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Sample records for dwarf-neutron star binaries

  1. White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, P.

    1977-01-01

    The three possible fates of burned-out stars: white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes, are described in elementary terms. Characteristics of these celestial bodies, as provided by Einstein's work, are described. (CP)

  2. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  3. Quasisoft X-Ray Sources: White Dwarfs? Neutron Stars? Black Holes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    Two of the most exciting areas of current research in astrophysics are black holes and Type Ia supernovae. We propose archival work that has the potential to shed light on both areas. The focus of our research is a newly-established class of x-ray sources called Quasisoft X-ray Sources (QSSs). Although they comprise a significant fraction of the x- ray sources in galaxies of all types, including M31, it has proved difficult to identify members of this class in the Milky Way or Magellanic Clouds. We have developed methods to find these sources, and have begun to meet with success in the application of our methods. The three-year project we propose will allow us to identify QSSs. We will then use the full range of archived data to determine which QSS candidates are highly luminous, and which are members of less luminous classes, such as quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries (qLMXBs), or even isolated neutron stars. Many will be nearby x-ray active stars, or else distant AGN, whose discovery will also be of interest to a range of researchers. In the end, we will have a subset of intriguing physical systems, some of which may be accreting black holes and some of which may be unusual states of neutron stars or even of nuclear-burning white dwarfs. The systems identified through this ADAP program will be targets of future observing programs, from space and from the ground. The information we derive from NASA archived data will provide insight into important astrophysical questions. Do intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) exist? It has only been during the past 15 years or so that accreting compact objects that were considered as black hole candidates have been promoted to black holes. This achievement required years of observations of candidates in the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. The discovery of ultraluminous X- ray source in external galaxies suggests that there are black holes with masses larger than the 10-30 solar masses typical of the known black holes. To

  4. On the formation of Be stars through binary interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2014-11-20

    Be stars are rapidly rotating B-type stars. The origin of their rapid rotation is not certain, but binary interaction remains as a possibility. In this work, we investigate the formation of Be stars resulting from mass transfer in binaries in the Galaxy. We calculate binary evolution with both stars evolving simultaneously and consider different possible mass accretion histories for the accretor. From the calculated results, we obtain the critical mass ratios q {sub cr} that determine the stability of the mass transfer. We also numerically calculate the parameter λ in common envelope evolution and then incorporate both q {sub cr} and λ into the population synthesis calculations. We present the predicted numbers and characteristics of Be stars in binary systems with different types of companions, including helium stars, white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. We find that in Be/neutron star binaries, the Be stars can have a lower mass limit ∼8 M {sub ☉} if they are formed by stable (i.e., without the occurrence of common envelope evolution) and nonconservative mass transfer. We demonstrate that isolated Be stars may originate from both mergers of two main-sequence stars and disrupted Be binaries during the supernova explosions of the primary stars, but mergers seem to play a much more important role. Finally, the fraction of Be stars that have involved binary interactions in all B-type stars can be as high as ∼13%-30%, implying that most Be stars may result from binary interaction.

  5. A field guide to the binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    1983-05-01

    Details and examples of the six phases of existence for a binary star system are described. The birth and pre-main-sequence contraction is generally obscured from observation by the presence of gas and dust clouds; it comprises 1/1000th of a system's lifetime. The main sequence, i.e., hydrogen burning, takes up to 90 pct of a star's lifetime, and has been detected in stars with masses ranging from 0.07-32 solar masses. In binary systems, the main sequence stars may or may not interact, or one companion may burn out before the other leaves the main sequence. The primary in a binary system expands to fill its Roche lobe before mass transfer begins, then continues on a Kelvin-Helmholtz time scale until the primary is smaller than the secondary, when transfer proceeds on a nuclear time scale. The depletion of hydrogen fuel or He ignition stops the mass transfer, leading to formation of a white dwarf, neutron star, or supernova that sends both the neutron star and the OB secondary off at high speeds. Back transfer can be initiated in a fifth phase and can produce black holes or dwarf novae, or supernovae. Finally, the system terminates when both stars are extinguished and fall into one another, which can also yield supernovae or black holes.

  6. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  7. Modeling Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Conner; Read, Jocelyn; Flynn, Eric; Lockett-Ruiz, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein's Theory of Relativity, are a new frontier in astronomical observation we can use to observe phenomena in the universe. Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory (LIGO) is currently searching for gravitational wave signals, and requires accurate predictions in order to best extract astronomical signals from all other sources of fluctuations. The focus of my research is in increasing the accuracy of Post-Newtonian models of binary neutron star coalescence to match the computationally expensive Numerical models. Numerical simulations can take months to compute a couple of milliseconds of signal whereas the Post-Newtonian can generate similar signals in seconds. However the Post-Newtonian model is an approximation, e.g. the Taylor T4 Post-Newtonian model assumes that the two bodies in the binary neutron star system are point charges. To increase the effectiveness of the approximation, I added in tidal effects, resonance frequencies, and a windowing function. Using these observed effects from simulations significantly increases the Post-Newtonian model's similarity to the Numerical signal.

  8. Chemical Evolution of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzard, R. G.

    2013-02-01

    Energy generation by nuclear fusion is the fundamental process that prevents stars from collapsing under their own gravity. Fusion in the core of a star converts hydrogen to heavier elements from helium to uranium. The signature of this nucleosynthesis is often visible in a single star only for a very short time, for example while the star is a red giant or, in massive stars, when it explodes. Contrarily, in a binary system nuclear-processed matter can captured by a secondary star which remains chemically polluted long after its more massive companion star has evolved and died. By probing old, low-mass stars we gain vital insight into the complex nucleosynthesis that occurred when our Galaxy was much younger than it is today. Stellar evolution itself is also affected by the presence of a companion star. Thermonuclear novae and type Ia supernovae result from mass transfer in binary stars, but big questions still surround the nature of their progenitors. Stars may even merge and one of the challenges for the future of stellar astrophysics is to quantitatively understand what happens in such extreme systems. Binary stars offer unique insights into stellar, galactic and extragalactic astrophysics through their plethora of exciting phenomena. Understanding the chemical evolution of binary stars is thus of high priority in modern astrophysics.

  9. BINARIES AMONG DEBRIS DISK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.

    2012-02-01

    We have gathered a sample of 112 main-sequence stars with known debris disks. We collected published information and performed adaptive optics observations at Lick Observatory to determine if these debris disks are associated with binary or multiple stars. We discovered a previously unknown M-star companion to HD 1051 at a projected separation of 628 AU. We found that 25% {+-} 4% of our debris disk systems are binary or triple star systems, substantially less than the expected {approx}50%. The period distribution for these suggests a relative lack of systems with 1-100 AU separations. Only a few systems have blackbody disk radii comparable to the binary/triple separation. Together, these two characteristics suggest that binaries with intermediate separations of 1-100 AU readily clear out their disks. We find that the fractional disk luminosity, as a proxy for disk mass, is generally lower for multiple systems than for single stars at any given age. Hence, for a binary to possess a disk (or form planets) it must either be a very widely separated binary with disk particles orbiting a single star or it must be a small separation binary with a circumbinary disk.

  10. Theoretical Astrophysics - Volume 2, Stars and Stellar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2001-07-01

    Preface; 1. Overview: stars and stellar systems; 2. Stellar structure; 3. Stellar evolution; 4. Supernova (Type II); 5. White dwarfs, neutron stars and blackholes; 6. Pulsars; 7. Binary stars and accretion; 8. Sun and the solar system; 9. Interstellar medium; 10. Globular clusters; References; Index.

  11. BDB: The Binary Star Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O.; Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.; Malkov, O.

    2014-05-01

    Description of the Binary star DataBase (BDB, http://bdb.inasan.ru), the world's principal database of binary and multiple systems of all observational types, is presented in the paper. BDB contains data on physical and positional parameters of 100,000 components of 40,000 systems of multiplicity 2 to 20, belonging to various observational types: visual, spectroscopic, eclipsing, etc. Information on these types of binaries is obtained from heterogeneous sources of data - astronomical and. Organization of the information is based on the careful cross-identification of the objects. BDB can be queried by star identifier, coordinates, and other parameters.

  12. The Michigan Binary Star Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Rudi P.

    2007-07-01

    At the end of the nineteenth century, William J. Hussey and Robert G. Aitken, both at Lick Observatory, began a systematic search for unrecorded binary stars with the aid of the 12" and 36" refracting telescopes at Lick Observatory. Aitken's work (and book on binary stars) are well known, Hussey's contributions less so. In 1905 Hussey, a Michigan engineering graduate, returned to direct the Ann Arbor astronomy program, and immediately he began to design new instrumentation for the study of binary stars and to train potential observers. For a time, he spent six months a year at the La Plata Observatory, where he discovered a number of new pairs and decided upon a major southern hemisphere campaign. He spent a decade obtaining the lenses for a large refractor, through the vicissitudes of war and depression. Finally, he obtained a site in South Africa, a 26" refractor, and a small corps of observers, but he died in London en route to fulfill his dream. His right hand man, Richard Rossiter, established the observatory and spent the next thirty years discovering and measuring binary stars: his personal total is a record for the field. This talk is an account of the methods, results, and utility of the extraordinary binary star factory in the veldt.

  13. Binary Stars in SBS Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erastova, L. K.

    2016-06-01

    Thirty spectroscopic binary stars were found in the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS). They show composite spectra - WD(DA)+dM or dC (for example Liebert et al. 1994). They may have red color, if the radiation of the red star dominates, and blue one, if the blue star is brighter and have peculiar spectrum in our survey plate. We obtained slit spectra for most of such objects. But we often see the spectrum of one component, because our slit spectra did not cover all optical range. We examine by eye the slit spectra of all SBS stellar objects (˜700) in SDSS DR7, DR8 or DR9 independent on our observations. We confirmed or discovered the duplicity of 30 stars. Usually they are spectroscopic binaries, where one component is WD (DA) and the second one is a red star with or without emission. There also are other components combinations. Sometimes there are emission lines, probably, indicating variable ones.

  14. Spectroscopic Binary Frequency among CNO Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levato, H.; Malaroda, S.; Garcia, B.; Morell, N.

    1987-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Radial velocity variations are- analyzed through a sample of 35 OB stars with CH anomalies.Bolton and Rogers' proposal (1978) is con- firmed in the sense that the OBN stars appear preferably in short-period binary systems, in contrast to OBC stars. : STARS-BINARY - STARS-EARLY TYPE

  15. Interpretations for Low- and High-Frequency QPO Correlations of X-Ray Sources among White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars, and Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. M.; Yin, H. X.; Zhao, Y. H.

    2007-04-01

    An empirical linear relation is found to exist between the high and low frequencies (νhigh, νlow) of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) for black hole candidates (BHCs), neutron stars (NSs), and white dwarfs (WDs) in binary systems, spanning 5 orders of magnitude in frequency. For the NS Z (atoll) sources, νhigh and νlow are identified as the lower kHz QPO frequency and horizontal-branch oscillation (HBO) frequency νHBO (broad noise components); for the BHCs and low-luminosity NSs, they are the QPOs and broad noise components at frequencies between 1 and 10 Hz; for WDs, they are the ``dwarf nova oscillations'' (DNOs) and QPOs of cataclysmic variables (CVs). To interpret this relation, our model ascribes νhigh to the Alfvén wave oscillation frequency at a preferred radius, and νlow to the same mechanism at another radius. We can then obtain νlow=0.08νhigh and the relation between the upper kHz QPO frequency ν2 and the HBO frequency, νHBO~=(56 Hz)(ν2/kHz)2, which are in accordance with the observed empirical relations. Furthermore, some implications of the model are discussed, including why QPO frequencies of WDs and NSs span 5 orders of magnitude.

  16. Gravity darkening in binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Lara, F.; Rieutord, M.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Interpretation of light curves of many types of binary stars requires the inclusion of the (cor)relation between surface brightness and local effective gravity. Until recently, this correlation has always been modeled by a power law relating the flux or the effective temperature and the effective gravity, namely Teff ∝ geffβ . Aims: We look for a simple model that can describe the variations of the flux at the surface of stars belonging to a binary system. Methods: This model assumes that the energy flux is a divergence-free vector anti-parallel to the effective gravity. The effective gravity is computed from the Roche model. Results: After explaining in a simple manner the old result of Lucy (1967, Z. Astrophys., 65, 89), which says that β ~ 0.08 for solar type stars, we first argue that one-dimensional models should no longer be used to evaluate gravity darkening laws. We compute the correlation between log Teff and log geff using a new approach that is valid for synchronous, weakly magnetized, weakly irradiated binaries. We show that this correlation is approximately linear, validating the use of a power law relation between effective temperature and effective gravity as a first approximation. We further show that the exponent β of this power law is a slowly varying function, which we tabulate, of the mass ratio of the binary star and the Roche lobe filling factor of the stars of the system. The exponent β remains mostly in the interval [0.20,0.25] if extreme mass ratios are eliminated. Conclusions: For binary stars that are synchronous, weakly magnetized and weakly irradiated, the gravity darkening exponent is well constrained and may be removed from the free parameters of the models.

  17. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    ADONIS Observes Low-mass Eclipsing System in Orion Summary A series of very detailed images of a binary system of two young stars have been combined into a movie . In merely 3 days, the stars swing around each other. As seen from the earth, they pass in front of each other twice during a full revolution, producing eclipses during which their combined brightness diminishes . A careful analysis of the orbital motions has now made it possible to deduce the masses of the two dancing stars . Both turn out to be about as heavy as our Sun. But while the Sun is about 4500 million years old, these two stars are still in their infancy. They are located some 1500 light-years away in the Orion star-forming region and they probably formed just 10 million years ago . This is the first time such an accurate determination of the stellar masses could be achieved for a young binary system of low-mass stars . The new result provides an important piece of information for our current understanding of how young stars evolve. The observations were obtained by a team of astronomers from Italy and ESO [1] using the ADaptive Optics Near Infrared System (ADONIS) on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. PR Photo 29a/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before primary eclipse PR Photo 29b/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-primary eclipse PR Photo 29c/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after primary eclipse PR Photo 29d/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before secondary eclipse PR Photo 29e/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-secondary eclipse PR Photo 29f/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after secondary eclipse PR Video Clip 06/01 : Video of the RXJ 0529.4+0041 system Binary stars and stellar masses Since some time, astronomers have noted that most stars seem to form in binary or multiple systems. This is quite fortunate, as the study of binary stars is the only way in which it is possible to measure directly one of the most fundamental quantities of a star, its mass. The mass of a

  18. Contact binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochnacki, S. W.

    1981-04-01

    Densities, corrected primary colors, minimum periods, inferred masses, luminosities, and specific angular momenta are computed from data on 37 W Ursae Majoris systems. A-type systems, having lower densities and angular momenta than the W-type systems, are shown to be evolved, and a new class of contact binary is identified, the OO Aquilae systems, whose members have evolved into contact. Evolutionary grids based on the contact condition agree with observation, except in that the evolved A-type systems have lost more angular momentum than predicted by gravitational radiation alone. This is accounted for by stellar wind magnetic braking, which is shown to be effective on a shorter time scale and to be important in other kinds of binaries containing a cool, tidally coupled component.

  19. Neutron Star Mass Distribution in Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Young-Min

    2016-05-01

    Massive neutron stars with ∼ 2Mʘ have been observed in neutron star-white dwarf binaries. On the other hand, well-measured neutron star masses in double-neutron-star binaries are still consistent with the limit of 1.5Mʘ. These observations raised questions on the neutron star equations of state and the neutron star binary evolution processes. In this presentation, a hypothesis of super-Eddington accretion and its implications are discussed. We argue that a 2Mʘ neutron star is an outcome of the super-Eddington accretion during the evolution of neutron star-white dwarf binary progenitors. We also suggest the possibility of the existence of new type of neutron star binary which consists of a typical neutron star and a massive compact companion (high-mass neutron star or black hole) with M ≥ 2Mʘ.

  20. Young and Waltzing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-10-01

    ADONIS Observes Low-mass Eclipsing System in Orion Summary A series of very detailed images of a binary system of two young stars have been combined into a movie . In merely 3 days, the stars swing around each other. As seen from the earth, they pass in front of each other twice during a full revolution, producing eclipses during which their combined brightness diminishes . A careful analysis of the orbital motions has now made it possible to deduce the masses of the two dancing stars . Both turn out to be about as heavy as our Sun. But while the Sun is about 4500 million years old, these two stars are still in their infancy. They are located some 1500 light-years away in the Orion star-forming region and they probably formed just 10 million years ago . This is the first time such an accurate determination of the stellar masses could be achieved for a young binary system of low-mass stars . The new result provides an important piece of information for our current understanding of how young stars evolve. The observations were obtained by a team of astronomers from Italy and ESO [1] using the ADaptive Optics Near Infrared System (ADONIS) on the 3.6-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. PR Photo 29a/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before primary eclipse PR Photo 29b/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-primary eclipse PR Photo 29c/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after primary eclipse PR Photo 29d/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system before secondary eclipse PR Photo 29e/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system at mid-secondary eclipse PR Photo 29f/01 : The RXJ 0529.4+0041 system after secondary eclipse PR Video Clip 06/01 : Video of the RXJ 0529.4+0041 system Binary stars and stellar masses Since some time, astronomers have noted that most stars seem to form in binary or multiple systems. This is quite fortunate, as the study of binary stars is the only way in which it is possible to measure directly one of the most fundamental quantities of a star, its mass. The mass of a

  1. Recent Minima of 193 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO Eclipsing Binary section. Times of minima from CCD observations received by the author from November 2015 through January 2016 are presented.

  2. Massive Stars in Interactive Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St.-Louis, Nicole; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    Massive stars start their lives above a mass of ~8 time solar, finally exploding after a few million years as core-collapse or pair-production supernovae. Above ~15 solar masses, they also spend most of their lives driving especially strong, hot winds due to their extreme luminosities. All of these aspects dominate the ecology of the Universe, from element enrichment to stirring up and ionizing the interstellar medium. But when they occur in close pairs or groups separated by less than a parsec, the interaction of massive stars can lead to various exotic phenomena which would not be seen if there were no binaries. These depend on the actual separation, and going from wie to close including colliding winds (with non-thermal radio emission and Wolf-Rayet dust spirals), cluster dynamics, X-ray binaries, Roche-lobe overflow (with inverse mass-ratios and rapid spin up), collisions, merging, rejuventation and massive blue stragglers, black-hole formation, runaways and gamma-ray bursts. Also, one wonders whether the fact that a massive star is in a binary affects its parameters compared to its isolated equivalent. These proceedings deal with all of these phenomena, plus binary statistics and determination of general physical properties of massive stars, that would not be possible with their single cousins. The 77 articles published in these proceedings, all based on oral talks, vary from broad revies to the lates developments in the field. About a third of the time was spent in open discussion of all participants, both for ~5 minutes after each talk and 8 half-hour long general dialogues, all audio-recorded, transcribed and only moderately edited to yield a real flavour of the meeting. The candid information in these discussions is sometimes more revealing than the article(s) that preceded them and also provide entertaining reading. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar astrophysics and in various physical processes involved when

  3. Terrestrial Planet Formation Around Close Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets around close binary stars, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. The sum of the masses of the two stars is one solar mass, and the initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and in the Alpha Centauri wide binary star system. Giant planets &are included in the simulations, as they are in most simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet accumulation in our Solar System. When the stars travel on a circular orbit with semimajor axis of up to 0.1 AU about their mutual center of mass, the planetary embryos grow into a system of terrestrial planets that is statistically identical to those formed about single stars, but a larger semimajor axis and/or a significantly eccentric binary orbit can lead to significantly more dynamically hot terrestrial planet systems.

  4. Cool Star Binaries with ALEXIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    We proposed to search for high-temperature, flare-produced Fe XXIII line emission from active cool star binary systems using the ALEXIS all-sky survey. Previous X-ray transient searches with ARIEL V and HEAO-1, and subsequent shorter duration monitoring with the GINGA and EXOSAT satellites demonstrated that active binaries can produce large (EM approximately equals 10(exp 55-56/cu cm) X-ray flares lasting several hours or longer. Hot plasma from these flares at temperatures of 10(exp 7)K or more should produce Fe XXIII line emission at lambda = 132.8 A, very near the peak response of ALEXIS telescopes 1A and 2A. Our primary goals were to estimate flare frequency for the largest flares in the active binary systems, and, if the data permitted, to derive a distribution of flare energy vs. frequency for the sample as a whole. After a long delay due to the initial problems with the ALEXIS attitude control, the heroic efforts on the part of the ALEXIS satellite team enabled us to carry out this survey. However, the combination of the higher than expected and variable background in the ALEXIS detectors, and the lower throughput of the ALEXIS telescopes resulted in no convincing detections of large flares from the active binary systems. In addition, vignetting-corrected effective exposure times from the ALEXIS aspect solution were not available prior to the end of this contract; therefore, we were unable to convert upper limits measured in ALEXIS counts to the equivalent L(sub EUV).

  5. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Chambers, John; Duncan, Martin J.; Adams, Fred

    2003-01-01

    Most stars reside in multiple star systems; however, virtually all models of planetary growth have assumed an isolated single star. Numerical simulations of the collapse of molecular cloud cores to form binary stars suggest that disks will form within such systems. Observations indirectly suggest disk material around one or both components within young binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such circumstellar disks, they can remain in stable orbits within the binary star systems for eons. We are simulating the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets within binary star systems, using a new, ultrafast, symplectic integrator that we have developed for this purpose. We show that the late stages of terrestrial planet formation can indeed take place in a wide variety of binary systems and we have begun to delineate the range of parameter space for which this statement is true. Results of our initial simulations of planetary growth around each star in the alpha Centauri system and other 'wide' binary systems, as well as around both stars in very close binary systems, will be presented.

  6. Close binary stars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Although close binary stars are thought theoretically to play a major role in globular cluster dynamics, virtually no non-degenerate close binaries are known in clusters. We review the status of observations in this area, and report on two new programs which are finally yielding candidate systems suitable for further study. One of the objects, a close eclipsing system in omega Cen, is also a big straggler, thus finally proving firm evidence that globular cluster blue stragglers really are binary stars.

  7. Encounters between binaries and neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    We simulated encounters between a neutron star and primordial and tidal-capture binaries. In the case of encounters involving a tidal-capture binary, comprising a white dwarf and a main-sequence star, we find that most exchange encounters will produce a single merged object with the white dwarf and neutron star engulfed in a common envelope of gas donated by the main-sequence primary of the original binary. A small fraction of exchanges induce a merger of the white dwarf and main-sequence star, with this object being unbound to the neutron star, and the two objects having a large relative speed at infinity. For encounters involving a primordial binary, fewer encounters require the inclusion of hydrodynamical effects. Those involving collisions or close encounters tend to produce a binary comprised of the two merged stars (now forming one star) and the third star. The binaries produced typically have large enough separations to prevent the formation of a single merged object until subsequent stellar evolution of one of the components causes it to fill its Roche lobe. Clean exchanges produce binaries with large eccentricities; they are typically sufficiently wide to avoid circularization.

  8. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Quintana, E. V.; Adams, F. C.; Chambers, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Most stars reside in binary/multiple star systems; however, previous models of planet formation have studied growth of bodies orbiting an isolated single star. Disk material has been observed around one or both components of various young close binary star systems. If planets form at the right places within such disks, they can remain dynamically stable for very long times. We have simulated the late stages of growth of terrestrial planets in both circumbinary disks around 'close' binary star systems with stellar separations ($a_B$) in the range 0.05 AU $\\le a_B \\le$ 0.4 AU and binary eccentricities in the range $0 \\le e \\le 0.8$ and circumstellar disks around individual stars with binary separations of tens of AU. The initial disk of planetary embryos is the same as that used for simulating the late stages of terrestrial planet growth within our Solar System and around individual stars in the Alpha Centauri system (Quintana et al. 2002, A.J., 576, 982); giant planets analogous to Jupiter and Saturn are included if their orbits are stable. The planetary systems formed around close binaries with stellar apastron distances less than or equal to 0.2 AU with small stellar eccentricities are very similar to those formed in the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn, whereas planetary systems formed around binaries with larger maximum separations tend to be sparser, with fewer planets, especially interior to 1 AU. Likewise, when the binary periastron exceeds 10 AU, terrestrial planets can form over essentially the entire range of orbits allowed for single stars with Jupiter-like planets, although fewer terrestrial planets tend to form within high eccentricity binary systems. As the binary periastron decreases, the radial extent of the terrestrial planet systems is reduced accordingly. When the periastron is 5 AU, the formation of Earth-like planets near 1 AU is compromised.

  9. Radio Detection of Neutron Star Binary Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bear, Brandon; Cardena, Brett; Dispoto, Dana; Papadopoulos, Joanna; Kavic, Michael; Simonetti, John

    2011-10-01

    Neutron star binary systems lose energy through gravitational radiation, and eventually merge. The gravitational radiation from the merger can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). It is expected that a transient radio pulse will also be produced during the merger event. Detection of such radio transients would allow for LIGO to search for signals within constrained time periods. We calculate the LWA-1 detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers. We calculate the detection rate of transient events from neutron star binary mergers for the Long Wavelength Array and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array.

  10. Binary stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, R.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Bouvier, J.; Duchêne, G.; Quirrenbach, A.; Zinnecker, H.

    2006-11-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5-15 arcmin (0.65-2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 arcsec-1.12 arcsec (60-500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 M⊙ is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ^1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  11. Binary Stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Rainer; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; McCaughrean, Mark J.; Bouvier, Jerome; Duchêne, Gaspard; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Zinnecker, Hans

    2007-08-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5 - 15 arcmin (0.65 - 2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 - 1.12 arcsec (60 - 500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 Msun is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  12. Recent Minima of 171 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for 171 eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO EB section. Times of minima from observations received by the author from March 2015 thru October 2015 are presented.

  13. Eclipsing Binary B-Star Mass Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Amanda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    B-stars in binary pairs provide a laboratory for key astrophysical measurements of massive stars, including key insights for the formation of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes). In their paper, Martayan et al (2004) find 23 Be binary star pairs in NGC2004 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, five of which are both eclipsing and spectroscopic binaries with archival data from VLT-Giraffe and photometric data from MACHO. By using the Wilson eclipsing binary code (e.g., Wilson, 1971), we can determine preliminary stellar masses of the binary components. We present the first results from this analysis. This study also serves as proof-of-concept for future observations with the Photonic Synthesis Telescope Array (Eikenberry et al., in prep) that we are currently building for low-cost, precision spectroscopic observations. With higher resolution and dedicated time for observations, we can follow-up observations of these Be stars as well as Be/X-ray binaries, for improved mass measurements of neutron stars and black holes and better constraints on their origin/formation.

  14. Contact binary stars as standard candles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klagyivik, P.; Csizmadia, Sz.

    2004-06-01

    Rucinski (1996) suggested to use contact binary stars as standard candles. We investigated the properties of contact binary stars in order to search for possibility of their using as standard candles. For this purpose a catalogue of their light curve solution was compiled and on the basis of the catalogue data we calculated the rate of energy transfer between the two components. This allowed us to determine the mass-luminosity relation of the primary as well as secondary components in a contact binary and using Kepler's third law and the strict geometry a very reliable distance determination method was developed.

  15. Binary Star database BDB: datasets and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Yu.; Kaygorodov, P. V.; Koravleva, D. A.; Oblak, E.; Debray, B.

    Description of the Binary star DataBase (BDB, http://bdb.inasan.ru), the world's principal database of binary and multiple systems of all observational types, is presented in the paper. BDB contains data on physical and positional parameters of 100,000 components of 40,000 systems of multiplicity 2 to 20, belonging to various observational types: visual, spectroscopic, eclipsing, etc. Information on these types of binaries is obtained from heterogeneous sources of data astronomical catalogues and surveys. Organization of the information is based on the careful cross-identification of the objects. BDB can be queried by star identifier, coordinates, and other paramete

  16. Exploring the Birth of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    More than half of all stars are thought to be in binary or multiple star systems. But how do these systems form? The misaligned spins of some binary protostars might provide a clue.Two Formation ModelsIts hard to tell how multiple-star systems form, since these systems are difficult to observe in their early stages. But based on numerical simulations, there are two proposed models for the formation of stellar binaries:Turbulent fragmentationTurbulence within a single core leads to multiple dense clumps. These clumps independently collapse to form stars that orbit each other.Disk fragmentationGravitational instabilities in a massive accretion disk cause the formation of a smaller, secondary disk within the first, resulting in two stars that orbit each other.Log column density for one of the authors simulated binary systems, just after the formation of two protostars. Diamonds indicate the protostar positions. [Adapted from Offner et al. 2016]Outflows as CluesHow can we differentiate between these formation mechanisms? Led by Stella Offner (University of Massachusetts), a team of scientists has suggested that the key isto examine the alignment of the stars protostellar outflows jets that are often emitted from the poles of young, newly forming stars.Naively, wed expect that disk fragmentation would produce binary stars with common angular momentum. As the stars spins would be aligned, they would therefore also launch protostellar jets that were aligned with each other. Turbulent fragmentation, on the other hand, would cause the stars to have independent angular momentum. This would lead to randomly oriented spins, so the protostellar jets would be misaligned.Snapshots from the authors simulations. Left panel of each pair: column density; green arrows giveprotostellar spin directions. Right panel: synthetic observations produced from the simulations; cyan arrows giveprotostellar outflow directions. [Offner et al. 2016]Simulations of FragmentationIn order to better

  17. Last orbits of binary strange quark stars

    SciTech Connect

    Limousin, Francois; Gourgoulhon, Eric; Gondek-Rosinska, Dorota

    2005-03-15

    We present the first relativistic calculations of the final phase of inspiral of a binary system consisting of two stars built predominantly of strange quark matter (strange quark stars). We study the precoalescing stage within the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation of general relativity using a multidomain spectral method. A hydrodynamical treatment is performed under the assumption that the flow is either rigidly rotating or irrotational, taking into account the finite density at the stellar surface--a distinctive feature with respect to the neutron star case. The gravitational-radiation driven evolution of the binary system is approximated by a sequence of quasiequilibrium configurations at fixed baryon number and decreasing separation. We find that the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) is given by an orbital instability both for synchronized and irrotational systems. This contrasts with neutron stars for which the ISCO is given by the mass-shedding limit in the irrotational case. The gravitational wave frequency at the ISCO, which marks the end of the inspiral phase, is found to be {approx}1400 Hz for two irrotational 1.35 M{sub {center_dot}} strange stars and for the MIT bag model of strange matter with massless quarks and a bag constant B=60 MeV fm{sup -3}. Detailed comparisons with binary neutrons star models, as well as with third order post-Newtonian point-mass binaries are given.

  18. Adiabatic Mass Loss Model in Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H. W.

    2012-07-01

    Rapid mass transfer process in the interacting binary systems is very complicated. It relates to two basic problems in the binary star evolution, i.e., the dynamically unstable Roche-lobe overflow and the common envelope evolution. Both of the problems are very important and difficult to be modeled. In this PhD thesis, we focus on the rapid mass loss process of the donor in interacting binary systems. The application to the criterion of dynamically unstable mass transfer and the common envelope evolution are also included. Our results based on the adiabatic mass loss model could be used to improve the binary evolution theory, the binary population synthetic method, and other related aspects. We build up the adiabatic mass loss model. In this model, two approximations are included. The first one is that the energy generation and heat flow through the stellar interior can be neglected, hence the restructuring is adiabatic. The second one is that he stellar interior remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We model this response by constructing model sequences, beginning with a donor star filling its Roche lobe at an arbitrary point in its evolution, holding its specific entropy and composition profiles fixed. These approximations are validated by the comparison with the time-dependent binary mass transfer calculations and the polytropic model for low mass zero-age main-sequence stars. In the dynamical time scale mass transfer, the adiabatic response of the donor star drives it to expand beyond its Roche lobe, leading to runaway mass transfer and the formation of a common envelope with its companion star. For donor stars with surface convection zones of any significant depth, this runaway condition is encountered early in mass transfer, if at all; but for main sequence stars with radiative envelopes, it may be encountered after a prolonged phase of thermal time scale mass transfer, so-called delayed dynamical instability. We identify the critical binary mass ratio for the

  19. Binary Origin of Blue Straggler Stars in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Close-binary evolution is one of the major formation channels of blue straggler stars (BSSs). We present binary evolution models, including case-A and/or case-B mass transfer (MT) in the intermediate- and low-mass stars, to try to understand the binary origin of BSS populations in star clusters. With the help of Monte-Carlo simulations, we compared the distribution of our synthetic MT BSSs with observations in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of M67 and M30. The current results show that primordial binary MT can only contribute to a small part of BSSs in M67, and it can credibly explain the formation of the red-BSS sequence observed in the CMD of M30. We also analyzed the spectral properties of BSS populations in open clusters (OCs) based on the LAMOST data, and a small part of BSSs indeed present Carbon depletion compared with the main sequence stars, which indicate their binary origin. Unfortunately, a statistical resfult of how much the binary MT can contribute to BSS fomation in OCs still requires larger working sample.

  20. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  1. Are All Dwarf Carbon Stars Binary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farihi, Jay; Harris, Hugh; Subasavage, John; Bergfors, Carolina; Green, Paul; Gansicke, Boris

    2014-08-01

    The origin of dwarf carbon stars is a persistent astrophysical curiosity dating back to 1977. Only giant stars dredge up interior carbon, and hence the discovery of an unevolved dwarf star with C/O >1 was a big surprise. Astronomers are no closer to understanding these rare and spectrally peculiar stars 37 years later(!). The bulk of dwarf carbon stars show no sign of an evolved companion necessary to account for their externally polluted atmospheres. These stars are sensitive tracers of Galactic chemical evolution and star formation, and provide strong constraints on the potential for carbon-dominated (single star) planetary systems. We propose to conclusively validate or refute the hypothetical binary nature of dwarf carbon stars, and hence their chemical and physical formation channel(s). For all binaries, we will initially constrain and eventually measure orbital periods. By determining their physical separation during the previous epoch of mass transfer, we will distinguish between the Roche lobe overflow and wind capture models for the creation of carbon dwarfs.

  2. The evolution of close binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutukov, A. V.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A review of our current understanding of the physics and evolution of close binary stars with various masses under the influence of the nuclear evolution of their components and their magnetic stellar winds is presented. The role of gravitational-wave radiation by close binaries on their evolution and the loss of their orbital angular momentum is also considered. The final stages in the evolution of close binary systems are described. The review also notes the main remaining tasks related to studies of the physics and evolution of various classes of close binaries, including analyses of collisions of close binaries and supermassive black holes in galactic nuclei. Such a collision could lead to the capture of one of the components by the black hole and the acceleration of the remaining component to relativistic speeds.

  3. Dynamics and Habitability in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggl, Siegfried; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke

    2014-07-01

    Determining planetary habitability is a complex matter, as the interplay between a planet's physical and atmospheric properties with stellar insolation has to be studied in a self consistent manner. Standardized atmospheric models for Earth-like planets exist and are commonly accepted as a reference for estimates of Habitable Zones. In order to define Habitable Zone boundaries, circular orbital configurations around main sequence stars are generally assumed. In gravitationally interacting multibody systems, such as double stars, however, planetary orbits are forcibly becoming non circular with time. Especially in binary star systems even relatively small changes in a planet's orbit can have a large impact on habitability. Hence, we argue that a minimum model for calculating Habitable Zones in binary star systems has to include dynamical interactions.

  4. White dwarfs in Be star binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apparao, K. M. V.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is made of possible reasons for the persistent inability to identify white dwarf stars in the Be binary systems. It is noted that many Be stars exhibiting large optical enhancements may be Be + WD and Be + He systems, and that observations of pulsations in the H-alpha emission, as well as observation of time delays between enhancements of optical line and continuum, can identify such systems.

  5. Merger of Magnetized Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Hirschmann, Eric; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We present simulations of the merger of binary neutron star systems calculated with full general relativity and incorporating the global magnetic field structure for the stars evolved with resistive magnetohydrodynamics. We also incorporate the effects of neutrino transport and tabular equations of state to describe the degenerate matter. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA through the Astrophysics Theory Program grant NNX13AH01G.

  6. An electrically powered binary star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kinwah; Cropper, Mark; Ramsay, Gavin; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2002-03-01

    We propose a model for stellar binary systems consisting of a magnetic and a non-magnetic white dwarf pair which is powered principally by electrical energy. In our model the luminosity is caused by resistive heating of the stellar atmospheres arising from induced currents driven within the binary. This process is reminiscent of the Jupiter-Io system, but greatly increased in power because of the larger companion and stronger magnetic field of the primary. Electrical power is an alternative stellar luminosity source, following on from nuclear fusion and accretion. We find that this source of heating is sufficient to account for the observed X-ray luminosity of the 9.5-min binary RX J1914+24, and provides an explanation for its puzzling characteristics.

  7. Orbits of Six Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olevic, D.; Cvetkovic, Z.

    2005-04-01

    Preliminary orbital elements of binary systems WDS 03494-1956 = RST 2324, WDS 03513+2621 = A 1830, WDS 04093-2025 = RST 2333, WDS 06485-1226 = A 2935, WDS 07013-0906 = A 671, and WDS 18323-1439 = CHR 73 are presented. For all systems but WDS 18323-1439 the individual masses and dynamical parallaxes are derived.

  8. FU Orionis: A Binary Star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchi; Apai, Dániel; Henning, Thomas; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2004-01-01

    By using the Adaptive Optics with a Laser for Astronomy system at the 3.6 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory, we detected a faint red star in the apparent vicinity of FU Ori, the prototype of the FUor outburst stars. Independent confirmation of the detection is obtained from archival Probing the Universe with Enhanced Optics/Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope images. The separation between the companion candidate and FU Ori is 0.50", and their brightness contrast is around 4 mag. We discuss the possible nature of the newly detected star based on near-infrared photometry and its proper motion relative to FU Ori. The photometric data are consistent with a nearby late-type main-sequence star, a background giant star, and a pre-main-sequence star. On the basis of the proper motion and the stellar surface density in the direction toward FU Ori, we argue that the probabilities of the first two options are very low.

  9. Division G Commission 42: Close Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Mercedes T.; Pribulla, Theodor; Ribas, Ignasi; Bradstreet, David H.; Dreschsel, Horst; Maceroni, Carla; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Prsa, Andrej; Scharfe, Colin; Southworth, John; Trimble, Virginia

    2016-04-01

    Commission 42 began life as Photometric Double Stars in 1948 at the 7th General Assembly in Zurich, under the presidency of Zdenek Kopal. As early as 1961, then General Secretary Lukas Plaut recommended a merger between C42 and C26, Double Stars, one of the original 32 commissions going back to 1919-22 (first president Aitken, assistant director at Lick). C42 became Close Binary Stars in 1970, at the 14th GA in Brighton (the first one I attended). Table 1 shows the presidents of C42, and vice presidents, from when the office started, through the history of the Commission.

  10. Nonparametric statistical modeling of binary star separations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacox, William D.; Gathright, John

    1994-01-01

    We develop a comprehensive statistical model for the distribution of observed separations in binary star systems, in terms of distributions of orbital elements, projection effects, and distances to systems. We use this model to derive several diagnostics for estimating the completeness of imaging searches for stellar companions, and the underlying stellar multiplicities. In application to recent imaging searches for low-luminosity companions to nearby M dwarf stars, and for companions to young stars in nearby star-forming regions, our analyses reveal substantial uncertainty in estimates of stellar multiplicity. For binary stars with late-type dwarf companions, semimajor axes appear to be distributed approximately as a(exp -1) for values ranging from about one to several thousand astronomical units. About one-quarter of the companions to field F and G dwarf stars have semimajor axes less than 1 AU, and about 15% lie beyond 1000 AU. The geometric efficiency (fraction of companions imaged onto the detector) of imaging searches is nearly independent of distances to program stars and orbital eccentricities, and varies only slowly with detector spatial limitations.

  11. Nonparametric statistical modeling of binary star separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacox, William D.; Gathright, John

    1994-09-01

    We develop a comprehensive statistical model for the distribution of observed separations in binary star systems, in terms of distributions of orbital elements, projection effects, and distances to systems. We use this model to derive several diagnostics for estimating the completeness of imaging searches for stellar companions, and the underlying stellar multiplicities. In application to recent imaging searches for low-luminosity companions to nearby M dwarf stars, and for companions to young stars in nearby star-forming regions, our analyses reveal substantial uncertainty in estimates of stellar multiplicity. For binary stars with late-type dwarf companions, semimajor axes appear to be distributed approximately as a-1 for values ranging from about one to several thousand astronomical units. About one-quarter of the companions to field F and G dwarf stars have semimajor axes less than 1 AU, and about 15% lie beyond 1000 AU. The geometric efficiency (fraction of companions imaged onto the detector) of imaging searches is nearly independent of distances to program stars and orbital eccentricities, and varies only slowly with detector spatial limitations.

  12. Component Properties of T Tauri Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzio, Ryan; L. Prato, T. Allen, N. Wright-Garba, L. Biddle, J. McLane (Lowell Observatory), G. Schaefer (GSU & CHARA)

    2016-01-01

    This poster describes our study of the properties of individual components of young T Tauri binary stars. We observed about 100 multi-star systems in the near-infrared, within the relatively close star forming regions Taurus and Ophiuchus. Here we specifically focus on four systems in the Taurus sample, IS Tau, UZ Tau B, IW Tau, and Haro 6- 37 A. Their spectra were taken with the Keck 2 telescope's NIRSPEC spectrograph and the imaging data with the Keck 2 NIRC2 camera, both with adaptive optics. Properties that we determined include spectral type, radial velocity, vsini, veiling, and near-infrared colors. On the basis of these data, we estimate stellar and circumstellar disk properties for the subset of binaries presented here.

  13. The impact of IUE on binary star studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of IUE observations in the investigation of binary stars is discussed. The results of data analysis of several classes of binary systems are briefly reviewed including zeta Aurigae and VV Cephei stars, mu Sagittarii, epsilon Aurigae, beta Lyrae and the W Serpentis stars, symbiotic stars, and the Algols.

  14. Transit Timing Variations In Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansone, Eric; Haghighipour, N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the effect of a stellar companion on the transit timing variations (TTV) of a planetary system. The purpose of our study is to determine the ranges of the orbital elements of a secondary star for which the amplitude of a currently existing TTV is enhanced. We chose the system of Kepler 9 as this system represents the first planetary system detected by the transit timing variation method, and studied its TTVs by considering a hypothetical secondary star in this system. By varying the mass, semi-major axis, and eccentricity of the fictitious binary companion, we tested the stability of the known planets Kepler-9c and Kepler-9b and identified the region of the parameter-space for which the binary planetary system would be stable. We calculated TTVs for the two planets of the system for different values of the orbital elements of the secondary star and calculated its difference with the system's already existing TTVs. Results of our study indicate that the effect of the binary companion is significant only when the secondary star is in a highly eccentric orbit and/or the planets of the system are within the range of Super-Earth or terrestrial sizes. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation in the form of a Research Experience for Undergraduates program at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

  15. Light curves from binary neutron star coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Nestor; Green, Stephen; Lehner, Luis; Ponce, Marcelo; HAD Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Evolution of binary neutron stars, and the extraction of associated gravitational waveforms, have acquired certain maturity using numerical simulations. In this work we look to augment the observational predictions by extracting electromagnetic counterparts. That is, given results from a merger simulation, we produce a photon emission sky map. Our ray-tracing algorithm employ the two-pole caustic model of gamma-ray emission from the binary system's magnetosphere. The combined measurement of both gravitational and electromagnetic wave signals provides additional information to characterize the merger.

  16. Binary-binary collisions involving main-sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars in globular clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Davies, M.B.

    1993-12-31

    We consider collisions between dynamically-evolved primordial binaries consisting of main-sequence stars, white dwarfs and neutron stars in globular clusters. In our four-body binary-binary scattering experiments, we allow stars to ``stick`` if they pass close enough to each other, which leads to the formation of a wide variety of exotic objects. Most of these objects have binary companions. Also, relatively clean exchange interactions can produce binaries containing neutron stars that eventually receive material from their companions. Such systems will be observable as X-ray binaries.

  17. Binary neutron stars with arbitrary spins in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacik, Nick; Foucart, Francois; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Haas, Roland; Ossokine, Serguei; Kaplan, Jeff; Muhlberger, Curran; Duez, Matt D.; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2015-12-01

    We present a code to construct initial data for binary neutron star systems in which the stars are rotating. Our code, based on a formalism developed by Tichy, allows for arbitrary rotation axes of the neutron stars and is able to achieve rotation rates near rotational breakup. We compute the neutron star angular momentum through quasilocal angular momentum integrals. When constructing irrotational binary neutron stars, we find a very small residual dimensionless spin of ˜2 ×10-4 . Evolutions of rotating neutron star binaries show that the magnitude of the stars' angular momentum is conserved, and that the spin and orbit precession of the stars is well described by post-Newtonian approximation. We demonstrate that orbital eccentricity of the binary neutron stars can be controlled to ˜0.1 % . The neutron stars show quasinormal mode oscillations at an amplitude which increases with the rotation rate of the stars.

  18. Coalescence of Magnetized Binary Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Ponce, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of the merger of binary neutron star systems calculated with full general relativity and incorporating the global magnetic field structure for the stars evolved with resistive magnetohydrodynamics. Our simulation tools have recently been improved to incorporate the effects of neutrino cooling and have been generalized to allow for tabular equations of state to describe the degenerate matter. Of particular interest are possible electromagnetic counterparts to the gravitational radiation that emerges from these systems. We focus on magnetospheric interactions that ultimately tap into the gravitational potential energy of the binary to power a Poynting flux and deposition of energy through Joule heating and magnetic reconnection. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA through the Astrophysics Theory Program grant NNX13AH01G.

  19. Mergers of Binary Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    We present results from fully relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers varying the tabular equation of state used to approximate the degenerate material and the mass ratio. The simulations incorporate both magnetic fields and the effects of neutrino cooling. In particular, we examine the amount and properties of material ejected from the merger. We gratefully acknowledge the support of NASA through the Astrophysics Theory Program grant NNX13AH01G.

  20. A Numerical Study of Boson Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundim, Bruno C.

    2010-02-01

    This thesis describes a numerical study of binary boson stars within the context of an approximation to general relativity. The approximation we adopt places certain restrictions on the dynamical variables of general relativity (conformal flatness of the 3-metric), and on the time-slicing of the spacetime (maximal slicing). The resulting modeling problem requires the solution of a coupled nonlinear system of 4 hyperbolic, and 5 elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) in three space dimensions and time. We approximately solve this system as an initial-boundary value problem, using finite difference techniques and well known, computationally efficient numerical algorithms such as the multigrid method in the case of the elliptic equations. Careful attention is paid to the issue of code validation, and a key part of the thesis is the demonstration that, as the basic scale of finite difference discretization is reduced, our numerical code generates results that converge to a solution of the continuum system of PDEs as desired. The thesis concludes with a discussion of results from some initial explorations of the orbital dynamics of boson star binaries. In particular, we describe calculations in which motion of such a binary is followed for more than two orbital periods, which is a significant advance over previous studies. We also present results from computations in which the boson stars merge, and where there is evidence for black hole formation.

  1. Nonlinear Tides in Coalescing Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Nevin

    2016-03-01

    Coalescing binary neutron stars are among the most promising sources for ground-based gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO. Tidal interactions in such systems extract energy from the orbit and, at some level, modify the gravitational wave signal. Previous studies found that tidal effects are probably too small to be detected from individual systems with LIGO. However, these studies typically assumed that the tide can be treated as a linear perturbation to the star. I will show that the linear approximation is invalid even during the early stages of inspiral and that nonlinear fluid effects in the form of tide-internal wave interactions become important around the time the binary first enters LIGO's bandpass (at gravitational wave frequencies around 30 Hz). Although the precise influence of nonlinear fluid effects is not yet well constrained, I will show that they may significantly modify the gravitational wave signal and electromagnetic emission from coalescing binary neutron stars. This research was supported by NASA Grant NNX14AB40G.

  2. Binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars.

    PubMed

    Sana, H; de Mink, S E; de Koter, A; Langer, N; Evans, C J; Gieles, M; Gosset, E; Izzard, R G; Le Bouquin, J-B; Schneider, F R N

    2012-07-27

    The presence of a nearby companion alters the evolution of massive stars in binary systems, leading to phenomena such as stellar mergers, x-ray binaries, and gamma-ray bursts. Unambiguous constraints on the fraction of massive stars affected by binary interaction were lacking. We simultaneously measured all relevant binary characteristics in a sample of Galactic massive O stars and quantified the frequency and nature of binary interactions. More than 70% of all massive stars will exchange mass with a companion, leading to a binary merger in one-third of the cases. These numbers greatly exceed previous estimates and imply that binary interaction dominates the evolution of massive stars, with implications for populations of massive stars and their supernovae. PMID:22837522

  3. B-type stars in eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Milena; Pigulski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    B-type stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique astrophysical tools to test several aspects of stellar evolution. Such objects can be used e.g. to determine the masses of Beta Cephei variable stars, as well as help to place tighter constraints on the value of the convective core overshooting parameter α. Both precise photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy with high SNR are required to achieve these goals, but since many of the targets are bright enough, the challenge is fair. Following this assumption, we shall explain how we plan to examine both the aforementioned aspects of stellar evolution using observations of B-type stars obtained with a wide range of spectrographs, as well as BRITE-Constellation satellites.

  4. Coordinate System Issues in Binary Star Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, George H.

    2015-08-01

    It has been estimated that half of all stars are components of binary or multiple systems. Yet the number of known orbits for astrometric and spectroscopic binary systems together is less than 7,000 (including redundancies), almost all of them for bright stars. A new generation of deep all-sky surveys such as Pan-STARRS, Gaia, and LSST are expected to lead to the discovery of millions of new systems. Although for many of these systems, the orbits may be undersampled initially, it is to be expected that combinations of new and old data sources will eventually lead to many more orbits being known. As a result, a revolution in the scientific understanding of these systems may be upon us.The current database of visual (astrometric) binary orbits represents them relative to the “plane of the sky”, that is, the plane orthogonal to the line of sight. Although the line of sight to stars constantly changes due to proper motion, aberration, and other effects, there is no agreed upon standard for what line of sight defines the orbital reference plane. Furthermore, the computation of differential coordinates (component B relative to A) for a given date must be based on the binary system’s direction at that date. Thus, a different “plane of the sky” is appropriate for each such date, i.e., each observation. However, projection effects between the reference planes, differential aberration, and the curvature of the sky are generally neglected in such computations. Usually the only correction applied is for the change in the north direction (position angle zero) due to precession (and sometimes also proper motion). This paper will present an algorithm for a more complete model of the geometry involved, and will show that such a model is necessary to avoid errors in the computed observables that are significant at modern astrometric accuracy. The paper will also suggest where conventions need to be established to avoid ambiguities in how quantities related to binary star

  5. Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on research activities covered on Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters. Substantial progress was made in the development and dissemination of the "Starlab" software environment. Significant improvements were made to "kira," an N-body simulation program tailored to the study of dense stellar systems such as star clusters and galactic nuclei. Key advances include (1) the inclusion of stellar and binary evolution in a self-consistent manner, (2) proper treatment of the anisotropic Galactic tidal field, (3) numerous technical enhancements in the treatment of binary dynamics and interactions, and (4) full support for the special-purpose GRAPE-4 hardware, boosting the program's performance by a factor of 10-100 over the accelerated version. The data-reduction and analysis tools in Starlab were also substantially expanded. A Starlab Web site (http://www.sns.ias.edu/-starlab) was created and developed. The site contains detailed information on the structure and function of the various tools that comprise the package, as well as download information, "how to" tips and examples of common operations, demonstration programs, animations, etc. All versions of the software are freely distributed to all interested users, along with detailed installation instructions.

  6. Design and Implementation of BDB, the Binary Star Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaygorodov, P.; Kovaleva, D.; Malkov, O.

    2013-02-01

    The Binary star DataBase (BDB, http://bdb.inasan.ru) is created to provide liasons between binary star catalogue data of various origin. Information on different observational types of binaries is obtained from heterogeneous sources of data - astronomical catalogues and surveys. The database allows a variety of query options useful for selected stars investigation purposes, for binary observations planning, and for construction and examination of binary datasets with certain characteristics.

  7. MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS IN COALESCING NEUTRON STAR BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.

    2012-08-10

    It is expected on both evolutionary and empirical grounds that many merging neutron star (NS) binaries are composed of a highly magnetized NS in orbit with a relatively low magnetic field NS. I study the magnetic interactions of these binaries using the framework of a unipolar inductor model. The electromotive force generated across the non-magnetic NS as it moves through the magnetosphere sets up a circuit connecting the two stars. The exact features of this circuit depend on the uncertain resistance in the space between the stars R{sub space}. Nevertheless, I show that there are interesting observational and/or dynamical effects irrespective of its exact value. When R{sub space} is large, electric dissipation as great as {approx}10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1} (for magnetar-strength fields) occurs in the magnetosphere, which would exhibit itself as a hard X-ray precursor in the seconds leading up to merger. With less certainty, there may also be an associated radio transient. When R{sub space} is small, electric dissipation largely occurs in the surface layers of the magnetic NS. This can reach {approx}10{sup 49} erg s{sup -1} during the final {approx}1 s before merger, similar to the energetics and timescales of short gamma-ray bursts. In addition, for dipole fields greater than Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 12} G and a small R{sub space}, magnetic torques spin up the magnetized NS. This drains angular momentum from the binary and accelerates the inspiral. A faster coalescence results in less orbits occurring before merger, which would impact matched-filtering gravitational-wave searches by ground-based laser interferometers and could create difficulties for studying alternative theories of gravity with compact inspirals.

  8. Neutron star binaries, pulsars and burst sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.

    1981-01-01

    Unresolved issues involving neutron star binaries, pulsars, and burst sources are described. Attention is drawn to the types of observations most likely to resolve them. Many of these observations are likely to be carried out during the next decade by one or more missions that have been approved or proposed. Flux measurements with an imaging detector and broad-band spectroscopic studies in the energy range 30-150 keV are discussed. The need for soft X-ray and X-ray observations with an instrument which has arcminute angular resolution and an effective area substantially greater than of ROSAT or EXOSAT is also discussed.

  9. Synchronization of magnetic stars in binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, F. K.; Aly, J.-J.; Cook, M. C.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1983-01-01

    Asynchronous rotation of magnetic stars in close binary systems drives substantial field-aligned electrical currents between the magnetic star and its companion. The resulting magnetohydrodynamic torque is able to account for the heretofore unexplained synchronous rotation of the strongly magnetic degenerate dwarf component in systems like AM Her, VV Pup, AN UMa, and EF Eri as well as the magnetic A type component in systems like HD 98088 and 41 Tauri. The electric fields produced by even a small asynchronism are large and may accelerate some electrons to high energies, producing radio emission. The total energy dissipation rate in systems with degenerate dwarf spin periods as short as 1 minute may reach 10 to the 33rd ergs/s. Total luminosities of this order may be a characteristic feature of such systems.

  10. BINARY NEUTRON STARS IN QUASI-EQUILIBRIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Keisuke; Shibata, Masaru

    2010-05-15

    Quasi-equilibrium sequences of binary neutron stars are constructed for a variety of equations of state in general relativity. Einstein's constraint equations in the Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews approximation are solved together with the relativistic equations of hydrostationary equilibrium under the assumption of irrotational flow. We focus on unequal-mass sequences as well as equal-mass sequences, and compare those results. We investigate the behavior of the binding energy and total angular momentum along a quasi-equilibrium sequence, the endpoint of sequences, and the orbital angular velocity as a function of time, changing the mass ratio, the total mass of the binary system, and the equation of state of a neutron star. It is found that the orbital angular velocity at the mass-shedding limit can be determined by an empirical formula derived from an analytic estimation. We also provide tables for 160 sequences, which will be useful as a guideline of numerical simulations for the inspiral and merger performed in the near future.

  11. CALCULATING THE HABITABLE ZONE OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS. II. P-TYPE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Haghighipour, Nader; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2013-11-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology for calculating the circumbinary habitable zone (HZ) in planet-hosting P-type binary star systems. We present a general formalism for determining the contribution of each star of the binary to the total flux received at the top of the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet and use the Sun's HZ to calculate the inner and outer boundaries of the HZ around a binary star system. We apply our calculations to the Kepler's currently known circumbinary planetary systems and show the combined stellar flux that determines the boundaries of their HZs. We also show that the HZ in P-type systems is dynamic and, depending on the luminosity of the binary stars, their spectral types, and the binary eccentricity, its boundaries vary as the stars of the binary undergo their orbital motion. We present the details of our calculations and discuss the implications of the results.

  12. Quasistatic Evolution of Binary Neutron Star Systems Before Merging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriguchi, Y.; Usui, F.

    Binary neutron star systems evolve due to the back reaction of gravitational wave emission. Although this evolution is essentially a time dependent phenomenon, most stages of the evolution can be regarded as if the system were in a stationary state. Consequently we can follow the evolution of binary neutron star systems quasistatically by connecting quasiequilibrium states of binary neutron stars. On the equilibrium sequences of congruent binary neutron star systems there are two important states of equilibrium configurations: 1) the minimum angular momentum state where some unstable phenomenon sets in and 2) the contact state from which a single body sequence will continue. Recent numerical results of quasiequilibrium approaches for the binary neutron star evolution are briefly reviewed and some problems in general relativistic treatments are discussed.

  13. Time markers in interstellar communication. [with binary star civilizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, G. W.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1975-01-01

    The chances that two civilizations establish contact with each other by means of interstellar radio communication are exceedingly small in the absence of time markers which will tell the two civilizations when to search for one another. In the case of binary stars, suitable time markers are provided by the apastron and the periastron. Single star civilization would transmit signals to binaries at the observation of apastron and periastron and the binary star civilization would scan single stars at the proper time for the reception of these signals.

  14. Planetary system disruption by Galactic perturbations to wide binary stars.

    PubMed

    Kaib, Nathan A; Raymond, Sean N; Duncan, Martin

    2013-01-17

    Nearly half the exoplanets found within binary star systems reside in very wide binaries with average stellar separations greater than 1,000 astronomical units (one astronomical unit (AU) being the Earth-Sun distance), yet the influence of such distant binary companions on planetary evolution remains largely unstudied. Unlike their tighter counterparts, the stellar orbits of wide binaries continually change under the influence of the Milky Way's tidal field and impulses from other passing stars. Here we report numerical simulations demonstrating that the variable nature of wide binary star orbits dramatically reshapes the planetary systems they host, typically billions of years after formation. Contrary to previous understanding, wide binary companions may often strongly perturb planetary systems, triggering planetary ejections and increasing the orbital eccentricities of surviving planets. Although hitherto not recognized, orbits of giant exoplanets within wide binaries are statistically more eccentric than those around isolated stars. Both eccentricity distributions are well reproduced when we assume that isolated stars and wide binaries host similar planetary systems whose outermost giant planets are scattered beyond about 10 AU from their parent stars by early internal instabilities. Consequently, our results suggest that although wide binaries eventually remove the most distant planets from many planetary systems, most isolated giant exoplanet systems harbour additional distant, still undetected planets. PMID:23292514

  15. STAR HOPPERS: PLANET INSTABILITY AND CAPTURE IN EVOLVING BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Perets, Hagai B.

    2012-07-01

    Many planets are observed in stellar binary systems, and their frequency may be comparable to that of planetary systems around single stars. Binary stellar evolution in such systems influences the dynamical evolution of the resident planets. Here, we study the evolution of a single planet orbiting one star in an evolving binary system. We find that stellar evolution can trigger dynamical instabilities that drive planets into chaotic orbits. This instability leads to planet-star collisions, exchange of the planet between the binary stars ('star hoppers'), and ejection of the planet from the system. The means by which planets can be recaptured is similar to the pull-down capture mechanism for irregular solar system satellites. Because planets often suffer close encounters with the primary on the asymptotic giant branch, captures during a collision with the stellar envelope are also possible for more massive planets. Such capture could populate the habitable zone around white dwarfs.

  16. Einstein observations of selected close binaries and shell stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Koch, R. H.; Plavec, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Several evolved close binaries and shell stars were observed with the IPC aboard the HEAO 2 Einstein Observatory. No eclipsing target was detected, and only two of the shell binaries were detected. It is argued that there is no substantial difference in L(X) for eclipsing and non-eclipsing binaries. The close binary and shell star CX Dra was detected as a moderately strong source, and the best interpretation is that the X-ray flux arises primarily from the corona of the cool member of the binary at about the level of Algol-like or RS CVn-type sources. The residual visible-band light curve of this binary has been modeled so as to conform as well as possible with this interpretation. HD 51480 was detected as a weak source. Substantial background information from IUE and ground scanner measurements are given for this binary. The positions and flux values of several accidentally detected sources are given.

  17. A New Eclipsing Binary Discovered in a Crowded Star Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jessica A.; Ranquist, E.; Hernandez, A.; Stoker, E.; Gaillard, C.

    2013-06-01

    Using the 0.9 meter telescope on West Mountain to follow-up possible transiting planets with ground based photometry, we discovered a previously unknown eclipsing binary system. This eclipsing binary is located in a crowded star field and so could not be reduced using photometry. In order to figure out which object in our field of view is the eclipsing binary, we learned how to use DAO phot. By using DAO phot we hope to be able to learn more about the individual stars that make up the binary system and their parameters.

  18. Constraints on the winds of hot subdwarf stars from X-ray observations of two sdB binaries with compact companions: CD -30° 11223 and PG 1232-136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, S.; La Palombara, N.; Esposito, P.; Gastaldello, F.; Tiengo, A.; Heber, U.; Geier, S.; Wilms, J.

