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mutations in SURF1 cytochrome c oxidase (COX) assembly protein are associated with Leigh’s syndrome, a human mitochondrial disorder that manifests as severe mitochondrial phenotypes and early lethality. In contrast, mice lacking the Surf1 protein (Surf1−/−) are viable and were previously shown to have enhanced longevity and a greater than 50% reduction in COX activity. We measured mitochondrial function in heart and skeletal muscle, and despite the significant reduction in COX activity, we found little or no difference in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, membrane potential, ATP production or respiration in isolated mitochondria from Surf1−/− mice compared to wild-type. However, blood lactate levels are elevated and Surf1−/− mice have reduced running endurance, suggesting compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism in vivo. Decreased COX activity in Surf1−/− mice is associated with increased markers of mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α and VDAC) in both heart and skeletal muscle. While mitochondrial biogenesis is a common response in the two tissues, skeletal muscle have an up-regulation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRMT) and heart exhibits induction of the Nrf2 antioxidant response pathway. These data are the first to report induction of the UPRMT in a mammalian model of diminished COX activity. In addition our results suggest that impaired mitochondrial function can lead to induction of mitochondrial stress pathways to confer protective effects on cellular homeostasis. Loss of complex IV assembly factor Surf1 in mice results in compensatory responses including mitochondrial biogenesis, the nrf2 pathway and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This compensatory response may contribute to the lack of deleterious phenotypes under basal conditions. PMID:24911525

  3. Surf zone entrainment, along-shore transport, and human health implications of pollution from tidal outlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, S. B.; Kim, J. H.; Jones, B. H.; Jenkins, S. A.; Wasyl, J.; Cudaback, C.

    2005-10-01

    Field experiments and modeling studies were carried out to characterize the surf zone entrainment and along-shore transport of pollution from two tidal outlets that drain into Huntington Beach and Newport Beach, popular public beaches in southern California. The surf zone entrainment and near-shore transport of pollutants from these tidal outlets appears to be controlled by prevailing wave conditions and coastal currents, and fine-scale features of the flow field around the outlets. An analysis of data from dye experiments and fecal indicator bacteria monitoring studies reveals that the along-shore flux of surf zone water is at least 50 to 300 times larger than the cross-shore flux of surf zone water. As a result, pollutants entrained in the surf zone hug the shore, where they travel significant distances parallel to the beach before diluting to extinction. Under the assumption that all surf zone pollution at Huntington Beach originates from two tidal outlets, the Santa Ana River and Talbert Marsh outlets, models of mass and momentum transport in the surf zone approximately capture the observed tidal phasing and magnitude of certain fecal indicator bacteria groups (total coliform) but not others (Escherichia coli and enterococci), implying the existence of multiple sources of, and/or multiple transport pathways for, fecal pollution at this site. The intersection of human recreation and near-shore pollution pathways implies that, from a human health perspective, special care should be taken to reduce the discharge of harmful pollutants from land-side sources of surface water runoff, such as tidal outlets and storm drains.

  4. Post-processing enhancement of reverberation-noise suppression in dual-frequency SURF imaging.

    PubMed

    Näsholm, Sven Peter; Hansen, Rune; Angelsen, Bjørn A J

    2011-02-01

    A post-processing adjustment technique to enhance dual-frequency second-order ultrasound field (SURF) reverberation-noise suppression imaging in medical ultrasound is analyzed. Two variant methods are investigated through numerical simulations. They both solely involve post-processing of the propagated high-frequency (HF) imaging wave fields, which in real-time imaging corresponds to post-processing of the beamformed receive radio-frequency signals. Hence, the transmit pulse complexes are the same as for the previously published SURF reverberation-suppression imaging method. The adjustment technique is tested on simulated data from propagation of SURF pulse complexes consisting of a 3.5-MHz HF imaging pulse added to a 0.5-MHz low-frequency soundspeed manipulation pulse. Imaging transmit beams are constructed with and without adjustment. The post-processing involves filtering, e.g., by a time-shift, to equalize the two SURF HF pulses at a chosen depth. This depth is typically chosen to coincide with the depth where the first scattering or reflection occurs for the reverberation noise one intends to suppress. The beams realized with post-processing show energy decrease at the chosen depth, especially for shallow depths where, in a medical imaging situation, a body-wall is often located. This indicates that the post-processing may further enhance the reverberation- suppression abilities of SURF imaging. Moreover, it is shown that the methods might be utilized to reduce the accumulated near-field energy of the SURF transmit-beam relative to its imaging region energy. The adjustments presented may therefore potentially be utilized to attain a slightly better general suppression of multiple scattering and multiple reflection noise compared with non-adjusted SURF reverberation-suppression imaging. PMID:21342819

  5. Reductions in Sprint Paddling Ability and Countermovement Jump Performance After Surfing Training.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Josh L; Sheppard, Jeremy M; Dascombe, Ben J

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether any meaningful change in a surfer's sprint paddling ability and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance developed after a 2-hour surfing training session and also whether any physical demands of the surfing session were related to the resultant changes in the capacities. Fifteen competitive male surfing athletes (age, 22.1 ± 3.9 years; height, 175.4 ± 6.4 cm; body mass, 72.5 ± 7.7 kg) performed a 2-hour surfing training session, with 15-m sprint paddle and CMJ trials performed both before and after the surfing session. Pre- to posttesting measures were analyzed using magnitude-based inferences. Likely declines were observed in the velocity achieved at the 5-, 10-, and 15-m splits of the 15-m sprint paddle, as well as peak velocity. Similarly, likely declines were calculated for CMJ peak force, relative peak force, and jump height. Furthermore, large correlations were calculated between presurfing session peak velocity and the change in 5, 10, 15 m, and peak velocity of the 15-m sprint paddle and total distance covered, wave riding bouts, and success rate. Surfing athletes and coaches may need to consider implementing shorter duration training sessions to reduce the decline in sprint paddling ability and CMJ performance. Furthermore, surfing athletes should possess highly developed sprint paddling ability because this may allow them to undertake a greater workload and catch more waves, which will increase the opportunity for technical refinement of maneuvers and skill acquisition. PMID:25559904

  6. Lipid characteristics of a seep clam, Mesolinga soliditesta: Comparison with those of two coastal clams, Meretrix lamarckii and Ruditapes philippinarum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Hiroaki; Murata, Masakazu; Hashimoto, Jun

    2014-12-01

    The lipids and fatty acids of two coastal clams, Meretrix lamarckii and Ruditapes philippinarum, collected at 5 and 1 m of depth, and a seep clam, Mesolinga soliditesta, collected at 331 m of depth, were examined to assess their lipid physiology and trophic relationship with their diets. The major fatty acids of lipids in Mer. lamarckii and R. philippinarum were 14:0, 16:0, 18:0, 16:1n-7, 18:1n-9, 18:1n-7, 20:4n-6, 20:5n-3, and 22:6n-3, while those of Mes. soliditesta were 16:0, 18:0, 16:1n-7, 18:1n-7, 20:1n-7, 20:1n-13, 20:2n-7, 15 (Δ5,13-20:2), and 22:2n-7,15 (Δ7,15-22:2). The major polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the Mer. lamarckii and R. philippinarum lipids consisted of various n-3 and n-6 long-chain (LC) PUFAs, such as 20:4n-6, 22:4n-6, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3, and 22:6n-3, while those in Mes. soliditesta muscle and viscera included various n-4 family PUFAs (18:3n-7, 18:4n-4, 20:2n-7, and 20:3n-7) with limited kinds of n-3 and n-6 PUFAs (20:4n-6 and 20:5n-3). These findings indicate that, like other common shallow-water clams, Mer. lamarckii and R. philippinarum ingest phytoplanktonic n-3 and n-6 LC-PUFAs, whereas Mes. soliditesta utilizes limited kinds of n-3 and n-6 LC-PUFAs. In contrast to the other two bivalves species, Mes. soliditesta yielded various n-4 and n-7 (n-4/n-7) PUFAs, which were assimilated from the chemosynthetic symbionts. The high diversity of PUFAs contained in the Mes. soliditesta lipids (n-3, n-4 family, and n-6 PUFAs) suggests that this species mixotrophically utilized both photosynthetic products and vent chemosynthetic nutrition derived from geothermal energy.

  7. Local Universe Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, Claude

    2015-08-01

    One of the outstanding problems in cosmology is addressing the "small-scale crisis" and understanding structure formation at the smallest scales. Standard Lambda Cold Dark Matter cosmological simulations of Milky Way-size DM halos predict many more DM sub-halos than the number of dwarf galaxies observed. This is the so-called Missing Satellites Problem. The most popular interpretation of the Missing Satellites Problem is that the smallest dark matter halos in the universe are extremely inefficient at forming stars. The virialized extent of the Milky Way's halo should contain ~500 satellites, while only ˜100 satellites and dwarfs are observed in the whole Local Group. Despite the large amount of theoretical work and new optical observations, the discrepancy, even if reduced, still persists between observations and hierarchical models, regardless of the model parameters. It may be possible to find those isolated ultra-faint missing dwarf galaxies via their neutral gas component, which is one of the goals we are pursuing with the SKA precursor KAT-7 in South Africa, and soon with the SKA pathfinder MeerKAT.

  8. Dye dispersion in the surf zone: Measurements and simple models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, L. B.; Ackerman, D.; Largier, J.

    2007-03-01

    To examine the spatial and temporal effect of low-volume land-based runoff on beach contamination, discrete batches of dye were released at the shoreline at three beaches in Santa Monica Bay in 2000 (Malibu Creek, Santa Monica Canyon and Pico-Kenter drain). Dye concentration was measured at the shoreline 25, 50 and 100 m alongshore from the dye release point for up to 40 min after dye release. The shoreline concentration time series are characterized either by approximately exponential decay in concentration after passage of the dye patch maximum concentration or by persistent low concentration up to 30 min after passage of the initial dye patch front. In the absence of detailed measurements of physical conditions, several simple advection-diffusion models are used to simulate shoreline concentration time series for an idealized surf zone in order to probe the roles of alongshore current shear and rip currents in producing the observed characteristics in dye concentration time series. Favorable qualitative and quantitative comparison of measured and simulated time series suggest alongshore current shear and rip currents play key roles in generating the observed characteristics of nearshore dye patch dispersion. The models demonstrate the potential effects of these flow features on the extent and duration of beach contamination owing to a continuous contamination source.

  9. Photon surfing and magic speed revisited: Translucent effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Under the radiative environment of the intense radiation field around active phenomena such as black hole accretion disks, gaseous particles receive a strong radiative flux, which accelerates them, while they suffer from radiation drag by aberrated photons, which decelerates them. As a result, the acceleration of gaseous particles-photon surfing-would terminate at some magical speed βm(=v/c); (4-√7)/3 ˜ 0.45 for acceleration above an infinite flat radiator (Icke 1989, A&A, 216, 294). In a realistic gaseous cloud, part of the radiation would be absorbed by the cloud, some would be reflected, and some transmitted. We examine these translucent effects for a geometrically thin gaseous cloud (stratus). When the optical depth of the stratus is sufficiently large, the terminal speed is the well known magical speed βm for a particle. When the optical depth is around or less than unity, on the other hand, the terminal magical speed becomes large, up to ˜ 0.7c. This is just the translucent effect; the aberrated photons from the top of the stratus transmit the stratus much more than the direct photons from the bottom of the stratus facing the source.

  10. US Food and Drug Administration survey of cadmium, lead and other elements in clams and oysters.

    PubMed

    Capar, S G; Yess, N J

    1996-07-01

    In Fiscal Years 1985/1986, the US Food and Drug Administration conducted a survey of cadmium, lead and other elements in fresh clams and oysters collected from US coastal areas in use for shellfish production. Shellfish were analysed for cadmium and lead by using a dry ash-anodic stripping voltammetric method. Other elements (aluminium, arsenic, beryllium, calcium, chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, sodium, strontium, vanadium and zinc) were determined by using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, direct current plasma-atomic emission spectrometry or hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. A total of 75 hardshell clam, 59 softshell clam, 104 Eastern oyster and 40 Pacific oyster samples were analysed for cadmium and lead. Average levels found were 0.09, 0.05, 0.51 and 1.1 mg/kg wet weight for cadmium and 0.24, 0.30, 0.11 and 0.06 mg/kg wet weight for lead in hardshell clams, softshell clams, Eastern oysters and Pacific oysters, respectively. The other 19 elements were determined in 10-104 samples of the four types of shellfish. These data provide baseline values for elements in clams and oysters harvested from US coastal waters. PMID:8799717

  11. Spatial distribution and bioaccumulation patterns in three clam populations from a low contaminated ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velez, Cátia; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu; Freitas, Rosa

    2015-03-01

    When consuming bivalves, special concern should be taken to the total element burden. In order to assess this issue the present study aimed to measure the element levels in the sediments of different harvesting areas and relate them with clam accumulation; to assess the elements body burden, their availability for trophic transfer and relate it with total accumulation in clams, comparing the native (Ruditapes decussatus and Venerupis corrugata) and the invasive (Ruditapes philippinarum) species; to evaluate the human risk associated with the consumption of different clam species. The results showed that the element burden in clams does not reflect the sediment contamination and BAF values were higher in the less contaminated areas. Comparison of Maximum Levels (MLs) from international organizations with the concentration of elements in clams showed that As exceeded standard levels. The ingestion of less than 1 Kg per week of clams would result in exceeding the PTWI threshold for As. Furthermore, the results showed that, when comparing to other elements, As and Hg are more easily available to be transferred trophically.

  12. Soft shell clams Mya arenaria with disseminated neoplasia demonstrate reverse transcriptase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    House, M.L.; Kim, C.H.; Reno, P.W.

    1998-01-01

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN), a proliferative cell disorder of the circulatory system of bivalves, was first reported in oysters in 1969. Since that time, the disease has been determined to be transmissible through water-borne exposure, but the etiological agent has not been unequivocally identified. In order to determine if a viral agent, possibly a retrovirus, could be the causative agent of DN, transmission experiments were performed, using both a cell-free filtrate and a sucrose gradient-purified preparation of a cell-free filtrate of DN positive materials. Additionally, a PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay was used to determine if reverse transcriptase was present in tissues or hemolymph from DN positive soft shell clams Mya arenaria. DN was transmitted to healthy clams by injection with whole DN cells, but not with cell-free flitrates prepared from either tissues from DN positive clams, or DN cells. The cell-free preparations from DN-positive tissues and hemolymph having high levels of DN cells in circulation exhibited positive reactions in the PCR-enhanced reverse transcriptase assay. Cell-free preparations of hemolymph from clams having low levels of DN (<0.1% of cells abnormal), hemocytes from normal soft shell clams, and normal soft shell clam tissues did not produce a positive reaction in the PCR enhanced reverse transcriptase assay.

  13. Evaluating sublethal indicators of stress in Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) caged in an urban stream

    SciTech Connect

    Black, M.C.; Belin, J.I.

    1998-12-31

    Freshwater bivalves have been used extensively to monitor chemical accumulation in field exposures, although little information is available on the use of biomarker measurements in field exposures with bivalves. DNA strand breakage, growth rate, condition index and percentage tissue water were measured in freshwater Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) exposed in-situ in a stream that receives urban and industrial stormwater runoff and in a non-impacted reference stream. After 4 weeks exposure, DNA strand lengths in foot tissue from Trail Creek-exposed clams were significantly shorter than DNA from reference clams. These results suggest a reduction in DNA integrity in Trail Creek-exposed clams, possibly indicating exposure to genotoxic chemicals. No significant differences were observed in the growth rates of clams. However, a significant inverse relationship was detected between condition index and % tissue water for all clams. Furthermore, site-specific differences in percentage tissue water and condition indices were observed after 2 and 10 weeks exposure. For this study DNA strand breakage, condition indices, and tissue hydration appear to be more sensitive indicators of sublethal toxicity than growth.

  14. Management strategies to optimise sustainable clam ( Tapes philippinarum) harvests in Barbamarco Lagoon, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, C. M.; Hamilton, D. P.; Imberger, J.

    2009-01-01

    Barbamarco Lagoon is a small lagoon adjoining the Northern Adriatic Sea and is the site of a commercially valuable clam ( Tapes philippinarum) fishery. A three-dimensional (3D) coupled hydrodynamic-ecological model was applied to the lagoon with the objective of assessing impacts on clam food supply, commercial harvests and water quality of different clam rearing strategies, lagoon morphologies and flow regimes. Harvest and net growth to seeding ratios, total harvest value, clearance efficiencies and clam satiety were used to quantify the commercial success of different management strategies, while bottom dissolved oxygen concentrations were used as an indicator of ecosystem health. Increasing exchange with the Northern Adriatic Sea or increasing freshwater inputs into the lagoon improved clam food supply and increased both harvest production and ecosystem health in model simulations of the system. Results indicated that the high spatial and temporal variability of clam production and water quality responses must be considered for a holistic assessment of the outcomes of strategies in the context of ecological and production carrying capacity.

  15. Automated parasites detection in clams by transillumination imaging and pattern classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Miguel; Coelho, Pablo; Soto, Jose; Torres, Sergio; Sbarbaro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Quality control of clams considers the detection of foreign objects like shell pieces, sand and even parasites. Particularly, Mulinia edulis clams are susceptible to have a parasite infection caused by the isopoda Edotea magellanica, which represents a serious commercial problem commonly addressed by manual inspection. In this work a machine vision system capable of automatically detect the parasite using a clam image is presented. The parasite visualization inside the clam is achieved by an optoelectronic imaging system based on an transillumination technique. Furthermore, automatic parasite detection in the clam's image is accomplished by a pattern recognition system designed to quantitatively describe parasite candidate zones. The extracted features are used to predict the parasite presence by means of a binary decision tree classifier. A real sample dataset of more than 155000 patterns of parasite candidate zones was generated using 190 shell-off cooked clams from the Chilean south pacific coasts. This data collection was used to train a test the classifier using cross-validation. Primary results have shown a mean parasite detection rate of 85% and a mean total correct classification of 87%, which represent a substantive improvement to the existing solutions.

  16. Occurrence of domoic acid in Washington state razor clams (Siliqua patula) during 1991-1993.

    PubMed

    Wekell, J C; Gauglitz, E J; Barnett, H J; Hatfield, C L; Simons, D; Ayres, D

    1994-01-01

    The presence of domoic acid in aquatic species was reported for the first time in the United States in the late summer of 1991 in Monterey Bay, California. By October of 1991, domoic acid was found in razor clams (Siliqua patula) and in the viscera of Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) along the coasts of Washington and Oregon. In response to this outbreak, the National Marine Fisheries Service, in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Fisheries began analysis of Washington State razor clams for the period from November 1991 to June 1993. This survey indicated that domoic acid levels in the edible portion of the razor clams peaked in December of 1991 (average of all Washington state coastal sites: 106 ppm) and followed a slow decline to the present day low levels (< 5 ppm). Sixteen months after the maximum level, domoic acid has not completely disappeared from the razor clams from the Washington State beaches. Unlike mussels (Mytilus edulis), where the toxin is found only in the viscera, domoic acid distributes itself throughout the various body parts of the razor clam. The highest concentration occurs in the foot or "digger" and the lowest in the siphon or "neck." The concentration of domoic acid in the razor clam foot reached a high of 230 ppm. PMID:7952944

  17. Hunting the Coolest Substellar Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, Ben; Rodriguez, David; Melis, Carl; Song, Inseok; Vican, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Brown dwarfs with effective surface temperatures of 500 K or cooler have recently been identified as a new spectral class: Y-dwarfs. Some Y-dwarfs have now been discovered, most with the WISE all sky survey. Additional Y-dwarfs may be found by searching for widely separated companions to old stars given that the lowest mass substellar objects discovered in previous imaging surveys tend to have large semi?major axes, typically hundreds of AU. To expand the sample of the coolest brown dwarfs, we propose to re?observe some of our Spitzer Cycle 7 fields that targeted nearby old (ages >2 Gyr) white dwarfs. We have identified a number of 3.6-micron dropouts that could represent cold Y-dwarf companions. These second epoch observations are crucial to confirm these as co-moving substellar companions. As companions to white dwarfs, we will be able to determine the ages of any cool brown dwarfs we find and thus constrain their masses.

  18. Relative importance of burrow sediment and porewater to the accumulation of trace metals in the clam Amiantis umbonella.

    PubMed

    Tarique, Qaiser; Burger, Joanna; Reinfelder, John R

    2013-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the infaunal, facultative deposit-feeding clam Amiantis umbonella as a bioindicator of trace-metal contamination and the relative importance of clam burrow sediment and porewater to total accumulation in an urban/industrial coastal environment. Concentrations of eight trace metals (cadmium [Cd], chromium, copper, mercury [Hg], nickel, lead [Pb], vanadium, and zinc) were measured in the soft tissues of clams and in sediment and porewater from clam burrows along a 5-km transect from desalination/power plant discharges in inner Kuwait Bay. All metals had significantly greater concentrations in clams collected near the desalination/power plant discharges than from the reference site and exhibited decreasing trends with distance from the point source in clam soft tissues and burrow sediment and porewater. Concentrations of Hg (1-9 ppm [dry weight]) and the highest concentrations of Pb (3 ppm) and Cd (7 ppm) in clams from contaminated sites in Kuwait Bay were greater than human consumption limits. Metal concentrations in clams were correlated with those in burrow sediment and porewater across all sites and at sites closest to the point source but not within the reference site. The concentrations of all metals, except Pb, in clams from the contaminated sites were more highly correlated with those in clam burrow sediment than porewater. Concentrations of Pb in clam soft tissues were more strongly correlated with those in burrow porewater than sediment. These results indicate that A. umbonella is an excellent bioindicator of trace metal contamination and that sediment is an important source of contaminant metals to this infaunal clam; however, the source of each metal must be evaluated separately. PMID:23392587

  19. Functional alteration of cytochrome c oxidase by SURF1 mutations in Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pecina, Petr; Capková, Markéta; Chowdhury, Subir K R; Drahota, Zdenek; Dubot, Audrey; Vojtísková, Alena; Hansíková, Hana; Houst'ková, Hana; Zeman, Jirí; Godinot, Catherine; Houstek, Josef

    2003-09-01

    Subacute necrotising encephalomyopathy (Leigh syndrome) due to cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency is often caused by mutations in the SURF1 gene, encoding the Surf1 protein essential for COX assembly. We have investigated five patients with different SURF1 mutations resulting in the absence of Surf1 protein. All of them presented with severe and generalised COX defect. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis of cultured fibroblasts revealed 85% decrease of the normal-size COX complexes and significant accumulation of incomplete COX assemblies of 90-120 kDa. Spectrophotometric assay of COX activity showed a 70-90% decrease in lauryl maltoside (LM)-solubilised fibroblasts. In contrast, oxygen consumption analysis in whole cells revealed only a 13-31% decrease of COX activity, which was completely inhibited by detergent in patient cells but not in controls. In patient fibroblasts ADP-stimulated respiration was 50% decreased and cytofluorometry showed a significant decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential DeltaPsi(m) in state 4, as well as a 2.4-fold higher sensitivity of DeltaPsi(m) to uncoupler. We conclude that the absence of the Surf1 protein leads to the formation of incomplete COX complexes, which in situ maintain rather high electron-transport activity, while their H(+)-pumping is impaired. Enzyme inactivation by the detergent in patient cells indicates instability of incomplete COX assemblies. PMID:12943968

  20. Modeling surf zone tracer plumes: 1. Waves, mean currents, and low-frequency eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feddersen, Falk; Clark, David B.; Guza, R. T.

    2011-11-01

    A model that accurately simulates surf zone waves, mean currents, and low-frequency eddies is required to diagnose the mechanisms of surf zone tracer transport and dispersion. In this paper, a wave-resolving time-dependent Boussinesq model is compared with waves and currents observed during five surf zone dye release experiments. In a companion paper, Clark et al. (2011) compare a coupled tracer model to the dye plume observations. The Boussinesq model uses observed bathymetry and incident random, directionally spread waves. For all five releases, the model generally reproduces the observed cross-shore evolution of significant wave height, mean wave angle, bulk directional spread, mean alongshore current, and the frequency-dependent sea surface elevation spectra and directional moments. The largest errors are near the shoreline where the bathymetry is most uncertain. The model also reproduces the observed cross-shore structure of rotational velocities in the infragravity (0.004 < f < 0.03 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF) (0.001 < f < 0.004 Hz) bands, although the modeled VLF energy is 2-3 times too large. Similar to the observations, the dominant contributions to the modeled eddy-induced momentum flux are in the VLF band. These eddies are elliptical near the shoreline and circular in the mid surf zone. The model-data agreement for sea swell waves, low-frequency eddies, and mean currents suggests that the model is appropriate for simulating surf zone tracer transport and dispersion.

  1. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (south Atlantic): Hard clam. [Mercenaria mercenaria

    SciTech Connect

    Eversole, A.G.

    1987-08-01

    The hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, supports an important commercial fishery in the South Atlantic, averaging about 1 million kg of meats annually from 1979 to 1983. It also is an important constituent of estuarine systems throughout the region. Spawning occurs in the spring and the fall at 16 to 30/sup 0/C. Planktonic eggs and larvae are carried by water currents, and larvae set sometime after 6 days of age. Mortality is highest in egg and larval stages, the most sensitive part of the life cycle. Spat display gregarious setting behavior and appear to select sand over finer substrates. Highest densities of clams occur in sandy bottoms with shell. Crab predation is an important factor influencing the density and distribution of clams. Blue crabs and mud crabs appear to be the most important predators. Hard clams are infested by few parasites. Adult clams feed by filtering suspended particulate matter from the water. Growth of clams decreases with size and age. Growth occurs year-round with peaks in spring and fall. Growth of adult hard clams occurs at 9 to 31/sup 0/C and at 4 to 35 ppt (optima near 20/sup 0/C and 24 to 28 ppt). Hard clams mature in 2 years and reach commercial size in 3 years in the South Atlantic. Tight-fitting shells permit hard clams to survive poor water quality for short periods.

  2. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic): Softshell clam. [Mya arenaria

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, B.J.; Dillon, P.L.

    1986-08-01

    The softshell clam supports the third most valuable commercial clam fishery in the United States. Density is highest at depths of 3 to 4 m, temperatures less than 28/sup 0/C, and salinities greater than 3 ppt. Its near-shore habitat makes it easily threatened by pollution. Clam beds in some places have been closed because of contamination by bacteria. Softshell clams are more sensitive to oil pollution than are the other clams that share its habitat. The softshell clam spawns in spring (sometimes in early summer) and again in fall. In 36 to 48 h after fertilization, a pelagic veliger larva develops and persists for 2 to 6 weeks. Then it settles out of the plankton. It attaches to the substrate and can move and reattach itself. Eventually, it adopts the adult lifestyle and occupies a permanent burrow, usually in sandy bottom with less than 50% silt. Adult clams feed by filtering small particles from the water column. Predators of adult clams include crabs, fish, birds, and raccoons. The 24-h LC/sub 50/ values for summer-acclimated clams have been reported as 32.5 to 34.4/sup 0/C. Juveniles and adults can withstand long periods of anaerobiosis.

  3. Satellite dwarf galaxies in a hierarchical universe: the prevalence of dwarf-dwarf major mergers

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, Alis; Wetzel, Andrew; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea

    2014-10-20

    Mergers are a common phenomenon in hierarchical structure formation, especially for massive galaxies and clusters, but their importance for dwarf galaxies in the Local Group remains poorly understood. We investigate the frequency of major mergers between dwarf galaxies in the Local Group using the ELVIS suite of cosmological zoom-in dissipationless simulations of Milky Way- and M31-like host halos. We find that ∼10% of satellite dwarf galaxies with M {sub star} > 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} that are within the host virial radius experienced a major merger of stellar mass ratio closer than 0.1 since z = 1, with a lower fraction for lower mass dwarf galaxies. Recent merger remnants are biased toward larger radial distance and more recent virial infall times, because most recent mergers occurred shortly before crossing within the virial radius of the host halo. Satellite-satellite mergers also occur within the host halo after virial infall, catalyzed by the large fraction of dwarf galaxies that fell in as part of a group. The merger fraction doubles for dwarf galaxies outside of the host virial radius, so the most distant dwarf galaxies in the Local Group are the most likely to have experienced a recent major merger. We discuss the implications of these results on observable dwarf merger remnants, their star formation histories, the gas content of mergers, and massive black holes in dwarf galaxies.

  4. The Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies are the most numerous galaxies in the Universe, yet the driving forces in their evolution remain elusive. The proposed evolutionary link between dwarf irregular and dwarf elliptical/spheroidal galaxies is investigated using broad-band UBVR photometry obtained for a sample of 29 dwarf galaxies. The galaxies span a range of absolute B-band magnitude from -13.67 to -19.86 mag. Broad-band colors and Sérsic surface brightness profile fits are compared for the two morphological types. All optical parameters are statistically different between the two subsamples, as evidenced by the significance level of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic.Others have noted that dwarf ellipticals might have looked much like the currently observed dwarf irregulars in the past based on optical colors. An overlap between in the range of colors observed is noted for these targets, implying the possibility of an evolutionary link. A difference is noted between the two samples in the value of n (the power-law exponent determined from the Sérsic profile fitting), suggesting that the two main types of dwarf galaxy are structurally distinct. The differences in the structure of the stellar components would imply that dwarf irregulars do not evolve to become dwarf ellipticals in isolation, meaning that some sort of external interaction is required if the transformation is to occur. However, when the brightest dwarf elliptical targets are eliminated from the comparison, the two dwarf samples are much more similar in their values and range for the power-law exponent, which again suggests a possible evolutionary link. The environments of the galaxies are initially classified as either field or group/cluster, though no definitive environmental comparison is presented here.

  5. Etiology, pathogenesis and epizootiology of hematopoietic neoplasia in the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

    SciTech Connect

    Paquette, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies on the etiology of hematopoietic neoplasia (HN) in soft-shell clams, Mya arenaria, have been inconclusive. Petroleum-derived hydrocarbons, polychlorinated-biphenyls and a virus have all been implicated as causative agents. The isolation of 100 nm virus-like particles from neoplastic clams proved conclusively that the causative agent is a retrovirus. The virus can induce a neoplasia in non-neoplastic clams and similar virus particles can be re-isolated and induce neoplasia. The activities of the RT are temperature dependent, found at 6[degrees]C, but not at 25[degrees]C and 37[degrees]C. The incidence rate for neoplasia in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island was 7.7% and for combined other locations, 3.7% (26/699). HN was present in clams throughout the year at varying levels. The highest incidence occurred in October (11.5%); the lowest incidence in April (1.2%) and June (2.5%). The outcome of the disease depends on the water temperature and degree of severity of neoplasia in the clams. Death rate was greatest when water temperature was at 15[degrees]C (100%). High severity clams had the highest death rate (100%). Chronicity of persistent neoplasia occurred more at 10[degrees]C (19%) than at 6[degrees]C (15%) or 15[degrees]C (0%). Remission occurred only in low severity juvenile clams at either 6[degrees]C or 10[degrees]C. Neoplasia causes metabolic alteration in clams. Remission occurred only in low severity juvenile clams at either 6[degrees]C or 10[degrees]C. The time to remission was longer at 6[degrees]C than 10[degrees]C. Neoplasia causes metabolic alteration in clams. This shown by a significant increase in uric acid, asparatate transminase and triglycerides and a decrease in urea in the hemolymph. The cell membrane of neoplastic hemocytes also shows differences in their binding pattern to lectin than the normal hemocytes, indicating a change in cell surface glycoprotein probably induced by the retrovirus.

  6. Surf1, associated with Leigh syndrome in humans, is a heme-binding protein in bacterial oxidase biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Freya A; Hannappel, Achim; Anderka, Oliver; Ludwig, Bernd

    2009-09-18

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) relies on a large number of assembly factors, among them the transmembrane protein Surf1. The loss of human Surf1 function is associated with Leigh syndrome, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by severe COX deficiency. In the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, two homologous proteins, Surf1c and Surf1q, were identified, which we characterize in the present study. When coexpressed in Escherichia coli together with enzymes for heme a synthesis, the bacterial Surf1 proteins bind heme a in vivo. Using redox difference spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding of the heme cofactor to purified apo-Surf1c and apo-Surf1q is quantified: Each of the Paracoccus proteins binds heme a in a 1:1 stoichiometry and with Kd values in the submicromolar range. In addition, we identify a conserved histidine as a residue crucial for heme binding. Contrary to most earlier concepts, these data support a direct role of Surf1 in heme a cofactor insertion into COX subunit I by providing a protein-bound heme a pool. PMID:19625251

  7. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at opposite ends after threading it through an object, like a ring. If one person wiggles the string rapidly up and down, waves form in the string that move toward the person at the other end. The ring will "surf" these waves and move toward the other person as well. Try it! "Even with this major discovery, there are questions left to answer. The observations have made it abundantly clear that heavy particles like oxygen 'surf' on the waves, and there is also mounting evidence that waves are responsible for accelerating the hydrogen atoms, the most common constituent of the solar wind. Future observations are needed to establish this fact. Many other kinds of particles, such as helium (second most common) have never been observed in the accelerating part of the corona, and new observations are also needed to refine our understanding of how the waves interact with the solar wind as a whole," said Dr. Steven Cranmer of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, lead author of the research to be published in the Astrophysical Journal*. Nevertheless, SOHO has again been able to reveal another of the Sun's mysteries: "This is another triumph for SOHO, stealing a long-held secret from our Sun", said Dr Martin Huber, Head of ESA Space Science Department and co-investigator for UVCS. *Ref. Article by S.Cranmer, G.B. Field and J.L. Kohl on Astrophysical Journal ( June 20, Vol 518, p. 937-947) available on the web at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/journal/issues/ApJ/v518n2/39802/sc0.html

  8. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at opposite ends after threading it through an object, like a ring. If one person wiggles the string rapidly up and down, waves form in the string that move toward the person at the other end. The ring will "surf" these waves and move toward the other person as well. Try it! "Even with this major discovery, there are questions left to answer. The observations have made it abundantly clear that heavy particles like oxygen 'surf' on the waves, and there is also mounting evidence that waves are responsible for accelerating the hydrogen atoms, the most common constituent of the solar wind. Future observations are needed to establish this fact. Many other kinds of particles, such as helium (second most common) have never been observed in the accelerating part of the corona, and new observations are also needed to refine our understanding of how the waves interact with the solar wind as a whole," said Dr. Steven Cranmer of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, lead author of the research to be published in the Astrophysical Journal*. Nevertheless, SOHO has again been able to reveal another of the Sun's mysteries: "This is another triumph for SOHO, stealing a long-held secret from our Sun", said Dr Martin Huber, Head of ESA Space Science Department and co-investigator for UVCS. *Ref. Article by S.Cranmer, G.B. Field and J.L. Kohl on Astrophysical Journal ( June 20, Vol 518, p. 937-947) available on the web at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/ApJ/journal/issues/ApJ/v518n2/39802/sc0.html

  9. Kinematics of faint white dwarfs.

    PubMed

    Luyten, W J

    1978-10-01

    An analysis has been made for solar motion for 128 very faint white dwarfs of color class b or a. While about 40% of these stars may be high-velocity objects, it seems definitely indicated that the luminosity of all of them is considerably lower than that for the "normal" white dwarf of the same color. PMID:16592566

  10. White Dwarf Population Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybicka, M.; Krzeszowski, K.; Slowikowska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Villanova University White Dwarf Catalog (McCook & Sion 1999) contains almost 13 000 white dwarfs (WDs). Different WD types show different properties (e.g. Brightness, magnetic field). We present population wide statistical analysis of various WD properties. Analysis includes, but is not limited to e.g. distribution analysis and correlations.

  11. Cluster of Leptospirosis Acquired Through River Surfing in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Peter W; Aceto, Leonardo; Korach, Raphael; Marreros, Nelson; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre; Günthard, Huldrych F

    2015-09-01

    Background.  In Switzerland, leptospirosis is still considered as a travel-associated disease. After the surprising diagnosis of leptospirosis in a patient who was initially suspected as having primary human immunodeficiency virus infection, we recognized that acquisition of leptospirosis occurred through recreational activities and we identified additional affected individuals. Methods.  Detailed anamnesis, excluding occupational exposure, acquisition abroad, and pet contacts, enabled us to detect the source of infection and identify a cluster of leptospirosis. Convalescent sera testing was performed to confirm Leptospira infection. Microscopic agglutination tests were used to determine the infecting serovar. Results.  We identified a cluster of leptospirosis in young, previously healthy persons. Acquisition of leptospirosis was traced back to a surfing spot on a river in Switzerland (Reuss, Aargau). Clinical presentation was indistinct. Two of the 3 reported cases required hospitalization, and 1 case even suffered from meningitis. Serologic tests indicated infection with the serovar Grippotyphosa in all cases. With the exception of the case with meningitis, no antibiotics were administered, because leptospirosis was diagnosed after spontaneous resolution of most symptoms. Despite a prolonged period of convalescence in 2 cases, full recovery was achieved. Recent reports on beavers suffering from leptospirosis in this region underline the possible water-borne infection of the 3 cases and raise the question of potential wildlife reservoirs. Conclusions.  Insufficient awareness of caregivers, which may be promoted by the missing obligation to report human leptospirosis, combined with the multifaceted presentation of the disease result in significant underdiagnosis. More frequent consideration of leptospirosis as differential diagnosis is inevitable, particularly as veterinary data suggest re-emergence of the disease. PMID:26269796

  12. Cluster of Leptospirosis Acquired Through River Surfing in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Peter W.; Aceto, Leonardo; Korach, Raphael; Marreros, Nelson; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre; Günthard, Huldrych F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. In Switzerland, leptospirosis is still considered as a travel-associated disease. After the surprising diagnosis of leptospirosis in a patient who was initially suspected as having primary human immunodeficiency virus infection, we recognized that acquisition of leptospirosis occurred through recreational activities and we identified additional affected individuals. Methods. Detailed anamnesis, excluding occupational exposure, acquisition abroad, and pet contacts, enabled us to detect the source of infection and identify a cluster of leptospirosis. Convalescent sera testing was performed to confirm Leptospira infection. Microscopic agglutination tests were used to determine the infecting serovar. Results. We identified a cluster of leptospirosis in young, previously healthy persons. Acquisition of leptospirosis was traced back to a surfing spot on a river in Switzerland (Reuss, Aargau). Clinical presentation was indistinct. Two of the 3 reported cases required hospitalization, and 1 case even suffered from meningitis. Serologic tests indicated infection with the serovar Grippotyphosa in all cases. With the exception of the case with meningitis, no antibiotics were administered, because leptospirosis was diagnosed after spontaneous resolution of most symptoms. Despite a prolonged period of convalescence in 2 cases, full recovery was achieved. Recent reports on beavers suffering from leptospirosis in this region underline the possible water-borne infection of the 3 cases and raise the question of potential wildlife reservoirs. Conclusions. Insufficient awareness of caregivers, which may be promoted by the missing obligation to report human leptospirosis, combined with the multifaceted presentation of the disease result in significant underdiagnosis. More frequent consideration of leptospirosis as differential diagnosis is inevitable, particularly as veterinary data suggest re-emergence of the disease. PMID:26269796

  13. [Identification of the protein partners of the human nucleolar protein SURF6 in HeLa cells by GST pull-down assay].

    PubMed

    Kordiukova, M Iu; Polzikov, M A; Shishova, K V; Zatsepina, O V

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic proteins comprising the SURF6 protein family are evolutionary conservative and housekeeping proteins however, functional roles of human SURF6 have not been studied so far. To shed light to this question in the present work we applied GST pull-down assay and used two proteins fused with GST, namely human GST-SURF6 and the conservative C-terminal domain of mouse Surf6 that has 85% homology with the C-terminus of the human SURF6 conservative domain (GST-Surf6-dom), to identify SURF6-interacting proteins in human HeLa cells. The results obtained showed that GST-SURF6 interacts with several key nucleolar RNA processing factors (B23/nucleophosmin, nucleolin, EBP2), and also with the specific cofactor of RNA polymerase I, protein UBE These results are the first experimental evidences in favor of participation of the human SURF6 protein in ribosome biogenesis, including transcription of rDNA and processing of rRNAs. The same results were obtained, when GST-Surf6-dom was used to pull-down proteins in HeLa cells. In addition, the panel of the GST-Surf6-dom protein partners, which were identified by mass-spectrometry, points to putative interactions of human SURF6 with a number of nuclear and nucleolar, proteins of other functional groups, i.e. to the protein plurifunctionality. PMID:25898752

  14. Surfing in tortoises? Empirical signs of genetic structuring owing to range expansion

    PubMed Central

    Graciá, Eva; Botella, Francisco; Anadón, José Daniel; Edelaar, Pim; Harris, D. James; Giménez, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge about the genetic dynamics in range expansions originates from models, simulations and microcosm experiments that need to be corroborated by field data. Here, we report a neutral genetic pattern that matches the predictions of the genetic surfing theory. Genetic surfing occurs when repeated founding events and genetic drift act on the wave of advance of an expanding population, promoting strong spatial structure. In the range expansion of the tortoise Testudo graeca from North Africa to southeastern Spain, we found several genetic signatures consistent with surfing: a decrease of genetic diversity with distance from the initial founder area, clinal patterns in allele frequencies, rare African alleles which have become common at distal sites in the Spanish range, and stronger spatial differentiation in the expanded range than in the original one. Our results provide support for the theory that genetic drift can be an important force in shaping the genetic structure of expanding populations. PMID:23554278

  15. An improved image matching algorithm based on SURF and Delaunay TIN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan-ming; Cheng, Peng-gen; Chen, Xiao-yong; Zheng, Shou-zhu

    2015-12-01

    Image matching is one of the key technologies in the image processing. In order to increase its efficiency and precision, a new method for image matching which based on the improved SURF and Delaunay-TIN is proposed in this paper. Based on the original SURF algorithm, three constraint conditions, color invariant model, Delaunay-TIN, triangle similarity function and photography invariant are added into the original SURF model. With the proposed algorithm, the image color information is effectively retained and the erroneous matching rate of features is largely reduced. The experimental results shows that this proposed method has the characteristics of higher matching speed, uniform distribution of feature points to be matched, and higher correct matching rate than the original algorithm does.

  16. Brown dwarfs detections through microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranc, C.; Cassan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gravitational microlensing is known to be a powerful method to hunt for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Recently, several brown dwarfs companions to stars have been detected through microlensing, as well as brown dwarfs binaries. We present the discovery of a new 40 M_{J} brown dwarf orbiting a K-dwarf at 4 AU, located at 4 kpc from the Earth. Besides using the standard photometric light curves gathered from different round-the-world observatories, its characterization involved high-resolution adaptative optics measurements from NaCo at VLT which allowed to break the degeneracies between the physical parameters and provide the exact mass and projected separation of the system.

  17. Testing gravity using dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    Generic scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict deviations from Newtonian physics inside astrophysical bodies. In this paper, we point out that low mass stellar objects, red and brown dwarf stars, are excellent probes of these theories. We calculate two important and potentially observable quantities: the radius of brown dwarfs and the minimum mass for hydrogen burning in red dwarfs. The brown dwarf radius can differ significantly from the general relativity prediction, and upcoming surveys that probe the mass-radius relation for stars with masses dwarf stars. This places a new and extremely stringent constraint on the parameters that appear in the effective field theory of dark energy and rules out several well-studied dark energy models.

  18. M Dwarf Flares: Exoplanet Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, John; Kowalski, Adam; Schmidt, Sarah; Hawley, Suzanne; Kundurthy, Praveen

    2009-08-01

    Low mass M dwarfs are attractive stars for exoplanet transit research as their low luminosities and small stellar radii could enable detection of super-Earths residing in their habitable zones using existing technology. Future IR facilities such as JWST will undoubtedly attempt to characterize these systems through detailed transit observations. M dwarfs can exhibit highly energetic flare events which cause <0.1 to 6.0 magnitude flux enhancements in the optical U-band, which is significantly higher than the predicted transit depths of super- Earths (~0.005 magnitude flux decrease). While Solar flares have been observed to cause IR continuum enhancements (Xu et al 2006); surprisingly, it is not known whether energetic flares associated with M dwarfs similarly induce IR variability. We propose to contemporaneously monitor the optical & IR flux of two M dwarfs known to regularly flare, to determine what effect flares could have on future IR characterization studies of M dwarf exoplanets.

  19. Structure of Manila Clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) Microbiota at the Organ Scale in Contrasting Sets of Individuals.

    PubMed

    Meisterhans, Guillaume; Raymond, Natalie; Girault, Emilie; Lambert, Christophe; Bourrasseau, Line; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Garabetian, Frédéric; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Marine invertebrate microbiota has a key function in host physiology and health. To date, knowledge about bivalve microbiota is poorly documented except public health concerns. This study used a molecular approach to characterize the microbiota associated with the bivalve Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) by determining (1) the difference among organs either or not under the influence of host habitat, (2) small-scale variability of microbiota, and (3) the experimental response of the Manila clam microbiota submitted to different lateral transmissions. These questions were investigated by sampling two groups of individuals living in contrasting habitats and carrying out a transplant experiment. Manila clam microbiota (i.e., bacterial community structure) was determined at organ-scale (gills, gut, and a pool of remaining tissues) by capillary electrophoresis DNA fingerprinting (CE fingerprinting). The Manila clam microbiota structure differed among organs indicating a selection of Manila clam microbiota at organ scale. Habitat strongly influenced gill and gut microbiota. In contrast, microbiota associated with remaining tissues was similar between group individuals suggesting that these communities are mostly autochthonous, i.e., Manila clam specific. Transplant experiment showed that improving living condition did not induce any change in microbiota associated with remaining tissues. In contrast, the reduction in individual habitat quality led to individuals in declining health as strongly suggested by the increase in phagocytosis activity and decrease in condition index together with the change in internal organ microbiota. This study provides a first description of the Manila clam holobiont which can withstand disturbance and respond opportunistically to improved environmental conditions. PMID:26311127

  20. The after-effects of hypoxia exposure on the clam Ruditapes philippinarum in Omaehama beach, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuki, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Ryoichi; Matsushige, Maya; Saitoh, Azusa; Otani, Sosuke; Ishida, Tatsunori

    2013-01-01

    A number of reports describe the impact of hypoxic conditions on the manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, but few deal with the after-effects of hypoxia on this clam species. Exposure experiments were carried out on the manila clam under conditions of low dissolved oxygen (DO, 0.5 mg/L). In the first exposure experiment (i.e., 3 days of hypoxia), a substantial change in mortality rate, glycogen content, and clearance rate was not observed in the period following the hypoxia. However, in the second exposure experiment (i.e., an additional 3 days of hypoxia following recovery from the first exposure), the mortality rate was significantly increased relative to that of the first exposure experiment, and glycogen content underwent a long-term decline. At the end of the experimental period, subsequent to the 2 exposures to hypoxia, the clearance rate had decreased until it was 77% of that of the normal manila clams unexposed to hypoxia. Moreover, the clearance rate was unable to recover following the second exposure. Thus, when the manila clams were repeatedly exposed to hypoxic conditions, the surviving individuals showed a residual disability, as reflected in the increased mortality and unrecovered clearance capacity. Afterward, the after-effects of hypoxia exposure on the clearance function of the manila clams in Omaehama beach, Japan, were assessed using the experimental results and the observed data. An examination of the effects of the residual disability showed a more extensive decrease in filtering capacity when a formula accounting for residual disability was used rather than a standard one. The clearance volume using our new formula was 75% of that of a standard formula. The formula equations that have been used up until now have only evaluated whether the manila clams die. However, the surviving individuals have a residual disability, and our formula indicates this effect would cause a further decline in the purification function of the beach.

  1. Anaerobic methanotrophic community of a 5346-m-deep vesicomyid clam colony in the Japan Trench.

    PubMed

    Felden, J; Ruff, S E; Ertefai, T; Inagaki, F; Hinrichs, K-U; Wenzhöfer, F

    2014-05-01

    Vesicomyidae clams harbor sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts and are typical members of cold seep communities where active venting of fluids and gases takes place. We investigated the central biogeochemical processes that supported a vesicomyid clam colony as part of a locally restricted seep community in the Japan Trench at 5346 m water depth, one of the deepest seep settings studied to date. An integrated approach of biogeochemical and molecular ecological techniques was used combining in situ and ex situ measurements. In sediment of the clam colony, low sulfate reduction rates (maximum 128 nmol mL(-1) day(-1)) were coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane. They were observed over a depth range of 15 cm, caused by active transport of sulfate due to bioturbation of the vesicomyid clams. A distinct separation between the seep and the surrounding seafloor was shown by steep horizontal geochemical gradients and pronounced microbial community shifts. The sediment below the clam colony was dominated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2c) and sulfate-reducing Desulfobulbaceae (SEEP-SRB-3, SEEP-SRB-4). Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria were not detected in the sediment, and the oxidation of sulfide seemed to be carried out chemolithoautotrophically by Sulfurovum species. Thus, major redox processes were mediated by distinct subgroups of seep-related microorganisms that might have been selected by this specific abyssal seep environment. Fluid flow and microbial activity were low but sufficient to support the clam community over decades and to build up high biomasses. Hence, the clams and their microbial communities adapted successfully to a low-energy regime and may represent widespread chemosynthetic communities in the Japan Trench. In this regard, they contributed to the restricted deep-sea trench biodiversity as well as to the organic carbon availability, also for non-seep organisms, in such oligotrophic benthic environment of the dark deep ocean. PMID:24593671

  2. Anaerobic methanotrophic community of a 5346-m-deep vesicomyid clam colony in the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Felden, J; Ruff, S E; Ertefai, T; Inagaki, F; Hinrichs, K-U; Wenzhöfer, F

    2014-01-01

    Vesicomyidae clams harbor sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts and are typical members of cold seep communities where active venting of fluids and gases takes place. We investigated the central biogeochemical processes that supported a vesicomyid clam colony as part of a locally restricted seep community in the Japan Trench at 5346 m water depth, one of the deepest seep settings studied to date. An integrated approach of biogeochemical and molecular ecological techniques was used combining in situ and ex situ measurements. In sediment of the clam colony, low sulfate reduction rates (maximum 128 nmol mL−1 day−1) were coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of methane. They were observed over a depth range of 15 cm, caused by active transport of sulfate due to bioturbation of the vesicomyid clams. A distinct separation between the seep and the surrounding seafloor was shown by steep horizontal geochemical gradients and pronounced microbial community shifts. The sediment below the clam colony was dominated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2c) and sulfate-reducing Desulfobulbaceae (SEEP-SRB-3, SEEP-SRB-4). Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria were not detected in the sediment, and the oxidation of sulfide seemed to be carried out chemolithoautotrophically by Sulfurovum species. Thus, major redox processes were mediated by distinct subgroups of seep-related microorganisms that might have been selected by this specific abyssal seep environment. Fluid flow and microbial activity were low but sufficient to support the clam community over decades and to build up high biomasses. Hence, the clams and their microbial communities adapted successfully to a low-energy regime and may represent widespread chemosynthetic communities in the Japan Trench. In this regard, they contributed to the restricted deep-sea trench biodiversity as well as to the organic carbon availability, also for non-seep organisms, in such oligotrophic benthic environment of the dark deep ocean. PMID:24593671

  3. Seeing Baby Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version

    The unique ultraviolet vision of NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer reveals, for the first time, dwarf galaxies forming out of nothing more than pristine gas likely leftover from the early universe. Dwarf galaxies are relatively small collections of stars that often orbit around larger galaxies like our Milky Way.

    The forming dwarf galaxies shine in the far ultraviolet spectrum, rendered as blue in the call-out on the right hand side of this image. Near ultraviolet light, also obtained by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, is displayed in green, and visible light from the blue part of the spectrum here is represented by red. The clumps (in circles) are distinctively blue, indicating they are primarily detected in far ultraviolet light.

    The faint blue overlay traces the outline of the Leo Ring, a huge cloud of hydrogen and helium that orbits around two massive galaxies in the constellation Leo (left panel). The cloud is thought likely to be a primordial object, an ancient remnant of material that has remained relatively unchanged since the very earliest days of the universe. Identified about 25 years ago by radio waves, the ring cannot be seen in visible light.

    Only a portion of the Leo Ring has been imaged in the ultraviolet, but this section contains the telltale ultraviolet signature of recent massive star formation within this ring of pristine gas. Astronomers have previously only seen dwarf galaxies form out of gas that has already been cycled through a galaxy and enriched with metals elements heavier than helium produced as stars evolve.

    The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md. The Leo Ring visible image (left) represents the survey's blue, red, and infrared bands with the colors blue, green, and red. The overlay indicating the location of hydrogen gas in the Leo Ring is based on observations made at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico.

  4. Barley yellow dwarf viruses.

    PubMed

    Miller, W A; Rasochová, L

    1997-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf viruses represent one of the most economically important and ubiquitous groups of plant viruses. This review focuses primarily on four research areas in which progress has been most rapid. These include (a) evidence supporting reclassification of BYDVs into two genera; (b) elucidation of gene function and novel mechanisms controlling gene expression; (c) initial forays into understanding the complex interactions between BYDV virions and their aphid vectors; and (d) replication of a BYDV satellite RNA. Economic losses, symptomatology, and means of control of BYD are also discussed. PMID:15012520

  5. Dwarfs in Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This false-color mosaic of the central region of the Coma cluster combines infrared and visible-light images to reveal thousands of faint objects (green). Follow-up observations showed that many of these objects, which appear here as faint green smudges, are dwarf galaxies belonging to the cluster. Two large elliptical galaxies, NGC 4889 and NGC 4874, dominate the cluster's center. The mosaic combines visible-light data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (color coded blue) with long- and short-wavelength infrared views (red and green, respectively) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  6. Complex IV-deficient Surf1(-/-) mice initiate mitochondrial stress responses.

    PubMed

    Pulliam, Daniel A; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Liu, Yuhong; Hill, Shauna; Lin, Ai-Ling; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Shi, Yun; Sloane, Lauren; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-09-01

    Mutations in SURF1 (surfeit locus protein 1) COX (cytochrome c oxidase) assembly protein are associated with Leigh's syndrome, a human mitochondrial disorder that manifests as severe mitochondrial phenotypes and early lethality. In contrast, mice lacking the SURF1 protein (Surf1-/-) are viable and were previously shown to have enhanced longevity and a greater than 50% reduction in COX activity. We measured mitochondrial function in heart and skeletal muscle, and despite the significant reduction in COX activity, we found little or no difference in ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation, membrane potential, ATP production or respiration in isolated mitochondria from Surf1-/- mice compared with wild-type. However, blood lactate levels were elevated and Surf1-/- mice had reduced running endurance, suggesting compromised mitochondrial energy metabolism in vivo. Decreased COX activity in Surf1-/- mice is associated with increased markers of mitochondrial biogenesis [PGC-1α (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α) and VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel)] in both heart and skeletal muscle. Although mitochondrial biogenesis is a common response in the two tissues, skeletal muscle has an up-regulation of the UPRMT (mitochondrial unfolded protein response) and heart exhibits induction of the Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2) antioxidant response pathway. These data are the first to show induction of the UPRMT in a mammalian model of decreased COX activity. In addition, the results of the present study suggest that impaired mitochondrial function can lead to induction of mitochondrial stress pathways to confer protective effects on cellular homoeostasis. PMID:24911525

  7. A spatially resolved model of seasonal variations in phytoplankton and clam ( Tapes philippinarum) biomass in Barbamarco Lagoon, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, C. M.; Hamilton, D. P.; Hipsey, M. R.; Imberger, J.

    2008-08-01

    Barbamarco Lagoon (area = 7 km 2) is in the Po River Delta, adjoining the Northern Adriatic Sea, and supports a commercially valuable clam ( Tapes philippinarum) fishery. This study investigated interactions of the lagoon with adjacent coastal waters and inland riverine inputs by modelling both the lagoon and the Northern Adriatic Sea, using a coupled three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic-ecological model (ELCOM-CAEDYM) adapted to include the clam population. The clam model accounted for carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) biomass in the benthos through parameterisations for filtration, excretion, egestion, respiration, mortality, and harvesting. Multiple clam size classes were included in a new population dynamics sub-model. Output from the coupled model was validated against hydrodynamic and water quality data from intensive field sampling and routine monitoring. Time scales of tidal flushing, primary production and clam grazing were investigated with the model to demonstrate that food supply to clam populations is dominated by phytoplankton inputs from the Northern Adriatic Sea. Effects of clam cultivation on nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton biomass in Barbamarco Lagoon were primarily localised, with strong tidal flushing minimising impacts of clam filtration on lagoon-wide nutrient concentrations at current clam stocking levels. Clam populations were found to alter the cycling of nutrients in the system, causing the lagoon to become a net sink for particulate organic matter and to export dissolved organic matter to the adjacent sea via tidal flushing. Ecosystem health and sensitivity of nutrient cycles to clam cultivation are important considerations for the long term sustainable management and potential expansion of the fishery.

  8. Registration of cardiac magnetic resonance images using SURF points and matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Braian; Atehortúa, Angélica; Corredor, Germán.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of the heartbeat is an useful tool to detect and diagnose some pathologies. However, this process represents a challenge because the heart is a moving organ inside a moving body, so that, either similar regions are hard to identify or some regions appear and disappear constantly. This article presents a reconstruction method of the right ventricle using SURF points in irregular regions. The SURF points, invariant to image scale and rotation, provide robust features of a right ventricle slice that can then be traced to the other slices. By using such points and then, using a nonrigid registration, it possible to perform a volumetrical reconstruction of these images.

  9. Leigh Syndrome with COX deficiency and SURF1 gene mutations: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta; Bruno, Claudio; Di Rocco, Maja; Calvi, Angela; Pessagno, Alice; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the nuclear SURF1 gene are specifically associated with cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient Leigh syndrome. MR imaging abnormalities in three children with this condition involved the subthalamic nuclei, medulla, inferior cerebellar peduncles, and substantia nigra in all cases. The dentate nuclei and central tegmental tracts were involved in two cases each (all instances), and the putamina, interpeduncular nucleus, and pallido-cortical-nigro-cortical tracts in one. MR imaging pattern recognition can suggest an underlying COX deficiency and should prompt investigators to search for SURF1 gene mutations. PMID:12812953

  10. SURF1 gene mutations in three cases with Leigh syndrome and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moslemi, A-R; Tulinius, M; Darin, N; Aman, P; Holme, E; Oldfors, A

    2003-10-14

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is one of the most frequent forms of mitochondrial disease in infancy and childhood. Mutations in SURF1 have been shown to be an important cause of LS with cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency. The authors have identified four pathogenic mutations including a novel, in-frame, 15-bp tandem duplication (806-820) in exon 8 and a novel 751+1G>A splice site mutation in SURF1 in three cases of LS with COX deficiency. PMID:14557577

  11. SURF: Taking Sustainable Remediation from Concept to Standard Operating Procedure (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. M.; Wice, R. B.; Torrens, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade, many sectors of industrialized society have been rethinking behavior and re-engineering practices to reduce consumption of energy and natural resources. During this time, green and sustainable remediation (GSR) has evolved from conceptual discussions to standard operating procedure for many environmental remediation practitioners. Government agencies and private sector entities have incorporated GSR metrics into their performance criteria and contracting documents. One of the early think tanks for the development of GSR was the Sustainable Remediation Forum (SURF). SURF brings together representatives of government, industry, consultancy, and academia to parse the means and ends of incorporating societal and economic considerations into environmental cleanup projects. Faced with decades-old treatment programs with high energy outputs and no endpoints in sight, a small group of individuals published the institutional knowledge gathered in two years of ad hoc meetings into a 2009 White Paper on sustainable remediation drivers, practices, objectives, and case studies. Since then, SURF has expanded on those introductory topics, publishing its Framework for Integrating Sustainability into Remediation Projects, Guidance for Performing Footprint Analyses and Life-Cycle Assessments for the Remediation Industry, a compendium of metrics, and a call to improve the integration of land remediation and reuse. SURF's research and members have also been instrumental in the development of additional guidance through ASTM International and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council. SURF's current efforts focus on water reuse, the international perspective on GSR (continuing the conversations that were the basis of SURF's December 2012 meeting at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC), and ways to capture and evaluate the societal benefits of site remediation. SURF also promotes and supports student chapters at universities across the US, encouraging the incorporation of sustainability concepts into environmental science and engineering in undergraduate curricula and graduate research, and student participation at professional conferences. This presentation will provide an overview of the evolution of GSR to-date and a history of SURF's technical and outreach work. Examples will be provided--using both qualitative and quantitative metrics--that document and support the benefits of GSR.

  12. Infrared Colors of Dwarf-Dwarf Galaxy Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Sandra; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Johnson, Kelsey; Patton, Dave; Kallivayalil, Nitya

    2015-10-01

    We request Spitzer Warm Mission IRAC Channel 1 & 2 imaging for a sample of 60 isolated dwarf galaxy pairs as a key component of a larger, multi-wavelength effort to understand the role low-mass mergers play in galaxy evolution. A systematic study of dwarf-dwarf mergers has never been done, and we wish to characterize the impact such interactions have on fueling star formation in the nearby universe. The Spitzer imaging proposed here will allow us to determine the extent to which the 3.6 and 4.5 mum bands are dominated by stellar light and investigate a) the extent to which interacting pairs show IR excess and b) whether the excess is related to the pair separation. Second, we will use this IR photometry to constrain the processes contributing to the observed color excess and scatter in each system. We will take advantage of the wealth of observations available in the Spitzer Heritage Archive for 'normal' non-interacting dwarfs by comparing the stellar populations of those dwarfs with the likely interacting dwarfs in our sample. Ultimately, we can combine the Spitzer imaging proposed here with our current, ongoing efforts to obtain groundbased optical photometry to model the star formation histories of these dwarfs and to help constrain the timescales and impact dwarf-dwarf mergers have on fueling star formation. The sensitivity and resolution offered by Spitzer are necessary to determine the dust properties of these interacting systems, and how these properties vary as a function of pair separation, mass ratio, and gas fraction.

  13. Seasonal variation of metals in seawater, sediment, and Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum from China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqiang; Yang, Feng; Wang, Yuan; Huo, Zhongming; Yan, Xiwu

    2013-06-01

    Concentrations of trace metals (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg, and As) were determined for the first time in seawater, sediment, and Manila clam from Deer Island, Liaoning Province, China. The seawater, sediment, and clam samples were collected seasonally at three clam farming sites around Deer Island during 2010-2011. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg, and As in the seawater samples were 4.16, 0.72, 5.88, 0.45, 2.51, 0.03, and 1.02 μg/l, respectively. The seasonal variations of trace metals in seawater showed a significant difference in the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Hg, and As among seasons. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg, and As in the sediment samples were 6.43, 13.80, 53.08, 1.10, 36.40, 0.05, and 4.78 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. Trace metal concentrations in sediment seasonally varied significantly except for Cd and Hg. The average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Hg, and As in the clam samples were 11.28, 0.61, 92.50, 0.58, 3.98, 0.03, and 1.98 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Cr, and As in Manila clam showed marked seasonal fluctuations with significant difference. Cu and Zn were the metals with the highest mean biosediment accumulation factor values in Manila clam. Besides, significant correlations for the concentrations of Cu and Zn relative to their concentrations in sediment were also found. Such differences in regression analyzes may be explained by differential bioaccumulation of essential and xenobiotic metals. Concentrations of trace metals in Manila clam did not exceed the maximum established regulatory concentrations for human consumption. Moreover, the calculations revealed that the estimated daily intake values for the examined clam samples were below the internationally accepted dietary guidelines and the calculated hazard quotient values were well less than 1, thus strongly indicating that health risk associated with the intake studied metals through the consumption of Manila clam from Deer Island was absent. PMID:23412810

  14. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the oldest stars puts astronomers within arm's reach of the universe's age.

    Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 made the observations from January through April 2001. These optical observations were combined to create the above images. Spectral data were also taken. M4 is 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Scorpius.

    The full press release on the latest findings is online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/pr.html .

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between the European Space Agency and NASA. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA.

  15. Impediment to Symbiosis Establishment between Giant Clams and Symbiodinium Algae Due to Sterilization of Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment (“symbiosis rate”) is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds. PMID:23613802

  16. Infection by gymnophallid metacercariae enhances predation mortality of SW Atlantic stout razor clam Tagelus plebeius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addino, Mariana; Lomovasky, Betina J.; Cremonte, Florencia; Iribarne, Oscar

    2010-02-01

    Parasite life cycles are frequently completed in different hosts, thus the parasites have its life cycle overlapped to natural trophic webs. The family Gymnophallidae (Class: Trematoda; Subclass: Digenea) includes digenetic parasites whose larval stages occur on bivalves and may affect bivalve predation by the final host of these parasites. In this work we evaluated: (a) if individuals of the razor clam Tagelus plebeius with higher parasite intensity suffer higher predation by the oystercatcher Haematopus palliatus and, (b) if there is any effect of parasite intensity on burrowing and escape behaviours of these razor clams which may enhance exposure to predators. Field experiments (oystercatcher exclusion vs. open access) showed that clams with higher parasite intensity support higher predation by oystercatchers, which suggests a higher consumption of more parasitized clams and thus, a more successful reproduction of parasites linked to the intensity of infection. However, clam burrowing and escape behaviours did not show differences related to different parasite intensity, suggesting that the commonly believed mechanisms are not responsible in this case.

  17. Depletion of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts from Contaminated Sewage by Using Freshwater Benthic Pearl Clams (Hyriopsis schlegeli)

    PubMed Central

    Yagita, Kenji; Izumiyama, Shinji; Endo, Takuro; Itoh, Yasoo

    2012-01-01

    The freshwater benthic pearl clam, Hyriopsis schlegeli, was experimentally exposed to Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, and it was verified that the oocysts were eliminated predominantly via the fecal route, retaining their ability to infect cultured cells (HCT-8). The total fecal oocyst elimination rate was more than 90% within 5 days after exposure to the oocysts. H. schlegeli was able to survive in the final settling pond of a sewage plant for long periods, as confirmed by its pearl production. In the light of these findings, the clam was placed in the final settling pond in a trial to test its long-term efficacy in depleting oocysts contaminating the pond water. The number of clams placed was set to ensure a theoretical oocyst removal rate of around 50%, and the turbidity and the density of feed microbes in the overflow trough water of the pond were about 35% and 40 to 60% lower, respectively, than in the control water throughout the year. It was found that the clam feces containing oocysts were sufficiently heavy for them to settle to the bottom of the pond, despite the upward water flow. From these results, we concluded that efficient depletion of oocysts in the sewage water of small or midscale sewage treatment plants can be achieved by appropriate placement of H. schlegeli clams. PMID:22904053

  18. Effects of copper on adult and early life stages of the freshwater clam, Corbicula manilensis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Knezovich, J.P.; Rice, D.W. Jr.

    1981-09-01

    The copper sensitivity of adult and larval stages of the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis was evaluated. In addition, copper concentrations in adult clams exposed for 4 to 10 wks to copper in a high-volume, flow-through bioassay are determined. The response of these clams to copper depended on life stage. Copper sensitivity of larvae decreased markedly in successive developmental stages. The LC50/sub 24/s of veliger and juvenile larve were 28 and 600 ..mu..g Cu/L, respectively. The mortality of trochophore larvae exposed to 10 ..mu..g Cu/L for 1 h was 91.5%. The sensitivity to copper decreased with the amount of larval shell deposition. Adult clams were resistant to copper; the LC50/sub 96/ was greater than 2600 ..mu..g Cu/L. By comparison the incipient concentration (ILC) was low - less than 10 ..mu..g Cu/L. Adult clams accumulated more copper as copper concentrations in the water increased. Evidence for copper loss near or at death was obtained.

  19. Hydrocarbon concentrations in sediments and clams (Rangia cuneata) in Laguna de Pom, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Legorreta, T.; Gold-Bouchot, G.; Zapata-Perez, O.

    1994-01-01

    Laguna de Pom is a coastal lagoon within the Laguna de Terminos system in southern Gulf of Mexico. It belongs to the Grijalva-Usumacinta basin, and is located between 18{degrees} 33{prime} and 18{degrees} 38{prime} north latitude and 92{degrees} 01{prime} and 92{degrees} 14{prime} west longitude, in the Coastal Plain physiographic Province of the Gulf. It is ellipsoidal and approximately 10 km long, with a surface area of 5,200 ha and a mean depth of 1.5 m. Water salinity and temperature ranges are 0 to 13 {per_thousand} and 25{degrees} to 31{degrees}C, respectively. Benthic macrofauna is dominated by bivalves such as the clams Rangia cuneata, R. flexuosa, and Polymesoda carolineana. These clams provide the basis of an artisanal fishery, which is the main economic activity in the region. The presence of several oil-processing facilities around the lagoon is very conspicuous, which together with decreasing yields has created social conflicts, with the fishermen blaming the mexican state oil company (PEMEX) for the decrease in the clam population. This work aims to determine if the concentration of hydrocarbons in the clams (R. cuneata) and sediments of Laguna de Pom are responsible for the declining clam fishery. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Dynamics and control of the Asiatic clam in the New River, Virginia. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Cherry, D.S.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.; Graney, R.L.; Cairns, J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, has invaded the New River at the rate of 9 miles a year from the Kanawha River, which enters downstream from the Glen Lyn coal-powered generating plant in Virginia. During the period of investigation, October 1976-September 1978, clams were more numerous in the vicinity of the thermal discharge of the plant than they were in unheated waters, and their population fell sharply during the winter months, when the water temperature dropped to approximately 2C. The temperature (35C) of the heated discharge water in late summer did not adversely affect the clam. High mortality occurred at temperatures greater or equal to 36C in laboratory thermal tolerance studies. The clam proved to be highly resistant to the conventional biocidal practice of intermittent chlorination and to exposure to heavy metals in both static and artificial stream bioassays. Copper was more toxic than either zinc or a combination of zinc and copper. Potassium was not an effective biocidal agent at low concentrations (less than 100 mg/l). Measurements of 42 elements in water, sediment, clam shell, and visceral tissue revealed that Corbicula was an efficient accumulator of many elements.

  1. Continuous water quality monitoring for the hard clam industry in Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, Derk C; Heuberger, David; Sturmer, Leslie N; Baker, Shirley M

    2009-01-01

    In 2000, Florida's fast-growing hard clam aquaculture industry became eligible for federal agricultural crop insurance through the US Department of Agriculture, but the responsibility for identifying the cause of mortality remained with the grower. Here we describe the continuous water quality monitoring system used to monitor hard clam aquaculture areas in Florida and show examples of the data collected with the system. Systems recording temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, water depth, turbidity and chlorophyll at 30 min intervals were installed at 10 aquaculture lease areas along Florida's Gulf and Atlantic coasts. Six of these systems sent data in real-time to a public website, and all 10 systems provided data for web-accessible archives. The systems documented environmental conditions that could negatively impact clam survival and productivity and identified biologically relevant water quality differences among clam aquaculture areas. Both the real-time and archived data were used widely by clam growers and nursery managers to make management decisions and in filing crop loss insurance claims. While the systems were labor and time intensive, we recommend adjustments that could reduce costs and staff time requirements. PMID:18320336

  2. Impediment to symbiosis establishment between giant clams and Symbiodinium algae due to sterilization of seawater.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Takeo; Yamada, Hideaki; Inoue, Ken; Iwai, Kenji; Hatta, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    To survive the juvenile stage, giant clam juveniles need to establish a symbiotic relationship with the microalgae Symbiodinium occurring in the environment. The percentage of giant clam juveniles succeeding in symbiosis establishment ("symbiosis rate") is often low, which is problematic for seed producers. We investigated how and why symbiosis rates vary, depending on whether giant clam seeds are continuously reared in UV treated or non treated seawater. Results repeatedly demonstrated that symbiosis rates were lower for UV treated seawater than for non treated seawater. Symbiosis rates were also lower for autoclaved seawater and 0.2-µm filtered seawater than for non treated seawater. The decreased symbiosis rates in various sterilized seawater suggest the possibility that some factors helping symbiosis establishment in natural seawater are weakened owing to sterilization. The possible factors include vitality of giant clam seeds, since additional experiments revealed that survival rates of seeds reared alone without Symbiodinium were lower in sterilized seawater than in non treated seawater. In conclusion, UV treatment of seawater was found to lead to decreased symbiosis rates, which is due possibly to some adverse effects common to the various sterilization techniques and relates to the vitality of the giant clam seeds. PMID:23613802

  3. PROPERTIES OF THE COOLEST DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    SAUMON, DIDIER; LEGGETT, SANDY K.; FREEDMAN, RICHARD S.; GEBALLE, THOMAS R.; GOLIMOWSKI, DAVID A.; LODIEU, NICOLAS; MARLEY, MARK S.; STEPHENS, DENISE; PINFIELD, DAVID J.; WARREN, STEPHEN J.

    2007-01-18

    Eleven years after the discovery of the first T dwarf, we have a population of ultracool L and T dwarfs that is large enough to show a range of atmospheric properties, as well as model atmospheres advanced enough to study these properties in detail. Since the last Cool Stars meeting, there have been observational developments which aid in these studies. they present recent mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope which confirms the prevalence of vertical mixing in the atmospheres of L and T dwarfs. Hence, the 700 K to 2200 K L and t dwarf photspheres require a large number of parameters for successful modeling: effective temperature, gravity, metallicity, grain sedimentation and vertical mixing efficiency. They also describe initial results of a search for ultracool dwarfs in the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey, and present the latest T dwarf found to date. They conclude with a discussion of the definition of the later-than-T spectral type, the Y dwarf.

  4. Mitochondrial ageing of a polar and a temperate mud clam.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Eva; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Abele, Doris

    2005-05-01

    We investigated mitochondrial ageing in a temperate (Mya arenaria) and an Antarctic (Laternula elliptica) mud clam, with similar lifestyle (benthic filter feeders) but different maximum life spans (MLSP), 13 and 36 years, respectively. The short-lived temperate M. arenaria showed a more pronounced decrease in mitochondrial function (respiration, respiratory control ratio, proton leak, membrane potential) with age than the long-lived Antarctic L. elliptica. H2O2 generation rates at habitat temperature were far higher in the short-lived M. arenaria compared to L. elliptica. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as proportion of the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (%H2O2/O2) increased significantly with age in M. arenaria, whereas in L. elliptica the proportion remained unchanged. Lower rates of mitochondrial H2O2 generation were presumably due to mild uncoupling as L. elliptica mitochondria showed higher proton leak compared to M. arenaria mitochondria. The results are discussed in to the light of the "Free Radical-Rate of Living theory", (Pearl, R., 1928. The Rate of Living. Alfred Knopf, New York; Harman, D., 1956. Aging: a theory based on free radical and radiation biology. J. Gerontol. 11, 298-300) and the "Uncoupling to Survive" hypothesis (Brand, M.D., 2000. Uncoupling to survive? The role of mitochondrial inefficiency in ageing. Exp. Gerontol. 35, 811-820). PMID:15811430

  5. Tandem repeat-containing MITEs in the clam Donax trunculus.

    PubMed

    Satovic, Eva; Plohl, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct classes of repetitive sequences, interspersed mobile elements and satellite DNAs, shape eukaryotic genomes and drive their evolution. Short arrays of tandem repeats can also be present within nonautonomous miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In the clam Donax trunculus, we characterized a composite, high copy number MITE, named DTC84. It is composed of a central region built of up to five core repeats linked to a microsatellite segment at one array end and flanked by sequences holding short inverted repeats. The modular composition and the conserved putative target site duplication sequence AA at the element termini are equivalent to the composition of several elements found in the cupped oyster Crassostrea virginica and in some insects. A unique feature of D. trunculus element is ordered array of core repeat variants, distinctive by diagnostic changes. Position of variants in the array is fixed, regardless of alterations in the core repeat copy number. Each repeat harbors a palindrome near the junction with the following unit, being a potential hotspot responsible for array length variations. As a consequence, variations in number of tandem repeats and variations in flanking sequences make every sequenced element unique. Core repeats may be thus considered as individual units within the MITE, with flanking sequences representing a "cassette" for internal repeats. Our results demonstrate that onset and spread of tandem repeats can be more intimately linked to processes of transposition than previously thought and suggest that genomes are shaped by interplays within a complex network of repetitive sequences. PMID:24317975

  6. Tandem Repeat-Containing MITEs in the Clam Donax trunculus

    PubMed Central

    atovi?, Eva; Plohl, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Two distinct classes of repetitive sequences, interspersed mobile elements and satellite DNAs, shape eukaryotic genomes and drive their evolution. Short arrays of tandem repeats can also be present within nonautonomous miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs). In the clam Donax trunculus, we characterized a composite, high copy number MITE, named DTC84. It is composed of a central region built of up to five core repeats linked to a microsatellite segment at one array end and flanked by sequences holding short inverted repeats. The modular composition and the conserved putative target site duplication sequence AA at the element termini are equivalent to the composition of several elements found in the cupped oyster Crassostrea virginica and in some insects. A unique feature of D. trunculus element is ordered array of core repeat variants, distinctive by diagnostic changes. Position of variants in the array is fixed, regardless of alterations in the core repeat copy number. Each repeat harbors a palindrome near the junction with the following unit, being a potential hotspot responsible for array length variations. As a consequence, variations in number of tandem repeats and variations in flanking sequences make every sequenced element unique. Core repeats may be thus considered as individual units within the MITE, with flanking sequences representing a cassette for internal repeats. Our results demonstrate that onset and spread of tandem repeats can be more intimately linked to processes of transposition than previously thought and suggest that genomes are shaped by interplays within a complex network of repetitive sequences. PMID:24317975

  7. Spatial and seasonal biomarker responses in the clam Ruditapes decussatus.

    PubMed

    Cravo, Alexandra; Lopes, Belisandra; Serafim, Angela; Company, Rui; Barreira, Luísa; Gomes, Tânia; Bebianno, Maria J

    2013-02-01

    The clam Ruditapes decussatus is an important resource to preserve in coastal lagoon systems around the Mediterranean including the South Portugal. To assess spatial and temporal biomarker responses to contamination in the species, a multibiomarker approach was conducted using antioxidant enzymes, MFO system phase I and II; acetylcholinesterase, metallothionein (MT), δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and lipid peroxidation (LPO). The condition index (CI), metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also determined. The levels of contaminants were not particularly high and the antioxidant enzymes, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), MT in the digestive gland, and δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) do not provide a suitable seasonal and spatial discrimination reversely to that regarding CYP450, glutathione-S-transferase (GST), MT in the gills, and LPO in both tissues. However, even those could vary with natural variables that may act as confounding factors. Thus, seasonal variability and natural range of biomarker responses must be carefully and accurately taken into account in ecotoxicological approaches of environmental quality assessment programmes. PMID:23066887

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the hard clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    He, Chong-Bo; Wang, Jian; Gao, Xiang-Gang; Song, Wen-Tao; Li, Hong-Jun; Li, Yun-Feng; Liu, Wei-Dong; Su, Hao

    2011-06-01

    Veneridae is a diverse, commercially important, and cosmopolitan family. Here we present the complete mitochondrial genome of the hard clam Meretrix meretrix (Bivalvia: Veneridae). The entire mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of M. meretrix is 19,826 bp in length, and contains 37 genes including 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and 23 tRNAs. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand. In contrast to the typical animal mitochondrial genome, it lacks the protein-coding gene ATP8, and has only one copy of the tRNA(Ser) gene, but three duplications of the tRNA(Gln), which is the first report among the present molluscan mtDNAs. We observed that the gene arrangement between M. meretrix and M. petechialis is same except one more tRNAGln gene in M. meretrix., and the sequence similarity is as high as 99%, indicating that M. petechialis and M. meretrix could be treated as a junior synonym of M. meretrix. Maximum Likelihood and Bayeslan analysis of 12 concatenated protein-coding amino acid sequences place the Unionidae as a sister group to other bivalves, which reflects the general opinion that the Unionidae deverged very early in Bivalvia evolution. PMID:21086173

  9. DIRECT MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR THE DETERMINING VENTILATION RATE IN THE DEPOSIT FEEDING CLAM, MACOMA NASUTA (BIVALVIA, TELLINACEAE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An exposure chamber, the "clambox", was developed to measure ventilation rate, sediment processing rate, and efficiency of pollutant uptake byMacoma nasuta Conrad, a surface surface deposit-feeding clams. Clams, collected from Yaquina, Bay, Oregon, USA, were cemented into a hole ...