    2014-07-01

    Little observational data are available on the weak stellar winds of hot subdwarf stars of B spectral type (sdB). Close binary systems composed of an sdB star and a compact object (white dwarf, neutron star or black hole) could be detected as accretion-powered X-ray sources. The study of their X-ray emission can probe the properties of line-driven winds of sdB stars that cannot be derived directly from spectroscopy because of the low luminosity of these stars. Here we report on the first sensitive X-ray observations of two sdB binaries with compact companions. CD -30° 11223 is the sdB binary with the shortest known orbital period (1.2 h) and its companion is certainly a white dwarf. PG 1232-136 is an sdB binary considered the best candidate to host a black hole companion. We observed these stars with XMM-Newton in 2013 August for 50 ks and in 2009 July for 36 ks, respectively. None of them was detected and we derived luminosity upper limits of ˜1.5 × 1029 erg s-1 for CD -30° 11223 and ˜5 × 1029 erg s-1 for PG 1232-136. The corresponding mass-loss rate for PG 1232-136 is poorly constrained, owing to the unknown efficiency for black hole accretion. On the other hand, in the case of CD -30° 11223 we could derive, under reasonable assumptions, an upper limit of ˜3 × 10-13 M⊙ yr-1 on the wind mass-loss rate from the sdB star. This is one of the few observational constraints on the weak winds expected in this class of low-mass hot stars. We also report the results on the X-ray emission from a cluster of galaxies serendipitously discovered in the field of CD -30° 11223.

  19. NIP of Stars: early results and new eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaque Arancibia, M.; Barba, R.; Morrell, N.; Roman Lopes, A.; Torres Robledo, S.; Gunthardt, G.; Soto, M.; Ferrero, G.; Arias, J. I.; Gamen, R.; Fernadez Lajus, E.

    2014-10-01

    We have performed a near-infrared photometric monitoring of 39 galactic young star clusters and star-forming regions, known as NIP of Stars, between the years 2009-2011, using the Swope telescope at Las Campanas Observatory (Chile) and the RetroCam camera, in H- and Y-bands. This monitoring program is complementary to the Vista Variables in the Via Láctea (VVV), as the brightest sources observed in NIP of Stars are saturated in VVV. The aim of this campaign is to perform a census of photometric variability of such clusters and star-forming regions, with the main goal of discovering massive eclipsing binary stars. In this work, we present a preliminary analysis of this photometric monitoring program with the discovery of tens of candidates for variable stars, among them candidates for massive eclipsing binaries. We included also to the analysis of variability, a small set of images obtained in the Ks with the VISTA telescope in the framework of VVV survey (Minniti et al. 2010). In special, we announce the infrared discovering of four massive eclipsing binaries in the massive young cluster NGC 3603. The stars have been classified spectroscopically as O-type stars, and one of them, MTT 58, has a rare star with a spectral type of O2 If*/WN6, as one of its components. We present a preliminary analysis of the light-curves of these binaries.

  20. Identification and Spectral Classification of Close Red Dwarf Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, James

    2015-01-01

    The position angle, angular and linear separation, distance, and spectral class of 713 red dwarf binary star systems are reported based on data-mining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. 707 of these systems are new discoveries.

  1. BINARY STAR SYNTHETIC PHOTOMETRY AND DISTANCE DETERMINATION USING BINSYN

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Albert P.; DeStefano, Paul; Hubeny, Ivan E-mail: pdestefa@uw.edu

    2013-09-15

    This paper extends synthetic photometry to components of binary star systems. The paper demonstrates accurate recovery of single star photometric properties for four photometric standards, Vega, Sirius, GD153, and HD209458, ranging over the HR diagram, when their model synthetic spectra are placed in fictitious binary systems and subjected to synthetic photometry processing. Techniques for photometric distance determination have been validated for all four photometric standards.

  2. Phenomenological modelling of eclipsing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Chinarova, L. L.

    2016-03-01

    We review the method NAV ("New Algol Variable") first introduced in (2012Ap.....55..536A) which uses the locally-dependent shapes of eclipses in an addition to the trigonometric polynomial of the second order (which typically describes the "out-of-eclipse" part of the light curve with effects of reflection, ellipticity and O'Connell). Eclipsing binary stars are believed to show distinct eclipses only if belonging to the EA (Algol) type. With a decreasing eclipse width, the statistically optimal value of the trigonometric polynomial s(2003ASPC..292..391A) drastically increases from ~2 for elliptic (EL) variables without eclipses, ~6-8 for EW and up to ~30-50 for some EA with narrow eclipses. In this case of large number of parameters, the smoothing curve becomes very noisy and apparent waves (the Gibbs phenomenon) may be seen. The NAV set of the parameters may be used for classification in the GCVS, VSX and similar catalogs. The maximal number of parameters is m=12, which corresponds to s=5, if correcting both the period and the initial epoch. We have applied the method to few stars, also in a case of multi-color photometry (2015JASS...32..127A), when it is possible to use the phenomenological parameters from the NAV fit to estimate physical parameters using statistical dependencies. For the one-color observations, one may estimate the ratio of the surface brightnesses of the components. We compiled a catalog of phenomenological characteristics based on published observations. We conclude that the NAV approximation is better than the TP one even for the case of EW-type stars with much wider eclipses. It may also be used to determine timings (see 2005ASPC..335...37A for a review of methods) or to determine parameters in the case of variable period, using a complete light curve modeling the phase variations. The method is illustrated on 2MASS J11080447-6143290 (EA-type), USNO-B1.0 1265-0306001 and USNO-B1.01266-0313413 (EW-type) and compared to various other methods

  3. THE CLOSE BINARY FRACTION OF DWARF M STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Benjamin M.; Blake, Cullen H.; Knapp, Gillian R.

    2012-01-10

    We describe a search for close spectroscopic dwarf M star binaries using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to address the question of the rate of occurrence of multiplicity in M dwarfs. We use a template-fitting technique to measure radial velocities from 145,888 individual spectra obtained for a magnitude-limited sample of 39,543 M dwarfs. Typically, the three or four spectra observed for each star are separated in time by less than four hours, but for {approx}17% of the stars, the individual observations span more than two days. In these cases we are sensitive to large-amplitude radial velocity variations on timescales comparable to the separation between the observations. We use a control sample of objects having observations taken within a four-hour period to make an empirical estimate of the underlying radial velocity error distribution and simulate our detection efficiency for a wide range of binary star systems. We find the frequency of binaries among the dwarf M stars with a < 0.4 AU to be 3%-4%. Comparison with other samples of binary stars demonstrates that the close binary fraction, like the total binary fraction, is an increasing function of primary mass.

  4. The evolution of highly compact binary stellar systems in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krolik, J. H.; Meiksin, A.; Joss, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    A highly compact binary represents a system which is composed of a collapsed object (degenerate dwarf, neutron star, or black hole) in orbit with a low-mass (equal to or less than 0.5 solar mass) secondary star. Matter may be transferred from the secondary to the collapsed star due to the decay of the orbit resulting from the emission of gravitational radiation. The present investigation has the objective to study quantitatively the evolution of highly compact binaries in globular cluster cores, subject to the interplay of gravitational radiation and collisions with field stars. The investigation is exploratory in nature. The numerical methods employed are based on the techniques developed by Rappaport et al. (1982). It is found that occasional close encounters with field stars strongly dominate the evolution of highly compact binaries in dense globular cluster cores. Attention is given to the applicability of the findings to observations of X-ray sources and cataclysmic variables.

  5. Binary nature of the HADS stars AN Lyn & BE Lyn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, J. H.; Rentería, A.; Villarreal, C.; Pani, A.; Huepa, H.; Huepa, J. L.; Bernal, A.; Arenas, A.; García, C.; León, R.; Ramírez, E.; Trejo, O.; Colorado, E.; Sánchez-Cruces, M.; Rechy-García, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    From newly determined times of maxima from CCD photometry of the HADS stars AN Lyn & BE Lyn and a compilation of previous times of maxima, we are able to determine the binary nature of these stars. We determine their physical parameters by means of uvby-β photometry.

  6. The close-binary content of massive star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen C.

    2015-08-01

    The fates of star clusters and the binaries in them are closely intertwined. Close binaries support a cluster against core collapse, while stellar encounters in the dense cores of massive star clusters shape the properties and numbers of the binaries. Observations of massive globular clusters with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have revealed hundreds of close binaries. I will present new results from deep HST observations of massive star clusters including 47Tuc, M28, and M4, that are aimed at classifying the X-ray source populations. Besides exotic systems such as low-mass X-ray binaries and millisecond pulsars, more mundane systems such as magnetically active binaries and accreting white dwarfs have been found. I will discuss how a breakdown of sources by class has revealed how the various binary populations bear the imprints of stellar encounters: some are dominated by dynamical creation, others by dynamical destruction. I will also discuss the effects on the integrated X-ray emissivity of massive star clusters, which is suppressed compared to lower-density environments.

  7. MASS TRANSFER IN BINARY STARS USING SMOOTHED PARTICLE HYDRODYNAMICS. II. ECCENTRIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Sills, Alison E-mail: asills@mcmaster.ca

    2011-01-10

    Despite numerous efforts to better understand binary star evolution, some aspects of it remain poorly constrained. In particular, the evolution of eccentric binaries has remained elusive mainly because the Roche lobe formalism derived for circular binaries does not apply. Here we report the results of our smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of mass transfer in eccentric binaries using an alternate method in which we model only the outermost layers of the stars with appropriate boundary conditions. Using this technique, along with properly relaxed model stars, we characterize the mass transfer episodes of binaries with various orbital parameters. In particular, we show that these episodes can be described by Gaussians with an FWHM of {approx}0.12P{sub orb} and that the peak rates occur after periastron, at an orbital phase of {approx}0.58, independently of the eccentricity and mass of the stars. The accreted material is observed to form a rather sparse envelope around either or both stars. Although the fate of this envelope is not modeled in our simulations, we show that a constant fraction ({approx}5%) of the material transferred is ejected from the systems. We discuss this result in terms of the non-conservative mass transfer scenario. We suggest that our results could be incorporated in analytical and binary population synthesis studies to help better understand the evolution of eccentric binaries and the formation of exotic stellar populations.

  8. Modelling of binary stars from observations. (Italian Title: Creare modelli di stelle binarie dalle osservazioni)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, G.

    2011-08-01

    A review on basic physical parameters of closed binary stars introduces to modelling observational data. PHOEBE and other modelling software are described. As example of application, for the first time photometric elements of the eclipsing binary V400 Lyr are obtained.

  9. Milankovitch Cycles of Terrestrial Planets in Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, Duncan

    2016-08-01

    The habitability of planets in binary star systems depends not only on the radiation environment created by the two stars, but also on the perturbations to planetary orbits and rotation produced by the gravitational field of the binary and neighbouring planets. Habitable planets in binaries may therefore experience significant perturbations in orbit and spin. The direct effects of orbital resonances and secular evolution on the climate of binary planets remain largely unconsidered. We present latitudinal energy balance modelling of exoplanet climates with direct coupling to an N Body integrator and an obliquity evolution model. This allows us to simultaneously investigate the thermal and dynamical evolution of planets orbiting binary stars, and discover gravito-climatic oscillations on dynamical and secular timescales. We investigate the Kepler-47 and Alpha Centauri systems as archetypes of P and S type binary systems respectively. In the first case, Earthlike planets would experience rapid Milankovitch cycles (of order 1000 years) in eccentricity, obliquity and precession, inducing temperature oscillations of similar periods (modulated by other planets in the system). These secular temperature variations have amplitudes similar to those induced on the much shorter timescale of the binary period. In the Alpha Centauri system, the influence of the secondary produces eccentricity variations on 15,000 year timescales. This produces climate oscillations of similar strength to the variation on the orbital timescale of the binary. Phase drifts between eccentricity and obliquity oscillations creates further cycles that are of order 100,000 years in duration, which are further modulated by neighbouring planets.

  10. Binary stars can provide the `missing photons' needed for reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangcheng; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kasen, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan; Murray, Norman; Strom, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Empirical constraints on reionization require galactic ionizing photon escape fractions fesc ≳ 20 per cent, but recent high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamic calculations have consistently found much lower values ˜1-5 per cent. While these models include strong stellar feedback and additional processes such as runaway stars, they almost exclusively consider stellar evolution models based on single (isolated) stars, despite the fact that most massive stars are in binaries. We re-visit these calculations, combining radiative transfer and high-resolution cosmological simulations with detailed models for stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments project. For the first time, we use a stellar evolution model that includes a physically and observationally motivated treatment of binaries (the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis model). Binary mass transfer and mergers enhance the population of massive stars at late times (≳3 Myr) after star formation, which in turn strongly enhances the late-time ionizing photon production (especially at low metallicities). These photons are produced after feedback from massive stars has carved escape channels in the interstellar medium, and so efficiently leak out of galaxies. As a result, the time-averaged `effective' escape fraction (ratio of escaped ionizing photons to observed 1500 Å photons) increases by factors ˜4-10, sufficient to explain reionization. While important uncertainties remain, we conclude that binary evolution may be critical for understanding the ionization of the Universe.

  11. Evolution of binary stars in multiple-population globular clusters - II. Compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Sollima, Antonio; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey of N-body simulations aimed at exploring the evolution of compact binaries in multiple-population globular clusters. We show that as a consequence of the initial differences in the structural properties of the first-generation (FG) and the second-generation (SG) populations and the effects of dynamical processes on binary stars, the SG binary fraction decreases more rapidly than that of the FG population. The difference between the FG and SG binary fraction is qualitatively similar to but quantitatively smaller than that found for wider binaries in our previous investigations. The evolution of the radial variation of the binary fraction is driven by the interplay between binary segregation, ionization and ejection. Ionization and ejection counteract in part the effects of mass segregation but for compact binaries the effects of segregation dominate and the inner binary fraction increases during the cluster evolution. We explore the variation of the difference between the FG and the SG binary fraction with the distance from the cluster centre and its dependence on the binary binding energy and cluster structural parameters. The difference between the binary fraction in the FG and the SG populations found in our simulations is consistent with the results of observational studies finding a smaller binary fraction in the SG population.

  12. Eccentricity boost of stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasa, Mao; Seto, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Based on a simple geometrical approach, we analyze the evolution of the Kozai-Lidov mechanism for stars around shrinking massive black hole binaries on circular orbits. We find that, due to a peculiar bifurcation pattern induced by the Newtonian potential of stellar clusters, the orbit of stars could become highly eccentric. This transition occurs abruptly for stars with small initial eccentricities. The approach presented in this paper may be useful for studying the Kozai-Lidov mechanism in various astrophysical contexts.

  13. Observations of hot stars and eclipsing binaries with FRESIP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gies, Douglas R.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP project offers an unprecedented opportunity to study pulsations in hot stars (which vary on time scales of a day) over a several year period. The photometric data will determine what frequencies are present, how or if the amplitudes change with time, and whether there is a connection between pulsation and mass loss episodes. It would initiate a new field of asteroseismology studies of hot star interiors. A search should be made for selected hot stars for inclusion in the list of project targets. Many of the primary solar mass targets will be eclipsing binaries, and I present estimates of their frequency and typical light curves. The photometric data combined with follow up spectroscopy and interferometric observations will provide fundamental data on these stars. The data will provide definitive information on the mass ratio distribution of solar-mass binaries (including the incidence of brown dwarf companions) and on the incidence of planets in binary systems.

  14. Formation and Evolution of Binary Systems Containing Collapsed Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This research includes theoretical studies of the formation and evolution of five types of interacting binary systems. Our main focus has been on developing a number of comprehensive population synthesis codes to study the following types of binary systems: (i) cataclysmic variables (#3, #8, #12, #15), (ii) low- and intermediate-mass X-ray binaries (#13, #20, #21), (iii) high-mass X-ray binaries (#14, #17, #22), (iv) recycled binary millisecond pulsars in globular clusters (#5, #10, #ll), and (v) planetary nebulae which form in interacting binaries (#6, #9). The numbers in parentheses refer to papers published or in preparation that are listed in this paper. These codes take a new unified approach to population synthesis studies. The first step involves a Monte Carlo selection of the primordial binaries, including the constituent masses, and orbital separations and eccentricities. Next, a variety of analytic methods are used to evolve the primary star to the point where either a dynamical episode of mass transfer to the secondary occurs (the common envelope phase), or the system evolves down an alternate path. If the residual core of the primary is greater than 2.5 solar mass, it will evolve to Fe core collapse and the production of a neutron star and a supernova explosion. In the case of systems involving neutron stars, a kick velocity is chosen randomly from an appropriate distribution and added to the orbital dynamics which determine the state of the binary system after the supernova explosion. In the third step, all binaries which commence stable mass transfer from the donor star (the original secondary in the binary system) to the compact object, are followed with a detailed binary evolution code. Finally, we include all the relevant dynamics of the binary system. For example, in the case of LMXBs, the binary system, with its recoil velocity from the supernova explosion, is followed in time through its path in the Galactic potential. For our globular cluster

  15. Misaligned protoplanetary disks in a young binary star system.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Eric L N; Akeson, Rachel

    2014-07-31

    Many extrasolar planets follow orbits that differ from the nearly coplanar and circular orbits found in our Solar System; their orbits may be eccentric or inclined with respect to the host star's equator, and the population of giant planets orbiting close to their host stars suggests appreciable orbital migration. There is at present no consensus on what produces such orbits. Theoretical explanations often invoke interactions with a binary companion star in an orbit that is inclined relative to the planet's orbital plane. Such mechanisms require significant mutual inclinations between the planetary and binary star orbital planes. The protoplanetary disks in a few young binaries are misaligned, but often the measurements of these misalignments are sensitive only to a small portion of the inner disk, and the three-dimensional misalignment of the bulk of the planet-forming disk mass has hitherto not been determined. Here we report that the protoplanetary disks in the young binary system HK Tauri are misaligned by 60 to 68 degrees, such that one or both of the disks are significantly inclined to the binary orbital plane. Our results demonstrate that the necessary conditions exist for misalignment-driven mechanisms to modify planetary orbits, and that these conditions are present at the time of planet formation, apparently because of the binary formation process. PMID:25079553

  16. CALCULATING THE HABITABLE ZONE OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS. I. S-TYPE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltenegger, Lisa; Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-11-10

    We have developed a comprehensive methodology for calculating the boundaries of the habitable zone (HZ) of planet-hosting S-type binary star systems. Our approach is general and takes into account the contribution of both stars to the location and extent of the binary HZ with different stellar spectral types. We have studied how the binary eccentricity and stellar energy distribution affect the extent of the HZ. Results indicate that in binaries where the combination of mass-ratio and orbital eccentricity allows planet formation around a star of the system to proceed successfully, the effect of a less luminous secondary on the location of the primary's HZ is generally negligible. However, when the secondary is more luminous, it can influence the extent of the HZ. We present the details of the derivations of our methodology and discuss its application to the binary HZ around the primary and secondary main-sequence stars of an FF, MM, and FM binary, as well as two known planet-hosting binaries α Cen AB and HD 196886.

  17. General relativistic models of binary neutron stars in quasiequilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgarte, T. W.; Cook, G. B.; Scheel, M. A.; Shapiro, S. L.; Teukolsky, S. A.

    1998-06-01

    We perform fully relativistic calculations of binary neutron stars in corotating, circular orbit. While Newtonian gravity allows for a strict equilibrium, a relativistic binary system emits gravitational radiation, causing the system to lose energy and slowly spiral inwards. However, since inspiral occurs on a time scale much longer than the orbital period, we can treat the binary to be in quasiequilibrium. In this approximation, we integrate a subset of the Einstein equations coupled to the relativistic equation of hydrostatic equilibrium to solve the initial value problem for binaries of arbitrary separation. We adopt a polytropic equation of state to determine the structure and maximum mass of neutron stars in close binaries for polytropic indices n=1, 1.5 and 2. We construct sequences of constant rest-mass and locate turning points along energy equilibrium curves to identify the onset of orbital instability. In particular, we locate the innermost stable circular orbit and its angular velocity. We construct the first contact binary systems in full general relativity. These arise whenever the equation of state is sufficiently soft (n>~1.5). A radial stability analysis reveals no tendency for neutron stars in close binaries to collapse to black holes prior to merger.

  18. Searching for pulsations in Kepler eclipsing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulme, Patrick; Guzik, Joyce A.

    2014-02-01

    Eclipsing binaries can in principle provide additional constraints to facilitate asteroseismology of one or more pulsating components. We have identified 94 possible eclipsing binary systems in a sample of over 1800 stars observed in long cadence as part of the Kepler Guest Observer Program to search for γ Doradus and δ Scuti star candidates. We show the results of a procedure to fold the light curve to identify the potential binary period, subtract a fit to the binary light curve, and perform a Fourier analysis on the residuals to search for pulsation frequencies that may arise in one or both of the stellar components. From this sample, we have found a large variety of light curve types; about a dozen stars show frequencies consistent with δ Sct or γ Dor pulsations, or light curve features possibly produced by stellar activity (rotating spots). For several stars, the folded candidate `binary' light curve resembles more closely that of an RR Lyr, Cepheid, or high-amplitude δ Sct star. We show highlights of our results and discuss the potential for asteroseismology of the most interesting objects.

  19. Photometric binary stars in Praesepe and the search for globular cluster binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolte, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A radial velocity study of the stars which are located on a second sequence above the single-star zero-age main sequence at a given color in the color-magnitude diagram of the open cluster Praesepe, (NGC 2632) shows that 10, and possibly 11, of 17 are binary systems. Of the binary systems, five have full amplitudes for their velocity variations that are greater than 50 km/s. To the extent that they can be applied to globular clusters, these results suggests that (1) observations of 'second-sequence' stars in globular clusters would be an efficient way of finding main-sequence binary systems in globulars, and (2) current instrumentation on large telescopes is sufficient for establishing unambiguously the existence of main-sequence binary systems in nearby globular clusters.

  20. Changes in the orbital periods of close binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Pringle, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    A number of close binary stars show erratic changes in their orbital periods on time scales of order 5-10 yr. Recently it has been proposed that the period changes are the result of changes in the quadrupole moment of one star, caused in turn by an alteration of the internal structure of that star. Magnetic pressure, which either distorts the shape of the star or changes its tidally induced quadrupole moment, is suggested as the driving force behind the alteration. Here, the amount of energy required to distort one component of a binary and match the observed period changes is estimated. The rate at which energy is produced or lost is governed by the thermal time scale of the star, and the estimates indicate that the observed period changes would take at least 1000 yr for the tidal quadrupole mechanism, and of order 60 yr to match a period change in V471 Tau which took only 4 yr.

  1. Binary Stars Can Provide the "Missing Photons" Needed for Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiangcheng; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kasen, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan; Murray, Norman; Strom, Allison

    2016-04-01

    Empirical constraints on reionization require galactic ionizing photon escape fractions fesc ≳ 20%, but recent high-resolution radiation-hydrodynamic calculations have consistently found much lower values ˜1-5%. While these models include strong stellar feedback and additional processes such as runaway stars, they almost exclusively consider stellar evolution models based on single (isolated) stars, despite the fact that most massive stars are in binaries. We re-visit these calculations, combining radiative transfer and high-resolution cosmological simulations with detailed models for stellar feedback from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) project. For the first time, we use a stellar evolution model that includes a physically and observationally motivated treatment of binaries (the BPASS model). Binary mass transfer and mergers enhance the population of massive stars at late times (≳ 3 Myr) after star formation, which in turn strongly enhances the late-time ionizing photon production (especially at low metallicities). These photons are produced after feedback from massive stars has carved escape channels in the ISM, and so efficiently leak out of galaxies. As a result, the time-averaged "effective" escape fraction (ratio of escaped ionizing photons to observed 1500 Å photons) increases by factors ˜4-10, sufficient to explain reionization. While important uncertainties remain, we conclude that binary evolution may be critical for understanding the ionization of the Universe.

  2. KOI-3278: A Self-Lensing Binary Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Ethan; Agol, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Over 40% of Sun-like stars are bound in binary or multistar systems. Stellar remnants in edge-on binary systems can gravitationally magnify their companions, as predicted 40 years ago. By using data from the Kepler spacecraft, we report the detection of such a “self-lensing” system, in which a 5-hour pulse of 0.1% amplitude occurs every orbital period. The white dwarf stellar remnant and its Sun-like companion orbit one another every 88.18 days, a long period for a white dwarf-eclipsing binary. By modeling the pulse as gravitational magnification (microlensing) along with Kepler’s laws and stellar models, we constrain the mass of the white dwarf to be ~63% of the mass of our Sun. Further study of this system, and any others discovered like it, will help to constrain the physics of white dwarfs and binary star evolution.

  3. KOI-3278: a self-lensing binary star system.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Ethan; Agol, Eric

    2014-04-18

    Over 40% of Sun-like stars are bound in binary or multistar systems. Stellar remnants in edge-on binary systems can gravitationally magnify their companions, as predicted 40 years ago. By using data from the Kepler spacecraft, we report the detection of such a "self-lensing" system, in which a 5-hour pulse of 0.1% amplitude occurs every orbital period. The white dwarf stellar remnant and its Sun-like companion orbit one another every 88.18 days, a long period for a white dwarf-eclipsing binary. By modeling the pulse as gravitational magnification (microlensing) along with Kepler's laws and stellar models, we constrain the mass of the white dwarf to be ~63% of the mass of our Sun. Further study of this system, and any others discovered like it, will help to constrain the physics of white dwarfs and binary star evolution. PMID:24744369

  4. Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy of three F + B binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.; Dempsey, Robert C.; Parsons, Sidney B.

    1991-05-01

    Optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy is presented for three F + B objects that are members of the first group of strongly interacting, F II + B systems. The data obtained confirm that HD 59771, HD 242257, and CoD -30 5135 are all binary star systems consisting of a luminous F-type component and a B star. Strong, variable H-alpha emission is seen in all the stars. It is found that the UV spectrum of HD 59771 resembles the spectrum of HD 207739. CoD -30 5135 has the most dramatic mid-UV spectrum seen among the scores of observed cool + hot star systems.

  5. Magnetic field effects on gravitational waves from binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel

    2008-04-01

    Observational evidence indicates that a fair number of neutron star binaries and neutron star-black hole binaries have a sizable magnetic field which can be responsible for powering pulsars and colimating jets. Magnetic field effects additionally can have a strong influence on the dynamics of the fluid by redistributing angular momentum through different mechanisms (magnetic winding and braking, magneto-rotational instabilities) depending on the strength of the magnetic field and the typical time scales involved in the process. These processes can affect the multipolar structure of the source and consequently the produced gravitational wave. We present results of neutron star binary mergers both with and without magnetic field and discuss the magnetic effects on the gravitational waves, fluid structure, and merger timescale.

  6. TRIPLE-STAR CANDIDATES AMONG THE KEPLER BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaport, S.; Deck, K.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Levine, A.; Borkovits, T.; Carter, J.; El Mellah, I.; Kalomeni, B. E-mail: kdeck@mit.edu E-mail: aml@space.mit.edu E-mail: jacarter@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search through the photometric database of Kepler eclipsing binaries looking for evidence of hierarchical triple-star systems. The presence of a third star orbiting the binary can be inferred from eclipse timing variations. We apply a simple algorithm in an automated determination of the eclipse times for all 2157 binaries. The ''calculated'' eclipse times, based on a constant period model, are subtracted from those observed. The resulting O - C (observed minus calculated times) curves are then visually inspected for periodicities in order to find triple-star candidates. After eliminating false positives due to the beat frequency between the {approx}1/2 hr Kepler cadence and the binary period, 39 candidate triple systems were identified. The periodic O - C curves for these candidates were then fit for contributions from both the classical Roemer delay and so-called physical delay, in an attempt to extract a number of the system parameters of the triple. We discuss the limitations of the information that can be inferred from these O - C curves without further supplemental input, e.g., ground-based spectroscopy. Based on the limited range of orbital periods for the triple-star systems to which this search is sensitive, we can extrapolate to estimate that at least 20% of all close binaries have tertiary companions.

  7. Triple-star Candidates among the Kepler Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappaport, S.; Deck, K.; Levine, A.; Borkovits, T.; Carter, J.; El Mellah, I.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Kalomeni, B.

    2013-05-01

    We present the results of a search through the photometric database of Kepler eclipsing binaries looking for evidence of hierarchical triple-star systems. The presence of a third star orbiting the binary can be inferred from eclipse timing variations. We apply a simple algorithm in an automated determination of the eclipse times for all 2157 binaries. The "calculated" eclipse times, based on a constant period model, are subtracted from those observed. The resulting O - C (observed minus calculated times) curves are then visually inspected for periodicities in order to find triple-star candidates. After eliminating false positives due to the beat frequency between the ~1/2 hr Kepler cadence and the binary period, 39 candidate triple systems were identified. The periodic O - C curves for these candidates were then fit for contributions from both the classical Roemer delay and so-called physical delay, in an attempt to extract a number of the system parameters of the triple. We discuss the limitations of the information that can be inferred from these O - C curves without further supplemental input, e.g., ground-based spectroscopy. Based on the limited range of orbital periods for the triple-star systems to which this search is sensitive, we can extrapolate to estimate that at least 20% of all close binaries have tertiary companions.

  8. Black Hole - Neutron Star Binary Simulations at Georgia Tech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Roland

    2009-05-01

    Mixed compact object binaries consisting of a black hole and a neutron star are expected to be not only one of the primary sources of gravitational radiation to be observed by interferometric detectors but also the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts. We report on the status of our effort at Georgia Tech to model these mixed binary systems using the moving puncture method. The results are obtained with an enhanced version our vacuum MayaKranc code coupled to the hydrodynamics Whisky code. We present preliminary results of gravitational waveforms and the disruption of the neutron star for simple polytropic equations of state.

  9. Binary Neutron Star Mergers: Prospects for Multimessenger Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, David; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Binary neutron star mergers are possible progenitors for short gamma-ray bursts. We evolve a binary system of two neutron stars using the fully relativistic Einstein equations from an initial quasi-circular orbit, through and past merger. We consider different finite-temperature, nuclear equations of state, which vary from soft to quite stiff, and allow for magnetization of the system and neutrino cooling via a leakage scheme. We focus on potential observables, other than gravitational waves, produced mainly by the hot, strongly magnetized matter resulting from the merger.

  10. The CHARA Catalog of Orbital Elements of Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.; Harvin, James A.; McAlister, Harold A.

    2003-05-01

    Optical interferometry is entering a new age, with several ground-based long-baseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented resolution. Interferometers bring a new level of resolution to bear on spectroscopic binaries, enabling the full extraction of the physical parameters for the component stars with high accuracy. In the case of double-lined systems, a geometrically determined orbital parallax becomes available as well. The first step in preparing to observe spectroscopic binaries is to list them, which has not been done since the 1989 publication of the Eighth Catalogue of the Orbital Elements of Spectroscopic Binaries by Batten et al. We present a new catalog with roughly half again as many listings as the Eighth Catalogue. Angular separation predictions are made for each catalog entry. The numbers of spectroscopic binaries available for study as a function of several important observational parameters are explored, and in particular, the number of spectroscopic binaries as a function of expected separation is discussed.

  11. The Binary Nature of CH-Like Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Začs, L.; Schuster, W. J.; Deveikis, V.

    2016-07-01

    Yamashita has described a group of early carbon stars with enhanced lines of barium that resemble the CH stars but have low radial velocities. It is not clear whether they represent a class of stars separate from early R stars. Radial-velocity measurements and abundance analyses are applied in order to clarify the evolutionary status of CH-like stars. Radial-velocity monitoring was performed over a time interval of about 10 years. Abundance analysis was carried out using high-resolution spectra and the method of atmospheric models for three CH-like candidate stars. The radial-velocity monitoring confirmed regular variations for all of the classified CH-like stars, except for two, in support of their binary nature. The calculated orbital parameters are similar to those observed for barium stars in the disk of the Galaxy and their counterparts in the halo, that is, the CH stars. The relatively low luminosity of CH-like stars and the overabundance of s-process elements in the atmospheres are in agreement with a mass-transfer scenario from the secondary—an AGB star in the past. The kinematic data and metallicities support the idea that CH-like stars are thin/thick-disk population objects.

  12. Observations of Disks Around Pre--Main-Sequence Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric L. N.

    1996-08-01

    This work is an observational study of disks around low-mass, pre--main-sequence binary stars. Its purpose is to study the extent of binary-disk interactions and to determine whether binaries modify the structure of their associated disks. We present 800 micron continuum photometry of pre--main-sequence binary stars with projected separations ap < 150 AU in the Scorpius-Ophiuchus and Taurus-Auriga star-forming regions. Combining our observations with published 1300 micron continuum photometry, we find that binaries with 1 < ap < 50--100 AU have lower submillimeter continuum fluxes than wider binaries or single stars with a confidence level of greater than 99%, implying reduced disk masses. Thus, binary companions with separations less than 50--100 AU significantly influence the nature of associated disks. A simple model suggests that large gaps in disks with surface densities typical of wide-binary or single-star disks can reduce submillimeter fluxes to levels consistent with the observed limits. This model shows that the present submillimeter flux upper limits do not necessarily imply a large reduction in disk surface densities outside of cleared gaps. IRAS 60 micron fluxes show that most binaries have at least one circumstellar disk, with typical lower limits of Mdisk = 10-5 Modot. Thus, circumstellar disk surface densities are no more than two orders of magnitude smaller than those of typical disks around single stars. Our upper limits on submillimeter fluxes place upper limits of 0.005 Modot on circumbinary disk masses among binaries with 1 < ap < 50--100 AU; however, circumbinary disks are found around some binaries with separations less than a few AU null. We then present λ = 1.3 and 3 mm aperture synthesis imaging of the multiple T Tauri system UZ Tauri. UZ Tau is a hierarchical quadruple composed of a sub-AU spectroscopic binary, UZ Tau E, 530 AU distant from a 50 AU binary, UZ Tau W null. Both dust and gas emission from the 50 AU binary are at least a

  13. Ring Planetary Nebulae Ejected from Close Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, H. E.; Ciardullo, R.; Webbink, R.

    1996-12-01

    We report photometric observations of the central stars of three planetary nebulae (PNe) which appear to be thin circular rings. All three central stars have proven to be close binaries, from CCD observations made at the CTIO and KPNO 0.9-m telescopes. The southern-hemisphere PN Sp 1 is a nearly perfect circular ring. Its central star has a light curve which is a low-amplitude sinusoid with a period of 2.9 days, suggesting a reflection effect in a binary system seen nearly pole-on. We therefore suggested (Bond & Livio, ApJ 355, 568, 1990) that the nebula must be a true toroidal annulus, likewise seen nearly pole-on. SuWt 2 is another southern PN, which appears as a thin ellipse. If it were an Sp 1-like PN, seen almost edge-on, and also ejected from a close binary, we might hope to detect actual stellar eclipses. This has proven to be the case: the central star is an eclipsing binary with a period of 4.8 days. WeBo 1 is a northern PN recently discovered by Webbink and Bond. Morphologically the nebula is extremely similar to SuWt 2, in being an almost mathematically perfect ellipse. Recent observations at KPNO reveal that its central star is also a close binary, with a sinusoidal light curve and a period of approximately 5 days. It is thus becoming clear that some close binaries can undergo a common-envelope interaction that results in a much shorter orbital period accompanied by ejection of a thin nebular ring. Parallels with other objects, including SN 1987A, should be explored.

  14. Hydrodynamical evolution of coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of the final merging of two neutron stars and the corresponding gravitational wave emission is studied in detail. Various test calculations are presented, including the compressible Roche and Darwin problems and the head-on collision of two polytropes. A complete coalescence calculation is presented for the simplest case of two identical neutron stars, represented by Gamma = 2 polytropes, in a circular orbit, with their spins aligned and synchronized with the orbital rotation.

  15. Binary star orbits from speckle interferometry. 5: A combined speckle/spectroscopic study of the O star binary 15 Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gies, Douglas R.; Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Mcalister, Harold A.; Frazin, Richard A.; Hahula, Michael E.; Penny, Laura R.; Thaller, Michelle L.; Fullerton, Alexander W.; Shara, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the discovery of a speckle binary companion to the O7 V (f) star 15 Monocerotis. A study of published radial velocities in conjunction with new measurements from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and IUE suggests that the star is also a spectroscopic binary with a period of 25 years and a large eccentricity. Thus, 15 Mon is the first O star to bridge the gap between the spectroscopic and visual separation regimes. We have used the star's membership in the cluster NGC 2264 together with the cluster distance to derive masses of 34 and 19 solar mass for the primary and secondary, respectively. Several of the He I line profiles display a broad shallow component which we associate with the secondary, and we estimate the secondary's classification to be O9.5 Vn. The new orbit leads to several important predictions that can be tested over the next few years.

  16. RADIAL VELOCITY STUDIES OF CLOSE BINARY STARS. XIV

    SciTech Connect

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; DeBond, Heide; De Ridder, Archie; Karmo, Toomas; Thomson, J. R.; Croll, Bryce; Ogloza, Waldemar; Pilecki, Bogumil; Siwak, Michal E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: ridder@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: croll@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: pilecki@astrouw.edu.pl

    2009-03-15

    Radial velocity (RV) measurements and sine curve fits to the orbital RV variations are presented for 10 close binary systems: TZ Boo, VW Boo, EL Boo, VZ CVn, GK Cep, RW Com, V2610 Oph, V1387 Ori, AU Ser, and FT UMa. Our spectroscopy revealed two quadruple systems, TZ Boo and V2610 Oph, while three stars showing small photometric amplitudes, EL Boo, V1387 Ori, and FT UMa, were found to be triple systems. GK Cep is a close binary with a faint third component. While most of the studied eclipsing systems are contact binaries, VZ CVn and GK Cep are detached or semidetached double-lined binaries, and EL Boo, V1387 Ori, and FT UMa are close binaries of uncertain binary type. The large fraction of triple and quadruple systems found in this sample supports the hypothesis of formation of close binaries in multiple stellar systems; it also demonstrates that low photometric amplitude binaries are a fertile ground for further discoveries of multiple systems.

  17. Hydrodynamics of coalescing binary neutron stars: Ellipsoidal treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Dong; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1995-01-01

    We employ an approximate treatment of dissipative hydrodynamics in three dimensions to study the coalescence of binary neutron stars driven by the emission of gravitational waves. The stars are modeled as compressible ellipsoids obeying a polytropic equation of state; all internal fluid velocities are assumed to be linear functions of the coordinates. The hydrodynamics equations then reduce to a set of coupled ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the principal axes of the ellipsoids, the internal velocity parameters, and the binary orbital parameters. Gravitational radiation reaction and viscous dissipation are both incorporated. We set up exact initial binary equilibrium configurations and follow the transition from the quasi-static, secular decay of the orbit at large separation to the rapid dynamical evolution of the configurations just prior to contact. A hydrodynamical instability resulting from tidal interactions significantly accelerates the coalescence at small separation, leading to appreciable radial infall velocity and tidal lag angles near contact. This behavior is reflected in the gravitational waveforms and may be observable by gravitational wave detectors under construction. In cases where the neutron stars have spins which are not aligned with the orbital angular momentum, the spin-induced quadrupole moment can lead to precession of the orbital plane and therefore modulation of the gravitational wave amplitude even at large orbital radius. However, the amplitude of the modulation is small for typical neutron star binaries with spins much smaller than the orbital angular momentum.

  18. The LIGO Scientific Collaboration search for inspiralling binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Duncan

    2006-04-01

    The three LIGO interferometers and the GEO600 interferometer operate as a network of detectors under the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). This network has now reached unprecedented levels of sensitivity. In this talk we will present the status and current results from the binary neutron star search in LIGO/GEO data.

  19. Electromagnetic and Gravitational Outputs from Binary-Neutron-Star Coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Ponce, Marcelo; Liebling, Steven L.; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    The late stage of an inspiraling neutron-star binary gives rise to strong gravitational wave emission due to its highly dynamic, strong gravity. Moreover, interactions between the stellar magnetospheres can produce considerable electromagnetic radiation. We study this scenario using fully general relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We show that these interactions extract kinetic energy from the system, dissipate heat, and power radiative Poynting flux, as well as develop current sheets. Our results indicate that this power can (i) outshine pulsars in binaries, (ii) display a distinctive angular- and time-dependent pattern, and (iii) radiate within large opening angles. These properties suggest that some binary neutron-star mergers are ideal candidates for multimessenger astronomy.

  20. Observations of binary stars by speckle interferometry. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, B. L.; Beckmann, G. K.; Scaddan, R. J.

    1980-07-01

    This is the second paper in a series describing observations of binary stars using the technique of speckle interferometry. Observations were made using the 2.5-m Newton Telescope and the 1-m telescope of the Royal Greenwich Observatory and the 1.9-m telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory. The classical Rayleigh diffraction limits are 0.050 arcsec for the 2.5-m telescope, 0.065 arcsec for the 1.9-m telescope and 0.125 arcsec for the 1-m telescope, at a wavelength of 500 nm. The results of 29 measurements of 26 objects are presented. The objects include long period spectroscopic binaries from the 6th Catalog of Batten, close visual binary systems from the 3rd Catalog of Finsen and Worley and variable stars. Nine of the objects have not been previously resolved by speckle interferometry. New members are detected in the systems Beta Cep, p Vel and Iota UMa.

  1. Cool and luminous transients from mass-losing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the recently established link between luminous red novae (LRN) and catastrophic phases of binary star evolution, we perform smoothed particle hydrodynamic calculations of outflows from binary stars with realistic equation of state and opacities. We focus on the case of mass loss from the outer Lagrangian point (L2), where the resulting spiral stream experiences tidal torques from the binary and becomes unbound. As the individual spiral arms merge and collide near the binary, the outflow thermalizes about 5% of its kinetic energy. For reasonable binary parameters, the outflow can produce luminosities up to 106 L ⨀ with effective temperatures between 500 and 6000 K, depending on the optical depth through the outflow. This is compatible with many examples of the LRN such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. The luminosity and the expansion velocity are correlated, as is roughly observed in the known LRN. The outflow readily forms dust, leading to great variations of the appearance of the transient as a function of the viewing angle. Our results are relevant for a more general class of equatorial outflows with asymptotic velocity and heating rate near the binary proportional to its orbital speed.

  2. Orbital evolution of eccentric interacting binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepinsky, Jeremy Francis

    2009-06-01

    We provide a comprehensive description of the long-term (secular) orbital evolution of eccentric interacting binary systems. The evolution of circular interacting binary systems is a well studied phenomenon, but observations have shown the existence of a small but significant number of eccentric interacting binary systems. We begin by extending the commonly accepted Roche formalism for binary interacting to include eccentric orbits and asynchronously rotating stars. Using this, we calculate orbital trajectories for particles ejected from a Roche lobe-filling donor star at the periastron of the eccentric orbit. These particles admit of three possible trajectories: direct impact onto the secondary star, self accretion back onto the donor star, and the formation of a disk about the accretor. We provide a proscription for determining a priorithe trajectory of the particle given the initial system parameters, as well as describe the secular evolution of the system for each of the three cases described above. We find that these orbital evolution timescales are comparable to the mass transfer timescale which can be significantly longer than expected from the literature. Furthermore, while it is commonly assumed that any mass transfer interactions will act to circularize the orbit, we find that there are regimes of parameter space where mass transfer can cause an increase in eccentricity, and can do so at a timescale comparable to the circularization timescale created by tidal interactions. The formalism presented here can be incorporated into binary evolution and population synthesis models to create a self-consistent treatment of mass transfer in eccentric binaries.

  3. Active Longitudes and Flip-Flops in Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Heidi; Järvinen, Silva P.

    2007-08-01

    In many active stars the spots concentrate on two permanent active longitudes which are 180 degrees apart. In some of these stars the dominant part of the spot activity changes the longitude every few years. This so-called flip-flop phenomenon was first reported in the early 1990's in the single, late type giant FK Com. Since then flip-flops have been reported also on binary stars, young solar type stars and the Sun itself. Even though this phenomenon has been detected on many different kinds of active stars, still less than ten stars are known to exhibit this effect. Therefore no statistically significant correlation between the stellar parameters and the flip-flop phenomenon can be carried out. Here we present results from investigation where we have studied the long-term photometry of several magnetically active RS CVn binaries to see whether or not they show permanent active longitudes and the flip-flop phenomenon. We find that it is very common for the active regions to occur on permanent active longitudes, and some of these stars also show clear flip-flop phenomenon.

  4. Binary stars and the UVX in early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Pérez, Fabiola; Bruzual, Gustavo

    2014-11-01

    We use the Hernández-Pérez and Bruzual (HB13) stellar population synthesis models to study the role of interacting binary pairs as progenitors of extreme horizontal branch (EHB) stars. We assemble a sample of 3417 early-type galaxies observed both in the optical (SDSS-DR8) and the UV (GALEX-GR6). The galaxies in our sample can be classified according to their position in the colour-colour diagram as UV-weak or red-sequence galaxies (˜48 per cent), UV-strong or UVX galaxies (˜9 per cent), and recent star-forming galaxies (˜43 per cent). Analysing this sample using the HB13 models for various choices of basic model parameters, we conclude that (a) the UVr colours of UV-weak and UV-strong galaxies are reproduced by the models as long as the fraction of binary stars is at least 15 per cent. (b) Higher metallicity models (Z = 0.02 and 0.03) reproduce the colours of UV-weak and UV-strong galaxies better than lower Z models. The Z = 0.03 model is slightly bluer than the Z = 0.02 model in the UV-strong region, indicating a weak relationship between UVX and Z. (c) The strength of UVX increases with age in the model population. This is at variance with the results of other models that include binary stars as progenitors of EHB stars.

  5. Δ μ binaries among stars with large proper motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovritchev, M. Yu.; Kulikova, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based on observations performed with the Pulkovo normal astrograph in 2008-2015 and data from sky surveys (DSS, 2MASS, SDSS DR12, WISE), we have investigated the motions of 1308 stars with proper motions larger than 300 mas yr-1 down to magnitude 17. The main idea of our search for binary stars based on this material is reduced to comparing the quasi-mean (POSS2-POSS1; an epoch difference of ≈50 yr) and quasi-instantaneous (2МASS, SDSS, WISE, Pulkovo; an epoch difference of ≈10 yr) proper motions. If the difference is statistically significant compared to the proper motion errors, then the object may be considered as a Δ μ-binary candidate. One hundred and twenty one stars from among those included in the observational program satisfy this requirement. Additional confirmations of binarity for a number of stars have been obtained by comparing the calculated proper motions with the data from several programs of stellar trigonometric parallax determinations and by analyzing the asymmetry of stellar images on sky-survey CCD frames. Analysis of the highly accurate SDSS photometric data for four stars (J0656+3827, J0838+3940, J1229+5332, J2330+4639) allows us to reach a conclusion about the probability that these Δ μ binaries are white dwarf +Mdwarf pairs.

  6. Merger of binary neutron stars in numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    The merger of binary neutron stars is one of most promising sources of gravitational waves. It is also a promising candidate for the central engine of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and a source of the strong transient electromagnetic signal that could be the counterpart of gravitational-wave signals. Numerical relativity is probably the unique tool for theoretically exploring the merger process, and now, it is powerful enough to provide us a wide variety of aspects of the binary-neutron-star merger. In this talk, I will summarize our current understanding of the entire merger event that is obtained by a large-scale numerical-relativity simulations. In particular, I focus on the relation between the neutron-star equation of state and gravitational waves emitted during the late inspiral and merger phase, and observable electromagnetic signal that is likely to be emitted by the dynamical ejecta through r-process nucleosynthesis.

  7. Photometric study of the active binary star V1430 Aquilae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Sürgit, D.

    2006-05-01

    New BVR light curves and a photometric analysis of the eclipsing binary star V1430 Aql are presented. The light curves were obtained at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2004. The light curves are generally those of detached eclipsing binaries, but there are large asymmetries between maxima. New BVR light curves were analysed with an ILOT procedure. Light curve asymmetries of the system were explained in terms of large dark starspots on the primary component. The primary star shows a long-lived and quasi-poloidal spot distribution with active longitudes in opposite hemispheres. Absolute parameters of the system were derived. We also discuss the evolution of the system: the components are likely to be pre-main sequence stars, but a post-main sequence stage cannot be ruled out. More observations are needed to decide this point.

  8. Magnetised winds in single and binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Colin

    2016-07-01

    Stellar winds are fundamentally important for the stellar magnetic activity evolution and for the immediate environment surrounding their host stars. Ionised winds travel at hundreds of km/s, impacting planets and clearing out large regions around the stars called astropheres. Winds influence planets in many ways: for example, by compressing the magnetosphere and picking up atmospheric particles, they can cause significant erosion of a planetary atmosphere. By removing angular momentum, winds cause the rotation rates of stars to decrease as they age. This causes the star's magnetic dynamo to decay, leading to a significant decay in the star's levels of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet emission. Despite their importance, little is currently known about the winds of other Sun-like stars. Their small mass fluxes have meant that no direct detections have so far been possible. What is currently known has either been learned indirectly or through analogies with the solar wind. In this talk, I will review what is known about the properties and evolution of the winds of other Sun-like stars. I will also review wind dynamics in binary star systems, where the winds from both stars impact each other, leading to shocks and compression regions.

  9. ADIABATIC MASS LOSS IN BINARY STARS. I. COMPUTATIONAL METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Hongwei; Chen Xuefei; Han Zhanwen; Webbink, Ronald F. E-mail: mshjell@gmail.co

    2010-07-10

    The asymptotic response of donor stars in interacting binary systems to very rapid mass loss is characterized by adiabatic expansion throughout their interiors. In this limit, energy generation and heat flow through the stellar interior can be neglected. We model this response by constructing model sequences, beginning with a donor star filling its Roche lobe at an arbitrary point in its evolution, holding its specific entropy and composition profiles fixed as mass is removed from the surface. The stellar interior remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. Luminosity profiles in these adiabatic models of mass-losing stars can be reconstructed from the specific entropy profiles and their gradients. These approximations are validated by comparison with time-dependent binary mass transfer calculations. We describe how adiabatic mass-loss sequences can be used to quantify threshold conditions for dynamical timescale mass transfer, and to establish the range of post-common envelope binaries that are allowed energetically. In dynamical timescale mass transfer, the adiabatic response of the donor star drives it to expand beyond its Roche lobe, leading to runaway mass transfer and the formation of a common envelope with its companion star. For donor stars with surface convection zones of any significant depth, this runaway condition is encountered early in mass transfer, if at all; but for main-sequence stars with radiative envelopes, it may be encountered after a prolonged phase of thermal timescale mass transfer, a so-called delayed dynamical instability. We identify the critical binary mass ratio for the onset of dynamical timescale mass transfer as that ratio for which the adiabatic response of the donor star radius to mass loss matches that of its Roche lobe at some point during mass transfer; if the ratio of donor to accretor masses exceeds this critical value, dynamical timescale mass transfer ensues. In common envelope evolution, the dissipation of orbital energy of the

  10. Synergies in Astrometry: Predicting Navigational Error of Visual Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner Stewart, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Celestial navigation can employ a number of bright stars which are in binary systems. Often these are unresolved, appearing as a single, center-of-light object. A number of these systems are, however, in wide systems which could introduce a margin of error in the navigation solution if not handled properly. To illustrate the importance of good orbital solutions for binary systems - as well as good astrometry in general - the relationship between the center-of-light versus individual catalog position of celestial bodies and the error in terrestrial position derived via celestial navigation is demonstrated. From the list of navigational binary stars, fourteen such binary systems with at least 3.0 arcseconds apparent separation are explored. Maximum navigational error is estimated under the assumption that the bright star in the pair is observed at maximum separation, but the center-of-light is employed in the navigational solution. The relationships between navigational error and separation, orbital periods, and observers' latitude are discussed.

  11. Ba STARS AND OTHER BINARIES IN FIRST AND SECOND GENERATION STARS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    D'Orazi, Valentina; Gratton, Raffaele; Lucatello, Sara; Carretta, Eugenio; Bragaglia, Angela; Marino, Anna F.

    2010-08-20

    The determination of the Ba abundance in globular cluster (GC) stars is a very powerful test to address several issues in the framework of multiple population scenarios. We measured the Ba content for a sample of more than 1200 stars in 15 Galactic GCs, using high-resolution FLAMES/Giraffe spectra. We found no variation in [Ba/Fe] ratios for different stellar populations within each cluster; this means that low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars do not significantly contribute to the intracluster pollution. Very interestingly, we found that the fraction of Ba stars in first generation (FG) stars is close to the values derived for field stars ({approx}2%); on the other hand, second generation (SG) stars present a significantly lower fraction. An independent and successful test, based on radial velocity variations among giant stars in NGC 6121, confirms our finding: the binary fraction among FG stars is about {approx}12%, to be compared with {approx}1% of SG stars. This is an evidence that SG stars formed in a denser environment, where infant mortality of binary systems was particularly efficient.

  12. Electromagnetic field dynamics in Binary Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    Neutron star mergers represent one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GW) within the bandwidth of advLIGO. In addition to GW, strong magnetic fields may offer the possibility of a characteristic electromagnetic signature allowing for concurrent detection. In this talk we present results from numerical evolutions of such mergers, studying the dynamics of both the gravitational and electromagnetic degrees of freedom.

  13. The MACHO Project LMC variable star inventory. V. Classification and orbits of 611 eclipsing binary stars

    SciTech Connect

    The MACHO Collaboration

    1997-07-01

    We report the characteristics of 611 eclipsing binary stars in the Large Megallanic Cloud found by using the MACHO Project photometry database. The sample is magnitude limited, and extends down the main sequence to about spectral type A0. Many evolved binaries are also included. Each eclipsing binary is classified according to the traditional scheme of the {ital General Catalogue of Variable Stars} (EA and EB), and also according to a new decimal classification scheme defined in this paper. The new scheme is sensitive to the two major sources of variance in eclipsing binary star light curves{emdash}the sum of radii, and the surface-brightness ratio, and allow greater precision in characterizing the light curves. Examples of each type of light curve and their variations are given. Sixty-four of the eclipsing binaries have eccentric, rather than circular, orbits. The ephemeris and principal photometric characteristics of each eclipsing binary are listed in a table. Photometric orbits based on the Nelson{endash}Davis{endash}Etzel model have been fitted to all light curves. These data will be useful for planning future observations of these binaries. Plots of all data and fitted orbits and a table of the fitted orbital parameters are available on the AAS CD-ROM series, Vol. 9, 1997. These data are also available at the MACHO home page (http://wwwmacho.mcmaster.ca/). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Astronomical Society.}

  14. Resolving subdwarf B stars in binaries by HST imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.; Moehler, S.; Napiwotzki, R.; Thejll, P.; Green, E. M.

    2002-03-01

    The origin of subluminous B stars is still an unsolved problem in stellar evolution. Single star as well as close binary evolution scenarios have been invoked but until now have met with little success. We have carried out a small survey of spectroscopic binary candidates (19 systems consisting of an sdB star and late type companion) with the Planetary Camera of the WFPC2 onboard Hubble Space Telescope to test these scenarios. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that by imaging the programme stars in the R-band about one third of the sample (6-7 stars) should be resolved at a limiting angular resolution of 0.1 arcsec if they have linear separations like main sequence stars (``single star evolution''). None should be resolvable if all systems were produced by close binary evolution. In addition we expect three triple systems to be present in our sample. Most of these, if not all, should be resolvable. Components were resolved in 6 systems with separations between 0.2 arcsec and 4.5 arcsec. However, only in the two systems TON 139 and PG 1718+519 (separations 0.32 arcsec and 0.24 arcsec, respectively) do the magnitudes of the resolved components match the expectations from the deconvolution of the spectral energy distribution. These two stars could be physical binaries whereas in the other cases the nearby star may be a chance projection or a third component. Radial velocity measurements indicate that the resolved system TON 139 is a triple system, with the sdB having a close companion that does not contribute detectably to the integrated light of the system. Radial velocity information for the second resolved system, PG 1718+519, is insufficient. Assuming that it is not a triple system, it would be the only resolved system in our sample. Accordingly the success rate would be only 5% which is clearly below the prediction for single star evolution. We conclude that the distribution of separations of sdB binaries deviates strongly from that of normal stars. Our results

  15. Unification of Binary Star Ephemeris Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.; Van Hamme, W.

    2014-01-01

    Time-related binary system characteristics such as orbital period, its rate of change, apsidal motion, and variable light-time delay due to a third body, are measured in two ways that can be mutually complementary. The older way is via eclipse timings, while ephemerides by simultaneous whole light and velocity curve analysis have appeared recently. Each has its advantages, for example, eclipse timings typically cover relatively long time spans while whole curves often have densely packed data within specific intervals and allow access to systemic properties that carry additional timing information. Synthesis of the two information sources can be realized in a one step process that combines several data types, with automated weighting based on their standard deviations. Simultaneous light-velocity-timing solutions treat parameters of apsidal motion and the light-time effect coherently with those of period and period change, allow the phenomena to interact iteratively, and produce parameter standard errors based on the quantity and precision of the curves and timings. The logic and mathematics of the unification algorithm are given, including computation of theoretical conjunction times as needed for generation of eclipse timing residuals. Automated determination of eclipse type, recovery from inaccurate starting ephemerides, and automated data weighting are also covered. Computational examples are given for three timing-related cases—steady period change (XY Bootis), apsidal motion (V526 Sagittarii), and the light-time effect due to a binary's reflex motion in a triple system (AR Aurigae). Solutions for all combinations of radial velocity, light curve, and eclipse timing input show consistent results, with a few minor exceptions.

  16. Unification of binary star ephemeris solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R. E.; Van Hamme, W. E-mail: vanhamme@fiu.edu

    2014-01-10

    Time-related binary system characteristics such as orbital period, its rate of change, apsidal motion, and variable light-time delay due to a third body, are measured in two ways that can be mutually complementary. The older way is via eclipse timings, while ephemerides by simultaneous whole light and velocity curve analysis have appeared recently. Each has its advantages, for example, eclipse timings typically cover relatively long time spans while whole curves often have densely packed data within specific intervals and allow access to systemic properties that carry additional timing information. Synthesis of the two information sources can be realized in a one step process that combines several data types, with automated weighting based on their standard deviations. Simultaneous light-velocity-timing solutions treat parameters of apsidal motion and the light-time effect coherently with those of period and period change, allow the phenomena to interact iteratively, and produce parameter standard errors based on the quantity and precision of the curves and timings. The logic and mathematics of the unification algorithm are given, including computation of theoretical conjunction times as needed for generation of eclipse timing residuals. Automated determination of eclipse type, recovery from inaccurate starting ephemerides, and automated data weighting are also covered. Computational examples are given for three timing-related cases—steady period change (XY Bootis), apsidal motion (V526 Sagittarii), and the light-time effect due to a binary's reflex motion in a triple system (AR Aurigae). Solutions for all combinations of radial velocity, light curve, and eclipse timing input show consistent results, with a few minor exceptions.

  17. A Binary Model for the Emission Line Star FX Velorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, M.; Hunter, M.

    2015-06-01

    FX Vel is a southern, young variable star which shows large variations in brightness. In examining the environments where planets may form, disks around young stars provide important clues as to how long such disks might last. We discuss several possible scenarios for the structure of FX Vel, including a binary model similar to EE Cep and the possibility that FX Vel may be a UXor variable, a class of young stars with disks. This could also explain the colors and irregular variation in brightness of the star. We suggest FX Vel may be a blue straggler member of the open cluster ASCC48 based upon its position on the cluster CMD and proper motions. More data is required examine the alternate possibility of FX Vel being a member of Teutsch 101. A spectroscopic study of FX Vel would be valuable.

  18. Gravitational and Electromagnetic Emission from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Palenzuela, C.; Lehner, L.; Ponce, M.; Liebling, S. L.; Anderson, M.; Neilsen, D.

    2013-06-01

    The inspiral of a neutron star - neutron star binary is a leading candidate for strong emission of gravitational waves. The interaction between the stellar magnetospheres may also give rise to electromagnetic emissions accompanying the gravity waves as the neutron stars inspiral and merge. We present results from a set of resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of mergers computed with full general relativity. We vary the initial magnetic field of the neutron stars including cases where the fields are initially aligned, anit-aligned and where one star’s field dominates over its companion. This presentation is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant No. NNX13AH01G through the astrophysics theory program.

  19. SPECTROSCOPIC METALLICITY DETERMINATIONS FOR W UMa-TYPE BINARY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Pribulla, Theodor; Budaj, Jan E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2013-09-15

    This study is the first attempt to determine the metallicities of W UMa-type binary stars using spectroscopy. We analyzed about 4500 spectra collected at the David Dunlap Observatory. To circumvent problems caused by the extreme spectral line broadening and blending and by the relatively low quality of the data, all spectra were subject to the same broadening function (BF) processing to determine the combined line strength in the spectral window centered on the Mg I triplet between 5080 A and 5285 A. All individual integrated BFs were subsequently orbital-phase averaged to derive a single line-strength indicator for each star. The star sample was limited to 90 W UMa-type (EW) binaries with the strict phase-constancy of colors and without spectral contamination by spectroscopic companions. The best defined results were obtained for an F-type sub-sample (0.32 < (B - V){sub 0} < 0.62) of 52 binaries for which integrated BF strengths could be interpolated in the model atmosphere predictions. The logarithmic relative metallicities, [M/H], for the F-type sub-sample indicate metal abundances roughly similar to the solar metallicity, but with a large scatter which is partly due to combined random and systematic errors. Because of the occurrence of a systematic color trend resulting from inherent limitations in our approach, we were forced to set the absolute scale of metallicities to correspond to that derived from the m{sub 1} index of the Stroemgren uvby photometry for 24 binaries of the F-type sub-sample. The trend-adjusted metallicities [M/H]{sub 1} are distributed within -0.65 < [M/H]{sub 1} < +0.50, with the spread reflecting genuine metallicity differences between stars. One half of the F-sub-sample binaries have [M/H]{sub 1} within -0.37 < [M/H]{sub 1} < +0.10, a median of -0.04 and a mean of -0.10, with a tail toward low metallicities, and a possible bias against very high metallicities. A parallel study of kinematic data, utilizing the most reliable and recently

  20. Spectroscopic Metallicity Determinations for W UMa-type Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucinski, Slavek M.; Pribulla, Theodor; Budaj, Ján

    2013-09-01

    This study is the first attempt to determine the metallicities of W UMa-type binary stars using spectroscopy. We analyzed about 4500 spectra collected at the David Dunlap Observatory. To circumvent problems caused by the extreme spectral line broadening and blending and by the relatively low quality of the data, all spectra were subject to the same broadening function (BF) processing to determine the combined line strength in the spectral window centered on the Mg I triplet between 5080 Å and 5285 Å. All individual integrated BFs were subsequently orbital-phase averaged to derive a single line-strength indicator for each star. The star sample was limited to 90 W UMa-type (EW) binaries with the strict phase-constancy of colors and without spectral contamination by spectroscopic companions. The best defined results were obtained for an F-type sub-sample (0.32 < (B - V)0 < 0.62) of 52 binaries for which integrated BF strengths could be interpolated in the model atmosphere predictions. The logarithmic relative metallicities, [M/H], for the F-type sub-sample indicate metal abundances roughly similar to the solar metallicity, but with a large scatter which is partly due to combined random and systematic errors. Because of the occurrence of a systematic color trend resulting from inherent limitations in our approach, we were forced to set the absolute scale of metallicities to correspond to that derived from the m 1 index of the Strömgren uvby photometry for 24 binaries of the F-type sub-sample. The trend-adjusted metallicities [M/H]1 are distributed within -0.65 < [M/H]1 < +0.50, with the spread reflecting genuine metallicity differences between stars. One half of the F-sub-sample binaries have [M/H]1 within -0.37 < [M/H]1 < +0.10, a median of -0.04 and a mean of -0.10, with a tail toward low metallicities, and a possible bias against very high metallicities. A parallel study of kinematic data, utilizing the most reliable and recently obtained proper motion and radial

  1. Spectral Classification of Unresolved Binary Stars with Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Wm. Bruce

    2000-09-01

    An artificial neural network technique has been developed to perform two-dimensional spectral classification of the components of binary stars. The spectra are based on the 15 Å resolution near-infrared (NIR) spectral classification system described by Torres-Dodgen & Weaver. Using the spectrum with no manual intervention except wavelength registration, a single artificial neural network (ANN) can classify these spectra with Morgan-Keenan types with an average accuracy of about 2.5 types (subclasses) in temperature and about 0.45 classes in luminosity for up to 3 mag of difference in luminosity. The error in temperature classification does not increase substantially until the secondary contributes less than 10% of the light of the system. By following the coarse-classification ANN with a specialist ANN, the mean absolute errors are reduced to about 0.5 types in temperature and 0.33 classes in luminosity. The resulting ANN network was applied to seven binary stars.

  2. Cool and luminous transients from mass-losing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-02-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disc-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity vesc. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The resulting spiral stream becomes unbound for binary mass ratios 0.06 ≲ q ≲ 0.8. For synchronous binaries with non-degenerate components, the spiral-stream arms merge at a radius of ˜10a, where a is the binary semi-major axis, and the accompanying shock thermalizes about 10 per cent of the kinetic power of the outflow. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities reaching up to ˜106 L⊙ and effective temperatures spanning 500 ≲ Teff ≲ 6000 K, which is compatible with many of the class of recently discovered red transients such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catastrophic global cooling transition. The appearance of the transient is viewing angle-dependent due to vastly different optical depths parallel and perpendicular to the binary plane. We predict a correlation between the peak luminosity and the outflow velocity, which is roughly obeyed by the known red transients. Outflows from mass-losing binaries can produce luminous (105 L⊙) and cool (Teff ≲ 1500 K) transients lasting a year or longer, as has potentially been detected by Spitzer surveys of nearby galaxies.

  3. The Signature of Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos

    2011-04-01

    Black hole-neutron star (BHNS) binaries are key gravitational wave sources, merging in the frequency band to which Earth-based GW detectors are most sensitive. Furthermore, as possible candidates for short-hard gamma ray bursts, combined observations in both gravitational and electromagnetic bands of BHNS mergers is thus an exciting possibility. This talk will discuss results from simulations that account for gravitational and magnetic effects as well as connections with processes capable of explaining key features of gamma ray bursts.

  4. A catalogue of temperatures for Kepler eclipsing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Y.; Faedi, F.; Pollacco, D.

    2014-02-01

    We have combined the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalogue with information from the HES, KIS and 2MASS photometric surveys to produce spectral energy distribution fits to over 2600 eclipsing binaries in the catalogue over a wavelength range of 0.36-2.16 Å. We present primary (T1) and secondary (T2) stellar temperatures, plus information on the stellar radii and system distance ratios. The derived temperatures are on average accurate to 370 K in T1 and 620 K in T2. Our results improve on the similarly derived physical parameters of the Kepler Input Catalogue through consideration of both stars of the binary system rather than a single star model, and inclusion of additional U-band photometry. We expect these results to aid future uses of the Kepler eclipsing binary data, both in target selection and to inform users of the extremely high-precision light curves available. We do not include surface gravities or system metallicities, as these were found to have an insignificant effect on the observed photometric bands.

  5. RADIAL VELOCITY STUDIES OF CLOSE BINARY STARS. XV

    SciTech Connect

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Blake, R. M.; Lu, Wenxian; Thomson, J. R.; DeBond, Heide; Karmo, Toomas; De Ridder, Archie; Ogloza, Waldemar; Stachowski, Greg; Siwak, Michal E-mail: rucinski@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: karmo@astro.utoronto.ca E-mail: ogloza@ap.krakow.pl E-mail: siwak@oa.uj.edu.pl

    2009-03-15

    Radial velocity (RV) measurements and sine curve fits to the orbital RV variations are presented for the last eight close binary systems analyzed in the same way as in the previous papers of this series: QX And, DY Cet, MR Del, HI Dra, DD Mon, V868 Mon, ER Ori, and Y Sex. For another seven systems (TT Cet, AA Cet, CW Lyn, V563 Lyr, CW Sge, LV Vir, and MW Vir), phase coverage is insufficient to provide reliable orbits but RVs of individual components were measured. Observations of a few complicated systems observed throughout the David Dunlap Observatory (DDO) close binary program are also presented; among them is an especially interesting multiple system V857 Her which-in addition to the contact binary-very probably contains one or more subdwarf components of much earlier spectral type. All suspected binaries which were found to be most probably pulsating stars are briefly discussed in terms of mean RVs and projected rotation velocities (vsin i) as well as spectral-type estimates. In two of them, CU CVn and V752 Mon, the broadening functions show a clear presence of nonradial pulsations. The previously missing spectral types for Paper I are given here in addition to such estimates for most of the program stars of this paper.

  6. Kitt Peak Speckle Interferometry of Close Visual Binary Stars (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gener, R.; Rowe, D.; Smith, T. C.; Teiche, A.; Harshaw, R.; Wallace, D.; Weise, E.; Wiley, E.; Boyce, G.; Boyce, P.; Branston, D.; Chaney, K.; Clark, R. K.; Estrada, C.; Estrada, R.; Frey, T.; Green, W. L.; Haurberg, N.; Jones, G.; Kenney, J.; Loftin, S.; McGieson, I.; Patel, R.; Plummer, J.; Ridgely, J.; Trueblood, M.; Westergren, D.; Wren, P.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) Speckle interferometry can be used to overcome normal seeing limitations by taking many very short exposures at high magnification and analyzing the resulting speckles to obtain the position angles and separations of close binary stars. A typical speckle observation of a close binary consists of 1,000 images, each 20 milliseconds in duration. The images are stored as a multi-plane FITS cube. A portable speckle interferometry system that features an electron-multiplying CCD camera was used by the authors during two week-long observing runs on the 2.1-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory to obtain some 1,000 data cubes of close binaries selected from a dozen different research programs. Many hundreds of single reference stars were also observed and used in deconvolution to remove undesirable atmospheric and telescope optical effects. The database of well over one million images was reduced with the Speckle Interferometry Tool of platesolve3. A few sample results are provided. During the second Kitt Peak run, the McMath-Pierce 1.6- and 0.8-meter solar telescopes were evaluated for nighttime speckle interferometry, while the 0.8-meter Coude feed was used to obtain differential radial velocities of short arc binaries.

  7. VX Her: Eclipsing Binary System or Single Variable Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Kathleen; Castelaz, Michael; Henson, Gary; Boghozian, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    VX Her is a pulsating variable star with a period of .4556504 days. It is believed to be part of an eclipsing binary system (Fitch et al. 1966). This hypothesis originated from Fitch seeing VX Her's minimum point on its light curve reaching a 0.7 magnitude fainter than normal and remaining that way for nearly two hours. If VX Her were indeed a binary system, I would expect to see similar results with a fainter minimum and a broader, more horizontal dip. Having reduced and analyzed images from the Southeastern Association for Research in Astronomy Observatory in Chile and Kitt Peak, as well as images from a 0.15m reflector at East Tennessee State University, I found that VX Her has the standard light curve of the prototype variable star, RR Lyrae. Using photometry, I found no differing features in its light curve to suggest that it is indeed a binary system. However, more observations are needed in case VX Her is a wide binary.

  8. Single versus binary star progenitors of Type IIb supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sravan, Niharika

    2016-07-01

    Stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) represent a challenge to our understanding of massive star evolution. Wind mass loss and binary interactions are the leading candidates to explain observations. The latter has gained support in the recent years with growing evidence that mass-loss rates due to line-driven winds are, in reality, 2 - 3 times lower. Type IIb SNe retain a small amount of their Hydrogen envelope before undergoing core-collapse and are the only class of stripped-envelope SNe with identified progenitors. Thus they are powerful tools for testing our understanding of massive stellar evolution. To identify possible evolutionary pathways to Type IIb SNe, we use Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) to model a large population of single and binary star sequences covering a broad parameter space with a wide range of component masses and initial orbital periods and identify those that undergo core-collapse with 0.01 to 0.5 solar masses of residual Hydrogen envelope. We find no single star Type IIb progenitors in the parameter space covered. We find a few Type IIb binary progenitors. These sequences have initial mass ratios greater than 0.6, wide orbital periods and undergo non-conservative mass transfer.

  9. Linking electromagnetic and gravitational radiation in coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Ponce, Marcelo; Anderson, Matthew; Neilsen, David; Motl, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We expand on our study of the gravitational and electromagnetic emissions from the late stage of an inspiraling neutron star binary as presented in Palenzuela et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 061105 (2013)]. Interactions between the stellar magnetospheres, driven by the extreme dynamics of the merger, can yield considerable outflows. We study the gravitational and electromagnetic waves produced during the inspiral and merger of a binary neutron star system using a full relativistic, resistive magnetohydrodynamics evolution code. We show that the interaction between the stellar magnetospheres extracts kinetic energy from the system and powers radiative Poynting flux and heat dissipation. These features depend strongly on the configuration of the initial stellar magnetic moments. Our results indicate that this power can strongly outshine pulsars in binaries and have a distinctive angular and time-dependent pattern. Our discussion provides more detail than Palenzuela et al., showing clear evidence of the different effects taking place during the inspiral. Our simulations include a few milliseconds after the actual merger and study the dynamics of the magnetic fields during the formation of the hypermassive neutron star. We also briefly discuss the possibility of observing such emissions.

  10. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryer, Chris L.; Oliveira, F. G.; Rueda, J. A.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (Eiso≳1052 erg ), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs.

  11. Neutron-Star-Black-Hole Binaries Produced by Binary-Driven Hypernovae.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Chris L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Ruffini, R

    2015-12-01

    Binary-driven hypernovae (BdHNe) within the induced gravitational collapse paradigm have been introduced to explain energetic (E_{iso}≳10^{52}  erg), long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) associated with type Ic supernovae (SNe). The progenitor is a tight binary composed of a carbon-oxygen (CO) core and a neutron-star (NS) companion, a subclass of the newly proposed "ultrastripped" binaries. The CO-NS short-period orbit causes the NS to accrete appreciable matter from the SN ejecta when the CO core collapses, ultimately causing it to collapse to a black hole (BH) and producing a GRB. These tight binaries evolve through the SN explosion very differently than compact binaries studied in population synthesis calculations. First, the hypercritical accretion onto the NS companion alters both the mass and the momentum of the binary. Second, because the explosion time scale is on par with the orbital period, the mass ejection cannot be assumed to be instantaneous. This dramatically affects the post-SN fate of the binary. Finally, the bow shock created as the accreting NS plows through the SN ejecta transfers angular momentum, braking the orbit. These systems remain bound even if a large fraction of the binary mass is lost in the explosion (well above the canonical 50% limit), and even large kicks are unlikely to unbind the system. Indeed, BdHNe produce a new family of NS-BH binaries unaccounted for in current population synthesis analyses and, although they may be rare, the fact that nearly 100% remain bound implies that they may play an important role in the compact merger rate, important for gravitational waves that, in turn, can produce a new class of ultrashort GRBs. PMID:26684106

  12. The CHARA Catalog of Orbital Elements of Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. F.; McAlister, H. A.; Harvin, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Optical interferometry is entering a new age with several ground-based longbaseline observatories now making observations of unprecedented resolution. Interferometers bring a new level of resolution to bear on spectroscopic binaries, enabling the full extraction of the physical parameters for the component stars with high accuracy. In the case of double-lined systems, a geometrically determined orbital parallax becomes available as well. The first step in preparing to observe spectroscopic binaries is to list them, which has not been done since the 1989 publication of the Eighth Catalogue of the Orbital Elements of Spectroscopic Binaries by Batten, et al. (1989). We present a new catalog with roughly half again as many listings as the Eighth Catalog. Angular separation predictions are made for each catalog entry. The numbers of spectroscopic binaries available for study as a function of several important observational parameters are explored, and in particular, the number of spectroscopic binaries as a function of expected separation is discussed. CHARA gratefully acknowledges the support of the National Science Foundation, the offices of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Vice President for Research at Georgia State University, the W.M. Keck Foundation, and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

  13. Simulating binary neutron stars: Dynamics and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric W.; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick M.; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Tohline, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    We model two mergers of orbiting binary neutron stars, the first forming a black hole and the second a differentially rotating neutron star. We extract gravitational waveforms in the wave zone. Comparisons to a post-Newtonian analysis allow us to compute the orbital kinematics, including trajectories and orbital eccentricities. We verify our code by evolving single stars and extracting radial perturbative modes, which compare very well to results from perturbation theory. The Einstein equations are solved in a first-order reduction of the generalized harmonic formulation, and the fluid equations are solved using a modified convex essentially non-oscillatory method. All calculations are done in three spatial dimensions without symmetry assumptions. We use the had computational infrastructure for distributed adaptive mesh refinement.

  14. Magnetic Energy Production by Turbulence in Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrake, Jonathan; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2013-06-01

    The simultaneous detection of electromagnetic and gravitational wave emission from merging neutron star binaries would greatly aid in their discovery and interpretation. By studying turbulent amplification of magnetic fields in local high-resolution simulations of neutron star merger conditions, we demonstrate that magnetar-level (gsim 1016 G) fields are present throughout the merger duration. We find that the small-scale turbulent dynamo converts 60% of the randomized kinetic energy into magnetic fields on a merger timescale. Since turbulent magnetic energy dissipates through reconnection events that accelerate relativistic electrons, turbulence may facilitate the conversion of orbital kinetic energy into radiation. If 10-4 of the ~1053 erg of orbital kinetic available gets processed through reconnection and creates radiation in the 15-150 keV band, then the fluence at 200 Mpc would be 10-7 erg cm-2, potentially rendering most merging neutron stars in the advanced LIGO and Virgo detection volumes detectable by Swift BAT.

  15. Binary interactions with high accretion rates onto main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiber, Sagiv; Schreier, Ron; Soker, Noam

    2016-07-01

    Energetic outflows from main sequence stars accreting mass at very high rates might account for the powering of some eruptive objects, such as merging main sequence stars, major eruptions of luminous blue variables, e.g., the Great Eruption of Eta Carinae, and other intermediate luminosity optical transients (ILOTs; red novae; red transients). These powerful outflows could potentially also supply the extra energy required in the common envelope process and in the grazing envelope evolution of binary systems. We propose that a massive outflow/jets mediated by magnetic fields might remove energy and angular momentum from the accretion disk to allow such high accretion rate flows. By examining the possible activity of the magnetic fields of accretion disks, we conclude that indeed main sequence stars might accrete mass at very high rates, up to ≈ 10‑2 M ⊙ yr‑1 for solar type stars, and up to ≈ 1 M ⊙ yr‑1 for very massive stars. We speculate that magnetic fields amplified in such extreme conditions might lead to the formation of massive bipolar outflows that can remove most of the disk's energy and angular momentum. It is this energy and angular momentum removal that allows the very high mass accretion rate onto main sequence stars.

  16. Observed rotational properties of the O-type stars in 30 Doradus: single stars and binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernan Ramirez Agudelo, Oscar; Sana, Hugues; de Koter, Alex; Tramper, Frank; de Mink, Selma; Vlt-Flames Tarantula Survey

    2015-01-01

    The initial distribution of the spin rates of massive stars is a fingerprint of their formation process. The stellar spin rate is also one of the main properties that control the evolution and ultimate fate of these objects.Using ground-based multi-object optical spectroscopy obtained in the framework of the VLT/FLAMES Tarantula Survey we established the projected rotational velocities, vsini, of a sample of ~330 O-type objects located in the 30 Doradus (30 Dor) region in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The sample is composed by ~200 spectroscopic single stars and ~110 stars in binary systems (~110 primaries and ~30 secondaries). The vsini values are derived from the most commonly used methods, i.e. full-width at half-maximum, Fourier transform, and line profile fitting, applied to a set of spectral lines.The most distinctive feature of the vsini distributions of the presumed-single stars, primaries, and secondaries in 30 Dor is a low-velocity peak at around 100 km/s. Stellar winds are not expected to have spun-down the bulk of the stars significantly since their arrival on the main sequence and therefore the peak of presumed-single stars is likely to represent the outcome of the formation process. Whereas the spin distribution of presumed-single stars shows a well developed tail of stars rotating more rapidly than 300 km/s, primaries and secondaries do not feature such a high-velocity tail. The tail of the presumed-single star distribution is attributed for the most part -- and could potentially be completely due -- to spun-up binary products that appear as single stars or that have merged. This would be consistent with the lack of such post-interaction products in the binary sample, that is expected to be dominated by pre-interaction systems. The peak in this distribution is broader and is shifted toward somewhat higher spin rates compared to the distribution of spectroscopic-single stars. Systems displaying large radial velocity variations, typical for short period

  17. Generalized Solution for Binary Star Ephemerides and Apsidal Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hamme, W. V.; Wilson, R. E.

    1998-12-01

    We demonstrate generalized determination of apsidal motion rates (domega /dt's), orbital periods (P's), and period changes (dP/dt's) in binary stars. Our method can use eclipses but is not restricted to eclipse data. A general binary star program solves for domega /dt and/or ephemeris parameters together with other binary star quantities, and combines radial velocities and light curves within a coherent analysis. We can use data that may have large timewise gaps and may be far less than optimally distributed over time. The method is particularly useful when the apsidal period is long and eclipse timings cover only a small part of the cycle. We show apsidal motion results for AS Cam and find a domega /dt of 18.20+/-0.66 arcdeg /100;yr. This result compares to a domega /dt of 13.2+/-1.8 arcdeg /100;yr obtained from a traditional weighted least squares fit to almost 100 years of times of minima, which is 3.3 times smaller than predicted by theory. Other published estimates for the apsidal motion rate are 15.0+/-5.3 arcdeg /100;yr by Maloney, Guinan & Mukherjee (1991, AJ, 102, 256), and 18.3+/-2.6 arcdeg /100;yr by Wolf, \\u{S}arounova & Diethelm (1996, A&AS, 116, 463). Apsidal motion determined from times of minima depends on the value of the eccentricity e. Our result is for e = 0.1633, obtained from the light and velocity solution. The new domega /dt from the general analysis is 2.4 times smaller than theory, with a standard error 3 times smaller than in the traditional method. Our apsidal period of 1978+/-71 year is based on only 30 years of light and velocity curves, or 1.5% of the cycle. The method also works well in measuring period changes in long period giant binaries (such as symbiotics), considering that these stars are typically observed in fragments and that very few show eclipses that are useful as timing ticks. Our dP/dt results for the symbiotic binary AG Peg have implications for its future evolution. Natural extensions of the idea can include other

  18. Estimating the Binary Fraction of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douchin, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Planetary nebulae are the end-products of intermediate-mass stars evolution, following a phase of expansion of their atmospheres at the end of their lives. Observationally, it has been estimated that 80% of them have non-spherical shapes. Such a high fraction is puzzling and has occupied the planetary nebula community for more than 30 years. One scenario that would allow to justify the observed shapes is that a comparable fraction of the progenitors of central stars of planetary nebula (CSPN) are not single, but possess a companion. The shape of the nebulae would then be the result of an interaction with this companion. The high fraction of non-spherical planetary nebulae would thus imply a high fraction of binary central stars of planetary nebulae, making binarity a preferred channel for planetary nebula formation. After presenting the current state of knowledge regarding planetary nebula formation and shaping and reviewing the diverse efforts to find binaries in planetary nebulae, I present my work to detect a near-infrared excess that would be the signature of the presence of cool companions. The first part of the project consists in the analysis of data and photometry acquired and conducted by myself. The second part details an attempt to make use of archived datasets: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 optical survey and the extended database assembled by Frew (2008). I also present results from a radial velocity analysis of VLT/UVES spectra for 14 objects aiming to the detection of spectroscopic companions. Finally I give details of the analysis of optical photometry data from our observations associated to the detection of companions around central stars of planetary nebulae using the photometric variability technique. The main result of this thesis is from the near-infrared excess studies which I combine with previously published data. I conclude that if the detected red and NIR flux excess is indicative of a stellar companion then the binary

  19. Radial Velocity Studies of Close Binary Stars. XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Blake, R. M.; Lu, Wenxian; Thomson, J. R.; DeBond, Heide; Karmo, Toomas; De Ridder, Archie; Ogłoza, Waldemar; Stachowski, Greg; Siwak, Michal

    2009-03-01

    Radial velocity (RV) measurements and sine curve fits to the orbital RV variations are presented for the last eight close binary systems analyzed in the same way as in the previous papers of this series: QX And, DY Cet, MR Del, HI Dra, DD Mon, V868 Mon, ER Ori, and Y Sex. For another seven systems (TT Cet, AA Cet, CW Lyn, V563 Lyr, CW Sge, LV Vir, and MW Vir), phase coverage is insufficient to provide reliable orbits but RVs of individual components were measured. Observations of a few complicated systems observed throughout the David Dunlap Observatory (DDO) close binary program are also presented; among them is an especially interesting multiple system V857 Her which—in addition to the contact binary—very probably contains one or more subdwarf components of much earlier spectral type. All suspected binaries which were found to be most probably pulsating stars are briefly discussed in terms of mean RVs and projected rotation velocities (vsin i) as well as spectral-type estimates. In two of them, CU CVn and V752 Mon, the broadening functions show a clear presence of nonradial pulsations. The previously missing spectral types for Paper I are given here in addition to such estimates for most of the program stars of this paper. Based on the data obtained at the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE MOST LUMINOUS STAR IN M33: A SUPER SYMBIOTIC BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Mikołajewska, Joanna; Iłkiewicz, Krystian; Caldwell, Nelson; Shara, Michael M.

    2015-01-30

    We present the first spectrum of the most luminous infrared star in M33, and use it to demonstrate that the object is almost certainly a binary composed of a massive O star and a dust-enshrouded red hypergiant. This is the most luminous symbiotic binary ever discovered. Its radial velocity is an excellent match to that of the hydrogen gas in the disk of M33, supporting our interpretation that it is a very young and massive binary star.

  1. Equilibrium Structures of Differentially Rotating Primary Components of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, C.; Lal, A. K.; Singh, V. P.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper a method is proposed for computing the equilibrium structures and various other observable physical parameters of the primary components of stars in binary systems assuming that the primary is more massive than the secondary and is rotating differentially about its axis. Kippenhahn and Thomas averaging approach (1970) is used in a manner earlier used by Mohan, Saxena and Agarwal (1990) to incorporate the rotational and tidal effects in the equations of stellar structure. Explicit expressions for the distortional terms appearing in the stellar structure equations have been obtained by assuming a general law of differential rotation of the typeω2 = b 0+b 1 s 2+b 2 s 4, where ω is the angular velocity of rotation of a fluid element in the star at a distance s from the axis of rotation, and b 0, b 1, b 2 are suitably chosen numerical constants. The expressions incorporate the effects of differential rotation and tidal distortions up to second order terms. The use of the proposed method has been illustrated by applying it to obtain the structures and observable parameters of certain differentially rotating primary components of the binary stars assuming the primary components to have polytropic structures.

  2. Winds of Binary AGB Stars as Observed by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Jorissen, A.; Kerschbaum, F.; Ottensamer, R.; Mečina, M.; Paladini, C.; Cox, N. L. J.; Nowotny, W.; Aringer, B.; Pourbaix, D.; Mohamed, S.; Siopis, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.

    2015-08-01

    We present Herschel/PACS observations of the large-scale environments of binary AGB stars as part of the Mass-loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) sample. From the literature we found 18 of the objects to be members of physically bound multiple systems. Several show a large-scale far-IR emission which differs significantly from spherical symmetry. A probable cause is the gravitational force of the companion on the stellar AGB wind and the mass-losing star itself. A spiral pattern is thereby imprinted in the dusty stellar wind. The most remarkable structures are found around o Ceti, W Aquilæ, R Aquarii, and π1 Gruis. The environments of o Cet and W Aql show a spiral pattern while the symbiotic nature of R Aqr is revealed as two opposing arms which reflect a nova outburst. The emission around π1 Gru is dominated by two structures, a disk and an arc, which are presumably not caused by the same companion. We found evidence that π1 Gru is a hierarchical triple system in which a close companion attracts the AGB wind onto the orbital plane and the outer companion forms a spiral arm. These far-IR observations underline the role of a companion as a major external influence in creating asymmetric winds in the AGB phase, even before the star becomes a planetary nebula (PN).

  3. Phenomenological Modelling of a Group of Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, Ivan L.; Tkachenko, Mariia G.; Chinarova, Lidia L.

    2016-03-01

    Phenomenological modeling of variable stars allows determination of a set of the parameters, which are needed for classification in the "General Catalogue of Variable Stars" and similar catalogs. We apply a recent method NAV ("New Algol Variable") to eclipsing binary stars of different types. Although all periodic functions may be represented as Fourier series with an infinite number of coefficients, this is impossible for a finite number of the observations. Thus one may use a restricted Fourier series, i.e. a trigonometric polynomial (TP) of order s either for fitting the light curve, or to make a periodogram analysis. However, the number of parameters needed drastically increases with decreasing width of minimum. In the NAV algorithm, the special shape of minimum is used, so the number of parameters is limited to 10 (if the period and initial epoch are fixed) or 12 (not fixed). We illustrate the NAV method by application to a recently discovered Algol-type eclipsing variable 2MASS J11080308-6145589 (in the field of previously known variable star RS Car) and compare results to that obtained using the TP fits. For this system, the statistically optimal number of parameters is 44, but the fit is still worse than that of the NAV fit. Application to the system GSC 3692-00624 argues that the NAV fit is better than the TP one even for the case of EW-type stars with much wider eclipses. Model parameters are listed.

  4. Cool and Luminous Transients from Mass-Losing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejcha, Ondrej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tomida, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    We study transients produced by equatorial disk-like outflows from catastrophically mass-losing binary stars with an asymptotic velocity and energy deposition rate near the inner edge which are proportional to the binary escape velocity. As a test case, we present the first smoothed-particle radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the mass loss from the outer Lagrange point with realistic equation of state and opacities. The mass-losing binary outflows produce luminosities reaching up to 106 L⊙ and the effective temperatures are between 500 and 6000 K, which is compatible with those of many of the class of recently-discovered red transients such as V838 Mon and V1309 Sco. Dust readily forms in the outflow, potentially in a catastrophic global cooling transition. The appearance of the transient is viewing angle-dependent due to vastly different optical depths parallel and perpendicular to the binary plane. We predict a correlation between the peak luminosity and the outflow velocity, which is roughly obeyed by the known red transients.

  5. Electromagnetic Counterparts from Tilted Magnetized Binary Neutron-Stars Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Marcelo; Palenzuela, Carlos; Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, Matthew; Hirschmann, Eric W.; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Neilsen, David

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the interaction of magnetospheres in binary neutron star systems can radiate strongly electromagnetically. We study here a broader set of configurations accounting for tilted/misaligned dipoles in coalescing binaries and analyze the resulting Poynting flux and its correlation to the dynamics. In particular, the misalignment of the dipoles results in a very dynamic system with magnetic reconnections, sheer layers, and current sheets. The electromagnetic radiation displays a distinctive pulsating behaviour tied to the orbital dynamics and stellar dipole orientations and the overall power of this radiation. This work was supported by the NSF grants PHY-0969827 (LIU), PHY-0969811 (BYU), NASA's ATP grant NNX13AH01G, and NSERC through a Discovery Grant.

  6. Observational Investigations on Contact Binaries in Multiple-star Systems and Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.

    2013-01-01

    The W UMa-type contact binaries are strongly interacting systems whose components both fill their critical Roche lobes and share a convective common envelope. The models of contact binaries are bottlenecked due to too many uncertain parameters. In the 1960s and 1970s, the common convective envelope model was accepted after several fierce controversies. And then, the thermal relaxation oscillation (TRO) model, the discontinuity model, and the angular momentum loss (AML) model appeared. However, in the past forty years, there lacked remarkable advance. The coexistence of many unknown parameters blocks the theoretical development of contact binaries. A study on the contact binaries in multiple star systems and star clusters, which could provide lots of information for their formation and evolution, may be a potential growing point for understanding these objects. More and more evidence shows that many of contact binaries are located in multiple star systems and star clusters. In this thesis, we observed and analyzed contact binaries in the forementioned systems. The observational and theoretical studies for contact binary are also summarized briefly. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Three contact binaries V1128 Tau, GZ And, VW Boo which possess visual companions show periodic oscillations. The period ranges from 16.7 years to 46.5 years. These oscillations probably come from the orbital movement of a close third body. (2) Four contact binaries GSC 02393-00680, V396 Mon, FU Dra, SS Ari which do not have visual companions also present periodic oscillations. Whether they are real members of multiple star systems needs further investigations. These oscillations probably result from the orbital movement of a close M-type companion. (3) The periods of three contact binaries EQ Cep, ER Cep and V371 Cep in the old open cluster NGC 188 show a long-term increase. There is a cyclic period oscillation in ER Cep, with a period of 5.4 years. We find that the total mass of

  7. Visual Measurements of the Binary Star S 654

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Thomas; Achildiyev, Irina; Alduenda, Chandra; Bridgeman, Reid; Chamberlain, Rebecca; Hendrix, Alex

    2011-01-01

    A member of the faculty and students from The Evergreen State College, Olympia, Washington, participated in the 2010 summer astronomy workshop at Pine Mountain Observatory. They learned the proper techniques and skills required for measuring the separation and position angle of binary star S 654. They learned how to calibrate an astrometric eyepiece, make appropriate measurements, do a statistical analysis, and analyze the data. The separation and position angle values obtained were 69.9 arc seconds and 237 degrees, respectively. The percent difference for each value was less than 0.5% from the literature value.

  8. Quasiequilibrium sequences of binary neutron stars undergoing dynamical scalarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Keisuke; Shibata, Masaru; Buonanno, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    We calculate quasiequilibrium sequences of equal-mass, irrotational binary neutron stars in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity that admits dynamical scalarization. We model neutron stars with realistic equations of state (notably through piecewise polytropic equations of state). Using these quasiequilibrium sequences we compute the binary's scalar charge and binding energy versus orbital angular frequency. We find that the absolute value of the binding energy is smaller than in general relativity, differing at most by ˜14 % at high frequencies for the cases considered. We use the newly computed binding energy and the balance equation to estimate the number of gravitational-wave (GW) cycles during the adiabatic, quasicircular inspiral stage up to the end of the sequence, which is the last stable orbit or the mass-shedding point, depending on which comes first. We find that, depending on the scalar-tensor parameters, the number of GW cycles can be substantially smaller than in general relativity. In particular, we obtain that when dynamical scalarization sets in around a GW frequency of ˜130 Hz , the sole inclusion of the scalar-tensor binding energy causes a reduction of GW cycles from ˜120 Hz up to the end of the sequence (˜1200 Hz ) of ˜11 % with respect to the general-relativity case. (The number of GW cycles from ˜120 Hz to the end of the sequence in general relativity is ˜270 .) We estimate that when the scalar-tensor energy flux is also included the reduction in GW cycles becomes of ˜24 %. Quite interestingly, dynamical scalarization can produce a difference in the number of GW cycles with respect to the general-relativity point-particle case that is much larger than the effect due to tidal interactions, which is on the order of only a few GW cycles. These results further clarify and confirm recent studies that have evolved binary neutron stars either in full numerical relativity or in post-Newtonian theory, and point out the importance of developing

  9. Binary Neutron Star Mergers: Prospects for Multimessenger Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebling, Steven; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Motl, Patrick; Neilsen, David; Palenzuela, Carlos; Ponce, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    We evolve a binary system of two, equal-mass neutron stars in a quasi-circular orbit through and past merger. We consider different nuclear equations of state, which vary from soft to quite stiff, and allow for magnetization of the system and neutrino cooling via a leakage scheme. Here, I focus on potential observables, other than gravitational waves, produced mainly by the hot, strongly magnetized matter resulting from the merger and study their dependence on both the equation of state and the initial magnetic field strength.

  10. Gravitational radiation from primordial solitons and soliton-star binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that both the formation of nontopological solitons in a primordial second-order phase transition and binary systems of soliton stars could generate a stochastic gravitational-wave background is examined. The present contribution of gravitational radiation to the energy density of the universe from these processes is estimated for a number of different models. The detectability of such contributions from the timing measurements of the millisecond pulsar and spaceborne laser interferometry is briefly discussed and compared to other cosmological and local sources of background gravitational waves.

  11. Systematic parameter errors in inspiraling neutron star binaries.

    PubMed

    Favata, Marc

    2014-03-14

    The coalescence of two neutron stars is an important gravitational wave source for LIGO and other detectors. Numerous studies have considered the precision with which binary parameters (masses, spins, Love numbers) can be measured. Here I consider the accuracy with which these parameters can be determined in the presence of systematic errors due to waveform approximations. These approximations include truncation of the post-Newtonian (PN) series and neglect of neutron star (NS) spin, tidal deformation, or orbital eccentricity. All of these effects can yield systematic errors that exceed statistical errors for plausible parameter values. In particular, neglecting spin, eccentricity, or high-order PN terms causes a significant bias in the NS Love number. Tidal effects will not be measurable with PN inspiral waveforms if these systematic errors are not controlled. PMID:24679276

  12. Systematic Parameter Errors in Inspiraling Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Marc

    2014-03-01

    The coalescence of two neutron stars is an important gravitational wave source for LIGO and other detectors. Numerous studies have considered the precision with which binary parameters (masses, spins, Love numbers) can be measured. Here I consider the accuracy with which these parameters can be determined in the presence of systematic errors due to waveform approximations. These approximations include truncation of the post-Newtonian (PN) series and neglect of neutron star (NS) spin, tidal deformation, or orbital eccentricity. All of these effects can yield systematic errors that exceed statistical errors for plausible parameter values. In particular, neglecting spin, eccentricity, or high-order PN terms causes a significant bias in the NS Love number. Tidal effects will not be measurable with PN inspiral waveforms if these systematic errors are not controlled.

  13. Hybridizing Gravitationl Waveforms of Inspiralling Binary Neutron Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Torrey; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves are ripples in space and time and were predicted to be produced by astrophysical systems such as binary neutron stars by Albert Einstein. These are key targets for Laser Interferometer and Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), which uses template waveforms to find weak signals. The simplified template models are known to break down at high frequency, so I wrote code that constructs hybrid waveforms from numerical simulations to accurately cover a large range of frequencies. These hybrid waveforms use Post Newtonian template models at low frequencies and numerical data from simulations at high frequencies. They are constructed by reading in existing Post Newtonian models with the same masses as simulated stars, reading in the numerical data from simulations, and finding the ideal frequency and alignment to ``stitch'' these waveforms together.

  14. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2012-08-15

    V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  15. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR HY VIRGINIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Fekel, Francis C. E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2011-12-15

    HY Vir is found to be a double-lined F0m+F5 binary star with relatively shallow (0.3 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7509 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 8862 from the NFO WebScope, and 68 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope, and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Very accurate (better than 0.5%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the new light curves and radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 1.35 Gy.

  16. The Challenge of Observing the Zeta Aurigae Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melillo, Frank J.

    2013-07-01

    This author, in Holtsville, NY, has contributed to the observations of the Zeta Auriga binary stars, which included Zeta Aurigae itself and 32 Cygni. Both Zeta Aur and 32 Cygni were monitored in V and B bands during the most recent eclipses in the fall of 2011 and in late summer 2012, respectively. In addition, some spectra of both stars were captured to monitor the brightness in the near-UV section, that traces the hot companion being eclipsed. The lightcurves of both Zeta Aurigae and 32 Cygni show precise timing during the entire recent eclipses. The magnitude and duration of the eclipses in photometric V and B bands are described here, and forecasts made for future eclipses. This poster represents the work by Frank J Melillo and the observations were spaced closely enough to generate the true shape of the V and B lightcurves.

  17. Binary dynamics on star networks under external perturbations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Carolina A; Schneider, David M; de Aguiar, Marcus A M

    2015-10-01

    We study a binary dynamical process that is a representation of the voter model with two candidates and opinion makers. The voters are represented by nodes of a network of social contacts with internal states labeled 0 or 1 and nodes that are connected can influence each other. The network is also perturbed by opinion makers, a set of external nodes whose states are frozen in 0 or 1 and that can influence all nodes of the network. The quantity of interest is the probability of finding m nodes in state 1 at time t. Here we study this process on star networks, which are simple representations of hubs found in complex systems, and compare the results with those obtained for networks that are fully connected. In both cases a transition from disordered to ordered equilibrium states is observed as the number of external nodes becomes small. For fully connected networks the probability distribution becomes uniform at the critical point. For star networks, on the other hand, we show that the equilibrium distribution splits in two peaks, reflecting the two possible states of the central node. We obtain approximate analytical solutions for the equilibrium distribution that clarify the role of the central node in the process. We show that the network topology also affects the time scale of oscillations in single realizations of the dynamics, which are much faster for the star network. Finally, extending the analysis to two stars we compare our results with simulations in simple scale-free networks. PMID:26565294

  18. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star V501 Herculis

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C. E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu

    2014-10-01

    V501 Her is a well detached G3 eclipsing binary star with a period of 8.597687 days for which we have determined very accurate light and radial-velocity curves using robotic telescopes. Results of these data indicate that the component stars have masses of 1.269 ± 0.004 and 1.211 ± 0.003 solar masses, radii of 2.001 ± 0.003 and 1.511 ± 0.003 solar radii, and temperatures of 5683 ± 100 K and 5720 ± 100 K, respectively. Comparison with the Yonsei-Yale series of evolutionary models results in good agreement at an age of about 5.1 Gyr for a somewhat metal-rich composition. Those models indicate that the more massive, larger, slightly cooler star is just beyond core hydrogen exhaustion while the less massive, smaller, slightly hotter star has not quite reached core hydrogen exhaustion. The orbit is not yet circularized, and the components are rotating at or near their pseudosynchronous velocities. The distance to the system is 420 ± 30 pc.

  19. Binary dynamics on star networks under external perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, Carolina A.; Schneider, David M.; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    2015-10-01

    We study a binary dynamical process that is a representation of the voter model with two candidates and opinion makers. The voters are represented by nodes of a network of social contacts with internal states labeled 0 or 1 and nodes that are connected can influence each other. The network is also perturbed by opinion makers, a set of external nodes whose states are frozen in 0 or 1 and that can influence all nodes of the network. The quantity of interest is the probability of finding m nodes in state 1 at time t . Here we study this process on star networks, which are simple representations of hubs found in complex systems, and compare the results with those obtained for networks that are fully connected. In both cases a transition from disordered to ordered equilibrium states is observed as the number of external nodes becomes small. For fully connected networks the probability distribution becomes uniform at the critical point. For star networks, on the other hand, we show that the equilibrium distribution splits in two peaks, reflecting the two possible states of the central node. We obtain approximate analytical solutions for the equilibrium distribution that clarify the role of the central node in the process. We show that the network topology also affects the time scale of oscillations in single realizations of the dynamics, which are much faster for the star network. Finally, extending the analysis to two stars we compare our results with simulations in simple scale-free networks.

  20. Rotating and binary relativistic stars with magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, Charalampos

    We develop a geometrical treatment of general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics for perfectly conducting fluids in Einstein--Maxwell--Euler spacetimes. The theory is applied to describe a neutron star that is rotating or is orbiting a black hole or another neutron star. Under the hypotheses of stationarity and axisymmetry, we obtain the equations governing magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of rotating neutron stars with poloidal, toroidal or mixed magnetic fields. Under the hypothesis of an approximate helical symmetry, we obtain the first law of thermodynamics governing magnetized equilibria of double neutron star or black hole - neutron star systems in close circular orbits. The first law is written as a relation between the change in the asymptotic Noether charge deltaQ and the changes in the area and electric charge of black holes, and in the vorticity, baryon rest mass, entropy, charge and magnetic flux of the magnetofluid. In an attempt to provide a better theoretical understanding of the methods used to construct models of isolated rotating stars and corotating or irrotational binaries and their unexplained convergence properties, we analytically examine the behavior of different iterative schemes near a static solution. We find the spectrum of the linearized iteration operator and show for self-consistent field methods that iterative instability corresponds to unstable modes of this operator. On the other hand, we show that the success of iteratively stable methods is due to (quasi-)nilpotency of this operator. Finally, we examine the integrability of motion of test particles in a stationary axisymmetric gravitational field. We use a direct approach to seek nontrivial constants of motion polynomial in the momenta---in addition to energy and angular momentum about the symmetry axis. We establish the existence and uniqueness of quadratic constants and the nonexistence of quartic constants for stationary axisymmetric Newtonian potentials with equatorial symmetry

  1. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. II. 2165 ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE SECOND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Slawson, Robert W.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Prsa, Andrej; Engle, Scott G.; Conroy, Kyle; Coughlin, Jared; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Gregg, Trevor A.; Fetherolf, Tara; Short, Donald R.; Windmiller, Gur; Rucker, Michael; Batalha, Natalie; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Mullally, F.; Seader, Shawn E.

    2011-11-15

    The Kepler Mission provides nearly continuous monitoring of {approx}156,000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. Coincident with the first data release, we presented a catalog of 1879 eclipsing binary systems identified within the 115 deg{sup 2} Kepler field of view (FOV). Here, we provide an updated catalog augmented with the second Kepler data release which increases the baseline nearly fourfold to 125 days. Three hundred and eighty-six new systems have been added, ephemerides and principal parameters have been recomputed. We have removed 42 previously cataloged systems that are now clearly recognized as short-period pulsating variables and another 58 blended systems where we have determined that the Kepler target object is not itself the eclipsing binary. A number of interesting objects are identified. We present several exemplary cases: four eclipsing binaries that exhibit extra (tertiary) eclipse events; and eight systems that show clear eclipse timing variations indicative of the presence of additional bodies bound in the system. We have updated the period and galactic latitude distribution diagrams. With these changes, the total number of identified eclipsing binary systems in the Kepler FOV has increased to 2165, 1.4% of the Kepler target stars. An online version of this catalog is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  2. The VLT Unravels the Nature of the Fastest Binary Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    Two Hot White Dwarfs Perform a Tight Dance Summary Observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile and the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) on the Canary Islands during the past two years have enabled an international group of astronomers [1] to unravel the true nature of an exceptional binary stellar system. This system, designated RX J0806.3+1527 , was first discovered as an X-ray source of variable brightness - once every five minutes, it "switches off" for a short moment. The new observations have shown beyond doubt that this period reflects the orbital motion of two "white dwarf" stars that revolve around each other at a distance of only 80,000 km . Each of the stars is about as large as the Earth and this is the shortest orbital period known for any binary stellar system. The VLT spectrum displays lines of ionized helium, indicating that the presence of an exceedingly hot area on one of the stars - a "hot spot" with a temperature of approx. 250,000 degrees. The system is currently in a rarely seen, transitory evolutionary state . PR Photo 10a/02 : U- and R-band images of RX J0806.3+1527. PR Photo 10b/02 : Spectrum of RX J0806.3+1527 An amazing stellar binary system ESO PR Photo 10a/02 ESO PR Photo 10a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 400 pix - 440k] [Normal - JPEG: 1600 x 800 pix - 1.1M] Caption : PR Photo 10a/02 shows U and R filter images of the sky field around RX J0806.3+1527 (at centre of circle), obtained with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument on VLT KUEYEN. The object is brightest at the shorter wavelength (U-band) - reflecting its very high temperature. Technical information about the photo is available below. One year is the time it takes the Earth to move once around the Sun, our central star. This may seem quite fast when measured on the scale of the Universe, but this is a snail's motion compared to the the speed of two recently discovered stars. They revolve around each other 100,000 times faster; one full revolution takes only 321

  3. Using stellar population models with binary stars to study the early type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhang

    2015-08-01

    The stellar mass, mean ages, metallicities and star formation histories of galaxy are now commonly determined via fitting multiband photometric properties of galaxies to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of stellar population models. The stellar population models are still poorly calibrated for certain stellar evolution stages, especially for the treatment of binary stars, which are very common in the Universe and their evolution is very different from single stars. In this work, we use the stellar population with and without binary stars to study the star formation histories (SFHs) for early type galaxies sample. Our results show that for the SFHs obtained by models with binary star are different from that without binary stars for 10% galaxy sample.

  4. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  5. Investigating Binary Wolf-Rayet Binary Stars as Potential Gamma-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, Jacqueline; Alexander, Michael J.; McSwain, M. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Wolf-Rayets are massive, hot, and luminous evolved stars with strong stellar winds. When paired with another massive star emitting strong stellar winds, the region where their winds collide produces a bow shock that may emit gamma-rays. This work seeks to find such a colliding wind binary by correlating the orbital period of a binary Wolf-Rayet with periodic changes in flux in nearby gamma-ray sources observed by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Telescope (LAT). We selected three binary Wolf-Rayet stars for analysis. WR 39 and WR 48 are in close proximity to unassociated sources from the LAT 2-Year Point Source Catalog (2FGL). WR 140 was selected on the basis of being a double-lined spectroscopic binary; the close passage of the two stars may contribute to colliding winds that could produce gamma-rays. We first used the Fermi Science Tools to calculate average flux values. The orbital period of WR 39 has not been established; so rather than creating a folded light curve, photon data for its proposed 2FGL counterpart were next analyzed using seven-day time bins in an attempt to use periodic behavior in the 2FGL source to find the orbital period of WR 39. However, no periodic behavior was evident in the plotted data. Since WR 48 lies just outside error ellipse of its proposed 2FGL counterpart, we performed the six-year likelihood analysis twice. First, WR 48 was manually inserted as a point source; this resulted in a non-converging fit. Instead, we used the proposed 2FGL counterpart as the object of interest. After calculating the average flux, we separated the photon data into phase bins based on the 18.34 day period of WR 48. The resulting folded light curve does not show any periodic behavior. WR 140 was also manually inserted as a point source; the analysis of the six-year data set failed to establish the existence of a gamma-ray source at the location of WR 140 and no further analysis was performed on this source.This research took place at Lehigh

  6. Merging compact binaries in hierarchical triple systems: Resonant excitation of binary eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Lai, Dong; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2015-12-01

    We study the secular dynamics of compact binaries (consisting of white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes) with tertiary companions in hierarchical triple systems. As the inner binary (with initially negligible eccentricity) undergoes orbital decay due to gravitational radiation, its eccentricity can be excited by gravitational forcing from the tertiary. This excitation occurs when the triple system passes through an "apsidal precession resonance," when the precession rate of the inner binary, driven by the gravitational perturbation of the external companion and general relativity, matches the precession rate of the outer binary. The eccentricity excitation requires the outer companion to be on an eccentric orbit, with the mutual inclination between the inner and outer orbits less than ˜40 ° . Gravitational wave (GW) signals from the inner binary can be significantly modified as the system evolves through the apsidal precession resonance. For some system parameters (e.g., a white dwarf binary with a brown dwarf tertiary), the resonance can happen when the binary emits GWs in the 10-4-10-1 Hz range (the sensitivity band of LISA).

  7. Dynamical mass ejection from binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, David; Galeazzi, Filippo; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    We present fully general-relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers with a temperature and composition dependent nuclear equation of state. We study the dynamical mass ejection from both quasi-circular and dynamical-capture eccentric mergers. We systematically vary the level of our treatment of the microphysics to isolate the effects of neutrino cooling and heating and we compute the nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta. We find that eccentric binaries can eject significantly more material than quasi-circular binaries and generate bright infrared and radio emission. In all our simulations the outflow is composed of a combination of tidally- and shock-driven ejecta, mostly distributed over a broad $\\sim 60^\\circ$ angle from the orbital plane, and, to a lesser extent, by thermally driven winds at high latitudes. Ejecta from eccentric mergers are typically more neutron rich than those of quasi-circular mergers. We find neutrino cooling and heating to affect, quantitatively and qualitatively, composition, morphology, and total mass of the outflows. This is also reflected in the infrared and radio signatures of the binary. The final nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta are robust and insensitive to input physics or merger type in the regions of the second and third r-process peaks. The yields for elements on the first peak vary between our simulations, but none of our models is able to explain the Solar abundances of first-peak elements without invoking additional first-peak contributions from either neutrino and viscously-driven winds operating on longer timescales after the mergers, or from core-collapse supernovae.

  8. Dynamical mass ejection from binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, David; Galeazzi, Filippo; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    We present fully general-relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers with a temperature and composition dependent nuclear equation of state. We study the dynamical mass ejection from both quasi-circular and dynamical-capture eccentric mergers. We systematically vary the level of our treatment of the microphysics to isolate the effects of neutrino cooling and heating and we compute the nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta. We find that eccentric binaries can eject significantly more material than quasi-circular binaries and generate bright infrared and radio emission. In all our simulations the outflow is composed of a combination of tidally- and shock-driven ejecta, mostly distributed over a broad ˜60° angle from the orbital plane, and, to a lesser extent, by thermally driven winds at high latitudes. Ejecta from eccentric mergers are typically more neutron rich than those of quasi-circular mergers. We find neutrino cooling and heating to affect, quantitatively and qualitatively, composition, morphology, and total mass of the outflows. This is also reflected in the infrared and radio signatures of the binary. The final nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta are robust and insensitive to input physics or merger type in the regions of the second and third r-process peaks. The yields for elements on the first peak vary between our simulations, but none of our models is able to explain the Solar abundances of first-peak elements without invoking additional first-peak contributions from either neutrino and viscously-driven winds operating on longer time-scales after the mergers, or from core-collapse supernovae.

  9. Dynamical Mass Ejection from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, David; Galeazzi, Filippo; Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.; Ott, Christian D.; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2016-05-01

    We present fully general-relativistic simulations of binary neutron star mergers with a temperature and composition dependent nuclear equation of state. We study the dynamical mass ejection from both quasi-circular and dynamical-capture eccentric mergers. We systematically vary the level of our treatment of the microphysics to isolate the effects of neutrino cooling and heating and we compute the nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta. We find that eccentric binaries can eject significantly more material than quasi-circular binaries and generate bright infrared and radio emission. In all our simulations the outflow is composed of a combination of tidally- and shock-driven ejecta, mostly distributed over a broad ˜60° angle from the orbital plane, and, to a lesser extent, by thermally driven winds at high latitudes. Ejecta from eccentric mergers are typically more neutron rich than those of quasi-circular mergers. We find neutrino cooling and heating to affect, quantitatively and qualitatively, composition, morphology, and total mass of the outflows. This is also reflected in the infrared and radio signatures of the binary. The final nucleosynthetic yields of the ejecta are robust and insensitive to input physics or merger type in the regions of the second and third r-process peaks. The yields for elements on the first peak vary between our simulations, but none of our models is able to explain the Solar abundances of first-peak elements without invoking additional first-peak contributions from either neutrino and viscously-driven winds operating on longer timescales after the mergers, or from core-collapse supernovae.

  10. The VLT Unravels the Nature of the Fastest Binary Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    Two Hot White Dwarfs Perform a Tight Dance Summary Observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile and the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) on the Canary Islands during the past two years have enabled an international group of astronomers [1] to unravel the true nature of an exceptional binary stellar system. This system, designated RX J0806.3+1527 , was first discovered as an X-ray source of variable brightness - once every five minutes, it "switches off" for a short moment. The new observations have shown beyond doubt that this period reflects the orbital motion of two "white dwarf" stars that revolve around each other at a distance of only 80,000 km . Each of the stars is about as large as the Earth and this is the shortest orbital period known for any binary stellar system. The VLT spectrum displays lines of ionized helium, indicating that the presence of an exceedingly hot area on one of the stars - a "hot spot" with a temperature of approx. 250,000 degrees. The system is currently in a rarely seen, transitory evolutionary state . PR Photo 10a/02 : U- and R-band images of RX J0806.3+1527. PR Photo 10b/02 : Spectrum of RX J0806.3+1527 An amazing stellar binary system ESO PR Photo 10a/02 ESO PR Photo 10a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 400 pix - 440k] [Normal - JPEG: 1600 x 800 pix - 1.1M] Caption : PR Photo 10a/02 shows U and R filter images of the sky field around RX J0806.3+1527 (at centre of circle), obtained with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument on VLT KUEYEN. The object is brightest at the shorter wavelength (U-band) - reflecting its very high temperature. Technical information about the photo is available below. One year is the time it takes the Earth to move once around the Sun, our central star. This may seem quite fast when measured on the scale of the Universe, but this is a snail's motion compared to the the speed of two recently discovered stars. They revolve around each other 100,000 times faster; one full revolution takes only 321

  11. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    This NASA grant covered EUVE observing and data analysis programs during EUVE Cycle 5 GO observing. The research involved a single Guest Observer project 97-EUVE-061 "Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of Active Binary Stars". The grant provided funding that covered 1.25 months of the PI's salary. The activities undertaken included observation planning and data analysis (both temporal and spectral). This project was awarded 910 ksec of observing time to study seven active binary stars, all but one of which were actually observed. Lambda-And was observed on 1997 Jul 30 - Aug 3 and Aug 7-14 for a total of 297 ksec; these observations showed two large complex flares that were analyzed by Osten & Brown (1999). AR Psc, observed for 350 ksec on 1997 Aug 27 - Sep 13, showed only relatively small flares that were also discussed by Osten & Brown (1999). EUVE observations of El Eri were obtained on 1994 August 24-28, simultaneous with ASCA X-ray spectra. Four flares were detected by EUVE with one of these also observed simultaneously, by ASCA. The other three EUVE observations were of the stars BY Dra (1997 Sep 22-28), V478 Lyr (1998 May 18-27), and sigma Gem (1998 Dec 10-22). The first two stars showed a few small flares. The sigma Gem data shows a beautiful complete flare with a factor of ten peak brightness compared to quiescence. The flare rise and almost all the decay phase are observed. Unfortunately no observations in other spectral regions were obtained for these stars. Analysis of the lambda-And and AR Psc observations is complete and the results were published in Osten & Brown (1999). Analysis of the BY Dra, V478 Lyr and sigma Gem EUVE data is complete and will be published in Osten (2000, in prep.). The El Eri EUV analysis is also completed and the simultaneous EUV/X-ray study will be published in Osten et al. (2000, in prep.). Both these latter papers will be submitted in summer 2000. All these results will form part of Rachel Osten's PhD thesis.

  12. Merging binary stars and the magnetic white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Gordon P.; Ferrario, Lilia; Tout, Christopher A.; Wickramasinghe, Dayal T.; Hurley, Jarrod R.

    2015-02-01

    A magnetic dynamo driven by differential rotation generated when stars merge can explain strong fields in certain classes of magnetic stars, including the high field magnetic white dwarfs (HFMWDs). In their case the site of the differential rotation has been variously proposed to be within a common envelope, the massive hot outer regions of a merged degenerate core or an accretion disc formed by a tidally disrupted companion that is subsequently incorporated into a degenerate core. We synthesize a population of binary systems to investigate the stellar merging hypothesis for observed single HFMWDs. Our calculations provide mass distribution and the fractions of white dwarfs that merge during a common envelope phase or as double degenerate systems in a post-common-envelope phase. We vary the common envelope efficiency parameter α and compare with observations. We find that this hypothesis can explain both the observed incidence of magnetism and the mass distribution of HFMWDs for a wide range of α. In this model, the majority of the HFMWDs are of the carbon-oxygen type and merge within a common envelope. Less than about a quarter of a per cent of HFMWDs originate from double degenerate stars that merge after common envelope evolution and these populate the high-mass tail of the HFMWD mass distribution.

  13. MAGNETIC ENERGY PRODUCTION BY TURBULENCE IN BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zrake, Jonathan; MacFadyen, Andrew I.

    2013-06-01

    The simultaneous detection of electromagnetic and gravitational wave emission from merging neutron star binaries would greatly aid in their discovery and interpretation. By studying turbulent amplification of magnetic fields in local high-resolution simulations of neutron star merger conditions, we demonstrate that magnetar-level ({approx}> 10{sup 16} G) fields are present throughout the merger duration. We find that the small-scale turbulent dynamo converts 60% of the randomized kinetic energy into magnetic fields on a merger timescale. Since turbulent magnetic energy dissipates through reconnection events that accelerate relativistic electrons, turbulence may facilitate the conversion of orbital kinetic energy into radiation. If 10{sup -4} of the {approx}10{sup 53} erg of orbital kinetic available gets processed through reconnection and creates radiation in the 15-150 keV band, then the fluence at 200 Mpc would be 10{sup -7} erg cm{sup -2}, potentially rendering most merging neutron stars in the advanced LIGO and Virgo detection volumes detectable by Swift BAT.

  14. ellc: Light curve model for eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.

    2016-03-01

    ellc analyzes the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems. The model represents stars as triaxial ellipsoids, and the apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The code can also calculate the fluxweighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). ellc can model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and can enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing.

  15. Dynamics of primordial binary stars in multiple-population globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jongsuk; Vesperini, Enrico; Sollima, Antonio; McMillan, Steve; D'Antona, Franca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2016-02-01

    We have performed a survey of N-body simulations to explore the dynamics of primordial binaries in multiple-population globular clusters. We show that, as a consequence of the initial differences between the spatial distribution of first-generation (FG) and second-generation (SG) stars, SG binaries are disrupted more efficiently than FG binaries. The effects of dynamical evolution on the surviving binaries produces a difference between the SG and the FG binary binding energy distribution with the SG population characterized by a larger fraction of high binding energy (more bound) binaries. We also explore the evolution of the radial variation of the SG-to-FG binary number ratio and find that although the global binary fraction decreases more rapidly for the SG population, the local binary fraction measured in the cluster inner regions may still be dominated by SG binaries.

  16. Are either X Her or g Her Binary Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawl, Stephen J.; Scarfe, C.

    2007-12-01

    X Her (HD 144205) and g Her (HD 148783) were observed by Shawl (AJ, 80, 602, 1975) to exhibit polarization position angles that varied with time in peculiar ways. For example, for X Her, the variations in the B- and I-filters were significant and uncorrelated, while for g Her a possible periodic position angle variation was found. At the time of that work, a literature search found no papers indicating that either star was binary, which conceivably could explain the observed variations. For this reason, in spring 2001 these stars were placed on the observing list of the second author to obtain high precision radial velocities (2001-2003 using the DAO radial velocity scanner, while from 2004 onward using a CCD). The velocity errors are estimated to be les than 1 km/s. Nearly 100 observations were collected over a range of 2343 days. After we began collecting data, Hinkle et al. (AJ 123, 1002, 2002) published a paper that included radial velocity observations of both our program stars. For both stars they had 25 spectra during 1849 days between 1995 and 2000. X Her showed obvious velocity variations with a 666 day period. Lebzelter (Astron. Astrophys 351, 644, 1999) obtained a finer grid of data and found some complex short-period variations. For g Her, they found an 838 day period, which is consistent with the long-period variation in the V-band. We will present the interim results of our analysis of the more recent data. * Guest observer at the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada.

  17. Database of candidates for RR Lyrae stars in binary systems - RRLyrBinCan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liska, J.; Skarka, M.

    2016-05-01

    A new on-line database with RR Lyrae stars bound in binary systems is presented. Its purpose is to give a quick overview about known and suspected RR Lyrae stars in binaries on the basis of available literature. The first released version of the catalogue contains information about 61 double-star candidates, their orbital periods, method of detection, comments and active links to published papers.

  18. Gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yun; Stebbins, Albert; Turner, Edwin L.

    1996-05-01

    We discuss the gravitational lensing of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries, in the context of advanced LIGO type gravitational wave detectors. We consider properties of the expected observational data with cut on the signal-to-noise ratio \\rho, i.e., \\rho>\\rho_0. An advanced LIGO should see unlensed inspiral events with a redshift distribution with cut-off at a redshift z_{\\rm max} < 1 for h \\leq 0.8. Any inspiral events detected at z>z_{\\rm max} should be lensed. We compute the expected total number of events which are present due to gravitational lensing and their redshift distribution for an advanced LIGO in a flat Universe. If the matter fraction in compact lenses is close to 10\\%, an advanced LIGO should see a few strongly lensed events per year with \\rho >5.

  19. Observational Study of the Evolution of Massive Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burki, G.; Mayor, M.

    Six years ago an observational program on supergiant stars using CORAVEL was initiated at Geneva Observatory. About 1500 radial velocities were obtained out of a sample of 181 northern supergiants of F, G, K, M type. Nineteen new SB have been discovered and 16 others are suspected to be SB. From the catalogue of Batten et al. (1978) and the results of the authors' survey, the orbital elements are known for 25 SB having at least one supergiant component of type F to M. In each luminosity class all systems with Pcirc = P(1-e)3/2 (P, e are period and eccentricity of a binary system) shorter than a critical value have nearly circular orbits. The critical value is very well defined for class Ib: 350 - 440 days. This value is larger for classes Iab and Ia (1400 - 3900 days for class Ia).