  10. Clam Ruditapes philippinarum recovery from short-term exposure to the combined effect of salinity shifts and Arsenic contamination.

    PubMed

    Velez, Catia; Teixeira, Miguel; Wrona, Frederick J; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-04-01

    The current study assessed the biochemical alterations induced in the clam species Ruditapes philippinarum after exposure to salinity shifts (14, 28 and 42) and arsenic (As) contamination (0 and 2mg/L). The capacity of this species to recover (96h and 28 days) after exposure (96h) to both stressors, acting alone and in combination, was also evaluated. After exposure, regardless of the salinity tested, clams contaminated with As showed higher concentrations than non-contaminated specimens. After recovery, As concentration in clams decreased, with contaminated and non-contaminated specimens presenting similar values. The results obtained further demonstrated that exposure to As (2mg/L) at different salinities (salinities 14, 28 and 42) and salinity 42 (As 0mg/L) lead to an increase of lipid peroxidation and detoxification mechanisms in clams, compared with non-contaminated clams at salinities of 14 and 28. After recovery, at salinities 14 and 28, clams previously exposed to As were capable to decrease their oxidative stress to levels found in non-contaminated clams. Nevertheless, at salinity 42 both contaminated and non-contaminated clams did not survive. Overall results of measured energy-related parameters, indicators of oxidative stress, antioxidant and biotransformation enzymes indicated that As exposure and salinity shifts caused biochemical alterations in R. philippinarum, with stronger impacts when both stressors were acting in combination. PMID:26889773

  11. Toxicological evaluation of two pedigrees of clam Ruditapes philippinarum as bioindicators of heavy metal contaminants using metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chenglong; Cao, Lulu; Li, Fei

    2015-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution has been of great concern in the Bohai marine environment. Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum has been used as a bioindicator in marine toxicology. In this study, NMR-based metabolomics was used to ascertain whether there were significant biological differences between two dominant pedigrees (White and Zebra) of clam and evaluate the suitability of two pedigrees for marine environmental toxicology, together with antioxidant enzymatic analysis. Our results indicated that there were significant biological differences between White and Zebra clams based on the metabolic profiles and antioxidant enzyme activities. In details, the metabolic profiles showed higher levels of amino acids and succinate in Zebra clam digestive glands and higher levels of ATP in White clam digestive glands, respectively. The superoxide dismutase activities in control White and Zebra clam samples were significantly different. Additionally, White clam was more sensitive to Cd based on the significant accumulation of Cd, antioxidant enzymatic alterations and sensitive metabolic changes. Overall, we concluded that White clam could be a preferable bioindicator for marine environmental toxicology. PMID:25681705

  12. EFFECTS OF RECREATIONAL CLAM HARVESTING ON EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) AND ASSOCIATED INFAUNAL INVERTEBRATES: IN SITU MANIPULATIVE EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of recreational clam harvesting on eelgrass (Zostera marina) was experimentally tested by raking or digging for clams in experimental 1-m2 plots located in a Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR) eelgrass meadow. After three monthly treatments, eelgrass measures of biomass, prima...

  13. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay for QPX (Thraustochytriidae), a Parasite of the Hard Clam (Mercenaria mercenaria)▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianqian; Allam, Bassem; Collier, Jackie L.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the rRNA internal transcribed spacer region of the hard clam pathogen QPX. The qPCR assay was more sensitive than was histology in detecting clams with light QPX infections. QPX was detected in 4 of 43 sediment samples but in none of 40 seawater samples. PMID:19465523

  14. Pressure Gradients in the Inner Surf and Outer Swash Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, A.; Puleo, J. A.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.

    2010-12-01

    The swash zone is a highly dynamic region of the beach profile. Although there has been significant progression in understanding the complex hydrodynamics of the swash zone, an improvement in the understanding of the sediment transport mechanisms deserves further investigation. Prior studies have demonstrated that the existing formulations derived from the energetics-type formulation do not accurately and consistently predict sediment transport. Thus, measurements and numerical modeling can contribute in the improvement of the current predictive capability of sediment transport. A potential enhancement to nearshore sediment transport is the horizontal pressure gradient. However, measuring the dynamic pressure gradient in nearshore flows is a difficult task. For instance, standard pressure sensors are generally ill-suited for this type of measurement in shallow swash flows due to the obstructing size of the sensor and the potential for flow interference. With improved measurement apparati and techniques, it is possible to obtain measurements of the horizontal pressure gradient. Our current research includes laboratory and numerical model investigation of the horizontal pressure gradient in the inner surf and outer swash zone. An inexpensive differential pressure gauge is employed allowing for a pressure port on the order of 2 mm diameter. Four pressure sensor pairs are installed 1 cm above the bed with a cross-shore spacing of 8 cm. The sensors are deployed just outside of and at various locations within the outer swash zone to determine spatio-temporal pressure variations. The measurement of total pressure coupled with the corresponding free surface measurements from co-located capacitance wave gauges yields time series of the hydrostatic and dynamic pressure and pressure gradients. A VOF-type RANS model is employed in this investigation. Firstly, the numerical model is validated with swash measurements. Then, model simulations will be performed in order to complement the measured data. Initial investigations (lab and model) focus on the pressure gradients under solitary-wave-forced swash flows on a 1:12 sloping beach and will be extended to include the pressure gradient on a barred beach and for irregular waves.

  15. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  16. FIRST DIRECT EVIDENCE THAT BARIUM DWARFS HAVE WHITE DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R. O.; McGahee, C. E.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Corbally, C. J. E-mail: cmcgahe@g.clemson.edu E-mail: corbally@as.arizona.edu

    2011-05-15

    Barium II (Ba) stars are chemically peculiar F-, G-, and K-type objects that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements. Since s-process nucleosynthesis is unlikely to take place in stars prior to the advanced asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage, the prevailing hypothesis is that each present Ba star was contaminated by an AGB companion which is now a white dwarf (WD). Unless the initial mass ratio of such a binary was fairly close to unity, the receiving star is thus at least as likely to be a dwarf as a giant. So although most known Ba stars appear to be giants, the hypothesis requires that Ba dwarfs be comparably plentiful and moreover that they should all have WD companions. However, despite dedicated searches with the IUE satellite, no WD companions have been directly detected to date among the classical Ba dwarfs, even though some 90% of those stars are spectroscopic binaries, so the contamination hypothesis is therefore presently in some jeopardy. In this paper, we analyze recent deep, near-UV and far-UV Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) exposures of four of the brightest of the class (HD 2454, 15360, 26367, and 221531), together with archived GALEX data for two newly recognized Ba dwarfs: HD 34654 and HD 114520 (which also prove to be spectroscopic binaries). The GALEX observations of the Ba dwarfs as a group show a significant far-UV excess compared to a control sample of normal F-type dwarfs. We suggest that this ensemble far-UV excess constitutes the first direct evidence that Ba dwarfs have WD companions.

  17. Bioaccumulation and depuration of enteroviruses by the soft-shelled clam, Mya arenaria.

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, T G; Mullin, B; Eckerson, D; Moulton, E; Larkin, E P

    1979-01-01

    Low levels of feces-associated natural virus, simulating virus numbers estimated to exist in moderately polluted shellfish-growing waters, were used to evaluate the effectiveness of depuration as a virus depletion procedure in soft-shell clams. Depuration effectiveness depended upon the numbers of virus bioaccumulated and whether virus was solids associated. Virus uptake was greatest when viruses were solids associated and pollution levels were equivalent or greater than those likely to be found in grossly polluted growing waters. Virtually all bioaccumulated feces-associated natural virus was deposited within either the hepatopancreas or siphon tissues. Viruses usually were eliminated within a 24- to 48-h depuration period. Dependence upon depuration of clams to elimate health hazards of virus etiology involved a risk factor not measureable in the study. The greatest reduction of health risks would come from the routine depuration of clams harvested from growing waters of good sanitary quality. PMID:229766

  18. Effect of irradiation temperature on void swelling of China Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Fei; Qiao Jiansheng; Huang Yina; Wan Farong Ohnuki, Soumei

    2008-03-15

    CLAM is one composition of a Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel (RAFM), which is being studied in a number of institutes and universities in China. The effect of electron-beam irradiation temperature on irradiation swelling of CLAM was investigated by using a 1250 kV High Voltage Electron Microscope (HVEM). In-situ microstructural observations indicated that voids formed at each experimental temperature - 723 K, 773 K and 823 K. The size and number density of voids increased with increasing irradiation dose at each temperature. The results show that CLAM has good swelling resistance. The maximum void swelling was produced at 723 K; the swelling was about 0.3% when the irradiation damage was 13.8 dpa.

  19. Review on the Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Malaysian Clams.

    PubMed

    Hossen, Md Faruk; Hamdan, Sinin; Rahman, Md Rezaur

    2015-01-01

    The current review discusses the levels of six heavy metals in different clam species from 34 sites of Malaysian coasts. The concentrations (µg/g dry weight) of these heavy metals ranged around 0.18-8.51, 0.13-17.20, 2.17-7.80, 0.84-36.00, 24.13-368.00, and 177.82-1912.00 for Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Fe, respectively. It was observed that the concentrations of metals slightly depend on different clam species but mostly depend on site locations. According to Malaysian Food Regulation (1985), about 30% and more than 50% sites are safe from Cd and Pb contamination, respectively, and also the clam species from the other populations studied were safe for consumption. PMID:26060840

  20. A health status survey of clams, Mya arenaria and Ensis siliqua, in the Irish Sea.

    PubMed

    Cross, M E; Lynch, S; O'Riordan, R M; Culloty, S C

    2014-11-10

    The soft shell clam, Mya arenaria, and the razor clam, Ensis siliqua, are widely distributed in Irish waters. Though the reproductive biology and other aspects of the physiology of these species has been previously investigated, little or no data are currently available on their health status. As this knowledge is essential for correct management of a species, M. arenaria and E. siliqua were examined to assess their current health status using histological and molecular methods, over a period of sixteen months. No pathogens or disease were observed in M. arenaria, and low incidences of Prokaryote inclusions, trematode parasites, Nematopsis spp. and eosinophilic bodies were recorded in razor clams for the first time in Northern European waters. PMID:25446035

  1. Review on the Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Malaysian Clams

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Sinin; Rahman, Md. Rezaur

    2015-01-01

    The current review discusses the levels of six heavy metals in different clam species from 34 sites of Malaysian coasts. The concentrations (µg/g dry weight) of these heavy metals ranged around 0.18–8.51, 0.13–17.20, 2.17–7.80, 0.84–36.00, 24.13–368.00, and 177.82–1912.00 for Cd, Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Fe, respectively. It was observed that the concentrations of metals slightly depend on different clam species but mostly depend on site locations. According to Malaysian Food Regulation (1985), about 30% and more than 50% sites are safe from Cd and Pb contamination, respectively, and also the clam species from the other populations studied were safe for consumption. PMID:26060840

  2. Bioaccumulation and depuration of enteroviruses by the soft-shelled clam, Mya arenaria.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, T G; Mullin, B; Eckerson, D; Moulton, E; Larkin, E P

    1979-08-01

    Low levels of feces-associated natural virus, simulating virus numbers estimated to exist in moderately polluted shellfish-growing waters, were used to evaluate the effectiveness of depuration as a virus depletion procedure in soft-shell clams. Depuration effectiveness depended upon the numbers of virus bioaccumulated and whether virus was solids associated. Virus uptake was greatest when viruses were solids associated and pollution levels were equivalent or greater than those likely to be found in grossly polluted growing waters. Virtually all bioaccumulated feces-associated natural virus was deposited within either the hepatopancreas or siphon tissues. Viruses usually were eliminated within a 24- to 48-h depuration period. Dependence upon depuration of clams to elimate health hazards of virus etiology involved a risk factor not measureable in the study. The greatest reduction of health risks would come from the routine depuration of clams harvested from growing waters of good sanitary quality. PMID:229766

  3. Access Without Authentication: How and Why We Let Anyone Surf Our Wireless

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Donna

    2006-01-01

    Wireless hotspots are popping up in local coffee shops everywhere. Anyone with a wireless-ready laptop or PDA can surf the Internet at one of these hotspots. The same is now true for all 32 branches of the Orange County Public Library (OCPL) in California. Though many public library systems are moving toward wireless access, most require patrons…

  4. Post-transcriptional silencing and functional characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of human Surf1.

    PubMed

    Zordan, Mauro A; Cisotto, Paola; Benna, Clara; Agostino, Alessandro; Rizzo, Giorgia; Piccin, Alberto; Pegoraro, Mirko; Sandrelli, Federica; Perini, Giuliana; Tognon, Giuseppe; De Caro, Raffaele; Peron, Samantha; Kronniè, Truus Te; Megighian, Aram; Reggiani, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Costa, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in Surf1, a human gene involved in the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), cause Leigh syndrome, the most common infantile mitochondrial encephalopathy, characterized by a specific COX deficiency. We report the generation and characterization of functional knockdown (KD) lines for Surf1 in Drosophila. KD was produced by post-transcriptional silencing employing a transgene encoding a dsRNA fragment of the Drosophila homolog of human Surf1, activated by the UAS transcriptional activator. Two alternative drivers, Actin5C-GAL4 or elav-GAL4, were used to induce silencing ubiquitously or in the CNS, respectively. Actin5C-GAL4 KD produced 100% egg-to-adult lethality. Most individuals died as larvae, which were sluggish and small. The few larvae reaching the pupal stage died as early imagos. Electron microscopy of larval muscles showed severely altered mitochondria. elav-GAL4-driven KD individuals developed to adulthood, although cephalic sections revealed low COX-specific activity. Behavioral and electrophysiological abnormalities were detected, including reduced photoresponsiveness in KD larvae using either driver, reduced locomotor speed in Actin5C-GAL4 KD larvae, and impaired optomotor response as well as abnormal electroretinograms in elav-GAL4 KD flies. These results indicate important functions for SURF1 specifically related to COX activity and suggest a crucial role of mitochondrial energy pathways in organogenesis and CNS development and function. PMID:16172499

  5. Validation of accuracy and repeatability of UltraSurf metrology on common optical shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeFisher, Scott; Matthews, Greg; Fess, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Advancements in optical manufacturing technology allow optical designers to implement steep aspheric or high departure surfaces into their systems. Accurate metrology during the grinding and polishing stages of asphere manufacturing will reduce time and cost. Measuring these surfaces with common interferometers or profilometers can be difficult due to large surface slopes or unpolished surface texture. OptiPro has developed UltraSurf to qualify the form, figure, and thickness of steep aspheric and freeform optics. UltraSurf is a computer controlled, non-contact coordinate measuring machine. It incorporates five air-bearing axes, linear motors, high-resolution feedback, and a non-contact probe. The measuring probe is scanned over the optical surface while maintaining perpendicularity and a constant focal offset. There are multiple probe technologies available on UltraSurf, and each probe has strengths and weaknesses relative to the material properties, surface finish, and figure error of an optical component. Validation of the system accuracy, repeatability, and methodology must be performed to trust the measurement data. Form and figure maps of a flat, a sphere, and an asphere using UltraSurf will be presented with comparisons to interferometry. In addition, accuracy, repeatability, and machine qualification will be discussed.

  6. The sea sled - a device for measuring bottom profiles in the surf zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Ross, D.A.

    1971-01-01

    The Sea Sled is a simple, easily constructed device for obtaining relatively accurate and quick bottom profiles in the surf zone. The onshore - offshore motion associated with the passage of waves propels the sled on both its seaward traverse and the shoreward return. The device has been successfully used along the California coast. ?? 1971.

  7. Infragravity-wave modulation of short-wave celerity in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissier, M.; Bonneton, P.; Michallet, H.; Ruessink, B. G.

    2015-10-01

    The cross-shore evolution of individual wave celerity is investigated using two high-resolution laboratory experiments on bichromatic waves. Individual waves are tracked during their onshore propagation and their characteristics, including celerity, are estimated. The intrawave variability in celerity is low in the shoaling zone but increases strongly after breaking. It is maximum when the infragravity-wave height to water depth ratio is the largest, that is to say close to the shoreline. There the observed range of individual wave celerity can be as large as the mean celerity value. This variability can be largely explained by the variations in water depth and velocity induced by the infragravity waves. The differences in celerity are such that they lead to the merging of the waves in the inner surf zone for most of the wave conditions considered. Again, the location at which the first waves start merging strongly correlates with the infragravity-wave height to water depth ratio. The consequences of these findings for celerity-based depth-inversion techniques are finally discussed. Surprisingly, accounting for the infragravity-wave modulation of the velocity field in the celerity estimate does not significantly improve depth estimation in the surf zone. However, it is shown that the occurrence of bore merging decreases significantly the coherence of the wavefield in the surf zone. This loss of coherence could hamper celerity estimation from pixel intensity time series and explain, at least partly, the relatively poor performance of depth-inversion techniques in the inner surf zone.

  8. The Web Surfer: What (Literacy) Skills Does It Take to Surf Anyway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Jessie

    2010-01-01

    This article looks closely at some of the lingering stereotypes that Composition Studies holds toward Web surfing and queries the resulting literacy hierarchy against our students' reading and writing practices that take place online. This article claims that while good progress has been made in the way of revising twenty-first century definitions…

  9. The Ocean as a Unique Therapeutic Environment: Developing a Surfing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Emily D.; Armitano, Cortney N.; Lamont, Linda S.; Audette, Jennifer G.

    2014-01-01

    Educational aquatic programming offers necessary physical activity opportunities to children with disabilities and the benefits of aquatic activities are more pronounced for children with disabilities than for their able-bodied peers. Similar benefits could potentially be derived from surfing in the ocean. This article describes an adapted surfing…

  10. Constitutive knockout of Surf1 is associated with high embryonic lethality, mitochondrial disease and cytochrome c oxidase deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Agostino, Alessandro; Invernizzi, Federica; Tiveron, Cecilia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Prelle, Alessandro; Lamantea, Eleonora; Giavazzi, Alessio; Battaglia, Giorgio; Tatangelo, Laura; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo

    2003-02-15

    We report here the creation of a constitutive knockout mouse for SURF1, a gene encoding one of the assembly proteins involved in the formation of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Loss-of-function mutations of SURF1 cause Leigh syndrome associated with an isolated and generalized COX deficiency in humans. The murine phenotype is characterized by the following hallmarks: (1) high post-implantation embryonic lethality, affecting approximately 90% of the Surf1(-/-) individuals; (2) early-onset mortality of post-natal individuals; (3) highly significant deficit in muscle strength and motor performance; (4) profound and isolated defect of COX activity in skeletal muscle and liver, and, to a lesser extent, heart and brain; (5) morphological abnormalities of skeletal muscle, characterized by reduced histochemical reaction to COX and mitochondrial proliferation; (6) no obvious abnormalities in brain morphology, reflecting the virtual absence of overt neurological symptoms. These results indicate a function for murine Surf1 protein (Surf1p) specifically related to COX and recapitulate, at least in part, the human phenotype. This is the first mammalian model for a nuclear disease gene of a human mitochondrial disorder. Our model constitutes a useful tool to investigate the function of Surf1p, help understand the pathogenesis of Surf1p deficiency in vivo, and evaluate the efficacy of treatment. PMID:12566387

  11. Direct contribution of clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) to benthic fluxes, nitrification, denitrification and nitrous oxide emission in a farmed sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, David T.; Nizzoli, Daniele; Fano, Elisa A.; Viaroli, Pierluigi

    2015-03-01

    The influence of the manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) on N-cycle processes, and oxygen and nutrient fluxes in a farmed sediment was investigated using a multiple core incubation approach and parallel incubations of individual clams. Clam population/biomass density varied ∼8-fold between cores and all sediment-water column solute (O2. N2, N2O, NH4+, NOX and DIN) fluxes and benthic process (N-regeneration, nitrification and denitrification) rates were strongly and significantly correlated with clam density/biomass. Isolated clams exhibited high rates of respiration, N-excretion, nitrification and denitrification of 2050 ± 70, 395 ± 49, 201 ± 42 and 235 ± 40 nmol individual-1 h-1, respectively. The direct contribution of the clams and their associated microbiota to benthic processes was estimated by multiplying the per individual rates by the number of clams in each incubated core. The clams on average directly accounted for 64-133% of total rates of sediment oxygen demand, N-regeneration, nitrification and denitrification, indicating that they regulated processes primarily through their own metabolic activity and that of bacteria that colonise them. Clams and the farmed sediments were significant sources of the greenhouse gas N2O, but this was primarily due to their high nitrification and denitrification rates, rather than high specific N2O yields, as N2O emissions represented <1% of total N2O + N2 production. The clam-farmed sediments had a high denitrification efficiency of 67 ± 10%, but this ecosystem service came at the environmental cost of increased N-regeneration and N2O emission rates. The measured N2O emissions indicate that bivalve aquaculture may be a significant source of N2O. It is therefore recommended that N2O emissions should be included in the impact assessments of current and future bivalve-farming projects.

  12. Evaluation of short-term exposure to heated water and chlorine for control of the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea)

    SciTech Connect

    Mattice, J.S.; McLean, R.B.; Burch, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Based on the need for development of efficient procedures for prevention or control of fouling by the Asiatic clam, Corbicula fluminea, the response of these clams to chlorine in combination with rapid increases in water temperature was examined. Small clams were acclimated to 10 and 25/sup 0/C, and large clams were acclimated to 25/sup 0/C. Experiments with each of these acclimation groups consisted of variables of total residual chlorine concentration (0, 5, 7.5, and 10 mg/L) and test temperature (ambient and 3 test temperatures ranging from 35 to 46/sup 0/C). The periods of exposure to increased temperature and chlorine were 40 and 30 min respectively. Clam mortalities were related to water temperature but not to chlorine exposure. At high temperatures at least 50% of the clams remained open through the entire chlorine exposure period. At higher temperatures all of the clams remained open. Even when clams remained open for the entire 30-min chlorine exposure period, all clams were not killed. However, virtually all clams exposed to 41 to 43/sup 0/C water temperatures were killed whether open or closed during the exposure period. Death due to temperature shock is the logical conclusion from these data. Combined application of heated water and chlorine at the concentrations used is not more effective in killing Corbicula than is heated water alone. Current regulations on the concentration of chlorine in power plant effluents indicate that further studies of control of Corbicula using chlorine offer little likelihood for success. (ERB)

  13. Responses of Manila clam growth and its food sources to global warming in a subarctic lagoon in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seokjin; Abe, Hiroya; Kishi, Michio J.

    2013-12-01

    Akkeshi Lake is a subarctic shallow brackish lagoon located in Hokkaido, Japan. The Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, is cultured in sandy sediments at the shallow, intertidal flat near the mouth of the lake. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of environmental factors such as water temperature and food availability on the growth of the Manila clam and to estimate the responses of Manila clam growth and food availability to global warming in Akkeshi Lake, we developed a numerical model by coupling a three-dimensional ecosystem model with a bioenergetics model for the growth of the Manila clam. We ran the model under two different conditions: the present condition and the global warming condition. For the global warming condition, water temperature was increased by 2 °C at the open boundary for the entire computational period. The growth of the Manila clam was limited by water temperature and food availability. The Manila clam grew up to 1.33 g dry weight ind.-1 at the lake mouth (station A) for 5 years, whereas it grew up to 1.00 g dry weight ind.-1 at the lake center (station B). The difference in the biomass of the Manila clam between two stations was due to the difference in food availability. Under the global warming condition, the water temperature limitation for the Manila clam was relaxed with a water temperature increase. The Manila clam grew up to 1.55 g dry weight ind.-1 at station A and 1.10 g dry weight ind.-1 at station B. While the growth of the Manila clam was improved in the lake under the global warming condition, its food sources, especially phytoplankton, decreased because of ingestion increases of grazers.

  14. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Work on NAG5-3288 ("White Dwarf Pulsars") has been fully integrated with the identically titled project NAG5-4734. The final report below is the same, since the data analysis and interpretative work are integrated, as are the resulting (previous and in-pipeline) publications. The proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of - 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain and is "on ice". A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the ASCA data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s (Patterson et al. 1998, PASP, 110, 403). Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle".

  15. Heart Rate Responses of High School Students Participating in Surfing Physical Education.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Michelle M; Cummins, Kevin M; Nessler, Jeff A; Newcomer, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    Bravo, MM, Cummins, KM, Nessler, JA, and Newcomer, SC. Heart rate responses of high school students participating in surfing physical education. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1721-1726, 2016-Despite the nation's rising epidemic of childhood obesity and diabetes, schools struggle to promote physical activities that help reduce risks for cardiovascular disease. Emerging data suggest that adopting novel activities into physical education (PE) curriculum may serve as an effective strategy for increasing physical activity in children. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize activity in the water and heart rates (HRs) of high school students participating in surf PE courses. Twenty-four male (n = 20) and female (n = 4) high school students (mean age = 16.7 ± 1.0 years) who were enrolled in surf PE courses at 2 high schools participated in this investigation. Daily measurements of surfing durations, average HR, and maximum HR were made on the students with HR monitors (PolarFT1) over an 8-week period. In addition, HR and activity in the water was evaluated during a single session in a subset of students (n = 11) using a HR monitor (PolarRCX5) and a video camera (Canon HD). Activity and HR were synchronized and evaluated in 5-second intervals during data analyses. The average duration that PE students participated in surfing during class was 61.7 ± 1.0 minutes. Stationary, paddling, wave riding, and miscellaneous activities comprised 42.7 ± 9.5, 36.7 ± 7.9, 2.9 ± 1.4, and 17.8 ± 11.4 percent of the surf session, respectively. The average and maximum HRs during these activities were 131.1 ± 0.9 and 177.2 ± 1.0 b·min, respectively. These data suggest that high school students participating in surf PE attained HRs and durations that are consistent with recommendations with cardiovascular fitness and health. In the future, PE programs should consider incorporating other action sports into their curriculum to enhance cardiovascular health. PMID:26562714

  16. Microstructure and nanoindentation of the CLAM steel with nanocrystalline grains under Xe irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yongqin; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xiaolin; Guo, Qiang; Wan, Farong; Long, Yi

    2014-12-01

    This work presents an early look at irradiation effects on China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel with nanocrystalline grains (NC-CLAM steels) under 500 keV Xe-ion bombardment at room temperature to doses up to 5.3 displacements per atom (dpa). The microstructure in the topmost region of the steel is composed of nanocrystalline grains with an average diameter of 13 nm. As the samples were implanted at low dose, the nanocrystalline grains had martensite lath structure, and many dislocations and high density bubbles were introduced into the NC-CLAM steels. As the irradiation dose up to 5.3 dpa, a tangled dislocation network exists in the lath region, and the size of the bubbles increases. X-ray diffraction results show that the crystal quality decreases after irradiation, although the nanocrystals obviously coarsen. Grain growth under irradiation may be ascribed to the direct impact of the thermal spike on grain boundaries in the NC-CLAM steels. In irradiated samples, a compressive stress exists in the surface layer because of grain growth and irradiation-introduced defects, while the irradiation introduced grain-size coarsening and defects gradients from the surface to matrix result in a tensile stress in the irradiated NC-CLAM steels. Nanoindentation was used to estimate changes in mechanical properties during irradiation, and the results show that the hardness of the NC-CLAM steels increases with increasing irradiation dose, which was ascribed to the competition between the grain boundaries and the irradiation-introduced defects.

  17. Study of Dwarf Novae Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otulakowska-Hypka, Magdalena; Olech, Arkadiusz

    2015-06-01

    Based on all accessible data for the whole sample of dwarf novae, we performed an extensive study of all photometric features which are possible to measure during their outburst and superoutbursts. For all of them we looked for possible correlations. We confirmed a few of the known relations, questioned the existence of others, found new ones, as well as failed to find another presumed relation. In particular, in the context of white dwarfs, we present one of the most interesting correlations among them. Based on vast amount of up-to-date measurements, we were able to enhance the Stolz and Schoembs relation and make accurate estimates on the mass ratio and thus on masses of white dwarfs in such systems. We hope that results of this study will impact our knowledge on the physical phenomena which take place in dwarf novae and help to direct theoretical work to the areas where there is still a discrepancy between observations and theory.

  18. Accumulation and elimination of (9-/sup 14/C)phenanthrene in the calico clam (Macrocallista maculata)

    SciTech Connect

    Solbakken, J.E.; Jeffrey, F.M.H.; Knap, A.H.; Palmork, K.H.

    1982-05-01

    The accumulation and elimination of radoactivity is studied after exposure of (9-/sup 14/C) phenanthrene in various tissues in the calico clam (Macrocallista maculata). Results show that accumulation is highest in the lipid-rich hepatopancreas, and the elimination is very efficient compared to the horse mussel. The calico clam, which is a sand-dwelling organism, can easily come in contact with hydrocarbon contaminated sedments and might accumulate the hydrocarbons at different extents in various tissues. The efficient elimination, however, will prevent a lasting accumulation. (JMT)

  19. Synergistic Effect of Triple Ion Beams on Radiation Damage in CLAM Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Da-Qing; Zheng, Yong-Nan; Zuo, Yi; Fan, Ping; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Qiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Qiang; Cui, Bao-Qun; Chen, Li-Hua; Jiang, Wei-Sheng; Wu, Yi-Can; Huang, Qun-Ying; Peng, Lei; Cao, Xing-Zhong; Wang, Bao-Yi; Wei, Long; Zhu, Sheng-Yun

    2014-04-01

    The synergistic effect of triple ion beams is investigated by simultaneous and sequential irradiations of gold, hydrogen and helium ions on the low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) developed in China. The depth profile measurements of the positron annihilation Doppler broadening S parameter are carried out as a function of slow-positron beam energy to examine the produced radiation damage. The synergistic effect of displacement damage and hydrogen and helium on the formation of radiation damage is clearly observed. In the preset case, this effect suppresses the radiation damage in the CLAM steel due to the helium and/or hydrogen filling of vacancy clusters.

  20. Observations of geese foraging for clam shells during spring on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, P.L.; Fowler, A.C.; Bottitta, G.E.; Schamber, J.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the behavior of geese on exposed river ice during spring on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta. The predominant behavior while on the ice for both sexes was foraging; however, females foraged more than males. Visual inspection of the ice revealed no potential plant or animal food items. However, numerous small (<20 man) clam shells (Macoma balthica) and pieces of shell were noted. It appeared that geese were foraging on empty clam shells. This potential source of calcium was available to breeding geese just prior to egg formation and geese likely stored this calcium in the form of medullary bone for use during egg formation.

  1. Fishing mortality rates of giant clams (Family Tridacnidae) from the Sulu Archipelago and Southern Palawan, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanoy, Cesar L.; Juinio, Antoinette R.; Meñez, Lambert Anthony

    1988-05-01

    Average size frequency distributions of Tridacna squamosa, T. gigas, Hippopus hippopus and H. porcellanus harvested from the Sulu Archipelago and Southern Palawan areas from 1978 1985 were derived from export records and a warehouse inventory of giant clam shells. Average species mortality rates ( Z) were estimated and were used to approximate average fishing mortality rates ( F) over the period 1978 1985. Crude estimates of exploitation rates ( F/Z) indicate that populations of these species are already overexploited. These findings have serious implications in view of the fact that the Sulu Archipelago and Southern Palawan are thought to be the last strongholds of giant clams in Philippine waters.

  2. Adaptation of respiratory chain biogenesis to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency caused by SURF1 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Kovářová, Nikola; Cížková Vrbacká, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Stránecký, Viktor; Pronicka, Ewa; Kmoch, Stanislav; Houštěk, Josef

    2012-07-01

    The loss of Surf1 protein leads to a severe COX deficiency manifested as a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, the Leigh syndrome (LS(COX)). Surf1 appears to be involved in the early step of COX assembly but its function remains unknown. The aim of the study was to find out how SURF1 gene mutations influence expression of OXPHOS and other pro-mitochondrial genes and to further characterize the altered COX assembly. Analysis of fibroblast cell lines from 9 patients with SURF1 mutations revealed a 70% decrease of the COX complex content to be associated with 32-54% upregulation of respiratory chain complexes I, III and V and accumulation of Cox5a subunit. Whole genome expression profiling showed a general decrease of transcriptional activity in LS(COX) cells and indicated that the adaptive changes in OXPHOS complexes are due to a posttranscriptional compensatory mechanism. Electrophoretic and WB analysis showed that in mitochondria of LS(COX) cells compared to controls, the assembled COX is present entirely in a supercomplex form, as I-III₂-IV supercomplex but not as larger supercomplexes. The lack of COX also caused an accumulation of I-III₂ supercomplex. The accumulated Cox5a was mainly present as a free subunit. We have found out that the major COX assembly subcomplexes accumulated due to SURF1 mutations range in size between approximately 85-140kDa. In addition to the originally proposed S2 intermediate they might also represent Cox1-containing complexes lacking other COX subunits. Unlike the assembled COX, subcomplexes are unable to associate with complexes I and III. PMID:22465034

  3. Radiation stress gradients across the surf zone for hurricane wave forcing: theory and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, R. P.; Bowen, A. J.; Hanson, J. L.; Hathaway, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    Wave breaking is a non-linear, turbulent and chaotic phenomenon that is the overwhelmingly dominant physical process acting along beaches and coasts exposed to surface waves during storms. The breaking process causes large rates of wave energy dissipation over short distances and the momentum that is exchanged with the mean flow is the dominant forcing for currents and water level changes across nearshore region. Inside the surf zone, this can outweigh other flow forcing mechanisms such as winds and tides by several orders of magnitude. We examine Eulerian observations from six sensor sites the USACE FRF cross-shore array for several large hurricane wave events with wide surf zones, to elucidate the nearshore balance of momentum under storm conditions. Under such strong wave forcing, observations of longshore currents up to 2 m/s and mean cross-shore flows up to 0.3 m/s near the 5 m isobath are presented for wave events that impacted the U.S. Atlantic coast in 2009-2011 including Hurricanes Bill, Earl and Irene. An investigation of the mass flux and momentum terms across the surf zone indicates that the radiation stress gradient in the cross-shore direction can exceed the momentum that can be balanced by the pressure gradient and results in significant bottom stress term and thus an offshore directed cross-shore flow. The mean cross-shore flow contributes to advection of alongshore momentum and although small when integrated across the whole surf zone, is locally important especially near the outer edge of the surf zone.

  4. Chemical Signatures in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venn, Kim A.; Hill, Vanessa M.

    2008-12-01

    Chemical signatures in dwarf galaxies describe the examination of specific elemental abundance ratios to investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies, particularly when compared with the variety of stellar populations in the Galaxy. Abundance ratios can come from HII region emission lines, planetary nebulae, or supernova remnants, but mostly they come from stars. Since stars can live a very long time, for example, a 0.8 MSun star born at the time of the Big Bang would only now be ascending the red giant branch, and, if, for the most part, its quiescent main sequence lifetime had been uneventful, then it is possible that the surface chemistry of stars actually still resembles their natal chemistry. Detailed abundances of stars in dwarf galaxies can be used to reconstruct their chemical evolution, which we now find to be distinct from any other component of the Galaxy, questioning the assertion that dwarf galaxies like these built up the Galaxy. Potential solutions to reconciling dwarf galaxy abundances and Galaxy formation models include the timescale for significant merging and the possibility for uncovering different stellar populations in the new ultra-faint dwarfs.

  5. CpG methylation has differential effects on the binding of YY1 and ETS proteins to the bi-directional promoter of the Surf-1 and Surf-2 genes.

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, K; Fried, M

    1995-01-01

    The divergently transcribed Surf-1 and Surf-2 housekeeping genes are separated by a bi-directional, TATA-less promoter which lies within a CpG-rich island. Here we show that CpG methylation severely reduces transcription in the direction of both Surf-1 and Surf-2. Previous work has identified three promoter elements (Su1, Su2 and Su3) which are conserved between the human and mouse Surf-1/Surf-2 promoters. These elements bind transcription factors present in human and mouse cell nuclear extracts in vitro and mutations which prevent factor binding also reduce promoter activity in vivo. Transcription initiation factor YY1 binds to the Su1 site and stimulates transcription in the direction of Surf-1 and, to a lesser extent, Surf-2. Here we show that members of the ETS family of transcription factors bind to the Su2 site. Although the Su1 factor binding site contains three CpG dinucleotides, the binding of YY1 is not affected by CpG methylation. In contrast, CpG methylation abolishes the binding of ETS proteins to the Su2 site; methylation of a single cytosine, at position 3 of the consensus ETS site, is sufficient to prevent factor binding. This direct effect on the binding of ETS proteins is, however, not in itself sufficient to explain the repression of this promoter by CpG methylation. A mutation of the Su2 site which removes the sequence CpG, but which does not prevent ETS factor binding, fails to relieve this promoter from repression by CpG methylation. Images PMID:7731802

  6. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fish and invertebrates (North Atlantic): Softshell clam. [Mya arenaria

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, C.R.; Hidu, H.