  20. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star IM Persei

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Southworth, John E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu

    2015-01-01

    IM Per is a detached A7 eccentric eclipsing binary star. We have obtained extensive measurements of the light curve (28,225 differential magnitude observations) and radial velocity curve (81 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.7831 ± 0.0094 and 1.7741 ± 0.0097 solar masses, and radii of 2.409 ± 0.018 and 2.366 ± 0.017 solar radii. The orbital period is 2.25422694(15) days and the eccentricity is 0.0473(26). A faint third component was detected in the analysis of the light curves, and also directly observed in the spectra. The observed rate of apsidal motion is consistent with theory (U = 151.4 ± 8.4 year). We determine a distance to the system of 566 ± 46 pc.

  1. Optical microflaring on the nearby flare star binary UV Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Kanbach, G.; Rau, A.; Steinle, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present extremely high time resolution observations of the visual flare star binary UV Cet obtained with the Optical Pulsar Timing Analyzer (OPTIMA) at the 1.3 m telescope at Skinakas Observatory (SKO) in Crete, Greece. OPTIMA is a fiber-fed optical instrument that uses Single Photon Avalanche Diodes to measure the arrival times of individual optical photons. The time resolution of the observations presented here was 4 μs, allowing to resolve the typical millisecond variability time scales associated with stellar flares. We report the detection of very short impulsive bursts in the blue band with well resolved rise and decay time scales of about 2 s. The overall energetics put these flares at the lower end of the known flare distribution of UV Cet.

  2. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A. E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  3. THE HOT R CORONAE BOREALIS STAR DY CENTAURI IS A BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Kameswara Rao, N.; Lambert, David L.; McArthur, Barbara; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Woolf, Vincent M. E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2012-11-20

    The remarkable hot R Coronae Borealis (RCB) star DY Cen is revealed to be the first and only binary system to be found among the RCB stars and their likely relatives, including the extreme helium stars and the hydrogen-deficient carbon stars. Radial velocity determinations from 1982 to 2010 have shown that DY Cen is a single-lined spectroscopic binary in an eccentric orbit with a period of 39.67 days. It is also one of the hottest and most H-rich member of the class of RCB stars. The system may have evolved from a common envelope to its current form.

  4. ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR BF DRACONIS

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Sabby, Jeffrey A.; Claret, Antonio E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu

    2012-06-15

    BF Dra is now known to be an eccentric double-lined F6+F6 binary star with relatively deep (0.7 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7494 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 9700 from the NFO WebScope, 106 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope and the 1 m coude-feed spectrometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and 31 accurate radial velocities from the CfA. Very accurate (better than 0.6%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and four radial velocity curves. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 2.72 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.17, and tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric. Our observations of BF Dra constrain the convective core overshooting parameter to be larger than about 0.13 H{sub p}. We find, however, that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed slow rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

  5. Very wide binary stars as the primary source of stellar collisions in the galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaib, Nathan A.; Raymond, Sean N.

    2014-02-20

    We present numerical simulations modeling the orbital evolution of very wide binaries, pairs of stars separated by over ∼10{sup 3} AU. Due to perturbations from other passing stars and the Milky Way's tide, the orbits of very wide binary stars occasionally become extremely eccentric, which forces close encounters between the companion stars. We show that this process causes a stellar collision between very wide binary companion stars once every 1000-7500 yr on average in the Milky Way. One of the main uncertainties in this collision rate is the amount of energy dissipated by dynamic tides during close (but not collisional) periastron passages. This dissipation presents a dynamical barrier to stellar collisions and can instead transform very wide binaries into close or contact binaries. However, for any plausible tidal dissipation model, very wide binary stars are an unrealized, and potentially the dominant, source of stellar collisions in our Galaxy. Such collisions should occur throughout the thin disk of the Milky Way. Stellar collisions within very wide binaries should yield a small population of single, Li-depleted, rapidly rotating massive stars.

  6. Binary star formation: gravitational fragmentation followed by capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. A.; Chapman, S. J.; Bhattal, A. S.; Disney, M. J.; Pongracic, H.; Whitworth, A. P.

    1995-11-01

    We describe in detail one of a sequence of numerical simulations which realize the mechanism of binary star formation proposed by Pringle. In these simulations, collisions between stable molecular cloud clumps produce dense shocked layers, which cool radiatively and fragment gravitationally. The resulting fragments then condense to form protostellar discs, which at the same time fall together and, as a result of tidal and viscous interactions, capture one another to form binary systems. We refer to this mechanism as shock-induced gravitational fragmentation followed by capture, or SGF+C. When the initial clumps are sufficiently massive and/or the Mach number of the collision is sufficiently high, a large number (>~10) of protostellar discs is produced; under these circumstances, the layer fragments first into filaments, and then into beads along the filaments. The marriage of two protostellar discs in this way is `arranged' in the sense that the protostellar discs involved do not form independently. First, they both condense out of the same layer, and probably also out of the same filament within this layer; this significantly increases the likelihood of them interacting dynamically. Secondly, there tends to be alignment between the orbital and spin angular momenta of the interacting protostellar discs, reflecting the fact that these angular momenta derive mainly from the systematic global angular momentum of the off-axis collision which produced the layer; this alignment of the various angular momenta pre-disposes the discs to very dissipative interactions, thereby increasing the probability of producing a strongly bound, long-lasting union. It is a marriage because the binary orbit stabilizes itself rather quickly. Any subsequent orbit evolution, as the protostellar discs `mop up' the surrounding residual gas and interact tidally, tends to harden the orbit. Therefore, as long as a third body does not intervene, the union is binding. Even if a third body does

  7. Evidence for prolonged main sequence stellar evolution of F stars in close binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, A. A.

    2001-04-01

    Binary F stars exhibit large brightness anomaly, which is defined here as the difference between the absolute magnitude from the \\mboxuvby photometry and the actual absolute magnitude of the star. We have found that the anomaly inversely correlates with the binary components separation. There is evidence that the correlation reflects actual population differences between close and wide binary pairs, in which case it indicates that the anomaly is somehow associated with the interaction of binary's components. The anomaly has also been found to correlate with both kinematics and metallicity. The sense of the correlations implies that the anomaly increases as the star evolves, suggesting a peculiar evolution of a primary F star in a tight binary pair. This conclusion has further been supported by the study of the age-velocity relation (AVR) of F stars that are cataloged in the HIPPARCOS as single. Among these stars, those with brightness anomaly were previously shown to be most likely unidentified close binaries. We have found that the AVR of these binary candidates is different from that of the ``truly single'' F stars. The discrepancy between the two AVRs indicates that the putative binaries are, on average, older than similar normal single F stars at the same effective temperature and luminosity, which is consistent with the inferred peculiar evolution in close binaries. It appears that this peculiarity is caused by the impact of the components interaction in a tight pair on stellar evolution, which results in the prolonged main sequence lifetime of the primary F star. Based on the data from the Hipparcos astrometry satellite (European Space Agency).

  8. FM stars II: a Fourier view of pulsating binary stars - determining binary orbital parameters photometrically for highly eccentric cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Kurtz, Donald W.; Murphy, Simon J.

    2015-07-01

    Continuous and precise space-based photometry has made it possible to measure the orbital frequency modulation of pulsating stars in binary systems with extremely high precision over long time spans. Frequency modulation caused by binary orbital motion manifests itself as a multiplet with equal spacing of the orbital frequency in the Fourier transform. The amplitudes and phases of the peaks in these multiplets reflect the orbital properties, hence the orbital parameters can be extracted by analysing such precise photometric data alone. We derive analytically the theoretical relations between the multiplet properties and the orbital parameters, and present a method for determining these parameters, including the eccentricity and the argument of periapsis, from a quintuplet or a higher order multiplet. This is achievable with the photometry alone, without spectroscopic radial velocity measurements. We apply this method to Kepler mission data of KIC 8264492, KIC 9651065, and KIC 10990452, each of which is shown to have an eccentricity exceeding 0.5. Radial velocity curves are also derived from the Kepler photometric data. We demonstrate that the results are in good agreement with those obtained by another technique based on the analysis of the pulsation phases.

  9. Constraining the neutron star equation of state with gravitational wave signals from coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agathos, M.; Meidam, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Li, T. G. F.; Tompitak, M.; Veitch, J.; Vitale, S.; Van Den Broeck, C.

    2015-07-01

    Recently exploratory studies were performed on the possibility of constraining the neutron star equation of state (EOS) using signals from coalescing binary neutron stars, or neutron star-black hole systems, as they will be seen in upcoming advanced gravitational wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. In particular, it was estimated to what extent the combined information from multiple detections would enable one to distinguish between different equations of state through hypothesis ranking or parameter estimation. Under the assumption of zero neutron star spins both in signals and in template waveforms and considering tidal effects to 1 post-Newtonian (1PN) order, it was found that O (20 ) sources would suffice to distinguish between a stiff, moderate, and soft equation of state. Here we revisit these results, this time including neutron star tidal effects to the highest order currently known, termination of gravitational waveforms at the contact frequency, neutron star spins, and the resulting quadrupole-monopole interaction. We also take the masses of neutron stars in simulated sources to be distributed according to a relatively strongly peaked Gaussian, as hinted at by observations, but without assuming that the data analyst will necessarily have accurate knowledge of this distribution for use as a mass prior. We find that especially the effect of the latter is dramatic, necessitating many more detections to distinguish between different EOSs and causing systematic biases in parameter estimation, on top of biases due to imperfect understanding of the signal model pointed out in earlier work. This would get mitigated if reliable prior information about the mass distribution could be folded into the analyses.

  10. Photometric and Spectroscopic Analysis for the Determination of Physical Parameters of an Eclipsing Binary Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Piper

    2013-01-01

    A binary star system is a pair of stars that are bound together by gravity. Most of the stars that we see in the night sky are members of multiple star systems. A system of stars where one star passes in front of the other (as observed from Earth) on a periodic basis is called an eclipsing binary. Eclipsing binaries can have very short rotational periods and in all cases these pairs of stars are so far away that they can only be resolved from Earth as a single point of light. The interaction of the two stars serves to produce physical phenomena that can be observed and used to study stellar properties. By careful data collection and analysis is it possible for an amateur astronomer using commercial, low cost equipment (including a home built spectroscope) to gather photometric (brightness versus time) and spectroscopic (brightness versus wavelength) data, analyze the data, and calculate the physical properties of a binary star system? Using a CCD camera, tracking mount and telescope photometric data of BB Pegasi was collected and a light curve produced. 57 Cygni was also studied using a spectroscope, tracking mount and telescope to prove that Doppler shift of Hydrogen Balmer absorption lines can be used to determine radial velocity. The orbital period, orbital velocity, radius of each star, separation of the two stars and mass of each star was calculated for the eclipsing binary BB Pegasi using photometric and spectroscopic data and Kepler’s 3rd Law. These data were then compared to published data. By careful use of consumer grade astronomical equipment it is possible for an amateur astronomer to determine an array of physical parameters of a distant binary star system from a suburban setting.

  11. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. I. Catalog and Principal Characterization of 1879 Eclipsing Binaries in the First Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prša, Andrej; Batalha, Natalie; Slawson, Robert W.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Rucker, Michael; Mjaseth, Kimberly; Engle, Scott G.; Conroy, Kyle; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas; Koch, David; Borucki, William

    2011-03-01

    The Kepler space mission is devoted to finding Earth-size planets orbiting other stars in their habitable zones. Its large, 105 deg2 field of view features over 156,000 stars that are observed continuously to detect and characterize planet transits. Yet, this high-precision instrument holds great promise for other types of objects as well. Here we present a comprehensive catalog of eclipsing binary stars observed by Kepler in the first 44 days of operation, the data being publicly available through MAST as of 2010 June 15. The catalog contains 1879 unique objects. For each object, we provide its Kepler ID (KID), ephemeris (BJD0, P 0), morphology type, physical parameters (T eff, log g, E(B - V)), the estimate of third light contamination (crowding), and principal parameters (T 2/T 1, q, fillout factor, and sin i for overcontacts, and T 2/T 1, (R 1 + R 2)/a, esin ω, ecos ω, and sin i for detached binaries). We present statistics based on the determined periods and measure the average occurrence rate of eclipsing binaries to be ~1.2% across the Kepler field. We further discuss the distribution of binaries as a function of galactic latitude and thoroughly explain the application of artificial intelligence to obtain principal parameters in a matter of seconds for the whole sample. The catalog was envisioned to serve as a bridge between the now public Kepler data and the scientific community interested in eclipsing binary stars.

  12. Formation of the widest binary stars from dynamical unfolding of triple systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2012-12-01

    The formation of very wide binary systems, such as the α Centauri system with Proxima (also known as α Centauri C) separated from α Centauri (which itself is a close binary A/B) by 15,000 astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), challenges current theories of star formation, because their separation can exceed the typical size of a collapsing cloud core. Various hypotheses have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the suggestion that ultrawide binaries result from the dissolution of a star cluster--when a cluster star gravitationally captures another, distant, cluster star. Recent observations have shown that very wide binaries are frequently members of triple systems and that close binaries often have a distant third companion. Here we report N-body simulations of the dynamical evolution of newborn triple systems still embedded in their nascent cloud cores that match observations of very wide systems. We find that although the triple systems are born very compact--and therefore initially are more protected against disruption by passing stars--they can develop extreme hierarchical architectures on timescales of millions of years as one component is dynamically scattered into a very distant orbit. The energy of ejection comes from shrinking the orbits of the other two stars, often making them look from a distance like a single star. Such loosely bound triple systems will therefore appear to be very wide binaries.

  13. Formation of the widest binary stars from dynamical unfolding of triple systems.

    PubMed

    Reipurth, Bo; Mikkola, Seppo

    2012-12-13

    The formation of very wide binary systems, such as the α Centauri system with Proxima (also known as α Centauri C) separated from α Centauri (which itself is a close binary A/B) by 15,000 astronomical units (1 AU is the distance from Earth to the Sun), challenges current theories of star formation, because their separation can exceed the typical size of a collapsing cloud core. Various hypotheses have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the suggestion that ultrawide binaries result from the dissolution of a star cluster--when a cluster star gravitationally captures another, distant, cluster star. Recent observations have shown that very wide binaries are frequently members of triple systems and that close binaries often have a distant third companion. Here we report N-body simulations of the dynamical evolution of newborn triple systems still embedded in their nascent cloud cores that match observations of very wide systems. We find that although the triple systems are born very compact--and therefore initially are more protected against disruption by passing stars--they can develop extreme hierarchical architectures on timescales of millions of years as one component is dynamically scattered into a very distant orbit. The energy of ejection comes from shrinking the orbits of the other two stars, often making them look from a distance like a single star. Such loosely bound triple systems will therefore appear to be very wide binaries. PMID:23222523

  14. New Positions and/or Orbits for Binary Stars Observed at the SOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, J.

    2012-09-01

    Many binary stars observed at the SOR during adaptive optics calibration on the 3.5 m telescope turn out to be 'off orbit', especially those from the 'All Binaries' spreadsheet (as opposed to the 'Calibration Binaries' spreadsheet) that I made available at the AMOS Conference last year. In some cases new companions have been discovered. New positions and relative magnitudes will be reported, and for some, new orbits. At the separations available through AO, most binaries show motion, making the best calibrators those with derived orbits. The conclusion is that many new binary discoveries can be made by simply turning on AO in the IR.

  15. Radial Velocity Solution for Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars from SDSS APOGEE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Joni Marie; Mason, Paul A.; Rawls, Meredith L.; Jackiewicz, Jason; SDSS NMSU FAST

    2016-06-01

    Proper characterization of binary stars is provided by high quality spectra combined with light curves allowing for precise determination of stellar masses, radii, and effective temperatures along with binary semi-major axes and eccentricities. A program to extract radial velocities of Kepler eclipsing binaries observed by SDSS APOGEE is presented. We combine the quality light curves from the Kepler telescope with high precision radial velocity measurements from SDSS APOGEE in order to characterize the binary and stellar components. We report on the first results of this program on three eclipsing binaries, KIC 6864859, KIC 6698670, and KIC 7121885.

  16. In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Manjari; Torres, Diego F. E-mail: dtorres@ieec.uab.es

    2014-08-01

    Pulsars in binary systems have been very successful to test the validity of general relativity in the strong field regime [1-4]. So far, such binaries include neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) systems. It is commonly believed that a neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary will be much superior for this purpose. But in what sense is this true? Does it apply to all possible deviations?.

  17. In what sense a neutron star-black hole binary is the holy grail for testing gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Manjari; Torres, Diego F.

    2014-08-01

    Pulsars in binary systems have been very successful to test the validity of general relativity in the strong field regime [1-4]. So far, such binaries include neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) systems. It is commonly believed that a neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) binary will be much superior for this purpose. But in what sense is this true? Does it apply to all possible deviations?

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Binary star discoveries in the URAT1 catalog (Nicholson, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    Astrometric and photometric data are presented for 9450 common proper motion binary star system using results from the first U.S. Naval Observatory Astrometric Robotic Telescope Catalog (URAT1) (1 data file).

  19. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. II. SINGLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Hillwig, T. C.; McSwain, M. V.; Huang, W. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu

    2013-02-01

    We report on new radial velocity measurements of massive stars that are either suspected binaries or lacking prior observations. This is part of a survey to identify and characterize spectroscopic binaries among O-type stars with the goal of comparing the binary fraction of field and runaway stars with those in clusters and associations. We present orbits for HDE 308813, HD 152147, HD 164536, BD-16 Degree-Sign 4826, and HDE 229232, Galactic O-type stars exhibiting single-lined spectroscopic variation. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra, we obtain estimates for effective temperature, surface gravity, and rotational velocity. We compute orbital periods and velocity semiamplitudes for each system and note the lack of photometric variation for any system. These binaries probably appear single-lined because the companions are faint and because their orbital Doppler shifts are small compared to the width of the rotationally broadened lines of the primary.

  20. Identification and Spectral Classification of Red Dwarf Common Proper Motion Binary Stars Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivers, James

    2014-10-01

    The position angle, separation, and spectral class of 1042 common proper motion red dwarf binary stars are reported based on data-mining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. 727 of these are new discoveries.

  1. Eclipsing Binary Stars in the OGLE-III Fields of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, M.; Graczyk, D.; Soszyński, I.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Udalski, A.; Szymański, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Pietrzyński, G.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Kozłowski, S.; Skowron, J.

    2013-09-01

    We present a large sample of eclipsing binary stars detected in the Small Magellanic Cloud fields covering about 14 square degrees that have been monitored for eight years during the third phase of the OGLE survey. This is the largest set of such variables containing 6138 objects, of which 777 are contact and 5361 non-contact binaries. The estimated completeness of this sample is around 82%. We analyze the statistical properties of the sample and present selected interesting objects: 32 systems having eccentric orbit with visible apsidal motion, one Transient Eclipsing Binary, ten RS CVn type stars, 22 still unexplained Double-Periodic Variable stars, and 15 candidates for doubly eclipsing quadruple systems. Based on the OGLE-III proper motions, we classified 47 binaries from our sample as foreground Galactic stars. We also list candidates suitable for the SMC distance determination.

  2. AM CVn Stars: Structure and Evolution of Ultra-Short Period Interacting Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froning, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This is the final report of a FUSE program to study the physics of accretion and outflows in ultra-compact, helium dominated, disk-accreting binaries. With FUSE, we observed the AM CVn binary V803 Cen, which is one of only two AM CVn systems observed by FUSE to date. V803 Cen is a short-period interacting binary in which a hydrogen-deficient white dwarf transfers mass to another white dwarf via a hot, steady-state accretion disk. Unlike other cataclysmic variables (CVs), AM CVn stars have undergone double common envelope evolution (one for each white dwarf in the binary) and so probe an alternate route of evolution in binary stars. Our goals in this project were to investigate how the structure of the accretion disk and the link between the disk and wind outflows are affected by the absence of hydrogen in the system and by the compact size of the binary and the accretion disk.

  3. Wolf-Rayet stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud. II. Analysis of the binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenar, T.; Hainich, R.; Todt, H.; Sander, A.; Hamann, W.-R.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eldridge, J. J.; Pablo, H.; Oskinova, L. M.; Richardson, N. D.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars are evolved massive stars (Mi ≳ 20 M⊙) characterized by strong mass-loss. Hypothetically, they can form either as single stars or as mass donors in close binaries. About 40% of all known WR stars are confirmed binaries, raising the question as to the impact of binarity on the WR population. Studying WR binaries is crucial in this context, and furthermore enable one to reliably derive the elusive masses of their components, making them indispensable for the study of massive stars. Aims: By performing a spectral analysis of all multiple WR systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), we obtain the full set of stellar parameters for each individual component. Mass-luminosity relations are tested, and the importance of the binary evolution channel is assessed. Methods: The spectral analysis is performed with the Potsdam Wolf-Rayet (PoWR) model atmosphere code by superimposing model spectra that correspond to each component. Evolutionary channels are constrained using the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis (BPASS) evolution tool. Results: Significant hydrogen mass fractions (0.1 stars in our sample are not chemically homogeneous. The WR component in the binary AB 6 is found to be very luminous (log L ≈ 6.3 [L⊙]) given its orbital mass (≈10 M⊙), presumably because of observational contamination by a third component. Evolutionary paths derived for our objects suggest that Roche lobe overflow had occurred in most systems, affecting their evolution. However, the implied initial masses (≳60 M⊙) are large enough for the primaries to have entered the WR phase, regardless of binary interaction. Conclusions: Together with the results for the putatively single SMC WR stars, our study suggests that the binary evolution channel does not dominate the formation of WR stars at

  4. Loud and Bright: Gravitational and possible electromagnetic signals induced by binary neutron star mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Ponce, Marcelo; Thompson, Chris; Liebling, Steve; Neilsen, Dave; Hirschmann, Eric; Anderson, Matt; Motl, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    Our main goal is to investigate how the strongly gravitating and highly dynamical behavior of magnetized binary neutron stars can affect the plasma in the magnetosphere in such a way that powerful electromagnetic emissions can be induced, as well as stressing its connection with gravitational waves produced by the system. Such phenomena is a natural candidate for bright (EM) and loud (GW) emissions, as pulsars are strong electromagnetic emitters on one hand, and merging binary neutron stars are powerful sources of gravitational radiation.

  5. Differential Rotation of Close Binary Stars: Application to HR 1099

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, P.; Donati, J.-F.; Wade, G. A.; Landstreet, J. D.; Oliveira, J. M.; Shorlin, S. L. S.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Collier Cameron, A.

    We propose a new method for estimating differential rotation in binary stars, for which only moderate to poor phase coverage can be obtained (rotation period of order of a few days), preventing the use of conventional cross-correlation methods. Assuming a solar-like differential rotation law with two independent parameters (equatorial rotation rate φeq and rotational shear between pole and equator dφ), we reconstruct Doppler images for different values of the two parameters, and derive the optimal φeq, dφ and associated error bars from the corresponding 2 ° map. Simulations show that φeq and dφ can be recovered with good accuracy, even if the phase coverage per rotation cycle is poor, provided the total data set is long enough. From observations of the HR 1099 K1 subgiant secured in 1998, 1999 and 2000, we obtain that the equator rotates faster than the pole with a rotational shear about 3 times smaller than solar.

  6. Modelling of the Semi-Detached Binary Star WZ Corvi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virnina, N. A.; Zola, S.; Krajci, T.

    We present results from modeling of multicolor light curves of the semi-detached, algol- type binary system WZ Corvi. We analyzed V R data gathered in 2010 and new BV RcIc observations collected in 2012. Two models for WZ Crv are considered: the first was derived under the assumption that the temperature of the primary component, having the dominant contribution to total system light, corresponds to spectral type F7, and the second model, in which the temperature of the secondary was estimated from the colors observed at the at bottom of the primary minimum. The new set of observations shows almost no difference in maxima heights, obvious in the earlier, 2010 data. However, primary minimum in V and R is deeper than in the 2010 light curve. We explain the variable shape of the system light curve as spot(s) present on primary or secondary component(s) due to their magnetic activity. Based on the derived solutions, we calculate relative physical (assuming the primary component to be a Main Sequence star) parameters of WZ Crv for both models.

  7. Binary star formation and mass outflows: MHD nested grid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, M. N.; Tomisaka, K.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-08-01

    We study the binary star formation process from a rotating magnetized molecular cloud. We assume an isothermal cylindrical cloud in hydrostatic balance whose rotation axis and the direction of global magnetic field lines are both identical, and parallel to the cylinder axis. We added axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric density perturbations to the initial state and followed the subsequent evolutions. The evolution is characterized by three parameters: the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric perturbations, the rotation speed, and the magnetic field strength. As a result, it is found that non-axisymmetry hardly evolves in the early phase, but begins to grow after the gas contracts and forms a thin disk. There are two types of fragmentation: fragmentation from a ring and that from a bar. Thin adiabatic cores fragments if a thickness is smaller than 1/4 of the radius. For the fragments to survive, they should be formed in a heavily elongated barred core or a flat round disk. In the models showing fragmentation, outflows from respective fragments are found as well as those driven by the rotating bar or the disk.

  8. Fragmentation of Molecular Clouds and Binary Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    Using three-dimensional MHD nested-grid simulations we study the binary star formation process paying particular attention to the fragmentation of a rotating magnetized molecular cloud. We assume an isothermal rotating and magnetized cylindrical cloud in hydrostatic balance. Non-axisymmetric as well as axisymmetric perturbations are added to the initial state and the subsequent evolutions are studied. The evolution is characterized by three parameters: the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric perturbations the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. As a result it is found that non-axisymmetry hardly evolves in the early phase but begins to grow after the gas contracts and forms a thin disk. Disk formation is strongly promoted by the rotation speed and the magnetic field strength. There are two types of fragmentation: fragmentation from a ring and that from a bar. Thin adiabatic cores fragments if a thickness is smaller than 1/4 of the radius. For the fragments to survive they should be formed in a heavily elongated barred core or a flat round disk. In the models showing fragmentation outflows from respective fragments are found as well as those driven by the rotating bar or the disk

  9. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star AP Andromedae

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg Lacy, Claud H.; Torres, Guillermo; Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W. E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu

    2014-06-01

    AP And is a well-detached F5 eclipsing binary star for which only a very limited amount of information was available before this publication. We have obtained very extensive measurements of the light curve (19,097 differential V magnitude observations) and a radial velocity curve (83 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.277 ± 0.004 and 1.251 ± 0.004 M {sub ☉}, radii of 1.233 ± 0.006 and 1.1953 ± 0.005 R {sub ☉}, and temperatures of 6565 ± 150 K and 6495 ± 150 K. The distance to the system is about 400 ± 30 pc. Comparison with the theoretical properties of the stellar evolutionary models of the Yonsei-Yale series of Yi et al. shows good agreement between the observations and the theory at an age of about 500 Myr and a slightly sub-solar metallicity.

  10. A search for binary candidates among the fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars observed by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Elisabeth; Steixner, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Although roughly half of all stars are considered to be part of binary or multiple systems, there are only two confirmed cases of RR Lyrae pulsators with companions. One of them is TU Uma [1] - a classical RR Lyrae star in a very eccentric orbit - and the other is OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 [2]. Considering the wealth of well-studied RR Lyrae stars, this number is astoundingly low. Having more RR Lyrae stars in binary systems at hand would be extremely valuable to get independent measurements of the masses. The data from the Kepler mission with their unprecedented precision and the long time span of about four years offer a unique possibility to systematically search for the signatures of binarity in RR Lyrae stars. Using the pulsation as a clock, we studied the variations in the timing of maximum light to hunt for possible binary systems in the sample.

  11. Binary star detectability in Kepler data from phase modulation of different types of oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, D. L.; Bedding, T. R.; Murphy, S. J.; Stello, D.

    2016-09-01

    Detecting binary stars in photometric time series is traditionally done by measuring eclipses. This requires the orbital plane to be aligned with the observer. A new method without that requirement uses stellar oscillations to measure delays in the light arrival time and has been successfully applied to δ Scuti stars. However, application to other types of stars has not been explored. To investigate this, we simulated light curves with a range of input parameters. We find a correlation between the signal to noise of the pulsation modes and the time delay required to detect binary motion. The detectability of the binarity in the simulations and in real, Kepler data show strong agreement, hence, we describe the factors that have prevented this method from discovering binary companions to stars belonging to various classes of pulsating stars.

  12. The formation of primordial binaries in globular clusters by star-disk interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen D.; Clarke, C. J.; Pringle, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    The formation of primordial binaries in globular clusters is examined using simple numerical models. Clusters of protostars collapse until their velocity dispersion rises sufficiently to reverse the infall and the cluster reaches equilibrium. During the collapse, interactions between stars and protostellar disks lead to stellar capture. It is found that binary fraction of a few percent typically result. Binary formation is terminated when the velocity dispersion rises to a point at which most encounters result in disk destruction rather than capture. As a result, much gas is returned to the cluster ISM, limiting the star formation efficiency to a value significantly below 100 percent.

  13. An Interacting Binary System Powers Precessing Outflows of an Evolved Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, Henri M. J.; Miszalski, Brent; Rauch, Thomas; Jones, David; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Day-Jones, Avril C.; Köppen, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    Stars are generally spherical, yet their gaseous envelopes often appear nonspherical when ejected near the end of their lives. This quirk is most notable during the planetary nebula phase, when these envelopes become ionized. Interactions among stars in a binary system are suspected to cause the asymmetry. In particular, a precessing accretion disk around a companion is believed to launch point-symmetric jets, as seen in the prototype Fleming 1. Our finding of a post-common-envelope binary nucleus in Fleming 1 confirms that this scenario is highly favorable. Similar binary interactions are therefore likely to explain these kinds of outflows in a large variety of systems.

  14. An interacting binary system powers precessing outflows of an evolved star.

    PubMed

    Boffin, Henri M J; Miszalski, Brent; Rauch, Thomas; Jones, David; Corradi, Romano L M; Napiwotzki, Ralf; Day-Jones, Avril C; Köppen, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    Stars are generally spherical, yet their gaseous envelopes often appear nonspherical when ejected near the end of their lives. This quirk is most notable during the planetary nebula phase, when these envelopes become ionized. Interactions among stars in a binary system are suspected to cause the asymmetry. In particular, a precessing accretion disk around a companion is believed to launch point-symmetric jets, as seen in the prototype Fleming 1. Our finding of a post-common-envelope binary nucleus in Fleming 1 confirms that this scenario is highly favorable. Similar binary interactions are therefore likely to explain these kinds of outflows in a large variety of systems. PMID:23139326

  15. Planetary Systems Around Spectroscopic Binary Stars: The Very Dusty, Old, Sun-like BD+20 307

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuckerman, Ben M.; Fekel, F. C.; Williamson, M. H.; Henry, G. W.; Muno, M. P.; Melis, C.; Marois, C.

    2009-01-01

    Field star BD+20 307 is the dustiest known main sequence star, based on the fraction of its bolometric luminosity, 4%, emitted at infrared wavelengths (Song et al. 2005; Rhee et al. 2008). The temperature of the particles that carry this large IR luminosity is comparable to that of the Sun's zodiacal dust, and their existence is likely a consequence of a fairly recent collision of large objects such as planets or planetary embryos. BD+20 307 is now known to be a 3.4 day spectroscopic binary composed of two nearly equal solar-mass stars (Weinberger 2008; Zuckerman et al. 2008). Consideration of various age indicators implies that that star is likely to be at least one Gyr old, perhaps many Gyr old. Probably the dust around this close binary star has nothing to do with planet formation and everything to do with some major catastrophic event that recently took place near 1 AU in a mature planetary system. Destabilizing planetary orbits in an old system with a single star at its center appears to be possible, e.g., Mercury (Batygin & Laughlin 2008 and references therein). Destabilization may be easier to achieve in a close binary star system and easier yet in a triple star system. Tokovinin et al. (2006) conclude that, for a spectroscopic binary star with an orbital period of 3.4 days, the probability is 70% that a third star is present. Thus, we have searched for such a tertiary star in the BD+20 307 system using accurate radial velocities measured at Fairborn and Lick observatories and with adaptive optics imaging at Keck observatory. As of the writing of this abstract, no third star is detected. Limits on mass and semimajor axis of any tertiary star will be discussed. This research was supported by a grant from the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  16. Projected Constraints on Scalarization with Gravitational Waves from Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Laura; Yunes, Nicolas; Cornish, Neil; Ponce, Marcelo; Barausse, Enrico; Klein, Antoine; Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Certain scalar-tensor theories endow stars with scalar hair, sourced either by the star's own compactness, or by the companion's scalar charge, or by the orbital binding energy. Scalarized stars in binaries have different conservative dynamics than in General Relativity, and can excite a scalar mode in the metric perturbation that carries away dipolar radiation. As a result, the binary orbit shrinks faster than predicted in General Relativity, modifying the rate of decay of the orbital period. Scalar-tensor theories can pass existing binary pulsar tests, because observed pulsars may not be compact enough or sufficiently orbitally bound to activate scalarization. Gravitational waves emitted during the last stages of compact binary inspirals are thus ideal probes of scalarization effects. In the work presented here, we analyze the types of constraints the gravitational wave measurements from the advanced LIGO detectors will be able to place on these types of scalar-tensor theories.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalog of binary UV Ceti stars (Tamazian+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamazian, V.; Malkov, O.

    2015-01-01

    A catalogue of nearby UV Ceti type flare stars in (137) visual binary systems is presented in the form of two separate tables of information. The catalogue has developed from Catalogue and Bibliography of UV Cet stars (Gershberg et al., 1999, Cat. J/A+AS/139/555) and the list of nearby flare stars (Pettersen, 1991MmSAI..62..217P) by including more recent and additional information from catalogues of binary stars (WDS, Mason et al., 2001-2014, Cat. B/wds; ORB6, Hartkopf et al. 2006-2014; DM3, Mason+ 2006-2014) and data from the Catalog of Nearby Stars, Preliminary 3rd Version (Gliese et al., 1991, Cat. V/70), from Hipparcos, the New Reduction (van Leeuwen 2007, Cat. I/311) and from SIMBAD. Some issues relating to the mass, luminosity and spectrum relations of flare stars are also discussed. (2 data files).

  18. Gravitational radiation from binary neutron star mergers: Magnetic and microphysical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilsen, David; Anderson, Matthew; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick; Palenzuela, Carlos; Ponce, Marcelo

    2015-04-01

    Binary neutron star mergers will be important sources of gravitational radiation for Advanced LIGO. Understanding how different physical processes-such as magnetic and microphysical effects due to equations of state or neutrino cooling-are imprinted on the radiation is important for learning more about these systems. We perform a series of binary neutron star mergers to examine some of these effects on the gravitational radiation. We use three different realistic equations of state, ranging from soft to stiff, initially magnetized stars, and include neutrino cooling of the post-merger system using a leakage scheme. We discuss possible observational signatures for these systems.

  19. THE OCCURRENCE OF WIDE-ORBIT PLANETS IN BINARY STAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.

    2014-08-20

    The occurrence of planets in binary star systems has been investigated via a variety of techniques that sample a wide range of semi-major axes, but with a preponderance of such results applicable to planets with semi-major axes less than a few astronomical units. We utilize a new method—the presence or absence of heavy elements in the atmospheres of white dwarf stars—to elucidate the frequency in main sequence binary star systems of planets with semi-major axes greater than a few astronomical units. We consider only binaries where a putative planetary system orbits one member (no circumbinary planets). For main sequence binaries where the primary star is of spectral type A or F, data in the published literature suggests that the existence of a secondary star with a semi-major axis less than about 1000 AU suppresses the formation and/or long-term stability of an extended planetary system around the primary. For these spectral types and initial semi-major axis ≥1000 AU, extended planetary systems appear to be as common around stars in binary systems as they are around single stars.

  20. Illinois occultation summary. I - 1977-1978. [lunar observation using bright binary stars investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radick, R.; Lien, D.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented for the first two years of a program for the recording of lunar occultations primarily of bright stars or objects of special interest. Observations were obtained using a single-channel Cassegrain photometer at a 1-m reflector using various filters to provide spectral definition, with the tracking of guide stars used to achieve telescope pointing. Of the 64 events observed, 30 were of stars brighter than 7 magnitudes, 40 were reappearances, four were used for angular diameter measurements, eight were binary star observations and six may indicate multiple stars.

  1. Imaging the cool stars in the interacting binaries AE Aqr, BV Cen and V426 Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C. A.; Steeghs, D.; Dhillon, V. S.; Shahbaz, T.

    2007-10-01

    It is well known that magnetic activity in late-type stars increases with increasing rotation rate. Using inversion techniques akin to medical imaging, the rotationally broadened profiles from such stars can be used to reconstruct `Doppler images' of the distribution of cool, dark starspots on their stellar surfaces. Interacting binaries, however, contain some of the most rapidly rotating late-type stars known and thus provide important tests of stellar dynamo models. Furthermore, magnetic activity is thought to play a key role in their evolution, behaviour and accretion dynamics. Despite this, we know comparatively little about the magnetic activity and its influence on such binaries. In this review we summarise the concepts behind indirect imaging of these systems, and present movies of the starspot distributions on the cool stars in some interacting binaries. We conclude with a look at the future opportunities that such studies may provide.

  2. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. I. CATALOG AND PRINCIPAL CHARACTERIZATION OF 1879 ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE FIRST DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Prsa, Andrej; Engle, Scott G.; Conroy, Kyle; Batalha, Natalie; Rucker, Michael; Mjaseth, Kimberly; Slawson, Robert W.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Seager, Sara; Jenkins, Jon; Caldwell, Douglas

    2011-03-15

    The Kepler space mission is devoted to finding Earth-size planets orbiting other stars in their habitable zones. Its large, 105 deg{sup 2} field of view features over 156,000 stars that are observed continuously to detect and characterize planet transits. Yet, this high-precision instrument holds great promise for other types of objects as well. Here we present a comprehensive catalog of eclipsing binary stars observed by Kepler in the first 44 days of operation, the data being publicly available through MAST as of 2010 June 15. The catalog contains 1879 unique objects. For each object, we provide its Kepler ID (KID), ephemeris (BJD{sub 0}, P{sub 0}), morphology type, physical parameters (T{sub eff}, log g, E(B - V)), the estimate of third light contamination (crowding), and principal parameters (T{sub 2}/T{sub 1}, q, fillout factor, and sin i for overcontacts, and T{sub 2}/T{sub 1}, (R{sub 1} + R{sub 2})/a, esin {omega}, ecos {omega}, and sin i for detached binaries). We present statistics based on the determined periods and measure the average occurrence rate of eclipsing binaries to be {approx}1.2% across the Kepler field. We further discuss the distribution of binaries as a function of galactic latitude and thoroughly explain the application of artificial intelligence to obtain principal parameters in a matter of seconds for the whole sample. The catalog was envisioned to serve as a bridge between the now public Kepler data and the scientific community interested in eclipsing binary stars.

  3. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. II. UPDATED BINARY STAR ORBITS AND A LONG PERIOD ECLIPSING BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; O'Connell, J.; Hartkopf, William I.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Williamson, M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mi E-mail: maciej@ncac.torun.p

    2010-12-15

    Differential astrometry measurements from the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems have been combined with lower precision single-aperture measurements covering a much longer timespan (from eyepiece measurements, speckle interferometry, and adaptive optics) to determine improved visual orbits for 20 binary stars. In some cases, radial velocity observations exist to constrain the full three-dimensional orbit and determine component masses. The visual orbit of one of these binaries-{alpha} Com (HD 114378)-shows that the system is likely to have eclipses, despite its very long period of 26 years. The next eclipse is predicted to be within a week of 2015 January 24.

  4. Multiyear measurements of Position Angle and Separation of selected binary stars from the Washington Double Star Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Rafael J.; Cersosimo, Juan C.; Lopez, Andy J.; Vergara, Nelson; Torres, Brian; Mendoza, Lizyan; Ortiz, Deliris; Del Valle, Yashira; Espinosa, Gabriela; Reyes, Marjory

    2016-01-01

    We present here the multiyear data sets on separation and position angle of binary stars obtained at the NURO telescope, located east of Flagstaff Arizona at an elevation of 7200 feet. The data was analyzed at the Humacao University Observatory of the University of Puerto Rico and will be submitted for publication at the Journal of Double Star Observations. We describe the methodology for the analysis of the images we obtained.

  5. Binary Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae Discovered through Photometric Variability. IV. The Central Stars of HaTr 4 and Hf 2-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillwig, Todd C.; Bond, Howard E.; Frew, David J.; Schaub, S. C.; Bodman, Eva H. L.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the photometrically variable central stars of the planetary nebulae HaTr 4 and Hf 2-2. Both have been classified as close binary star systems previously based on their light curves alone. Here, we present additional arguments and data confirming the identification of both as close binaries with an irradiated cool companion to the hot central star. We include updated light curves, orbital periods, and preliminary binary modeling for both systems. We also identify for the first time the central star of HaTr 4 as an eclipsing binary. Neither system has been well studied in the past, but we utilize the small amount of existing data to limit possible binary parameters, including system inclination. These parameters are then compared to nebular parameters to further our knowledge of the relationship between binary central stars of planetary nebulae and nebular shaping and ejection.

  6. Unsolved Problems in the Evolution of Interacting Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webbink, R. F.

    2006-06-01

    Common envelope evolution is essential to the formation of short-period binaries with compact components. Conditions for its onset, and estimates of its outcome are summarized. However, applied to the well-known binaries V471 Tauri and T Coronae Borealis, these conditions lead to serious inconsistencies with their observed properties.

  7. Relativistic simulations of eccentric binary neutron star mergers: One-arm spiral instability and effects of neutron star spin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, William E.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Pretorius, Frans; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-01-01

    We perform general-relativistic hydrodynamical simulations of dynamical capture binary neutron star mergers, emphasizing the role played by the neutron star spin. Dynamical capture mergers may take place in globular clusters, as well as other dense stellar systems, where most neutron stars have large spins. We find significant variability in the merger outcome as a function of initial neutron star spin. For cases where the spin is aligned with the orbital angular momentum, the additional centrifugal support in the remnant hypermassive neutron star can prevent the prompt collapse to a black hole, while for antialigned cases the decreased total angular momentum can facilitate the collapse to a black hole. We show that even moderate spins can significantly increase the amount of ejected material, including the amount unbound with velocities greater than half the speed of light, leading to brighter electromagnetic signatures associated with kilonovae and interaction of the ejecta with the interstellar medium. Furthermore, we find that the initial neutron star spin can strongly affect the already rich phenomenology in the postmerger gravitational wave signatures that arise from the oscillation modes of the hypermassive neutron star. In several of our simulations, the resulting hypermassive neutron star develops the one-arm (m =1 ) spiral instability, the most pronounced cases being those with small but non-negligible neutron star spins. For long-lived hypermassive neutron stars, the presence of this instability leads to improved prospects for detecting these events through gravitational waves, and thus may give information about the neutron star equation of state.

  8. The effect of binary evolution on the theoretically predicted distribution of WR and O-type stars in starburst regions and in abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.; van Bever, J.; De Donder, E.

    1997-01-01

    We first discuss in detail the massive close binary evolutionary model and how it has to be used in a population number synthesis study. We account for the evolution of case A, case B and case C systems, the effect of stellar wind during core hydrogen burning, hydrogen shell burning, the red supergiant phase and the WR phase, the effect of common envelope evolution in binaries with large periods, the consequences of spiral-in in binaries with small mass ratio, the effect of an asymmetric supernova explosion on binary system parameters using recent studies of pulsar velocities, the evolution of binaries with a compact companion. The parameters entering the population model where close binaries are included, are constrained by comparing predictions and observations of the massive star content in regions of continuous star formation. We then critically investigate the influence of massive close binary evolution on the variation of the massive star content in starburst regions. We separately consider regions where, after a long period of continuous star formation, the star formation rate decreases sharply (we propose to call this an abruptly-terminated star formation region) and we show that also in these regions WR/O number ratios are reached which are significantly larger than in regions of continuous star formation. The most important conclusion of the study is that within our present knowledge of observations of massive stars, massive close binary evolution plays an ESSENTIAL role in the evolution of starbursts and abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

  9. A BINARY ORBIT FOR THE MASSIVE, EVOLVED STAR HDE 326823, A WR+O SYSTEM PROGENITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu

    2011-12-15

    The hot star HDE 326823 is a candidate transition-phase object that is evolving into a nitrogen-enriched Wolf-Rayet star. It is also a known low-amplitude, photometric variable with a 6.123 day period. We present new, high- and moderate-resolution spectroscopy of HDE 326823, and we show that the absorption lines show coherent Doppler shifts with this period while the emission lines display little or no velocity variation. We interpret the absorption line shifts as the orbital motion of the apparently brighter star in a close, interacting binary. We argue that this star is losing mass to a mass gainer star hidden in a thick accretion torus and to a circumbinary disk that is the source of the emission lines. HDE 326823 probably belongs to a class of objects that produce short-period WR+O binaries.

  10. ellc: A fast, flexible light curve model for detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxted, P. F. L.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Very high quality light curves are now available for thousands of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems as a result of surveys for transiting exoplanets and other large-scale photometric surveys. Aims: I have developed a binary star model (ellc) that can be used to analyse the light curves of detached eclipsing binary stars and transiting exoplanet systems that is fast and accurate, and that can include the effects of star spots, Doppler boosting and light-travel time within binaries with eccentric orbits. Methods: The model represents the stars as triaxial ellipsoids. The apparent flux from the binary is calculated using Gauss-Legendre integration over the ellipses that are the projection of these ellipsoids on the sky. The model can also be used to calculate the flux-weighted radial velocity of the stars during an eclipse (Rossiter-McLaghlin effect). The main features of the model have been tested by comparison to observed data and other light curve models. Results: The model is found to be accurate enough to analyse the very high quality photometry that is now available from space-spaced instruments, flexible enough to model a wide range of eclipsing binary stars and extrasolar planetary systems, and fast enough to enable the use of modern Monte Carlo methods for data analysis and model testing. The software package is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A111

  11. Hydrodynamical simulations of the tidal stripping of binary stars by massive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainetti, Deborah; Lupi, Alessandro; Campana, Sergio; Colpi, Monica

    2016-04-01

    In a galactic nucleus, a star on a low angular momentum orbit around the central massive black hole can be fully or partially disrupted by the black hole tidal field, lighting up the compact object via gas accretion. This phenomenon can repeat if the star, not fully disrupted, is on a closed orbit. Because of the multiplicity of stars in binary systems, also binary stars may experience in pairs such a fate, immediately after being tidally separated. The consumption of both the binary components by the black hole is expected to power a double-peaked flare. In this paper, we perform for the first time, with GADGET2, a suite of smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of binary stars around a galactic central black hole in the Newtonian regime. We show that accretion luminosity light curves from double tidal disruptions reveal a more prominent knee, rather than a double peak, when decreasing the impact parameter of the encounter and when elevating the difference between the mass of the star which leaves the system after binary separation and the mass of the companion. The detection of a knee can anticipate the onset of periodic accretion luminosity flares if one of the stars, only partially disrupted, remains bound to the black hole after binary separation. Thus knees could be precursors of periodic flares, which can then be predicted, followed up and better modelled. Analytical estimates in the black hole mass range 105-108 M⊙ show that the knee signature is enhanced in the case of black holes of mass 106-107 M⊙.

  12. High-resolution spectroscopy of extremely metal-poor stars from SDSS/Segue. II. Binary fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Wako; Suda, Takuma; Beers, Timothy C.; Honda, Satoshi E-mail: takuma.suda@nao.ac.jp E-mail: honda@nhao.jp

    2015-02-01

    The fraction of binary systems in various stellar populations of the Galaxy and the distribution of their orbital parameters are important but not well-determined factors in studies of star formation, stellar evolution, and Galactic chemical evolution. While observational studies have been carried out for a large sample of nearby stars, including some metal-poor Population II stars, almost no constraints on the binary nature for extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H] <−3.0) stars have yet been obtained. Here we investigate the fraction of double-lined spectroscopic binaries and carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, many of which could have formed as pairs of low-mass and intermediate-mass stars, to estimate the lower limit of the fraction of binary systems having short periods. The estimate is based on a sample of very metal-poor stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and observed at high spectral resolution in a previous study by Aoki et al. That survey reported 3 double-lined spectroscopic binaries and 11 CEMP stars, which we consider along with a sample of EMP stars from the literature compiled in the SAGA database. We have conducted measurements of the velocity components for stacked absorption features of different spectral lines for each double-lined spectroscopic binary. Our estimate indicates that the fraction of binary stars having orbital periods shorter than 1000 days is at least 10%, and possibly as high as 20% if the majority of CEMP stars are formed in such short-period binaries. This result suggests that the period distribution of EMP binary systems is biased toward short periods, unless the binary fraction of low-mass EMP stars is significantly higher than that of other nearby stars.

  13. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Extremely Metal-Poor Stars from SDSS/SEGUE. II. Binary Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Wako; Suda, Takuma; Beers, Timothy C.; Honda, Satoshi

    2015-02-01

    The fraction of binary systems in various stellar populations of the Galaxy and the distribution of their orbital parameters are important but not well-determined factors in studies of star formation, stellar evolution, and Galactic chemical evolution. While observational studies have been carried out for a large sample of nearby stars, including some metal-poor Population II stars, almost no constraints on the binary nature for extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H] \\lt -3.0) stars have yet been obtained. Here we investigate the fraction of double-lined spectroscopic binaries and carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, many of which could have formed as pairs of low-mass and intermediate-mass stars, to estimate the lower limit of the fraction of binary systems having short periods. The estimate is based on a sample of very metal-poor stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and observed at high spectral resolution in a previous study by Aoki et al. That survey reported 3 double-lined spectroscopic binaries and 11 CEMP stars, which we consider along with a sample of EMP stars from the literature compiled in the SAGA database. We have conducted measurements of the velocity components for stacked absorption features of different spectral lines for each double-lined spectroscopic binary. Our estimate indicates that the fraction of binary stars having orbital periods shorter than 1000 days is at least 10%, and possibly as high as 20% if the majority of CEMP stars are formed in such short-period binaries. This result suggests that the period distribution of EMP binary systems is biased toward short periods, unless the binary fraction of low-mass EMP stars is significantly higher than that of other nearby stars.

  14. Radial Velocity Studies of Close Binary Stars. XII.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, Theodor; Rucinski, Slavek M.; Conidis, George; DeBond, Heide; Thomson, J. R.; Gazeas, Kosmas; Ogłoza, Waldemar

    2007-05-01

    Radial velocity measurements and sine-curve fits to the orbital radial velocity variations are presented for 10 close binary systems: OO Aql, CC Com, V345 Gem, XY Leo, AM Leo, V1010 Oph, V2612 Oph, XX Sex, W UMa, and XY UMa. Most of these binaries have been observed spectroscopically before, but our data are of higher quality and consistency than in the previous studies. While most of the studied eclipsing pairs are contact binaries, V1010 Oph is probably a detached or semidetached double-lined binary, and XY UMa is a detached, chromospherically active system whose broadening functions clearly show well-defined and localized dark spots on the primary component. A particularly interesting case is XY Leo, which is a member of visually unresolved quadruple system composed of a contact binary and a detached, noneclipsing, active binary with an 0.805 day orbital period. V345 Gem and AM Leo are known members of visual binaries. We found faint visual companions at about 2"-3" from XX Sex and XY UMa. Based on data obtained at the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto.

  15. Binary systems, star clusters and the Galactic-field population. Applied stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroupa, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    This book contains the results of recent theoretical work on the evolution of primordial binary systems in young star clusters, their effect on the evolution of their host clusters, implications for the distribution of young stars in the Milky Way, and the formation of bound star clusters. This work shows that if the Galactic-field binary population is a dynamically evolved version of the Taurus-Auriga pre-main sequence population, then most stars form in clusters with typically a few hundred binaries within a radius of about 0.5-1 pc. The results also suggest that the population I primordial binary-star orbital-parameter distribution functions may be universal, much like the initial mass function. Most solar-like planetary systems can survive in such clusters. The work presented here also establishes that most observed triple and quadruple systems must be primordial, but that α Cen A/B-Proxima Cen-like systems can form in clusters through dynamical capture. Precise N-body calculations using Aarseth's N-body codes of clusters containing up to 104 stars are used to create an extensive young-cluster library. These data demonstrate that the primordial binary systems are disrupted on a crossing-time scale, and that the truncation of the surviving period distribution measures the maximum concentration the cluster ever experienced. The N-body calculations demonstrate that Galactic star clusters form readily as nuclei of expanding OB associations despite a star-formation efficiency of typically 30 per cent and gas-expulsion over a time-span shorter than the cluster crossing time.

  16. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2011-10-15

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter {Omega}(f), commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, {Omega}(f) is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the frequencies of all existing and planned detectors. A semi-analytical formula for {Omega}(f) is derived in the case of stellar binaries (containing white dwarfs, neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes). Besides a realistic expectation of the level of background, upper and lower limits are given, to account for the uncertainties in some astrophysical parameters such as binary coalescence rates. One interesting result concerns all current and planned ground-based detectors (including the Einstein Telescope). In their frequency range, the background of binaries is resolvable and only sporadically present. In other words, there is no stochastic background of binaries for ground-based detectors.

  17. Binaries, cluster dynamics and population studies of stars and stellar phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, Dany

    2005-10-01

    The effects of binaries on population studies of stars and stellar phenomena have been investigated over the past 3 decades by many research groups. Here we will focus mainly on the work that has been done recently in Brussels and we will consider the following topics: the effect of binaries on overall galactic chemical evolutionary models and on the rates of different types of supernova, the population of point-like X-ray sources where we distinguish the standard high mass X-ray binaries and the ULXs, a UFO-scenario for the formation of WR+OB binaries in dense star systems. Finally we critically discuss the possible effect of rotation on population studies.

  18. Eclipsing binary stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds from the MACHO project: The Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, L; Alcock, C; Cook, K; Prochter, G; Protopapas, P; Syphers, D

    2007-03-29

    We present a new sample of 4634 eclipsing binary stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), expanding on a previous sample of 611 objects and a new sample of 1509 eclipsing binary stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), that were identified in the light curve database of the MACHO project. We perform a cross correlation with the OGLE-II LMC sample, finding 1236 matches. A cross correlation with the OGLE-II SMC sample finds 698 matches. We then compare the LMC subsamples corresponding to center and the periphery of the LMC and find only minor differences between the two populations. These samples are sufficiently large and complete that statistical studies of the binary star populations are possible.

  19. Masses of Pre-Main Sequence Binary Stars-Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Michal

    1991-07-01

    There are still no pre-main sequence stars with reliably known masses. This represents a serious gap in our understanding of low-mass star formation. The goal of this long-term program is to measure the masses of pre-main sequence binaries selected from our survey (ref. 3) of the Taurus star forming region by IR lunar occultation and imaging. We propose to use the Fine Guide Sensors in the Transfer Function Mode to determine the apparent orbits of the binaries. Since the distance to the region is known, the apparent orbits will yield the total masses of the binaries. THIS PROPOSAL CONTAINS ONE FOLLOW-UP VISIT TO HV-TAU-C ONLY. THE REST OF THE EXPOSURES ARE IN 3842.

  20. Measuring The Distances, Masses, and Radii of Neutron Stars In X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guver, Tolga; Ozel, F.; Cabrera-Lavers, A.

    2010-03-01

    Low mass X-ray binaries that have independent distance measurements and show thermonuclear X-ray bursts are ideal sources for constraining the equation of state of neutron star matter. I will introduce our program to systematically measure the distances, masses, and radii of neutron stars in such binaries. We utilize high energy resolution X-ray spectra to measure the ISM column densities to these sources as well as time resolved, high count rate X-ray spectra to study their bursts. I will discuss in detail how the combination of these observations have led to the measurement of the masses and radii of the neutron stars in the low mass X-ray binaries EXO 1745-248, 4U 1608-52, and 4U 1820-30.

  1. A Cornucopia of Massive Binary Star Systems in the Cygnus OB2 Association: Fifty and Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kiminki, D. C.; Burke, J. F.; Chapman, J. E.; Keller, E.; Lester, K. V.; Rolen, E.; Topel, E.; Lundquist, M. J.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Vargas Alvarez, C. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Dale, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Massive binary star systems produce nature's most energetic events, including some classes of supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, X-ray binaries, and double-degenerate objects that generate gravitational wave radiation. The Cygnus OB2 Association is the largest nearby collection of massive stars, consisting of several hundred O and early B stars at a distance of just 1.4 kpc. Our Cygnus OB2 Radial Velocity Survey team at the University of Wyoming has spectroscopically monitored 115 stars of type B2 or earlier between 1999 and 2013, accruing an average of 12 observations per star at a velocity precision of 2-6 km/s. We have identified fifty massive binary systems, nearly all of which have full orbital solutions. Periods range from 1.4 days - 12.5 years and velocity semi-amplitudes span 4-300 km/s. Monte-Carlo modeling indicates that as many as 90% of massive systems contain multiple stars and that 45% of these can be characterized as ``close'' binaries that will interact, exchanging matter during main-sequence or post-main-sequence evolution. Statistical analysis of the orbital parameters reveals a striking surplus of close, short-period systems with periods P=1.4--7 days, with fully 30% (17 out of 50 systems) of the known binaries falling in this tight range; their typical orbital separations are just a small fraction of an astronomical unit. The remainder of the binary systems are consistent with a period distribution described as flat in log(P) out to several thousand day periods. The mass ratio distribution appears flat over the interval q=M2/M1=0.1-1.0, meaning that massive stars preferentially have massive companions. These data constitute the largest and most complete homogeneous database on any single collection of massive stars in a common formation environment covering the full range of stars expected to explode as supernovae (B2V and earlier). As such, the Survey provides the raw data for modeling rates of cosmic supernova, gamma-ray bursts, and X-ray binaries

  2. Stable Conic-Helical Orbits of Planets around Binary Stars: Analytical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, E.

    2015-05-01

    Studies of planets in binary star systems are especially important because it was estimated that about half of binary stars are capable of supporting habitable terrestrial planets within stable orbital ranges. One-planet binary star systems (OBSS) have a limited analogy to objects studied in atomic/molecular physics: one-electron Rydberg quasimolecules (ORQ). Specifically, ORQ, consisting of two fully stripped ions of the nuclear charges Z and Z‧ plus one highly excited electron, are encountered in various plasmas containing more than one kind of ion. Classical analytical studies of ORQ resulted in the discovery of classical stable electronic orbits with the shape of a helix on the surface of a cone. In the present paper we show that despite several important distinctions between OBSS and ORQ, it is possible for OBSS to have stable planetary orbits in the shape of a helix on a conical surface, whose axis of symmetry coincides with the interstellar axis; the stability is not affected by the rotation of the stars. Further, we demonstrate that the eccentricity of the stars’ orbits does not affect the stability of the helical planetary motion if the center of symmetry of the helix is relatively close to the star of the larger mass. We also show that if the center of symmetry of the conic-helical planetary orbit is relatively close to the star of the smaller mass, a sufficiently large eccentricity of stars’ orbits can switch the planetary motion to the unstable mode and the planet would escape the system. We demonstrate that such planets are transitable for the overwhelming majority of inclinations of plane of the stars’ orbits (i.e., the projections of the planet and the adjacent start on the plane of the sky coincide once in a while). This means that conic-helical planetary orbits at binary stars can be detected photometrically. We consider, as an example, Kepler-16 binary stars to provide illustrative numerical data on the possible parameters and the

  3. Radiation-driven warping of circumbinary disks around eccentric young star binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-12-10

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating, circumbinary disk around young binary stars on an eccentric orbit. Such a disk is subject to both the tidal torques due to a time-dependent binary potential and the radiative torques due to radiation emitted from each star. The tilt angle between the circumbinary disk plane and the binary orbital plane is assumed to be very small. We find that there is a radius within/beyond which the circumbinary disk is unstable to radiation-driven warping, depending on the disk density and temperature gradient indices. This marginally stable warping radius is very sensitive to viscosity parameters, a fiducial disk radius and the temperature measured there, the stellar luminosity, and the disk surface density at a radius where the disk changes from optically thick to thin for the irradiation from the central stars. On the other hand, it is insensitive to the orbital eccentricity and binary irradiation parameter, which is a function of the binary mass ratio and luminosity of each star. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping in the inner part of the circumbinary disk, the disk starts to be warped in the outer part. While the circumbinary disks are most likely to be subject to the radiation-driven warping on an AU to kilo-AU scale for binaries with young massive stars more luminous than 10{sup 4} L {sub ☉}, the radiation-driven warping does not work for those around young binaries with the luminosity comparable to the solar luminosity.

  4. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN X-RAY BINARIES AND STAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 4449

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, Blagoy; Chandar, Rupali; Prestwich, Andrea H.

    2011-11-10

    We present 23 candidate X-ray binaries with luminosities down to 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}, in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 4449, from observations totaling 105 ks taken with the ACIS-S instrument on the Chandra Space Telescope. We determine count rates, luminosities, and colors for each source, and perform spectral fits for sources with sufficient counts. We also compile a new catalog of 129 compact star clusters in NGC 4449 from high-resolution, multi-band optical images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope, doubling the number of clusters known in this galaxy. The UBVI, H{alpha} luminosities of each cluster are compared with predictions from stellar evolution models to estimate their ages and masses. We find strong evidence for a population of very young massive, black hole binaries, which comprise nearly 50% of the detected X-ray binaries in NGC 4449. Approximately a third of these remain within their parent star clusters, which formed {tau} {approx}< 6-8 Myr ago, while others have likely been ejected from their parent clusters. We also find evidence for a population of somewhat older X-ray binaries, including both supergiant and Be-binaries, which appear to be associated with somewhat older {tau} Almost-Equal-To 100-400 Myr star clusters, and one X-ray binary in an ancient ({tau} Almost-Equal-To 10 Gyr) globular cluster. Our results suggest that detailed information on star clusters can significantly improve constraints on X-ray binary populations in star-forming galaxies.

  5. Radiation-driven Warping of Circumbinary Disks around Eccentric Young Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Kimitake; Sohn, Bong Won; Okazaki, Atsuo T.; Jung, Taehyun; Zhao, Guangyao; Naito, Tsuguya

    2014-12-01

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating, circumbinary disk around young binary stars on an eccentric orbit. Such a disk is subject to both the tidal torques due to a time-dependent binary potential and the radiative torques due to radiation emitted from each star. The tilt angle between the circumbinary disk plane and the binary orbital plane is assumed to be very small. We find that there is a radius within/beyond which the circumbinary disk is unstable to radiation-driven warping, depending on the disk density and temperature gradient indices. This marginally stable warping radius is very sensitive to viscosity parameters, a fiducial disk radius and the temperature measured there, the stellar luminosity, and the disk surface density at a radius where the disk changes from optically thick to thin for the irradiation from the central stars. On the other hand, it is insensitive to the orbital eccentricity and binary irradiation parameter, which is a function of the binary mass ratio and luminosity of each star. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping in the inner part of the circumbinary disk, the disk starts to be warped in the outer part. While the circumbinary disks are most likely to be subject to the radiation-driven warping on an AU to kilo-AU scale for binaries with young massive stars more luminous than 104 L ⊙, the radiation-driven warping does not work for those around young binaries with the luminosity comparable to the solar luminosity.

  6. Advancement and New Functionality of the Binary Star DataBase (BDB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Kaygorodov, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    A new version of Binary star DataBase BDB (bdb.inasan.ru) has been released. It is much more flexible and quick than the previous version and offers full search capabilities on all parameters. New information is progressively added, in particular data from principal catalogues of close (spectroscopic, eclipsing, X-ray) binaries. A new interface has been completed, providing a more user-friendly navigation while retaining the multiple search and browsing capabilities.

  7. The dynamical fate of binary star clusters in the Galactic tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, R.; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Arifyanto, M. I.; Wulandari, H. R. T.; Siregar, S.

    2016-04-01

    Fragmentation and fission of giant molecular clouds occasionally results in a pair of gravitationally bound star clusters that orbit their mutual centre of mass for some time, under the influence of internal and external perturbations. We investigate the evolution of binary star clusters with different orbital configurations, with a particular focus on the Galactic tidal field. We carry out N-body simulations of evolving binary star clusters and compare our results with estimates from our semi-analytic model. The latter accounts for mass-loss due to stellar evolution and two-body relaxation, and for evolution due to external tides. Using the semi-analytic model, we predict the long-term evolution for a wide range of initial conditions. It accurately describes the global evolution of such systems, until the moment when a cluster merger is imminent. N-body simulations are used to test our semi-analytic model and also to study additional features of evolving binary clusters, such as the kinematics of stars, global cluster rotation, evaporation rates, and the cluster merger process. We find that the initial orientation of a binary star cluster with respect to the Galactic field, and also the initial orbital phase, is crucial for its fate. Depending on these properties, the binaries may experience orbital reversal, spiral-in, or vertical oscillation about the Galactic plane before they actually merge at t ≈ 100 Myr, and produce rotating star clusters with slightly higher evaporation rates. The merger process of a binary cluster induces an outburst that ejects ˜10 per cent of the stellar members into the Galactic field.

  8. Projected constraints on scalarization with gravitational waves from neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Laura; Yunes, Nicolás; Cornish, Neil; Ponce, Marcelo; Barausse, Enrico; Klein, Antoine; Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis

    2014-12-01

    Certain scalar-tensor theories have the property of endowing stars with scalar hair, sourced either by the star's own compactness (spontaneous scalarization) or, for binary systems, by the companion's scalar hair (induced scalarization) or by the orbital binding energy (dynamical scalarization). Scalarized stars in binaries present different conservative dynamics than in general relativity, and can also excite a scalar mode in the metric perturbation that carries away dipolar radiation. As a result, the binary orbit shrinks faster than predicted in general relativity, modifying the rate of decay of the orbital period. In spite of this, scalar-tensor theories can pass existing binary pulsar tests, because observed pulsars may not be compact enough or sufficiently orbitally bound to activate scalarization. Gravitational waves emitted during the last stages of compact binary inspirals are thus ideal probes of scalarization effects. For the standard projected sensitivity of advanced LIGO, we here show that, if the neutron star equation of state is such that the stars can be sufficiently compact that they enter the detector's sensitivity band already scalarized, then gravitational waves could place constraints at least comparable to binary pulsars. If the stars dynamically scalarize while inspiraling in band, then constraints are still possible provided the equation of state leads to scalarization that occurs sufficiently early in the inspiral, roughly below an orbital frequency of 50 Hz. In performing these studies, we rederive an easy-to-calculate data analysis measure, an integrated phase difference between a general-relativistic and a modified signal, and connect it directly to the Bayes factor, showing that it can be used to determine whether a modified gravity effect is detectable. Finally, we find that custom-made templates are equally effective as model-independent, parametrized post-Einsteinian waveforms at detecting such modified gravity effects at realistic

  9. An estimate of the probability of capture of a binary star by a supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremova, G. N.; Dremov, V. V.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    A simple model for the dynamics of stars located in a sphere with a radius of one-tenth of the central parsec, designed to enable estimation of the probability of capture in the close vicinity ( r < 10-3 pc) of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is presented. In the case of binary stars, such a capture with a high probability results in the formation of a hyper-velocity star. The population of stars in a sphere of radius <0.1 pc is calculated based on data for the Galactic rotation curve. To simulate the distortion of initially circular orbits of stars, these are subjected to a series of random shock encounters ("kicks"), whose net effect is to "push" these binary systems into the region of potential formation of hyper-velocity stars. The mean crossing time of the border of the close vicinity of the SMBH ( r < 10-3 pc) by the stellar orbit can be used to estimate the probability that a binary system is captured, followed by the possible ejection of a hyper-velocity star.

  10. Rotational velocities of single and binary O-type stars in the Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.; de Koter, A.; Simón-Díaz, S.; de Mink, S. E.; Tramper, F.; Dufton, P. L.; Evans, C. J.; Gräfener, G.; Herrero, A.; Langer, N.; Lennon, D. J.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; Markova, N.; Najarro, F.; Puls, J.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rotation is a key parameter in the evolution of massive stars, affecting their evolution, chemical yields, ionizing photon budget, and final fate. We determined the projected rotational velocity, υ e sin i, of ~330 O-type objects, i.e. ~210 spectroscopic single stars and ~110 primaries in binary systems, in the Tarantula nebula or 30 Doradus (30 Dor) region. The observations were taken using VLT/FLAMES and constitute the largest homogeneous dataset of multi-epoch spectroscopy of O-type stars currently available. The most distinctive feature of the υ e sin i distributions of the presumed-single stars and primaries in 30 Dor is a low-velocity peak at around 100 km s-1. Stellar winds are not expected to have spun-down the bulk of the stars significantly since their arrival on the main sequence and therefore the peak in the single star sample is likely to represent the outcome of the formation process. Whereas the spin distribution of presumed-single stars shows a well developed tail of stars rotating more rapidly than 300 km s-1, the sample of primaries does not feature such a high-velocity tail. The tail of the presumed-single star distribution is attributed for the most part - and could potentially be completely due - to spun-up binary products that appear as single stars or that have merged. This would be consistent with the lack of such post-interaction products in the binary sample, that is expected to be dominated by pre-interaction systems. The peak in this distribution is broader and is shifted toward somewhat higher spin rates compared to the distribution of presumed-single stars. Systems displaying large radial velocity variations, typical for short period systems, appear mostly responsible for these differences.

  11. The rate of neutron star binary mergers in the universe - Minimal predictions for gravity wave detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, E. S.

    1991-01-01

    Of the many sources which gravitational wave observatories might see, merging neutron star binaries are the most predictable. Their waveforms at the observable frequencies are easy to calculate. And three systems which will merge in less than a Hubble time have already been observed as binary pulsars: two in the disk of the Galaxy, and one in a globular cluster. From the lifetimes and positions of these, a lower limit to the merger rate in the Galaxy and globular cluster system are inferred with confidence. Taking the merger rate in other galaxies to scale with the star formation rate, the merger rate expected in the local universe is computed. An ultraconservative lower limit to the rate gives three per year within 1 Gpc. The best estimate, still conservative in that it considers only systems like those already observed, gives three per year within 200 Mpc. An upper limit of three mergers per year within 23/h Mpc is set by the rate of Type Ib supernovae. The rates of black hole binary mergers and black hole-neutron star binary mergers are model-dependent, but could be comparable to the given rate of neutron-star binary mergers.

  12. Spectral formation in black hole and neutron star binaries: theory vs observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfanov, Marat

    2016-07-01

    I will discuss spectral formation in X-ray binaries with particular emphasis on the dichotomy between black holes and neutron stars. Predictions of theoretical models will be confronted with observations of compact X-ray sources in the Milky Way and beyond. I will discuss how the difference in the nature of the compact object leads to observable differences between accreting neutron stars and black holes and how accretion regimes change across the mass accretion rate range. This will be illustrated with observations of X-ray binaries in the Milky Way and external galaxies, the latter providing us with a unique possibility to explore accretion at its extremities.

  13. A Photometric Study of the Eclipsing Binary Star V2790 Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Presented in this paper is the first precision set of multi-band light curves for the eclipsing binary star V2790 Ori. A new linear ephemeris gives an orbital period of 0.28784176 d. The light curves were analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney program to determine the best-fit stellar model. Star spots were required in the model to account for asymmetries in the light curves. The synthetic light curve solutions presented are consistent with a W-type contact binary.

  14. Joint LIGO and TAMA300 search for gravitational waves from inspiralling neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, J.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; Barr, B.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Beausoleil, R.; Belczynski, K.; Bennett, R.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Bland, B.; Bochner, B.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgess, R.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castiglione, J.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chickarmane, V.; Chin, D.; Christensen, N.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Csatorday, P.; Cusack, B. J.; Cutler, C.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Delker, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; di Credico, A.; Díaz, M.; Ding, H.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dupuis, R. J.; Edlund, J. A.; Ehrens, P.; Elliffe, E. J.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fallnich, C.; Farnham, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Findley, T.; Fine, M.; Finn, L. S.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Giaime, J. A.; Gillespie, A.; Goda, K.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grandclément, P.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimmett, D.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E.; Gustafson, R.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammond, M.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Hartunian, A.; Heefner, J.; Hefetz, Y.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Hepler, N.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hindman, N.; Hoang, P.; Hough, J.; Hrynevych, M.; Hua, W.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, L.; Jungwirth, D.; Kalogera, V.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kells, W.; Kern, J.; Khan, A.; Killbourn, S.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, C.; King, P.; Klimenko, S.; Koranda, S.; Kötter, K.; Kovalik, J.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Landry, M.; Langdale, J.; Lantz, B.; Lawrence, R.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Liu, S.; Logan, J.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Luna, M.; Lyons, T. T.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majid, W.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Mann, F.; Marin, A.; Márka, S.; Maros, E.; Mason, J.; Mason, K.; Matherny, O.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McHugh, M.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Newton, G.; Nocera, F.; Noel, J. S.; Nutzman, P.; Olson, T.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottewill, A.; Ouimette, D.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rao, S. R.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Redding, D.; Regehr, M. W.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reilly, K. T.; Reithmaier, K.; Reitze, D. H.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Rizzi, A.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robison, L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Rose, D.; Rotthoff, E.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Salzman, I.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sazonov, A.; Schilling, R.; Schlaufman, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Seader, S. E.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seel, S.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shapiro, C. A.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shu, Q. Z.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sievers, L.; Sigg, D.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, M. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Spero, R.; Spjeld, O.; Stapfer, G.; Steussy, D.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T.; Sumner, M. C.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.; Tanner, D. B.; Tariq, H.

    2006-05-01

    We search for coincident gravitational wave signals from inspiralling neutron star binaries using LIGO and TAMA300 data taken during early 2003. Using a simple trigger exchange method, we perform an intercollaboration coincidence search during times when TAMA300 and only one of the LIGO sites were operational. We find no evidence of any gravitational wave signals. We place an observational upper limit on the rate of binary neutron star coalescence with component masses between 1 and 3M⊙ of 49 per year per Milky Way equivalent galaxy at a 90% confidence level. The methods developed during this search will find application in future network inspiral analyses.

  15. Radial Velocity Studies of Southern Close Binary Stars. II. Spring/Summer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerbeck, Hilmar W.; Rucinski, Slavek M.

    2007-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements and sine-curve fits to the orbital velocity variations are presented for 14 close binary stars, S Ant, TT Cet, TW Cet, AA Cet, RW Dor, UX Eri, YY Eri, BV Eri, CT Eri, SZ Hor, AD Phe, TY Pup, HI Pup, and TZ Pyx. All are double-lined binaries, and all except the last one are contact binaries. The orbital data must be considered preliminary because of the relatively small number of observations (6-12), a circumstance that is partly compensated by the good definition of the broadening functions used for the radial velocity determinations. Based on data obtained at the European Southern Observatory.

  16. TIDAL DISRUPTIONS IN CIRCUMBINARY DISKS. I. STAR FORMATION, DYNAMICS, AND BINARY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Brem, Patrick; Cuadra, Jorge E-mail: Patrick.Brem@aei.mpg.de

    2013-02-10

    In our current interpretation of the hierarchical structure of the universe, it is well established that galaxies collide and merge with each other during their lifetimes. If massive black holes (MBHs) reside in galactic centers, we expect them to form binaries in galactic nuclei surrounded by a circumbinary disk. If cooling is efficient enough, the gas in the disk will clump and trigger stellar formation in situ. In this first paper we address the evolution of the binary under the influence of the newly formed stars, which form individually and also clustered. We use smoothed particle hydrodynamics techniques to evolve the gas in the circumbinary disk and to study the phase of star formation. When the amount of gas in the disk is negligible, we further evolve the system with a high-accurate direct-summation N-body code to follow the evolution of the stars, the innermost binary and tidal disruption events (TDEs). For this, we modify the direct N-body code to include (1) treatment of TDEs and (2) 'gas cloud particles' that mimic the gas, so that the stellar clusters do not dissolve when we follow their infall on to the MBHs. We find that the amount of stars disrupted by either infalling stellar clusters or individual stars is as large as 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1} per binary, higher than expected for typical galaxies.

  17. Teachers doing Binary Star Observations for the United States Naval Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    During the summer of 2002 seven science teachers made observations of visual binary stars listed as "neglected" in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) maintained at the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). In the "Binary Star Project" these teachers took CCD images of binary stars with a B&C 16 inch telescope at Georgia State University's Hard Labor Creek Observatory. Updated position angles and angular separations were measured and submitted to USNO. These data are now included as part of the WDS and the teachers written manuscripts are now archived at the USNO library. The purpose of this project was to give science teachers an opportunity to do some real science. The National Science Education Standards are encouraging science teachers to to use scientific inquiry as part of their pedagogy. However, most science teachers have never actually done any scientific research. One goal of this project was to provide science teachers with the opportunity to do some basic astronomy research that would make an authentic contribution to scientific knowledge. Thus, giving them some needed experience doing a scientific investigation. A second purpose was to couple this research with historical astronomy to do explicit instruction on the nature of science and scientific inquiy. By doing this, additional astronomy content was covered, which included Kepler's Laws, the Sun, and Stellar Evolution. The experiences of these teachers and their binary star results will be presented.

  18. Does Planet Formation Influence Whether Binary Stars Are Identical or Fraternal “Twins”?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, Johanna

    2015-12-01

    Disentangling how an individual star’s atmospheric composition is affected by the chemistry and transport of disk material, the formation of planets, and its broader position in/motion through the Galaxy during its evolution is difficult. While initially suggested as a sign of accretion of H-depleted material onto the star, the giant planet-metallicity correlation is now established as a mostly primordial effect -- stellar composition affects planet formation. But is it still possible that planet formation may also alter host star composition? Previous studies hinted at a few cases of compositional differences between stars in binary systems, and now high-precision abundance analyses are exploring this possibility in systems known to host planets. I will discuss the important role binary host stars have to play in extending correlations between stellar composition and the presence/type of planets that form, including brand new (not yet published!) results.

  19. Effects of Hardness of Primordial Binaries on Evolution of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, A.; Fukushige, T.

    2008-05-01

    We performed N-body simulations of star clusters with primordial binaries using a new code, GORILLA. It is based on Makino and Aarseth (1992)'s integration scheme on GRAPE, and includes a special treatment for relatively isolated binaries. Using the new code, we investigated effects of hardness of primordial binaries on whole evolution of the clusters. We simulated seven N=16384 equal-mass clusters containing 10% (in mass) primordial binaries whose binding energies are 1, 3, 10, 30, 100, 300, and 1000kT, respectively. Additionally, we also simulated a cluster without primordial binaries and that in which all binaries are replaced by stars with double mass, as references of soft and hard limits, respectively. We found that, in both soft (≤ 3kT) and hard (≥ 1000kT) limits, clusters experiences deep core collapse and shows gravothermal oscillations. On the other hands, in the intermediate hardness (10-300kT), the core collapses halt halfway due an energy releases of the primordial binaries.

  20. Primordial main equence binary stars in the globular cluster M71

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Lin; Mateo, Mario

    1994-01-01

    We report the identification of five short-period variables near the center of the metal-rich globular cluster M71. Our observations consist of multiepoch VI charge coupled device (CCD) images centered on the cluster and covering a 6.3 min x 6.3 min field. Four of these variables are contact eclipsing binaries with periods between 0.35 and 0.41 days; one is a detached or semidetached eclipsing binary with a period of 0.56 days. Two of the variables were first identified as possible eclipsing binaries in an earlier survey by Hodder et al. (1992). We have used a variety of arguments to conclude that all five binary stars are probable members of M71, a result that is consistent with the low number (0.15) of short-period field binaries expected along this line of sight. Based on a simple model of how contact binaries evolve from initially detached binaries, we have determined a lower limit of 1.3% on the frequency of primordial binaries in M71 with initial orbital periods in the range 2.5 - 5 days. This implies that the overall primordial binary frequency, f, is 22(sup +26)(sub -12)% assuming df/d log P = const ( the 'flat' distribution), or f = 57(sup +15)(sub -8)% for df/d log P = 0.032 log P + const as observed for G-dwarf binaries in the solar neighborhood (the 'sloped' distribution). Both estimates of f correspond to binaries with initial periods shorter than 800 yr since any longer-period binaries would have been disrupted over the lifetime of the cluster. Our short-period binary frequency is in excellent agreement with the observed frequency of red-giant binaries observed in globulars if we adopt the flat distribution. For the sloped distribution, our results significantly overestimate the number of red-giant binaries. All of the short-period M71 binaries lie within 1 mag of the luminosity of the cluster turnoff in the color-magnitude diagram despite the fact we should have easily detected similar eclipsing binaries 2 - 2.5 mag fainter than this. We discuss the

  1. Stochastic Background from Coalescences of Neutron Star-Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regimbau, T.; de Freitas Pacheco, J. A.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, numerical simulations were used to investigate the gravitational stochastic background produced by coalescences of double neutron star systems occurring up to z~5. The cosmic coalescence rate was derived from Monte Carlo methods using the probability distributions for massive binaries to form and for a coalescence to occur in a given redshift. A truly continuous background is produced by events located only beyond the critical redshift z*=0.23. Events occurring in the redshift interval 0.027

  2. Searching for Pulsating Stars in Eclipsing Binaries in the OMC--VAR Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonso-Garzón, J.; Moya, A.; Montesinos, B.; Mas-Hesse, J. M.; Domingo, A.

    The first catalogue of variable sources observed by OMC (OMC--VAR hereafter) contains light curves for 5263 variable stars, out of which we have been able to detect periodicities for 1137 objects. A large variety of objects can be found in the catalogue, but the most frequent ones in the present compilation are pulsating stars and eclipsing binaries. We have performed an analysis to find eclipsing systems showing evidences of pulsations in one of their components some preliminary results are shown.

  3. Close encounters of the third-body kind. [intruding bodies in binary star systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, M. B.; Benz, W.; Hills, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    We simulated encounters involving binaries of two eccentricities: e = 0 (i.e., circular binaries) and e = 0.5. In both cases the binary contained a point mass of 1.4 solar masses (i.e., a neutron star) and a 0.8 solar masses main-sequence star modeled as a polytrope. The semimajor axes of both binaries were set to 60 solar radii (0.28 AU). We considered intruders of three masses: 1.4 solar masses (a neutron star), 0.8 solar masses (a main-sequence star or a higher mass white dwarf), and 0.64 solar masses (a more typical mass white dwarf). Our strategy was to perform a large number (40,000) of encounters using a three-body code, then to rerun a small number of cases with a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code to determine the importance of hydrodynamical effects. Using the results of the three-body runs, we computed the exchange across sections, sigma(sub ex). From the results of the SPH runs, we computed the cross sections for clean exchange, denoted by sigma(sub cx); the formation of a triple system, denoted by sigma(sub trp); and the formation of a merged binary with an object formed from the merger of two of the stars left in orbit around the third star, denoted by sigma(sub mb). For encounters between either binary and a 1.4 solar masses neutron star, sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.7 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 0.3 sigma(sub ex). For encounters between either binary and the 0.8 solar masses main-sequence star, sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.50 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 1.0 sigma(sub ex). If the main sequence star is replaced by a main-sequence star of the same mass, we have sigma(sub cx) approx. 0.5 sigma(sub ex) and sigma(sub mb) + sigma(sub trp) approx. 1.6 sigma(sub ex). Although the exchange cross section is a sensitive function of intruder mass, we see that the cross section to produce merged binaries is roughly independent of intruder mass. The merged binaries produced have semi

  4. Unusual microscopic dynamics in melts of star-like polymer grafted nanoparticles and their binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Jaydeep; Srivastava, S.; C, Sivasurender; Kandar, A.; C, Sarika; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A.

    2010-03-01

    Star polymers have attracted wide attention due to their fascinating structural, dynamical and rheological behavior including observation of multiple glassy states in concentrated solutions [1]. We have shown recently [2] that the microscopic dynamics in melts of a novel type of star-like polymers created by grafting of linear polymer chains on nanoparticle surfaces shows an unusual dynamical arrest in the case of low number, f, of grafted chains as opposed to that predicted and observed so far for both melts and solutions of star polymers. Here we extend our studies further to include similar star polymers with large range of f and their binary mixtures. Remarkably we find that the structural relaxation times of the star polymers becomes smaller with increasing arm number upto a certain value above which the relaxation time increases with f. Further, in binary mixtures of star polymers of two different sizes the relaxation time decreases dramatically with very low added small star fraction but shows dynamical arrest at significantly higher fraction of smaller stars. Reference: 1. C. Mayer et al Nature Materials 7, 780 (2008); 2. A. K. Kandar et al, J Chem Phys 130, 121102 (2009)

  5. High Mass X-ray Binaries in Nearby Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelov, Blagoy

    High Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs), in which a compact object, either black hole or neutron star, is accreting material from a young, massive donor star, often dominate the high-energy emission from nearby star-forming galaxies. These high mass pairs are believed to form in star clusters, where most massive star formation takes place, but to become displaced from their parent clusters either because they are dynamically ejected or because their parent cluster has dissolved. We have conducted a systematic study of the formation and evolution of bright HMXBs in eight nearby galaxies, by detecting HMXBs from their X-ray emission in Chandra X-ray Observatory observations, and identifying their parent clusters and donor stars in optical observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. We use the X-ray and optical properties of these systems to determine the ages of the binaries, whether the compact objects are black holes or neutron stars, and to constrain the masses of the donor stars.

  6. Formation and Evolution of Planets in and Around Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighipour, N.

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of planets in and around binary stars (also known as circumprimary and circumbinary planets) has opened a new chapter in the studies of the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. Computational simulations indicate that in binaries with separations smaller than ˜50 au, the perturbation of the secondary star can have profound effects on the dynamics of solid bodies around the primary, prohibiting their collisions to result in coalescence and growth to larger objects. However, several circumprimary planets are known to exist in binaries with separations of ˜20 au raising questions about how these planets formed and acquired their final orbital architecture. Also, a survey of the currently known circumbinary planets (CBPs) points to several interesting characteristics of these bodies. The detection of multiple transits in these systems points to the (almost) co-planarity of the planet-binary orbits, giving strong support to the idea that these planets formed in circumbinary protoplanetary disks. The proximity of some of these planets to the boundary of orbital instability around the binary suggests an evolutionary scenario in which planets form at large distances and either migrate to their present orbits, or are scattered to their current locations. Surprisingly, all currently known CBPs are Neptune-sized or smaller, and no CBP seems to exist around very short-period binaries. These specific characteristics of binary-planetary systems have raised many questions regarding the formation, dynamical evolution, and orbital architecture of these objects. I will review the current state of research on the formation of planets in and around binary stars, and discuss the new developments on the understanding of their dynamical evolution.

  7. Constraining Planet Formation Theories with the Detailed Chemical Abundances of Planet-Hosting Wide Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Claude Ernest; Schuler, Simon; Stassun, Keivan

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed chemical abundance analysis of planet-hosting wide binary systems. Each of these binary systems consists of two stars with similar spectral types (ranging from G2V - K2V), and in each system, at least one star hosts a giant planet with an orbital pericenter ~< 0.5 AU. We examine the photospheric abundances of the host stars to determine if they have ingested rocky planetary material as a result of the close-in giant planets scattering inner rocky planets into the star as they migrated to their present-day locations. Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise echelle spectra, for both stars in each system we derive the chemical abundances ([X/H]) of 15 elements covering a range of condensation temperatures (Tc). For stars in our sample with approximately solar metallicity, the refractory elements (Tc > 900 K) show a positive correlation between [X/H] and Tc. However, for stars with super-solar metallicities, the refractory elements show a slightly negative correlation between [X/H] and Tc. We interpret these results in the context of numerical simulations of giant planet migration that predict the accretion of hydrogen-depleted rocky material by the host star. We demonstrate that a simple model for a solar-metallicity star accreting material with Earth-like composition predicts a positive correlation between [X/H] and Tc, while for a supersolar-metallicity star the model predicts a negative correlation. The stark contrast between the predicted correlations for solar-metallicity and supersolar-metallicity stars may indicate that extracting any chemical signature of rocky planetary accretion is particularly challenging for very metal-rich stars.

  8. Centaurus X-3. [early x-ray binary star spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Crampton, D.; Van Paradus, J.; White, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Krzeminski's star at dispersions 25-60 A/mm are described. The primary is an evolved star of type O6-O8(f) with peculiarities, some of which are attributable to X-ray heating. Broad emission lines at 4640A (N III), 4686 A(He II) and H-alpha show self-absorption and do not originate entirely from the region near the X-ray star. The primary is not highly luminous (bolometric magnitude about -9) and does not show signs of an abnormally strong stellar wind. The X-ray source was 'on' at the time of optical observations. Orbital parameters are presented for the primary, which yield masses of 17 + or - 2 and 1.0 + or - 3 solar masses for the stars. The optical star is undermassive for its luminosity, as are other OB-star X-ray primaries. The rotation is probably synchronized with the orbital motion. The distance to Cen X-3 is estimated to be 10 + or - 1 kpc. Basic data for 12 early-type X-ray primaries are discussed briefly

  9. A Search for X-ray Emitting Binary Stars in the Globular Cluster Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveny, Sarah; Gallien, Michael; Rickards Vaught, Ryan; Waters, Miranda; Cool, Adrienne; Bellini, Andrea; Anderson, Jay; Henleywillis, Simon; Haggard, Daryl; Heinke, Craig O.

    2016-06-01

    Omega Centauri is one of the most widely studied globular clusters, and is expected to harbor a significant population of binary stars. Binaries play a crucial role in determining the progression of stellar dynamics within globular clusters, and as such are relevant to questions concerning the possible formation of intermediate black holes at their centers. One effective way to identify certain classes of binary systems is to first locate X-ray sources in the cluster and then to search for their optical counterparts. Using Chandra X-ray Observatory's ACIS-I instrument we have identified 275 X-ray sources in and toward Omega Cen, more than 50 of which lie within the cluster's core radius. Here we present a search for the optical counterparts of these core sources using an extensive database of archival Hubble Space Telescope images. Using WFC3/UVIS data from 11 different filters, we construct color-magnitude diagrams that reveal a diverse array of objects, including (in addition to background and foreground objects) cataclysmic variables, coronally active binaries, and, interestingly, stars that lie on Omega Cen's anomalous giant branch. We discuss the significance of these results in the context of studies of the formation and evolution of binary stars in globular clusters.

  10. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. Scientific Harvest from the First 4 Months of Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Orosz, J. A.; Welsh, W. F.; Slawson, R. W.; Batalha, N.; Rucker, M.; Doyle, L. R.

    2011-05-01

    The Kepler mission observed over 2200 eclipsing binary stars in its 105-square degree field of view. Their importance in modern astrophysics cannot be overstated -- it ranges from deriving the fundamental stellar parameters across the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram and calibrating the mass-radius-temperature relationships, to determining the distances in the Galaxy and beyond. Kepler observations provide a unique sample with a nearly continuous coverage and sub-millimag precision, allowing us to model binary star light curves to unprecedented accuracy. In the context of planet hunting, the period and amplitude statistics derived from this sample are used to estimate the occurence rate of false positives: stellar sources that mimic planet transits due to third light contamination. I will present the results of the studies performed by the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Working Group: 1) determining the physical parameters of binary star components, 2) studying the eclipse timing variations that attest to the presence of third bodies or arise due to component interaction, 3) performing statistical analysis of the whole sample, 4) estimating the occurence rate of background eclipsing binaries, and 5) searching for tertiary events due to other eclipsing objects. This work is supported by the NASA/SETI grant 08-SC-1041 and NSF RUI #AST-05-07542.

  11. Separated Fringe Packet Binary Star Astrometry at the CHARA Array - An Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brummelaar, Theo; Farrington, C. D.; Mason, B. D.; Roberts, L. C.; Turner, N. H.

    2014-01-01

    When observed with optical long-baseline interferometers (OLBI), components of a binary star which are sufficiently separated such that their interferometric fringe packets do not overlap are referred to as Separated Fringe Packet (SFP) binaries. At the CHARA Array these `wide' binaries are in the range of a few tens of milliarcseconds and extend out into the regime of systems resolved by speckle interferometry at single, large-aperture telescopes. These SFP measurements can provide additional data for orbits lacking good phase coverage, help constrain elements of already established orbits, and locate new binaries in the under-sampled regime between the bounds of spectroscopic surveys and speckle interferometry. Unlike binary stars whose fringes overlap, a visibility calibration star is not needed, and the separation of the fringe packets can provide an accurate vector separation. We apply the SFP approach to Omega Andromeda, HD 178911, and Xi Cephei. For these systems we determine masses for the two components of 0.963+/-0.049 M_{sun}; and 0.860+/-0.051 M_{sun}; and an orbital parallax of 39.54+/-1.85 mas for Omega Andromeda, for HD 178911 masses of 0.802+/-0.055 M_{sun}; and 0.622+/-0.053 M_{sun}; with orbital parallax of 28.26+/-1.70 mas, and masses of 1.045+/-0.031 M_{sun}; and 0.408+/-0.066 M_{sun}; orbital parallax of 38.10+/-2.81 mas for Xi Cephei.

  12. Constraining the equation of state of neutron stars from binary mergers.

    PubMed

    Takami, Kentaro; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2014-08-29

    Determining the equation of state of matter at nuclear density and hence the structure of neutron stars has been a riddle for decades. We show how the imminent detection of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries can be used to solve this riddle. Using a large number of accurate numerical-relativity simulations of binaries with nuclear equations of state, we find that the postmerger emission is characterized by two distinct and robust spectral features. While the high-frequency peak has already been associated with the oscillations of the hypermassive neutron star produced by the merger and depends on the equation of state, a new correlation emerges between the low-frequency peak, related to the merger process, and the total compactness of the stars in the binary. More importantly, such a correlation is essentially universal, thus providing a powerful tool to set tight constraints on the equation of state. If the mass of the binary is known from the inspiral signal, the combined use of the two frequency peaks sets four simultaneous constraints to be satisfied. Ideally, even a single detection would be sufficient to select one equation of state over the others. We test our approach with simulated data and verify it works well for all the equations of state considered. PMID:25215972

  13. Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During the five-year period, our study of "Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries" has been focused on the following aspects: observations, data analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations, numerical calculations, and theoretical modeling. Most of the results of our study have been published in refereed journals and conference presentations.

  14. Binary pulsars studies with multiwavelength sky surveys - I. Companion star identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, R. P.; Corongiu, A.; Pallanca, C.; Oates, S. R.; Yershov, V. N.; Breeveld, A. A.; Page, M. J.; Ferraro, F. R.; Possenti, A.; Jackson, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    The identification of the stellar companions to binary pulsars is key to studying the evolution of the binary system and how this is influenced by the interactions between the two stars. For only a fraction of the known binary pulsars, the stellar companions have been identified. Here, we used 11 source catalogues available from multiwavelength (ultraviolet, optical, infrared) imaging sky surveys to search for the stellar companions of a sample of 144 field binary pulsars (i.e. not in globular clusters) selected from the Australia Telescope National Facility data base (version 1.48) and from the public list of γ-ray pulsars detected by Fermi. We found positional associations in at least one source catalogue for 22 pulsars, of which 10 are detected in γ-rays by Fermi, including 15 millisecond pulsars. For six pulsars in our compilation, we confirm their identifications. For another seven pulsars that had yet not been identified, we examine potential identifications. In particular, we identified a likely companion star candidate to PSR J2317+1439, whereas for both PSR B1953+29 and PSR J1935+1726 the companion star identification is more uncertain. Follow-up observations of these three pulsars are needed to settle the proposed identifications. For the remaining nine pulsars that had been already identified, we provide additional spectral information in at least one of the surveys' spectral bands, which we will use to better constrain the stars' spectral energy distributions.

  15. Spectral properties of the post-merger gravitational-wave signal from binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Kentaro; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Extending previous work by a number of authors, we have recently presented a new approach in which the detection of gravitational waves from merging neutron star binaries can be used to determine the equation of state of matter at nuclear density and hence the structure of neutron stars. In particular, after performing a large number of numerical-relativity simulations of binaries with nuclear equations of state, we have found that the post-merger emission is characterized by two distinct and robust spectral features. While the high-frequency peak was already shown to be associated with the oscillations of the hypermassive neutron star produced by the merger and to depend on the equation of state, we have highlighted that the low-frequency peak is related to the merger process and to the total compactness of the stars in the binary. This relation is essentially universal and provides a powerful tool to set tight constraints on the equation of state. We here provide additional information on the extensive analysis performed, illustrating the methods used, the tests considered, as well as the robustness of the results. We also discuss additional relations that can be deduced when exploring the data and how these correlate with various properties of the binary. Finally, we present a simple mechanical toy model that explains the main spectral features of the post-merger signal and can even reproduce analytically the complex waveforms emitted right after the merger.

  16. Chemical abundances of the secondary star in the neutron star X-ray binary Cygnus X-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Andrés, L.; González Hernández, J. I.; Israelian, G.; Casares, J.; Rebolo, R.

    2015-03-01

    We present Utrecht Echelle Spectrograph@William Herschel Telescope high-resolution spectra of the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Cygnus X-2. We have derived the stellar parameters of the secondary star using χ2 minimization procedure, and taking into account any possible veiling from the accretion disc. We determine a metallicity higher than solar ([Fe/H] = 0.27 ± 0.19), as seen also in the neutron star X-ray binary Centaurus X-4. The high quality of the secondary's spectrum allow us to determine the chemical abundances of O, Mg, Si, Ca, S, Ti, Fe, and Ni. We found that some α-elements (Mg, Si, S, Ti) are enhanced, consistent with a scenario of contamination of the secondary star during the supernova event. Surprisingly oxygen appears to be underabundant, whereas enhanced abundances of Fe and Ni are measured. Assuming that these abundances come from matter that has been processed in the SN and then captured by the secondary star, we explore different SN explosion scenarios with diverse geometries. A non-spherically symmetric SN explosion, with a low mass cut, seems to reproduce better the observed abundance pattern of the secondary star compared to the spherical case.

  17. Tomographic separation of composite spectra - The components of the O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagnuolo, William G., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The UV photospheric lines of the short-period, double-lined O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cas are analyzed. Archival data from IUE (16 spectra uniformly distributed in orbital phase) were analyzed with a tomography algorithm to produce the separate spectra of the two stars in six spectral regions. The spectral classifications of the primary and secondary, O9.5 III and O8 V, respectively, were estimated through a comparison of UV line ratios with those in spectral standard stars. An intensity ratio of 0.5-0.7 (primary brighter) at 1600 A is compatible with the data.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts as the death throes of massive binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Ramesh; Paczynski, Bohdan; Piran, Tsvi

    1992-01-01

    We propose that gamma-ray bursts are created in the mergers of double neutron star binaries and black hole neutron star binaries at cosmological distances. Two different processes provide the electromagnetic energy for the bursts: neutrino-antineutrino annihilation into electron-position pairs during the merger, and magnetic flares generated by the Parker instability in a postmerger differentially rotating disk. In both cases, an optically thick fireball of size less than or approximately equal to 100 km is initially created, which expands ultrarelativistically to large radii before radiating. The scenario is only qualitative at this time, but it eliminates many previous objections to the cosmological merger model. The strongest bursts should be found close to, but not at the centers of, galaxies at redshifts of order 0.1, and should be accompanied by bursts of gravitational radiation from the spiraling-in binary which could be detected by LIGO.

  19. STELLAR LOCI II. A MODEL-FREE ESTIMATE OF THE BINARY FRACTION FOR FIELD FGK STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu; Wu, Yue; Hou, Yonghui; Zhang, Yong E-mail: x.liu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    We propose a stellar locus outlier (SLOT) method to determine the binary fraction of main-sequence stars statistically. The method is sensitive to neither the period nor mass ratio distributions of binaries and is able to provide model-free estimates of binary fraction for large numbers of stars of different populations in large survey volumes. We have applied the SLOT method to two samples of stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, constructed by combining the recalibrated SDSS photometric data with the spectroscopic information from the SDSS and LAMOST surveys. For the SDSS spectroscopic sample, we find an average binary fraction for field FGK stars of 41% ± 2%. The fractions decrease toward late spectral types and are 44% ± 5%, 43% ± 3%, 35% ± 5%, and 28% ± 6% for stars with g – i colors in the range 0.3-0.6 mag, 0.6-0.9 mag, 0.9-1.2 mag, and 1.2-1.6 mag, respectively. A modest metallicity dependence is also found. The fraction decreases with increasing metallicity. For stars with [Fe/H] between –0.5 and 0.0 dex, –1.0 and –0.5 dex, –1.5 and –1.0 dex, and –2.0 and –1.5 dex, the inferred binary fractions are 37% ± 3%, 39% ± 3%, 50% ± 9%, and 53% ± 20%, respectively. We have further divided the sample into stars from the thin disk, the thick disk, the transition zone between them, and the halo. The results suggest that the Galactic thin and thick disks have comparable binary fractions, whereas the Galactic halo contains a significantly larger fraction of binaries. Applying the method to the LAMOST spectroscopic sample yields consistent results. Finally, other potential applications and future work with the method are discussed.

  20. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling neutron-star binaries: Prompt and delayed collapse to a black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiotti, Luca; Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2008-10-01

    Binary neutron-star systems represent primary sources for the gravitational-wave detectors that are presently operating or are close to being operating at the target sensitivities. We present a systematic investigation in full general relativity of the dynamics and gravitational-wave emission from binary neutron stars which inspiral and merge, producing a black hole surrounded by a torus. Our results represent the state of the art from several points of view: (i) We use high-resolution shock-capturing methods for the solution of the hydrodynamics equations and high-order finite-differencing techniques for the solution of the Einstein equations; (ii) We employ adaptive mesh-refinement techniques with “moving boxes” that provide high-resolution around the orbiting stars; (iii) We use as initial data accurate solutions of the Einstein equations for a system of binary neutron stars in irrotational quasicircular orbits; (iv) We exploit the isolated-horizon formalism to measure the properties of the black holes produced in the merger; (v) Finally, we use two approaches, based either on gauge-invariant perturbations or on Weyl scalars, to calculate the gravitational waves emitted by the system. Within our idealized treatment of the matter, these techniques allow us to perform accurate evolutions on time scales never reported before (i.e. ˜30ms) and to provide the first complete description of the inspiral and merger of a neutron-star binary leading to the prompt or delayed formation of a black hole and to its ringdown. We consider either a polytropic equation of state or that of an ideal fluid and show that already with this idealized treatment a very interesting phenomenology can be described. In particular, we show that while higher-mass polytropic binaries lead to the prompt formation of a rapidly rotating black hole surrounded by a dense torus, lower-mass binaries give rise to a differentially rotating star, which undergoes large oscillations and emits large

  1. Is V899 Herculis an unsolved quadruple system containing double close binary stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.-B.; Liao, W.-P.; He, J.-J.; Yuan, J.-Z.; Zhu, L.-Y.

    2006-10-01

    Orbital period variation of the W UMa-type eclipsing binary, V899 Herculis, discovered by the Hipparcos satellite was investigated based on all available photoelectric and CCD times of light minimum. It is discovered that the orbital period of the binary shows a cyclic change with an amplitude of 0.0117 days. The cyclic period change can be explained as the light-travel time orbit of a tertiary component in the system, which is in agreement with the spectroscopic result obtained by Lu et al. [Lu, W., Rucinski, S.M., Ogloza, W., 2001. AJ 122, 402] who found that the system, of which V899 Herculis is a fainter component (B), is a triple, even quadruple and with the photometric result obtained by Özdemir et al. [Özdemir, S., Demircan, O., Erdem, A., Cicek, C., Bulut, I., Soydugan, E., Soydugan, F., 2002. A&A 387, 240] who reported a large amount of third light ( L3 ˜ 0.68) of the system. The third body (A) rotates around the eclipsing pair in a period of 3.7 years. Lu et al. [Lu, W., Rucinski, S.M., Ogloza, W., 2001. AJ 122, 402] reported that the tertiary component is F5-type main-sequence star. However, the present analysis shows that the mass of the third component is no less than 2.8 M⊙, which is larger than the mass of an F5-type main-sequence star suggesting that the tertiary component may be a non-eclipsing close binary. Therefore, the system may be a possible unsolved quadruple system containing double close binary stars. It is a good astrophysical laboratory to study the formation and evolution of binary and multiple system. The timescale for the formation of the G-type overcontact binary (V899 Herculis) via AML should be shorter than the main-sequence time of an F5-type star.

  2. On the possibility that the most massive stars result from binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Koter, A.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; de Mink, S. E.; Evans, C. J.; Gräfener, G.; Izzard, R. G.; Langer, N.; Ramírez-Agudelo, O. H.; Sana, H.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Vink, J. S.

    2013-02-01

    The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey is an ESO Large Program from which we have obtained multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. This unprecedented dataset is being used to address outstanding questions in how massive stars evolve from the early main sequence to their deaths as core collapse supernovae. Here we focus on the rotation properties of the population of presumably single O stars and use binary population synthesis predictions to show that the rapid rotators among this population likely are post-interaction binaries. The same type of population synthesis can be used to study the mass function of massive young clusters. We argue - on the basis of predictions for the Arches and Quintuplet clusters - that a sizable fraction of the very massive WNh stars in 30 Doradus may also have such a binary interaction history. We single out the WNh star discovered in the VFTS, VFTS 682, and discuss its properties.

  3. GRAVITATIONAL CONUNDRUM? DYNAMICAL MASS SEGREGATION VERSUS DISRUPTION OF BINARY STARS IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Li, Chengyuan; Zheng, Yong; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Deng, Licai; Hu, Yi; Wicker, James E.

    2013-03-01

    Upon their formation, dynamically cool (collapsing) star clusters will, within only a few million years, achieve stellar mass segregation for stars down to a few solar masses, simply because of gravitational two-body encounters. Since binary systems are, on average, more massive than single stars, one would expect them to also rapidly mass segregate dynamically. Contrary to these expectations and based on high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope observations, we show that the compact, 15-30 Myr old Large Magellanic Cloud cluster NGC 1818 exhibits tantalizing hints at the {approx}> 2{sigma} level of significance (>3{sigma} if we assume a power-law secondary-to-primary mass-ratio distribution) of an increasing fraction of F-star binary systems (with combined masses of 1.3-1.6 M {sub Sun }) with increasing distance from the cluster center, specifically between the inner 10''-20'' (approximately equivalent to the cluster's core and half-mass radii) and the outer 60''-80''. If confirmed, then this will offer support for the theoretically predicted but thus far unobserved dynamical disruption processes of the significant population of 'soft' binary systems-with relatively low binding energies compared to the kinetic energy of their stellar members-in star clusters, which we have access to here by virtue of the cluster's unique combination of youth and high stellar density.

  4. On the velocity dispersion of young star clusters: super-virial or binaries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieles, M.; Sana, H.; Portegies Zwart, S. F.

    2010-03-01

    Many young extra-galactic clusters have a measured velocity dispersion that is too high for the mass derived from their age and total luminosity, which has led to the suggestion that they are not in virial equilibrium. Most of these clusters are confined to a narrow age range centred around 10Myr because of observational constraints. At this age, the cluster light is dominated by luminous evolved stars, such as red supergiants, with initial masses of ~13-22Msolar for which (primordial) binarity is high. In this study, we investigate to what extent the observed excess velocity dispersion is the result of the orbital motions of binaries. We demonstrate that estimates for the dynamical mass of young star clusters, derived from the observed velocity dispersion, exceed the photometric mass by up to a factor of 10 and are consistent with a constant offset in the square of the velocity dispersion. This can be reproduced by models of virialized star clusters hosting a massive star population of which ~25 per cent is in binaries, with typical mass ratios of ~0.6 and periods of ~1000 d. We conclude that binaries play a pivotal role in deriving the dynamical masses of young (~10Myr), moderately massive and compact (<~105Msolar >~1pc) star clusters.

  5. Mining Planet Search Data for Binary Stars: The ψ1 Draconis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullikson, Kevin; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.

    2015-12-01

    Several planet-search groups have acquired a great deal of data in the form of time-series spectra of several hundred nearby stars with time baselines of over a decade. While binary star detections are generally not the goal of these long-term monitoring efforts, the binary stars hiding in existing planet search data are precisely the type that are too close to the primary star to detect with imaging or interferometry techniques. We use a cross-correlation analysis to detect the spectral lines of a new low-mass companion to ψ1 Draconis A, which has a known roughly equal-mass companion at ∼680 AU. We measure the mass of ψ1 Draconis C as M2 = 0.70 ± 0.07M⊙, with an orbital period of ∼20 years. This technique could be used to characterize binary companions to many stars that show large-amplitude modulation or linear trends in radial velocity data.

  6. Cataclysmic Variables as Binary Stars - then and now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Robert P.

    A brief history is given of the clues that led to the establishment, in the period c. 1950 to 1965, of a universal binary model for novae and related cataclysmic variables. The observational facts, established early in this period by A. H. Joy and R. F. Sanford (selected binary orbits), J. L. Greenstein (spectroscopy) and M. Walker (photometry) are reviewed, as are the theoretical ideas that formed the basis for the early models, viz., those of G. Kuiper (restricted 3-body problem), A. Sandage and M. Schwarzschild (stellar evolution), J. Crawford (dog-eat-dog hypothesis), F. Hoyle and H. Bondi (accretion), S.-S. Huang (angular momentum losses), and S. Chandrasekhar (gravitational radiation). Some comparisons are made between what we knew then and what we know now. With apologies to all, the speaker will recall some anecdotes of an earlier time and comment on developments of the past score of years from a very personal perspective.

  7. Gravitational-wave signal from binary neutron stars: A systematic analysis of the spectral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezzolla, Luciano; Takami, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    A number of works have shown that important information on the equation of state of matter at nuclear density can be extracted from the gravitational waves emitted by merging neutron-star binaries. We present a comprehensive analysis of the gravitational-wave signal emitted during the inspiral, merger, and postmerger of 56 neutron-star binaries. This sample of binaries, arguably the largest studied to date with realistic equations of state, spans six different nuclear-physics equations of state and ten masses, allowing us to sharpen a number of results recently obtained on the spectral properties of the gravitational-wave signal. Overall we find the following: (i) for binaries with masses differing no more than 20%, the frequency at gravitational-wave amplitude's maximum is related quasiuniversally with the tidal deformability of the two stars; (ii) the spectral properties vary during the postmerger phase, with a transient phase lasting a few milliseconds after the merger and followed by a quasistationary phase; (iii) when distinguishing the spectral peaks between these two phases, a number of ambiguities in the identification of the peaks disappear, leaving a simple and robust picture; (iv) using properly identified frequencies, quasiuniversal relations are found between the spectral features and the properties of the neutron stars; (v) for the most salient peaks analytic fitting functions can be obtained in terms of the stellar tidal deformability or compactness. Altogether, these results support the idea that the equation of state of nuclear matter can be constrained tightly when a signal in gravitational waves from binary neutron stars is detected.

  8. Searching Kepler Variable Stars with the Eclipsing Binary Factory Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvizi, Mahmoud; Paegert, M.

    2014-01-01

    Repositories of large survey data, such as the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, provide an ideally sized sample from which to identify astrophysically interesting eclipsing binary systems (EBs). However, constraints on the rate of human analysis in solving for the characteristic parameters make mining this data using classical techniques prohibitive. The Kepler data set provides both the high precision simple aperture photometry necessary to detect EBs and a corresponding Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog - V3 (KEBC3) of 2,406 EBs in the Kepler filed of view (FoV) as a benchmark. We developed a fully automated end-to-end computational pipeline known as the Eclipsing Binary Factory (EBF) that employs pre-classification data processing modules, a feed-forward single layer perception neural network classifier (NNC), and a subsequent neural network solution estimator (NNSE). This paper focuses on the EBF component modules to include NNC, but excludes the NNSE, as a precursor to a fully automated pipeline that uses solution estimates of characteristic parameters to identify astrophysically interesting EBs. The EBF was found to recover ~94% of KEBC3 EBs contained in the Kepler “Q3” data release where the period is less than thirty days.

  9. Searching Planets Around Some Selected Eclipsing Close Binary Stars Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiroglu, Ilham; Slowikowska, Agnieszka; Krzeszowski, Krzysztof; Zejmo, M. Michal; Er, Hüseyin; Goździewski, Krzysztof; Zola, Stanislaw; Koziel-Wierzbowska, Dorota; Debski, Bartholomew; Ogloza, Waldemar; Drozdz, Marek

    2016-07-01

    We present updated O-C diagrams of selected short period eclipsing binaries observed since 2009 with the T100 Telescope at the TUBITAK National Observatory (Antalya, Turkey), the T60 Telescope at the Adiyaman University Observatory (Adiyaman, Turkey), the 60cm at the Mt. Suhora Observatory of the Pedagogical University (Poland) and the 50cm Cassegrain telescope at the Fort Skala Astronomical Observatory of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. All four telescopes are equipped with sensitive, back-illuminated CCD cameras and sets of wide band filters. One of the targets in our sample is a post-common envelope eclipsing binary NSVS 14256825. We collected more than 50 new eclipses for this system that together with the literature data gives more than 120 eclipse timings over the time span of 8.5 years. The obtained O-C diagram shows quasi-periodic variations that can be well explained by the existence of the third body on Jupiter-like orbit. We also present new results indicating a possible light time travel effect inferred from the O-C diagrams of two other binary systems: HU Aqr and V470 Cam.

  10. On the Possibility of Habitable Trojan Planets in Binary Star Systems.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Funk, Barbara; Bazsó, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 60% of all stars in the solar neighbourhood (up to 80% in our Milky Way) are members of binary or multiple star systems. This fact led to the speculations that many more planets may exist in binary systems than are currently known. To estimate the habitability of exoplanetary systems, we have to define the so-called habitable zone (HZ). The HZ is defined as a region around a star where a planet would receive enough radiation to maintain liquid water on its surface and to be able to build a stable atmosphere. We search for new dynamical configurations-where planets may stay in stable orbits-to increase the probability to find a planet like the Earth. PMID:26113154

  11. Observing quantum vacuum lensing in a neutron star binary system.

    PubMed

    Dupays, Arnaud; Robilliard, Cécile; Rizzo, Carlo; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2005-04-29

    In this Letter we study the propagation of light in the neighborhood of magnetized neutron stars. Because of the optical properties of quantum vacuum in the presence of a magnetic field, the light emitted by background astronomical objects is deviated, giving rise to a phenomenon of the same kind as the gravitational one. We give a quantitative estimation of this effect, and we discuss the possibility of its observation. We show that this effect could be detected by monitoring the evolution of the recently discovered double neutron star system J0737-3039. PMID:15904205

  12. The unusual interacting S star binary HR 1105

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ake, Thomas B., III; Johnson, Hollis R.; Bopp, Bernard W.

    1994-01-01

    IUE observations of HR 1105 over its 596-day orbit show strong orbital modulation of both continuum and emission lines. These are most intense just before both conjunctions and nearly disappear near quadratures, the most intense phase being just before the hot component passes in front of the S star. High dispersion observations exhibit a blue-shifted absorption feature in Mg II, representing an outflow of material of about 55 km/s. These observations are consistent with the UV source being an optically thin gas stream between the components of the system, which is partially eclipsed when the S star is in front.

  13. Observational results from cooling neutron stars in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    The composition and structure of the ~1 km thick, solid crust of neutron stars is responsible for many of their observable properties, and plays a fundamental role in the emission of gravitational waves and the evolution of their magnetic field. When residing in an X-ray binary, a neutron star accretes gas from a companion star. As matter accumulates on the neutron star surface, the underlying crust is compressed and heated due to nuclear reactions induced by this compression. Once accretion switches off, sensitive X-ray satellites can be employed to observe how the heated crust cools. Comparing these observations with theoretical simulations provides very valuable insight into the structure and composition of the crusts of neutron stars. I will present the latest observational results and challenges in this research field.

  14. Four New Binary Stars in the Field of CL Aurigae. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chun-Hwey; Lee, Jae Woo; Duck, Hyun Kim; Andronov, Ivan L.

    2010-12-01

    We report on a discovery of four new variable stars (USNO-B1.0 1234-0103195, 1235- 0097170, 1236-0100293 and 1236-0100092) in the field of CL Aur. The stars are classified as eclipsing binary stars with orbital periods of 0.5137413(23) (EW type), 0.8698365(26) (EA) and 4.0055842(40) (EA with a significant orbital eccentricity), respectively. The fourth star (USNO-B1.0 1236-0100092) showed only one partial ascending branch of the light curves, although 22 nights were covered at the 61-cm telescope at the Sobaeksan Optical Astronomy Observatory (SOAO) in Korea. Fourteen minima timings for these stars are published separately. In an addition to the original discovery paper (Kim et al. 2010), we discuss methodological problems and present results of mathematical modeling of the light curves using other methods, i.e. trigonometric polynomial fits and the newly developed fit "NAV" ("New Algol Variable").

  15. Transformation of a star into a planet in a millisecond pulsar binary.

    PubMed

    Bailes, M; Bates, S D; Bhalerao, V; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; D'Amico, N; Johnston, S; Keith, M J; Kramer, M; Kulkarni, S R; Levin, L; Lyne, A G; Milia, S; Possenti, A; Spitler, L; Stappers, B; van Straten, W

    2011-09-23

    Millisecond pulsars are thought to be neutron stars that have been spun-up by accretion of matter from a binary companion. Although most are in binary systems, some 30% are solitary, and their origin is therefore mysterious. PSR J1719-1438, a 5.7-millisecond pulsar, was detected in a recent survey with the Parkes 64-meter radio telescope. We show that this pulsar is in a binary system with an orbital period of 2.2 hours. The mass of its companion is near that of Jupiter, but its minimum density of 23 grams per cubic centimeter suggests that it may be an ultralow-mass carbon white dwarf. This system may thus have once been an ultracompact low-mass x-ray binary, where the companion narrowly avoided complete destruction. PMID:21868629

  16. CHARACTERIZING THE BROWN DWARF FORMATION CHANNELS FROM THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND BINARY-STAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Thies, Ingo; Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel; Marks, Michael

    2015-02-10

    The stellar initial mass function (IMF) is a key property of stellar populations. There is growing evidence that the classical star-formation mechanism by the direct cloud fragmentation process has difficulties reproducing the observed abundance and binary properties of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. In particular, recent analytical derivations of the stellar IMF exhibit a deficit of brown dwarfs compared to observational data. Here we derive the residual mass function of brown dwarfs as an empirical measure of the brown dwarf deficiency in recent star-formation models with respect to observations and show that it is compatible with the substellar part of the Thies-Kroupa IMF and the mass function obtained by numerical simulations. We conclude that the existing models may be further improved by including a substellar correction term that accounts for additional formation channels like disk or filament fragmentation. The term ''peripheral fragmentation'' is introduced here for such additional formation channels. In addition, we present an updated analytical model of stellar and substellar binarity. The resulting binary fraction and the dynamically evolved companion mass-ratio distribution are in good agreement with observational data on stellar and very-low-mass binaries in the Galactic field, in clusters, and in dynamically unprocessed groups of stars if all stars form as binaries with stellar companions. Cautionary notes are given on the proper analysis of mass functions and the companion mass-ratio distribution and the interpretation of the results. The existence of accretion disks around young brown dwarfs does not imply that these form just like stars in direct fragmentation.

  17. THE RADIUS DISCREPANCY IN LOW-MASS STARS: SINGLE VERSUS BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spada, F.; Demarque, P.; Kim, Y.-C.; Sills, A.

    2013-10-20

    A long-standing issue in the theory of low-mass stars is the discrepancy between predicted and observed radii and effective temperatures. In spite of the increasing availability of very precise radius determinations from eclipsing binaries and interferometric measurements of radii of single stars, there is no unanimous consensus on the extent (or even the existence) of the discrepancy and on its connection with other stellar properties (e.g., metallicity, magnetic activity). We investigate the radius discrepancy phenomenon using the best data currently available (accuracy ∼< 5%). We have constructed a grid of stellar models covering the entire range of low-mass stars (0.1-1.25 M{sub ☉}) and various choices of the metallicity and mixing length parameter, α. We used an improved version of the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code, implementing surface boundary conditions based on the most up-to-date PHOENIX atmosphere models. Our models are in good agreement with others in the literature and improve and extend the low mass end of the Yale-Yonsei isochrones. Our calculations include rotation-related quantities, such as moments of inertia and convective turnover timescales, useful in studies of magnetic activity and rotational evolution of solar-like stars. Consistent with previous works, we find that both binaries and single stars have radii inflated by about 3% with respect to the theoretical models; among binaries, the components of short orbital period systems are found to be the most deviant. We conclude that both binaries and single stars are comparably affected by the radius discrepancy phenomenon.

  18. Circumstellar disks in binary star systems. Models for γ Cephei and α Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T. W. A.; Kley, W.

    2012-03-01

    Context. As of today, over 50 planetary systems have been discovered in binary star systems, some of which have binary separations that are smaller than 20 AU. In these systems the gravitational forces from the binary have a strong influence on the evolution of the protoplanetary disk and hence the planet formation process. Aims: We study the evolution of viscous and radiative circumstellar disks under the influence of a companion star. We focus on the eccentric γ Cephei and α Centauri system as examples and compare disk quantities such as disk eccentricity and precession rate to previous isothermal simulations. Methods: We performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the binary star systems under the assumption of coplanarity of the disk, host star and binary companion. We used the grid-based, staggered mesh code FARGO with an additional energy equation to which we added radiative cooling based on opacity tables. Results: The eccentric binary companion perturbs the disk around the primary star periodically. Upon passing periastron, spirals arms are induced that wind from the outer disk towards the star. In isothermal simulations this results in disk eccentricities up to edisk ≈ 0.2, but in more realistic radiative models we obtain much smaller eccentricities of about edisk ≈ 0.04-0.06 with no real precession. Models with varying viscosity and disk mass indicate that disks with less mass have lower temperatures and higher disk eccentricity. Conclusions: The fairly high disk eccentricities, as indicated in previous isothermal disk simulations, implied a more difficult planet formation in the γ Cephei system caused by the enhanced collision velocities of planetesimals. We have shown that under more realistic conditions with radiative cooling the disk becomes less eccentric and thus planet formation may be made easier. However, we estimate that the viscosity in the disk has to very low, with α ≲ 0.001, because otherwise the disk's lifetime will be

  19. Star cluster evolution with primordial binaries. 3: Effect of the Galactic tidal field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Steve; Hut, Piet

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of N-body simulations of tidally limited star clusters with an initial population of 0%-20% binaries. We find that (1) if enough binaries are initially present, the binary fraction may fall to a minimum value, then increase at late times; (2) the cluster evaporation timescale is quite insensitive to the details of the initial binary distribution; (3) the cluster core radius stabilizes at a few percent of the half-mass radius when binaries are present, just as in the case of isolated clusters; and (4) there may be a marked difference between the spatial distribution of low-energy and high-energy binaries as the cluster evolves. Specifically, the spatial distribution of the lower energy systems is often substantially more extended than that of the more tightly bound pairs. At no time are our simulated clusters well described by simple dynamical models that neglect the close coupling between the binding energies and the center-of-mass energies of the binaries they contain.

  20. Modelling the observed properties of carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars using binary population synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abate, C.; Pols, O. R.; Stancliffe, R. J.; Izzard, R. G.; Karakas, A. I.; Beers, T. C.; Lee, Y. S.