    1986-06-01

    The softshell clam, Mya arenaria, is a commercially and recreationally important invertebrate that inhabits the bottom sediments of subtidal and intertidal waters of moderate to high salinity. Its range is limited by water temperatures too low for reproduction in the north and by lethal warm temperatures in the south. Clams feed by siphoning seawater and removing food particles, especially phytoplankton, with their gills. Clams are therefore sensitive to factors affecting water quality, including suspended sediments, salinity, water temperature, oxygen, and waterborne pollutants. The clam life cycle consists of mass spawning and external fertilization, the development of pelagic larvae, settlement and metamorphosis into spat, and rapid juvenile growth to maturity. Clam recruitment and the migration of spat are dependent upon inshore currents. High morality of eggs, larvae, and spat is largely offset by high reproductive potential. As the clam grows, it finds refuge from most predators deep in the sediments, but it also loses its ability to burrow and is subject to suffocation by siltation. Sediment types, currents, and tidal heights all affect clam growth rates.

  7. Metabolomic analysis revealed the differential responses in two pedigrees of clam Ruditapes philippinarum towards Vibrio harveyi challenge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Qing

    2013-12-01

    Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum is an important marine aquaculture shellfish. This species has several pedigrees including White, Zebra, Liangdao Red and Marine Red distributing in the coastal areas in North China. In this work, we studied the metabolic differences induced by Vibrio harveyi in hepatopancreas from White and Zebra clams using NMR-based metabolomics. Metabolic responses (e.g., amino acids, glucose, glycogen, ATP and succinate) and altered mRNA expression levels of related genes (ATP synthase, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme) suggested that V. harveyi induced clear disruption in energy metabolism and immune stresses in both White and Zebra clam hepatopancreas. However, V. harveyi caused obvious osmotic stress in Zebra clam hepatopancreas, which was not observed in V. harveyi-challenged White clams samples. In addition, V. harveyi challenge induced more severe disruption in energy metabolism and immune stress in White clams than in Zebra clams. Overall, our results indicated that the biological differences between different pedigrees of R. philippinarum should be considered in immunity studies. PMID:24161758

  8. Unusual clinical presentations in four cases of Leigh disease, cytochrome C oxidase deficiency, and SURF1 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Tay, Stacey K H; Sacconi, Sabrina; Akman, H Ohran; Morales, Judith F; Morales, Augusto; De Vivo, Darryl C; Shanske, Sara; Bonilla, Eduardo; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2005-08-01

    Mutations in the SURF1 gene are the most frequent causes of Leigh disease with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. We describe four children with novel SURF1 mutations and unusual features: three had prominent renal symptoms and one had ragged red fibers in the muscle biopsy. We identified five pathogenic mutations in SURF1: two mutations were novel, an in-frame nonsense mutation (834G-->A) and an out-of-frame duplication (820-824dupTACAT). Although renal manifestations have not been described in association with SURF1 mutations, they can be part of the clinical presentation. Likewise, mitochondrial proliferation in muscle (with ragged red fibers) is most unusual in Leigh disease but might be part of an emerging phenotype. PMID:16225813

  9. Influence of atmospheric parameters on vertical profiles and horizontal transport of aerosols generated in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.; Tedeschi, G.; Van Eijk, A. M. J.; Piazzola, J.

    2013-10-01

    The vertical and horizontal transport of aerosols generated over the surf zone is discussed. Experimental data were collected during the second campaign of the Surf Zone Aerosol Experiment that took place in Duck NC (USA) in November 2007. The Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) method was used to analyze the vertical concentration gradients, and allowed separating the surf aerosols from aerosols advected from elsewhere. The numerical Marine Aerosol Concentration Model (MACMod) supported the analysis by confirming that the concentration gradients are more pronounced under stable conditions and that aerosol plumes are then more confined to the surface. The model also confirmed the experimental observations made during two boat runs along the offshore wind vector that surf-generated aerosols are efficiently advected out to sea over several tens of kilometers.

  10. SURF's Up: An Outline of an Innovative Framework for Teaching Mental Computation to Students in the Early Years of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, James

    2015-01-01

    In this article James Russo presents the Strategies, Understanding, Reading and Fast Facts Framework (SURF) for mental computation. He explains how this framework can be used to deepen mathematical understanding and build mental flexibility.

  11. White Dwarf Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    This proposal was designed to study pulse and orbital modulations in candidate DQ Herculis stars. Data on 5 stars were obtained. The best results were obtained on YY Draconis, which exhibited a strongly pulsed hard X-ray flux, and even suggested a transition between one-pole and two-pole emission during the course of the observation. This result is being readied for inclusion in a comprehensive study of YY Draconis. A strong pulsation appeared to be present also in H0857-242, but with a period of about 50 minutes, confusion with the first harmonic of the satellite's orbital frequency is possible. So that result is uncertain. A negative result was obtained on 4UO608-49 (V347 Pup), suggesting either that the X-ray identification is incorrect, or that the source is very transient. Finally, data was obtained on V1432 Aql and WZ Sge, respectively the slowest and fastest of these stars. Combined with the Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data, the high-energy data demonstrates the latter to contain a white dwarf rotating with P = 27.87 s. Optical photometry contemporaneous with the X-ray data was obtained of V1432 Aql, in order to study the variations in the eclipse waveform. As anticipated, the width and centroid of the eclipse appeared to vary with the 50-day "supercycle". A paper reporting this study is now in preparation.

  12. Drones at the Beach - Surf Zone Monitoring Using Rotary Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynne, P.; Brouwer, R.; de Schipper, M. A.; Graham, F.; Reniers, A.; MacMahan, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the potential of rotary wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) to monitor the surf zone. In recent years, the arrival of lightweight, high-capacity batteries, low-power electronics and compact high-definition cameras has driven the development of commercially available UAVs for hobbyists. Moreover, the low operation costs have increased their potential for scientific research as these UAVs are extremely flexible surveying platforms. The UAVs can fly for ~12 min with a mean loiter radius of 1 - 3.5 m and a mean loiter error of 0.75 - 4.5 m, depending on the environmental conditions, flying style, battery type and vehicle type. Our experiments using multiple, alternating UAVs show that it is possible to have near continuous imagery data with similar Fields Of View. The images obtained from the UAVs (Fig. 1a), and in combination with surveyed Ground Control Points (GCPs) (Fig. 1b, red squares and white circles), can be geo-rectified (Fig. 1c) to pixel resolution between 0.01 - 1 m and a reprojection error, i.e. the difference between the surveyed GPS location of a GCP and the location of the GCP obtained from the geo-rectified image, of O(1 m). These geo-rectified images provide data on a variety of coastal aspects, such as beach width (Wb(x,t)), surf zone width (Wsf(x,t)), wave breaking location (rectangle B), beach usage (circle C) and location of dune vegegation (rectangle D), amongst others. Additionally, the possibility to have consecutive, high frequency (up to 2 Hz) rectified images makes the UAVs a great data instrument for spatially and temporally variable systems, such as the surf zone. Our first observations with the UAVs reveal the potential to quickly obtain surf zone and beach characteristics in response to storms or for day to day beach information, as well as the scientific pursuits of surf zone kinematics on different spatial and temporal scales, and dispersion and advection estimates of pollutants/dye. A selection of findings from several field experiments and using multiple optical instruments will be showed at the meeting, discussing the new possibilities rotary wing UAVs can offer for surf zone research.

  13. TOXICITY EVALUATION OF A COMPLEX METAL MIXTURE TO THE SOFTSHELL CLAM 'MYA ARENARIA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adults of the softshell clam Mya arenaria were continuously subjected to a flowing raw seawater solution containing a mixture of salts of manganese, zinc, lead, nickel, copper, and cadmium. Final calculated concentrations, in micrograms per liter of the toxicant solution were 720...

  14. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots induce oxidative stress and behavioral impairments in the marine clam Scrobicularia plana.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Poirier, Laurence; Lopes, Christelle; Risso-de-Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots have a number of current applications in electronics and solar cells and significant future potential in medicine. The aim of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of CdS quantum dots on the marine clam Scrobicularia plana exposed for 14 d to these nanomaterials (10 µg Cd L(-1) ) in natural seawater and to compare them with soluble Cd. Measurement of labile Cd released from CdS quantum dots showed that 52% of CdS quantum dots remained in the nanoparticulate form. Clams accumulated the same levels of Cd regardless of the form in which it was delivered (soluble Cd vs CdS quantum dots). However, significant changes in biochemical responses were observed in clams exposed to CdS quantum dots compared with soluble Cd. Increased activities of catalase and glutathione-S-transferase were significantly higher in clams exposed in seawater to Cd as the nanoparticulate versus the soluble form, suggesting a specific nano effect. The behavior of S. plana in sediment showed impairments of foot movements only in the case of exposure to CdS quantum dots. The results show that oxidative stress and behavior biomarkers are sensitive predictors of CdS quantum dots toxicity in S. plana. Such responses, appearing well before changes might occur at the population level, demonstrate the usefulness of this model species and type of biomarker in the assessment of nanoparticle contamination in estuarine ecosystems. PMID:25772261

  15. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  16. Use of Polymerase Chain Reaction for Bivalve Pathogen Surveillance in the Yellow Clam Mesodesma mactroides.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Yuri Bovi Morais; da Silva Santos, Juan Jethro; Raibenberg, Fernando C; Poersch, Luis Henrique; Romano, Luis Alberto

    2016-06-01

    The yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides is a valuable shellfish occurring from the southeastern coast of Brazil to the northern coast of Argentina. Populations of yellow clams are disappearing from their entire range, and the cause is still unknown. The objective of this paper was to search for World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)-listed pathogens and their relatives in the genera Marteilia, Bonamia, and Perkinsus as well as Mikrocytos mackini and the virus OsHV-1 μ var the yellow clam population in southern Brazil using molecular techniques and classic histology protocols. A total of 180 clams were manually collected in the intertidal region at six sampling points covering the entire coast of Rio Grande do Sul State (length, 622 km) in 2013. Tissue samples were tested by OIE-recommended single-step conventional polymerase chain reaction assays. The screening showed no evidence of the specific sequences of the protistan parasites and viral pathogens at any site within the six zones under study. We recommend continuous monitoring of the mollusks in the region. Received July 3, 2015; accepted February 3, 2016. PMID:27221761

  17. BENZO(A)PYRENE ACCUMULATION AND DEPURATION IN THE SOFT-SHELL CLAM ('MYA ARENARIA')

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three hundred clams were placed in sediment in a continuous flow seawater tank between March and June. The tank was dosed with 14C labeled benzo(a)pyrene in no. 2 fuel oil daily. Animals were removed weekly and assayed for accumulation of the radioactive material. On the sixth, t...

  18. SUBLETHAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC OIL EXPOSURE ON THE INTERTIDAL CLAM 'MACOMA BALTHICA'

    EPA Science Inventory

    When exposed to Prudhoe Bay crude oil in flowing seawater for 180 days, the small intertidal clam Macoma balthica showed behavioral, physical, physiological and biochemical changes. At a high concentration of oil in seawater (3.0 mg per l) burrowing rate decreased, respiration ra...

  19. DETERMINATION OF THE VENTILATION RATES OF INTERSTITIAL AND OVERLYING WATER BY THE CLAM MACOMA NASUTA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ventilation rates of interstitial and overlying water for the deposit-feeding, tellinid clam Macoma nasuta (Conrad) were determined using two water-soluble dyes to differentiate between the two water sources. nique exposure chamber, the clambox, was used to separate the inhal...

  20. Uptake of trace metals by the clam Macoma inquinata from clean and oil-contaminated detritus

    SciTech Connect

    Crecelius, E.A.; Augenfeld, J.M.; Woodruff, D.L.; Anderson, J.W.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increasing concern about the entry of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) into the marine environment and the effects of such entry on the composition and functioning of the marine ecosystem. Few reports have been published on the possible effect of oil on the uptake of metals from water or sediments by animals. The possibility of such effects is indicated by the work of Fletcher et al. (1979), who showed that crude oil causes a reduction in blood plasma copper concentrations in fish, and Payne et al. (1978) who reported that petroleum affected chloride regulation in fish. Luoma and Jenne (1977) have shown that the availability of sediment-bound metals to a deposit-feeding clam depended on the metal-sediment associated and sediment-to-water desorption rate. We exposed a detritivorous clam, Macoma inquinata, to clean and oil-contaminated detritus to determine the effects of the oil on metal accumulation. To measure the uptake of metals, clams were exposed to neutron activated detritus and the uptake of several isotopes (/sup 51/Cr, /sup 60/Co, /sup 152/Eu, /sup 59/Fe, /sup 46/Sc, and /sup 65/Zn) measured in the clams.

  1. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-03-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  2. The Quiet Clam Is Quite Calm: Transposed-Letter Neighborhood Effects on Eye Movements during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Rebecca L.

    2009-01-01

    In responses time tasks, inhibitory neighborhood effects have been found for word pairs that differ in a transposition of two adjacent letters (e.g., "clam/calm"). Here, the author describes two eye-tracking experiments conducted to explore transposed-letter (TL) neighborhood effects within the context of normal silent reading. In Experiment 1,…

  3. Metabolic responses of clam Ruditapes philippinarum exposed to its pathogen Vibrio tapetis in relation to diet.

    PubMed

    Richard, Gaëlle; Guérard, Fabienne; Corporeau, Charlotte; Lambert, Christophe; Paillard, Christine; Pernet, Fabrice

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of brown ring disease (BRD) development and algal diet on energy reserves and activity of enzymes related to energy metabolism, antioxidant system and immunity in Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum. We found that algal diet did not impact the metabolic response of clams exposed to Vibrio tapetis. At two days post-injection (dpi), activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) decreased whereas activities of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and catalase increased in infected clams, although no clinical signs were visible (BRD-). At 7 dpi, activities of several antioxidant and immune-related enzymes were markedly increased in BRD-likely indicating an efficient reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging compared to animals which developed clinical signs of BRD (BRD+). Therefore, resistance to BRD clinical signs appearance was associated with higher detoxification of ROS and enhancement of immune response. This study provides new biochemical indicators of disease resistance and a more comprehensive view of the global antioxidant response of clam to BRD development. PMID:26921670

  4. Fisheries ecology: hunger for shark fin soup drives clam chowder off the menu.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Andrew S

    2007-07-17

    Removal by fishing of large sharks has reduced predation-pressure on shark prey and, via a trophic cascade, caused clam populations to crash. This indirect response illustrates why fisheries should be managed in a whole-ecosystem context. PMID:17637357

  5. 50 CFR 17.45 - Special rules-snails and clams. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules-snails and clams. 17.45 Section 17.45 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED)...

  6. Effect of tributyltin on veliger larvae of the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Suguru; Oshima, Yuji; Usuki, Hironori; Hamaguchi, Masami; Hanamura, Yukio; Kai, Norihisa; Shimasaki, Yohei; Honjo, Tsuneo

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of waterborne and maternal exposure to tributyltin (TBT) on veliger larvae of the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum. In a waterborne exposure test, veliger larvae (D-larvae stage: 24h after fertilization) were exposed to TBT at measured concentrations of <0.01 (control), 0.055, 0.130, 0.340, and 0.600microg/l for 13d. The percentage of normal veliger larvae (the ratio of normal veliger larvae to all larvae) decreased significantly in all TBT treatment groups compared with that in the control group. In a maternal exposure test, 100 clams were exposed to TBT at measured concentrations of <0.01 (control), 0.061, and 0.310microg/l at 20-22 degrees C for 3 weeks, and the percentage of normal veliger larvae assessed for 13d. No maternal effects on veliger larvae from TBT were observed in TBT treatment groups as compared with the control group. These results demonstrate that waterborne TBT affects Manila clam veliger larvae, and indicates that TBT may have reduced Manila clam populations by preventing the development and survival of veliger larvae. PMID:16890269

  7. Epizootiology and distribution of transmissible sarcoma in Maryland softshell clams, Mya arenaria, 1984-1988.

    PubMed Central

    Farley, C A; Plutschak, D L; Scott, R F

    1991-01-01

    Seasonal and geographic studies of transmissible sarcoma in Maryland softshell clams, Mya arenaria, were carried out from 1984 to 1988. Three major epizootics occurred in our sampling location during this time, resulting in prevalences as high as 90%, with comparable mortalities in other high prevalence areas. The disease invaded populations of large adult clams first, later spreading to the small juvenile clam populations. An apparent 2-year cycle was noted with varying seasonal effects. Affected sites tended to be in the main stem of Chesapeake Bay north of Tangier Sound, primarily in the areas where the major harvesting occurs. Several sites, mostly in upstream locations, were consistently free of disease. The epizootiological study supports the interpretation that the disease is infectious exclusively to this species. Regression analysis between sarcoma prevalence and contaminant levels in clam tissues showed a significant correlation (p = 0.0001) between chlordane levels and this disease. No correlations were found with other contaminants that were analyzed. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:2050081

  8. Soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria, a convenient laboratory animal for screening pathogens of bivalve mollusks.

    PubMed

    Tubiash, H S

    1971-09-01

    Attempts to introduce infectious or foreign material into oysters and other bivalve mollusks usually involve force or trauma because of immediate, prolonged adduction of the tightly closing valves. The soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria, is unable to seal its valves completely and relaxes readily, exposing soft tissue and a large siphon. This species is free from fouling organisms and is readily available at all seasons in the New England and mid-Atlantic areas. Suspensions of five strains of Vibrio sp. that cause bacillary necrosis in larval and juvenile bivalve mollusks were injected into the heart, siphon tissue, and the incurrent and excurrent siphon lumina of soft-shell clams. All vibrio strains caused significant mortality, usually within 2 days. Heaviest losses resulted from heart and excurrent siphon injections. No mortality occurred in control clams injected with seawater, broth, Serratia sp., and Escherichia coli. The soft-shell clam appears to be a useful animal for testing the pathogenicity of marine microorganisms for bivalve mollusks. PMID:4940871

  9. Characterization of brevetoxin metabolism in Karenia brevis bloom-exposed clams (Mercenaria sp.) by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ann; Wang, Yuesong; El Said, Kathleen R; Plakas, Steven M

    2012-11-01

    Brevetoxin metabolites were identified and characterized in the hard clam (Mercenaria sp.) after natural exposure to Karenia brevis blooms by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Principal brevetoxins BTX-1 and BTX-2 produced by K. brevis were not detectable in clams. Metabolites of these brevetoxins found in clams included products of oxidation, reduction, hydrolysis and amino acid/fatty acid conjugation. Of highest abundance were cysteine and taurine conjugates. We also found glutathione, glycine-cysteine, and γ-glutamyl-cysteine conjugates. A series of fatty acid derivatives of cysteine-brevetoxin conjugates were also identified. PMID:22884629

  10. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Southwest): Common littleneck clam. [Protothaca staminea

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.N.

    1986-04-01

    Common littleneck clam (Protothaca staminea) supports an important sport fishery in the Pacific Southwest Region, but has no commercial importance. The species is distributed from Alaska to Baja, California. The egg develops into the trochophore stage 12 h after fertilization, and the planktonic larval stage lasts about 3 weeks. Adults usually mature in the second or third year of life. Mortality is greatest early in life. Intraspecific competition among adults is more evident in mud than in sand. Most littleneck clams live in the lower intertidal zone. Littleneck clams concentrate heavy metals and are highly sensitive to copper.

  11. The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellite (CLAMS) Campaign: Experiment Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. L.; Charlock, T.; Wielicki, B.; Kahn, R.; Martins, J.; Remer, L.; Gatebe, C.; Hobbs, P. V.; Purgold, G.; Redemann, J.; Rutledge, K.

    2001-12-01

    The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field campaign was conducted from NASA Wallops Flight Facility and successfully executed over the middle Atlantic eastern seaboard from July 10 - August 2, 2001. CLAMS is primarily a shortwave closure experiment designed to validate and improve EOS TERRA satellite data products being derived from three sensors: CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). CLAMS is jointly sponsored by the CERES, MISR and MODIS instrument teams and the NASA GEWEX Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). CLAMS primary objectives are to validate satellite-based retrievals of aerosol properties and vertical profiles of radiative flux, temperature and water vapor. Central to CLAMS measurement strategy is the Chesapeake Lighthouse, a stable sea platform located in the Atlantic Ocean, 13 miles east of Virginia Beach near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and the site of an ongoing CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE). Six research aircraft including NASA's ER-2 and OV-10, the University of Washington CV-580, the Proteus, a Cessna 210 and a Lear Jet were deployed to make detailed measurements of the atmosphere and ocean surface in the vicinity of COVE, over the surrounding ocean, over nearby NOAA buoys and over a few land sites. The measurements are used to validate and provide "ground truth" for simultaneous products being derived from TERRA data, a key step toward an improved understanding and ability to predict changes in the Earth's climate. One of the two CERES instruments on-board TERRA was programmed for Rotating Azimuth Plane Scans (RAPS) during CLAMS, increasing the CERES coverage over COVE by a factor of 10. Nine coordinated aircraft missions and numerous additional sorties were flown under a variety of atmospheric conditions and aerosol loadings. On one "golden day", July 17, all six aircraft flew coordinated patterns, vertically stacked between 100 ft and 65,000 ft over the COVE site as the TERRA satellite orbited overhead. A summary of CLAMS measurement campaign, a description of the platforms, measurements and anticipated data products will be presented.

  12. Faint Dwarfs in Nearby Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E.

    2014-06-01

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δmr ≡ (m r, sat - m r, main) ~ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δmr = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest "classical" dwarfs of the Local Group.

  13. Airborne Spectral Measurements of Ocean Anisotropy during CLAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; King, M. D.; Arnold, G. T.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) aboard the University of Washington Convair CV-580 research aircraft obtained bidirectional reflectance-distribution function (BRDF) of Atlantic Ocean and Dismal Swamp between July 10 and August 2, 2001. The BRDF measurements (15 in total, 8 uncontaminated by clouds) obtained under a variety of sun angles and wind conditions, will be used to characterize ocean anisotropy in support of Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) science objectives principally to validate products from NASA's EOS satellites, and to parameterize and validate BRDF models of the ocean. In this paper we present results of BRDF of the Ocean under different sun angles and wind conditions. The CAR is capable of measuring scattered light in fourteen spectral bands. The scan mirror, rotating at 100 rpm, directs the light into a Dall-Kirkham telescope where the beam is split into nine paths. Eight light beams pass through beam splitters, dichroics, and lenses to individual detectors (0.34-1.27 micron), and finally are registered by eight data channels. They are sampled simultaneously and continuously. The ninth beam passes through a spinning filter wheel to an InSb detector cooled by a Stirling cycle cooler. Signals registered by the ninth data channel are selected from among six spectral channels (1.55-2.30 micron). The filter wheel can either cycle through all six spectral bands at a prescribed interval (usually changing filter every fifth scan line), or lock onto any one of the six spectral bands and sample it continuously. To measure the BRF of the surface-atmosphere system, the University of Washington CV-580 had to fly in a circle about 3 km in diameter above the surface for roughly two minutes. Replicated observations (multiple circular orbits) were acquired over selected surfaces so that average BRF smooth out small-scale surface and atmospheric inhomogeneities. At an altitude of 600 m above the targeted surface area and with a 1 degree IFOV, the pixel resolution is about 10 m at nadir and about 270 m at an 80 deg. viewing angle from the CAR.

  14. Decreased in vitro mitochondrial function is associated with enhanced brain metabolism, blood flow, and memory in Surf1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Pulliam, Daniel A; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Halloran, Jonathan J; Hussong, Stacy A; Burbank, Raquel R; Bresnen, Andrew; Liu, Yuhong; Podlutskaya, Natalia; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Muir, Eric; Duong, Timothy Q; Bokov, Alex F; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Richardson, Arlan G; Van Remmen, Holly; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have challenged the prevailing view that reduced mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress are correlated with reduced longevity. Mice carrying a homozygous knockout (KO) of the Surf1 gene showed a significant decrease in mitochondrial electron transport chain Complex IV activity, yet displayed increased lifespan and reduced brain damage after excitotoxic insults. In the present study, we examined brain metabolism, brain hemodynamics, and memory of Surf1 KO mice using in vitro measures of mitochondrial function, in vivo neuroimaging, and behavioral testing. We show that decreased respiration and increased generation of hydrogen peroxide in isolated Surf1 KO brain mitochondria are associated with increased brain glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, and lactate levels, and with enhanced memory in Surf1 KO mice. These metabolic and functional changes in Surf1 KO brains were accompanied by higher levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, and by increases in the activated form of cyclic AMP response element-binding factor, which is integral to memory formation. These findings suggest that Surf1 deficiency-induced metabolic alterations may have positive effects on brain function. Exploring the relationship between mitochondrial activity, oxidative stress, and brain function will enhance our understanding of cognitive aging and of age-related neurologic disorders. PMID:23838831

  15. Characterization of breeding habitats for black and surf scoters in the eastern boreal forest and subarctic regions of Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Kidwell, D.M.; Wells, A.M.; Lohnes, E.J.R.; Osenton, P.C.; Altmann, S.H.

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed characteristics of wetland habitats used by breeding black scoters (Melanitta nigra) and surf scoters (M. perspicillata) in the eastern boreal forest and subarctic regions of Canada based on satellite telemetry data collected in the spring and summer. During 2002 and 2004, nine black scoters (four males, five females) were tracked to breeding areas in Quebec, Manitoba, and Northwest Territories. In addition, in 2001?04, seven surf scoters (three males, four females) were tracked to breeding areas in Labrador, Quebec, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. Based on satellite telemetry data, locations of black and surf scoters in breeding areas were not significantly different in regard to latitude and longitude. Presumed breeding areas were manually plotted on topographic maps and percent cover type and water were estimated. Breeding habitat of black scoters was significantly different than that for surf scoters, with black scoters mainly using open (tundra) areas (44%) and surf scoters using mainly forest areas (66%). Surf scoters presumed breeding areas were at significantly higher elevations than areas used by black scoters. Some breeding areas were associated with islands, but the role of islands for breeding areas is equivocal. These results aid in the identification of potentially critical breeding areas and provide a baseline classification of breeding habitats used by these two species.

  16. Transcriptome sequencing and microarray development for the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum: genomic tools for environmental monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, is one of the major aquaculture species in the world and a potential sentinel organism for monitoring the status of marine ecosystems. However, genomic resources for R. philippinarum are still extremely limited. Global analysis of gene expression profiles is increasingly used to evaluate the biological effects of various environmental stressors on aquatic animals under either artificial conditions or in the wild. Here, we report on the development of a transcriptomic platform for global gene expression profiling in the Manila clam. Results A normalized cDNA library representing a mixture of adult tissues was sequenced using a ultra high-throughput sequencing technology (Roche 454). A database consisting of 32,606 unique transcripts was constructed, 9,747 (30%) of which could be annotated by similarity. An oligo-DNA microarray platform was designed and applied to profile gene expression of digestive gland and gills. Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes between different tissues was performed by enrichment analysis. Expression of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NAT) analysis was also performed and bi-directional transcription appears a common phenomenon in the R. philippinarum transcriptome. A preliminary study on clam samples collected in a highly polluted area of the Venice Lagoon demonstrated the applicability of genomic tools to environmental monitoring. Conclusions The transcriptomic platform developed for the Manila clam confirmed the high level of reproducibility of current microarray technology. Next-generation sequencing provided a good representation of the clam transcriptome. Despite the known limitations in transcript annotation and sequence coverage for non model species, sufficient information was obtained to identify a large set of genes potentially involved in cellular response to environmental stress. PMID:21569398

  17. Depuration of striped venus clam (Chamelea gallina L.): effects on microorganisms, sand content, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Maffei, M; Vernocchi, P; Lanciotti, R; Guerzoni, M E; Belletti, N; Gardini, F

    2009-01-01

    This study was focused on the evaluation of the microbiological indices, defined by European legislation, before and after the depuration of clams (Chamelea gallina) landed in category B seawater. The survival of depurated clams and the meat yield were also evaluated. The results obtained from October 2002 to September 2003 evidenced a mean microbial reduction during depuration of 62% for Escherichia coli and 54% for fecal coliforms (FC). All the samples had FC counts below the limit after 24 h depuration with the exception of the August samples. E. coli was found in concentration slightly higher than the legal limit only in the samples of December and January. In August, the E. coli concentration did not decrease during the depuration, while in the other samples significant reduction of E. coli concentration was observed. Salmonella spp. and V. parahaemolyticus were never detected in the clams harvested between March and September. Vibrio alginolyticus was found in the clams harvested in May and September both before and after the depuration process. The viability of clam was not negatively affected by depuration, in fact, an increase of viability was observed with the exception of the samples of April. The meat yield was not influenced by the depurative treatment in C. gallina; the mean value found before depuration, 10.47% (with 1.95 SD), did not significantly vary after the treatment (10.58%, SD 2.07). In conclusion, the depuration conditions can improve the quality of C. gallina; however, its effects on microbiological quality depended on environmental conditions. PMID:19200100

  18. Characterization of a domoic acid binding site from Pacific razor clam.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Vera L; Bill, Brian D

    2004-08-10

    The Pacific razor clam, Siliqua patula, is known to retain domoic acid, a water-soluble glutamate receptor agonist produced by diatoms of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia. The mechanism by which razor clams tolerate high levels of the toxin, domoic acid, in their tissues while still retaining normal nerve function is unknown. In our study, a domoic acid binding site was solubilized from razor clam siphon using a combination of Triton X-100 and digitonin. In a Scatchard analysis using [3H]kainic acid, the partially-purified membrane showed two distinct receptor sites, a high affinity, low capacity site with a KD (mean +/- S.E.) of 28 +/- 9.4 nM and a maximal binding capacity of 12 +/- 3.8 pmol/mg protein and a low affinity, high capacity site with a mM affinity for radiolabeled kainic acid, the latter site which was lost upon solubilization. Competition experiments showed that the rank order potency for competitive ligands in displacing [3H]kainate binding from the membrane-bound receptors was quisqualate > ibotenate > iodowillardiine = AMPA = fluorowillardiine > domoate > kainate > L-glutamate. At high micromolar concentrations, NBQX, NMDA and ATPA showed little or no ability to displace [3H]kainate. In contrast, Scatchard analysis using [3H]glutamate showed linearity, indicating the presence of a single binding site with a KD and Bmax of 500 +/- 50 nM and 14 +/- 0.8 pmol/mg protein, respectively. These results suggest that razor clam siphon contains both a high and low affinity receptor site for kainic acid and may contain more than one subtype of glutamate receptor, thereby allowing the clam to function normally in a marine environment that often contains high concentrations of domoic acid. PMID:15261449

  19. Germinomas and teratoid siphon anomalies in softshell clams, Mya arenaria, environmentally exposed to herbicides.

    PubMed

    Gardner, G R; Yevich, P P; Hurst, J; Thayer, P; Benyi, S; Harshbarger, J C; Pruell, R J

    1991-01-01

    Seminomas and dysgerminomas are epizootic in softshell clams, Mya arenaria, from three Maine estuaries contaminated with herbicides. The first epizootic was discovered in 22% of clams collected as Searsport near Long Cove Brook and three culverts that conveyed heating oil and jet fuel spilled from a tank farm in 1971. Data from subsequent epizootiological studies and a series of long-term experimental exposures of softshell clams to no. 2 fuel oil, JP-4, and JP-5 jet fuel at the U.S. EPA, Environmental Research Laboratory in Narragansett, Rhode Island, and in the field did not support an etiology by these petroleum products. In the two recent epizootics reported here, the germinomas have been observed in 3% of the softshell clams collected from Roque Bluffs near Machiasport and from 35% of softshell clams collected from Dennysville. Mya collected at Dennysville had pericardial mesotheliomas and teratoid siphon anomalies in addition to gonadal neoplasms. Estuaries at Dennysville had been contaminated by herbicides in a 1979 accidental spray overdrift during aerial application of Tordon 101 to adjacent forests. Further investigation determined widespread use of the herbicides Tordon 101, 2,4-D,2,4,5-T, and other agrochemicals in an extensive forestry and blueberry industry in both the Roque Bluffs and the Dennysville areas. Herbicide applications at Searsport were confirmed for railroad property bordering Long Cove estuary and for Long Cove Brook adjacent to the estuary where a highway department reportedly cleans its spray equipment. Herbicide contamination is the only common denominator identified at all three sites where Mya have been found with gonadal neoplasms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2050082

  20. Role of Surf1 in heme recruitment for bacterial COX biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hannappel, Achim; Bundschuh, Freya A; Ludwig, Bernd

    2012-06-01

    Biogenesis of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a highly complex process involving subunits encoded both in the nuclear and the organellar genome; in addition, a large number of assembly factors participate in this process. The soil bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans is an interesting alternative model for the study of COX biogenesis events because the number of chaperones involved is restricted to an essential set acting in the metal centre formation of oxidase, and the high degree of sequence homology suggests the same basic mechanisms during early COX assembly. Over the last years, studies on the P. denitrificans Surf1 protein shed some light on this important assembly factor as a heme a binding protein associated with Leigh syndrome in humans. Here, we summarise our current knowledge about Surf1 and its role in heme a incorporation events during bacterial COX biogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes. PMID:21945856

  1. Littoral transport in the surf zone elucidated by an Eulerian sediment tracer.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duane, D.B.; James, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    An Eulerian, or time integration, sand tracer experiment was designed and carried out in the surf zone near Pt. Mugu, California on April 19, 1972. Data indicate that conditions of stationarity and finite boundaries required for proper application of Eulerian tracer theory exist for short time periods in the surf zone. Grain counts suggest time required for tracer sand to attain equilibrium concentration is on the order of 30-60 minutes. Grain counts also indicate transport (discharge) was strongly dependent upon grain size, with the maximum rate occurring in the size 2.5-2.75 phi, decreasing to both finer and coarser sizes. The measured instantaneous transport was at the annual rate of 2.4 x 106 m3/yr.- Authors

  2. The positive impact of structured surfing courses on the wellbeing of vulnerable young people.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Cath; Devine-Wright, Hannah; Taylor, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Involvement in positive leisure activities is a key way for young people to develop resilience and social and emotional skills. This paper outlines the evaluation of a six-week surfing intervention, the Wave Project, which aimed to boost wellbeing and confidence among 84 young people aged eight to 18, all of whom faced mental health issues or social exclusion. The intervention resulted in a significant and sustained increase in wellbeing. One year later, 70% of clients regularly attend a surf club and many have become trained as session volunteers. Parents and referrers noticed an increase in positive attitude and better communication, as well as improved self-management and behaviour at both home and school It is concluded that the Wave Project provides a demonstrable and cost-effective way to deliver mental health care, mentoring and social integration of young people. Further service evaluation of accessibility and long-term outcomes is also recommended. PMID:26357740

  3. Magnetic Activity of Ultracool Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Myles; Osten, Rachel A.; Stelzer, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Ultracool dwarfs are very low mass objects that have a temperature below about 2,800K; magnetic activity signatures probe magnetic field behavior in a mass regime intermediate between stars and planets. Very few ultracool dwarfs have detected levels of radio emission, so increasing the sample size is important for the understanding the variety of magnetic processes at work. Because of the dramatic variations in radio and X-ray properties, these probes are best done with simultaneous measurements. We report on a small sample of ultracool dwarfs that have been observed simultaneously with XMM Newton Observatory and the Jansky Very Large Array, for constraints on their coronal plasmas through X-ray and radio observations, respectively; we present the results of the radio reduction, calibration and imaging of our sample. We discuss the implications of upper limits and detections for increasing our understanding of magnetic field behavior in this regime.

  4. Branes constrictions with White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Aspeitia, Miguel A.

    2015-11-01

    We consider here a robust study of stellar dynamics for white dwarf stars with polytropic matter in the weak-field approximation using the Lane-Emden equation from the brane-world scenario. We also derive an analytical solution to the nonlocal energy density and show the behavior and sensitivity of these stars to the presence of extra dimensions. Similarly, we analyze stability and compactness, in order to show whether it is possible to agree with the conventional wisdom of white dwarfs dynamics. Our results predict an average value of the brane tension of < λ rangle ≳ 84.818MeV^4, with a standard deviation σ ˜eq 82.021MeV^4, which comes from a sample of dwarf stars, being weaker than other astrophysical observations but remaining higher than cosmological results provided by nucleosynthesis among others.

  5. Pluto: Dwarf planet 134340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, investigations of Pluto with up-to-date astronomical instruments yielded results that have been generally confirmed by the New Horizons mission. In 2006, in Prague, the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) reclassified Pluto as a member of the dwarf planet category according to the criteria defined by the IAU for the term "planet". At the same time, interest in studies of Pluto was increasing, while the space investigations of Pluto were delayed. In 2006, the New Horizons Pluto spacecraft started its journey to Pluto. On July 14, 2015, the spacecraft, being in fly-by mode, made its closest approach to Pluto. The heterogeneities and properties of the surface and rarified atmosphere were investigated thoroughly. Due to the extreme remoteness of the spacecraft and the energy limitations, it will take 18 months to transmit the whole data volume. Along with the preliminary results of the New Horizons Pluto mission, this paper reviews the basics on Pluto and its moons acquired from the ground-based observations and with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). There are only a few meteorite craters on the surfaces of Pluto and Charon, which distinctly marks them apart from such satellites of the giant planets as Ganymede and Callisto. The explanation is that the surface of Pluto is young: its age is estimated at less than 100 Myr. Ice glaciers of apparently a nitrogen nature were found. Nitrogen is also the main component of the atmosphere of Pluto. The planet demonstrates the signs of strong geologic activity, though the energy sources of these processes are unknown.

  6. How, Now, Brown Dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecher, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    The vocabulary of astronomy is riddled with colorful names for stars, from red giants to blue stragglers. Objects with masses between roughly .01 and .1 solar masses are called "brown dwarfs". Do they - could they - ever actually appear brown? Color is not a one-dimensional physical parameter like wavelength. It is a complex, psychophysical phenomenon involving not only three degrees of freedom - hue (often incorrectly equated with "color"), saturation and brightness - but also observational context. The perceptual nature of color has been known since Newton wrote in his "Opticks” in 1704: "For the Rays to speak properly are not coloured. In them there is nothing else than a certain Power and disposition to stir up a Sensation of this or that Colour.” To most observers, the 2000 or so naked eye stars observable from the northern hemisphere all appear white, with the half dozen exceptions which look reddish/orange like Betelgeuse, Arcturus and Antares. But what color would Betelgeuse (effective temperature 3600 K) appear at a distance of, say, 100 times the Earth-Sun separation? Not red. In fact, it has a temperature about 40% higher than that of an ordinary incandescent light bulb. It would appear white (or yellowish)! Can a very cool radiating (emissive) object ever appear brown? What is brown anyway? It is not a primary or even secondary color. In this presentation, we will explore the nature and meaning of "brown” by the use of several physical and computer demonstrations developed as part of "Project LITE- Light Inquiry Through Experiments", an educational materials development project. These demonstrations show that an isolated thermally radiating object will never appear brown. Hence the term "Brown Dwarf” is as nonsensical as the phrase "How, Now, Brown Cow?". Project LITE is supported by the NSF through DUE Grant # 0715975.