    2015-09-01

    The stellar population in the Galactic halo is characterised by a large fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. Most CEMP stars have enhanced abundances of s-process elements (CEMP-s stars), and some of these are also enriched in r-process elements (CEMP-s/r stars). In one formation scenario proposed for CEMP stars, the observed carbon excess is explained by invoking wind mass transfer in the past from a more massive thermally-pulsing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) primary star in a binary system.In this work we generate synthetic populations of binary stars at metallicity Z = 0.0001 ([Fe/H] ≈ - 2.3), with the aim of reproducing the observed fraction of CEMP stars in the halo. In addition, we aim to constrain our model of the wind mass-transfer process, in particular the wind-accretion efficiency and angular-momentum loss, and investigate under which conditions our model populations reproduce observed distributions of element abundances.We compare the CEMP fractions determined from our synthetic populations and the abundance distributions of many elements with observations. Several physical parameters of the binary stellar population of the halo are uncertain, in particular the initial mass function, the mass-ratio distribution, the orbital-period distribution, and the binary fraction. We vary the assumptions in our model about these parameters, as well as the wind mass-transfer process, and study the consequent variations of our synthetic CEMP population.The CEMP fractions calculated in our synthetic populations vary between 7% and 17%, a range consistent with the CEMP fractions among very metal-poor stars recently derived from the SDSS/SEGUE data sample. The resulting fractions are more than a factor of three higher than those determined with default assumptions in previous population-synthesis studies, which typically underestimated the observed CEMP fraction. We find that most CEMP stars in our simulations are formed in binary systems with periods

  1. Multi-periodic pulsations of a stripped red-giant star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Maxted, Pierre F L; Serenelli, Aldo M; Miglio, Andrea; Marsh, Thomas R; Heber, Ulrich; Dhillon, Vikram S; Littlefair, Stuart; Copperwheat, Chris; Smalley, Barry; Breedt, Elmé; Schaffenroth, Veronika

    2013-06-27

    Low-mass white-dwarf stars are the remnants of disrupted red-giant stars in binary millisecond pulsars and other exotic binary star systems. Some low-mass white dwarfs cool rapidly, whereas others stay bright for millions of years because of stable fusion in thick surface hydrogen layers. This dichotomy is not well understood, so the potential use of low-mass white dwarfs as independent clocks with which to test the spin-down ages of pulsars or as probes of the extreme environments in which low-mass white dwarfs form cannot fully be exploited. Here we report precise mass and radius measurements for the precursor to a low-mass white dwarf. We find that only models in which this disrupted red-giant star has a thick hydrogen envelope can match the strong constraints provided by our data. Very cool low-mass white dwarfs must therefore have lost their thick hydrogen envelopes by irradiation from pulsar companions or by episodes of unstable hydrogen fusion (shell flashes). We also find that this low-mass white-dwarf precursor is a type of pulsating star not hitherto seen. The observed pulsation frequencies are sensitive to internal processes that determine whether this star will undergo shell flashes. PMID:23803845

  2. ELECTROMAGNETIC EXTRACTION OF ENERGY FROM BLACK-HOLE-NEUTRON-STAR BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Sean T.; Levin, Janna

    2011-12-01

    The coalescence of black-hole-neutron-star binaries is expected to be a principal source of gravitational waves for the next generation of detectors, Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. For black hole masses not much larger than the neutron star mass, the tidal disruption of the neutron star by the black hole provides one avenue for generating an electromagnetic counterpart. However, in this work, we demonstrate that, for all black-hole-neutron-star binaries observable by Advanced LIGO/Virgo, the interaction of the black hole with the magnetic field of the neutron star will generate copious luminosity, comparable to supernovae and active galactic nuclei. This novel effect may have already been observed as a new class of very short gamma-ray bursts by the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Telescope. These events may be observable to cosmological distances, so that any black-hole-neutron-star coalescence detectable with gravitational waves by Advanced LIGO/Virgo could also be detectable electromagnetically.

  3. Progenitor Stars of Type Ib/c Supernovae in Close Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.-Ch.

    2010-06-01

    We discuss implications of the most up-to-date mass loss rate of Wolf-Rayet stars for Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c). According to recent evolutionary models, final masses of Wolf-Rayet stars originating from mass-losing single stars at solar metallicity are larger than about 10 Msun, which is most likely to result in black-hole formation without producing a bright supernova. This indicates that the majority of the observed Type Ib/c supernovae should originate from massive binary stars in close orbits. We present new evolutionary models of massive binary stars and mass-losing helium stars, and discuss key properties of SNe Ib/c progenitors. Compared to the previous models of Woosley, Langer & Weaver and Wellstein & Langer, our new models predict large amounts of helium in the envelope, presence of thin hydrogen layers for a certain range of progenitor masses, and large stellar radii at the pre-supernova stage. This result should have important consequences for SNe Ib/c light curves and spectra, and shock-breakouts.

  4. Discovery of a 66 mas Ultracool Binary with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Siegler, N; Close, L; Burgasser, A; Cruz, K; Marois, C; Macintosh, B; Barman, T

    2007-02-02

    We present the discovery of 2MASS J21321145+1341584AB as a closely separated (0.066'') very low-mass field dwarf binary resolved in the near-infrared by the Keck II Telescope using laser guide star adaptive optics. Physical association is deduced from the angular proximity of the components and constraints on their common proper motion. We have obtained a near-infrared spectrum of the binary and find that it is best described by an L5{+-}0.5 primary and an L7.5{+-}0.5 secondary. Model-dependent masses predict that the two components straddle the hydrogen burning limit threshold with the primary likely stellar and the secondary likely substellar. The properties of this sytem - close projected separation (1.8{+-}0.3AU) and near unity mass ratio - are consistent with previous results for very low-mass field binaries. The relatively short estimated orbital period of this system ({approx}7-12 yr) makes it a good target for dynamical mass measurements. Interestingly, the system's angular separation is the tightest yet for any very low-mass binary published from a ground-based telescope and is the tightest binary discovered with laser guide star adaptive optics to date.

  5. New code for quasiequilibrium initial data of binary neutron stars: Corotating, irrotational, and slowly spinning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsokaros, Antonios; UryÅ«, Kōji; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2015-05-01

    We present the extension of our cocal—Compact Object CALculator—code to compute general-relativistic initial data for binary compact-star systems. In particular, we construct quasiequilibrium initial data for equal-mass binaries with spins that are either aligned or antialigned with the orbital angular momentum. The Isenberg-Wilson-Mathews formalism is adopted and the constraint equations are solved using the representation formula with a suitable choice of a Green's function. We validate the new code with solutions for equal-mass binaries and explore its capabilities for a wide range of compactnesses, from a white dwarf binary with compactness ˜1 0-4, up to a highly relativistic neutron-star binary with compactness ˜0.22 . We also present a comparison with corotating and irrotational quasiequilibrium sequences from the spectral code lorene [Taniguchi and Gourgoulhon, Phys. Rev. D 66, 104019 (2002)] and with different compactness, showing that the results from the two codes agree to a precision of the order of 0.05%. Finally, we present equilibria for spinning configurations with a nuclear-physics equation of state in a piecewise polytropic representation.

  6. Polarimetric Variations of Binary Stars. VI. Orbit-Induced Variations in the Pre-Main-Sequence Binary AK Scorpii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manset, N.; Bastien, P.; Bertout, C.

    2005-01-01

    We present simultaneous UBV polarimetric and photometric observations of the pre-main-sequence binary AK Sco, obtained over 12 nights, slightly less than the orbital period of 13.6 days. The polarization is a sum of interstellar and intrinsic polarization, with a significant intrinsic polarization of 1% at 5250 Å, indicating the presence of circumstellar matter distributed in an asymmetric geometry. The polarization and its position angle are clearly variable on timescales of hours and nights in all three wavelengths, with a behavior related to the orbital motion. The variations have the highest amplitudes seen so far for pre-main-sequence binaries (~1% and ~30°) and are sinusoidal with periods similar to the orbital period and half of it. The polarization variations are generally correlated with the photometric ones: when the star gets fainter, it also gets redder, and its polarization increases. The (B-V, V) color-magnitude diagram exhibits a ratio of total to selective absorption R=4.3, higher than in normal interstellar clouds (R=3.1). The interpretation of the simultaneous photometric and polarimetric observations is that a cloud of circumstellar matter passes in front of the star, decreasing the amount of direct, unpolarized light and hence increasing the contribution of scattered (blue) light. We show that the large amplitude of the polarization variations cannot be reproduced with a single-scattering model and axially symmetric circumbinary or circumstellar disks. Based on observations made with the ESO telescopes at the La Silla Observatory.

  7. Spatial Resolution of the Silicate Feature in T Tauri Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Cleve, J. E.; Hayward, T. L.; Houck, J. R.; Miles, J.

    1994-05-01

    We took low resolution spectra from 7.9 to 13.0 microns of the T Tauri binary systems T Tau and Haro 6-10, as well as images of these systems and UY Aur, FV Tau, and FX Tau at 7.9 or 8.8, 10.3, and 12.5 microns, using the Cornell SpectroCam-10 imaging spectrometer on the 5-m Hale telescope. These binaries resemble planetary systems in that the projected separation of the components (100 to 180 AU) is roughly the diameter of our Solar System. For the images, the observed flux distribution along the axis of the binary was deconvolved by the flux distribution perpendicular to that axis. The resulting visibility function was then fitted to a two point-source model to obtain the relative flux of the components. The spectra were deconvolved by calibrator star spectra, and the model was fit to each wavelength of the visibility function spectrum to obtain the relative flux. Images and spectra agree and show that in binaries which contain an infrared companion -- such as T Tau and Haro 6-10 -- the IR companion has a deep silicate absorption feature, while the other component is featureless or shows a weak emission feature. In Haro 6-10, for example, the optical depth of the silicate absorption in the IR companion (Haro 6-10 N) is ~ 1 near its maximum at 9.7 microns. These results suggest that the components (including dust shells or disks around each star) of an IR companion system are not both coplanar and coeval. For a giant planet and a single star, however, we'd expect a circumplanetary disk to lie in the plane of the circumstellar disk, and be about the same age. At least for the IR companion systems, the analogy of binary stars and planetary systems is not a good one in this respect.

  8. Exploring tidal effects of coalescing binary neutron stars in numerical relativity. II. Long-term simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Okawa, Hirotada; Shibata, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    We perform new long-term (15-16 orbits) simulations of coalescing binary neutron stars in numerical relativity using an updated Einstein equation solver, employing low-eccentricity initial data, and modeling the neutron stars by a piecewise polytropic equation of state. A convergence study shows that our new results converge more rapidly than the third order, and using the determined convergence order, we construct an extrapolated waveform for which the estimated total phase error should be less than one radian. We then compare the extrapolated waveforms with those calculated by the latest effective-one-body (EOB) formalism in which the so-called tidal deformability, higher post-Newtonian corrections, and gravitational self-force effects are taken into account. We show that for a binary of compact neutron stars with their radius 11.1 km, the waveform by the EOB formalism agrees quite well with the numerical waveform so that the total phase error is smaller than one radian for the total phase of ˜200 radian up to the merger. By contrast, for a binary of less compact neutron stars with their radius 13.6 km, the EOB and numerical waveforms disagree with each other in the last few wave cycles, resulting in the total phase error of approximately three radian.

  9. An Apparent Precessing Helical Outflow from a Massive Evolved Star: Evidence for Binary Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, R. M.; Hankins, M. J.; Herter, T. L.; Morris, M. R.; Mills, E. A. C.; Ressler, M. E.

    2016-02-01

    Massive, evolved stars play a crucial role in the metal enrichment, dust budget, and energetics of the interstellar medium; however, the details of their evolution are uncertain because of their rarity and short lifetimes before exploding as supernovae. Discrepancies between theoretical predictions from single-star evolutionary models and observations of massive stars have evoked a shifting paradigm that implicates the importance of binary interaction. We present mid- to far-infrared observations from the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy of a conical “helix” of warm dust (˜180 K) that appears to extend from the Wolf-Rayet star WR102c. Our interpretation of the helix is a precessing, collimated outflow that emerged from WR102c during a previous evolutionary phase as a rapidly rotating luminous blue variable. We attribute the precession of WR102c to gravitational interactions with an unseen compact binary companion whose orbital period can be constrained to 800 days < P < 1400 days from the inferred precession period, τp ˜ 1.4 × 104 yr, and limits imposed on the stellar and orbital parameters of the system. Our results concur with the range of orbital periods (P ≲ 1500 days) where spin-up via mass exchange is expected to occur for massive binary systems.

  10. A LONG-PERIOD TOTALLY ECLIPSING BINARY STAR AT THE TURNOFF OF THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6819 DISCOVERED WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Jeffries, Mark W. Jr.; Brewer, Lauren N. E-mail: orosz@sciences.sdsu.edu; and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of the totally eclipsing long-period (P = 771.8 days) binary system WOCS 23009 in the old open cluster NGC 6819 that contains both an evolved star near central hydrogen exhaustion and a low-mass (0.45 M {sub Sun }) star. This system was previously known to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary, but the discovery of an eclipse near apastron using data from the Kepler space telescope makes it clear that the system has an inclination that is very close to 90 Degree-Sign . Although the secondary star has not been identified in spectra, the mass of the primary star can be constrained using other eclipsing binaries in the cluster. The combination of the total eclipses and a mass constraint for the primary star allows us to determine a reliable mass for the secondary star and radii for both stars, and to constrain the cluster age. Unlike well-measured stars of similar mass in field binaries, the low-mass secondary is not significantly inflated in radius compared to model predictions. The primary star characteristics, in combination with cluster photometry and masses from other cluster binaries, indicate a best age of 2.62 {+-} 0.25 Gyr, although stellar model physics may introduce systematic uncertainties at the {approx}10% level. We find preliminary evidence that the asteroseismic predictions for red giant masses in this cluster are systematically too high by as much as 8%.

  11. Consolidated RXTE Observing Grants on Observation of Neutron Stars and Black Holes in Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Thomas A.; Vaughan, Brian A.

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of neutron stars and black holes in binaries. The activities focused on observation made with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. The following areas were covered: long term observations of accreting binary pulsars with the All-Sky Monitor (ASM); observations of Centaurus X-3 with the Proportional Counter Array (PCA) and the High-Energy X-ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE); observations of accreting pulsars with the PCA and HEXTE; studies of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO); and investigations of accreting black-hole candidates.

  12. Southern RS CVn systems - Candidate list. [spectral catalog of variable binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiler, E. J.; Stencel, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    A list of 43 candidate RS CVn binary systems in the far southern hemisphere of the sky (south of -40 deg declination) is presented. The candidate systems were selected from the first two volumes of the Michigan Spectral Catalog (1975, 1978), which provides MK classifications for southern HD stars and identifies any unusual characteristics noted for individual stellar spectra. The selection criteria used were: (1) the occurrence of Ca II H and K emission; (2) known or suspected binary nature; (3) regular light variations of zero to one magnitude; and (4) spectral type between F0 and K2 and luminosity less than bright giant (II).

  13. Neutron star high-mass binaries as the origin of SGR/AXP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.

    2016-03-01

    A close high-mass binary system consisting of a neutron star (NS) and a massive OB supergiant companion is expected to lead to a Thorne-Żytkow object (TZO) structure, which consists of a NS core and a stellar envelope. We use the scenario machine program to calculate the formation tracks of TZOs in close high-mass NS binaries and their subsequent evolution. We propose and demonstrate that the explosion and instant contraction of a TZO structure leave its stellar remnant as a soft gamma-ray repeater and an anomalous X-ray pulsar respectively.

  14. Flux of icy asteroids towards the habitable zone in binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Bancelin, David; Bazso, Akos; Eggl, Siegfried

    2015-08-01

    From studies of habitability in our solar system we can conclude that a fraction of the water on Earth was transported via asteroids and comets to our planet. Assuming that other planetary systems would need similar water-bringing-scenarios we studied the efficiency of the water transport in binary star systems where we considered S-type planetary motion. We will show a detailed analysis of the dynamcial perturbations in the disk for different binary-planet configurations and analyse the efficiency of water transport via icy asteroids into the circumstellar habitable zone.

  15. A study of non-Keplerian velocities in observations of spectroscopic binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearnshaw, J. B.; Komonjinda, Siramas; Skuljan, J.; Kilmartin, P. M.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an orbital analysis of six southern single-lined spectroscopic binary systems. The systems selected were shown to have circular or nearly circular orbits (e < 0.1) from earlier published solutions of only moderate precision. The purpose was to obtain high-precision orbital solutions in order to investigate the presence of small non-Keplerian velocity effects in the data and hence the reality of the small eccentricities found for most of the stars. The Hercules spectrograph and 1-m McLellan telescope at Mt John Observatory, New Zealand, were used to obtain over 450 CCD spectra between 2004 October and 2007 August. Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation. These data were used to achieve high-precision orbital solutions for all the systems studied, sometimes with solutions up to about 50 times more precise than those from the earlier literature. However, the precision of the solutions is limited in some cases by the rotational velocity or chromospheric activity of the stars. The data for the six binaries analysed here are combined with those for six stars analysed earlier by Komonjinda, Hearnshaw and Ramm. We have performed tests using the prescription of Lucy on all 12 binaries, and conclude that, with one exception, none of the small eccentricities found by fitting Keplerian orbits to the radial-velocity data can be supported. Instead we conclude that small non-Keplerian effects, which are clearly detectable for six of our stars, make impossible the precise determination of spectroscopic binary orbital eccentricities for many late-type stars to better than about 0.03 in eccentricity, unless the systematic perturbations are also carefully modelled. The magnitudes of the non-Keplerian velocity variations are given quantitatively.

  16. Quasi-periodic oscillations in black-hole and neutron-star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Mariano; Motta, Sara Elisa

    2016-07-01

    Fast time variability is an important characteristic of black hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries and a key ingredient in understanding the physical processes in these systems. Black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries show a variety of X-ray spectral/variability states, representing different accretion regimes. It has been recently shown that the overall strength of the rapid variability is a good tracer of these states. Fast aperiodic variability is generally studied through the inspection of power density spectra. Most of the power spectral components are broad and can take the form of a wide power distribution over several decades of frequency or of a more localised peak (quasi-periodic oscillations, QPOs). It is now clear that QPOs are a common characteristic of accreting systems: they have been observed in accreting stellar mass black holes and neutron stars hosted in X-ray binaries, in cataclysmic variable, in the so-called ultra luminous X-ray sources and even in active galactic nuclei. Even though their origin and nature is still debated, the study of QPOs provides a way to explore the inner accretion flow around black holes and neutron stars. Various theoretical models have been proposed to explain the origin of QPOs in black hole and neutron star binaries, only a few have been proved to be promising so far, having shown good agreement with observations. I will describe how timing is done in X-rays and how QPOs are usually studied. I will briefly review some of the proposed models and I will finally show the most recent results obtained on QPOs.

  17. Massive star evolution in close binaries. Conditions for homogeneous chemical evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H. F.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Ekström, S.; Eggenberger, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the impact of tidal interactions, before any mass transfer, on various properties of the stellar models. We study the conditions for obtaining homogeneous evolution triggered by tidal interactions, and for avoiding any Roche lobe overflow (RLOF) during the main-sequence phase. By homogeneous evolution, we mean stars evolving with a nearly uniform chemical composition from the centre to the surface. Methods: We consider the case of rotating stars computed with a strong core-envelope coupling mediated by an interior magnetic field. Models with initial masses between 15 and 60 M⊙, for metallicities between 0.002 and 0.014 and with initial rotation equal to 30% and 66% the critical rotation on the zero age main sequence, are computed for single stars and for stars in close binary systems. We consider close binary systems with initial orbital periods equal to 1.4, 1.6, and 1.8 days and a mass ratio equal to 3/2. Results: In models without any tidal interaction (single stars and wide binaries), homogeneous evolution in solid body rotating models is obtained when two conditions are realised: the initial rotation must be high enough, and the loss of angular momentum by stellar winds should be modest. This last point favours metal-poor fast rotating stars. In models with tidal interactions, homogeneous evolution is obtained when rotation imposed by synchronisation is high enough (typically a time-averaged surface velocities during the main-sequence phase above 250 km s-1), whatever the mass losses. We present plots that indicate for which masses of the primary and for which initial periods the conditions for the homogenous evolution and avoidance of the RLOF are met, for various initial metallicities and rotations. In close binaries, mixing is stronger at higher than at lower metallicities. Homogeneous evolution is thus favoured at higher metallicities. RLOF avoidance is favoured at lower metallicities because stars with less metals remain more

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Adiabatic mass loss in binary stars. II. (Ge+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, H.; Webbink, R. F.; Chen, X.; Han, Z.

    2016-02-01

    In the limit of extremely rapid mass transfer, the response of a donor star in an interacting binary becomes asymptotically one of adiabatic expansion. We survey here adiabatic mass loss from Population I stars (Z=0.02) of mass 0.10M⊙-100M⊙ from the zero-age main sequence to the base of the giant branch, or to central hydrogen exhaustion for lower main sequence stars. The logarithmic derivatives of radius with respect to mass along adiabatic mass-loss sequences translate into critical mass ratios for runaway (dynamical timescale) mass transfer, evaluated here under the assumption of conservative mass transfer. For intermediate- and high-mass stars, dynamical mass transfer is preceded by an extended phase of thermal timescale mass transfer as the star is stripped of most of its envelope mass. The critical mass ratio qad (throughout this paper, we follow the convention of defining the binary mass ratio as q{equiv}Mdonor/Maccretor) above which this delayed dynamical instability occurs increases with advancing evolutionary age of the donor star, by ever-increasing factors for more massive donors. Most intermediate- or high-mass binaries with nondegenerate accretors probably evolve into contact before manifesting this instability. As they approach the base of the giant branch, however, and begin developing a convective envelope, qad plummets dramatically among intermediate-mass stars, to values of order unity, and a prompt dynamical instability occurs. Among low-mass stars, the prompt instability prevails throughout main sequence evolution, with qad declining with decreasing mass, and asymptotically approaching qad=2/3, appropriate to a classical isentropic n=3/2 polytrope. Our calculated qad values agree well with the behavior of time-dependent models by Chen & Han (2003MNRAS.341..662C) of intermediate-mass stars initiating mass transfer in the Hertzsprung gap. Application of our results to cataclysmic variables, as systems that must be stable against rapid mass

  19. Evidence for a warm wind from the red star in symbiotic binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedjung, M.; Stencel, R. E.; Viotti, R.

    1983-01-01

    A systematic redshift of the high ionization resonance emission lines with respect to the intercombination lines is found from an examination of the ultraviolet spectra of symbiotic stars obtained with IUE. After consideration of other possibilities, this is most probably explained by photon scattering in an expanding envelope optically thick to the resonance lines. Line formation in a wind, or at the base of a wind is therefore suggested. Reasons are also given indicating line formation of the most ionized species in a region with an electron temperature of the order of 100,000 K, probably around the cool star. The behavior of the emission line width with ionization energy seems to support this model. The cool components of symbiotic stars appear to differ from normal red giants, which do not have winds of this temperature. An explanation in terms of a higher rotation velocity due to the binary nature of these stars is suggested.

  20. V907 Scorpii: A Remarkable Binary Star Whose Eclipses Turn On and Off and On and Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Helt, Bodil E.; Vaz, Luiz Paulo R.

    1999-01-01

    V907 Scorpii, near the open cluster M7, and possibly a member, is unique among all known eclipsing binary stars because its eclipses have turned on and off twice within modern history. By using all available photometric and spectroscopic data, we have discovered that it is at least a triple star and possibly a quadruple star system consisting of a visual binary with a very long orbital period, the brighter member of which is itself the triple star. The triple star contains an eclipsing binary star (B9.5 V) with an orbital period of 3.78 days and a faint, distant companion (late K, or perhaps a white dwarf) with an orbital period of 99.3 days around the center of mass of the triple star system. Radial velocity measurements allow the masses to be estimated. Because the orbital planes of the eclipsing binary and its triple companion are not coplanar, the orbital plane of the eclipsing binary shows nodal regression with a period of 68 yr. For about one-third of this time, the close binary is eclipsing; the rest of the time the inclination is too small for eclipses to occur. The earliest observations of the system in the year 1899 show eclipses; the eclipses stopped about 1918, started again about 1963, and stopped again in about 1986. We predict that the eclipses should start occurring once again in the year 2030+/-5.

  1. The Henize sample of S stars --- III. Uncovering the binary intruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eck, S.; Jorissen, A.

    2000-08-01

    The properties of S stars are investigated thanks to a large observing program devoted to the well-defined Henize sample (205 S stars south of δ = -25̂ and brighter than R = 10.5, covering all galactic latitudes), in order to derive the respective properties of the intrinsic S stars (genuine thermally-pulsing AGB stars) and of the extrinsic S stars (post mass-transfer binaries). The stellar sample is first cleaned from a few stars misclassified as S thanks to UBV Geneva photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. These low-resolution spectra also allow to successfully distinguish subclasses within the S star family. Dedicated Geneva photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy have led to the discovery of two symbiotic S stars. The more stringent difference between extrinsic and intrinsic stars is their technetium content, but several other observational parameters are shown to be efficient to some extent in segregating intrinsic S stars from their extrinsic masqueraders (UBV , JHKL and IRAS photometry, radial-velocity standard deviation, shape of the CORAVEL cross-correlation dip, combination of band strength indices derived from low-resolution spectra). Multivariate classification has been performed on the Henize data sample in order to guarantee a classification as objective as possible and handling at the same time a large number of parameters. The resulting clusters separate efficiently extrinsic and intrinsic S stars, allowing to derive the respective properties of these two distinct stellar classes. The population difference between intrinsic and extrinsic S stars is for the first time clearly demonstrated, since intrinsic S stars are far more concentrated towards the galactic plane than extrinsic S stars (zint = 200 ∓ 100 pc and zext = 600 ∓ 100 pc), and are therefore believed to belong to a younger, more massive population. The frequency of extrinsic and intrinsic S stars in the magnitude-limited Henize sample amounts to 33% and 67%, respectively. In

  2. A Class Exercise: Studying the Eclipsing Binary Star RZ Cas Through Visual Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balonek, T. J.; Davis, S. M.

    2000-05-01

    As part of the sophomore-junior level "Astronomical Techniques" course at Colgate University, students learn just how much science they can do with simple tools: a pair of binoculars, a clock, and pencil and paper. The students study the Algol type visual eclipsing binary star system RZ Cassiopeiae: observing and making a light curve for the primary minimum, determining the time of minimum using several techniques, calculating the binary star system's orbital period, and determining changes in the system's period over a thirty year interval by constructing an O-C curve. Through a series of preparatory exercises, the students learn how to read star maps and use the unaided eye, binoculars and telescopes to locate star fields and make visual magnitude measurements. By making multiple measurements of stars in the field of RZ Cas on several nights, the students determine the accuracy they can achieve in estimating the visual magnitude of a star -- typically 0.2 magnitude. (Some students even accidentally discover that one of the stars in the field is a variable star!) With this experience, the students use binoculars to observe the four hour primary eclipse of RZ Cas (magnitude 6.2 - 7.7), making magnitude measurements every five minutes. A light curve is then plotted. Several methods are used to determine the time of minimum, which is then converted to heliocentric Julian day. Using times of minima determined by former students (and the instructor) in previous years dating from 1968 to the present, the students determine the average period to a tenth of a second second. By constructing an O-C curve from the class's data and that obtained by the AAVSO, changes in the period of RZ Cas are noticeable -- possibly due to mass transfer in the system. It will be interesting for future classes to build on this knowledge using the primitive tools of our not so distant past.

  3. Star formation history and X-ray binary populations: the case of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, V.; Zezas, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we investigate the link between high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and star formation in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), our nearest star-forming galaxy. Using optical photometric data, we identify the most likely counterpart of 44 X-ray sources. Among the 40 HMXBs classified in this work, we find 33 Be/X-ray binaries (Be-XRBs), and 4 supergiant XRBs. Using this census and the published spatially resolved star formation history map of the LMC, we find that the HMXBs (and as expected the X-ray pulsars) are present in regions with star formation bursts ∼6-25 Myr ago, in contrast to the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), for which this population peaks at later ages (∼25-60 Myr ago). We also estimate the HMXB production rate to be equal to one system per ∼43.5× 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 or one system per ∼143M⊙ of stars formed during the associated star formation episode. Therefore, the formation efficiency of HMXBs in the LMC is ∼17 times lower than that in the SMC. We attribute this difference primarily in the different ages and metallicity of the HMXB populations in the two galaxies. We also set limits on the kicks imparted on the neutron star during the supernova explosion. We find that the time elapsed since the supernova kick is ∼3 times shorter in the LMC than the SMC. This in combination with the average offsets of the HMXBs from their nearest star clusters results in ∼4 times faster transverse velocities for HMXBs in the LMC than in the SMC.

  4. FUV Emission from AGB Stars: Modeling Accretion Activity Associated with a Binary Companion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Alyx Catherine; Sahai, Raghvendra

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that the late stages of evolution for Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars are influenced by the presence of binary companions. Unfortunately, there is a lack of direct observational evidence of binarity. However, more recently, strong indirect evidence comes from the discovery of UV emission in a subsample of these objects (fuvAGB stars). AGB stars are comparatively cool objects (< or =3000 K), thus their fluxes falls off drastically for wavelengths 3000 Angstroms and shorter. Therefore, ultraviolet observations offer an important, new technique for detecting the binary companions and/or associated accretion activity. We develop new models of UV emission from fuvAGB stars constrained by GALEX photometry and spectroscopy of these objects. We compare the GALEX UV grism spectra of the AGB M7 star EY Hya to predictions using the spectral synthesis code Cloudy, specifically investigating the ultraviolet wavelength range (1344-2831 Angstroms). We investigate models composed of contributions from a photoionized "hot spot" due to accretion activity around the companion, and "chromospheric" emission from collisionally ionized plasma, to fit the UV observations.

  5. The massive binary companion star to the progenitor of supernova 1993J.

    PubMed

    Maund, Justyn R; Smartt, Stephen J; Kudritzki, Rolf P; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Gilmore, Gerard F

    2004-01-01

    The massive star that underwent a collapse of its core to produce supernova (SN)1993J was subsequently identified as a non-variable red supergiant star in images of the galaxy M81 taken before explosion. It showed an excess in ultraviolet and B-band colours, suggesting either the presence of a hot, massive companion star or that it was embedded in an unresolved young stellar association. The spectra of SN1993J underwent a remarkable transformation from the signature of a hydrogen-rich type II supernova to one of a helium-rich (hydrogen-deficient) type Ib. The spectral and photometric peculiarities were best explained by models in which the 13-20 solar mass supergiant had lost almost its entire hydrogen envelope to a close binary companion, producing a 'type IIb' supernova, but the hypothetical massive companion stars for this class of supernovae have so far eluded discovery. Here we report photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN1993J ten years after the explosion. At the position of the fading supernova we detect the unambiguous signature of a massive star: the binary companion to the progenitor. PMID:14712269

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 1992-1997 binary star speckle measurements (Balega+, 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balega, I. I.; Balega, Y. Y.; Maksimov, A. F.; Pluzhnik, E. A.; Shkhagosheva, Z. U.; Vasyuk, V. A.

    2000-11-01

    We present the results of speckle interferometric measurements of binary stars made with the television photon-counting camera at the 6-m Big Azimuthal Telescope (BTA) and 1-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) between August 1992 and May 1997. The data contain 89 observations of 62 star systems on the large telescope and 21 on the smaller one. For the 6-m aperture 18 systems remained unresolved. The measured angular separation ranged from 39 mas, two times above the BTA diffraction limit, to 1593 mas. (3 data files).

  7. A computer program for modeling non-spherical eclipsing binary star systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    The accurate analysis of eclipsing binary light curves is fundamental to obtaining information on the physical properties of stars. The model described accounts for the important geometric and photometric distortions such as rotational and tidal distortion, gravity brightening, and reflection effect. This permits a more accurate analysis of interacting eclipsing star systems. The model is designed to be useful to anyone with moderate computing resources. The programs, written in FORTRAN 4 for the IBM 360, consume about 80k bytes of core. The FORTRAN program listings are provided, and the computational aspects are described in some detail.

  8. Times of Minima and New Ephemerides for Southern Hemisphere Eclipsing Binary Stars Observed in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, H.; Mallama, A.; Loader, B.; Kerr, S.

    2016-06-01

    Observers from Australia and New Zealand used video equipment to time eclipses of short-period binary stars. The objects were typically south of -20o declination and had periods of less than a day. Many of those systems had very few observations since their discovery and some of them had not been observed for 50 or more years. We present 44 times of minima of 42 stars, provide revised ephemerides for 7 of these systems and characterize an orbital period change for RW PsA.

  9. Times of Minima and New Ephemerides for Southern Hemisphere Eclipsing Binary Stars Observed in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, H.; Mallama, A.; Loader, B.; Kerr, S.

    2016-04-01

    Observers from Australia and New Zealand used video equipment to time eclipses of short-period binary stars. The objects were typically south of -20o declination and had periods of less than a day. Many of those systems had very few observations since their discovery and some of them had not been observed for 50 or more years. We present 44 times of minima of 42 stars, provide revised ephemerides for 7 of these systems and characterize an orbital period change for RW PsA.

  10. IUE observations of long period eclipsing binaries - A study of accretion onto non-degenerate stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    IUE observations made in 1978-1979 recorded a whole class of interacting long-period binaries similar to beta Lyrae, which includes RX Cas, SX Cas, V 367 Cyg, W Cru, beta Lyr, and W Ser, called the W Serpentis stars. These mass-transferring binaries with relatively high mass transfer rate show two prominent features in the far ultraviolet: a continuum with a color temperature higher than the one observed in the optical region (about 12,000 K), and a strong emission line spectrum with the N V doublet at 1240 A, C IV doublet at 1550 A and lines of Si II, Si III, Si IV, C II, Fe III, AI III, etc. These phenomena are discussed on the assumption that they are due to accretion onto non-degenerate stars.

  11. Binary stars observed with adaptive optics at the starfire optical range

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, Jack D.

    2014-03-01

    In reviewing observations taken of binary stars used as calibration objects for non-astronomical purposes with adaptive optics on the 3.5 m Starfire Optical Range telescope over the past 2 years, one-fifth of them were found to be off-orbit. In order to understand such a high number of discrepant position angles and separations, all previous observations in the Washington Double Star Catalog for these rogue binaries were obtained from the Naval Observatory. Adding our observations to these yields new orbits for all, resolving the discrepancies. We have detected both components of γ Gem for the first time, and we have shown that 7 Cam is an optical pair, not physically bound.

  12. Binary Star Measurements with a 17th Century, Long-Focal, Non-Achromatic Refractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Alan

    2010-10-01

    As part of the evaluation of my long-focal, non-achromatic refractor of the type developed during the first century, i.e., the 17th century, of optical astronomy, I have observed 175 double and multiple stars. After having observed most of these binary stars visually, I decided to see if it would be possible to measure their position angles and separations. Thus, I built a micrometer and began a program to determine if - and how accurately - I could measure the characteristics of these binaries. To my great surprise, the average error of the measured position angles is only 2 degrees and that of the separations is only 1 arc-second - values that are almost a good as modern measurements. These results further indicate that these very early and relatively primitive telescopes were much better that modern astronomical historians believe.

  13. The Algol-like binary TT Hydrae - The stars, circumstellar matter, and superionized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plavec, Mirek J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on superionized UV emission lines discovered in TT Hydrae (HD 97528), a semidetached eclipsing binary system in the Southern-Hemisphere sky. The list of emission lines observed is typical for interacting nondegenerate binaries of the Algol type, but with system-specific relative-intensity characteristics. The primary component of the system is a B9.5 V main-sequence star with effective temperature of 9800 K. Its mass equals 2.25 solar masses; the radius is 1.9 solar radii; and surface gravity log g equals 4.23. The secondary star has a mass of 0.41 solar mass and fills its critical Roche lobe. Evidence obtained on mass interaction supports the conclusion that HD 97528 is a normal semidetached system.

  14. Search for gravitational waves from galactic and extra-galactic binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; Barr, B.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Beausoleil, R.; Belczynski, K.; Bennett, R.; Berukoff, S. J.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Bland, B.; Bochner, B.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burgess, R.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cantley, C. A.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castiglione, J.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chickarmane, V.; Chin, D.; Christensen, N.; Churches, D.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C.; Coldwell, R.; Coles, M.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Csatorday, P.; Cusack, B. J.; Cutler, C.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Daw, E.; Debra, D.; Delker, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Credico, A. Di; Díaz, M.; Ding, H.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dupuis, R. J.; Edlund, J. A.; Ehrens, P.; Elliffe, E. J.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fallnich, C.; Farnham, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Findley, T.; Fine, M.; Finn, L. S.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Giaime, J. A.; Gillespie, A.; Goda, K.; González, G.; Goßler, S.; Grandclément, P.; Grant, A.; Gray, C.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimmett, D.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E.; Gustafson, R.; Hamilton, W. O.; Hammond, M.; Hanson, J.; Hardham, C.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Hartunian, A.; Heefner, J.; Hefetz, Y.; Heinzel, G.; Heng, I. S.; Hennessy, M.; Hepler, N.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hindman, N.; Hoang, P.; Hough, J.; Hrynevych, M.; Hua, W.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jennrich, O.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnston, W. R.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, L.; Jungwirth, D.; Kalogera, V.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kells, W.; Kern, J.; Khan, A.; Killbourn, S.; Killow, C. J.; Kim, C.; King, C.; King, P.; Klimenko, S.; Koranda, S.; Kötter, K.; Kovalik, J.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Landry, M.; Langdale, J.; Lantz, B.; Lawrence, R.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lindquist, P.; Liu, S.; Logan, J.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Lyons, T. T.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Majid, W.; Malec, M.; Mann, F.; Marin, A.; Márka, S.; Maros, E.; Mason, J.; Mason, K.; Matherny, O.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McHugh, M.; McNabb, J. W. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Murray, P.; Myers, J.; Nagano, S.; Nash, T.; Nayak, R.; Newton, G.; Nocera, F.; Noel, J. S.; Nutzman, P.; Olson, T.; O'Reilly, B.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottewill, A.; Ouimette, D.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswaran, A.; Parameswariah, C.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pitkin, M.; Plissi, M.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rao, S. R.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Redding, D.; Regehr, M. W.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reilly, K. T.; Reithmaier, K.; Reitze, D. H.; Richman, S.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Rizzi, A.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Robison, L.; Roddy, S.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Rong, H.; Rose, D.; Rotthoff, E.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Salzman, I.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Sathyaprakash, B.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Sazonov, A.; Schilling, R.; Schlaufman, K.; Schmidt, V.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Seader, S. E.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seel, S.; Seifert, F.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shapiro, C. A.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shu, Q. Z.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sievers, L.; Sigg, D.; Sintes, A. M.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M.; Smith, M. R.; Sneddon, P. H.; Spero, R.; Stapfer, G.; Steussy, D.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T.; Sumner, M. C.; Sutton, P. J.; Sylvestre, J.; Takamori, A.; Tanner, D. B.; Tariq, H.; Taylor, I.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Tibbits, M.; Tilav, S.; Tinto, M.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Vallisneri, M.; van Putten, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.

    2005-10-01

    We use 373 hours (≈15 days) of data from the second science run of the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors to search for signals from binary neutron star coalescences within a maximum distance of about 1.5 Mpc, a volume of space which includes the Andromeda Galaxy and other galaxies of the Local Group of galaxies. This analysis requires a signal to be found in data from detectors at the two LIGO sites, according to a set of coincidence criteria. The background (accidental coincidence rate) is determined from the data and is used to judge the significance of event candidates. No inspiral gravitational-wave events were identified in our search. Using a population model which includes the Local Group, we establish an upper limit of less than 47 inspiral events per year per Milky Way equivalent galaxy with 90% confidence for nonspinning binary neutron star systems with component masses between 1 and 3M⊙.

  15. Hydrodynamics of rotating stars and close binary interactions: Compressible ellipsoid models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Dong; Rasio, Frederic A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a new formalism to study the dynamics of fluid polytropes in three dimensions. The stars are modeled as compressible ellipsoids, and the hydrodynamic equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the principal axes and other global quantities. Both viscous dissipation and the gravitational radiation reaction are incorporated. We establish the validity of our approximations and demonstrate the simplicity and power of the method by rederiving a number of known results concerning the stability and dynamical oscillations of rapidly rotating polytropes. In particular, we present a generalization to compressible fluids of Chandrasekhar's classical results for the secular and dynamical instabilities of incompressible Maclaurin spheroids. We also present several applications of our method to astrophysical problems of great current interest, such as the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole, the coalescence of compact binaries driven by the emission of gravitational waves, and the development of instabilities in close binary systems.

  16. Post Main Sequence Orbital Circularization of Binary Stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds.

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, L; Alcock, C; Cook, K

    2007-11-20

    We present results from a study of the orbits of eclipsing binary stars (EBs) in the Magellanic Clouds. The samples comprise 4510 EBs found in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the MACHO project, 2474 LMC EBs found by the OGLE-II project (of which 1182 are also in the MACHO sample), 1380 in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) found by the MACHO project, and 1317 SMC EBs found by the OGLE-II project (of which 677 are also in the MACHO sample); we also consider the EROS sample of 79 EBs in the bar of the LMC. Statistics of the phase differences between primary and secondary minima allow us to infer the statistics of orbital eccentricities within these samples. We confirm the well-known absence of eccentric orbit in close binary stars. We also find evidence for rapid circularization in longer period systems when one member evolves beyond the main sequence, as also found by previous studies.

  17. Light Curve Analysis for W UMa-Type Eclipsing Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Scott; Peach, N.; Olsen, T.

    2006-12-01

    We report results from summer 2006 in an ongoing study of eclipsing binary stars. Our investigations have focused on the measurement and interpretation of light curves for W UMa-type systems 44i Boötis and VW Cephei. These contact binaries have component stars of spectral type G, and revolve with periods of 6.43 and 6.67 hours. Dome automation and scripting capabilities introduced this summer have significantly reduced experimental uncertainties in our data. In support of previous findings we continue to observe an increase in the orbital period of 44i Boo at a rate of 10.4 µs/epoch or 14.2 ms/yr. Residuals computed after incorporating the increasing period suggest an underlying sinusoidal oscillation with a 61.5 year period and amplitude of 648 seconds. AAPT Member Thomas Olsen is sponsoring the lead presenter, SPS Member Scott Henderson, and the co-presenter, SPS Member Nick Peach.

  18. The near-contact binary star RZ Dra revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Zola, S.; Winiarski, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the absolute parameters of RZ Dra. New CCD observations were made at the Mt. Suhora Observatory in 2007. Two photometric data sets (1990 BV and 2007 BVRI) were analysed using modern light-curve synthesis methods. Large asymmetries in the light curves may be explained in terms of a dark starspot on the primary component, an A6 type star. Due to this magnetic activity, the primary component would appear to belong to the class of Ap-stars and would show small amplitude with δ Scuti-type pulsations. With this in mind, a time-series analysis of the residual light curves was made. However, we found no evidence of pulsation behaviour in RZ Dra. Combining the solutions of our light curves and Rucinski et al. (2000)'s radial velocity curves, the following absolute parameters of the components were determined: M1 = 1.63 ± 0.03 M ⊙, M2 = 0.70 ± 0.02 M ⊙, R1 = 1.65 ± 0.02R ⊙, R2 = 1.15 ± 0.02 R ⊙, L1 = 9.72 ± 0.30 L ⊙ and L2 = 0.74 ± 0.10 L ⊙. The distance to RZ Dra was calculated as 400 ± 25 pc, taking into account interstellar extinction. The orbital period of the system was studied using updated O- C information. It was found that the orbital period varied in its long-period sinusoidal form, superimposed on a downward parabola. The parabolic term shows a secular period decrease at a slow rate of 0.06 ± 0.02 s per century and is explained by the mass loss via magnetized wind of the Ap-star primary. The tilted sinusoidal form of the period variation may be considered as an apparent change and may be interpreted in terms of the light-time effect due to the presence of a third body.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler eclipsing binary stars. V. (Conroy+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, K. E.; Prsa, A.; Stassun, K. G.; Bloemen, S.; Parvizi, M.; Quarles, B.; Boyajian, T.; Barclay, T.; Shporer, A.; Latham, D. W.; Abdul-Masih, M.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the main Kepler mission that focused on a predetermined set of targets within the fixed field of view, the targets for each K2 campaign are solicited from the community, with ~10000 long-cadence (29.43 minute) and ~100 short-cadence (54.2s) targets selected for observations from each field (Howell et al., 2014PASP..126..398H). The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Working Group contributes a selection of science targets based on a cross-check of all objects in each K2 campaign field with available variable and binary star catalogs. One hundred and sixty four of 7757 targets selected for observation in campaign 0 and 49 of 21647 targets in campaign 1 were preidentified as eclipsing binaries (EBs). (4 data files).

  20. The Formation of Low-mass Binary Star Systems Via Turbulent Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.

    2010-12-01

    We characterize the infall rate onto protostellar systems forming in self-gravitating radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. Using two dimensionless parameters to determine the disks' susceptibility to gravitational fragmentation, we infer limits on protostellar system multiplicity and the mechanism of binary formation. We show that these parameters give robust predictions even in the case of marginally resolved protostellar disks. We find that protostellar systems with radiation feedback predominately form binaries via turbulent fragmentation, not disk instability, and predict that turbulent fragmentation is the dominant channel for binary formation for low-mass stars. We clearly demonstrate that systems forming in simulations including radiative feedback have fundamentally different parameters than those in purely hydrodynamics simulations.

  1. X-Ray Binary Populations in a Cosmological Context, Including NuSTAR Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardiff, Ann Hornschemeier

    2011-01-01

    The new ultradeep 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South has afforded the deepest view ever of X-ray binary populations. We report on the latest results on both LMXB and HMXB evolution out to redshifts of approximately four, including comparison with the latest theoretical models, using this deepest-ever view of the X-ray universe with Chandra. The upcoming NuSTAR mission will open up X-ray binary populations in the hard X-ray band, similar to the pioneering work of Fabbiano et al. in the Einstein era. We report on plans to study both Local Group and starburst galaxies as well as the implications those observations may have for X-ray binary populations in galaxies contributing to the Cosmic X-ray Background.

  2. Effects of Hardness of Primordial Binaries on the Evolution of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Ataru; Fukushige, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-01

    We have investigated the effects of the hardness of primordial binaries on the whole evolution of star clusters by means of N-body simulations. Using a newly developed code, GORILLA, we simulated eleven N = 16384 clusters with primordial binaries whose binding energies are equal in each cluster in the range of 1--300kT0, where 1.5kT0 is the average stellar kinetic energy at the initial time. We found that, in both the soft (≤3kT0) and hard (≥300kT0) limits, clusters experience deep core collapse. For intermediate hardness (10--100kT0), the core collapses halt halfway due to an energy releases of the primordial binaries. The core radii at the halt can be explained by their energy budget.

  3. Tidal evolution of close binary stars. I - Revisiting the theory of the equilibrium tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahn, J.-P.

    1989-01-01

    The theory of the equilibrium tide in stars that possess a convective envelope is reexamined critically, taking recent developments into account and treating thermal convection in the most consistent way within the mixing-length approach. The weak points are identified and discussed, in particular, the reduction of the turbulent viscosity when the tidal period becomes shorter than the convective turnover time. An improved version is derived for the secular equations governing the dynamical evolution of close binaries of such type.

  4. Wide Low-Mass Tertiary Companions of Binary Star Systems as a Test of Star Formation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Allen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We will present the status of a common proper motion search for wide low-mass stellar and sub-stellar companions to known white dwarf-M dwarf binary systems. I-band observations were made using the 31" NURO telescope at Lowell Observatory. Candidate companions are selected using astrometry from our own data and 2MASS photometry. We have begun to spectroscopically confirm candidates that pass our selection criteria. The ultimate goal of the search is to test star formation theories which predict that close binary systems form by transferring angular momentum to a third companion. To this end, we will model the physical companion population and perform Bayesian statistical analysis to determine the best-fit population model to our data. Here we will present our spectroscopically confirmed companions as well as the preliminary results of our population models and statistical analysis.

  5. Timing of Eclipses of Binary Stars from the ASAS Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, S. K.; Konacki, M.; Sybilski, P.

    2011-09-01

    Light was thought of as something infinite and transcendent till 1676 when Olaus Roemer carried out precise measurements of the times of eclipses of Jovian moons. Roemer's scrupulous observations led him to a qualitative conclusion that light travels at a finite speed, at the same time providing scientists with the basics of the Light-Time Effect (LTE). LTE is observed whenever the distance between the observer and any kind of periodic event changes in time. The usual cause of this distance change is the reflex motion about the system's barycenter due to the gravitational influence of one or more additional bodies. We present results of the analysis of 5032 eclipsing contact and detached binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalogue for variations in the times of eclipses. We use an approach known from the radio pulsar timing where a template radio pulse of a pulsar is used as a reference to measure the times of arrivals of the collected pulses. Most of the variations we detect in O--Cs correspond to a linear period change, but three show evidence of more than one complete LTE-orbit. For these objects we present preliminary orbital solutions. Our results demonstrate that the timing analysis employed in radio pulsar timing can be effectively used to study large data sets from photometric surveys. This is the prelude to the analysis of data gathered by the Solaris Project which aims at the search for circumbinary planets.

  6. The triple binary star EQ Tau with an active component

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Hu, S.-M.; Qian, S.-B.; He, J.-J. E-mail: likai@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-05-01

    New photometric data of EQ Tau observed in 2010 and 2013 are presented. Light curves obtained in 2000 and 2004 by Yuan and Qian and 2001 by Yang and Liu, together with our two newly determined sets of light curves, were analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. The five sets of light curves exhibit very obvious variations, implying that the light curves of EQ Tau show a strong O'Connell effect. We found that EQ Tau is an A-type shallow contact binary with a contact degree of f = 11.8%; variable dark spots on the primary component of EQ Tau were also observed. Using 10 new times of minimum light, together with those collected from the literature, the orbital period change of EQ Tau was analyzed. We found that its orbital period includes a secular decrease (dP/dt = –3.63 × 10{sup –8} days yr{sup –1}) and a cyclic oscillation (A {sub 3} = 0.0058 days and P {sub 3} = 22.7 yr). The secular increase of the period can be explained by mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one or/and angular momentum loss due to a magnetic stellar wind. The Applegate mechanism cannot explain the cyclic orbital period change. A probable transit-like event was observed in 2010. Therefore, the cyclic orbital period change of EQ Tau may be due to the light time effect of a third body.

  7. The dynamical mass of a classical Cepheid variable star in an eclipsing binary system.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyński, G; Thompson, I B; Gieren, W; Graczyk, D; Bono, G; Udalski, A; Soszyński, I; Minniti, D; Pilecki, B

    2010-11-25

    Stellar pulsation theory provides a means of determining the masses of pulsating classical Cepheid supergiants-it is the pulsation that causes their luminosity to vary. Such pulsational masses are found to be smaller than the masses derived from stellar evolution theory: this is the Cepheid mass discrepancy problem, for which a solution is missing. An independent, accurate dynamical mass determination for a classical Cepheid variable star (as opposed to type-II Cepheids, low-mass stars with a very different evolutionary history) in a binary system is needed in order to determine which is correct. The accuracy of previous efforts to establish a dynamical Cepheid mass from Galactic single-lined non-eclipsing binaries was typically about 15-30% (refs 6, 7), which is not good enough to resolve the mass discrepancy problem. In spite of many observational efforts, no firm detection of a classical Cepheid in an eclipsing double-lined binary has hitherto been reported. Here we report the discovery of a classical Cepheid in a well detached, double-lined eclipsing binary in the Large Magellanic Cloud. We determine the mass to a precision of 1% and show that it agrees with its pulsation mass, providing strong evidence that pulsation theory correctly and precisely predicts the masses of classical Cepheids. PMID:21107425

  8. Second Einstein Telescope mock data and science challenge: Low frequency binary neutron star data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacher, Duncan; Cannon, Kipp; Hanna, Chad; Regimbau, Tania; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Einstein Telescope is a conceived third-generation gravitational-wave detector that is envisioned to be an order of magnitude more sensitive than advanced LIGO, Virgo, and Kagra, which would be able to detect gravitational-wave signals from the coalescence of compact objects with waveforms starting as low as 1 Hz. With this level of sensitivity, we expect to detect sources at cosmological distances. In this paper we introduce an improved method for the generation of mock data and analyze it with a new low-latency compact binary search pipeline called gstlal. We present the results from this analysis with a focus on low-frequency analysis of binary neutron stars. Despite compact binary coalescence signals lasting hours in the Einstein Telescope sensitivity band when starting at 5 Hz, we show that we are able to discern various overlapping signals from one another. We also determine the detection efficiency for each of the analysis runs conducted and show a proof of concept method for estimating the number signals as a function of redshift. Finally, we show that our ability to recover the signal parameters has improved by an order of magnitude when compared to the results of the first mock data and science challenge. For binary neutron stars we are able to recover the total mass and chirp mass to within 0.5% and 0.05%, respectively.

  9. Investigation of the binary fraction among candidate A-F type hybrid stars detected by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampens, P.; Bognár, Zs.; Frémat, Y.; Sódor, Á.; Vermeylen, L.; De Nutte, R.; Lombaert, R.; De Cat, P.

    2015-09-01

    We are currently monitoring up to 40 Kepler candidate δ Scuti-γ Doradus (resp. γ Doradus-δ Scuti) hybrid stars in radial velocity in order to identify the physical cause behind the low frequencies observed in the periodograms based on the ultra-high accuracy Kepler space photometry. The presence of low frequency variability in unevolved or slightly evolved oscillating A/F-type stars can generally be explained in three ways: either 1) the star is an (un)detected binary or multiple system, or 2) the star is a g-mode pulsator (i.e. a genuine hybrid), or 3) the star's atmosphere displays an asymmetric intensity distribution (caused by spots, i.e. chemical anomalies, or by (very) high rotation), which is detected through rotational modulation. Our targets were selected from the globally characterized variable A/F-type stars of the Kepler mission [7]. We observe each star at least 4 times unevenly spread over a time lapse up to 2 months with the HERMES spectrograph [6]. In the case of composite, multiple-lined spectra, these observations also provide the atmospheric properties of each component. Our principal goal is to estimate the fraction of short-period, spectroscopic systems in the sample.

  10. The Masses of the B Stars in the High Galactic Latitude Eclipsing Binary IT Librae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, John C.

    2003-01-01

    A number of blue stars that appear to be similar to Population I B stars in the star-forming regions of the Galactic disk are found more than 1 kpc from the Galactic plane. Uncertainties about the true distances and masses of these high-latitude B stars have fueled a debate as to their origin and evolutionary status. The eclipsing binary IT Lib is composed of two B stars, is approximately 1 kpc above the Galactic plane, and is moving back toward the plane. Observations of the light and velocity curves presented here lead to the conclusion that the B stars in this system are massive young main-sequence stars. While there are several possible explanations, it appears most plausible that the IT Lib system formed in the disk about 30 million years ago and was ejected on a trajectory taking it to its present position. Based on observations made at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of McDonald Observatory operated by the University of Texas at Austin and also at the 2.1 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  11. A Model for Short Gamma-Ray Bursts: Heated Neutron Stars in Close Binary Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J.D.; Wilson, J.R.

    2001-12-17

    In this paper we present a model for the short (< second) population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this model heated neutron stars in a close binary system near their last stable orbit emit neutrinos at large luminosities ({approx} 10{sup 53} ergs/sec). A fraction of these neutrinos will annihilate to form an e{sup +}e{sup -} pair plasma wind which will, in turn, expand and recombine to photons which make the gamma-ray burst. We study neutrino annihilation and show that a substantial fraction ({approx}1/2) of energy deposited comes from inter-star neutrinos, where each member of the neutrino pair originates from each neutron star. Thus, in addition to the annihilation of neutrinos blowing off of a single star, we have a new source of baryon free energy that is deposited between the stars. To model the e{sup +}e{sup -} pair plasma wind between stars, we do three-dimensional relativistic numerical hydrodynamic calculations. Preliminary results are also presented of new, fully general relativistic calculations of gravitationally attracting stars falling from infinity with no angular momentum. These simulations exhibit a compression effect.

  12. Modeling the Dynamics of Tidally Interacting Binary Neutron Stars up to the Merger.

    PubMed

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Nagar, Alessandro; Dietrich, Tim; Damour, Thibault

    2015-04-24

    The data analysis of the gravitational wave signals emitted by coalescing neutron star binaries requires the availability of an accurate analytical representation of the dynamics and waveforms of these systems. We propose an effective-one-body model that describes the general relativistic dynamics of neutron star binaries from the early inspiral up to the merger. Our effective-one-body model incorporates an enhanced attractive tidal potential motivated by recent analytical advances in the post-Newtonian and gravitational self-force description of relativistic tidal interactions. No fitting parameters are introduced for the description of tidal interaction in the late, strong-field dynamics. We compare the model energetics and the gravitational wave phasing with new high-resolution multiorbit numerical relativity simulations of equal-mass configurations with different equations of state. We find agreement within the uncertainty of the numerical data for all configurations. Our model is the first semianalytical model that captures the tidal amplification effects close to merger. It thereby provides the most accurate analytical representation of binary neutron star dynamics and waveforms currently available. PMID:25955043

  13. THE WIDEST-SEPARATION SUBSTELLAR COMPANION CANDIDATE TO A BINARY T TAURI STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuhara, M.; Tamura, M.; Kudo, T.; Kandori, R.; Ishii, M.; Nishiyama, S.

    2011-04-15

    The results of near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of a substellar companion (SR12 C), with a possible planetary mass, of a binary T Tauri star (SR12 AB) in the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region are presented. The object is separated by {approx}8.''7, corresponding to {approx}1100 AU at 125 pc, and has an H-band brightness of 15.2 mag and infrared spectra suggesting a spectral type of M9.0 {+-} 0.5. It is confirmed that SR12 C is physically related to the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region from its common proper motion with SR12 AB and its youth is confirmed by a gravity-sensitive spectral feature. Furthermore, based on the number of known members of the {rho} Ophiuchi star-forming region in the area in which SR12 AB exists, the probability of a chance alignment is {approx}1% and it is therefore likely that SR12 C is physically associated with SR12 AB. The mass of SR12 C is estimated by comparing its estimated luminosity and assumed age with the theoretical age-luminosity relation. SR12 C is identified as an extremely low-mass (0.013 {+-} 0.007 M{sub sun}) object, but its separation from its parent star is the widest among planetary-mass companion (PMC) candidates imaged to date. In addition, SR12 C is the first PMC candidate directly imaged around a binary star. This discovery suggests that PMCs form via multiple star formation processes including disk gravitational instability and cloud core fragmentation.

  14. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-04-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  15. The donor star winds in High-Mass X-ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, Lida

    2014-10-01

    High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) are essential astrophysical laboratories. These objects represent an advanced stage in the evolution of massive binary systems, after the initially more massive star has already collapsed in a supernova explosion, but its remnant, a neutron star or black hole, remains gravitationally bound. The stellar wind from the OB-type donor is partially accreted onto its compact companion powering its relatively high X-ray luminosity. Since HMXBs accrete from the stellar wind, parameters such as the donor's mass-loss rate, the velocity of the wind, and its clumpiness are of fundamental importance.This proposal takes advantage of the unique capabilities of HST/STIS for UV spectroscopy. We focus on the most populous in the Galaxy class of those HMXBs where the stellar wind of the OB donor is directly accreted onto a neutron star. Recently, a new sub-class of HMXBs - "supergiant fast X-ray transients" - was discovered. It has been proposed that these enigmatic objects can be explained by the specific properties of their donor-star winds. The only way to validate or disprove this hypothesis is by a studying the wind diagnostics lines in the UV spectra of donor stars. The observations proposed here will, for the first time, provide the UV spectra of this important new type of accreting binaries. Our state-of-the art non-LTE expanding stellar atmospheres and 3-D stellar wind simulations allow thorough exploitation of the STIS spectra. As a result we will obtain the wind parameters for a representative sample of six Galactic HMXBs, thus heightening our knowledge thereof considerably.

  16. Measurability of the tidal deformability by gravitational waves from coalescing binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokezaka, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichiro; Shibata, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    Combining new gravitational waveforms derived by long-term (14 to 16 orbit) numerical-relativity simulations with waveforms by an effective-one-body (EOB) formalism for coalescing binary neutron stars, we construct hybrid waveforms and estimate the measurability for the dimensionless tidal deformability of the neutron stars, Λ , by advanced gravitational-wave detectors. We focus on the equal-mass case with the total mass 2.7 M⊙. We find that for an event at a hypothetical effective distance of Deff=200 Mpc , the distinguishable difference in the dimensionless tidal deformability will be ≈100 , 400, and 800 at 1 σ , 2 σ , and 3 σ levels, respectively, for Advanced LIGO. If the true equation of state is stiff and the typical neutron-star radius is R ≳13 km , our analysis suggests that the radius will be constrained within ≈1 km at 2 σ level for an event at Deff=200 Mpc . On the other hand, if the true equation of state is soft and the typical neutron-star radius is R ≲12 km , it will be difficult to narrow down the equation of state among many soft ones, although it is still possible to discriminate the true one from stiff equations of state with R ≳13 km . We also find that gravitational waves from binary neutron stars will be distinguished from those from spinless binary black holes at more than 2 σ level for an event at Deff=200 Mpc . The validity of the EOB formalism, Taylor-T4, and Taylor-F2 approximants as the inspiral waveform model is also examined.

  17. Clumpy wind accretion in supergiant neutron star high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, E.; Oskinova, L.; Feldmeier, A.; Falanga, M.

    2016-05-01

    The accretion of the stellar wind material by a compact object represents the main mechanism powering the X-ray emission in classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. In this work we present the first attempt to simulate the accretion process of a fast and dense massive star wind onto a neutron star, taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion ("gating") due to the spin and magnetic field of the compact object. We made use of a radiative hydrodynamical code to model the nonstationary radiatively driven wind of an O-B supergiant star and then place a neutron star characterized by a fixed magnetic field and spin period at a certain distance from the massive companion. Our calculations follow, as a function of time (on a total timescale of several hours), the transitions of the system through all different accretion regimes that are triggered by the intrinsic variations in the density and velocity of the nonstationary wind. The X-ray luminosity released by the system is computed at each time step by taking into account the relevant physical processes occurring in the different accretion regimes. Synthetic lightcurves are derived and qualitatively compared with those observed from classical supergiant high mass X-ray binaries and supergiant fast X-ray transients. Although a number of simplifications are assumed in these calculations, we show that taking into account the effects of the centrifugal and magnetic inhibition of accretion significantly reduces the average X-ray luminosity expected for any neutron star wind-fed binary. The present model calculations suggest that long spin periods and stronger magnetic fields are favored in order to reproduce the peculiar behavior of supergiant fast X-ray transients in the X-ray domain.