  7. Shell-armored wood cobbles as a potential criterion for detrital coal deposits

    SciTech Connect

    DiMarco, M.J.; Nummedal, D.

    1986-01-01

    Shell-armored wood cobbles occur on detrital-peat beaches along the seaward edge of the Mississippi Delta. Shell material consists exclusively of Mulinia lateralis, a dwarf surf clam. Soft, heavy, waterlogged wood fragments are abraded and become armored by hard shells in response to wave activity on the beach. Although their preservation potential is suspect, fossilized shell-armored wood clasts would probably be recognized as a type of coal ball and might indicate an allochthonous origin for the host coal.

  8. [Cytochrome c oxydase-deficient Leigh syndrome with homozygous mutation in SURF1 gene].

    PubMed

    Monnot, S; Chabrol, B; Cano, A; Pellissier, J F; Collignon, P; Montfort, M F; Paquis-Flucklinger, V

    2005-05-01

    Leigh syndrome is a heterogeneous disorder, usually due to a defect in oxidative metabolism. Mutations in SURF1 gene have been identified in patients with cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. We report a homozygous splice site deletion [516-2_516-1delAG] in a young girl presenting with cytochrome c oxidase-deficient Leigh syndrome. Identification of molecular defect is indispensable for genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:15885549

  9. "Sub-Surf Rocks"! An A-Level Resource Developed through an Industry-Education Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    A free internet resource called "Sub-Surf Rocks"! was launched in 2010. Its aim is to use seismic data obtained by the oil industry for enhancing the teaching of structural and economic geology at A-level (ages 16-18) in the UK. Seismic data gives a unique insight into the sub-surface and the many high-quality images coupled with ready-made (but…

  10. Vortical surf zone velocity fluctuations with 0(10) min period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmahan, Jamie H.; Reniers, Ad J. H. M.; Thornton, Ed B.

    2010-06-01

    Observations of velocity fluctuations with periods between about 4 and 30 min, thus longer than infragravity waves and referred to as very low frequency (VLF) surf zone motions, are described and compared with numerical simulations. The VLF motions discussed here exclude instabilities (generated by the wave-driven alongshore current velocity shear) that occur in the same frequency range by selecting cases with weak alongshore currents only. Numerical simulations are based on the linear shallow water equations including friction and forced by nonlinear difference-frequency interactions between incident sea and swell waves. The model is initialized with sea and swell frequency directional spectra observed seaward of the surf zone. Modeled and observed VLF velocity fluctuation magnitudes agree within a factor of 2; both increase approximately linearly with increasing incident wave height and rapidly decay seaward of the surf zone. Observed frequency-wave-number, f-ky, spectra of VLF velocity fluctuations, estimated with instrumented alongshore arrays, are energetic in a broad range of ky in the vortical band. Observed and modeled VLF pressure fluctuations are relatively weak. Still, the model momentum balance suggests that VLF pressure gradients are as important as the nonlinear wave group forcing by sea and swell in accelerating/decelerating the VLF velocities. Model calculations demonstrate that the VLF-f-ky response is a function of the modulations of short-wave forcing associated with the frequency directional distribution of the incident sea and swell spectra. This results in VLF motions which span the surf zone and have O(50-1000 m) alongshore scales with O(200-2000 s) time scales. Given the fact that modulations of short waves resulting from directionally spread incident waves are common during field conditions we expect VLFs to be ubiquitous.

  11. Accumulation of trace elements and organochlorines by surf scoters wintering in the Pacific northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Blus, L.J.; Grove, R.A.; Thompson, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Selenium, cadmium, mercury, copper, manganese, zinc, aluminum, lead, PCBs and DDE were accumulated by segments of the surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) population that winters in the Pacific Northwest, but whether the uptake occurred on breeding and/or wintering grounds was uncertain for some contaminants. Surf scoters collected in Puget Sound and San Francisco Bay (in another study) during the same period (January 1985) contained similar concentrations of cadmium, but Alsea Bay scoters contained more. Cadmium was inversely related to both liver and body weights of Northwest scoters in January; similar weight losses were reported in experimental laboratory studies. Northwest and north San Francisco Bay scoters contained similar mercury concentrations, but those in south San Francisco Bay contained higher concentrations. San Francisco Bay scoters contained higher arsenic and selenium concentrations than those in the Northwest; however, the 43.4 ppm (geometric mean, dry wt) selenium in livers at Commencement Bay in January was above levels associated with the reproductive problems in aquatic birds at Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge. Even higher concentrations of some elements may be found in surf scoters in March, because a later collection (March) at San Francisco Bay yielded higher concentrations than found there in January. Trace element concentrations in birds at a given wintering location are variable among species and may be influenced by diet, breeding grounds, and physiology (e.g., at Commencement Bay surf scoters with a sediment-associated diet contained 50X more cadmium in their kidneys than did fish-eating western grebes [Aechmophorus occidentalis]). The numerous wildlife species that live on estuaries require further attention.

  12. "Sub-Surf Rocks"! An A-Level Resource Developed through an Industry-Education Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Hazel

    2012-01-01

    A free internet resource called "Sub-Surf Rocks"! was launched in 2010. Its aim is to use seismic data obtained by the oil industry for enhancing the teaching of structural and economic geology at A-level (ages 16-18) in the UK. Seismic data gives a unique insight into the sub-surface and the many high-quality images coupled with ready-made (but

  13. In Brief: Dwarf planet named

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-09-01

    The dwarf planet 2003 UB313, which had been nicknamed `Xena,' has been given the formal name of Eris, the International Astronomical Union announced on 13 September. Eris, which was discovered in January 2005, was named for the Greek goddess of discord. Its moon has been named Dysnomia, for the daughter of Eris, the demon goddess of lawlessness. Eris was assigned dwarf planet status in an IAU resolution approved in August (see Eos 87(35), 2006) along with Pluto and Ceres. Pluto's demotion prompted the Minor Planet Center, which operates under the auspices of the IAU, to assign Pluto an asteroid number, 134340, on 7 September.

  14. Pedestrian detection in far-infrared daytime images using a hierarchical codebook of SURF.

    PubMed

    Besbes, Bassem; Rogozan, Alexandrina; Rus, Adela-Maria; Bensrhair, Abdelaziz; Broggi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in intelligent vehicles concerns pedestrian detection for driving assistance. Recent experiments have showed that state-of-the-art descriptors provide better performances on the far-infrared (FIR) spectrum than on the visible one, even in daytime conditions, for pedestrian classification. In this paper, we propose a pedestrian detector with on-board FIR camera. Our main contribution is the exploitation of the specific characteristics of FIR images to design a fast, scale-invariant and robust pedestrian detector. Our system consists of three modules, each based on speeded-up robust feature (SURF) matching. The first module allows generating regions-of-interest (ROI), since in FIR images of the pedestrian shapes may vary in large scales, but heads appear usually as light regions. ROI are detected with a high recall rate with the hierarchical codebook of SURF features located in head regions. The second module consists of pedestrian full-body classification by using SVM. This module allows one to enhance the precision with low computational cost. In the third module, we combine the mean shift algorithm with inter-frame scale-invariant SURF feature tracking to enhance the robustness of our system. The experimental evaluation shows that our system outperforms, in the FIR domain, the state-of-the-art Haar-like Adaboost-cascade, histogram of oriented gradients (HOG)/linear SVM (linSVM) and MultiFtrpedestrian detectors, trained on the FIR images. PMID:25871724

  15. Human Action Poselets Estimation via Color G-Surf in Still Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favorskaya, M.; Novikov, D.; Savitskaya, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Human activity is a persistent subject of interest in the last decade. On the one hand, video sequences provide a huge volume of motion information in order to recognize the human active actions. On the other hand, the spatial information about static human poses is valuable for human action recognition. Poselets were introduced as latent variables representing a configuration for mutual locations of body parts and allowing different views of description. In current research, some modifications of Speeded-Up Robust Features (SURF) invariant to affine geometrical transforms and illumination changes were tested. First, a grid of rectangles is imposed on object of interest in a still image. Second, sparse descriptor based on Gauge-SURF (G-SURF) invariant to color/lighting changes is constructed for each rectangle separately. A common Spatial POselet Descriptor (SPOD) aggregates the SPODs of rectangles with following random forest classification in order to receive fast classification results. The proposed approach was tested on samples from PASCAL Visual Object Classes (VOC) Dataset and Challenge 2010 providing accuracy 61-68% for all possible 3D poses locations and 82-86% for front poses locations regarding to nine action categories.

  16. Two Japanese patients with Leigh syndrome caused by novel SURF1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Junpei; Kaneko, Kaori; Honda, Masakazu; Harashima, Hiroko; Murayama, Kei; Wada, Takahito; Takano, Kyoko; Iai, Mizue; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Shimbo, Hiroko; Aida, Noriko; Ohtake, Akira; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2012-11-01

    We report two patients with Leigh syndrome that showed a combination of facial dysmorphism and MRI imaging indicating an SURF1 deficiency, which was confirmed by sequence analysis. Case 1 is a 3-year-old girl with failure to thrive and developmental delay. She presented with tachypnea at rest and displayed facial dysmorphism including frontal bossing, lateral displacement of inner canthi, esotropia, maxillary hypoplasia, slightly upturned nostril, and hypertrichosis dominant on the forehead and extremities. Case 2 is an 8-year-old boy with respiratory failure. He had been diagnosed as selective complex IV deficiency. Case 2 displayed facial dysmorphism and hypertrichosis. Since both patients displayed characteristic facial dysmorphism and MRI findings, we sequenced the SURF1 gene and identified two heterozygous mutations; c.49+1 G>T and c.752_753del in Case 1, and homozygous c.743 C>A in Case 2. For patients with Leigh syndrome showing these facial dysmorphism and hypertrichosis, sequence analysis of the SURF1 gene may be useful. PMID:22410471

  17. Rehabilitation and long-term course of nontraumatic myelopathy associated with surfing.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiro; Moriizumi, Shigehiro; Toki, Megumi; Murakami, Takanori; Ishiai, Sumio

    2013-09-01

    A nontraumatic spinal cord injury related to surfing is called surfer's myelopathy. The case of a 26-yr-old man who became paraplegic after surfing without apparent traumatic events is described. Physical examination revealed a spinal cord injury at T12 according to the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale A. The initial magnetic resonance image revealed a fusiform swelling of the spinal cord from T7-8 to the conus, which was hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 6 mos of rehabilitation, the patient was followed for more than 1 yr after onset. He became able to walk with knee-ankle-foot-orthoses without assistance. A magnetic resonance image obtained 1 yr after the onset of paraplegia showed an atrophic spinal cord from T7-8 to the conus. The course of the neurologic findings and the imaging studies suggest that the pathogenesis of surfer's myelopathy may be ischemia of the anterior spinal artery territory induced by the abnormal trunk posture while surfing. PMID:22019977

  18. Estimating wave energy dissipation in the surf zone using thermal infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Roxanne J.; Chickadel, C. Chris; Jessup, Andrew T.; Thomson, Jim

    2015-06-01

    Thermal infrared (IR) imagery is used to quantify the high spatial and temporal variability of dissipation due to wave breaking in the surf zone. The foam produced in an actively breaking crest, or wave roller, has a distinct signature in IR imagery. A retrieval algorithm is developed to detect breaking waves and extract wave roller length using measurements taken during the Surf Zone Optics 2010 experiment at Duck, NC. The remotely derived roller length and an in situ estimate of wave slope are used to estimate dissipation due to wave breaking by means of the wave-resolving model by Duncan (1981). The wave energy dissipation rate estimates show a pattern of increased breaking during low tide over a sand bar, consistent with in situ turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate estimates from fixed and drifting instruments over the bar. When integrated over the surf zone width, these dissipation rate estimates account for 40-69% of the incoming wave energy flux. The Duncan (1981) estimates agree with those from a dissipation parameterization by Janssen and Battjes (2007), a wave energy dissipation model commonly applied within nearshore circulation models.

  19. Alongshore momentum in the outer surf zone under hurricane wind and wave forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, R. P.; Hanson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Wave breaking is the dominant physical process acting along beaches and coasts exposed to surface waves during storms, causing large gradients in wave momentum that generate strong currents in the nearshore zone. At the outer edge of the wave breaking region, strong horizontal current shear between the alongshore currents and alongshelf flows can develop and drive strong shear and mixing between these regions. Wave and current observations from a cross-shore array of six acoustic sensors in water depths of 2-11 m at Duck, NC, are used to elucidate the balance of momentum under storm wave conditions with wide surf zones, corresponding to offshore hurricanes. Offshore hurricanes that are distal (calm local wind) and proximal (local wind up to 25 m/s) generate large wave heights (3-5 m) and very strong alongshore currents (up to 2 m/s). We find that horizontal shear contributes strongly to momentum at the seaward limit of the surf zone and that radiation stress gradients, bottom stress, wind stress, mixing and advection play important roles at different times and locations in the cross-shore integrated momentum balance. The results provide insight into the cross-shore distribution of the alongshore current and the connection between alongshore flows inside the surf zone and outside it during major storms.

  20. Vertical structure of mean cross-shore currents across a barred surf zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, John W.; Sallenger, Asbury H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Mean cross-shore currents observed across a barred surf zone are compared to model predictions. The model is based on a simplified momentum balance with a turbulent boundary layer at the bed. Turbulent exchange is parameterized by an eddy viscosity formulation, with the eddy viscosity Aυ independent of time and the vertical coordinate. Mean currents result from gradients due to wave breaking and shoaling, and the presence of a mean setup of the free surface. Descriptions of the wave field are provided by the wave transformation model of Thornton and Guza [1983]. The wave transformation model adequately reproduces the observed wave heights across the surf zone. The mean current model successfully reproduces the observed cross-shore flows. Both observations and predictions show predominantly offshore flow with onshore flow restricted to a relatively thin surface layer. Successful application of the mean flow model requires an eddy viscosity which varies horizontally across the surf zone. Attempts are made to parameterize this variation with some success. The data does not discriminate between alternative parameterizations proposed. The overall variability in eddy viscosity suggested by the model fitting should be resolvable by field measurements of the turbulent stresses. Consistent shortcomings of the parameterizations, and the overall modeling effort, suggest avenues for further development and data collection.

  1. Pedestrian Detection in Far-Infrared Daytime Images Using a Hierarchical Codebook of SURF

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, Bassem; Rogozan, Alexandrina; Rus, Adela-Maria; Bensrhair, Abdelaziz; Broggi, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in intelligent vehicles concerns pedestrian detection for driving assistance. Recent experiments have showed that state-of-the-art descriptors provide better performances on the far-infrared (FIR) spectrum than on the visible one, even in daytime conditions, for pedestrian classification. In this paper, we propose a pedestrian detector with on-board FIR camera. Our main contribution is the exploitation of the specific characteristics of FIR images to design a fast, scale-invariant and robust pedestrian detector. Our system consists of three modules, each based on speeded-up robust feature (SURF) matching. The first module allows generating regions-of-interest (ROI), since in FIR images of the pedestrian shapes may vary in large scales, but heads appear usually as light regions. ROI are detected with a high recall rate with the hierarchical codebook of SURF features located in head regions. The second module consists of pedestrian full-body classification by using SVM. This module allows one to enhance the precision with low computational cost. In the third module, we combine the mean shift algorithm with inter-frame scale-invariant SURF feature tracking to enhance the robustness of our system. The experimental evaluation shows that our system outperforms, in the FIR domain, the state-of-the-art Haar-like Adaboost-cascade, histogram of oriented gradients (HOG)/linear SVM (linSVM) and MultiFtrpedestrian detectors, trained on the FIR images. PMID:25871724

  2. Cohort life tables for a population of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria L., in the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimova, Alexandra V.; Maximovich, Nikolay V.; Filippova, Nadezhda A.

    2015-06-01

    The Mya arenaria generation in the White Sea was observed for almost the whole life cycle (around 25 years). Using the data on this generation dynamics, the cohort life table was built. The main purpose of the research is analysis of age-specific mortality in this soft-shell clam population. The mortality rate was found to change more than tenfold throughout the study period. No regular changes in its value were observed. Periods of low mortality alternated with periods of much higher mortality. Several reasons for the increase in M. arenaria mortality rate during its life cycle are proposed: (a) living in the surface sediment layer at early stages of life cycle (unstable environment, high mortality of non-viable clams, predator impact); (b) intense intraspecific relationships in dense aggregations of young clams; (c) increased intraspecific competition during periods of the rapid individual growth; (d) ageing (clam mortality increases with older age—achievement of an average and a maximum lifespan).

  3. White Dwarf-M Dwarf Binaries in the Solar Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Julie N.; Morgan, Dylan P.; Thorstensen, John R.; Lepine, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    As the most populous constituents of our galaxy, low-mass dwarfs are vital to understanding our galaxy's structure and kinematics. While wide White dwarf-M dwarf binaries (WD+dMs) can provide significant constraints on M dwarf age-activity relations, close WD+dMs can aid our understanding of the nature of common envelope evolution and its products (e.g. cataclysmic variables). We present the discovery and characterization of 186 new WD+dMs from the SUPERBLINK proper motion survey. These WD+dMs were discovered as a result of a search for post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs) and are part of an ongoing project to understand the space density and distribution of WD+dMs and PCEBs. In order to identify the sample of WD+dMs in SUPERBLINK, we utilized NUV-V and V-Ks colors. Here, we describe the discovery method and color selection, as well as present a detailed description of the properties of our sample based on two-component fits to our optical spectroscopy obtained at the MDM Observatory.

  4. Annual variations of biogenic element contents of manila clam ( Ruditapes philippinarum) bottom-cultivated in Jiaozhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zan, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Binduo; Zhang, Chongliang; Ren, Yiping

    2014-08-01

    Manila clam ( Ruditapes philippinarum) was monthly sampled from its benthic aquaculture area in Jiaozhou Bay from May 2009 to June 2010. The annual variations of major elemental composition, organic content, fatness and element ratio of Manila clam were examined. The element removal effect of clam farming in Jiaozhou Bay was analyzed based on natural mortality and clam harvest. The results indicated that the variation trend of carbon content in shell ( C shell) was similar to that in clam ( C clam). Such a variation was higher in summer and autumn than in other seasons, which ranged from 9.10 ± 0.13 to 10.38 ± 0.09 mmol g-1 and from 11.28 ± 0.29 to 12.36 ± 0.06 mmol g-1, respectively. Carbon content of flesh ( C flesh) showed an opposite variation trend to that of shell in most months, varying from 29.42 ± 0.05 to 33.64 ± 0.62 mmol g-1. Nitrogen content of shell ( N shell) and flesh ( N flesh) changed seasonally, which was relatively low in spring and summer. N shell and N flesh varied from 0.07 ± 0.009 to 0.14 ± 0.009 mmol g-1 and from 5.46 ± 0.12 to 7.39 ± 0.43 mmol g-1, respectively. Total nitrogen content of clam ranged from 0.50 ± 0.003 to 0.76 ± 0.10 mmol g-1 with a falling tend except for a high value in March 2010. Phosphorus content of clam ( N clam) fluctuated largely, while phosphorus content of shell ( P shell) was less varied than that of flesh ( P flesh). P shell varied from 0.006 ± 0.001 to 0.016 ± 0.001 mmol g-1; while P flesh fluctuated between 0.058 ± 0.017 and 0.293 ± 0.029 mmol g-1. P clam ranged from 0.015 ± 0.002 to 0.041 ± 0.006 mmol g-1. Carbon and nitrogen content were slightly affected by shell length, width or height. Elemental contents were closely related to the reproduction cycle. The removal amounts of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from clam harvest and natural death in Jiaozhou Bay were 2.92×104t, 1420 t and 145 t, respectively. The nutrient removal may aid to reduce the concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus, the main causes of eutrophication, and to maintain the ecosystem health of Jiaozhou Bay.

  5. Effect of cooling rates and temperatures on quality and safety of quahog clams (Mercenaria mercenaria).

    PubMed

    Granata, Linda Ankenman; Bourne, Dianne Wall; Flick, George J; Peirson, Michael; Riley, Tara; Croonenberghs, Robert E; Kensler, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    The model ordinance in the National Shellfish Sanitation Program's Guide for the Control of Molluscan Shellfish was initially established for oysters; however, the clam industry also follows the protocol. Rapid cooling during periods when the growing waters exceed 80 °F (26.7 °C) results in cold shock, which causes unacceptable mortalities in clams. The clam industry was looking for a procedure to lower the clams to the standard temperature while minimizing shell shock mortalities during the warm summer months. Three tempering treatments were examined, and total aerobic plate counts (APCs) and most-probable-number (MPN) counts of Vibrio, V. parahaemolyticus, and fecal coliforms were enumerated. In treatment 1 (control), clams were harvested, held for 5 h at 90 °F (32.2 °C), and then moved to 45 °F (7.2 °C) for storage. In treatment 2, clams were harvested and held for 5 h at 90 °F (32.2 °C), followed by 12 h at 65 °F (18.3 °C) and 12 h at 55 °F (12.8 °C), and then were moved to 45 °F (7.2 °C) for long-term storage. In treatment 3, clams were harvested and held for 5 h at 90 °F (32.2 °C), followed by 24 h at 55 °F (12.8 °C) before being moved to 45 °F (7.2 °C) for long-term storage. Three replicate trials were performed with triplicate analyses during late June through early to mid-August. The current National Shellfish Sanitation Program standard is treatment 1; it contained statistically (P ≤ 0.05) higher total APCs than treatments 2 and 3 throughout the 21-day storage period. APCs ranged from 2.3 × 10(4) immediately after harvest to 2.7 × 10(6), 1.6 × 10(5), and 4.8 × 10(5) for treatments 1, 2, and 3, respectively, after 14 days of storage. A statistical analysis showed that treatments 2 and 3 had significantly lower total MPN per gram Vibrio than treatment 1 on day 7 but were equal to treatment 1 on days 1 and 14. MPN per gram for V. parahaemolyticus was statistically lower in treatments 2 and 3 than in treatment 1 on storage days 1 and 7. However, on day 14, treatment 3 was significantly lower than treatments 1 and 2. There was no statistical difference for fecal coliforms. The greatest mortality occurred in treatment 1 (87.4%), followed by treatment 2 (83.3%) and treatment 3 (66.0%). The outcome of this research clearly shows that treatments 2 and 3 can cool clams to a temperature of 45 °F (7.2 °C) without compromising quality or safety and can reduce the number of dead clams introduced into the marketplace. PMID:24780343

  6. Enzymatic and histopathologic biomarkers as indicators of contaminant exposure and effect in Asian clam (Potamocorbula amurensis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teh, S.J.; Clark, S.L.; Brown, C.L.; Luoma, S.N.; Hinton, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Enzymatic and histopathologic alterations of the digestive gland, gill, gonad, and kidney were studied in Asian clam (Potamocorbula amurensis) in April, 1997 from each of four United States Geological Survey (USGS) stations in the San Francisco Estuary. Stations were selected based on differing body burdens of metallic contaminants in clams (Stn 4.1>6.1>8.1>12.5) observed over 7 years. Because no pristine sites are known within the estuary and because no laboratory-reared stocks of P. amurensis were available, clams from station 12.5 served as reference animals. Histopathologic analysis revealed no lesions in clams collected from station 12.5. Mild digestive gland atrophy and moderate distal kidney tubular vacuolation were seen in clams collected from station 8.1. Mild digestive gland atrophy, moderate kidney tubular atrophy, and moderate gill inflammation were seen in clams collected from station 6.1. Lesions found only in clams from station 4.1 were: (1) severe inflammation and moderate atrophy of primary ducts and diverticula, and decreased numbers of heterophagosomes and heterolysosomes in diverticula of the digestive gland; (2) severe gill inflammation; (3) severe kidney tubular atrophy; (4) severe ovarian and testicular inflammation and necrosis (5) decreased numbers of mature ova; and (6) decreased number of glycogen storage cells in the ovary and testis. Localization of specific enzymes including adenosine triphosphatase (ATP), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALKP), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) was performed and correlated, in serial sections with glycogen (PAS) and haematoxylin and eosin stains. Enzymatic analysis revealed: (1) increased digestive diverticula ATP in stations 6.1 and 4.1; (2) decreased digestive diverticula ACP in stations 6.1 and 4.1 and proximal kidney tubular ACP deficiency in station 4.1; (3) no ALKP differences among stations; (4) increased distal kidney tubular GGT at station 12.5 and decreased distal kidney tubular GGT at station 4.1; (5) decreased digestive diverticula G6PDH G6PDH in all stations except 12.5 and decreased proximal kidney tubular G6PDH in stations 8.1 and 6.1. It is possible that other anthropogenic and natural stressors may have affected the results in this study. However, the prevalence and increased severity of lesions in clams with highest metal body burden suggests a contaminant- associated etiology. Enzymatic and histopathologic biomarker alterations identified in this study were positively correlated with the metal body burden. Clams with the higher prevalence of diseases and enzyme alterations also showed a lower condition index and glycogen content in the month when histopathological assessment was performed. Further study will seek to develop enzymatic and histopathologic biomarkers for use in controlled laboratory conditions to help validate the field study.

  7. Effect of fluctuating low-level chlorine concentrations on valve-movement behavior of the asiatic clam (corbicula fluminea)

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, K.D. . Graduate Program in Ecology); Peterson, M.J. )

    1994-03-01

    Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) exposed to water from the upstream section of East Fork Popular Creek (Oak Ridge, TN), a stream receiving chlorine-containing industrial discharges, were monitored for changes in valve movement patterns. Individual clams were attached to an automated valve-movement monitoring apparatus and suspended in flow-through tanks located streamside. Valve-closure behavior of two clams exposed to untreated water was compared to that of two clams exposed to dechlorinated water for two 18-d periods. Chlorine concentrations in untreated water exhibited a pronounced diurnal cycle, fluctuating between a mean daily minimum of 0.02 mg/L total residual chlorine (TRC) during the day and a mean daily maximum of 0.07 mg/L TRC at night during the second monitoring period. In over 2,300 fifteen-minute intervals, clams closed for 0.70 of the intervals while exposed to untreated water, but closed for only 0.22 of the intervals while exposed to dechlorinated water. Treatment differences in valve closure were tested by repeated-measures ANOVA. A significant treatment effect on valve closure was found in the first monitoring period. Graphical analysis of valve-closure records revealed duel cycles that differed between treatments. Clams in untreated water usually opened only near midday, when TRC concentrations were lowest. Clams in dechlorinated water opened more often, for longer periods, and appeared to respond to dawn and dusk changes in light. The valve-closure behavior of clams in untreated water effectively minimized tissue exposure to waterborne TRC, presumably reducing toxic effects. Valve-closure monitoring in conjunction with other studies may help estimate the effect of tissue isolation on the toxicity or bioaccumulation of waterborne chemicals. Such estimates could improve prediction of toxicological or ecological consequences of stressful conditions on bivalves.

  8. Length-weight relationship of the freshwater clam, Galatea paradoxa (born 1778) from the Volta Estuary, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Obirikorang, K A; Adjei-Boateng, D; Madkour, H A; Amisah, S; Otchere, F A

    2013-02-15

    The length-weight relationship of the threatened freshwater clam, Galatea paradoxa (Born 1778) from the Volta Estuary, Ghana was studied over a two-year period, from March 2008 to February 2010, to aid in the development of stock assessment models for the sustainable management of the remaining clam stock. Data reported in this study were collected at monthly intervals and covered varying depths of the Estuary ranging from 0.5 to about 10 m. Overall, a total of 5276 clams with shell lengths ranging from 3.40 to 89.24 mm and total weight from 0.10 to 154.00 g were sampled during the study period. The length-weight relationships were highly significant (p < 0.0001) for all the months and the b-values ranged from 2.023 (January 2010) to 3.874 (June 2009). The calculated b-values indicated that clams exhibited different growth patterns at different periods but overall, the pooled samples of 5276 individuals exhibited an isometric growth pattern (b = 3.003). The observed monthly growth patterns exhibited by G. paradoxa appeared to be largely influenced by the reproductive cycle of the organism. During the periods leading to spawning, the clams generally exhibited positive allometric growth patterns (weight increasing faster than length) which appeared to be strongly linked to the build-up of proteins and carbohydrates in their tissues. Successive negative allometric growth patterns (length increasing faster relative to weight) were, however, observed from March to June 2008 and from December 2009 to February 2010, which are possibly indicative of the loss in tissue weight that occurs as a direct result of the spawning process. It will thus be suitable to institute a close season to coincide with the spawning period of the clams to avoid the harvesting of clams during the spawning period which will enhance future recruitment of the clam stock. PMID:24171267

  9. Pathologic survey on the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum (Adams and Reeve 1850) from Haeju off the western coastal Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyun-Sung; Park, Kwang-Jae; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2010-06-01

    Pathologic condition of Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum collected from Haeju off the west coast of North Korea in February and March 2007 was investigated in this study. The diagnostics included a protozoan parasite, Perkinsus olseni, the brown ring disease (BRD) caused by bacteria Vibrio tapetis and metazoan parasites Trematod and Cestod. P. olseni infection was examined using histology and Ray’s fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) assay along with Choi’s NaOH digestion technique. Trematode and cestode infection was also examined from the histology. A total of 140 clams with 35-45 mm in shell length (2-3 years old) were analyzed. Condition factor (CF), a ratio of the wet tissue weight to the shell dry weight, ranged from 0.445±0.074 (February) to 0.544±0.132 (March). Total body burden of P. olseni (i.e. infection intensity) ranged from 18,644±37,755 (February) to 26,933±80,611 cells/g wet tissue (March) with the prevalence of 76.7-43.3% (March) respectively. Prevalence of trematode and cestode infection in February and March varied 22.5-25.0 and 15.0-22.5% respectively. Infection intensity of V. tapetis ranged 1-2 and the prevalence was 1.4 (February) and 5.7% (March). Prevalence and infection intensity of P. olseni in clams from Haeju was comparatively lower than those of clams reported on the west coast of Korea. BRD and the other metazoan parasite infection were also relatively lower or similar to the condition of the clams reported previously. CF of Haeju clams was also relatively higher than the clams in Gyeonggi Bay and Taean, suggesting that Haeju clams had relatively better pathologic and health condition.

  10. Archive and Analysis of Data Collected Aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 Research Aircraft in CLAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2004-01-01

    Work under this grant has been concerned with: (a) quality-assurance (QA) checking of the data collected on the University of Washington s (UW) Convair- 580 in the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field study in the Summer of 2001, (b) providing these data to the Langley DAAC, (c) providing specific data to users as requested, (d) analysis of portions of the data and publication of results, and (e) presentation of CLAMS results at workshop and conferences.

  11. FORMATION OF DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES VIA MERGERS OF DISKY DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Lokas, Ewa L.; Klimentowski, Jaroslaw; Mayer, Lucio; Knebe, Alexander

    2011-10-10

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate whether binary mergers between rotationally supported dwarfs can lead to the formation of dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Our simulation campaign is based on a hybrid approach combining cosmological simulations and controlled numerical experiments. We select merger events from a Constrained Local Universe simulation of the Local Group (LG) and record the properties of the interacting dwarf-sized halos. This information is subsequently used to seed controlled experiments of binary encounters between dwarf galaxies consisting of exponential stellar disks embedded in cosmologically motivated dark matter halos. These simulations are designed to reproduce eight cosmological merger events, with initial masses of the interacting systems in the range {approx}(5-60) x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, occurring quite early in the history of the LG, more than 10 Gyr ago. We compute the properties of the merger remnants as a distant observer would and demonstrate that at least three of the simulated encounters produce systems with kinematic and structural properties akin to those of the classic dSphs in the LG. Tracing the history of the remnants in the cosmological simulation to z = 0, we find that two dSph-like objects remain isolated at distances {approx}> 800 kpc from either the Milky Way or M31. These systems constitute plausible counterparts of the remote dSphs Cetus and Tucana which reside in the LG outskirts, far from the tidal influence of the primary galaxies. We conclude that merging of rotationally supported dwarfs represents a viable mechanism for the formation of dSphs in the LG and similar environments.

  12. Comparative study on differential accumulation of PSP toxins between cockle (Acanthocardia tuberculatum) and sweet clam (Callista chione).

    PubMed

    Sagou, Reqia; Amanhir, Rachid; Taleb, Hamid; Vale, Paulo; Blaghen, Mohamed; Loutfi, Mohamed

    2005-11-01

    At the western Mediterranean coast of Morocco, the cockle (Acanthocardia tuberculatum) contained persistent high levels of paralytic shellfish toxins for several years, while other bivalve molluscs such as sweet clam (Callista chione) from the same vicinity were contaminated seasonally to a much lesser extent. In order to understand the causes of this prolonged contamination, a comparative study on PSP decontamination between sweet clam and cockle was conducted from November 2001 until June 2002. PSP toxicity was analysed by automated pre-column oxidation (Prechromatographic oxidation and LC-FD) in several organs of both species, namely digestive gland, foot, gill, mantle, muscle and siphon for sweet clams. The results showed that cockle sequester PSP toxins preferably in non-visceral organs (Foot, gill and mantle) contrary to sweet clam that sequester them in visceral tissues (digestive gland). The toxin profile of cockle organs indicated dominance of dcSTX, whereas sweet clam tissues contained especially C-toxins. Substantial differences in toxin profile between cockle and sweet clam, from the same area as well as from the composition of PSP toxin producer, Gymnodinium catenatum, confirm the bioconversion of PSP toxins in cockle. PMID:16168451

  13. De novo RNA-Seq Analysis of the Venus Clam, Cyclina sinensis, and the Identification of Immune-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Baoping; Ren, Yipeng; Gao, Jing; Gao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The Venus clam, Cyclina sinensis, is one of the most important bivalves in China. In recent years, increasing expansive morbidity has occurred in breeding areas, imposing significant losses on the national economy. To understand the molecular mechanisms of immune-related genes, we analyzed and sequenced hemolymph samples that were injected with two pathogenic microorganisms using the Illumina Miseq system. After trimming, more than 12 M PE reads with an average length greater than 410 bp were assembled into 70,079 transcripts with a mean length of 980 bp. Using a homology analysis, 102 (135 transcripts) potentially immune-related genes were identified, and most of them exhibited a similar pattern in both samples. These data indicated that the response of the clam to both types of bacterial infection might follow a similar molecular mechanism. Using the TreeFam method, 9,904 gene families and 1,031 unique families of the clam were preliminarily classified in comparison to five related species. A significant number of SSRs were identified, which could facilitate the identification of polymorphisms in Venus clam populations. These datasets will improve our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms driving the immune response to bacterial infection in clam populations and will provide basic data about clam breeding and disease control. PMID:25853714

  14. Identification and expression of differentially expressed genes in the hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, in response to quahog parasite unknown (QPX)

    PubMed Central

    Perrigault, Mickael; Tanguy, Arnaud; Allam, Bassem

    2009-01-01

    Background The hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, has been affected by severe mortality episodes associated with the protistan parasite QPX (Quahog Parasite Unknown) for several years. Despite the commercial importance of hard clams in the United States, molecular bases of defense mechanisms in M. mercenaria, especially during QPX infection, remain unknown. Results Our study used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), as well as the construction of cDNA libraries from hemocytes to identify genes related to the defense of the hard clam against its parasite. Hard clams were experimentally infected with QPX and SSH was performed on mRNA samples extracted from mantle and gill tissues at different times post-challenge. A total of 298 clones from SSH libraries and 1352 clones from cDNA libraries were sequenced. Among these sequences, homologies with genes involved in different physiological processes related to signal transduction, stress response, immunity and protein synthesis were identified. Quantitative PCR revealed significant changes in the expression of several of these genes in response to QPX challenge and demonstrated significant correlations in terms of levels of gene expression between intermediates of signalling pathways and humoral defense factors, such as big defensin and lysozyme. Conclusion Results of this study allowed the detection of modifications caused by QPX at the transcriptional level providing insight into clam immune response to the infection. These investigations permitted the identification of candidate genes and pathways for further analyses of biological bases of clam resistance to QPX allowing for a better understanding of bivalve immunity in general. PMID:19682366

  15. Biochemical performance of native and introduced clam species living in sympatry: The role of elements accumulation and partitioning.

    PubMed

    Velez, Cátia; Leandro, Sérgio; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    The present study reports metal and arsenic contamination in sediments, as well as element accumulation and partitioning in native (Ruditapes decussatus and Venerupis corrugata) and introduced (Ruditapes philippinarum) clam species living in sympatry at the Óbidos lagoon (Portugal). The biochemical performance and the human health risks derived from the consumption of these species are also discussed. The results obtained showed that R. decussatus was the most abundant species in all the sampling sites, revealing that the introduced clam has not yet supplanted the native species. The concentration of elements was higher in areas with higher Total Organic Matter (TOM) and fines content, being Chromium (Cr), Copper (Cu) and Lead (Pb) the most abundant metals. Clams from these areas showed the highest concentration of elements but the lowest bioaccumulation levels. Furthermore, except for As, higher concentration of elements was found in clams insoluble fraction, the less toxic fraction to the organisms. Due to the low contamination levels and because elements, except As, were mainly allocated to the insoluble fraction, clams presented similar biochemical parameters among distinct areas, with no significant oxidative stress induced. Furthermore, clams from the Óbidos lagoon represent a low health risk to human consumption since, except for As, their contamination levels were below the maximum permissible limits defined by international organizations. PMID:26112075

  16. Occurrence and Seasonal Variations of Lipophilic Marine Toxins in Commercial Clam Species along the Coast of Jiangsu, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin-Zhi; Cheng, Ying; Li, Na; Wen, Hong-Mei; Liu, Rui; Shan, Chen-Xiao; Chai, Chuan; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have examined lipophilic marine toxins (LMTs) in shellfish and toxic algae worldwide, but the occurrence and seasonal variations of LMTs in commercial clams (including Mactra veneriformis, Ruditapes philippinarum, Meretrix meretrix, and Cyclina sinensis) at their major culturing area in Jiangsu, China, remain largely unexplored. In this study, a new solid phase extraction (SPE) in combination with an ultra-fast liquid chromatography and triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UFLC-TQ-MS) method was developed to determine the presence of 10 typical LMTs (okadaic acid (OA), yessotoxins (YTXs), azaspiracids (AZA1-3), pectenotoxins (PTX2), gymnodimine (GYM), dinophysistoxins (DTX1&2), and spirolides (SPX1)) in the aforementioned four clam matrices. After confirmation of its sensitivity and precision, this method was used to evaluate the amounts of LMTs in clam samples harvested in five aquaculture zones of the Jiangsu coastal area. Monthly variations of GYM, PTX2, OA, and DTX1&2 in 400 clam samples from the sample areas were determined from January 2014 through August 2015. Peak values were observed during May and August. This is the first systematic report of LMTs detected in clam samples harvested in Jiangsu. Follow-up research and the implementation of protective measures are needed to ensure the safety of clams harvested in this area. PMID:26712791

  17. Immunological Profile of the Yellow Clam Mesodesma mactroides (Mesodesmatidae) from the Southern Coast of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva Santos, Juan Jethro; Carvalho, Yuri Bovi; de Alcantara Lopes, Diogo Luiz; Romano, Luis Alberto

    2016-03-01

    The yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides (Mesodesmatidae) is a sandy beach bivalve that is distributed from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to the south of Buenos Aires province, Argentina. The yellow clam population has been declining in recent decades. To increase our understanding of this species, we evaluated the immunological status of yellow clams collected during different seasons from various areas in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. We characterized the hemocytes, determined the differential hemocyte counts (DHCs), calculated the apoptotic index, and evaluated the incidence of parasites in yellow clams through histological analysis. We identified two types of hemocyte (hyaline and granular) that showed significant variation in DHCs among sampling areas during the summer and winter. The apoptotic index only exhibited significant variation during the summer. Histopathological analysis results did not significantly differ among sampling areas. This work demonstrated that environmental variation (e.g., temperature and salinity) associated with anthropogenic actions may be affecting the immune system of yellow clams. However, more studies are needed to determine the full influence of these factors on the yellow clam's immune system and thus contribute to future management and aquaculture of the species. Received May 10, 2015; accepted October 28, 2015. PMID:26913557

  18. Size-related and seasonal diet of the manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum), as determined using dual stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Yeon Jee; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Stable isotope ratios of lab-cultured Manila clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) and those from natural tidal flats of Seonjae Island in Korea were investigated in terms of their dietary uptake patterns in relation to body size and season. The smallest size group of wild Manila clams revealed significantly depleted δ15N based on the results of a one-way ANOVA. There was significant seasonal change in the proportional contribution of food sources, especially in winter, from benthic particulate organic matter (BPOM) to pelagic particulate organic matter (POM). Laboratory-cultured Manila clams showed growth rates of 6.02-37.75 mm/yr, and smaller-sized clams did not fully utilise the microalgal diets that were provided constantly. Instead, they derived most of their energy from detritus or dead microalgae that had settled on the bottom. Bigger clams, however, exhibited well-balanced source contributions, converting the microalgal diets into biomass. This demonstrates intra-specific differences in the growth rates and preferred diet uptakes of Manila clams, even under similar environmental conditions.

  19. Occurrence and Seasonal Variations of Lipophilic Marine Toxins in Commercial Clam Species along the Coast of Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Zhi; Cheng, Ying; Li, Na; Wen, Hong-Mei; Liu, Rui; Shan, Chen-Xiao; Chai, Chuan; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have examined lipophilic marine toxins (LMTs) in shellfish and toxic algae worldwide, but the occurrence and seasonal variations of LMTs in commercial clams (including Mactra veneriformis, Ruditapes philippinarum, Meretrix meretrix, and Cyclina sinensis) at their major culturing area in Jiangsu, China, remain largely unexplored. In this study, a new solid phase extraction (SPE) in combination with an ultra-fast liquid chromatography and triple-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (UFLC-TQ-MS) method was developed to determine the presence of 10 typical LMTs (okadaic acid (OA), yessotoxins (YTXs), azaspiracids (AZA1-3), pectenotoxins (PTX2), gymnodimine (GYM), dinophysistoxins (DTX1&2), and spirolides (SPX1)) in the aforementioned four clam matrices. After confirmation of its sensitivity and precision, this method was used to evaluate the amounts of LMTs in clam samples harvested in five aquaculture zones of the Jiangsu coastal area. Monthly variations of GYM, PTX2, OA, and DTX1&2 in 400 clam samples from the sample areas were determined from January 2014 through August 2015. Peak values were observed during May and August. This is the first systematic report of LMTs detected in clam samples harvested in Jiangsu. Follow-up research and the implementation of protective measures are needed to ensure the safety of clams harvested in this area. PMID:26712791

  20. High prevalence of SURF1 c.845_846delCT mutation in Polish Leigh patients.

    PubMed

    Piekutowska-Abramczuk, Dorota; Popowska, Ewa; Pronicki, Maciej; Karczmarewicz, Elzbieta; Tylek-Lemanska, Dorota; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Szymanska-Dembinska, Tamara; Bielecka, Liliana; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Pronicka, Ewa

    2009-03-01

    Leigh syndrome is a neuropathological disorder with typical morphological changes in brain, appearing regardless of diverse molecular background. One of the most common enzymatic defects in Leigh patients is cytochrome c oxidase deficiency associated with recessive mutations in the SURF1 gene. To assess the SURF1 mutation profile among Polish patients we studied 41 affected children from 34 unrelated families by PCR-SSCP and sequencing. Four novel mutations, c.39delG, c.752-1G>C, c.800_801insT, c.821A>G, and five described pathogenic changes, c.311_312insAT312_321del10, c.688C>T, c.704T>C, c.756_757delCA, c.845_846delCT, were identified in 85.3% of analysed probands. One mutation, c.845_846delCT, was identified in 77.6% of SURF1 alleles. Up to now, it has been reported only in 9% of alleles in other parts of the world. The deletion was used as LS(SURF1-) marker in population studies. Eight heterozygous carriers of the mutation were found in a cohort of 2890 samples. The estimated c.845_846delCT allele frequency is 1:357 (0.28+/-0.2%), and the lowest predicted LS(SURF1-) frequency in Poland 1:126,736.births. Relatively high frequency of LS(SURF1-) in Poland with remarkable c.845_846delCT mutation dominance allows one to start the differential diagnosis of LS in each patient of Polish (and probably Slavonic) origin from the direct search for c.845_846delCT SURF1 mutation. PMID:18583168

  1. White Dwarfs in Intermediate Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Kunegunda E.; Sion, E. M.

    2009-01-01

    Intermediate polars (IPs), magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) in which the white dwarf (WD) has an intermediate strength magnetic field (B< 5 MG), present an interesting laboratory for the study of the evolution of CVs as they contain elements of both non-magnetic and magnetic systems. Do magnetic CVs and IPs evolve in the same manner as non-magnetic systems? One answer in this puzzle may come from understanding the nature of the white dwarf in a magnetic CV. Standard CV evolution theory predicts a white dwarf temperature for a given CV orbital period and accretion rate. By investigating the temperature of white dwarfs in IPs and comparing the temperatures to those predicted from theory, we can learn where IPs fit into the model of CV evolution. Here we present the results of our continued study of the nature of WDs in IPs. We compare temperatures derived from model fits to UV spectra with temperatures calculated based on the accretion rate and binary orbital period. Our preliminary results indicate that IPs follow the general trend of magnetic CVs containing cooler WDs than non-magnetic CVs.

  2. The Physics of White Dwarfs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Hugh M.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the current understanding of the structure and evolution of the white dwarf stars that was gained as a result of the increasingly sensitive and detailed astronomical observations coupled with calculations of the properties of matter under extreme conditions. (Author/GA)

  3. PN abundances in dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, Denise R.

    2015-08-01

    In this presentation I will discuss our own results for the chemical abundances of Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies, as given by their PN population. Adding to the discussion all the available data on the literature, altogether we come up with the chemical abundances - O/H - for a significant sample of 14 LG dwarf galaxies, either irregulars (dIrr) or spheroidals (dSph). This sample is considered to study the PN metallicity trends of the these galaxies, in an effort to establish the PN luminosity- and mass-metallicity relations (LZR and MZR) for the LG dwarfs. Previous attempts to obtain such relations failed to provide correct conclusions because were based on too limited samples (Richer & McCall 1995; Gonçalves et al. 2007). As far as we are able to compare stellar with nebular metallicities, our MZR is in very good agreement with the slope of the MZR recently obtained for LG dwarf galaxies using spectroscopic stellar metallicities (Kirby et al. 2013). Actually, we found that both dIrr and dSph galaxies follow the same MZR, at variance with the differences claimed in the past. And, moreover, our MZR is also consistent with the global MZR of star-forming galaxies, which span a wider stellar mass range (~106 - 1011 M⊙).

  4. Microlensing, brown dwarfs and Gaia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, N. W.

    The GAIA satellite can precisely measure the masses of nearby brown dwarfs and lower main sequence stars by the microlensing effect. The scientific yield is maximised if the microlensing event is also followed with ground-based telesecopes to provide densely sampled photometry. There are two possible strategies. First, ongoing events can be triggered by photometric or astrometric alerts by GAIA. Second, events can be predicted using known high proper motion stars as lenses. This is much easier, as the location and time of an event can be forecast. Using the GAIA source density, we estimate that the sample size of high proper motion (>300 mas yr-1) brown dwarfs needed to provide predictable events during the 5 year mission lifetime is surprisingly small, only of the order of tens. This is comparable to the number of high proper motion brown dwarfs already known from the work of the UKIDSS Large Area Survey and the all-sky WISE satellite. Provided the relative parallax of the lens and the angular Einstein radius can be recovered from astrometric data, then the mass of the lens can be found. Microlensing provides the only way of measuring the masses of individual objects irrespective of their luminosity. So, microlensing with GAIA is the best way to carry out an inventory of masses in the solar neighbourhood in the brown dwarf regime.

  5. Pulsating Helium Atmosphere White Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provencal, Judith; Montgomery, Michael H.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Shipman, Harry; Nitta, Atsuko; Whole Earth Telescope Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars currently on the main sequence as well as those from earlier generations will or have ended their stellar lives as white dwarf stars. White dwarfs are rich forensic laboratories linking the history and future evolution of our Galaxy. Their structure and atmospheric composition provide evidence of how the progenitors lived, how they evolved, and how they died. This information reveals details of processes governing the behavior of contemporary main sequence stars. Combined with their distribution in luminosity/temperature, white dwarfs strongly constrain models of galactic and cosmological evolution.GD358 is among the brightest (mv =13.7) and best studied of the pulsating white dwarfs. This helium atmoshere pulsator (DBV) has an extensive photometric database spanning 30 years, including nine multisite Whole Earth Telescope campaigns. GD358 exhibits a range of behaviors, from drastic changes in excited pulsation modes to variable multiplet splittings. We use GD358 as a template for an examination of the DBV class, combining photometric results with recent COS spectroscopy. The results present new questions concerning DB formation and evolution.

  6. Star Formation in Dwarf Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schombert, James

    2014-02-01

    We propose to obtain H(alpha) and optical broad band images of a select sample of dwarf spirals, a new type of dwarf galaxy. Our claim that a new class of dwarf galaxies exists is based on a combination of their morphological, luminosity, HI and kinematic properties (i.e., double-horned HI profiles that confirm rotation). Outstanding issues on the formation and evolution of dwarf spirals are the origin of their spiral patterns in dark matter dominated disks, style of star formation in the LSB realm and clues to their existence with respect to the local environment. The goal of this project is to use deep H(alpha) imaging to 1) map the HII regions as they measure spiral patterns and design, 2) measure the current and the time-averaged star formation rate in these unusual galaxies, 3) determine the structural parameters (disk scalelength, central surface brightness, B/D ratios) for comparison between star-forming dS's and non-star forming dS0's, and 4) provide a baseline set of observations for follow-up VLA and mid-IR space imaging.

  7. THREE NEW ECLIPSING WHITE-DWARF-M-DWARF BINARIES DISCOVERED IN A SEARCH FOR TRANSITING PLANETS AROUND M-DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Kraus, Adam L.; Street, Rachel; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Shporer, Avi; Lister, Tim; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Baranec, Christoph; Bui, Khanh; Davis, Jack T. C.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, Eran O.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Nugent, Peter; and others

    2012-10-01

    We present three new eclipsing white-dwarf/M-dwarf binary systems discovered during a search for transiting planets around M-dwarfs. Unlike most known eclipsing systems of this type, the optical and infrared emission is dominated by the M-dwarf components, and the systems have optical colors and discovery light curves consistent with being Jupiter-radius transiting planets around early M-dwarfs. We detail the PTF/M-dwarf transiting planet survey, part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We present a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based box-least-squares search for transits that runs approximately 8 Multiplication-Sign faster than similar algorithms implemented on general purpose systems. For the discovered systems, we decompose low-resolution spectra of the systems into white-dwarf and M-dwarf components, and use radial velocity measurements and cooling models to estimate masses and radii for the white dwarfs. The systems are compact, with periods between 0.35 and 0.45 days and semimajor axes of approximately 2 R{sub Sun} (0.01 AU). The M-dwarfs have masses of approximately 0.35 M{sub Sun }, and the white dwarfs have hydrogen-rich atmospheres with temperatures of around 8000 K and have masses of approximately 0.5 M{sub Sun }. We use the Robo-AO laser guide star adaptive optics system to tentatively identify one of the objects as a triple system. We also use high-cadence photometry to put an upper limit on the white-dwarf radius of 0.025 R{sub Sun} (95% confidence) in one of the systems. Accounting for our detection efficiency and geometric factors, we estimate that 0.08%{sub -0.05%}{sup +0.10%} (90% confidence) of M-dwarfs are in these short-period, post-common-envelope white-dwarf/M-dwarf binaries where the optical light is dominated by the M-dwarf. The lack of detections at shorter periods, despite near-100% detection efficiency for such systems, suggests that binaries including these relatively low-temperature white dwarfs are preferentially found at relatively large orbital radii. Similar eclipsing binary systems can have arbitrarily small eclipse depths in red bands and generate plausible small-planet-transit light curves. As such, these systems are a source of false positives for M-dwarf transiting planet searches. We present several ways to rapidly distinguish these binaries from transiting planet systems.

  8. Faint dwarfs in nearby groups

    SciTech Connect

    Speller, Ryan; Taylor, James E. E-mail: taylor@uwaterloo.ca

    2014-06-20

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to Δm{sub r} ≡ (m{sub r,} {sub sat} – m{sub r,} {sub main}) ∼ 6-8, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead, we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down to Δm{sub r} = 12, 4 mag fainter than most recent studies. We detect an overdensity of objects at separations <400 kpc, corresponding to about 4.6 ± 0.5 satellites per central galaxy, consistent with the satellite abundance expected from the Local Group, given our selection function. Although the sample of satellites detected is incomplete by construction, since it excludes the least and most compact dwarfs, this detection provides a lower bound on the average satellite luminosity function, down to luminosities corresponding to the faintest ''classical'' dwarfs of the Local Group.

  9. RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY OF A BROWN DWARF BINARY AT THE T DWARF/Y DWARF TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Cushing, Michael C.

    2012-01-20

    We report resolved near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations of the T8.5 binary WISEP J045853.90+643452.6AB obtained with Keck/NIRC2, Keck/OSIRIS, and the Keck Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. These data confirm common proper and radial motion for the two components, and we see the first indications of orbital motion (mostly radial) for this system. H-band spectroscopy identifies both components as very late type brown dwarfs with strong H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} absorption. The spectrum of WISE J0458+6434B also exhibits a compelling signature of NH{sub 3} absorption over 1.52-1.54 {mu}m when compared to the T9 dwarf UGPS J072227.51-054031.2. Comparison to T8-Y0 spectral standards and H-band spectral indices indicate classifications of T8.5 and T9.5 for these two components, approaching the boundary between the T dwarf and Y dwarf spectral classes.

  10. He and H irradiation effects on the nanoindentation hardness of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Siben; Peng, Lei; Ge, Hongen; Huang, Qunying; Xin, Jingping; Zhao, Ziqiang

    2014-12-01

    In this study, He and H ion irradiation induced hardening behavior of China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was investigated, and the influence of Si on irradiation hardening was also examined. CLAM steel with different Si contents, Heat 0912 and Heat 0408D, were irradiated with single He (He concentration range from 0 to 2150 appm) ion beam and He/H dual ion beams. Then nanoindentation tests were applied to evaluate the ion irradiation induced hardening effect. The result of Heat 0912 showed hardening effect would be more serious with higher He concentration, and the trend saturated when He concentration reach 1000 appm. Comparing the result of Heat 0912 and Heat 0408D, higher Si content might improve the resistance to hardening.

  11. Horizontal transmission of clonal cancer cells causes leukemia in soft-shell clams

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Michael J.; Reinisch, Carol; Sherry, James; Goff, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Outbreaks of fatal leukemia-like cancers of marine bivalves throughout the world have led to massive population loss. The cause of the disease is unknown. We recently identified a retrotransposon, Steamer, that is highly expressed and amplified to high copy number in neoplastic cells of soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria). Through analysis of Steamer integration sites, mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and polymorphic microsatellite alleles, we show that the genotypes of neoplastic cells do not match those of the host animal. Instead, neoplastic cells from dispersed locations in New York, Maine, and Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, all have nearly identical genotypes that differ from those of the host. These results indicate that the cancer is spreading between animals in the marine environment as a clonal transmissible cell derived from a single original clam. Our findings suggest that horizontal transmission of cancer cells is more widespread in nature than previously supposed. PMID:25860608

  12. Cooling water canal improvements to correct structural failures and control Asian clams

    SciTech Connect

    England, W.; Snow, R.E.; Palmer, E.C.

    1995-10-01

    Expansive soils destroyed the floor and impacted the roof support columns of a 600-foot-long concrete cooling water intake canal at the two unit, 700-MW Decker Creek Power Plant in Austin, Texas. These movements exposed clay and silt soils in the canal bottom and provided a habitat for a thriving Asian Clam community which caused operational problems in the plant including unplanned outages. Evaluations were performed to address the structural damages, characterize the clam habitat, and identify concepts to remediate the problem conditions. The various concepts evaluated to eliminate the difficulties are discussed in this paper as well as the basis for selection of the remedial concept. The selected remedial concept consisted of replacing the concrete canal structure with large diameter concrete pipes. The paper also discusses the construction sequence to accomplish the work within a limited outage period.

  13. Illinois River fingernail clam toxicity study. Final report, 1 July 1990--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, R.E.; Dillon, F.S.

    1998-12-31

    A filtering performance bioassay was developed for the fingernail clam, Musculium transversum, a dominant bottom-dwelling organism in many waters of the midwestern United States, and a key in food chains leading from organic matter in water and sediment to fish and ducks valued by humans. The bioassay was used with a battery of standard bioassays to assess the toxicity of porewaters obtained from sediments of the Illinois River and its associated canal (known collectively as the Illinois Waterway), where fingernail clams and other benthic macroinvertebrates died out in 1955--1958 and have not recolonized, despite the availability of seed populations in tributaries and isolated refugia within the river. Inhibition of filtering performance was easily measured with relatively simple equipment available in most laboratories and proved be directly related to the concentration of a reference toxicant, sodium cyanide.

  14. Oxidative effects of the pharmaceutical drug paracetamol on the edible clam Ruditapes philippinarum under different salinities.

    PubMed

    Correia, Bárbara; Freitas, Rosa; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Nunes, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Paracetamol, a drug with analgesic and antipyretic properties, is one of the most used substances in human therapeutics, being also frequently detected in aquatic environments. Recent studies report its toxicity towards aquatic species, but the overall amount of data concerning its effects is still scarce. Global changes, likely alterations in abiotic conditions, including salinity, can modulate the interactions of contaminants with biota, conditioning the toxicological responses elicited also by pharmaceuticals. The present article describes the oxidative toxic effects posed by paracetamol on the clam species Ruditapes philippinarum under different salinity conditions. The results demonstrated the establishment of an oxidative-based effect, with significant alteration of several parameters, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG). Water salinity influenced the response of clams exposed to different paracetamol concentrations, showing the importance of studying physiological traits under realistic test conditions, which are likely to vary in great extent as a result of climate change. PMID:26409706

  15. Tensile properties of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.1 dpa in STIP-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Hongen; Peng, Lei; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-V) up to 20.1 dpa/1499 appm He/440 °C. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (R.T) and irradiation temperatures (Tirr) in the range of 25-450 °C. The tensile results demonstrated strong effect of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature on hardening and embrittlement. With Tirr below ˜314 °C, CLAM steel specimens tested at R.T and Tirr showed similar evolution trend with irradiation dose, compared to other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels in similar irradiation conditions. At higher Tirr above ˜314 °C, it is interesting that the hardening effect decreases and the ductility seems to recover, probably due to a strong effect of high irradiation temperature.

  16. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of CLAM steel at 823 K and 873 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Boyu; Huang, Bo; Li, Chunjing; Liu, Shaojun; Xu, Gang; Zhao, Yanyun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is selected as the candidate structural material in Fusion Design Study (FDS) series fusion reactor conceptual designs. The creep property of CLAM steel has been studied in this paper. Creep tests have been carried out at 823 K and 873 K over a stress range of 150-230 MPa. The creep curves showed three creep regimes, primary creep, steady-state creep and tertiary creep. The relationship between minimum creep rate (ε˙min) and the applied stress (σ) could be described by Norton power law, and the stress exponent n was decreased with the increase of the creep temperature. The creep mechanism was analyzed with the fractographes of the rupture specimens which were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The coarsening of precipitates observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated the microstructural degradation after creep test.

  17. Influence of Methylmercury from Tributary Streams on Mercury Levels in Savannah River Asiatic Clams

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.

    2004-03-01

    Average methylmercury levels in five Savannah River tributary streams sampled 11 times over two years were nearly twice as high as in the Savannah River. Total mercury levels in the tributaries did not differ significantly from the river. All of the tributaries drained extensive wetlands that would be expected to support comparatively high rates of methylation. Mercury concentrations in Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) collected from the discharge plumes of Savannah River tributaries were significantly higher than in Asiatic clams collected from the Savannah River upstream from the tributary mouths . These results indicate that streams draining wetlands into coastal plain rivers can create localized areas of elevated methylmercury with resulting increases in the mercury levels of river biota.

  18. Resistance of the Manila clam (Venerupis philippinarum) to infection with Mikrocytos mackini.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary R; Bower, Susan M; Lowe, Geoff; Davies, Sarah

    2008-05-01

    Manila clams (Venerupis philippinarum) challenged in laboratory trials via bath exposure proved to be resistant to infections with Mikrocytos mackini (protistan parasite of unknown taxonomic affiliation), while Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) challenged simultaneously using identical conditions developed infections. Although M. mackini was detected by a nucleic acid pathogen specific (PCR) assay in 10-30% of the challenged V. philippinarum that were sampled soon after exposure (0-48 h, n=40), all of the subsequent V. philippinarum (n=62) sampled 9-17 weeks post-exposure tested negative for M. mackini by PCR assay. Prevalence of infection for the exposed C. gigas (n=100) during this same period ranged from 50% to 100% by PCR assay. Infection was confirmed in the oysters (58%, n=60) by a digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe designed to detect M. mackini by in situ hybridization, but M. mackini was not found in any of the exposed Manila clams (n=63) using this technique. PMID:18031756

  19. Virus-like particles associated with mortalities of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum in England.

    PubMed

    Bateman, K S; White, P; Longshaw, M

    2012-06-13

    Mortalities of the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum (Adams & Reeve, 1850) were reported in southern England (Kent and Poole Harbour) during late spring of 2008. In response to these reported mortalities, samples were collected from 5 sites across the south coast of England. Clams were sampled for both histology and electron microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed unenveloped virus-like particles within the connective tissue of the gills and surrounding the tubules in the digestive gland. The virus-like particles appeared to be free within the cytoplasm or associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes and cytoplasmic vesicles. Particles were icosahedral in shape, with a diameter of 25 to 30 nm. The location, size and morphology of the virus-like particles suggest that they belong to the Picornaviridae family. This is the first report of this virus infection in wild and farmed R. philippinarum within the UK. PMID:22691985

  20. Nitrogen stable isotope ratio in the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, reflects eutrophication levels in tidal flats.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Kodama, Masashi; Fukuda, Masaaki

    2009-10-01

    Understanding the effects of anthropogenic eutrophication on coastal fisheries may help in the enhancement of fishery production by effective utilization of sewage effluents, as well as in the consequent reduction of eutrophication. In this study, it was revealed that the nitrogen stable isotope ratio (delta(15)N) in the soft tissues of the manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, can be used as an indicator of anthropogenic eutrophication levels in tidal flat environments by investigation of delta(15)N in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), particulate organic matter (POM), sedimentary organic matter (SOM) and soft tissues of the clam in five tidal flats in Japan with different levels of DIN concentration. In addition, it was found that the acid insoluble fraction of the shell organic matrix, conchiolin, can be used as a proxy for the soft tissues in delta(15)N analyses. This will contribute in easier storage handling and the expansion of chances for sample acquisition. PMID:19647270

  1. Isolation and characterization of 48 polymorphic microsatellite markers for the blood clam Scapharca broughtonii (Arcidae).

    PubMed

    Tian, J-T; Liu, Z-H; Zhou, L-Q; Wu, B; Liu, P; Yang, A-G

    2012-01-01

    Blood clams (Scapharca broughtonii) are widely cultivated and consumed in noutheast Asia. Forty-eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for this clam using magnetic-bead hybridization enrichment. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14. Polymorphism of these loci was assessed in 30 individuals from a population collected from coastal areas of Qingdao, China. The values of observed heterozygosity, expected heterozygosity and polymorphism information content per locus ranged from 0.1034 to 0.9655, from 0.1831 to 0.9208, and from 0.1638 to 0.8964, respectively. Forty-three of 48 loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci would be useful for molecular genetic breeding, population genetics, genome mapping, and other relevant research on S. broughtonii. PMID:23096914

  2. Impacts of stage-specific acute pesticide exposure on predicted population structure of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, S.; Chasse, J.; Butler, R.A.; Morrill, W.; Van Beneden, R.J.

    2010-01-01

    A combined laboratory and modeling approach was used to assess the impact of selected pesticides on early life stages of the soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria. Clams were exposed for 24 h as veligers or pediveligers to the broad-spectrum herbicide hexazinone [3-cyclohexyl-6-(dimethylamino)-1-methyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4 (1h,3h)-dione; (Velpar®)], the phenoxyacetic acid herbicide, 2,4-D (2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid; Agway® Super BK 32), or phosmet (Imidan®). In addition, juvenile clams were exposed for 24 h to 2,4-D and their growth monitored for 21 months. Laboratory experiments indicated veligers were more sensitive to acute pesticide exposure than pediveligers, with 2,4-D exposed veligers exhibiting the lowest survival among all treatments. Relative to controls, juvenile clams exposed to 0.5 ppm 2,4-D had enhanced survival following the initial 3 months of grow out. Juveniles exposed to 0.5 ppm, 5 ppm and 10 ppm 2,4-D showed an initial growth delay relative to control clams, but at 21 months post exposure these clams were significantly larger than control clams. Data from the larval and juvenile exposures were used to generate a stage-specific matrix model to predict the effect of pesticide exposure on clam populations. Impacts on simulated clam populations varied with the pesticide and stage exposed. For example, 2,4-D exposure of veligers and pediveligers significantly reduced predicted recruitment as well as population growth rate compared to controls, but juvenile exposure to 2,4-D did not significantly reduce population growth rate. With the exception of veligers exposed to 10 ppm, hexazinone exposure at the both veliger and pediveliger stages significantly reduced predicted recruitment success compared to 0 ppm controls. Hexazinone exposure also reduced modeled population growth rates, but these reductions were only slight in the pediveliger exposure simulations. Veliger and pediveliger exposure to phosmet reduced modeled population growth rate in a dose-dependent fashion. Changes in modeled population stable stage distributions were also observed when veligers were exposed to any pesticide. These results suggest that both the stage of exposure and the specific toxicant are important in predicting effects of pesticide exposure on soft-shell clam populations, with earlier life stages showing greater sensitivity to the pesticides tested. PMID:20233632

  3. Ichthyoplankton in a southern african surf zone: Nursery area for the postlarvae of estuarine associated fish species?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, A. K.

    1989-12-01

    The surf zone ichthyoplankton of Swartvlei Bay was studied between February 1986 and June 1987, with particular emphasis on its potential role as a nursery area for estuarine associated marine fish species. Larvae and/or postlarvae of 16 families were identified from the surf zone, with the Gobiidae, Soleidae, Sparidae and Mugilidae comprising 85·7% of all teleosts sampled. The postlarvae of several taxa (including the six most common species), which utilize the Swartvlei estuary as a juvenile nursery area, were abundant in the surf zone. Conversely, species which are common in nearshore marine waters as juveniles and adults, but seldom enter estuaries, totalled less than 8% of the surf zone ichthyoplankton assemblage. Larval and postlarval densities peaked during summer when water temperatures exceeded 19°C and the estuary mouth was open. Concentrations of ichthyoplankton were highest at those sampling stations closest to the estuary mouth during the summer period. Diel changes in total catches revealed no significant difference between day and night densities; but of the four major taxa, the Mugilidae and Sparidae tended to be more abundant during the day, the Gobiidae at night and the Soleidae showed no distinct pattern. Results from a 24 h sampling session indicated that tidal phase may also be important in governing ichthyoplankton abundance in the surf zone.

  4. Slow growth rate of a deep-sea clam determined by 228Ra chronology.

    PubMed Central

    Turekian, K K; Cochran, J K; Kharkar, D P; Cerrato, R M; Vaisnys, J R; Sanders, H L; Grassle, J F; Allen, J A

    1975-01-01

    The age of a deep-sea clam, Tindaria callistiformis, from 3803 m depth has been determined by 228Ra (6.7 year half-life) chronology of separated size fractions of a captured population. A length of 8.4 mm is attained in about 100 years. Shells of this size fraction show about 100 regularly spaced bands, indicating that the growth feature may be an annual one. PMID:1058499

  5. Molecular actuator: redox-controlled clam-like motion in a bichromophoric electron donor.

    PubMed

    Chebny, Vincent J; Shukla, Ruchi; Lindeman, Sergey V; Rathore, Rajendra

    2009-05-01

    The one-electron oxidation of tetramethoxydibenzobicyclo[4.4.1]undecane (4) prompts it to undergo a clam-like electromechanical actuation into a cofacially pi-stacked conformer as established by (i) electrochemical analysis, (ii) by the observation of the intense charge-resonance transition in the near IR region in its cation radical spectrum, and (iii) by X-ray crystallographic characterization of the isolated cation radical salt (4(+*) SbCl(6)(-)). PMID:19331350

  6. Water and sediment toxicity of freshwater mussels from population crashes of Asiatic clams

    SciTech Connect

    Scheller, J.L.; Cherry, D.S.; Yeager, M.M.; Lynde, S.R.; Shepard, N.D.

    1994-12-31

    The Clinch River watershed in Virginia contains one of the most diverse communities of freshwater bivalves or unionids in North America. These communities are becoming depleted over the past few decades due to various point (industrial, municipal) and nonpoint (roadside and agricultural runoff) discharges. By the latter 1980`s, the Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) had invaded most reaches of this system and may be becoming a contributing factor to the demise of native mussels by the natural release of toxic ammonia from dense population crashes during late summer, low flow conditions. When densities surpassed 1,500 clams/m{sup 2}, crashes resulting in >99% mortality have been observed in various areas of the river. Total ammonia release from dying clams reached and sustained 70 mg/L for several days in laboratory artificial stream experiments. These ammonia levels resulted in acute toxicity and reproductive chronic impairment to Daphnia magna in 10-day sediment toxicity tests. Pediveliger larvae of Corbicula were acutely sensitive (48 hr LC{sub 50}) to 1.72 mg/L total ammonia (O.05 mg/L unionized), mortality was 100% to juvenile and adult clams in 9 to 13 days at 16.1 mg/L total (0.74 mg/L unionized ammonia). Mussel glochidia were sensitive to 24-hr ammonia exposures (LC{sub 50} = 3.29 and 0.11 mg/L as total and unionized ammonia, respectively). Juvenile and adult mussels are predicted to be less sensitive members of the unionid life cycle as observed from earlier studies involving copper toxicity in the Clinch River.

  7. Multi-species generalist predation on the stochastic harvested clam Tivela mactroides (Mollusca, Bivalvia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turra, Alexander; Fernandez, Wellington S.; Bessa, Eduardo; Santos, Flavia B.; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down control is an important force modulating the abundance of prey and structuring marine communities. The harvested trigonal clam Tivela mactroides is hypothesized to be part of the diet of a variety of marine organisms, with its stock influencing predator abundance and being influenced by them. Here we analyzed the diet of potential predators of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay, northern coast of São Paulo State, Brazil, to identify the main consumers of this marine resource, and also to address the importance of this clam in the diet of each predator. Samples were taken year-round by trawls; all specimens collected were identified and measured and the food items identified and quantified. Twenty-one species consumed T. mactroides, whose importance in the diet varied greatly in both the volume ingested and the frequency of occurrence (pompano Trachinotus carolinus > blue crab Callinectes danae > starfish Astropecten marginatus). Top-down influence on T. mactroides was also dependent on the abundance of consumers (yellow catfish Cathorops spixii > rake stardrum Stellifer rastrifer > barred grunt Conodon nobilis > A. marginatus). Considering the mean volume ingested, the frequency of occurrence of T. mactroides in the diet, and the relative abundance of consumers, the predators that most influenced T. mactroides were T. carolinus, A. marginatus, and C. danae, in decreasing order. Large numbers of small-sized individuals of T. mactroides (<10 mm) were generally preyed upon by A. marginatus, which may have a stronger effect on clam abundance in comparison to C. danae and T. carolinus, which preyed upon larger clams. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that predators' consumption of T. mactroides in Caraguatatuba Bay can influence its stocks, mainly due to the type and/or abundance of predator species, the volume and number of individuals of T. mactroides preyed upon, and the temporal variations in the abundance of predators.

  8. Detection of a proteinaceous toxin in the brackishwater clam (Corbicula japonica).

    PubMed

    Shiomi, K; Arita, J; Nagashima, Y; Shinagawa, A

    1995-05-01

    Water extracts from the brackishwater clam (Corbicula japonica) were found to be lethal to mice upon i.v. injection. Muscular tissues (foot muscle, adductor muscle, mantle muscle, mantle and siphon) were all toxic while gill and viscera (mid-gut gland, testis and ovary) were nontoxic; the highest toxicity was observed with foot muscle. The toxin was judged to be a thermolabile, basic protein with a mol. wt. of about 13,000. PMID:7660374

  9. Genetic responses to metal contamination in two clams: Ruditapes decussatus and Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Moraga, D; Mdelgi-Lasram, E; Romdhane, M S; El Abed, A; Boutet, I; Tanguy, A; Auffret, M

    2002-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are subjected to a wide variety of disturbances, including those due to xenobiotics of agricultural and industrial origin. These pollutants as heavy metals can modify the genetic diversity of populations by favouring or counter-selecting certain alleles or genotypes by differential mortality. In the present study, two genetic markers (phosphoglucomutase and glucosephosphate isomerase) and a protein marker (metallothionein) were monitored in order to determine the impact of heavy metals in different clam populations. Analysis of the genetic structure of the clam populations examined reveals that those inhabiting environments contaminated by heavy metals exhibit a higher allelic diversity and possess alleles at PGM loci that could be selected by the presence of heavy metals. The evaluation of metallothionein levels using a specific polyclonal antibody developed in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) demonstrated the existence of a relationship between metallothionein concentrations and the level of metal pollution for clam populations sampled from different sites. An inter-specific difference was also detected between Ruditapes decussatus and Ruditapes philippinarum living in sympatry at the same site, suggesting a differential response of these two species upon exposure to an identical heavy metal concentration. PMID:12408612

  10. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in clams, sediments, and seawater from the Great Barrier Reef region, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Bagg, J.; Smith, J.D. )

    1988-09-01

    On the Great Barrier Reef actively growing organisms occur mainly in shallow water, between the low-water mark and about 5m depth. The effects of hydrocarbon pollution either from discharge into the sea or run-off from the shore might be expected to be most significantly at air/water or solid/water interfaces and so the earliest indications of contamination are likely to be found in species that live in this vulnerable zone. For this reason the clam Tridacna maxima which is found in the intertidal region was chosen to be analyzed for PAH content. This clam occurs in adequate numbers along the entire length of the Great Barrier Reef and yields enough tissue to permit detection of PAH at very low concentrations. In addition during collection their shells close so that the chance of significant contamination during transport is very small. Clams were taken from a number of sites including isolated reefs such as John Brewer Reef, the research stations, Heron and Lizard Islands, and a tourist resort, Green Island. At all these sites sediments were analyzed for PAH and at Green Island, in addition, seawater was analyzed.

  11. Histopathology and stress biomarkers in the clam Venerupis philippinarum from the Venice Lagoon (Italy).

    PubMed

    Boscolo Papo, Michele; Bertotto, Daniela; Quaglio, Francesco; Vascellari, Marta; Pascoli, Francesco; Negrato, Elena; Binato, Giovanni; Radaelli, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the histomorphology and the stress response in the bivalve Venerupis philippinarum sampled in four differently polluted sites of the Venice Lagoon (Palude del Monte, Marghera, Ca' Roman and Val di Brenta). This species is often used as bioindicator of environmental pollution since it can bioaccumulate a large variety of pollutants because of its filter feeding. Chemical analyses for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Hg and Pb) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were performed on whole soft tissues of V. philippinarum. The histological evaluation of clams revealed the presence of Perkinsus sp. infection in animals from all sites, although a very high prevalence of parasites was evidenced in clams from Ca' Roman. Perkinsus sp. were systemically distributed in the mantle, in the intestine and digestive gland, in gonads and gills. The trophozoites of Perkinsus sp. were found isolated or in cluster surrounded by a heavy hemocitical response. Haemocytes always exhibited an immunopositivity to cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and nitrotyrosine (NT) antibodies. The digestive gland of animals from Palude del Monte showed the highest malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, whereas clams from Ca' Roman exhibited the highest quantity of metallothioneins. PMID:24795081

  12. Assessment of the toxicity of organochlorine pesticide endosulfan in clams Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yanxia; Pan, Luqing; Zhang, Hui; Tian, Shuangmei

    2013-07-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of endosulfan in clams (Ruditapes philippinarum). For this purpose, a study was performed on clams exposed to 0.005, 0.05 and 0.5μg/L endosulfan for 15 days. S ubsequently, the level of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, glutathione (GSH) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and DNA strand break was determined in gills and digestive glands. Among the parameters, endosulfan caused significant changes in induction of EROD activity and oxidative stress in clams R. philippinarum. The exposure to endosulfan increased the concentration of EROD, GST, GSH, MDA and decreased the concentration of SOD. Moreover, according to the correlation analysis results, the EROD activity and GSH content in digestive gland as well as GST activity, LPO and DNA damage in both tissues had excellent correlation with endosulfan concentration. These results provided information on potential biomarkers that could be effectively applied to the biomonitoring of aquatic ecosystem in areas susceptible to persistent organochlorine compounds contamination, and also information on toxic effects. PMID:23642779

  13. Microstructure of nano-structured ODS CLAM steel by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chen-yang; Lu, Zheng; Liu, Chun-ming

    2013-11-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing. The morphology and microstructure of MA powders were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and laser diffraction scattering to optimize the milling time. The microstructure of nano-structured ODS CLAM steel was characterized by electron backscatter diffraction, atom probe tomography, and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that, during mechanical alloying, the morphology of MA powders changes from an initial fine spherical shape to a coarse laminar shape (at 0.5 h) back to a fine near-spherical shape (after 20 h), and the alloying elements and yttria (Y) gradually dissolve into the iron (Fe) matrix. With increased milling time, the mean grain size decreases rapidly (from 0 to 3 h), then gradually (from 3 to 8 h), then remains constant thereafter. The average grain size of as-received ODS CLAM steel that has undergone hot isotopic pressing is 368 nm. High-density Y-Ti-O-rich nano-clusters, a few Y2Ti2O7 precipitates, and some Cr-Mn-rich precipitates are formed. The size of Y2Ti2O7 and Cr-Mn-rich precipitates increases with increasing temperature. The nano-clusters show excellent temperature stability.