  18. CCD photometry in the globular cluster NGC 288. I - Blue stragglers and main-sequence binary stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolte, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Photometry based on a mosaic of CCD images in B and V is presented for the globular cluster NGC 288. The spatial coverage ranges from the cluster core to about 6 core radii, and stars have been measured over the absolute visual magnitude range -1.2 to 8.4. The cluster is shown to contain a significant number of blue straggler stars in the central regions, and there is an excess of objects brighter and redder than the single-star main-sequence in the color-magnitude plane. These objects are interpreted as a population of main-sequence binary stars. With this interpretation, the explicity measured fraction of binary stars is 10 percent, which sets a lower limit for the total binary population.

  19. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. III. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars - CEMP-s stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Detailed spectroscopic studies of metal-poor halo stars have highlighted the important role of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in understanding the early production and ejection of carbon in the Galaxy and in identifying the progenitors of the CEMP stars among the first stars formed after the Big Bang. Recent work has also classified the CEMP stars by absolute carbon abundance, A(C), into high- and low-C bands, mostly populated by binary and single stars, respectively. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital parameters of binary systems among the CEMP-s stars, which exhibit strong enhancements of neutron-capture elements associated with the s-process. This allows us to test whether local mass transfer from a binary companion is necessary and sufficient to explain their dramatic carbon excesses. Methods: We have systematically monitored the radial velocities of a sample of 22 CEMP-s stars for several years with ~monthly, high-resolution, low S/N échelle spectra obtained at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) at La Palma, Spain. From these spectra, radial velocities with an accuracy of ≈100 m s-1 were determined by cross-correlation with optimised templates. Results: Eighteen of the 22 stars exhibit clear orbital motion, yielding a binary frequency of 82 ± 10%, while four stars appear to be single (18 ± 10%). We thus confirm that the binary frequency of CEMP-s stars is much higher than for normal metal-poor giants, but not 100% as previously claimed. Secure orbits are determined for eleven of the binaries and provisional orbits for six long-period systems (P > 3000 days), and orbital circularisation timescales are discussed. Conclusions: The conventional scenario of local mass transfer from a former asymptotic giant branch (AGB) binary companion does appear to account for the chemical composition of most CEMP-s stars. However, the excess of C and s-process elements in some single CEMP-s stars was apparently transferred to their

  20. Double White Dwarfs as Probes of Single and Binary Star Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Jeffrey John

    2016-01-01

    As the endpoints of stars less massive than roughly eight solar masses, the population of Galactic white dwarfs (WD) contain information about complex stellar evolution processes. Associated pairs of WDs add an extra degree of leverage; both WDs must have formed and evolved together. The work presented in this dissertation uses various populations of double WDs (DWD) to constrain evolution of both single and binary stars. One example is the set of low-mass WDs with unseen WD companions, which are formed through a dynamically-unstable mass loss process called the common envelope. To work toward a quantitative understanding of the common envelope, we develop and apply a Bayesian statistical technique to identify the masses of the unseen WD companions. We provide results which can be compared to evolutionary models and hence a deeper understanding of how binary stars evolve through a common envelope. The statistical technique we develop can be applied to any population of single-line spectroscopic binaries. Binaries widely separated enough that they avoid any significant interaction independently evolve into separate WDs that can be identified in photometric and astrometric surveys. We discuss techniques for finding these objects, known as wide DWDs. We present a catalog of 142 candidate wide DWDs, combining both previously detected systems and systems we identify in our searches in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Having been born at the same time, the masses and cooling ages of the WDs in wide DWDs, obtained with our spectroscopic follow-up campaign can be used to constrain the initial-final mass relation, which relates a main sequence star to the mass of the WD into which it will evolve. We develop a novel Bayesian technique to interpret our data and present our resulting constraints on this relation which are particularly strong for initial masses between two and four solar masses. During this process, we identified one wide DWD, HS 2220+2146, that was peculiar since

  1. Expected Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Yield of Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prša, Andrej; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we estimate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) yield of eclipsing binary stars, which will survey ~20,000 deg2 of the southern sky during a period of 10 years in six photometric passbands to r ~ 24.5. We generate a set of 10,000 eclipsing binary light curves sampled to the LSST time cadence across the whole sky, with added noise as a function of apparent magnitude. This set is passed to the analysis-of-variance period finder to assess the recoverability rate for the periods, and the successfully phased light curves are passed to the artificial-intelligence-based pipeline ebai to assess the recoverability rate in terms of the eclipsing binaries' physical and geometric parameters. We find that, out of ~24 million eclipsing binaries observed by LSST with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 in mission lifetime, ~28% or 6.7 million can be fully characterized by the pipeline. Of those, ~25% or 1.7 million will be double-lined binaries, a true treasure trove for stellar astrophysics.

  2. EXPECTED LARGE SYNOPTIC SURVEY TELESCOPE (LSST) YIELD OF ECLIPSING BINARY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Prsa, Andrej; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2011-08-15

    In this paper, we estimate the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) yield of eclipsing binary stars, which will survey {approx}20,000 deg{sup 2} of the southern sky during a period of 10 years in six photometric passbands to r {approx} 24.5. We generate a set of 10,000 eclipsing binary light curves sampled to the LSST time cadence across the whole sky, with added noise as a function of apparent magnitude. This set is passed to the analysis-of-variance period finder to assess the recoverability rate for the periods, and the successfully phased light curves are passed to the artificial-intelligence-based pipeline ebai to assess the recoverability rate in terms of the eclipsing binaries' physical and geometric parameters. We find that, out of {approx}24 million eclipsing binaries observed by LSST with a signal-to-noise ratio >10 in mission lifetime, {approx}28% or 6.7 million can be fully characterized by the pipeline. Of those, {approx}25% or 1.7 million will be double-lined binaries, a true treasure trove for stellar astrophysics.

  3. An ultraviolet study of the semi-detached eclipsing binary star system TT Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orleski, Michael P.

    2008-02-01

    TT Hydrae is an Algol-type interacting binary star consisting of a B9.5 V primary star and a K1 III-IV companion star. The companion star fills its Roche lobe and is transferring matter onto the primary star via a gas stream that flows through the binary system's first Lagrange point. The orbital period of the two stars is 6.95 days. This orbital period is long enough that the gas stream most likely does not strike the primary star directly, but gives it a glancing impact. The model of the mass flow in the binary system being presented is one of a "river" of material flowing around the equator of the primary star at the level of its photosphere. This river of gas can be heated by accretional heating and friction with the photosphere to temperatures higher than the 10,000 K photospheric temperature of the primary star. Ultraviolet absorption lines of the high temperature ions Si IV (25,000 K) and C IV (35,000 K) are identified in the IUE absorption spectra at all orbital phases. This is consistent with the river model as the river encircles the primary star. Another indication of the presence of the gas stream can be seen in the radial velocity curves of some spectral lines. When the radial velocities of the UV spectral lines are plotted versus orbital phase, some of them exhibit a deviation with respect to the orbital motion of the primary star. This deviation consists of excess positive radial velocity between orbital phases 0.6 and 0.9. The deviation has the correct sign and is within the correct orbital phase range to be consistent with the expected orientation of the gas stream. Emission spectra were recorded during the total phase of primary eclipse. Spectra recorded by the Hubble Space Telescope show emission lines of C IV, Si IV, and N V. These lines exhibit high radial velocity magnitudes in the range of 300 km s -1 to 400 km s -1 . Circular orbit velocities within a few solar radii of the primary star would have magnitudes this large. This is consistent

  4. High energy neutrino absorption and its effects on stars in close X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    The physics and astrophysics of high energy neutrino production and interactions in close X-ray binary systems are studied. These studies were stimulated by recent observations of ultrahigh energy gamma-rays and possibly other ultrahigh energy particles coming from the directions of Cygnus X-3 and other binary systems and possessing the periodicity characteristics of these systems. Systems in which a compact object, such as a neutron star, is a strong source of high energy particles which, in turn, produce photons, neutronos and other secondary particles by interactions in the atmosphere of the companion star were considered. The highest energy neutrinos are absorbed deep in the companion and the associated energy deposition may be large enough to effect its structure or lead to its ultimate disruption. This neutrino heating was evaluated, starting with a detailed numerical calculation of the hadronic cascade induced in the atmosphere of the companion star. For some theoretical models, the resulting energy deposition from neutrino absorption may be so great as to disrupt the companion star over an astronomically small timescale of the order of 10,000 years. Even if the energy deposition is smaller, it may still be high enough to alter the system substantially, perhaps leading to quenching of high energy signals from the source. Given the cosmic ray luminosities required to produce the observed gamma rays from cygnus X-3 and LMX X-4, such a situation may occur in these sources.

  5. Fully Relativistic Simulations of the Inspiral and Merger of Black Hole - Neutron Star Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Anderson, M.; Besselman, M.; Chawla, S.; Hirschmann, E. W.; Lehner, L.; Liebling, S. L.; Neilsen, D.; Tohline, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    We present fully relativistic simulations of the inspiral and merger of quasi-equilibrium binaries composed of a neutron star and a black hole. We vary the mass ratio of the binary, the spin angular momentum of the black hole and the initial separation in a series of simulations. We also explore the role of magnetic fields by including a dipole field in the neutron star and evolve the field in the MHD approximation. We use the adaptive mesh refinement package HAD to resolve the disparate length scales in the problem ranging from the radiation zone down to the internal dynamics of the initial neutron star and tidal remnant. We will briefly highlight our results for the gravitational radiation waveform as well as the fate of the neutron star's material including the fraction that forms a debris disk. This work was supported by the NSF through grants PHY-0803629 and PHY-0653375 to LSU. The computations presented here were performed on resources from the Teragrid and the Louisiana Optical Network Initiative (LONI).

  6. Detectable radio flares following gravitational waves from mergers of binary neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-10-01

    Mergers of neutron-star/neutron-star binaries are strong sources of gravitational waves. They can also launch subrelativistic and mildly relativistic outflows and are often assumed to be the sources of short γ-ray bursts. An electromagnetic signature that persisted for weeks to months after the event would strengthen any future claim of a detection of gravitational waves. Here we present results of calculations showing that the interaction of mildly relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium produces radio flares with peak emission at 1.4 gigahertz that persist at detectable (submillijansky) levels for weeks, out to a redshift of 0.1. Slower subrelativistic outflows produce flares detectable for years at 150 megahertz, as well as at 1.4 gigahertz, from slightly shorter distances. The radio transient RT 19870422 (ref. 11) has the properties predicted by our model, and its most probable origin is the merger of a compact neutron-star/neutron-star binary. The lack of radio detections usually associated with short γ-ray bursts does not constrain the radio transients that we discuss here (from mildly relativistic and subrelativistic outflows) because short γ-ray burst redshifts are typically >0.1 and the appropriate timescales (longer than weeks) have not been sampled. PMID:21964342

  7. LSS 2018: A double-lined spectroscopic binary central star with an extremely large reflection effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drilling, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    LSS 2018, the central star of the planetry nebulae DS1, was found to be a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 8.571 hours. Light variations with the same period were observed in U, B, and V; in the wavelength regions defined by the two IUE cameras; and in the strength of the CIII 4647 emission line. The light variations can be accurately predicted by a simple reflection effect, and an analysis of the light curves yields the angular diameter and effective temperature of the primary, the radii of the two stars in terms of their separation, and the inclination of the system. Analysis of the radial velocities then yields the masses of the two stars, their separation, the distance of the system, the absolute magnitude of the primary, and the size of the nebula.

  8. A Dynamical Mass and Distance for a PMS Star: The Binary NTT 045251+3016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, A. T.; Mathieu, R. D.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Latham, D. W.; Mazeh, T.; Prato, L.; Simon, M.; Zinnecker, H.

    2000-05-01

    We present spectroscopic and astrometric orbital solutions for the pre-main-sequence binary NTT 045251+ 3016. Combination of these data allow the dynamical masses and the distance of the stars to be calculated. Our derived values for the primary and secondary masses are 1.4 +/- 0.3 Msun and 0.8 +/- 0.2 Msun, respectively, at a distance of 139 +/- 10 pc. The independently derived distance is consistent with prior distance estimates for the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. The primary star is compared with evolutionary tracks of D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997), Baraffe et al. (1998), and Palla and Stahler (1999) as a preliminary test of PMS evolutionary models. The Baraffe et al. (1998) tracks provide the best fit with our data. The tracks of D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997) deviate by more than two standard deviations from our result.

  9. A Dynamical Mass and Distance for a PMS Star: The Binary NTT 045251+3016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Aaron; Mathieu, Robert D.; Lattanzi, Mario G.; Latham, David W.; Mazeh, Tsevi; Prato, Lisa; Simon, Michal; Zinnecker, Hans

    We present spectroscopic and astrometric orbital solutions for the pre-main-sequence binary NTT 045251+ 3016. Combination of these data allow the dynamical masses and the distance of the stars to be calculated. Our derived values for the primary and secondary masses are 1.4 +/- 0.3 Modot and 0.8 +/- 0.2 Modot, respectively, at a distance of 139 +/- 10 pc. The independently derived distance is consistent with prior distance estimates for the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region. The primary star is compared with evolutionary tracks of D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997), Baraffe et al. (1998), and Palla and Stahler (1999) as a preliminary test of PMS evolutionary models.

  10. Hydrodynamics of winds from irradiated companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco; London, Richard

    1993-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of evaporative winds driven by X-rays and/or soft gamma-rays irradiating the outer layers of companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We consider several irradiating fluxes and spectra for LMXBs with white dwarf and main-sequence companion stars. The thermal structure of the base of the coronal region, the position of the sonic point, and the value of the mass-loss rate are calculated in the case of spherical geometry. We consider photospheric and coronal heating from both X-ray photoionization and Compton scattering of X-rays and soft gamma-rays with energy about 1 MeV possibly irradiating the companion star in LMXBs. Evaporative winds may play a relevant role for the evolution of a special class of radiation-driven LMXBs, and this study is a step toward a quantitative understanding of the mechanism driving LMXB evolution.

  11. LSS 2018 - A double-lined spectroscopic binary central star with an extremely large reflection effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drilling, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    LSS 2018, the central star of the planetary nebulae DS1, was found to be a double-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 8.571 hours. Light variations with the same period were observed in U, B, and V; in the wavelength regions defined by the two IUE cameras; and in the strength of the CIII 4647 emission line. The light variations can be accurately predicted by a simple reflection effect, and an analysis of the light curves yields the angular diameter and effective temperature of the primary, the radii of the two stars in terms of their separation, and the inclination of the system. Analysis of the radial velocities then yields the masses of the two stars, their separation, the distance of the system, the absolute magnitude of the primary, and the size of the nebula.

  12. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  13. Analysis of gravitational waves from binary neutron star merger by Hilbert-Huang transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyama, Masato; Oohara, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Shibata, Masaru

    2016-06-01

    Using the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we analyze gravitational waves from late inspiral, merger, and post-merger phases of binary neutron stars coalescence, computed by a general relativistic numerical simulation. The HHT analysis has been developed as a method for time series analysis of nonlinear and nonstationary data, and it enables us to perform a high resolution time frequency analysis of signals with strong frequency modulation by evaluating the instantaneous variation of amplitude and frequency of data. We find that we can clearly observe the time evolution of the instantaneous frequency of the post-merger waveforms. It is found that temporal variation of frequency of post-merger waveforms can be evaluated within 5% error if BNS coalescences occur within 10 Mpc. This accuracy allows us to constrain the equation of state of neutron stars and to evaluate the radius of a fiducial neutron star of 1.8 M⊙ with a few hundred meters accuracy.

  14. Magnetic field, chemical composition and line profile variability of the peculiar eclipsing binary star AR Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folsom, C. P.; Kochukhov, O.; Wade, G. A.; Silvester, J.; Bagnulo, S.

    2010-10-01

    AR Aur is the only eclipsing binary known to contain a HgMn star, making it an ideal case for a detailed study of the HgMn phenomenon. HgMn stars are a poorly understood class of chemically peculiar stars, which have traditionally been thought not to possess significant magnetic fields. However, the recent discovery of line profile variability in some HgMn stars, apparently attributable to surface abundance patches, has brought this belief into question. In this paper we investigate the chemical abundances, line profile variability, and magnetic field of the primary and secondary of the AR Aur system, using a series of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations. We find the primary is indeed a HgMn star, and present the most precise abundances yet determined for this star. We find the secondary is a weak Am star, and is possibly still on the pre-main sequence. Line profile variability was observed in a range of lines in the primary, and is attributed to inhomogeneous surface distributions of some elements. No magnetic field was detected in any observation of either stars, with an upper limit on the longitudinal magnetic field in both stars of 100 G. Modelling of the phase-resolve longitudinal field measurements leads to a 3σ upper limit on any dipole surface magnetic field of about 400 G. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii. Also based on observations obtained at the Bernard Lyot Telescope (TBL, Pic du Midi, France) of the Midi-Pyrénées Observatory, which is operated by the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France. E-mail: cpf@arm.ac.uk

  15. Asteroseismology of Red-Giant Stars: Mixed Modes, Differential Rotation, and Eccentric Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Paul G.

    2013-12-01

    Astronomers are aware of rotation in stars since Galileo Galilei attributed the movement of sunspots to rotation of the Sun in 1613. In contrast to the Sun, whose surface can be resolved by small telescopes or even the (protected) eye, we detect stars as point sources with no spatial information. Numerous techniques have been developed to derive information about stellar rotation. Unfortunately, most observational data allow only for the surface rotational rate to be inferred. The internal rotational profile, which has a great effect on the stellar structure and evolution, remains hidden below the top layers of the star - the essential is hidden to the eyes. Asteroseismology allows us to "sense" indirectly deep below the stellar surface. Oscillations that propagate through the star provide information about the deep stellar interiors while they also distort the stellar surface in characteristic patterns leading to detectable brightness or velocity variations. Also, certain oscillation modes are sensitive to internal rotation and carry information on how the star is spinning deep inside. Thanks to the unprecedented quality of NASA's space telescope Kepler, numerous detailed observations of stars in various evolutionary stages are available. Such high quality data allow that for many stars, rotation can not only be constrained from surface rotation, but also investigated through seismic studies. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the oscillations and internal rotational gradient of evolved single and binary stars. It is shown that the seismic analysis can reach the cores of oscillating red-giant stars and that these cores are rapidly rotating, while nested in a slowly rotating convective envelope.

  16. A survey study of energy distribution in component stars of Algol-type binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobias, Jan Joseph

    A study survey of Algol-type binary systems was undertaken in order to investigate radiative flux distributions of their component stars. For hot primaries low-dispersion ultraviolet spectra, made with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUD) satellite, are combined at comparable phases with optical spectrophotometric scans, made at Lick Observatory, and then matched with a least-square method to Kurucz model atmospheres. Cooler secondaries are classified by matching their optical flux distributions, observed at totality, to standard stars. Results show that the U Sagittae system consists of a B7.5V-IV star while the secondary is matched by a G4III IV standard. The RW Tauri system consists of a B8V primary, while the secondary is matched by a KOIII standard. The UV spectrum of the primary in RY Geminorum matches that of an AOV standard. The secondary in RY GEM is KOIV. The system of RS Cephei consists of B9.7Ve and G8III-IV stars. The system of RW Persei consists of B9.6e and K2(+ or - 2)IV-III stars. The system of RX Geminorum consists of AOV or AOIII and K2(+ or - 2) stars. Finally, in Beta Lyrae the primary appears to be a B8.5-B9II-Ib object.

  17. Binary Neutron Star Mergers: A Jet Engine for Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Milton; Lang, Ryan N.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2016-06-01

    We perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations in full general relativity (GRMHD) of quasi-circular, equal-mass, binary neutron stars that undergo merger. The initial stars are irrotational, n = 1 polytropes and are magnetized. We explore two types of magnetic-field geometries: one where each star is endowed with a dipole magnetic field extending from the interior into the exterior, as in a pulsar, and the other where the dipole field is initially confined to the interior. In both cases the adopted magnetic fields are initially dynamically unimportant. The merger outcome is a hypermassive neutron star that undergoes delayed collapse to a black hole (spin parameter a/M BH ˜ 0.74) immersed in a magnetized accretion disk. About 4000M ˜ 60(M NS/1.625 M ⊙) ms following merger, the region above the black hole poles becomes strongly magnetized, and a collimated, mildly relativistic outflow—an incipient jet—is launched. The lifetime of the accretion disk, which likely equals the lifetime of the jet, is Δ t ˜ 0.1 (M NS/1.625 M ⊙) s. In contrast to black hole–neutron star mergers, we find that incipient jets are launched even when the initial magnetic field is confined to the interior of the stars.

  18. The role of binaries in the enrichment of the early Galactic halo. II. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: CEMP-no stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, T. T.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Beers, T. C.; Placco, V. M.; Yoon, J.; Buchhave, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Context. The detailed composition of most metal-poor halo stars has been found to be very uniform. However, a fraction of 20-70% (increasing with decreasing metallicity) exhibit dramatic enhancements in their abundances of carbon; these are the so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars. A key question for Galactic chemical evolution models is whether this non-standard composition reflects that of the stellar natal clouds or is due to local, post-birth mass transfer of chemically processed material from a binary companion; CEMP stars should then all be members of binary systems. Aims: Our aim is to determine the frequency and orbital parameters of binaries among CEMP stars with and without over-abundances of neutron-capture elements - CEMP-s and CEMP-no stars, respectively - as a test of this local mass-transfer scenario. This paper discusses a sample of 24 CEMP-no stars, while a subsequent paper will consider a similar sample of CEMP-s stars. Methods: High-resolution, low S/N spectra of the stars were obtained at roughly monthly intervals over a time span of up to eight years with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope. Radial velocities of ~100 m s-1 precision were determined by cross-correlation after each observing night, allowing immediate, systematic follow-up of any variable object. Results: Most programme stars exhibit no statistically significant radial-velocity variation over this period and appear to be single, while four are found to be binaries with orbital periods of 300-2000 days and normal eccentricity; the binary frequency for the sample is 17 ± 9%. The single stars mostly belong to the recently identified low-C band, while the binaries have higher absolute carbon abundances. Conclusions: We conclude that the nucleosynthetic process responsible for the strong carbon excess in these ancient stars is unrelated to their binary status; the carbon was imprinted on their natal molecular clouds in the early Galactic interstellar

  19. AN UPDATED LOOK AT BINARY CHARACTERISTICS OF MASSIVE STARS IN THE CYGNUS OB2 ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Kiminki, Daniel C.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.

    2012-05-20

    This work provides a statistical analysis of the massive star binary characteristics in the Cygnus OB2 association using radial velocity information of 114 B3-O5 primary stars and orbital properties for the 24 known binaries. We compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo simulations to infer the intrinsic binary fraction and distributions of mass ratios, periods, and eccentricities. We model the distribution of mass ratio, log-period, and eccentricity as power laws and find best-fitting indices of {alpha} = 0.1 {+-} 0.5, {beta} = 0.2 {+-} 0.4, and {gamma} = -0.6 {+-} 0.3, respectively. These distributions indicate a preference for massive companions, short periods, and low eccentricities. Our analysis indicates that the binary fraction of the cluster is 44% {+-} 8% if all binary systems are (artificially) assumed to have P < 1000 days; if the power-law period distribution is extrapolated to 10{sup 4} years, then a plausible upper limit for bound systems, the binary fraction is {approx}90% {+-} 10%. Of these binary (or higher order) systems, {approx}45% will have companions close enough to interact during pre- or post-main-sequence evolution (semi-major axis {approx}<4.7 AU). The period distribution for P < 26 days is not well reproduced by any single power law owing to an excess of systems with periods around 3-5 days (0.08-0.31 AU) and a relative shortage of systems with periods around 7-14 days (0.14-0.62 AU). We explore the idea that these longer-period systems evolved to produce the observed excess of short-period systems. The best-fitting binary parameters imply that secondaries generate, on average, {approx}16% of the V-band light in young massive populations. This means that photometrically based distance measurements for young massive clusters and associations will be systematically low by {approx}8% (0.16 mag in the distance modulus) if the luminous contributions of unresolved secondaries are not taken into account.

  20. THE ROTATION RATES OF MASSIVE STARS: THE ROLE OF BINARY INTERACTION THROUGH TIDES, MASS TRANSFER, AND MERGERS

    SciTech Connect

    De Mink, S. E.; Langer, N.; Izzard, R. G.; Sana, H.; De Koter, A.

    2013-02-20

    Rotation is thought to be a major factor in the evolution of massive stars-especially at low metallicity-with consequences for their chemical yields, ionizing flux, and final fate. Deriving the birth spin distribution is of high priority given its importance as a constraint on theories of massive star formation and as input for models of stellar populations in the local universe and at high redshift. Recently, it has become clear that the majority of massive stars interact with a binary companion before they die. We investigate how this affects the distribution of rotation rates, through stellar winds, expansion, tides, mass transfer, and mergers. For this purpose, we simulate a massive binary-star population typical for our Galaxy assuming continuous star formation. We find that, because of binary interaction, 20{sup +5} {sub -10}% of all massive main-sequence stars have projected rotational velocities in excess of 200 km s{sup -1}. We evaluate the effect of uncertain input distributions and physical processes and conclude that the main uncertainties are the mass transfer efficiency and the possible effect of magnetic braking, especially if magnetic fields are generated or amplified during mass accretion and stellar mergers. The fraction of rapid rotators we derive is similar to that observed. If indeed mass transfer and mergers are the main cause for rapid rotation in massive stars, little room remains for rapidly rotating stars that are born single. This implies that spin-down during star formation is even more efficient than previously thought. In addition, this raises questions about the interpretation of the surface abundances of rapidly rotating stars as evidence for rotational mixing. Furthermore, our results allow for the possibility that all early-type Be stars result from binary interactions and suggest that evidence for rotation in explosions, such as long gamma-ray bursts, points to a binary origin.

  1. Asteroid flux towards circumprimary habitable zones in binary star systems. II. Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bancelin, D.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.; Bazsó, Á.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Secular and mean motion resonances (MMR) are effective perturbations for shaping planetary systems. In binary star systems, they play a key role during the early and late phases of planetary formation, as well as for the dynamical stability of a planetary system. Aims: In this study, we aim to correlate the presence of orbital resonances with the rate of icy asteroids crossing the habitable zone (HZ) from a circumprimary disk of planetesimals in various binary star systems. Methods: We modelled a belt of small bodies in the inner and outer regions, interior and exterior to the orbit of a gas giant planet, respectively. The planetesimals are equally placed around a primary G-type star and move under the gravitational influence of the two stars and the gas giant. We numerically integrated the system for 50 Myr, considering various parameters for the secondary star. Its stellar type varies from a M- to F-type; its semimajor axis is either 50 au or 100 au, and its eccentricity is either 0.1 or 0.3. For comparison, we also varied the gas giant's orbital and physical parameters. Results: Our simulations highlight that a disk of planetesimals will suffer from perturbations owing to a perturbed gas giant, mean motion, and secular resonances. We show that a secular resonance - with location and width varying according to the secondary star's characteristics - can exist in the icy asteroid belt region and overlap with MMRs, which have an impact on the dynamical lifetime of the disk. In addition, we point out that, in any case, the 2:1 MMR, the 5:3 MMR, and the secular resonance are powerful perturbations for the flux of icy asteroids towards the HZ and the transport of water therein.

  2. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. III. Classification of Kepler Eclipsing Binary Light Curves with Locally Linear Embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevič, Gal; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of "detachedness" of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  3. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. III. CLASSIFICATION OF KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY LIGHT CURVES WITH LOCALLY LINEAR EMBEDDING

    SciTech Connect

    Matijevic, Gal; Prsa, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Bloemen, Steven; Barclay, Thomas E-mail: andrej.prsa@villanova.edu

    2012-05-15

    We present an automated classification of 2165 Kepler eclipsing binary (EB) light curves that accompanied the second Kepler data release. The light curves are classified using locally linear embedding, a general nonlinear dimensionality reduction tool, into morphology types (detached, semi-detached, overcontact, ellipsoidal). The method, related to a more widely used principal component analysis, produces a lower-dimensional representation of the input data while preserving local geometry and, consequently, the similarity between neighboring data points. We use this property to reduce the dimensionality in a series of steps to a one-dimensional manifold and classify light curves with a single parameter that is a measure of 'detachedness' of the system. This fully automated classification correlates well with the manual determination of morphology from the data release, and also efficiently highlights any misclassified objects. Once a lower-dimensional projection space is defined, the classification of additional light curves runs in a negligible time and the method can therefore be used as a fully automated classifier in pipeline structures. The classifier forms a tier of the Kepler EB pipeline that pre-processes light curves for the artificial intelligence based parameter estimator.

  4. Collective Properties of Neutron-star X-Ray Binary Populations of Galaxies. II. Pre-low-mass X-Ray Binary Properties, Formation Rates, and Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadkamkar, H.; Ghosh, P.

    2014-04-01

    We continue our exploration of the collective properties of neutron-star X-ray binaries in the stellar fields (i.e., outside globular clusters) of normal galaxies. In Paper I of this series, we considered high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). In this paper (Paper II), we consider low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), whose evolutionary scenario is very different from that of HMXBs. We consider the evolution of primordial binaries up to the stage where the neutron star just formed in the supernova explosion of the primary is in a binary with its low-mass, unevolved companion, and this binary has circularized tidally, producing what we call a pre-low-mass X-ray binary (pre-LMXB). We study the constraints on the formation of such pre-LMXBs in detail (since these are low-probability events), and calculate their collective properties and formation rates. To this end, we first consider the changes in the binary parameters in the various steps involved, viz., the common-envelope phase, the supernova, and the tidal evolution. This naturally leads to a clarification of the constraints. We then describe our calculation of the evolution of the distributions of primordial binary parameters into those of pre-LMXB parameters, following the standard evolutionary scenario for individual binaries. We display the latter as both bivariate and monovariate distributions, discuss their essential properties, and indicate the influences of some essential factors on these. Finally, we calculate the formation rate of these pre-LMXBs. The results of this paper will be used in a subsequent one to compute the expected X-ray luminosity function of LMXBs.

  5. When Asymmetric Cosmic Bubbles Betray a Difficult Marriage: the Study of Binary Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffin, H. M. J.; Miszalski, B.

    2011-09-01

    Planetary Nebulae represent a powerful window into the evolution of low-intermediate mass stars that have undergone extensive mass-loss. The nebula manifests itself in an extremely wide variety of shapes, but exactly how the mass lost is shaped into such a diverse range of morphologies is still highly uncertain despite over thirty years of vigorous debate. Binaries have long been thought to offer a solution to this vexing problem. Now, thanks to recent surveys and improved observing strategies, it appears clearly that a binary channel, in particular common-envelope (CE) evolution, is responsible for a large fraction of planetary nebulae. Moreover, as planetary nebulae are just “fresh out of the oven” compared to other post-CE systems, they provide invaluable contributions to the study of common-envelope evolution and to the formation of jets in binary systems. Our studies have also started to identify strong links between binarity and morphology, including a high proportion of bipolar nebulae and rings of low ionisation filaments resembling SN 1987A. Equally important are the newly found binary CSPN with intermediate periods, which appear linked to chemically peculiar stars whose composition was modified by binary evolution. Their study may also reveal much information on mass and angular momentum transfer processes in binary stars. Here we show examples of four PNe for which we have discovered their binary nature, including the discovery of a rare case of a barium-rich cool central star.

  6. The gravitational-wave signal generated by a galactic population of double neutron-star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shenghua; Jeffery, C. Simon

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the gravitational wave (GW) signal generated by a population of double neutron-star (DNS) binaries with eccentric orbits caused by kicks during supernova collapse and binary evolution. The DNS population of a standard Milky Way-type galaxy has been studied as a function of star formation history, initial mass function (IMF) and metallicity and of the binary-star common-envelope ejection process. The model provides birthrates, merger rates and total number of DNS as a function of time. The GW signal produced by this population has been computed and expressed in terms of a hypothetical space GW detector (eLISA) by calculating the number of discrete GW signals at different confidence levels, where `signal' refers to detectable GW strain in a given frequency-resolution element. In terms of the parameter space explored, the number of DNS-originating GW signals is greatest in regions of recent star formation, and is significantly increased if metallicity is reduced from 0.02 to 0.001, consistent with Belczynski et al. Increasing the IMF power-law index (from -2.5 to -1.5) increases the number of GW signals by a large factor. This number is also much higher for models where the common-envelope ejection is treated using the α-mechanism (energy conservation) than when using the γ-mechanism (angular-momentum conservation). We have estimated the total number of detectable DNS GW signals from the Galaxy by combining contributions from thin disc, thick disc, bulge and halo. The most probable numbers for an eLISA-type experiment are 0-1600 signals per year at S/N ≥ 1, 0-900 signals per year at S/N ≥ 3, and 0-570 at S/N ≥ 5, coming from about 0-65, 0-60 and 0-50 resolved DNS, respectively.

  7. The close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayet stars as a function of metallicity in M31 and M33

    SciTech Connect

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip E-mail: phil.massey@lowell.edu

    2014-07-01

    Massive star evolutionary models generally predict the correct ratio of WC-type and WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars at low metallicities, but underestimate the ratio at higher (solar and above) metallicities. One possible explanation for this failure is perhaps single-star models are not sufficient and Roche-lobe overflow in close binaries is necessary to produce the 'extra' WC stars at higher metallicities. However, this would require the frequency of close massive binaries to be metallicity dependent. Here we test this hypothesis by searching for close Wolf-Rayet binaries in the high metallicity environments of M31 and the center of M33 as well as in the lower metallicity environments of the middle and outer regions of M33. After identifying ∼100 Wolf-Rayet binaries based on radial velocity variations, we conclude that the close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayets is not metallicity dependent and thus other factors must be responsible for the overabundance of WC stars at high metallicities. However, our initial identifications and observations of these close binaries have already been put to good use as we are currently observing additional epochs for eventual orbit and mass determinations.

  8. The Life Cycles of Stars: An Information and Activity Booklet, Grades 9-12, 1997-1998. Imagine the Universe! Probing the Structure & Evaluation of the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Granger, Kara C.

    This booklet contains information and activities on the life cycle of stars. Materials can be adapted for grade 9 through grade 12 classrooms. Background information about star birth and life, black dwarfs, supernovae, white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and the electromagnetic spectrum is included. The seven activities focus on star mass,…

  9. A Study on the Evolution of Compact Star Binaries and Stellar X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. J.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray serves as one of the most important domains of discovery in astronomy. It could be used to study the properties as well as the formation and evolution of X-ray emitting objects. X-ray can also be used to constrain the formation and evolution history of galaxies in the universe. In this thesis, we discuss the properties of the X-ray point sources, especially those with white dwarfs as accretors. We focus on the evolution of these binaries and their progenitors, as well as the relation between these objects and their host environments with the numerical and observational methods. We further put constraints on the final product and the possible connection to the type Ia supernovae. Our main results are as follows: (1) We study the case in which the thermally unstable accretion disks occur in binaries, and apply to the evolution of GRO J1744-28 and type Ia supernovae. Our result shows that GRO J1744-28 could have evolved from a binary composed by a normal star and an ONeMg white dwarf and with the white dwarf as the accretor. During its evolution, the white dwarf experienced accretion from the X-ray irradiated unstable accretion disk, then accumulated mass by burning the accreted matter on its surface before it collapsed to a neutron star. The new formed neutron star then accreted from the companion again, and evolved to its present properties. We also apply the unstable disks to the binaries with C/O white dwarfs as accretors, and calculate the region of the initial companion masses and orbital periods which could lead to successful type Ia supernovae. The results suggest that the companion star of the progenitor system could have the initial mass as low as ≲ 1.5 M_{⊙}. (2) We study the λ parameter in the common envelope evolution. Our results show that the λ parameter varies for the stars with different initial masses. For the same star, λ also varies in different evolutional stages. At the end of their evolution, the stars with the approximate initial

  10. Primordial binary populations in low-density star clusters as seen by Chandra: globular clusters versus old open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen C.

    2015-08-01

    The binaries in the core of a star cluster are the energy source that prevents the cluster from experiencing core collapse. To model the dynamical evolution of a cluster, it is important to have constraints on the primordial binary content. X-ray observations of old star clusters are very efficient in detecting the close interacting binaries among the cluster members. The X-ray sources in star clusters are a mix of binaries that were dynamically formed and primordial binaries. In massive, dense star clusters, dynamical encounters play an important role in shaping the properties and numbers of the binaries. In contrast, in the low-density clusters the impact of dynamical encounters is presumed to be very small, and the close binaries detected in X-rays represent a primordial population. The lowest density globular clusters have current masses and central densities similar to those of the oldest open clusters in our Milky Way. I will discuss the results of studies with the Chandra X-ray Observatory that have nevertheless revealed a clear dichotomy: far fewer (if any at all) X-ray sources are detected in the central regions of the low-density globular clusters compared to the number of secure cluster members that have been detected in old open clusters (above a limiting X-ray luminosity of typically 4e30 erg/s). The low stellar encounter rates imply that dynamical destruction of binaries can be ignored at present, therefore an explanation must be sought elsewhere. I will discuss several factors that can shed light on the implied differences between the primordial close binary populations in the two types of star clusters.

  11. Neutron star masses and radii from quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Steiner, Andrew W. E-mail: steiner3@uw.edu

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of neutron star radius constraints from five quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and examine how they depend on measurements of their distances and amounts of intervening absorbing material, as well as their assumed atmospheric compositions. We construct and calibrate to published results a semi-analytic model of the neutron star atmosphere which approximates these effects for the predicted masses and radii. Starting from mass and radius probability distributions established from hydrogen-atmosphere spectral fits of quiescent sources, we apply this model to compute alternate sets of probability distributions. We perform Bayesian analyses to estimate neutron star mass-radius curves and equation of state (EOS) parameters that best-fit each set of distributions, assuming the existence of a known low-density neutron star crustal EOS, a simple model for the high-density EOS, causality, and the observation that the neutron star maximum mass exceeds 2 M {sub ☉}. We compute the posterior probabilities for each set of distance measurements and assumptions about absorption and composition. We find that, within the context of our assumptions and our parameterized EOS models, some absorption models are disfavored. We find that neutron stars composed of hadrons are favored relative to those with exotic matter with strong phase transitions. In addition, models in which all five stars have hydrogen atmospheres are found to be weakly disfavored. Our most likely models predict neutron star radii that are consistent with current experimental results concerning the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction near the nuclear saturation density.

  12. A Re-Analysis of Einstein SSS Spectra of Active Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. A.; White, N. E.

    1992-12-01

    We have re-analyzed the highest signal-to-noise spectra that were obtained by the Einstein Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) of active RS CVn binary stars. We compare our results with those obtained by Swank et al. (1981, ApJ, 246, 208) who also analyzed these same data. The new analysis incorporates several improvements over the original: (i) it makes use of the improved understanding of the SSS instrument response matrix and of how to correct the observed spectrum for the affect of the ice build-up on the detector window; (ii) it uses the simultaneously obtained Einstein Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) data to constrain more tightly the high-temperature thermal emission component; and (iii) it uses modern versions of the Mewe and Gronenschild and Raymond and Smith plasma codes to model the data. We discuss in some detail the X-ray spectrum of the nearby giant binary system Capella which is anomalously soft compared to the other binary stars, and for which the fit to the data of a two-component thermal emission model is by far the worst. In addition, we analyze the Exosat Transmission Grating Spectrometer spectrum of Capella and contrast the best-fit model to these data with the best-fit model to the SSS spectrum.

  13. A CCD PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE CONTACT BINARY STAR GSC 03526-01995

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, W.-P.; Qian, S.-B.; Liu, N.-P.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first two sets of complete light curves in the R and I bands observed in 2011 and 2012 photometrically for the contact binary GSC 03526-01995. The asymmetric light curves are analyzed with spot models using the Wilson-Devinney code. It is discovered that GSC 03526-01995 is a spotted marginal W-type W UMa contact binary system with a mass ratio of q 2.845({+-} 0.006) and a degree of contact factor f = 18.2%({+-} 1.5%). Combining new determined times of light minimum together with the others published in the literature, the period change of the system is investigated. A cyclic variation, with a period of 7.39 yr and a semiamplitude of 0.00896 days, is discovered. It is plausibly caused by the light-time effect via a third body. The photometric analysis indicates that the suspected third companion might itself be a binary consisting of two stars of 0.285 solar masses, suggesting that GSC 03526-01995 is a quadruple system containing four late-type stars.

  14. Measurements of Binary Stars with the Starfire Optical Range Adaptive Optics Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaby, David; Spillar, Earl; Christou, Julian C.; Drummond, Jack D.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the relative photometry produced by adaptive optics within the isoplanatic patch, we observed four binaries, 10 UMa, φ UMa, 81 Cnc, and κ UMa, with adaptive optics using natural guide stars on the 3.5 m telescope, as well as one binary, β Del, with adaptive optics using a laser guide star on the 1.5 m telescope at the Starfire Optical Range. Iterative blind deconvolution (IBD) and parametric blind deconvolution (PBD) techniques were used to postprocess the data, which produced consistent results for position angles, separations, and magnitude differences. We also conducted simulations that verify the agreement between IBD and PBD and compared their measurements to truth data. From the results of both observations and simulations, we conclude that adaptive optics is well suited for providing not only position angles and separations for close binaries, but also good relative magnitudes without quadrant ambiguity. From the observations, we find that the secondary of 81 Cnc (separation=0.12") appears to be 0.12 mag brighter than the primary at 0.85 μm and is, therefore, cooler. We also derive a new orbit for κ UMa (separation=0.067"). Our results for β Del (ADS 14073) have significantly improved precision compared with the 1998 analyses of the same data by ten Brummelaar and colleagues and by Roberts, ten Brummelaar, and Mason.

  15. Binary Stars "Flare" With Predictable Cycles, Analysis of Radio Observations Reveals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    Astronomers have completed a 5-year campaign to monitor continuously radio flares from two groups of binary star systems. This survey is of special interest because it provides evidence that certain binary star systems have predictable activity cycles like our Sun. The survey, which ran from January 1995 to October 2000, was conducted with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Green Bank Interferometer. The report was presented at the American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico, by Mercedes Richards of the University of Virginia, and her collaborators Elizabeth Waltman of the Naval Research Laboratory, and Frank Ghigo of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). "This long-term survey was critical to our understanding of the short- and long-term magnetic cycles of these intriguing star systems," said Richards. The survey focused on the binary star systems Beta Persei and V711 Tauri -- both are about 95 light-years from Earth. Beta Persei is the prototype of the "Algol" class of interacting binary stars. An Algol system contains a hot, blue, main sequence star, along with a cool, orange/red star that is more active than our Sun. V711 Tauri is an "RS Canum Venaticorum" binary, which contains two cool stars that behave like our Sun. "Our survey was the longest-running continuous radio flare survey of Algol or RS Canum Venaticorum binary star systems," said Richards. A flare is an enormous explosion on the surface of a star, which is accompanied by a release of magnetic energy. Flares can be detected over the full range of wavelengths from gamma rays to the radio. It is estimated that the energy release in a flare on the Sun is equivalent to a billion megatons of TNT. The strength of the magnetic field and the amount of activity it displays, like sunspots and flares, are directly related to the rotation or "spin" of the star. In Beta Persei and V711 Tauri, the cool star spins once every 3 days, compared to once every month in the

  16. High-velocity stars from the interaction of a globular cluster and a massive black hole binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragione, G.; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, R.

    2016-05-01

    High-velocity stars are usually thought to be the dynamical product of the interaction of binary systems with supermassive black holes. In this paper, we investigate a particular mechanism of production of high-velocity stars as due to the close interaction between a massive and orbitally decayed globular cluster and a supermassive black hole binary. The high velocity acquired by some stars of the cluster comes from combined effect of extraction of their gravitational binding energy and from the slingshot due to the interaction with the black hole binary. After the close interaction, stars could reach a velocity sufficient to travel in the halo and even overcome the galactic potential well, while some of them are just stripped from the globular cluster and start orbiting around the galactic centre.

  17. Grid search in stellar parameters: a software for spectrum analysis of single stars and binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The currently operating space missions, as well as those that will be launched in the near future, will deliver high-quality data for millions of stellar objects. Since the majority of stellar astrophysical applications still (at least partly) rely on spectroscopic data, an efficient tool for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy is needed. Aims: We aim at developing an efficient software package for the analysis of medium- to high-resolution spectroscopy of single stars and those in binary systems. The major requirements are that the code should have a high performance, represent the state-of-the-art analysis tool, and provide accurate determinations of atmospheric parameters and chemical compositions for different types of stars. Methods: We use the method of atmosphere models and spectrum synthesis, which is one of the most commonly used approaches for the analysis of stellar spectra. Our Grid Search in Stellar Parameters (gssp) code makes use of the Message Passing Interface (OpenMPI) implementation, which makes it possible to run in parallel mode. The method is first tested on the simulated data and is then applied to the spectra of real stellar objects. Results: The majority of test runs on the simulated data were successful in that we were able to recover the initially assumed sets of atmospheric parameters. We experimentally find the limits in signal-to-noise ratios of the input spectra, below which the final set of parameters is significantly affected by the noise. Application of the gssp package to the spectra of three Kepler stars, KIC 11285625, KIC 6352430, and KIC 4931738, was also largely successful. We found an overall agreement of the final sets of the fundamental parameters with the original studies. For KIC 6352430, we found that dependence of the light dilution factor on wavelength cannot be ignored, as it has a significant impact on the determination of the atmospheric parameters of this binary system. Conclusions: The

  18. Time-Dependent Behavior of the O'Connell Effect in Eclipsing Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaky, Matthew M.; Koju, V.

    2012-05-01

    The characteristic shape of an eclipsing binary light curve consists of two out-of-eclipse maxima and two mid-eclipse minima. Many eclipsing binary light curves exhibit unequally high maxima, a feature known as the O'Connell effect. So far, this asymmetry has not been convincingly explained aside from a few individual systems. Most theories attribute the O'Connell effect to phenomena such as starspots, clouds of circumstellar gas and dust, or a hot spot caused by the impact of a mass-transferring gas stream. The high precision and nearly continuous temporal coverage of light curves produced by the Kepler Space Mission make it possible to detect variations in the O'Connell effect within individual systems that have not previously been observed via ground-based observations. Our analysis of Kepler light curves of eclipsing binary systems reveals that in most cases the size and even the sign of the O'Connell effect changes significantly over time scales of weeks or months. Moreover, the magnitude difference between the eclipse minima also varies, usually lagging behind the variations in the difference between the out-of-eclipse maxima by several orbital cycles. We have created models of eclipsing binary systems using Binary Maker 3 that include starspots that migrate slowly in longitude, and have analyze the light curves generated by these model systems. Models with constant starspots at fixed latitude and models with starspots that vary in size and latitude both reproduce the qualitative behavior of the time-dependent O'Connell effect in the Kepler light curves very closely. These results provide support for the notion that the O'Connell effect, at least in some cases, is caused by migrating starspots on the surface of one or both components of the binary star system.

  19. Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, E (Editor); Stepinski, T. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars was to bring together workers on accretion disks in the western Gulf region (Texas and Louisiana). Part 2 presents the workshop program, a list of poster presentations, and a list of workshop participants. Accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of these disks form around compact stars, such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes that are members of binary systems and reveal themselves as a power source, especially in the x-ray and gamma regions of the spectrum. On the other hand, protostellar disks are believed to be accretion disks associated with young, pre-main-sequence stars and manifest themselves mostly in infrared and radio observations. These disks are considered to be a natural outcome of the star formation process. The focus of this workshop included theory and observations relevant to accretion disks around compact objects and newly forming stars, with the primary purpose of bringing the two communities together for intellectual cross-fertilization. The nature of the workshop was exploratory, to see how much interaction is possible between distinct communities and to better realize the local potential in this subject. A critical workshop activity was identification and documentation of key issues that are of mutual interest to both communities.

  20. A statistical test on the reliability of the non-coevality of stars in binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: We develop a statistical test on the expected difference in age estimates of two coeval stars in detached double-lined eclipsing binary systems that are only caused by observational uncertainties. We focus on stars in the mass range [0.8; 1.6] M⊙, with an initial metallicity [Fe/H] from -0.55 to 0.55 dex, and on stars in the main-sequence phase. Methods: The ages were obtained by means of the SCEPtER technique, a maximum-likelihood procedure relying on a pre-computed grid of stellar models. The observational constraints used in the recovery procedure are stellar mass, radius, effective temperature, and metallicity [Fe/H]. To check the effect of the uncertainties affecting observations on the (non-)coevality assessment, the chosen observational constraints were subjected to a Gaussian perturbation before applying the SCEPtER code. We defined the statistic W computed as the ratio of the absolute difference of estimated ages for the two stars over the age of the older one. We determined the critical values of this statistics above which coevality can be rejected in dependence on the mass of the two stars, on the initial metallicity [Fe/H], and on the evolutionary stage of the primary star. Results: The median expected difference in the reconstructed age between the coeval stars of a binary system - caused alone by the observational uncertainties - shows a strong dependence on the evolutionary stage. This ranges from about 20% for an evolved primary star to about 75% for a near ZAMS primary. The median difference also shows an increase with the mass of the primary star from 20% for 0.8 M⊙ stars to about 50% for 1.6 M⊙ stars. The reliability of these results was checked by repeating the process with a grid of stellar models computed by a different evolutionary code; the median difference in the critical values was only 0.01. We show that the W test is much more sensible to age differences in the binary system components than the alternative approach of

  1. An Atlas of O-C Diagrams of Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreiner, Jerzy M.; Kim, Chun-Hwey; Nha, Il-Seong

    The Atlas contains data for 1,138 eclipsing binaries represented by 91,798 minima timings, collected from the usual international and local journals, observatory publications and unpublished minima. Among this source material there is a considerable representation of amateur astronomers. Some timings were found in the card-index catalogue of the Astronomical Observatory of the Jagiellonian University, Cracow. Stars were included in the Atlas provided that they satisfied 3 criteria: (1) at least 20 minima had been times; (2) these minima spanned at least 2,500 cycles; and (3) the 2,500 cycles represented no fewer than 40 years. Some additional stars not strictly satisfying these criteria were also included if useful information was available. For each star, the Atlas contains the (O-C) diagram calculated by the authors and a table of general information containing: binary characteristics; assorted catalogue numbers; the statistics of the collected minima timings; the light elements (light ephemeris); comments and literature references. All of the data and diagrams in the Atlas are also available in electronic form on the Internet at http://www.as.ap.krakow.pl/o- c".

  2. Gravitational-wave cutoff frequencies of tidally disruptive neutron star-black hole binary mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannarale, Francesco; Berti, Emanuele; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Lackey, Benjamin D.; Shibata, Masaru

    2015-10-01

    Tidal disruption has a dramatic impact on the outcome of neutron star-black hole mergers. The phenomenology of these systems can be divided in three classes: nondisruptive, mildly disruptive, and disruptive. The cutoff frequency of the gravitational radiation produced during the merger (which is potentially measurable by interferometric detectors) is very different in each regime, and when the merger is disruptive it carries information on the neutron star equation of state. Here we use semianalytical tools to derive a formula for the critical binary mass ratio Q =MBH/MNS below which mergers are disruptive as a function of the stellar compactness C =MNS/RNS and the dimensionless black hole spin χ . We then employ a new gravitational waveform amplitude model, calibrated to 134 general relativistic numerical simulations of binaries with black hole spin (anti-)aligned with the orbital angular momentum, to obtain a fit to the gravitational-wave cutoff frequency in the disruptive regime as a function of C , Q , and χ . Our findings are important to build gravitational-wave template banks, to determine whether neutron star-black hole mergers can emit electromagnetic radiation (thus helping multimessenger searches), and to improve event rate calculations for these systems.

  3. The Peculiar Galactic Center Neutron Star X-Ray Binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of a milli-second radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of 2 hr and a radiated energy output of 5E40 erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of Lx5E32 ergs and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to Lx1E35-1E36 ergs for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at Lx1E33-1E34 ergs. This unusual X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  4. The White Dwarf Binary Pathways Survey I: A sample of FGK stars with white dwarf companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. G.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Zorotovic, M.; Ren, J. J.

    2016-08-01

    The number of spatially unresolved white dwarf plus main-sequence star binaries has increased rapidly in the last decade, jumping from only ˜30 in 2003 to over 3000. However, in the majority of known systems the companion to the white dwarf is a low mass M dwarf, since these are relatively easy to identify from optical colours and spectra. White dwarfs with more massive FGK type companions have remained elusive due to the large difference in optical brightness between the two stars. In this paper we identify 934 main-sequence FGK stars from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey in the southern hemisphere and the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey in the northern hemisphere, that show excess flux at ultraviolet wavelengths which we interpret as the likely presence of a white dwarf companion. We obtained Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra for nine systems which confirmed that the excess is indeed caused, in all cases, by a hot compact companion, eight being white dwarfs and one a hot subdwarf or pre-helium white dwarf, demonstrating that this sample is very clean. We also address the potential of this sample to test binary evolution models and type Ia supernovae formation channels.

  5. Initial Data for Binary Neutron Stars with Arbitrary Spin and Orbital Eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsatsin, Petr; Marronetti, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    The starting point of any general relativistic numerical simulation is a solution of the Hamiltonian and momentum constraint. One characteristic of the Binary Neutron Star (BNS) initial data problem is that, unlike the case of binary black holes, there are no formalisms that permit the construction of initial data for stars with arbitrary spins. For many years, the only options available have been systems either with irrotational or corotating fluid. Ten years ago, Marronetti & Shapiro (2003) introduced an approximation that would produce such arbitrarily spinning systems. More recently, Tichy (2012) presented a new formulation to do the same. However, all these data sets are bound to have a non-zero eccentricity that results from the fact the stars' velocity have initial null radial components. We present here a new approximation for BNS initial data for systems that possess arbitrary spins and arbitrary radial and tangential velocity components. The latter allows for the construction of data sets with arbitrary orbital eccentricity. Through the fine-tuning of the radial component, we were able to reduce the eccentricity by a factor of several compared to that of standard helical symmetry data sets such as those currently used in the scientific community.

  6. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  7. Absolute Properties of the Pre-main-sequence Eclipsing Binary Star NP Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg; Fekel, Francis C.; Pavlovski, Krešimir; Torres, Guillermo; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    NP Per is a well-detached, 2.2 day eclipsing binary whose components are both pre-main-sequence stars that are still contracting toward the main-sequence phase of evolution. We report extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations with which we have determined their properties accurately. Their surface temperatures are quite different: 6420 ± 90 K for the larger F5 primary star and 4540 ± 160 K for the smaller K5e star. Their masses and radii are 1.3207 ± 0.0087 solar masses and 1.372 ± 0.013 solar radii for the primary, and 1.0456 ± 0.0046 solar masses and 1.229 ± 0.013 solar radii for the secondary. The orbital period is variable over long periods of time. A comparison of the observations with current stellar evolution models from MESA indicates that the stars cannot be fit at a single age: the secondary appears significantly younger than the primary. If the stars are assumed to be coeval and to have the age of the primary (17 Myr), then the secondary is larger and cooler than predicted by current models. The Hα spectral line of the secondary component is completely filled by, presumably, chromospheric emission due to a magnetic activity cycle.

  8. Spectroscopy of close visual binary components of the stable shell star 1 Delphini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubát, Jiří; Kubátová, Brankica; Doležalová, Barbora; Iliev, Lubomir; Šlechta, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    Stable shell stars are ideal objects for studying basic physical principles of the formation of disks in Be stars. If these stars have a close unresolved visual companion, its contribution toward the modelling of the disk cannot be overlooked, as is sometimes done. The study aims to spectroscopically resolve close visual binary Be (shell) star 1 Del, which up to now was only resolved by speckle or micrometric measurements. The integral field spectroscopy obtained by the SINFONI spectrograph at the VLT telescope in the European Southern Observatory (ESO) in the infrared region was used; we supplemented these observations with visual spectroscopy with the Perek Telescope at the Ondřejov Observatory. Spectra of 1 Del were successfully resolved, and, for the first time, spectra of 1 Del B were obtained. We found that 1 Del A is a Be/shell star, while 1 Del B is not an emission-line object. Based on observations collected with the Perek 2-m Telescope at the Ondřejov Observatory, Czech Republic and the SINFONI spectrograph at UT4-Yepun in ESO during the observing programme 093.D-0172.The reduced spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A22

  9. Initial data for high-compactness black hole-neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, Katherine; Foucart, François; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-05-01

    For highly compact neutron stars, constructing numerical initial data for black hole-neutron star binary evolutions is very difficult. We describe improvements to an earlier method that enable it to handle these more challenging cases. These improvements were found by invoking a general relaxation principle that may be helpful in improving robustness in other initial data solvers. We examine the case of a 6:1 mass ratio system in inspiral close to merger, where the star is governed by a polytropic {{Γ }}=2, an SLy, or an LS220 equation of state (EOS). In particular, we are able to obtain a solution with a realistic LS220 EOS for a star with compactness 0.26 and mass 1.98 M ⊙, which is representative of the highest reliably determined neutron star masses. For the SLy EOS, we can obtain solutions with a comparable compactness of 0.25, while for a family of polytropic equations of state, we obtain solutions with compactness up to 0.21, the largest compactness that is stable in this family. These compactness values are significantly higher than any previously published results.

  10. Tidal heating and mass loss in neutron star binaries - Implications for gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    A neutron star in a close binary orbit around another neutron star (or stellar-mass black hole) spirals inward owing to gravitational radiation. We discuss the effects of tidal dissipation during this process. Tidal energy dissipated in the neutron star's core escapes mainly as neutrinos, but heating of the crust, and outward diffusion of photons, blows off the outer layers of the star. This photon-driven mass loss precedes the final coalescence. The presence of this eject material impedes the escape of gamma-rays created via neutrino interactions. If an e(+) - e(-) fireball, created in the late stages of coalescence, were loaded with (or surrounded by) material with the mean column density of the ejecta, it could not be an efficient source of gamma-rays. Models for cosmologically distant gamma-rays burst that involve neutron stars must therefore be anisotropic, so that the fireball expands preferentially in directions where the column density of previously blown-off material is far below the spherically averaged value which we have calculated. Some possible 'scenarios' along these lines are briefly discussed.

  11. Detector configuration of DECIGO/BBO and identification of cosmological neutron-star binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Kent; Seto, Naoki

    2011-02-15

    The primary target for the planned space-borne gravitational wave interferometers DECIGO/BBO (Decihertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory/Big Bang Observer) is a primordial gravitational wave background. However there exist astrophysical foregrounds, and among them, gravitational waves from neutron-star (NS) binaries are the solid and strong component that must be identified and subtracted. In this paper, we discuss the geometry of detector configurations preferable for identifying the NS/NS binary signals. As a first step, we analytically estimate the minimum signal-to-noise ratios of the binaries for several static detector configurations that are characterized by adjustable geometrical parameters, and determine the optimal values for these parameters. Next we perform numerical simulations to take into account the effect of detector motions, and find reasonable agreements with the analytical results. We show that, with the standard network formed by 4 units of triangle detectors, the proposed BBO sensitivity would be sufficient in receiving gravitational waves from all the NS/NS binaries at z{<=}5 with signal-to-noise ratios higher than 25. We also discuss the minimum sensitivity of DECIGO required for the foreground identification.

  12. Separating the spectra of binary stars I. A simple method: Secondary reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferluga, S.; Floreano, L.; Bravar, U.; Bedalo, C.

    1997-01-01

    We present a practical method for the analysis of spectroscopic binaries, reconstructing the lines of the two components of the system. We show that the problem of the separation of binary spectra can be solved in an easy way, under most common conditions. One pair of observations may be sufficient, if taken at different orbital phases of the system, preferably at opposite quadratures. The separation procedure is discussed analytically, and a technique is described, which allows to restore the secondary lines in few steps. An algorithm is also provided, which derives the radial velocity of the secondary star, by directly analysing a difference line-profile obtained from the two input spectra. The efficiency of the method is tested, by reconstructing artificial line-profiles and simulated binary spectra as well. Then the procedure is applied to the eclipsing binary IZ Per, revealing for the first time its faint secondary spectrum. Based on observations performed at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP), and made available through the Trieste-Aurelie-Archive (TAA).

  13. The discovery and characterisation of binary central stars in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David

    2016-07-01

    Close binary central stars of planetary nebulae are key in constraining the poorly- understood common-envelope phase of evolution, which in turn is critical in understanding the formation of a wide-range of astrophysical phenomena (including cataclysmic variables, low-mass X-ray binaries and supernovae type Ia). Here, I present the results of our on-going, targeted search for close-binaries in planetary nebulae which has led to the discovery of more than ten new central binaries in just the last few years (almost the same as the total discovered during the 1980s and 1990s together). This success has been rooted in the targeted selection of objects for study, based on morphological features deemed typical of binarity, as well as novel observing strategies (including the employment of narrow-band filters for photometry to minimise nebular contamination), both of which are discussed. These new discoveries coupled with the painstaking characterisation of both newly discovered systems and those from the literature mean that we are now in a position to begin to probe the poorly understood common-envelope phase.

  14. On Poynting-flux-driven bubbles and shocks around merging neutron star binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-05-01

    Merging binaries of compact relativistic objects (neutron stars and black holes) are thought to be progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts and sources of gravitational waves, hence their study is of great importance for astrophysics. Because of the strong magnetic field of one or both binary members and high orbital frequencies, these binaries are strong sources of energy in the form of Poynting flux (e.g. magnetic-field-dominated outflows, relativistic leptonic winds, electromagnetic and plasma waves). The steady injection of energy by the binary forms a bubble (or a cavity) filled with matter with the relativistic equation of state, which pushes on the surrounding plasma and can drive a shock wave in it. Unlike the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor blast wave solution for a point-like explosion, the shock wave here is continuously driven by the ever-increasing pressure inside the bubble. We calculate from the first principles the dynamics and evolution of the bubble and the shock surrounding it and predict that such systems can be observed as radio sources a few hours before and after the merger. At much later times, the shock is expected to settle on to the Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor solution, thus resembling an explosion.