  14. Accumulation of organochlorines in the European clam (Ruditapes decussatus) and sediment of the Oualidia lagoon (Morocco).

    PubMed

    Jayed, Maria; Benbrahim, Samir; Bakkas, Salem; Ramdani, Mohamed; Flower, Roger

    2015-05-01

    This study focused on the analysis of organochlorine pesticides and PCBs in tissue samples of the clam, Ruditapes decussatus, in the Oualidia lagoon. Tissue assays were conducted during February to December 2005 and sediment (October 2005) was also tested. 13 organochlorine compounds and eight PCBs congeners were investigated, is HCB, γ-HCH, chlordane, cis-chlordane and trans-nonachlor, DDT and its metabolites DDD, DDE, heptachlor, its epoxide, mirex and PCBs (PCB28 + 50, PCB52, PCB101, PCB 118, PCB138, PCB153, PCB180). Analysis of these compounds was performed using a gas chromatography capillary column and an electron capture detector. Organochlorine contamination of clams and sediments in the lagoon did not exceed tolerable thresholds according to European standards. The levels of tPCB, tDDT and tOCP in clams are high at 49.4, 22.2, and 7.1 ng g(-1) dw respectively. Concentrations of trans nonachlor and mirex are low compared to other chlorinated pesticides. PCB28 + 50, PCB52 and PCB101 show typical values in sediment, at 18.5, 10.8 and 17.8 ng g(-1) dw respectively. PMID:25829056

  15. Molecular diversity and evolution of defensins in the manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Zhang, Linbao; Yang, Dinglong; Yu, Qian; Li, Fei; Cong, Ming; Ji, Chenglong; Wu, Huifeng; Zhao, Jianmin

    2015-11-01

    Four types of defensins were identified in Manila clam and designated as Rpdef1, Rpdef2, Rpdef3 and Rpdef4, which encoded a polypeptide of 49, 46, 45 and 42 amino acids, respectively. Sequence alignments indicated that Rpdef1 shared 46.9% identity with Rpdef2, 40.8% with Rpdef3, and 34.7% with Rpdef4. Analysis of transcript polymorphism showed that Rpdef3 accounted for about 60% frequency of Rpdefs occurrence in clams from three geographic origins (Dalian, Qingdao and Hangzhou). By quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, the transcripts of Rpdefs were mainly detected in hemocytes and they responded sensitively to bacterial challenge in hemocytes. Evolutionary analysis indicated that all Rpdefs were under positive selection with positively selected basic amino acid residues detected in the C-terminal regions, which perhaps have a functional relevance by modifying the charge distribution of Rpdefs. The results also showed some lineages with dN/dS > 1, suggesting positive selection pressures existed in some lineages of phylogeny tree constructed by mollusk defensins. Overall, our results suggest that Rpdefs perhaps played important roles in host defense and positive selection is the major driving force in generating high diversity of defensins in the Manila clam. PMID:26363232

  16. Effects of storage, processing and proteolytic digestion on microcystin-LR concentration in edible clams.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Azevedo, Joana; Carvalho, Antnio Paulo; Campos, Alexandre; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2014-04-01

    Accumulation of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) in edible aquatic organisms, particularly in bivalves, is widely documented. In this study, the effects of food storage and processing conditions on the free MC-LR concentration in clams (Corbicula fluminea) fed MC-LR-producing Microcystisaeruginosa (110(5) cell/mL) for four days, and the bioaccessibility of MC-LR after in vitro proteolytic digestion were investigated. The concentration of free MC-LR in clams decreased sequentially over the time with unrefrigerated and refrigerated storage and increased with freezing storage. Overall, cooking for short periods of time resulted in a significantly higher concentration (P<0.05) of free MC-LR in clams, specifically microwave (MW) radiation treatment for 0.5 (57.5%) and 1 min (59%) and boiling treatment for 5 (163.4%) and 15 min (213.4%). The bioaccessibility of MC-LR after proteolytic digestion was reduced to 83%, potentially because of MC-LR degradation by pancreatic enzymes. Our results suggest that risk assessment based on direct comparison between MC-LR concentrations determined in raw food products and the tolerable daily intake (TDI) value set for the MC-LR might not be representative of true human exposure. PMID:24491263

  17. Influence of thermal aging on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lixin; Hu, Xue; Yang, Chunguang; Yan, Wei; Xiao, Furen; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2013-11-01

    In order to investigate the influence of thermal aging on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM (China low activation martensitic) steel, a comparison study was made on the as-tempered and the aged steels. The tempered CLAM steels were subjected to aging treatment at 600 °C for 1100 h and 3000 h, and at 650 °C for 1100 h, respectively. The changes of microstructure were characterized by both transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical properties were evaluated by Charpy impact, tensile and Vickers hardness tests. The upper shelf energy (USE) of the thermal aged CLAM steel decreased with the extension of aging time, while the yield strength changed slightly. After long-term thermal aging, the MX type precipitates remained stable. The coarsening of M23C6 and the formation of Laves phase were confirmed by scanning/transmission electron microscopes. The Laves phase was the main factor leading to the increase of DBTT.

  18. A theoretical study of burrowing in dry soil using razor clam-inspired kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Amos; Isava, Monica

    2015-11-01

    This work investigates whether the digging kinematics of Ensis directus, the Atlantic razor clam, could be utilized in dry soil. In wet soil, E. directus uses contractions of its valves to relieve stress on the surrounding soil, and then draw water towards its body to create a pocket of fluidized substrate. This locally fluidized zone requires much less force to move through than static soil, resulting in burrowing energy that scales linearly with depth, rather than depth squared. In dry soil, if the valves of a clam-like device are contracted fast enough, the horizontal stress in the soil could be brought to a zero-stress state. This would correspondingly reduce the local vertical stresses to zero, which could drastically lower the forces required to burrow compared to moving through static dry soil. Using analytical models of soil failure mechanics, we investigated the critical timescales for inducing a zero-stress state in soil surrounding an E. directus-like device with contracting valves. This device was modeled as a similar size to a real razor clam (15 mm wide). It was found that for most dry soils, the device would have to contract its valves in 0.02 seconds, a speed within the realm of possibility for a mechanical system. These results suggest that the burrowing method used by E. directus could feasibly be adapted for digging in dry soil.

  19. University of Washington Airborne Studies in Support of the CLAMS-2001 Field Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.

    2003-01-01

    The main activity under this grant was participation in the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field study from 10 July through 2 August 2001. The Cloud and Aerosol Research Group (CARG) from the University of Washington (UW) flew its Convair-580 research aircraft on thirteen occasions, for a total of 45 research flight hours, in support of CLAMS. Some of the main accomplishments of these flights were: 1) Aerosol and trace gas measurements and sunphotometer measurements of aerosol optical depth and column water vapor and ozone from close to Ocean surface to approx. 10,000 ft off Delmarva Peninsula on various occasions; 2) Measurements of aerosol properties on seven occasions beneath the Terra satellite, once beneath AVHRR, and five times beneath the ER-2 aircraft; 3) Measurements of aerosol properties in the vicinity of the (CERES instrumented) Chesapeake Bay lighthouse (COVE) on nine occasions; 4) Use of the NASA Goddard Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) to obtain measurements of BRDF of the ocean surface on fifteen occasions and over Great Dismal Swamp on two occasions; 5) Measurements of aerosol properties over instrumented buoys 44014, 44004, and 41001. 6) On July 17 (a CLAMS 'Golden Day') six aircraft, including the Convair-580 and ER-2, were stacked above the Chesapeake Bay lighthouse under clear skies at the time of the Terra overpass.

  20. The Pulsating White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, G.; Brassard, P.

    2008-10-01

    We present a summary of what is currently known about the three distinct families of isolated pulsating white dwarfs. These are the GW Vir stars (He/C/O-atmosphere stars with Teff sime 120,000 K), the V777 Her stars (He-atmosphere, Teff sime 25,000 K), and the ZZ Ceti stars (H-atmosphere, Teff sime 12,000 K), all showing multiperiodic luminosity variations caused by low-order and low-degree g-mode instabilities. We also provide, in an Appendix, a very brief overview of the newly found evidence in favor of the existence of a fourth category of oscillating white dwarfs bearing strong similarities with these families of pulsators. We begin our survey with a short historical introduction, followed by a general discussion of pulsating white dwarfs as compact pulsators. We then discuss the class properties of these objects, including an updated census. We next focus on the instability domains for each family of pulsators in the log g - Teff diagram, and present their time-averaged properties in more detail. This is followed by a section on excitation physics, i.e., the causes of the pulsational instabilities, with emphasis on the common properties of the different types of pulsator. We then discuss the time-dependent properties of the pulsating white dwarfs featuring, among other things, a brief "picture tour" across the ZZ Ceti instability strip. We next review the methods used to infer or constrain the angular geometry of a pulsation mode in a white dwarf. These include multicolor photometry and time-resolved spectroscopy, the exploitation of the nonlinear features in the observed light curves, and rotational splitting. We also consider basic adiabatic asteroseismology starting with a discussion of the reaction of the period spectrum to variations of model parameters. We next review the various asteroseismological inferences that have so far been claimed for white dwarfs. We also discuss the potential of exploiting the rates of period change. We finally provide some concluding remarks, including a list with several suggestions for future progress in the field.

  1. Shaping the Brown Dwarf Desert: Predicting the Primordial Brown Dwarf Binary Distributions from Turbulent Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumper, Peter; Fisher, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Brown dwarfs are failed stars, with masses too low to undergo hydrogen nuclear burning. While the first incontrovertible brown dwarf was detected observationally in 1995, their formation mechanism and the origin of many of their physical properties remain open questions. The absence of brown dwarf companions in close orbits (less than several AU) to solar-type primary stars in binary systems poses a major problem. Astronomers have termed this sparsity of nearby brown dwarf companions in binary systems the brown dwarf desert. We demonstrate that direct fragmentation of the parent gaseous turbulent giant molecular cloud cores naturally gives rise to widely-separated stellar-brown dwarf binary systems. We also show that this fragmentation produces narrowly-separated brown dwarf - brown dwarf binary systems. Additionally, these results support the observation that the minimum binding energy of systems increases with decreasing system mass.

  2. Growth and Histological Effects to Protothaca staminea (Littleneck Clam) of Long-Term Exposure to Chlorinated Sea Water

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, C. I.; Hillman, A. E.; Wilkinson, P.; Woodruff, D. L.

    1980-08-01

    There has been considerable concern about the potential for long-term effects to marine organisms from chlorinated sea water. As part of a larger study to investigate the effects of materials resulting from seawater chlorination on marine organisms, groups of littleneck clams, Protothaca staminea, were exposed to sea water that had been chlorinated. Two experiments were conducted. In one test, groups of littleneck clams were exposed to dilutions of chlorinated sea water that had average chlorine produced oxidant (CPO) concentrations of 16 {micro}g/l or less. In the second test, groups of clams were exposed to chlorinated seawater-unchlorinated seawater mixtures that had target CPO concentrations of 0, 6, 12, 25, 50 and 100 {micro}g/l. In the first experiment, length measurements were made on all clams at approximately one-month intervals for three months. In the second test, length, weight, depth, width and edge etching were used to measure growth, and subsamples were harvested and measured at one-month intervals. In addition, clams were preserved for histological examination. The clams in the first experiment all had negative growth. In the second test, growth was inhibited under all conditions through the first four months of exposure. During the last four months, there was positive signs of growth at the 0, 6 and 12 {micro}g/l CPO test conditions. Histological examination indicates that P. staminea does not adapt well to being held in aquaria. Most clams, tram all test and control conditions, showed evidence of necrosis at one month. This condition seemed to improve with longer exposure at lower CPO concentrations but persisted at CPO concentrations of 25 {micro}g/l and higher. Other histological effects were apparent at the higher exposure concentrations as the length of exposure increased.

  3. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sue-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are 'solar-powered' animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm) and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1). Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm) reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation) in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals. PMID:26083404

  4. Assimilation of cadmium, chromium, and zinc by the green mussel Perna viridis and the clam Ruditapes philippinarum

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, K.; Wang, W.X.

    2000-06-01

    The green mussel Perna viridis and the clam Ruditapes philippinarum have been frequently used as biomonitors of coastal contamination in subtropical and tropical waters, yet the physiological processes controlling metal uptake in these bivalves are unknown. Assimilation efficiency (AE) is an important physiological parameter quantifying metal bioavailability from ingested food. The authors determined the AEs of Cd, CR, and Zn in these bivalves feeding on five species of phytoplankton and one natural section. The influences of the cytoplasmic distribution of metals in the algal cells and the digestive physiology of bivalves on metal AEs were also examined. Among the three metals, Zn was generally assimilated at the highest efficiency, i.e., 21 to 36% in the mussels and 29 to 59% in the clams. Cr was the least assimilated metal, with AEs being 10 to 16% in the mussels and 11 to 24% in the clams. The AEs of Cd and Zn in the clams were 1.8 to 4.7 and 1.1 to 1.9 times higher, respectively, than the AEs in the mussels. Assimilation efficiencies of Cr were, however, comparable between the mussels and the clams. A positive significant relationship between the metal AE and the percent of metals in the algal cytoplasm was found only for Cd in the clams, suggesting that Cd fractionation in the algal cells influenced its assimilation. No significant relationship, however, was found for other metals in both bivalves. A significant relationship between Cr-assimilation efficiency and gut passage time (GPT) was documented in the mussels, indicating a higher assimilation when Cr was retained longer in the gut. There was also significant correlation of metal AEs among the three metals, which were probably subjected to the same digestive pathway in the bivalves. Their study demonstrated that both the green mussels and the clams were able to accumulate metals from ingested food source, and food quality appeared to have different effects on metal assimilation in different bivalve species.

  5. Measuring the economic value of alternative clam fishing management practices in the Venice Lagoon: results from a conjoint valuation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Paulo A. L. D.; Rossetto, Luca; de Blaeij, Arianne

    2004-11-01

    This article focuses on the economic valuation of alternative clam management practices in the Venice Lagoon. The proposed valuation method is characterized by the design of a survey questionnaire applied to the fishermen population. In each questionnaire, two fishing alternatives are described. The respondent is asked to choose one of them. This valuation method, referred in the article as conjoint valuation, gives sufficient flexibility to set, alter, and combine the valuation of different clam management practices. Furthermore, this approach presents an important advantage to the well-known contingent valuation method since it makes the monetary valuation of each management attribute possible. Estimation results show that all three attributes used in the questionnaire to describe and value different clam management practices—price of the annual permit and fishing technological system—are statistically robust, indicating that fishermen bear a utility change whenever these attributes change. In particular, fishermen's willingness to pay for a larger clam fishing area ranges between 568 and 811 € per year. In addition, an individual's willingness to pay for a fishing practice exclusively based on the vibrant rake system ranges between 1005 and 2456 €. Finally, the adoption of a clam fish management practice in the Venice Lagoon that is exclusively based on the use of manual rakes, which is associated with the lowest damage to the lagoon ecosystem, will represent a welfare loss of 5904 € per fisherman per year. Combining such a value estimate with the total number of fishermen currently operating in the Lagoon of Venice, the welfare loss associated with the adoption of this type of clam management policy amounts to 11.8 € million per year. This figure can be regarded as an upper bound to the cost of implementation of a clam fishing system anchored in the use of manual, ecosystem friendly rakes.

  6. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sue-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as ‘Vulnerable’ on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are ‘solar-powered’ animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm) and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1). Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm) reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation) in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals. PMID:26083404

  7. Evaluation of the potential impact of polluted sediments using Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum: bioaccumulation and biomarker responses.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Hong, Seongjin; Ra, Kongtae; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2011-08-01

    An assessment was made to monitor the short-term impact of heavily polluted sediments that may move out from the brackish man-made Lake Shihwa outside of the sea dike due to operations of a tidal power plant. Here, we exposed the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum collected from the western coast of Korea to natural sediment under lab condition for 96 h. Sediments were collected from Lake Shihwa and outside of the sea dike representing polluted and reference conditions, respectively. The results of chemical analysis revealed that the concentrations of nonylphenol and heavy metals in water and sediment from the inner region of Lake Shihwa were significantly higher than those of reference sediments. After 48 and 96 h of exposure, 30 specimens of clams were sampled from each experimental condition, and concentrations of nonylphenol and metals were measured in clams, water, and sediments. Several biomarkers, including concentrations of metallothionein-like proteins, and activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione S-transferase and catalase were determined in clams to characterize the effects of polluted sediments to clams. After 96 h of exposure, R. philippinarum assimilated nonylphenol up to 71 times compared to initial concentrations. However, there was no apparent uptake of heavy metals into the clams. Additionally, antioxidant enzymes exhibited higher activities in clams exposed to the polluted sediment. The results of the present study with physiological responses in R. philippinarum suggest that sediment transportation caused by the operation of a tidal power plant in Lake Shihwa will have striking effects on benthic organisms in the adjacent coastal area. PMID:22739769

  8. The imbalanced surfing-life of humanity to survival in the global changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have written many times about the imbalance of Nature as the cause of the global change. Here, we offer some method for the humanity survival in the face of global change of the imbalanced anisotropic real Nature. There are two logics of understanding the real Nature: the traditional balanced, and the new imbalanced. The balanced logic presupposes that Nature is balanced, isotropic, etc. The imbalanced logic presupposes opposite that Nature is imbalanced, anisotropic, etc. Respectively can be two styles of the people life: balanced and imbalanced. The image of the flat earth corresponds well with the balanced lifestyle of people. On the balanced life people spend activities to achieve the balance by reducing the change, stabilization, leveling any level changes, etc. If there is a mountain on the road, it must be align the track or make the tunnel. If there is a ravine on the road, then it need backfilled or to build a bridge. If someone is in restless, it must be calm, etc. As example of the happiness in the balanced life is the stability, balance, and therefore the global changes of Nature are perceived as a catastrophe. In the balanced lifestyle people can easily decide to use force, especially if there is not enough knowledge. But Nature has power which in billions times greater than the forces of humanity. Therefore, humanity will beaten in struggle with Nature and disappear. The imbalanced lifestyle is the fundamentally different. The imbalanced lifestyle complies with the surface of the ocean, which always changes, but sometimes can be and flat. But the flat calm ocean surface is inconvenient for the imbalanced life. You need to pull boat yourself because is no wind in the sails. The anisotropic imbalanced Nature has gradients in all parameters. At a certain level of knowledge and experience, people can use this multi-dimensional gradient essence of the real Nature for human's discretion. The imbalanced life is like a surfing. If properly understood Nature, you can find a route slip through the waves of Nature, which will bring closer the person to the desired goals. Of course, the changeable ocean is much more complicated than a flat surface. The imbalanced logic also is much more complex than the simplified balanced logic. As the calm ocean is like the flat surface, so same the balanced logic solutions are sometimes looks like as the truth, but only in the calm weather. At the normal ocean weather the balanced solutions are incorrect and mislead people. The river can be as image of the imbalanced surfing life. The river starts as small stream and running through all the obstacles to ocean. The water of river is flowing at the bottom of the potential trench of the Earth gravity and the Coriolis acceleration. For the imbalanced surfing life is most important not a steamroller of force, but the knowledge and perseverance in the search for the best path to the desirable goals. The example of happiness in the surfing imbalanced life can be joy from successfully usage the suitable trends of the anisotropic imbalanced real Nature. At the imbalanced surfing life should be the main guide: Nature doesn't have the bad weather. The global changes it is not catastrophe, but the normal state of the real anisotropic imbalanced Nature. Just everybody has to choose the weather which will be good for their personal surfing.

  9. White dwarfs and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Raymond, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation emanating from hot (T greater than 40,000 K) white dwarfs can create large volumes of ionized material containing substantial column densities of highly ionized species, in particular Si IV and C IV. The ions N V and O VI can also be produced by hot, hydrogen-rich white dwarfs. These ionization spheres may be detectable around the nearby dwarfs. The relatively high space motions of these stars coupled with long recombination times in the interstellar medium suggest that a white dwarf leaves a region of ionized material - a fossil Stroemgren trail - that marks its progress through the galaxy. White dwarfs create a patchy substrate of ionized gas in the galactic plane and lead to extended ionized regions out of the plane. The spatial frequency of hot white dwarfs indicates that they contribute a radiative energy comparable to that provided by nondegenerate stars and by supernovae and capable of affecting the ionization balance of the interstellar medium.

  10. [The study of M dwarf spectral classification].

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhen-Ping; Pan, Jing-Chang; Luo, A-Li

    2013-08-01

    As the most common stars in the galaxy, M dwarfs can be used to trace the structure and evolution of the Milky Way. Besides, investigating M dwarfs is important for searching for habitability of extrasolar planets orbiting M dwarfs. Spectral classification of M dwarfs is a fundamental work. The authors used DR7 M dwarf sample of SLOAN to extract important features from the range of 600-900 nm by random forest method. Compared to the features used in Hammer Code, the authors added three new indices. Our test showed that the improved Hammer with new indices is more accurate. Our method has been applied to classify M dwarf spectra of LAMOST. PMID:24159887

  11. Hypoxic and hypercapnic challenges unveil respiratory vulnerability of Surf1 knockout mice, an animal model of Leigh syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stettner, Georg M; Viscomi, Carlo; Zeviani, Massimo; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Surf1 gene mutations were detected as a main cause for Leigh syndrome (LS), also known as infantile subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy. This syndrome which is commonly associated with systemic cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency manifests in early childhood and has an invariable poor prognosis. Progressive disturbances of the respiratory function, for which both the metabolic condition and necrotizing brainstem lesions contribute, belong to the major symptoms of LS. A constitutive knockout (KO) mouse for Surf1 enables invasive investigations of distinct aspects of LS. In the present study the respiratory function was analyzed applying an arterially perfused brainstem preparation. Compared to wild type (WT) preparations Surf1 KO preparations had a higher baseline respiratory frequency and abnormal responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia that involved both respiratory frequency and motor nerve discharge pattern. These data suggest that COX deficiency impairs peripheral and/or central chemoreceptor function. PMID:21167962

  12. Spatial and temporal variability in surf zone fish assemblages on the coast of northern New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilber, D. H.; Clarke, D. G.; Burlas, M. H.; Ruben, H.; Will, R. J.

    2003-02-01

    The surf zone fish community along 15 km of northern New Jersey shoreline was sampled every 2 weeks by beach seine in the late summers and early falls of 1995-1999 in conjunction with monitoring of a beach nourishment project. Fifty-seven species representing 30 families were collected during the course of the study. Over 90% of each sampling period's catch was composed of five taxa or less. These taxa included Atlantic and rough silversides, Menidia menidia and Membras martinica, bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix, and bay and striped anchovies, Anchoa mitchilli and Anchoa hepsetus, with the relative contributions of these taxa varying among years. Both bluefish and anchovy abundances varied by an order of magnitude among years. Size-frequency distributions indicate summer-spawned bluefish recruit to the surf zone habitat as two cohorts in August and October, respectively. Fish abundance and richness were greater at substations closest to rock groins. Taxonomic richness declined along with decreasing water temperature in the fall, but was not correlated with turbidity or tide stage (measured as minutes before or after low tide). The extensive sampling effort undertaken in this study, 2190 seine hauls that captured 295 868 fish, was examined in relation to the number and relative proportions of taxa collected. Species accumulation curves and percent similarity calculations were used to investigate the adequacy of a reduced sampling protocol in characterizing the taxonomic composition of the surf zone fish community. Calculations from eight complete sampling periods (84 seine hauls each) indicate that a reduction in sampling effort by one-half would have yielded on average 75% of the total number of species captured with approximately 85% similarity in relative species composition.

  13. Fish Communities in the Surf Zone of a Protected Sandy Beach at Doigahama, Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Y.; Inoue, T.; Uchida, H.

    2002-07-01

    Fish communities comprising postlarval to early adult stages were studied in the surf zone of a protected sandy beach, with runnels and a low tide terrace, at Doigahama, Yamaguchi Prefecture, western Japan. One elasmobranch and 100 teleost species, represented by a total of 17 608 individuals (1·85-785 mm in TL), were collected by fine and coarse meshed beach seines from May 1994 to April 1999. Species richness, abundance and biomass were greater during the evenings as well as in the warmer seasons (May to October). Larval and smaller juvenile ichthyofauna (collected mainly by fine-mesh seine) was relatively poor compared to larger juvenile ichthyofauna (coarse-mesh seine). Tidal effect was observed in the fine-mesh seine samples, whereas no tide-related trends were evident in the coarse-mesh seine samples. Effects of time of the day and tide on the species diversities were not so evident in both seines. Dominant species were classified according to the developmental stages occurring in the surf zone, as follows: Type-I: Postlarval (transformation) stage (Plecoglossus altivelis altivelis,Sardinops melanostictus , Enneapterygius etheostomus, Tripterygion bapturum, Luciogobius sp.). Type-II: Juvenile stage (Lateolabrax latus, Trachurus japonicus, Gerres oyena, Acanthopagrus schlegeli, Sparus sarba, Girella punctata, Mugil cephalus cephalus, Paralichthys olivaceus, Tarphops oligolepis, Heteromycteris japonica). Type-III: Postlarval and juvenile stages (Spratelloides gracilis, Engraulis japonicus, Gobiidae sp.1). Type-IV: Juvenile and early adult stages (Sillago japonica, Paraplagusia japonica). Type V: Postlarval to early adult stages (Takifugu niphobles). It is considered that the surf zone at Doigahama functions as a nursery area, particularly as a feeding place for larger juveniles than as a shelter for larvae and smaller juveniles.

  14. Prediction and assimilation of surf-zone processes using a Bayesian network: Part I: Forward models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Holland, K. Todd

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of coastal processes, including waves, currents, and sediment transport, can be obtained from a variety of detailed geophysical-process models with many simulations showing significant skill. This capability supports a wide range of research and applied efforts that can benefit from accurate numerical predictions. However, the predictions are only as accurate as the data used to drive the models and, given the large temporal and spatial variability of the surf zone, inaccuracies in data are unavoidable such that useful predictions require corresponding estimates of uncertainty. We demonstrate how a Bayesian-network model can be used to provide accurate predictions of wave-height evolution in the surf zone given very sparse and/or inaccurate boundary-condition data. The approach is based on a formal treatment of a data-assimilation problem that takes advantage of significant reduction of the dimensionality of the model system. We demonstrate that predictions of a detailed geophysical model of the wave evolution are reproduced accurately using a Bayesian approach. In this surf-zone application, forward prediction skill was 83%, and uncertainties in the model inputs were accurately transferred to uncertainty in output variables. We also demonstrate that if modeling uncertainties were not conveyed to the Bayesian network (i.e., perfect data or model were assumed), then overly optimistic prediction uncertainties were computed. More consistent predictions and uncertainties were obtained by including model-parameter errors as a source of input uncertainty. Improved predictions (skill of 90%) were achieved because the Bayesian network simultaneously estimated optimal parameters while predicting wave heights.

  15. On the importance of nearbed sediment flux measurements for estimating sediment transport in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogston, Andrea S.; Sternberg, Richard W.

    1995-11-01

    Previous sediment studies in the surf zone typically have computed suspended sediment flux profiles by pairing a single current meter measurement at an elevation of 20 cm or more with measurements of suspended sediment concentration from sensor arrays located at 4-50 cm elevation. This note reports the results of a field experiment in which small impellor current meters were paired with OBS sensors at common elevations of 4, 9 and 19 cm from the bed and across the inner surf zone to obtain concurrent velocity and concentration profiles. The objectives of this experiment were to measure suspended sediment flux profiles within 20 cm of the seabed to determine the magnitude of flux very close to the seabed in comparison to measurements at higher elevation; and to evaluate the errors associated with estimating sediment flux using current meter measurements at only one elevation compared to flux estimates based on velocity profile measurements. Results show that the total sediment flux at z = 4 cm was greater than the flux higher in the water column ( z = 9 and 19 cm) by a factor of at least 2. The flux profiles computed using a single impellor current meter at z = 19 cm and OBS sensors at z = 4, 9 and 19 cm typically were between 0.5 and 2.0 times the flux profiles computed using paired instruments. In one case the estimate of flux direction from the single current meter data predicted transport in the wrong cross shore direction. These results highlight the importance of nearbed measurements of concentration and velocity in estimating sediment transport in the surf zone.

  16. AST3: dwarf nova outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bin; Hu, Yi; Shang, Zhaohui; Wang, Lifan

    2016-05-01

    AST3#2 OT J024453.11-580940.1 discovery - new dwarf nova outburst with ampl > 5.8 The 2nd Antarctic Survey Telescope (AST3#2) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 02:44:53.11 -58:09:40.1 on 2016-05-06.071 UT with Sloan-g magnitude of 15.5m (limit 18.6m).

  17. An Overview of the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. L.; Charlock, T. P.; Rutledge, C. K.; Zhang, T.; Hobbs, P. V.; Gatebe, C. K.; Rivers, R. A.; Roback, V. E.

    2002-05-01

    The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) field campaign was successfully executed over the middle Atlantic eastern seaboard from July 10-August 2, 2001. CLAMS is a radiative closure experiment designed to validate and improve EOS TERRA satellite data products, namely, radiative flux profiles retrieved from CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System) and aerosol properties retrieved from MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). Central to CLAMS experimental strategy is the Chesapeake Lighthouse located in the Atlantic Ocean, 13 miles east of Virginia Beach near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and the site of an ongoing CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE). Unlike a ship or bouy, the Chesapeake Lighthouse is a stable sea platform, well offshore, on which radiometers are elevated 25-40 m above the sea surface (and hence above the most intense sea spray). Nevertheless, the measurement of upwelling radiation may be problematic owing to the possible effect of the platforms legs both directly (the legs reflect light) or indirectly (the legs generate foam and bubbles). This paper focuses on analyses of the shortwave radiation measurements made from the NASA Langley OV-10 aircraft during CLAMS. The OV-10 aircraft is instrumented with commercial uplooking and downlooking broadband and spectral radiometers. The spectral radiometers are the Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc. Full-Range Fieldspec which measure hemispheric solar irradiance from 350-2200 nm with a resolution of 7-10 nm. During CLAMS, the OV-10 was primarily flown at low-altitude (100-600 ft) to characterize ocean optical properties in the vicinity of COVE and to compliment spectral BRDF measurements made from the Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) aboard the University of Washington Convair-580. Broadband and spectral albedos derived from the aircraft data are compared to measurements from COVE in clear-sky and overcast conditions to help understand the platform effects. The variation of ocean optical properties in the vicinity of COVE is examined. The measured spectral albedos are compared to those inferred from the CAR data in discrete wavelength bands. The broadband SW fluxes are compared for consistency to similar measurements made from the Convair 580 which had greater horizontal range than the OV-10 and was able to achieve broadband albedo measurements over the darker ocean farther offshore.

  18. [Problematic aspects of breeding dwarf rabbits].

    PubMed

    Wegner, W

    1997-05-01

    Some aspects of relevance for animal protection in breeding dwarf (pet) rabbits are enumerated and discussed. The predisposition of these standard dwarfs (Dw/dw) for certain defects and diseases underlines the partial dominance of Dw; mating of these heterozygous dwarfs is an open neglect of the German animal protection law (section 11b). For feasibility of control breeders (and especially so in commercial pet rabbitries) should be obliged to guarantee unambiguous identification of breeding animals and their progeny. PMID:9289403

  19. Gyrosolitons and helical surfing diffusion of impurity atoms in reactor fuel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, O. A.; Semenov, V. A.; Orlov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    Fundamentally new gyrosolitons with helical trajectories of motion have been revealed in UO2 and PuO2 reactor fuel materials by the computer simulation of the microdynamics of high-amplitude atomic vibrations. The phonon spectra of nanostructures, as well as of gyrotropic materials, include quasioptical branches with different-sign linear dispersion. The corresponding branches of gyrosolitons have been revealed on the phase plane in the spectral density of vibrations. The main dynamic event of the kinetic process of helical surfing diffusion of impurity atoms on gyrosolitons has been observed.

  20. Internal waves and surf zone water quality at Huntington Beach, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, H.; Santoro, A.; Nidzieko, N. J.; Hench, J. L.; Boehm, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    This study characterized diurnal, semi-diurnal, and high-frequency internal wave field at Huntington Beach, California, USA and the connection between internal waves and surf zone water quality. An array of oceanographic moorings was deployed in the summer of 2005 and 2006 at 10-20 meter depths offshore of the beach to observe internal waves and cross-shore exchange. Concurrently, surf zone water quality was assessed twice daily at an adjacent station (Huntington State Beach) with measurements of phosphate, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, silicate, chlorophyll a, fecal indicator bacteria, and the human-specific fecal DNA marker in Bacteroidales. Spectral analysis of water temperature shows well-defined spectral peaks at diurnal and semi-diurnal frequencies. Complex Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis of observed currents reveals that the baroclinic component (summation of second to fifth principal components) accounted for 30% of the total variance in the currents in both years, indicating the importance of density-driven flow during the summer when the water column was stratified. The major axis of the first principal component was oriented alongshore, whereas that of the second and third principal components made an angle of 25 to 55 degree with the cross-shore direction. Arrival of cold subthermocline water in the very near shore (within 1 km of the surf zone) was characterized by strong onshore flow near the bottom of the water column. The near bottom, baroclinic, cross-shore current was significantly lag-correlated with the near bottom temperature data along a cross-shore transect towards shore, indicative of shoreward transport of cold subthermocline water. Wavelet analysis of temperature data showed that non-stationary temperature fluctuations were correlated with buoyancy frequency and the near bottom cross-shore baroclinic current. During periods of large temperature fluctuations, the majority of the variance was within the semi-diurnal band; however, the diurnal and high frequency bands also contained a substantial fraction of total variance. The bottom cross-shore baroclinic current served as a proxy for shoreward internal wave propagation and was positively correlated with phosphate concentration in both years, silicate in 2005, and fecal indicator bacteria measurements in 2006. The results suggest internal waves are an important transport mechanism of nutrient-rich sub-thermocline water to the very near shore in the Southern California Bight, and may facilitate the transport of FIB into the surf zone or enhance persistence of land-derived FIB.

  1. Uncovering Blue Diffuse Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Bethan; Koposov, Sergey; Stark, Daniel; Belokurov, Vasily; Pettini, Max; Olszewski, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) and the star-formation within their chemically pristine environments are fundamental to our understanding of the galaxy formation process at early times. However, traditional emission-line surveys detect only the brightest metal-poor galaxies where star-formation occurs in compact, starbursting environments, and thereby give us only a partial view of the dwarf galaxy population. To avoid such biases, we have developed a new search algorithm based on the morphological, rather then spectral, properties of XMPs and have applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database of images. Using this novel approach, we have discovered ~100 previously undetected, faint blue galaxies, each with isolated HII regions embedded in a diffuse continuum. In this talk I will present the first results from follow-up optical spectroscopy of this sample, which reveals these blue diffuse dwarfs (BDDs) to be young, very metal-poor and actively forming stars despite their intrinsically low luminosities. I will present evidence showing that BDDs appear to bridge the gap between quiescent dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies and blue compact galaxies (BCDs) and as such offer an ideal opportunity to assess how star-formation occurs in more `normal' metal-poor systems.

  2. GRB Nucleosynthesis in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeyama, T.; Nakamura, K.; Tsujimoto, T.; Moriya, T.

    2010-10-01

    Recent observations with large telescopes have revealed that stars in nearby dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSph stars) have elemental abundances distinct from metal poor stars in our galaxy [7, 8, 9]. This indicates that the chemical evolution of these dwarf galaxies was dominated by supernovae that have not mainly contributed to the chemical evolution of our galaxy. On the other hand, the identification of host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) suggests that GRBs may preferentially occur in low luminosity metal-poor galaxies [6]. Supernovae associated with GRBs might have exclusively imprinted their nucleosynthesis on the elemental abundances of stars in dwarf galaxies while these supernovae were too rare to contribute to the chemical evolution of our galaxy. To test this conjecture, we have planned to perform nucleosynthesis calculations in aspherical supernovae and investigate the elemental abundance patterns of stars inheriting the nucleosynthesis products by taking into account ejecta with different abundance patterns moving in different directions. As a consequence, we found that aspherical supernovae could be responsible for low α/Fe ratios (except for Ca/Fe) and/or large scatter of the abundance ratios seen in dSph stars. The abundance ratios of O/Mg are found to be a good indicator to identify the progenitor stars that have supplied heavy elements to dSph stars.

  3. Mimicking a SURF1 allele reveals uncoupling of cytochrome c oxidase assembly from translational regulation in yeast.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, Robert; Bareth, Bettina; Balleininger, Martina; Wissel, Mirjam; Rehling, Peter; Mick, David U

    2011-06-15

    Defects in mitochondrial energy metabolism lead to severe human disorders, mainly affecting tissues especially dependent on oxidative phosphorylation, such as muscle and brain. Leigh Syndrome describes a severe encephalomyopathy in infancy, frequently caused by mutations in SURF1. SURF1, termed Shy1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a conserved assembly factor for the terminal enzyme of the respiratory chain, cytochrome c oxidase. Although the molecular function of SURF1/Shy1 is still enigmatic, loss of function leads to cytochrome c oxidase deficiency and reduced expression of the central subunit Cox1 in yeast. Here, we provide insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to disease through missense mutations in codons of the most conserved amino acids in SURF1. Mutations affecting G(124) do not compromise import of the SURF1 precursor protein but lead to fast turnover of the mature protein within the mitochondria. Interestingly, an Y(274)D exchange neither affects stability nor localization of the protein. Instead, SURF1(Y274D) accumulates in a 200 kDa cytochrome c oxidase assembly intermediate. Using yeast as a model, we demonstrate that the corresponding Shy1(Y344D) is able to overcome the stage where cytochrome c oxidase assembly links to the feedback regulation of mitochondrial Cox1 expression. However, Shy1(Y344D) impairs the assembly at later steps, most apparent at low temperature and exhibits a dominant-negative phenotype upon overexpression. Thus, exchanging the conserved tyrosine (Y(344)) with aspartate in yeast uncouples translational regulation of Cox1 from cytochrome c oxidase assembly and provides evidence for the dual functionality of Shy1. PMID:21470975

  4. Establishment of pharmacophore and VolSurf models to predict the substrates of UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A3.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhufeng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ma, Zhiguo; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    1.UDP-glucuronosyltransferase1A3 (UGT1A3) catalyzes glucuronidation of numerous xenobiotics/drugs. Here, we aimed to establish substrate selectivity models for UGT1A3 using the pharmacophore and VolSurf approaches. 2.Fifty structurally diverse substrates of UGT1A3 were collated from the literature. These substrates were divided into training (n=34) and test sets (n=16). The pharmacophore model was developed using the Discovery Studio 2.5 software. A user-defined feature (i.e. the glucuronidation site) was included in the program for model generation. The VolSurf model was derived using the VolSurf program implemented in SYBYL 8.0 software. 3.The pharmacophore model consisted of three features (i.e. one glucuronidation site and two hydrogen-bond acceptors). The activities of 81% of test set substrates were adequately predicted (deviated by less than one-log unit) by the model, suggestive of a satisfactory predictive power. The refined VolSurf model based on 22 molecular descriptors was statistically significant (r(2)=0.793, q(2)=0.606). It also processed a good predictability as the activities of 14 test set compounds were well predicted. The VolSurf model highlighted the chemical features (including large molecule size, hydrophilic regions and hydrogen-bonding groups) contributing to favored glucuronidation by UGT1A3. 4.In conclusion, two predictive 3D-QSAR models (i.e. the pharmacophore and VolSurf models) for UGT1A3 were successfully established. These models contributed to an improved understanding of the substrate preference of UGT1A3 and a more comprehensive prediction of UGT-mediated metabolism. PMID:25837689

  5. White Dwarf Critical Tests for Modified Gravity.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Kouvaris, Chris; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2016-04-15

    Scalar-tensor theories of gravity can lead to modifications of the gravitational force inside astrophysical objects. We exhibit that compact stars such as white dwarfs provide a unique setup to test beyond Horndeski theories of G^{3} type. We obtain stringent and independent constraints on the parameter ϒ characterizing the deviations from Newtonian gravity using the mass-radius relation, the Chandrasekhar mass limit, and the maximal rotational frequency of white dwarfs. We find that white dwarfs impose stronger constraints on ϒ than red and brown dwarfs. PMID:27127952

  6. Auroral Phenomena in Brown Dwarf Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, J. Sebastian; Hallinan, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery of radio emission from brown dwarfs some 15 years ago, investigations into the nature of this emission have revealed that, despite their cool and neutral atmospheres, brown dwarfs harbor strong kG magnetic fields, but unlike the warmer stellar objects, they generate highly circularly polarized auroral radio emission, like the giant planets of the Solar System. Our recent results from Keck LRIS monitoring of the brown dwarf LSR1835+32 definitively confirm this picture by connecting the auroral radio emission to spectroscopic variability at optical wavelengths as coherent manifestations of strong large-scale magnetospheric auroral current systems. I present some of the results of my dissertation work to understand the nature brown dwarf auroral phenomena. My efforts include a survey of Late L dwarfs and T dwarfs, looking for auroral Hα emission and a concurrent survey looking for the auroral emission of H3+ from brown dwarfs with radio pulse detections. I discuss the potential connection of this auroral activity to brown dwarf weather phenomena and how brown dwarf aurorae may differ from the analogous emission of the magnetized giant planets in the Solar System.

  7. The galactic population of white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napiwotzki, Ralf

    2009-06-01

    The contribution of white dwarfs of the different Galactic populations to the stellar content of our Galaxy is only poorly known. Some authors claim a vast population of halo white dwarfs, which would be in accordance with some investigations of the early phases of Galaxy formation claiming a top-heavy initial- mass- function. Here, I present a model of the population of white dwarfs in the Milky Way based on observations of the local white dwarf sample and a standard model of Galactic structure. This model will be used to estimate the space densities of thin disc, thick disc and halo white dwarfs and their contribution to the baryonic mass budget of the Milky Way. One result of this investigation is that white dwarfs of the halo population contribute a large fraction of the Galactic white dwarf number count, but they are not responsible for the lion's share of stellar mass in the Milky Way. Another important result is the substantial contribution of the - often neglected - population of thick disc white dwarfs. Misclassification of thick disc white dwarfs is responsible for overestimates of the halo population in previous investigations.

  8. White Dwarf Critical Tests for Modified Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Kouvaris, Chris; Nielsen, Niklas Grønlund

    2016-04-01

    Scalar-tensor theories of gravity can lead to modifications of the gravitational force inside astrophysical objects. We exhibit that compact stars such as white dwarfs provide a unique setup to test beyond Horndeski theories of G3 type. We obtain stringent and independent constraints on the parameter ϒ characterizing the deviations from Newtonian gravity using the mass-radius relation, the Chandrasekhar mass limit, and the maximal rotational frequency of white dwarfs. We find that white dwarfs impose stronger constraints on ϒ than red and brown dwarfs.

  9. White Dwarfs in the ALHAMBRA Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, S.; Isern, J.; García-Berro, E.; Torres, S.; Alhambra Team

    2005-07-01

    A new high visual depth survey is presented. New cool white dwarfs will eventually be discovered, which will undoubtely increase the statistical significance of the white dwarf luminosity function. Moreover, by increasing the sample of known white dwarfs, we will be able to determine which ones are members of a binary system and which of those binary systems are detached and composed by a main sequence star and a white dwarf. Hence, comparison of their corresponding ages will provide tight constraints on the evolutionary models.

  10. Habitats used by black and surf scoters in eastern North America as determined by satellite radio telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Kidwell, D.M.; Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Lohnes, E.J.R.; Olsen, G.H.; Osenton, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Satellite radio telemetry was used to determine the movements and habitats of black scoters (Melanitta nigra) and surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata) in eastern North America. A total of 21 surf scoters were instrumented during five years (2001-05) and 32 black scoters were instrumented during three years (2002-04) with implanted PTT 100 satellite transmitters (39 g) with external antenna. Nesting habitat of black scoters was more open than surf scoters (44% vs. 11%), whereas nesting habitat for surf scoters was located in more forested areas (66% vs. 20%). Locations of black scoters in breeding areas on average were at significantly higher latitude and lower elevations than sites used by surf scoters. Satellite telemetry determined that James Bay was the major molting area for male black and surf scoters, although some males molted along the coast of Labrador-Newfoundland. Black scoters instrumented on the Restigouche River, which is a major staging area, were widely distributed along the Atlantic Coast from Cape Cod to Georgia during winter. Major wintering areas for black scoters were Cape Cod (Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island), Long Island, and New Jersey. In these northern marine wintering areas, black scoters were located farther from shore (4.2 km) and in deeper water (8.3 m) than black scoters in more southern estuarine areas, where distance from shore was 3.1 km and water depth was 5.2 m. Surf scoters instrumented in Chesapeake Bay in late winter showed a strong tendency to return to the Bay the following winter after they had migrated to and from breeding areas. In Chesapeake Bay, black scoters and surf scoters were located mostly in mesohaline areas that had similar water depths (5.1 m vs. 7.5 m) and distances from shore (3.0 km vs. 2.9 km). Distance from shore and depth of water increased over time during the winter for both species. Updated information from the ARGOS Systems aboard the NOAA satellites on scoter movements was made accessible on the Patuxent Website.

  11. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Pacific Northwest): Pacific razor clam

    SciTech Connect

    Lassuy, D.R.; Simons, D.

    1989-01-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, distribution, life history, ecological role, fishery (when appropriate), and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist coastal managers, engineers, and biologists in the gathering of information pertinent to coastal development activities. The Pacific razor clam has a long history of human consumption on the West Coast. Turn-of-the-century commercial canning operations have given way to today's extensive recreational fishery. Razor clams spawn in late spring and early summer in the Pacific Northwest and recruit to flat, sandy beaches in late summer. Greatest densities of large clams occur in the lower intertidal zone. Razor clams grow and mature faster but attain a lower maximum size and age in the southern part of their range. They are noted for their unusual ability to dig very rapidly through the subsurface sand. Silt-generating activities should be avoided in the vicinity of razor clam beaches, as juveniles are susceptible to suffocation. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (mid-Atlantic). Hard clam. [Mercenaria mercenaria

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, J.G.

    1985-02-01

    This species profile is a literature summary on the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of the hard clam (Mercenaria mercenaria). The species profiles are designed to assist in environmental impact assessments. The hard clam is the most extensively distributed commercial clam in the United States. They spawn offshore in summer when water temperatures are between 18/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C. The eggs and larvae are carried by currents into estuaries, where seed clams set on sand or pebbles. Seed clams that lack cover of shells or stone largely perish because of predation. Adults filter-feed on phytoplankton and particulate material. Adults survive temperatures of -6/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/C and salinities of 10 to 35 ppt, and can withstand freshwater for several days by closing their shell. When the shell is closed, they must tolerate anoxic conditions, and they survive less than 1 mg/1 oxygen in the water for several days. Even the larvae tolerate 0.5 mg/1 of oxygen. 130 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Purification and characterization of hemagglutinating proteins from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Fu; Hung, Shao-Wen; Chang, Yung-Chung; Chen, Ming-Hui; Chang, Chen-Hsuan; Tsou, Li-Tse; Tu, Ching-Yu; Lin, Yu-Hsing; Liu, Pan-Chen; Lin, Shiun-Long; Wang, Way-Shyan

    2012-01-01

    Hemagglutinating proteins (HAPs) were purified from Poker-chip Venus (Meretrix lusoria) and Corbicula clam (Corbicula fluminea) using gel-filtration chromatography on a Sephacryl S-300 column. The molecular weights of the HAPs obtained from Poker-chip Venus and Corbicula clam were 358 kDa and 380 kDa, respectively. Purified HAP from Poker-chip Venus yielded two subunits with molecular weights of 26 kDa and 29 kDa. However, only one HAP subunit was purified from Corbicula clam, and its molecular weight was 32 kDa. The two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed hemagglutinating ability (HAA) for erythrocytes of some vertebrate animal species, especially tilapia. Moreover, HAA of the HAP purified from Poker-chip Venus was higher than that of the HAP of Corbicula clam. Furthermore, Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA at a pH higher than 7.0. When the temperature was at 4°C-10°C or the salinity was less than 0.5‰, the two Poker-chip Venus HAPs possessed better HAA compared with that of Corbicula clam. PMID:22666167

  14. Effects of tributyltin maternal and/or waterborne exposure on the embryonic development of the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Suguru; Oshima, Yuji; Usuki, Hironori; Hamaguchi, Masami; Hanamura, Yukio; Kai, Norihisa; Shimasaki, Yohei; Honjo, Tsuneo

    2006-05-01

    We examined the effect of tributyltin (TBT) on embryonic development of the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum. In a maternal exposure test, 100 clams were exposed to TBT at measured concentrations of <0.01 (control), 0.061, 0.310, or 0.350 microg/l at 20-22 degrees C for 3 weeks, and the embryo developmental success (the ratio of normal D-larvae to all larvae) was measured. There was a significant negative correlation between embryo developmental success and TBT concentration in the female Manila clams (p < 0.001). These results indicated that TBT accumulated in the female clam decreased embryo developmental success. In a waterborne exposure test, fertilized eggs (4 h after fertilization) were exposed to TBT at measured concentrations of <0.01 (control), 0.062, 0.140, 0.320, or 0.640 microg/l for 23 h. Embryo developmental success was also significantly decreased in all TBT treatment groups compared with that in the control group. TBT accumulated in female adults and waterborne TBT clearly inhibit reproductive success of the clam. PMID:16169053

  15. BOSS Ultracool Dwarfs. I. Colors and Magnetic Activity of M and L Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Davenport, James R. A.; Ge, Jian; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-05-01

    We present the colors and activity of ultracool (M7-L8) dwarfs from the Tenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We combine previous samples of SDSS M and L dwarfs with new data obtained from the Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey (BOSS) to produce the BOSS Ultracool Dwarf (BUD) sample of 11820 M7-L8 dwarfs. By combining SDSS data with photometry from 2MASS and the Wide-field Infrared Sky Explorer (WISE) mission, we present ultracool dwarf colors from i-z to W2-W3 as a function of spectral type, and extend the SDSS-2MASS-WISE color locus to include ultracool dwarfs. The i-z, i-J, and z-J colors provide the best indication of spectral type for M7-L3 dwarfs. We also examine ultracool dwarf chromospheric activity through the presence and strength of Hα emission. The fraction of active dwarfs rises through the M spectral sequence until it reaches ˜90% at spectral type L0. The fraction of active dwarfs then declines to 50% at spectral type L5; no Hα emission is observed in the late-L dwarfs in the BUD sample. The fraction of active L0-L5 dwarfs is much higher than previously observed. The strength of activity declines with spectral type from M7 through L3, after which the data do not show a clear trend. Using one-dimensional chromosphere models, we explore the range of filling factors and chromospheric temperature structures that are consistent with Hα observations of M0-L7 dwarfs. M dwarf chromospheres have a similar, smoothly varying range of temperature and surface coverage, while L dwarf chromospheres are cooler and have smaller filling factors.

  16. COMPARISON OF AQUEOUS AND SOLID-PHASE UPTAKE FOR HEXACHLOROBENZENE IN THE TELLINID CLAM MACOMA NASUTA (CONRAD): A MASS BALANCE APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The uptake of sediment-associated hexachlorobenzene (HCB) by the deposit-feeding clam Macoma nasuta (Conrad) was determined using a clam ventilation chamber. lams were exposed to [14C]HCB-dosed sediment, and the 14C amounts were measured in inhalant and exhalant waters, fecal pel...

  17. A DESCRIPTIVE EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF NUMBER 2 FUEL OIL ON THE TISSUES OF THE SOFT SHELL CLAM 'MYA ARENARIA L'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soft shell clams were exposed over 28 days at 4C to single dose concentrations of 10, 50 and 100 ppm No. 2 fuel oil emulsion to simulate a potential winter oil spill. The hydrocarbon content of the water column was monitored on a weekly basis. Clams were removed and their histolo...

  18. Norovirus recognizes histo-blood group antigens on the gastrointestinal cells of clams, mussels and oysters: a possible mechanism of bio-accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a set of HBGA-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was used to detect the expression of HBGA in three oyster species consumed commonly (pacific, virginica, and kumamato), and manila clams, and blue mussels. rNVLPs were applied to plate coated with oyster, mussel or clam GI homogena...

  19. An unsuccessful search for brown dwarf companions to white dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a survey to detect excess infrared emission from white dwarf stars which would be attributable to a low mass companion are reviewed. Neither a simple comparison of spectroscopically identified white dwarf stars with the IRAS Point Source Catalog nor the coadding of IRAS survey data resulted in a detection of a brown dwarf. The seven nearest stars where the most stringent limits to the presence of a brown dwarf were obtained are listed, and an effort to detect brown dwarfs in the solar neighborhood is discussed.

  20. THE FORNAX DWARF GALAXY AS A REMNANT OF RECENT DWARF-DWARF MERGING IN THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Yozin, C.; Bekki, K.

    2012-09-01

    We present results from the first numerical analysis to support the hypothesis, first proposed in Coleman et al., that the Fornax dwarf galaxy was formed from the minor merging of two dwarfs about 2 Gyr ago. Using orbits for the Fornax dwarf that are consistent with the latest proper motion measurements, our dynamical evolution models show that the observed asymmetric shell-like substructures can be formed from the remnant of a smaller dwarf during minor merging. These models also predict the formation of diffuse stellar streams. We discuss how these stellar substructures depend on model parameters of dwarf-dwarf merging, and how the intermediate-age subpopulations found in the vicinity of these substructures may be formed from gas accretion in past merger events. We also suggest that one of Fornax's globular clusters originates from a merged dwarf companion, and demonstrate where as yet undetected tidal streams or H I gas formed from the dwarf merging may be found in the outer halo of the Galaxy.

  1. Overview of research at NBS using synchrotron radiation at SURF-II

    SciTech Connect

    Ederer, D. L.; Madden, R. P.; Parr, A. C.; Rakowsky, G.; Saloman, E. B.; Copper, J.; Stockbauer, Roger; Madey, T. E.; Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-11-01

    The National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF-II) is used in conjunction with several high throughput monochromators to study the interaction of vacuum ultraviolet photons with solids and gases. Recent work has been concerned with the photon stimulated desorption of atomic and molecular ions from surfaces, with the effect of electric fields on molecular photoabsorption and with the study of molecular photoionization by angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. These research programs yield new information about molecular bonding at surfaces, molecular dynamics near ionization thresholds, and the coupling of the electronic and nuclear motion near resonances in molecules. In addition to these programs in basic research SURF-II is used for the calibration of transfer standard detectors over a photon energy range 20 to 250 eV. Calibration of monochromator systems is achieved over the photon energy range 5 to 250 eV by using the now calculable spectral intensity radiated by the electrons, which are confined in a nearly circular orbit.

  2. Longitudinal instability studies at the SURF II storage ring at NIST.

    SciTech Connect

    Harkay, K.C.; Sereno, N.S.

    1998-08-27

    Measurements of the longitudinal instability observed in the storage ring at the Synchrotrons Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF II) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NET) were performed to understand the mechanism driving the instability. The instability, studied in depth by Ralcowsky and others, manifests itself in broad resonance features in the horizontal and vertical motion spectrum of the synchrotrons light from DC to a few kHz. Also observed are multiple synchrotrons harmonics that modulate the revolution harmonics; these are characteristic of longitudinal phase oscillations. These spectral features of the motion are found to be correlated with the periodic lengthening and shortening of the bunch length on time scales from {approximately}0.1 ms to 20 ms, depending on machine and radio-frequency (rf) system parameters. In this report, the growth rate of the instability is determined from measurements using an rf pickup electrode. The measured growth rates are compared to computed growth rates from an analytical model. Recommendations are made regarding options to control or mitigate the instability. In light of upgrade plans for SURF III, a few comments are presented about the beam lifetime.

  3. Discrete particle model for bedload sediment transport in the surf zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, Joseph

    2002-04-01

    Predicting the evolution of nearshore bathymetry from the highest uprush of the swash offshore to the location of wave breaking is a difficult problem of significant importance, with economic, legal, engineering, scientific, and military implications for coastal environments. Despite the apparent accessibility of the phenomena of interest, namely, the motion of sand under the forcing of waves and currents, the predictive capability of existing models for nearshore evolution is poor. A detailed study of the forces exerted on individual sand grains is undertaken in an effort to elucidate sediment transport mechanisms in the surf zone. New results indicate that fluid acceleration is a particularly important feature of surf zone transport; likewise, the processes of particle size segregation and the role of particle shape are newly explored. The study methodology employs computer simulations that describe the collective and individual motions of discrete particles immersed in a Newtonian fluid having essentially arbitrary density and viscosity. In this study all particle properties are those of quartz sand, and the fluid properties correspond to saltwater at 20°C. Such discrete-particle models, having a basis in molecular dynamics studies, have a broad range of applications in addition to the sedimentological one of interest here; for example, similar methodologies have been applied to traffic flow, schooling fish, crowd control, and other problems in which the particulate nature of the phenomenon is of critical importance.

  4. A model for the generation of two-dimensional surf beat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, Jeffrey H.

    1992-01-01

    A finite difference model predicting group-forced long waves in the nearshore is constructed with two interacting parts: an incident wave model providing time-varying radiation stress gradients across the nearshore, and a long-wave model which solves the equations of motion for the forcing imposed by the incident waves. Both shallow water group-bound long waves and long waves generated by a time-varying breakpoint are simulated. Model-generated time series are used to calculate the cross correlation between wave groups and long waves through the surf zone. The cross-correlation signal first observed by Tucker (1950) is well predicted. For the first time, this signal is decomposed into the contributions from the two mechanisms of leaky mode forcing. Results show that the cross-correlation signal can be explained by bound long waves which are amplified, though strongly modified, through the surf zone before reflection from the shoreline. The breakpoint-forced long waves are added to the bound long waves at a phase of pi/2 and are a secondary contribution owing to their relatively small size.

  5. The Web-Surf Task: A translational model of human decision-making.

    PubMed

    Abram, Samantha V; Breton, Yannick-André; Schmidt, Brandy; Redish, A David; MacDonald, Angus W

    2016-02-01

    Animal models of decision-making are some of the most highly regarded psychological process models; however, there remains a disconnection between how these models are used for pre-clinical applications and the resulting treatment outcomes. This may be due to untested assumptions that different species recruit the same neural or psychological mechanisms. We propose a novel human foraging paradigm (Web-Surf Task) that we translated from a rat foraging paradigm (Restaurant Row) to evaluate cross-species decision-making similarities. We examined behavioral parallels in human and non-human animals using the respective tasks. We also compared two variants of the human task, one using videos and the other using photos as rewards, by correlating revealed and stated preferences. We demonstrate similarities in choice behaviors and decision reaction times in human and rat subjects. Findings also indicate that videos yielded more reliable and valid results. The joint use of the Web-Surf Task and Restaurant Row is therefore a promising approach for functional translational research, aiming to bridge pre-clinical and clinical lines of research using analogous tasks. PMID:26377334

  6. Turbulent stresses in the surf-zone: Which way is up?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, John W.; Gelfenbaum, Guy

    1997-01-01

    Velocity observations from a vertical stack of three-component Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) within the energetic surf-zone are presented. Rapid temporal sampling and small sampling volume provide observations suitable for investigation of the role of turbulent fluctuations in surf-zone dynamics. While sensor performance was good, failure to recover reliable measures of tilt from the vertical compromise the data value. We will present some cursory observations supporting the ADV performance, and examine the sensitivity of stress estimates to uncertainty in the sensor orientation. It is well known that turbulent stress estimates are highly sensitive to orientation relative to vertical when wave motions are dominant. Analyses presented examine the potential to use observed flow-field characteristics to constrain sensor orientation. Results show that such an approach may provide a consistent orientation to a fraction of a degree, but the inherent sensitivity of stress estimates requires a still more restrictive constraint. Regardless, the observations indicate the degree to which stress estimates are dependent on orientation, and provide some indication of the temporal variability in time-averaged stress estimates.

  7. Comparison of impact forces, accelerations and ankle range of motion in surfing-related landing tasks.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Lina E; Tran, Tai T; Nimphius, Sophia; Raymond, Ellen; Secomb, Josh L; Farley, Oliver R L; Newton, Robert U; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to describe the impact forces, accelerations and ankle range of motion in five different landing tasks that are used in training and testing for competitive surfing athletes, to assist coaches in the prescription of landing task progression and monitoring training load. Eleven competitive surfing athletes aged 24 ± 7 years participated, and inertial motion sensors were fixed to the anterior aspect of the feet, mid-tibial shafts, sacrum and eighth thoracic vertebrae on these athletes. Three tasks were performed landing on force plates and two tasks in a modified gymnastics set-up used for land-based aerial training. Peak landing force, resultant peak acceleration and front and rear side ankle dorsiflexion ranges of motion during landing were determined. The peak acceleration was approximately 50% higher when performing aerial training using a mini-trampoline and landing on a soft-density foam board, compared to a similar landing off a 50 cm box. Furthermore, the ankle ranges of motion during the gymnastic type landings were significantly lower than the other landing types (P ≤ 0.05 and P ≤ 0.001), for front and rear sides, respectively. Conclusively, increased task complexity and specificity of the sport increased the tibial peak acceleration, indicating greater training load. PMID:26383823

  8. Robust and Effective Component-based Banknote Recognition by SURF Features

    PubMed Central

    Hasanuzzaman, Faiz M.; Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    Camera-based computer vision technology is able to assist visually impaired people to automatically recognize banknotes. A good banknote recognition algorithm for blind or visually impaired people should have the following features: 1) 100% accuracy, and 2) robustness to various conditions in different environments and occlusions. Most existing algorithms of banknote recognition are limited to work for restricted conditions. In this paper we propose a component-based framework for banknote recognition by using Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF). The component-based framework is effective in collecting more class-specific information and robust in dealing with partial occlusion and viewpoint changes. Furthermore, the evaluation of SURF demonstrates its effectiveness in handling background noise, image rotation, scale, and illumination changes. To authenticate the robustness and generalizability of the proposed approach, we have collected a large dataset of banknotes from a variety of conditions including occlusion, cluttered background, rotation, and changes of illumination, scaling, and viewpoints. The proposed algorithm achieves 100% recognition rate on our challenging dataset. PMID:25531008

  9. Preventing Shoulder-Surfing Attack with the Concept of Concealing the Password Objects' Information

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peng Foong; Kam, Yvonne Hwei-Syn; Wee, Mee Chin

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, picture-based password systems employ password objects (pictures/icons/symbols) as input during an authentication session, thus making them vulnerable to “shoulder-surfing” attack because the visual interface by function is easily observed by others. Recent software-based approaches attempt to minimize this threat by requiring users to enter their passwords indirectly by performing certain mental tasks to derive the indirect password, thus concealing the user's actual password. However, weaknesses in the positioning of distracter and password objects introduce usability and security issues. In this paper, a new method, which conceals information about the password objects as much as possible, is proposed. Besides concealing the password objects and the number of password objects, the proposed method allows both password and distracter objects to be used as the challenge set's input. The correctly entered password appears to be random and can only be derived with the knowledge of the full set of password objects. Therefore, it would be difficult for a shoulder-surfing adversary to identify the user's actual password. Simulation results indicate that the correct input object and its location are random for each challenge set, thus preventing frequency of occurrence analysis attack. User study results show that the proposed method is able to prevent shoulder-surfing attack. PMID:24991649

  10. DwarfArchives.org: A Homogeneous Database Of M, L , & T Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelino, C. R.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Burgasser, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    With the ever growing number of L and T dwarfs, it is becoming increasingly difficult to keep track of all the publications presenting the data (photometry, spectra, finder charts, etc.) of these objects. Furthermore, given the different methods for discovery, there is no consistent way in which the data are presented from one publication to the next. No service exists that lists all known L and T dwarfs. SIMBAD is very useful for certain applications, but it only contains limited data for some L and T dwarfs. We introduce DwarfArchives.org: a self-consistent, homogeneous archive of data for cool dwarf objects. This archive combines J. D. Kirkpatrick's M, L, & T Dwarf Archive at http://spider.ipac.caltech.edu/staff/davy/ARCHIVE and A. J. Burgasser's T Dwarf pages. It will contain 2MASS All-Sky Point Source Catalog photometry and positions for 23 late-K dwarfs, 506 M dwarfs, 407 L dwarfs, 63 T dwarfs, 43 late-type giants, and 19 M subdwarfs (as of this writing). The archive will contain finder charts, and when available, spectral types (both optical and near-IR), optical spectra, and links to discovery papers. While the archive will be fully searchable, we will provide several subsets of objects, including those objects with measured parallaxes and those objects appropriate for spectral standards. Finally, we will discuss science projects that are possible with this uniform dataset.

  11. Evaluation of Using Caged Clams to Monitor Contaminated Groundwater Exposure in the Near-Shore Environment of the Hanford Site 300 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Kyle B.; Poston, Ted M.; Tiller, Brett L.

    2008-01-31

    The Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) has been identified as an indicator species for locating and monitoring contaminated groundwater in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a field study to explore the use of caged Asiatic clams to monitor contaminated groundwater upwelling in the 300 Area near-shore environment and assess seasonal differences in uranium uptake in relation to seasonal flow regimes of the Columbia River. Additional objectives included examining the potential effects of uranium accumulation on growth, survival, and tissue condition of the clams. This report documents the field conditions and procedures, laboratory procedures, and statistical analyses used in collecting samples and processing the data. Detailed results are presented and illustrated, followed by a discussion comparing uranium concentrations in Asiatic clams collected at the 300 Area and describing the relationship between river discharge, groundwater indicators, and uranium in clams. Growth and survival, histology, and other sources of environmental variation also are discussed.

  12. Selenium and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in the benthic clam Corbula amurensis from Northern San Francisco Bay, California: May 1995-February 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleckner, Amy E.; Stewart, A. Robin; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2010-01-01

    The clam-based food webs of San Francisco Bay, California efficiently bioaccumlate selenium and thus provide pathways for exposure to predators important to the estuary. This study documents changes in monthly selenium concentrations for the clam Corbula amurensis, a keystone species of the estuary, at five locations in northern San Francisco Bay from 1995 through 2010. Samples were collected from designated U.S. Geological Survey stations and prepared and analyzed by U.S. Geological Survey methods. Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in soft tissues of clams also were measured as an indicator of sources of selenium for the clams. These monitoring data indicate that clam selenium concentrations ranged from a low of 2 to a high of 22 micrograms per gram dry weight with strong spatial and seasonal variation over the period of study.

  13. Verification of the effect of surface preparation on Hot Isostatic Pressing diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanyun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Bo; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) diffusion bonding with CLAM steel is the primary candidate fabrication technique for the first wall (FW) of DFLL-TBM. Surface state is one of the key factors for the joints quality. The effect of surface state prepared with grinder and miller on HIP diffusion bonding joints of CLAM steel was investigated. HIP diffusion bonding was performed at 140 MPa and 1373 K within 3 h. The mechanical properties of the joints were investigated with instrumented Charpy V-notch impact tests and the microstructures of the joints were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the milled samples with fine surface roughness were more suitable for CLAM steel HIP diffusion bonding.

  14. Environmentally realistic concentrations of the antibiotic Trimethoprim affect haemocyte parameters but not antioxidant enzyme activities in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Matozzo, Valerio; De Notaris, Chiara; Finos, Livio; Filippini, Raffaella; Piovan, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Several biomarkers were measured to evaluate the effects of Trimethoprim (TMP; 300, 600 and 900 ng/L) in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum after exposure for 1, 3 and 7 days. The actual TMP concentrations were also measured in the experimental tanks. The total haemocyte count significantly increased in 7 day-exposed clams, whereas alterations in haemocyte volume were observed after 1 and 3 days of exposure. Haemocyte proliferation was increased significantly in animals exposed for 1 and 7 days, whereas haemocyte lysate lysozyme activity decreased significantly after 1 and 3 days. In addition, TMP significantly increased haemolymph lactate dehydrogenase activity after 3 and 7 days. Regarding antioxidant enzymes, only a significant time-dependent effect on CAT activity was recorded. This study demonstrated that environmentally realistic concentrations of TMP affect haemocyte parameters in clams, suggesting that haemocytes are a useful cellular model for the assessment of the impact of TMP on bivalves. PMID:26301695

  15. Accumulation and tissue distribution of radioiodine ( sup 131 I) from algal phytoplankton by the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis

    SciTech Connect

    Cuvin-Aralar, Ma.L.A. ); Umaly, R.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Radioactive wastes discharged from establishments involved in the use of radioisotopes such as nuclear-powered industries, tracer research and nuclear medicine are a potential public health hazard. Such wastes contain radionuclides, particularly Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I), produced in fission with a yield of about 3%. Radionuclides in waste waters are known to be taken up by molluscs such as mussels, oysters, and clams. This study aims to determine the uptake of {sup 131}I from algal phytoplankton (Chroococcus dispersus) fed to the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis as well as the organ/tissue distribution. The results will be compared with a previous study on {sup 131}I uptake from water by the same clams.

  16. Local Group dwarf galaxies: nature and nurture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawala, Till; Scannapieco, Cecilia; White, Simon

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies in a high-resolution, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of a Milky Way sized halo and its environment. Our simulation includes gas cooling, star formation, supernova feedback, metal enrichment and ultraviolet heating. In total, 90 satellites and more than 400 isolated dwarf galaxies are formed in the simulation, allowing a systematic study of the internal and environmental processes that determine their evolution. We find that 95 per cent of satellite galaxies are gas free at z= 0, and identify three mechanisms for gas loss: supernova feedback, tidal stripping and photoevaporation due to re-ionization. Gas-rich satellite galaxies are only found with total masses above ˜5 × 109 M⊙. In contrast, for isolated dwarf galaxies, a total mass of ˜109 M⊙ constitutes a sharp transition; less massive galaxies are predominantly gas free at z= 0, more massive, isolated dwarf galaxies are often able to retain their gas. In general, we find that the total mass of a dwarf galaxy is the main factor which determines its star formation, metal enrichment and its gas content, but that stripping may explain the observed difference in gas content between field dwarf galaxies and satellites with total masses close to 109 M⊙. We also find that a morphological transformation via tidal stripping of infalling, luminous dwarf galaxies whose dark matter is less concentrated than their stars cannot explain the high total mass-to-light ratios of the faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  17. Isolation of Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio splendidus from aquacultured carpet shell clam (Ruditapes decussatus) larvae associated with mass mortalities.

    PubMed

    Gómez-León, J; Villamil, L; Lemos, M L; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2005-01-01

    Two episodes of mortality of cultured carpet shell clams (Ruditapes decussatus) associated with bacterial infections were recorded during 2001 and 2002 in a commercial hatchery located in Spain. Vibrio alginolyticus was isolated as the primary organism from moribund clam larvae that were obtained during the two separate events. Vibrio splendidus biovar II, in addition to V. alginolyticus, was isolated as a result of a mixed Vibrio infection from moribund clam larvae obtained from the second mortality event. The larval mortality rates for these events were 62 and 73%, respectively. Mortality was also detected in spat. To our knowledge, this is the fist time that these bacterial species have been associated with larval and juvenile carpet shell clam mortality. The bacterial strains were identified by morphological and biochemical techniques and also by PCR and sequencing of a conserved region of the 16S rRNA gene. In both cases bacteria isolated in pure culture were inoculated into spat of carpet shell clams by intravalvar injection and by immersion. The mortality was attributed to the inoculated strains, since the bacteria were obtained in pure culture from the soft tissues of experimentally infected clams. V. alginolyticus TA15 and V. splendidus biovar II strain TA2 caused similar histological lesions that affected mainly the mantle, the velum, and the connective tissue of infected organisms. The general enzymatic activity of both live cells and extracellular products (ECPs), as evaluated by the API ZYM system, revealed that whole bacterial cells showed greater enzymatic activity than ECPs and that the activity of most enzymes ceased after heat treatment (100 degrees C for 10 min). Both strain TA15 and strain TA2 produced hydroxamate siderophores, although the activity was greater in strain TA15. ECPs from both bacterial species at high concentrations, as well as viable bacteria, caused significant reductions in hemocyte survival after 4 h of incubation, whereas no significant differences in viability were observed during incubation with heat-killed bacteria. PMID:15640176

  18. The endocrine-disrupting effect and other physiological responses of municipal effluent on the clam Ruditapes decussatus.

    PubMed

    Mezghani-Chaari, Sawssan; Machreki-Ajmi, Monia; Tremolet, Gauthier; Kellner, Kristell; Geffard, Alain; Minier, Christophe; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2015-12-01

    In order to document the potential endocrine disrupting and toxic effect of the municipal wastewater effluents discharged into the Sfax coastal area (South of Tunisia), specimens of clam R. decussatus were collected from a reference site and were in vivo exposed to treated sewage effluent for 30 days. To this end, estrogenic and androgenic activities were measured in the gills to assess potential accumulation and regulation of active compounds. After effluent exposure androgenic activity in organic extracts increased up to fivefold compared to controls and remained elevated, while estrogenic activity was not significantly affected by exposure. As a consequence, remarkable disruptions in the gametogenesis activity, glycogen content, and Vitellogenin-like protein levels in male clams were observed. A parallel analysis of heavy metals in clam tissues was determined. A significant uptake of Ni, Zn, and Pb in soft tissues of exposed clams was observed. The significant increase of malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations as a function of exposure time implies that clams have been exposed to an oxidative stress probably due to the presence of high metal concentrations in sewage effluent. Correlation analysis has revealed a statistically significant and positive relationship between MDA levels and metal concentrations in clams' tissues. The acetylcholinesterase activity was not significantly affected by exposure. Altogether, these results showed that a short-term exposure to a mixture of chemical compounds released by the Sfax wastewater treatment plant induce adverse physiological and reproductive effects in R. decussatus. Further studies are underway in order to evaluate its long-term impacts on aquatic wildlife in the gulf of Gabes area. PMID:26278908

  19. Frequency, Magnitude, and Possible Causes of Stranding and Mass-Mortality Events of the Beach Clam Tivela mactroides (Bivalvia: Veneridae).

    PubMed

    Turra, Alexander; Pombo, Maíra; Petracco, Marcelo; Siegle, Eduardo; Fonseca, Mariana; Denadai, Márcia R

    2016-01-01

    Stranding combined with mass-mortality events of sandy-beach organisms is a frequent but little-understood phenomenon, which is generally studied based on discrete episodes. The frequency, magnitude, and possible causes of stranding and mass-mortality events of the trigonal clam Tivela mactroides were assessed based on censuses of stranded individuals, every four days from September 2007 through December 2008, in Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil. Stranded clams were classified as dying (closed valves did not open when forced) or dead (closed valves were easily opened). Information on wave parameters and the living intertidal clam population was used to assess possible causes of stranding. This fine-scale monitoring showed that stranding occurred widely along the shore and year-round, with peaks interspersed with periods of low or no mortality. Dead clams showed higher mean density than dying individuals, but a lower mean shell length, attributed to a higher tolerance to desiccation of larger individuals. Wave height had a significant negative relationship to the density of dying individuals, presumed to be due to the accretive nature of low-energy waves: when digging out, clams would be more prone to be carried upward and unable to return; while larger waves, breaking farther from the beach and with a stronger backwash, would prevent stranding in the uppermost areas. This ecological finding highlights the need for refined temporal studies on mortality events, in order to understand them more clearly. Last, the similar size structure of stranded clams and the living population indicated that the stranded individuals are from the intertidal or shallow subtidal zone, and reinforces the ecological and behavioral components of this process, which have important ecological and socioeconomic implications for the management of this population. PMID:26745804

  20. Frequency, Magnitude, and Possible Causes of Stranding and Mass-Mortality Events of the Beach Clam Tivela mactroides (Bivalvia: Veneridae)

    PubMed Central

    Turra, Alexander; Pombo, Maíra; Petracco, Marcelo; Siegle, Eduardo; Fonseca, Mariana; Denadai, Márcia R.

    2016-01-01

    Stranding combined with mass-mortality events of sandy-beach organisms is a frequent but little-understood phenomenon, which is generally studied based on discrete episodes. The frequency, magnitude, and possible causes of stranding and mass-mortality events of the trigonal clam Tivela mactroides were assessed based on censuses of stranded individuals, every four days from September 2007 through December 2008, in Caraguatatuba Bay, southeastern Brazil. Stranded clams were classified as dying (closed valves did not open when forced) or dead (closed valves were easily opened). Information on wave parameters and the living intertidal clam population was used to assess possible causes of stranding. This fine-scale monitoring showed that stranding occurred widely along the shore and year-round, with peaks interspersed with periods of low or no mortality. Dead clams showed higher mean density than dying individuals, but a lower mean shell length, attributed to a higher tolerance to desiccation of larger individuals. Wave height had a significant negative relationship to the density of dying individuals, presumed to be due to the accretive nature of low-energy waves: when digging out, clams would be more prone to be carried upward and unable to return; while larger waves, breaking farther from the beach and with a stronger backwash, would prevent stranding in the uppermost areas. This ecological finding highlights the need for refined temporal studies on mortality events, in order to understand them more clearly. Last, the similar size structure of stranded clams and the living population indicated that the stranded individuals are from the intertidal or shallow subtidal zone, and reinforces the ecological and behavioral components of this process, which have important ecological and socioeconomic implications for the management of this population. PMID:26745804