  15. Final binary star results from the ESO VLT Lunar occultations program

    SciTech Connect

    Richichi, A.; Fors, O.; Cusano, F.; Ivanov, V. D.

    2014-03-01

    We report on 13 subarcsecond binaries, detected by means of lunar occultations in the near-infrared at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). They are all first-time detections except for the visual binary HD 158122, which we resolved for the first time in the near-infrared. The primaries have magnitudes in the range K = 4.5-10.0, and companions in the range K = 6.8-11.1. The magnitude differences have a median value of 2.4, with the largest being 4.6. The projected separations are in the range of 4-168 mas, with a median of 13 mas. We discuss and compare our results with the available literature. With this paper, we conclude the mining for binary star detections in the 1226 occultations recorded at the VLT with the ISAAC instrument. We expect that the majority of these binaries may be unresolvable by adaptive optics on current telescopes, and they might be challenging for long-baseline interferometry. However, they constitute an interesting sample for future larger telescopes and for astrometric missions such as GAIA.

  16. Importance of tides for periastron precession in eccentric neutron star-white dwarf binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sravan, N.; Valsecchi, F.; Kalogera, V.; Althaus, L. G.

    2014-09-10

    Although not nearly as numerous as binaries with two white dwarfs, eccentric neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) binaries are important gravitational-wave (GW) sources for the next generation of space-based detectors sensitive to low frequency waves. Here we investigate periastron precession in these sources as a result of general relativistic, tidal, and rotational effects; such precession is expected to be detectable for at least some of the detected binaries of this type. Currently, two eccentric NS-WD binaries are known in the galactic field, PSR J1141–6545 and PSR B2303+46, both of which have orbits too wide to be relevant in their current state to GW observations. However, population synthesis studies predict the existence of a significant Galactic population of such systems. Though small in most of these systems, we find that tidally induced periastron precession becomes important when tides contribute to more than 3% of the total precession rate. For these systems, accounting for tides when analyzing periastron precession rate measurements can improve estimates of the inferred WD component mass and, in some cases, will prevent us from misclassifying the object. However, such systems are rare, due to rapid orbital decay. To aid the inclusion of tidal effects when using periastron precession as a mass measurement tool, we derive a function that relates the WD radius and periastron precession constant to the WD mass.

  17. Binary star statistics - The mass ratio distribution for very wide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    Published observational data on a common-proper-motion sample (CPMS) of 326 pairs of AGK 3 stars (Halbwachs, 1986) with proper motion greater than 50 marcsec/yr and separation/proper-motion ratios less than 1000 yr are analyzed statistically to determine the frequency distribution of mass ratios (q = M2/M1). The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with those for a sample of 798 visual binaries (VBs) studied by Worley and Heintz (1983). Both samples are found to have distributions with a peak at q = about 1, but this tendency is more pronounced in the VBs than in the CPMS. The q distribution of the VB sample, unlike that of the CPMS, cannot be explained by assuming that it is a random sample of normal initial mass functions; from this it is inferred that a binary formation mechanism which favors systems with q = about 1 may be involved.

  18. Application of the Direct Distance Estimation procedure to eclipsing binaries in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Schiller, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    We alert the community to a paradigm method to calibrate a range of standard candles by means of well-calibrated photometry of eclipsing binaries in star clusters. In particular, we re-examine systems studied as part of our Binaries-in-Clusters program, and previously analyzed with earlier versions of the Wilson-Devinney light-curve modeling program. We make use of the 2010 version of this program, which incorporates a procedure to estimate the distance to an eclipsing system directly, as a system parameter, and is thus dependent on the data and analysis model alone. As such, the derived distance is accorded a standard error, independent of any additional assumptions or approximations that such analyses conventionally require.

  19. Neutrino-driven explosions of ultra-stripped Type Ic supernovae generating binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Yoshida, Takashi; Shibata, Masaru; Umeda, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koh

    2015-12-01

    We study explosion characteristics of ultra-stripped supernovae (SNe), which are candidates of SNe generating binary neutron stars (NSs). As a first step, we perform stellar evolutionary simulations of bare carbon-oxygen cores of mass from 1.45 to 2.0 M⊙ until the iron cores become unstable and start collapsing. We then perform axisymmetric hydrodynamics simulations with spectral neutrino transport using these stellar evolution outcomes as initial conditions. All models exhibit successful explosions driven by neutrino heating. The diagnostic explosion energy, ejecta mass, Ni mass, and NS mass are typically ˜1050 erg, ˜0.1 M⊙, ˜0.01 M⊙, and ≈1.3 M⊙, which are compatible with observations of rapidly evolving and luminous transient such as SN 2005ek. We also find that the ultra-stripped SN is a candidate for producing the secondary low-mass NS in the observed compact binary NSs like PSR J0737-3039.

  20. Stability of outer planetary orbits around binary stars - A comparison of Hill's and Laplace's stability criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubala, A.; Black, D.; Szebehely, V.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made between the stability criteria of Hill and that of Laplace to determine the stability of outer planetary orbits encircling binary stars. The restricted, analytically determined results of Hill's method by Szebehely and coworkers and the general, numerically integrated results of Laplace's method by Graziani and Black (1981) are compared for varying values of the mass parameter mu. For mu = 0 to 0.15, the closest orbit (lower limit of radius) an outer planet in a binary system can have and still remain stable is determined by Hill's stability criterion. For mu greater than 0.15, the critical radius is determined by Laplace's stability criterion. It appears that the Graziani-Black stability criterion describes the critical orbit within a few percent for all values of mu.

  1. Orbital motion and mass flow in the interacting binary Be star HR 2142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The discovery of an unusual, periodic, two-component shell phase of short duration in the 'classical' Be star HR2142 (HD41335, MWC133) offered convincing evidence that this object is a mass-transfer binary system. A model based solely on the phase-dependent behavior of the hydrogen shell lines in this 80(d).860 binary was developed by Peters and Polidan (1973) and by Peters (1976). The present investigation is concerned with a refinement to the earlier model, taking into account the utilization of an orbital solution obtained from measurements of the wings of the broad photospheric features observed in the rapidly rotating primary. Velocities and equivalent widths from the sharp 'shell' lines, presumably formed in or near the gas stream, provide additional information on the mass flow in the Balmer-line-formation region.

  2. Hyperspectral datacube estimations of binary stars with the Computed Tomographic Imaging Spectrometer (CTIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, James F.; Hege, E. Keith; O'Connell, Daniel G.; Dereniak, Eustace L.

    2010-08-01

    Using mathematical techniques recently adapted for the analysis of hyperspectral imaging systems such as the CTIS, we have performed datacube reconstructions for a number of binary star systems. The CTIS images in the visible (420nm to 720nm) wavelength range were obtained in 2001 using the 3.67m Advanced Electro Optical System (AEOS) of the Maui Space Surveillance System (MSSS). These methods used an analytical model of the CTIS to construct an imaging system operator from optical, focal plane array and Computer Generated Holographic (CGH) disperser parameters in the CTIS. We used the adjoint of this operator to construct matched filtered estimates of the datacubes from the image data. In these reconstructions we are able to simultaneously obtain information on the geometry and relative photometry of the binary systems as well as the spectrum for each component of the system.

  3. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  4. HE 0017+0055: A probable pulsating CEMP-rs star and long-period binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorissen, A.; Hansen, T.; Van Eck, S.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Siess, L.; Torres, G.; Masseron, T.; Van Winckel, H.

    2016-02-01

    Context. A large fraction of the carbon-enhanced, extremely metal-poor halo giants ([Fe/H] < -2.5) are also strongly enriched in neutron-capture elements from the s process (CEMP-s stars). The conventional explanation for the properties of these stars is mass transfer from a nearby binary companion on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB). This scenario leads to a number of testable predictions in terms of the properties of the putative binary system and the resulting abundance pattern. Among the CEMP stars, some stars further exhibit overabundances in r-process elements on top of the s-process enrichment, and are tagged CEMP-rs stars. Although the nucleosynthesis process responsible for this kind of mixed abundance pattern is still under debate, CEMP-rs stars seem to belong to binary systems as do CEMP-s stars. Aims: Our aim is to present and analyse in detail our comprehensive data set of systematic radial-velocity measurements and high-resolution spectroscopy of the CEMP star HE 0017+0055. Methods: Our precise radial-velocity monitoring of HE 0017+0055 over 2940 days (8 yr) with the Nordic Optical Telescope and Mercator telescopes exhibits variability, with a period of 384 d and amplitude of 540 ± 27 m s-1 superimposed on a nearly linear long-term decline of ~1 m s-1 day-1. We used high-resolution HERMES/Mercator and Keck/HIRES spectra to derive elemental abundances with 1D LTE MARCS models. A metallicity of [Fe/H] ~ -2.4 is found, along with s-process overabundances of the order of 2 dex (with the exception of [Y/Fe] ~ + 0.5), and most notably overabundances of r-process elements like Sm, Eu, Dy, and Er in the range 0.9-2.0 dex. With [Ba/Fe] > 1.9 dex and [Eu/Fe] = 2.3 dex, HE 0017+0055 is a CEMP-rs star. We used the derived atmospheric parameters and abundances to infer HE 0017+0055 evolutionary status from a comparison with evolutionary tracks. Results: HE 0017+0055 appears to be a giant star below the tip of the red giant branch. The s-process pollution must

  5. KIC 9851142: A binary star with total eclipses and γ Dor pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakırlı, Ö.

    2015-07-01

    KIC 9851142 (V2094 Cyg, HD 188854) is an eccentric eclipsing binary with an orbital period of Porb = 8.4854 d, exhibiting millimagnitude (mmag) amplitude pulsations on time scales of a few days. I present the results of the analysis of high-resolution spectroscopic data and Kepler long and short cadence photometry. The iterative combination of spectral classification by atmospheric analysis, radial velocity and eclipse timing variation studies, separation of pulsational features of the light curve, and binary light curve analysis led to the accurate determination of the fundamental stellar parameters and the comparison with evolutionary models strict constraints on the system age. I found that the binary is composed of two main sequence stars with an age of 0.75 ± 0.21 Gyr, having masses, radii and temperatures of M1 = 1.79 ± 0.11 M⊙ , R1 = 2.47 ± 0.07R⊙,Teff1 = 7250 ± 480 K for the primary, and M2 = 0.83 ± 0.12M⊙ , R2 = 0.67 ± 0.05R⊙,Teff2 = 5050 ± 650 K for the secondary. Multiple frequency analyses techniques were applied to the light residuals after subtracting the synthetic eclipsing curve from the Kepler data. This revealed that the primary component of KIC 9851142 is a γ Dor type pulsating star, exhibiting five pulsation frequencies in the range of 0.6-1.95 d-1 with amplitudes of 0.29-6.72 mmag and pulsation constants of 0.24-0.27 d. The analysis of the eclipse timing variations revealed preliminary apsidal motion with a period of Papseobs = 240 ± 29 y. Only six eclipsing binaries have been known to contain γ Dor pulsating components and, therefore, KIC 9851142 will be an important test-bed for examining these exceptional and interesting objects.

  6. Parameter Estimation on Gravitational Waves from Neutron-star Binaries with Spinning Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Ben; Berry, Christopher P. L.; Farr, Will M.; Haster, Carl-Johan; Middleton, Hannah; Cannon, Kipp; Graff, Philip B.; Hanna, Chad; Mandel, Ilya; Pankow, Chris; Price, Larry R.; Sidery, Trevor; Singer, Leo P.; Urban, Alex L.; Vecchio, Alberto; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    Inspiraling binary neutron stars (BNSs) are expected to be one of the most significant sources of gravitational-wave signals for the new generation of advanced ground-based detectors. We investigate how well we could hope to measure properties of these binaries using the Advanced LIGO detectors, which began operation in September 2015. We study an astrophysically motivated population of sources (binary components with masses 1.2\\quad {M}ȯ {--}1.6\\quad {M}ȯ and spins of less than 0.05) using the full LIGO analysis pipeline. While this simulated population covers the observed range of potential BNS sources, we do not exclude the possibility of sources with parameters outside these ranges; given the existing uncertainty in distributions of mass and spin, it is critical that analyses account for the full range of possible mass and spin configurations. We find that conservative prior assumptions on neutron-star mass and spin lead to average fractional uncertainties in component masses of ∼16%, with little constraint on spins (the median 90% upper limit on the spin of the more massive component is ∼0.7). Stronger prior constraints on neutron-star spins can further constrain mass estimates but only marginally. However, we find that the sky position and luminosity distance for these sources are not influenced by the inclusion of spin; therefore, if LIGO detects a low-spin population of BNS sources, less computationally expensive results calculated neglecting spin will be sufficient for guiding electromagnetic follow-up.

  7. Photometry and Spectroscopy of Short-Period Binary Stars in Four Old Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R. M.; Rucinski, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    We have performed a spectroscopic and photometric study of six contact binary stars in four old open clusters, M67, Praesepe, NGC 6791 and NGC 752, in order to evaluate their suitability for measuring the distance to their respective clusters. The technique being tested uses the cosine Fourier coefficients of the light curves of the binary stars, and the mass ratios obtained spectroscopically, to provide distances to the binaries. The contact binary TX Cnc was used to obtain the distance to Praesepe, which we find to be (V - MV}){o = 6.30 ± 0.08, which is in good agreement with the values of V - MV = 6.20 - 6.35 found in color-magnitude diagram (CMD) studies. Our spectroscopic study of QX And in NGC 752 provided a distance modulus of (V - MV}){o = 8.30± 0.07 for this cluster. This compares to a value of (V - MV}){o = 7.9 ± 0.1 obtained by Milone et al. (1995) using the same star, but is in good agreement with V - MV = 8.25 ± 0.10 obtained by Daniel et al. (1994) from the CMD. We obtained a distance modulus of (V - MV}){o = 12.71 ± 0.44 for V7 in NGC 6791, the oldest cluster in our survey. This agrees within ˜ 1σ the values of 13.3 ≤ (V - MV) ≤ 13.42 obtained by isochrone fitting of the cluster CMD. EV Cnc in M67 did not yield a distance to the cluster from our procedure because of faintness of the system resulting in poor spectroscopic data. The distances to the clusters as determined from the contact binaries using our procedure do not seem to give systematically smaller or larger distances as compared to CMD fitting. However, we have measured the distances to only three clusters, and only one object per cluster, and so establishing any systematic differences may require a larger survey. R. M. Blake acknowledges the support of the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada through grants to S. M. Rucinski and C. T. Bolton.

  8. X-ray Observations of Binary and Single Wolf-Rayet Stars with XMM-Newton and Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen; Gudel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner; Zhekov, Svetozar

    2006-01-01

    We present an overview of recent X-ray observations of Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars with XMM-Newton and Chandra. These observations are aimed at determining the differences in X-ray properties between massive WR + OB binary systems and putatively single WR stars. A new XMM spectrum of the nearby WN8 + OB binary WR 147 shows hard absorbed X-ray emission (including the Fe Ka line complex), characteristic of colliding wind shock sources. In contrast, sensitive observations of four of the closest known single WC (carbon-rich) WR stars have yielded only nondetections. These results tentatively suggest that single WC stars are X-ray quiet. The presence of a companion may thus be an essential factor in elevating the X-ray emission of WC + OB stars to detectable levels.

  9. Non-Keplerian effects in precision radial velocity measurements of double-line spectroscopic binary stars: numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilski, P.; Konacki, M.; Kozłowski, S. K.; Hełminiak, K. G.

    2013-05-01

    Current precision in radial velocity (RV) measurements of binary stars reaches ˜2 m s-1. This level of precision means that RV models have to take into account additional non-Keplerian effects such as tidal and rotational distortion of the components of a binary star, relativistic effects and orbital precession. Such an approach is necessary when one wants to search for planets or precisely measure fundamental parameters of stars with a very high accuracy using precision RVs of binary stars. We generate synthetic binaries using Yonsei-Yale stellar models. For typical representatives, we investigate the impact of various orbital orientations and different non-Keplerian effects on the RV curves. To this end, we simulate RV observations with an added white noise of different scale. Subsequently, we try to reconstruct the input orbital parameters and their errors by fitting a model using a standard least-squares method. In particular, we investigate the connection between the tidal distortion of the shape of the stars and the best-fitting orbital eccentricity; the possibility of deriving orbital inclination of a non-eclipsing binary star by exploiting relativistic effects and the circumstances in which the orbital precession can be detected. We confirm that the method proposed by Zucker & Alexander to obtain orbital inclination with use of the relativistic effect does work in favourable cases and that it can be used even for orbital configurations far from an edge-on orientation. We show that the RV variations imposed by tidally distorted stars can mimic non-zero eccentricity in some binaries. The scale of such an effect depends on the RV accuracy. Finally, we demonstrate that the apsidal precession can be easily detected with precision RVs. In particular, we can detect orbital precession of 10-4, 10-3 rad yr-1 for precision of RVs of 1 and 10 m s-1, respectively.

  10. XMM-Newton Observation of the Double Neutron Star Binary J1537+1155

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egron, Elise

    2013-10-01

    The properties of neutron star magnetospheres and relativistic winds down to light cylinder scale can be constrained with unprecedented precision by multiwavelength observations of suitable double neutron star binaries (DNSBs). PSR J1537+1155 and PSR J0737 3039 are the only firmly identified DNSBs detected with the current generation of X-ray telescopes. Because of its higher orbital eccentricity, J1537+1155 offers a unique opportunity for the identification and study of NSs interaction signatures, such as flux orbital modulation. The presence of detectable X-ray emission from this system is guaranteed by Chandra observations, but the crucial claims about orbital variability can be confirmed and better investigated only by XMM-Newton.

  11. Monitoring the latest stages of a transient neutron star X-ray binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Sergio

    2012-10-01

    Neutron star transient low mass X-ray binaries (TLMXB) are among the brightest sources in the X-ray sky. Their outbursts are well known and studied. Despite this, their return to quiescence has been studied only in a handful of cases. This return is quite fast making even more difficult. Recently we monitor in high detail the return to quiescence of the archetypal TLMXB Aql X-1 thanks to XMM-Newton observations. We probed for the first time the cooling of the neutron star after a (short) outburst, finding a very short cooling time ( 3d). Thanks to an approved Swift XRT program for monitoring every day for 5 ks (for 30 d) the latest stages of a TLMXB, we are aiming assessing the spectral properties of a transient LMXB close to the quiescent level.

  12. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s-2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  13. An Extremely Fast Halo Hot Subdwarf Star in a Wide Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Péter; Ziegerer, Eva; Irrgang, Andreas; Geier, Stephan; Fürst, Felix; Kupfer, Thomas; Heber, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    New spectroscopic observations of the halo hyper-velocity star candidate SDSS J121150.27+143716.2 (V = 17.92 mag) revealed a cool companion to the hot subdwarf primary. The components have a very similar radial velocity and their absolute luminosities are consistent with the same distance, confirming the physical nature of the binary, which is the first double-lined hyper-velocity candidate. Our spectral decomposition of the Keck/ESI spectrum provided an sdB+K3V pair, analogous to many long-period subdwarf binaries observed in the Galactic disk. We found the subdwarf atmospheric parameters: {T}{{eff}}=30\\600+/- 500 K, {log}g=5.57+/- 0.06 cm s‑2, and He abundance {log}(n{{He}}/n{{H}})=-3.0+/- 0.2. Oxygen is the most abundant metal in the hot subdwarf atmosphere, and Mg and Na lines are the most prominent spectral features of the cool companion, consistent with a metallicity of [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]=-1.3. The non-detection of radial velocity variations suggest the orbital period to be a few hundred days, in agreement with similar binaries observed in the disk. Using the SDSS-III flux calibrated spectrum we measured the distance to the system d=5.5+/- 0.5 {{kpc}}, which is consistent with ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometric constraints derived from binary spectral energy distributions. Our kinematic study shows that the Galactic rest-frame velocity of the system is so high that an unbound orbit cannot be ruled out. On the other hand, a bound orbit requires a massive dark matter halo. We conclude that the binary either formed in the halo or was accreted from the tidal debris of a dwarf galaxy by the Milky Way.

  14. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. II. HIPPARCOS STARS OBSERVED IN 2010 JANUARY AND JUNE

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Gomez, Shamilia C.; Anderson, Lisa M.; Sherry, William H.; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Van Altena, William F. E-mail: shamilia.gomez@gmail.com E-mail: wsherry@noao.edu E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2011-02-15

    The results of 497 speckle observations of Hipparcos stars and selected other targets are presented. Of these, 367 were resolved into components and 130 were unresolved. The data were obtained using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument at the WIYN 3.5 m Telescope. (The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories.) Since the first paper in this series, the instrument has been upgraded so that it now uses two electron-multiplying CCD cameras. The measurement precision obtained when comparing to ephemeris positions of binaries with very well known orbits is approximately 1-2 mas in separation and better than 0.{sup 0}6 in position angle. Differential photometry is found to be in very good agreement with Hipparcos measures in cases where the comparison is most relevant. We derive preliminary orbits for two systems.

  15. Low mass binary neutron star mergers : gravitational waves and neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; SXS Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present numerical simulations of low mass binary neutron star mergers (1 . 2M⊙ - 1 . 2M⊙) with the SpEC code for a set of three nuclear-theory based, finite temperature equations of state. The merger remnant is a massive neutron star which is either permanently stable or long-lived. We focus on the post-merger gravitational wave signal, and on neutrino-matter interactions in the merger remnant. We show that the frequency peaks of the post-merger gravitational wave signal are in good agreement with predictions obtained from simulations using a simpler treatment of gravity. We then estimate the neutrino emission of the remnant using a neutrino leakage scheme and, in one case, compare these results with a gray two-moment neutrino transport scheme. We confirm the complex geometry of the neutrino emission, also observed in previous simulations with neutrino leakage, and show explicitly the presence of important differences in the neutrino luminosity, disk composition, and outflow properties between the neutrino leakage and transport schemes. We discuss the impact of our results on our ability to measure the neutron star equation of state, and on the post-merger electromagnetic signal and r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. Einstein Fellow.

  16. Masses and ages of Delta Scuti stars in eclipsing binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Ts. G.; Petrova, Ts. C.

    1993-05-01

    By using data mainly from Frolov et al. (1982) for four Delta Scuti stars in eclipsing binary systems, AB Cas, Y Cam, RS Cha, and AI Hya, their physical parameters, distances, and radial pulsation modes are determined. The evolutionary track systems of Iben (1967), Paczynski (1970), and Maeder and Meynet (1988) are interpolated in order to estimate evolutionary masses Me and ages t of these variables. Their pulsation masses MQ are estimated from the fitting formulae of Faulkner (1977) and Fitch (1981). Our estimates of evolutionary masses M(e) and pulsation masses M(Q) are close to the masses M determined by Frolov et al. from the star binarity. The only exception is AB Cas, for which there is no agreement between certain star parameters. Another, independent approach is also applied to the stars RS Cha and AI Hya: by using their photometric indices b - y and c(1) from the catalog of Lopez de Coca et al. (1990) and appropriate photometric calibrations, other sets of physical parameters, distances, modes, ages, and evolutionary and pulsation masses of both variables are obtained.

  17. AN ANALYTIC METHOD TO DETERMINE HABITABLE ZONES FOR S-TYPE PLANETARY ORBITS IN BINARY STAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Gyergyovits, Markus; Funk, Barbara; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos E-mail: elke.pilat-lohinger@univie.ac.at

    2012-06-10

    With more and more extrasolar planets discovered in and around binary star systems, questions concerning the determination of the classical habitable zone have arisen. Do the radiative and gravitational perturbations of the second star influence the extent of the habitable zone significantly, or is it sufficient to consider the host star only? In this article, we investigate the implications of stellar companions with different spectral types on the insolation a terrestrial planet receives orbiting a Sun-like primary. We present time-independent analytical estimates and compare them to insolation statistics gained via high precision numerical orbit calculations. Results suggest a strong dependence of permanent habitability on the binary's eccentricity, as well as a possible extension of habitable zones toward the secondary in close binary systems.

  18. Analysis of GSC 2475-1587 and GSC 841-277: Two Eclipsing Binary Stars Found During Asteroid Lightcurve Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, R. D.; Warner, B. D.

    2006-05-01

    When observing asteroids we select from two to five comparison stars for differential photometry, taking the average value of the comparisons for the single value to be subtracted from the value for the asteroid. As a check, the raw data of each comparison star are plotted as is the difference between any single comparison and the average of the remaining stars in the set. On more than one occasion, we have found that at least one of the comparisons was variable. In two instances, we took time away from our asteroid lightcurve work to determine the period of the two binaries and attempted to model the system using David Bradstreet's Binary Maker 3. Unfortunately, neither binary showed a total eclipse. Therefore, our results are not conclusive and present only one of many possibilities.

  19. The origin of the hard X-ray tail in neutron-star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reig, P.; Kylafis, N.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Neutron star X-ray binaries emit a compact, optically thick, relativistic radio jet during low-luminosity, usually hard states, as Galactic black-hole X-ray binaries do. When radio emission is bright, a hard power-law tail without evidence for an exponential cutoff is observed in most systems. Aims: We have developed a jet model that explains many spectral and timing properties of black-hole binaries in the states where a jet is present. Our goal is to investigate whether our jet model can reproduce the hard tail, with the correct range of photon index and the absence of a high-energy cutoff, in neutron-star X-ray binaries. Methods: We performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Compton upscattering of soft, accretion-disk or boundary layer photons in the jet and computed the emergent energy spectra, as well as the time lag of hard photons with respect to softer ones as a function of Fourier frequency. We fit the energy spectra with a power law modified by an exponential cutoff at high energy. Results: We demonstrate that our jet model naturally explains the observed power-law distribution with photon index in the range 1.8-3. With an appropriate choice of the parameters, the cutoff expected from Comptonization is shifted to energies above ~300 keV, producing a pure power law without any evidence for a rollover, in agreement with the observations. Conclusions: Our results reinforce the idea that the link between the outflow (jet) and inflow (disk) in X-ray binaries does not depend on the nature of the compact object, but on the process of accretion. Furthermore, we address the differences between jets in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries and predict that the break frequency in the spectral energy distribution of neutron-star X-ray binaries, as a class, will be lower than that of black-hole binaries.

  20. Detecting Circumbinary Planets Using Eclipse Timing of Binary Stars - From Simulations to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sybilski, Piotr; Konacki, M.; Kozlowski, S. K.

    2010-05-01

    The Light-Time Effect (LTE) occurs whenever the distance between the observer and any kind of periodic signal occurring in space changes. The usual cause of this is the reflex motion about the system's barycenter due to the gravitational influence of one or more additional bodies. With a sufficient precision of the times of eclipses, the eclipse timing can be used to detect substellar or even planetary mass companions. The main goal of the poster is to investigate the potential of the photometry based eclipse timing of binary stars as a method of detecting circumbinary planets. In the models we assume that the companion orbits a binary star in a circular Keplerian orbit. We analyze throug the numerical simulations both the space and ground based photometry cases. In particular, we study the usefulness of the on-going COROT and Kepler missions in detecting circumbinary planets. We determine the sensitivity of the eclipse timing technique to circumbinary planets for the ground and space based photometric observations. We provide suggestions for the best targets, observing strategies and instruments for the eclipse timing method. Finally, we present some preliminary results comparing simulations and real observations.

  1. Search for gravitational waves from galactic and extra-galactic binary neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.; Anderson, S.B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Barish, B.C.; Barnes, M.; Barton, M.A.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Brown, D.A.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Chandler, A.; Chapsky, J.; Charlton, P.

    2005-10-15

    We use 373 hours ({approx_equal}15 days) of data from the second science run of the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors to search for signals from binary neutron star coalescences within a maximum distance of about 1.5 Mpc, a volume of space which includes the Andromeda Galaxy and other galaxies of the Local Group of galaxies. This analysis requires a signal to be found in data from detectors at the two LIGO sites, according to a set of coincidence criteria. The background (accidental coincidence rate) is determined from the data and is used to judge the significance of event candidates. No inspiral gravitational-wave events were identified in our search. Using a population model which includes the Local Group, we establish an upper limit of less than 47 inspiral events per year per Milky Way equivalent galaxy with 90% confidence for nonspinning binary neutron star systems with component masses between 1 and 3M{sub {center_dot}}.

  2. Simultaneous CCD Photometry of Two Eclipsing Binary Stars in Pegasus - Part 1: KW Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, K. B.

    2013-06-01

    The coincidental location of BX Peg and KW Peg in the same field-of-view captured by the primary imaging system at UnderOak Observatory (UO) provided an opportunity to study both variable stars from the same exposures. Herein new findings for the eclipsing binary KW Peg will be presented while those from BX Peg will be discussed in a separate paper (Part 2). KW Peg, described as an "Algol type" eclipsing variable (P = 0.816402 d), is only reported in a single work published over twenty years ago. Photometric data collected in three bandpasses (B, V, and Ic), produced eight new times of minimum for KW Peg. These were used to update the linear ephemeris and further analyze potential changes in orbital periodicity by examining the available history of eclipse timings. In addition, synthetic fitting of light curves by Roche modeling was accomplished with programs employing the Wilson-Devinney code. Results from the present study provide a reasonable case for classifying KW Peg as a short-period RS CVn eclipsing binary rather than Algol-like. The primary star in KW Peg would appear to be a late stage G9V-K0V dwarf whereas the secondary is a slightly cooler K0-K1 companion. The eclipse-timing diagram for KW Peg is quite simple and indicates that, on average, the orbital period for this system has remained fairly constant over the past two decades.

  3. The CCD photometric study of the newly identified RS CVn binary star V1034 Hercules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogˇru, D.; Erdem, A.; Dogˇru, S. S.

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a new CCD Bessell VRcIc light curves and photometric analysis of the newly discovered RS CVn type eclipsing binary star V1034 Her. The light curves were obtained at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2006. Variations of the orbital period of the system were firstly studied. The ( O - C) diagram with a low range of observing time of about 20 years shows an upward parabola, which indicates a secular increase in the orbital period of the system. The light curves are generally those of detached eclipsing binaries; however, there are large asymmetries between maxima. The VRcIc light curves were analysed with two different fitting procedures: Wilson-Devinney method supplemented with a Monte Carlo type algorithm and Information Limit Optimization Technique (ILOT). Our general results find V1034 Her. as a well detached system, in which the components are filling ˜65% of their Roche lobes. Light curve asymmetries of the system are explained in terms of large dark starspots on the primary component. The primary star shows a long-lived spot distribution with active longitudes in the same hemisphere.

  4. Correlated Temporal and Spectral Variability in Neutron Star and Black Hole X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swank, J.

    2006-01-01

    The variability of neutron star and black hole X-ray sources has several dimensions, because of the roles played by different important time-scales. The variations on time scales of hours, weeks, and months, ranging from 50% to orders of magnitude, arise out of changes in the flow in the disk. The most important driving forces for those changes are probably various possible instabilities in the disk, though there may be effects with other dominant causes. The changes in the rate of flow appear to be associated with changes in the flow's configuration, as the accreting material approaches the compact object, for there are generally correlated changes in both the X-ray spectra and the character of the faster temporal variability. There has been a lot of progress in tracking these correlations, both for Z and Atoll neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries, and for black hole binaries. I will discuss these correlations and what they tell us about the physical states of the systems.

  5. TU Comae Berenices: Blazhko RR Lyrae Star in a Potential Binary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ponthière, P.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Menzies, K.; Sabo, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a photometry campaign of TU Com performed over a five-year time span. The analysis showed that the possible Blazhko period of 75 days published by the General Catalogue of Variable Stars is not correct. We identified two Blazhko periods of 43.6 and 45.5 days. This finding is based on measurement of 124 light maxima. A spectral analysis of the complete light curve confirmed these two periods. Besides the Blazhko amplitude and phase modulations, another long term periodic phase variation has been identified. This long term periodic variation affects the times of maximum light only and can be attributed to a light-travel time effect due to orbital motion of a binary system. The orbital parameters have been estimated by a nonlinear least-square fit applied to the set of (O-C) values. The Levenberg-Marquart algorithm has been used to perform the nonlinear least-square fit. The tentative orbital parameters include an orbital period of 1676 days, a minimal semi-major axis of 1.55 AU and a small eccentricity of 0.22. The orbital parameter estimation also used 33 (O-C) values obtained from the SWASP survey database. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements are needed to confirm this binarity. If confirmed, TU Com would be the first Blazhko RR Lyrae star detected in a binary system.

  6. Accurate evolutions of inspiralling and magnetized neutron stars: Equal-mass binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomazzo, Bruno; Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca

    2011-02-15

    By performing new, long and numerically accurate general-relativistic simulations of magnetized, equal-mass neutron-star binaries, we investigate the role that realistic magnetic fields may have in the evolution of these systems. In particular, we study the evolution of the magnetic fields and show that they can influence the survival of the hypermassive neutron star produced at the merger by accelerating its collapse to a black hole. We also provide evidence that, even if purely poloidal initially, the magnetic fields produced in the tori surrounding the black hole have toroidal and poloidal components of equivalent strength. When estimating the possibility that magnetic fields could have an impact on the gravitational-wave signals emitted by these systems either during the inspiral or after the merger, we conclude that for realistic magnetic-field strengths B < or approx. 10{sup 12} G such effects could be detected, but only marginally, by detectors such as advanced LIGO or advanced Virgo. However, magnetically induced modifications could become detectable in the case of small-mass binaries and with the development of gravitational-wave detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope, with much higher sensitivities at frequencies larger than {approx_equal}2 kHz.

  7. THE REFLECTION EFFECT IN INTERACTING BINARIES OR IN PLANET-STAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Budaj, J.

    2011-02-15

    There are many similarities between interacting binary stars and stars with a close-in giant extrasolar planet. The reflection effect is a well-known example. Although the generally accepted treatment of this effect in interacting binaries is successful in fitting light curves of eclipsing binaries, it is not very suitable for studying cold objects irradiated by hot objects or extrasolar planets. The aim of this paper is to develop a model of the reflection effect which could be easily incorporated into the present codes for modeling of interacting binaries so that these can be used to study the aforementioned objects. Our model of the reflection effect takes into account the reflection (scattering), heating, and heat redistribution over the surface of the irradiated object. The shape of the object is described by the non-spherical Roche potential expected for close objects. Limb and gravity darkening are included in the calculations of the light output from the system. The model also accounts for the orbital revolution and rotation of the exoplanet with appropriate Doppler shifts for the scattered and thermal radiation. Subsequently, light curves and/or spectra of several exoplanets have been modeled and the effects of the heat redistribution, limb darkening/brightening, (non-)gray albedo, and non-spherical shape have been studied. Recent observations of planet-to-star flux ratio of HD189733b, WASP12b, and WASP-19b at various phases were reproduced with very good accuracy. It was found that HD189733b has a low Bond albedo and intense heat redistribution, while WASP-19b has a low Bond albedo and low heat redistribution. The exact Roche geometries and temperature distributions over the surface of all 78 transiting extrasolar planets have been determined. Departures from the spherical shape may vary considerably but departures of about 1% in the radius are common within the sample. In some cases, these departures can reach 8%, 12%, or 14%, for WASP-33b, WASP-19b, and

  8. RR-Lyrae-type pulsations from a 0.26-solar-mass star in a binary system.

    PubMed

    Pietrzyński, G; Thompson, I B; Gieren, W; Graczyk, D; Stępień, K; Bono, G; Moroni, P G Prada; Pilecki, B; Udalski, A; Soszyński, I; Preston, G W; Nardetto, N; McWilliam, A; Roederer, I U; Górski, M; Konorski, P; Storm, J

    2012-04-01

    RR Lyrae pulsating stars have been extensively used as tracers of old stellar populations for the purpose of determining the ages of galaxies, and as tools to measure distances to nearby galaxies. There was accordingly considerable interest when the RR Lyrae star OGLE-BLG-RRLYR-02792 (referred to here as RRLYR-02792) was found to be a member of an eclipsing binary system, because the mass of the pulsator (hitherto constrained only by models) could be unambiguously determined. Here we report that RRLYR-02792 has a mass of 0.26 solar masses M[symbol see text] and therefore cannot be a classical RR Lyrae star. Using models, we find that its properties are best explained by the evolution of a close binary system that started with M[symbol see text] and 0.8M[symbol see text]stars orbiting each other with an initial period of 2.9 days. Mass exchange over 5.4 billion years produced the observed system, which is now in a very short-lived phase where the physical properties of the pulsator happen to place it in the same instability strip of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram as that occupied by RR Lyrae stars. We estimate that only 0.2 per cent of RR Lyrae stars may be contaminated by systems similar to this one, which implies that distances measured with RR Lyrae stars should not be significantly affected by these binary interlopers. PMID:22481359

  9. Electromagnetic outflows in a class of scalar-tensor theories: Binary neutron star coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Marcelo; Palenzuela, Carlos; Barausse, Enrico; Lehner, Luis

    2015-04-01

    As we showed in previous work, the dynamics and gravitational emission of binary neutron-star systems in certain scalar-tensor theories can differ significantly from that expected from general relativity (GR) in the coalescing stage. In this work we examine whether the characteristics of the electromagnetic counterparts to these binaries—driven by magnetosphere interactions prior to the merger event—can provide an independent way to test gravity in the most strongly dynamical stages of binary mergers. We find that the electromagnetic flux emitted by binaries in these scalar-tensor theories can show deviations from the GR prediction in particular cases. These differences are quite subtle, thus requiring delicate measurements to differentiate between GR and the type of scalar-tensor theories considered in this work using electromagnetic observations alone. However, if coupled with a gravitational-wave detection, electromagnetic measurements might provide a way to increase the confidence with which GR will be confirmed (or ruled out) by gravitational observations.

  10. Data Mining the Ogle-II I-band Database for Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, M.

    2013-08-01

    The OGLE I-band database is a searchable database of quality photometric data available to the public. During Phase 2 of the experiment, known as "OGLE-II", I-band observations were made over a period of approximately 1,000 days, resulting in over 1010 measurements of more than 40 million stars. This was accomplished by using a filter with a passband near the standard Cousins Ic. The database of these observations is fully searchable using the mysql database engine, and provides the magnitude measurements and their uncertainties. In this work, a program of data mining the OGLE I-band database was performed, resulting in the discovery of 42 previously unreported eclipsing binaries. Using the software package Peranso (Vanmuster 2011) to analyze the light curves obtained from OGLE-II, the eclipsing types, the epochs and the periods of these eclipsing variables were determined, to one part in 106. A preliminary attempt to model the physical parameters of these binaries was also performed, using the Binary Maker 3 software (Bradstreet and Steelman 2004).

  11. Basic parameter estimation of binary neutron star systems by the advanced LIGO/Vigro network

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Carl L.; Farr, Benjamin; Raymond, Vivien; Farr, Will M.; Littenberg, Tyson B.; Fazi, Diego; Kalogera, Vicky

    2014-04-01

    Within the next five years, it is expected that the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network will have reached a sensitivity sufficient to enable the routine detection of gravitational waves. Beyond the initial detection, the scientific promise of these instruments relies on the effectiveness of our physical parameter estimation capabilities. A major part of this effort has been toward the detection and characterization of gravitational waves from compact binary coalescence, e.g., the coalescence of binary neutron stars. While several previous studies have investigated the accuracy of parameter estimation with advanced detectors, the majority have relied on approximation techniques such as the Fisher Matrix which are insensitive to the non-Gaussian nature of the gravitational wave posterior distribution function. Here we report average statistical uncertainties that will be achievable for strong detection candidates (S/N = 20) over a comprehensive sample of source parameters. We use the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based parameter estimation software developed by the LIGO/Virgo Collaboration with the goal of updating the previously quoted Fisher Matrix bounds. We find the recovery of the individual masses to be fractionally within 9% (15%) at the 68% (95%) credible intervals for equal-mass systems, and within 1.9% (3.7%) for unequal-mass systems. We also find that the Advanced LIGO/Virgo network will constrain the locations of binary neutron star mergers to a median uncertainty of 5.1 deg{sup 2} (13.5 deg{sup 2}) on the sky. This region is improved to 2.3 deg{sup 2} (6 deg{sup 2}) with the addition of the proposed LIGO India detector to the network. We also report the average uncertainties on the luminosity distances and orbital inclinations of strong detections that can be achieved by different network configurations.

  12. DETECTABILITY OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS IN CIRCUMSTELLAR HABITABLE ZONES OF BINARY STAR SYSTEMS WITH SUN-LIKE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eggl, Siegfried; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Haghighipour, Nader

    2013-02-20

    Given the considerable percentage of stars that are members of binaries or stellar multiples in the solar neighborhood, it is expected that many of these binaries host planets, possibly even habitable ones. The discovery of a terrestrial planet in the {alpha} Centauri system supports this notion. Due to the potentially strong gravitational interaction that an Earth-like planet may experience in such systems, classical approaches to determining habitable zones (HZ), especially in close S-type binary systems, can be rather inaccurate. Recent progress in this field, however, allows us to identify regions around the star permitting permanent habitability. While the discovery of {alpha} Cen Bb has shown that terrestrial planets can be detected in solar-type binary stars using current observational facilities, it remains to be shown whether this is also the case for Earth analogs in HZs. We provide analytical expressions for the maximum and rms values of radial velocity and astrometric signals, as well as transit probabilities of terrestrial planets in such systems, showing that the dynamical interaction of the second star with the planet may indeed facilitate the planets' detection. As an example, we discuss the detectability of additional Earth-like planets in the averaged, extended, and permanent HZs around both stars of the {alpha} Centauri system.

  13. Calibrating the Updated Overshoot Mixing Model on Eclipsing Binary Stars: HY Vir, YZ Cas, χ2 Hya, and VV Crv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Y.; Zhang, Q. S.

    2014-06-01

    Detached eclipsing binary stars with convective cores provide a good tool to investigate convective core overshoot. It has been performed on some binary stars to restrict the classical overshoot model which simply extends the boundary of the fully mixed region. However, the classical overshoot model is physically unreasonable and inconsistent with helioseismic investigations. An updated model of overshoot mixing was established recently. There is a key parameter in the model. In this paper, we use observations of four eclipsing binary stars, i.e., HY Vir, YZ Cas, χ2 Hya, and VV Crv, to investigate a suitable value for the parameter. It is found that the value suggested by calibrations on eclipsing binary stars is the same as the value recommended by other methods. In addition, we have studied the effects of the updated overshoot model on the stellar structure. The diffusion coefficient of convective/overshoot mixing is very high in the convection zone, then quickly decreases near the convective boundary, and exponentially decreases in the overshoot region. The low value of the diffusion coefficient in the overshoot region leads to weak mixing and a partially mixed overshoot region. Semi-convection, which appears in the standard stellar models of low-mass stars with convective cores, is removed by partial overshoot mixing.

  14. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE BINARY CENTRAL STARS OF THE PLANETARY NEBULAE HFG 1, DS 1, AND LOTR 5

    SciTech Connect

    Montez, Rodolfo; Kastner, Joel H.; De Marco, Orsola; Chu, You-Hua

    2010-10-01

    Close binary systems undergoing mass transfer or common envelope interactions can account for the morphological properties of some planetary nebulae. The search for close binary companions in planetary nebulae is hindered by the difficulty of detecting cool, late-type, main-sequence companions in binary systems with hot pre-white-dwarf primaries. However, models of binary planetary nebula progenitor systems predict that mass accretion or tidal interactions can induce rapid rotation in the companion, leading to X-ray-emitting coronae. To test such models, we have searched for, and detected, X-ray emission from three binary central stars within planetary nebulae: the post-common envelope close binaries in HFG 1 and DS 1 consisting of O-type subdwarfs with late-type, main-sequence companions and the binary system in LoTr 5 consisting of O-type subdwarf and rapidly rotating, late-type giant companion. The X-ray emission in each case is best characterized by spectral models consisting of two optically thin thermal plasma components with characteristic temperatures of {approx}10 MK and 15-40 MK and total X-ray luminosities {approx}10{sup 30} erg s{sup -1}. We consider the possible origin of the X-ray emission from these binary systems and conclude that the most likely origin is, in each case, a corona around the late-type companion, as predicted by models of interacting binaries.

  15. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY ON LOW-MASS STARS IN ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Juan Carlos; Ribas, Ignasi; Jordi, Carme; Baraffe, Isabelle; Chabrier, Gilles

    2010-07-20

    In recent years, analyses of eclipsing binary systems have unveiled differences between the observed fundamental properties of low-mass stars and those predicted by stellar structure models. Particularly, radius and effective temperatures computed from models are {approx}5%-10% lower and {approx}3%-5% higher than observed, respectively. These discrepancies have been attributed to different factors, notably the high levels of magnetic activity present on these stars. In this paper, we test the effect of magnetic activity both on models and on the observational analysis of eclipsing binaries using a sample of such systems with accurate fundamental properties. Regarding stellar models, we have found that unrealistically high spot coverages need to be assumed to reproduce the observations. Tests considering metallicity effects and missing opacities on models indicate that these are not able to explain the radius discrepancies observed. With respect to the observations, we have tested the effect of several spot distributions on the light curve analysis. Our results show that spots cause systematic deviations on the stellar radii derived from light curve analysis when mainly distributed over the stellar poles. Assuming the existence of polar spots, overall agreement between models and observations is reached when {approx}35% spot coverage is considered on stellar models. Such spot coverage induces a systematic deviation in the radius determination from the light curve analysis of {approx}3% and is also compatible with the modulations observed on the light curves of these systems. Finally, we have found that the effect of activity or rotation on convective transport in partially radiative stars may also contribute to the explanation of the differences seen in some of the systems with shorter orbital periods.

  16. The peculiar galactic center neutron star X-ray binary XMM J174457-2850.3

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Altamirano, D.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.

    2014-09-10

    The recent discovery of a millisecond radio pulsar experiencing an accretion outburst similar to those seen in low mass X-ray binaries, has opened up a new opportunity to investigate the evolutionary link between these two different neutron star manifestations. The remarkable X-ray variability and hard X-ray spectrum of this object can potentially serve as a template to search for other X-ray binary/radio pulsar transitional objects. Here we demonstrate that the transient X-ray source XMM J174457-2850.3 near the Galactic center displays similar X-ray properties. We report on the detection of an energetic thermonuclear burst with an estimated duration of ≅2 hr and a radiated energy output of ≅ 5 × 10{sup 40} erg, which unambiguously demonstrates that the source harbors an accreting neutron star. It has a quiescent X-ray luminosity of L {sub X} ≅ 5 × 10{sup 32}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} and exhibits occasional accretion outbursts during which it brightens to L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 35}-10{sup 36}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1} for a few weeks (2-10 keV). However, the source often lingers in between outburst and quiescence at L {sub X} ≅ 10{sup 33}-10{sup 34}(D/6.5 kpc){sup 2} erg s{sup –1}. This peculiar X-ray flux behavior and its relatively hard X-ray spectrum, a power law with an index of Γ ≅ 1.4, could possibly be explained in terms of the interaction between the accretion flow and the magnetic field of the neutron star.

  17. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Vir systems from eclipse timings. The high incidence of circumbinary substellar objects suggests that most of the planets are formed from the remaining CE material (second generation planets). Several types of pulsating star have been discovered among hot subdwarf stars, the most common are the gravity-mode sdB pulsators (V1093 Her) and their hotter siblings, the p-mode pulsating V361 Hya stars. Another class of multi-periodic pulsating hot subdwarfs has been found in the globular cluster ω Cen that is unmatched by any field star. Asteroseismology has advanced enormously thanks to the high-precision Kepler photometry and allowed stellar rotation rates to be determined, the interior structure of gravity-mode pulsators to be probed and stellar ages to be estimated. Rotation rates turned out to be unexpectedly slow calling for very efficient angular momentum loss on the red giant branch or during the helium core flash. The convective cores were found to be larger than predicted by standard stellar evolution models requiring very efficient angular momentum transport on the red giant branch. The masses of hot subdwarf stars, both single or in binaries, are the key to understand the stars’ evolution. A few pulsating sdB stars in eclipsing binaries have been found that allow both techniques to be applied for mass determination. The results, though few, are in good agreement with predictions from binary population synthesis calculations. New classes of binaries, hosting so-called extremely low mass (ELM) white dwarfs (M < 0.3 M ⊙), have recently been discovered, filling a gap in the mosaic of binary stellar evolution. Like most sdB stars the ELM white dwarfs are the stripped cores of red giants, the known companions are either white dwarfs, neutron stars (pulsars) or F- or A-type main sequence stars (“EL CVn” stars). In the near future, the Gaia mission will provide high-precision astrometry for a large sample of subdwarf stars to disentangle the different stellar

  18. Carbon and Oxygen Abundances in the Hot Jupiter Exoplanet Host Star XO-2B and Its Binary Companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of connecting the compositions of stars and planets, we present the abundances of carbon and oxygen, as well as iron and nickel, for the transiting exoplanet host star XO-2N and its wide-separation binary companion XO-2S. Stellar parameters are derived from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, and the two stars are found to be similar in their T eff, log g, iron ([Fe/H]), and nickel ([Ni/H]) abundances. Their carbon ([C/H]) and oxygen ([O/H]) abundances also overlap within errors, although XO-2N may be slightly more C-rich and O-rich than XO-2S. The C/O ratios of both stars (~0.60 ± 0.20) may also be somewhat larger than solar (C/O ~ 0.50). The XO-2 system has a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting one binary component but not the other, allowing us to probe the potential effects planet formation might have on the host star composition. Additionally, with multiple observations of its atmosphere the transiting exoplanet XO-2b lends itself to compositional analysis, which can be compared to the natal chemical environment established by our binary star elemental abundances. This work sets the stage for determining how similar or different exoplanet and host star compositions are, and the implications for planet formation, by discussing the C/O ratio measurements in the unique environment of a visual binary system with one star hosting a transiting hot Jupiter. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  19. CARBON AND OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN THE HOT JUPITER EXOPLANET HOST STAR XO-2B AND ITS BINARY COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of connecting the compositions of stars and planets, we present the abundances of carbon and oxygen, as well as iron and nickel, for the transiting exoplanet host star XO-2N and its wide-separation binary companion XO-2S. Stellar parameters are derived from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, and the two stars are found to be similar in their T{sub eff}, log g, iron ([Fe/H]), and nickel ([Ni/H]) abundances. Their carbon ([C/H]) and oxygen ([O/H]) abundances also overlap within errors, although XO-2N may be slightly more C-rich and O-rich than XO-2S. The C/O ratios of both stars ({approx}0.60 {+-} 0.20) may also be somewhat larger than solar (C/O {approx} 0.50). The XO-2 system has a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting one binary component but not the other, allowing us to probe the potential effects planet formation might have on the host star composition. Additionally, with multiple observations of its atmosphere the transiting exoplanet XO-2b lends itself to compositional analysis, which can be compared to the natal chemical environment established by our binary star elemental abundances. This work sets the stage for determining how similar or different exoplanet and host star compositions are, and the implications for planet formation, by discussing the C/O ratio measurements in the unique environment of a visual binary system with one star hosting a transiting hot Jupiter.

  20. Low mass binary neutron star mergers: Gravitational waves and neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; Haas, Roland; Duez, Matthew D.; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Roberts, Luke; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Lippuner, Jonas; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Scheel, Mark A.

    2016-02-01

    Neutron star mergers are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves for advanced ground-based detectors. These mergers are also expected to power bright electromagnetic signals, in the form of short gamma-ray bursts, infrared/optical transients powered by r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron-rich material ejected by the merger, and radio emission from the interaction of that ejecta with the interstellar medium. Simulations of these mergers with fully general relativistic codes are critical to understand the merger and postmerger gravitational wave signals and their neutrinos and electromagnetic counterparts. In this paper, we employ the Spectral Einstein Code to simulate the merger of low mass neutron star binaries (two 1.2 M⊙ neutron stars) for a set of three nuclear-theory-based, finite temperature equations of state. We show that the frequency peaks of the postmerger gravitational wave signal are in good agreement with predictions obtained from recent simulations using a simpler treatment of gravity. We find, however, that only the fundamental mode of the remnant is excited for long periods of time: emission at the secondary peaks is damped on a millisecond time scale in the simulated binaries. For such low mass systems, the remnant is a massive neutron star which, depending on the equation of state, is either permanently stable or long lived (i.e. rapid uniform rotation is sufficient to prevent its collapse). We observe strong excitations of l =2 , m =2 modes, both in the massive neutron star and in the form of hot, shocked tidal arms in the surrounding accretion torus. We estimate the neutrino emission of the remnant using a neutrino leakage scheme and, in one case, compare these results with a gray two-moment neutrino transport scheme. We confirm the complex geometry of the neutrino emission, also observed in previous simulations with neutrino leakage, and show explicitly the presence of important differences in the neutrino luminosity, disk

  1. OBSERVATIONS OF BINARY STARS WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL SPECKLE SURVEY INSTRUMENT. IV. OBSERVATIONS OF KEPLER, CoRoT, AND HIPPARCOS STARS FROM THE GEMINI NORTH TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of 71 speckle observations of binary and unresolved stars, most of which were observed with the DSSI speckle camera at the Gemini North Telescope in 2012 July. The main purpose of the run was to obtain diffraction-limited images of high-priority targets for the Kepler and CoRoT missions, but in addition, we observed a number of close binary stars where the resolution limit of Gemini was used to better determine orbital parameters and/or confirm results obtained at or below the diffraction limit of smaller telescopes. Five new binaries and one triple system were discovered, and first orbits are calculated for other two systems. Several systems are discussed in detail.

  2. The close binary properties of massive stars in the Milky Way and low-metallicity Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, Maxwell; Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2013-12-01

    In order to understand the rates and properties of Type Ia and Type Ib/c supernovae, X-ray binaries, gravitational wave sources, and gamma-ray bursts as a function of galactic environment and cosmic age, it is imperative that we measure how the close binary properties of O- and B-type stars vary with metallicity. We have studied eclipsing binaries with early B main-sequence primaries in three galaxies with different metallicities: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC, respectively) and the Milky Way (MW). The observed fractions of early B stars that exhibit deep eclipses 0.25 < Δm (mag) < 0.65 and orbital periods 2 < P (days) < 20 in the MW, LMC, and SMC span a narrow range of (0.7-1.0)%, which is a model-independent result. After correcting for geometrical selection effects and incompleteness toward low-mass companions, we find for early B stars in all three environments (1) a close binary fraction of (22 ± 5)% across orbital periods 2 < P (days) < 20 and mass ratios q = M {sub 2}/M {sub 1} > 0.1, (2) an intrinsic orbital period distribution slightly skewed toward shorter periods relative to a distribution that is uniform in log P, (3) a mass-ratio distribution weighted toward low-mass companions, and (4) a small, nearly negligible excess fraction of twins with q > 0.9. Our fitted parameters derived for the MW eclipsing binaries match the properties inferred from nearby, early-type spectroscopic binaries, which further validates our results. There are no statistically significant trends with metallicity, demonstrating that the close binary properties of massive stars do not vary across metallicities –0.7 < log(Z/Z {sub ☉}) < 0.0 beyond the measured uncertainties.

  3. Uncovering the Putative B-Star Binary Companion of the SN 1993J Progenitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Bostroem, K. Azalee; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fransson, Claes; Matheson, Thomas; Cenko, S. Bradley; Chandra, Poonam; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Li, Weidong; Parker, Alex H.; Smith, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The Type IIb supernova (SN) 1993J is one of only a few stripped-envelope SNe with a progenitor star identified in pre-explosion images. SN IIb models typically invoke H envelope stripping by mass transfer in a binary system. For the case of SN 1993J, the models suggest that the companion grew to 22 solar mass and became a source of ultraviolet (UV) excess. Located in M81, at a distance of only 3.6 Mpc, SN 1993J offers one of the best opportunities to detect the putative companion and test the progenitor model. Previously published near-UV spectra in 2004 showed evidence for absorption lines consistent with a hot (B2 Ia) star, but the field was crowded and dominated by flux from the SN. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Wide-Field Camera 3 observations of SN 1993J from 2012, at which point the flux from the SN had faded sufficiently to potentially measure the UV continuum properties from the putative companion. The resulting UV spectrum is consistent with contributions from both a hot B star and the SN, although we cannot rule out line-of-sight coincidences.

  4. Quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlione, A.; Aguilera, D. N.; Pons, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. We monitored the quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries after active periods of intense activity in X-rays (outbursts). Aims: The theoretical modeling of the thermal relaxation of the neutron star crust may be used to establish constraints on the crust composition and transport properties, depending on the astrophysical scenarios assumed. Methods: We numerically simulated the thermal evolution of the neutron star crust and compared them with inferred surface temperatures for five sources: MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260, XTE J1701-462, EXO 0748-676 and IGR J17480-2446. Results: We find that the evolution of MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260 and EXO 0748-676 can be well described within a deep crustal cooling scenario. Conversely, we find that the other two sources can only be explained with models beyond crustal cooling. For the peculiar emission of XTE J1701-462 we propose alternative scenarios such as residual accretion during quiescence, additional heat sources in the outer crust, and/or thermal isolation of the inner crust due to a buried magnetic field. We also explain the very recent reported temperature of IGR J17480-2446 with an additional heat deposition in the outer crust from shallow sources.

  5. Dynamical mass ejection from binary neutron star mergers: Radiation-hydrodynamics study in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Kyutoku, Koutarou; Shibata, Masaru

    2015-03-01

    We perform radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of binary neutron-star mergers in numerical relativity on the Japanese "K" supercomputer, taking into account neutrino cooling and heating by an updated leakage-plus-transfer scheme for the first time. Neutron stars are modeled by three modern finite-temperature equations of state (EOS) developed by Hempel and his collaborators. We find that the properties of the dynamical ejecta of the merger such as total mass, average electron fraction, and thermal energy depend strongly on the EOS. Only for a soft EOS (the so-called SFHo), the ejecta mass exceeds 0.01 M⊙ . In this case, the distribution of the electron fraction of the ejecta becomes broad due to the shock heating during the merger. These properties are well-suited for the production of the solar-like r -process abundance. For the other stiff EOS (DD2 and TM1), for which a long-lived massive neutron star is formed after the merger, the ejecta mass is smaller than 0.01 M⊙, although broad electron-fraction distributions are achieved by the positron capture and the neutrino heating.

  6. Uncovering the putative B-star binary companion of the SN 1993J progenitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Bradley Cenko, S.; Li, Weidong; Parker, Alex H.; Azalee Bostroem, K.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Fransson, Claes; Matheson, Thomas; Chandra, Poonam; Dwarkadas, Vikram; Smith, Nathan

    2014-07-20

    The Type IIb supernova (SN) 1993J is one of only a few stripped-envelope SNe with a progenitor star identified in pre-explosion images. SN IIb models typically invoke H envelope stripping by mass transfer in a binary system. For the case of SN 1993J, the models suggest that the companion grew to 22 M{sub ☉} and became a source of ultraviolet (UV) excess. Located in M81, at a distance of only 3.6 Mpc, SN 1993J offers one of the best opportunities to detect the putative companion and test the progenitor model. Previously published near-UV spectra in 2004 showed evidence for absorption lines consistent with a hot (B2 Ia) star, but the field was crowded and dominated by flux from the SN. Here we present Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph and Wide-Field Camera 3 observations of SN 1993J from 2012, at which point the flux from the SN had faded sufficiently to potentially measure the UV continuum properties from the putative companion. The resulting UV spectrum is consistent with contributions from both a hot B star and the SN, although we cannot rule out line-of-sight coincidences.

  7. No Time for Dead Time: Timing Analysis of Bright Black Hole Binaries with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick; Tomsick, John; Schmid, Christian; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J.; Kara, Erin; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller, Jon M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Stern, Daniel; Uttley, Phil; Walton, Dominic J.; Wilms, Jörn; Zhang, William W.

    2015-02-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per event is relatively long (~2.5 msec) and varies event-to-event by a few percent. The most obvious effect is a distortion of the white noise level in the power density spectrum (PDS) that cannot be easily modeled with standard techniques due to the variable nature of the dead time. In this paper, we show that it is possible to exploit the presence of two completely independent focal planes and use the cospectrum, the real part of the cross PDS, to obtain a good proxy of the white-noise-subtracted PDS. Thereafter, one can use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the remaining effects of dead time, namely, a frequency-dependent modulation of the variance and a frequency-independent drop of the sensitivity to variability. In this way, most of the standard timing analysis can be performed, albeit with a sacrifice in signal-to-noise ratio relative to what would be achieved using more standard techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339-4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105.

  8. The Close Binary Frequency of Wolf-Rayet Stars as a Function of Metallicity in M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neugent, Kathryn F.; Massey, Philip

    2014-07-01

    Massive star evolutionary models generally predict the correct ratio of WC-type and WN-type Wolf-Rayet stars at low metallicities, but underestimate the ratio at higher (solar and above) metallicities. One possible explanation for this failure is perhaps single-star models are not sufficient and Roche-lobe overflow in close binaries is necessary to produce the "extra" WC stars at higher metallicities. However, this would require the frequency of close massive binaries to be metallicity dependent. Here we test this hypothesis by searching for close Wolf-Rayet binaries in the high metallicity environments of M31 and the center of M33 as well as in the lower metallicity environments of the middle and outer regions of M33. After identifying ~100 Wolf-Rayet binaries based on radial velocity variations, we conclude that the close binary frequency of Wolf-Rayets is not metallicity dependent and thus other factors must be responsible for the overabundance of WC stars at high metallicities. However, our initial identifications and observations of these close binaries have already been put to good use as we are currently observing additional epochs for eventual orbit and mass determinations. The spectroscopic observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. MMT telescope time was granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by the National Science Foundation. This paper uses data products produced by the OIR Telescope Data Center, supported by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.

  9. Beyond the Horizon Distance: LIGO-Virgo can Boost Gravitational-Wave Detection Rates by Exploiting the Mass Distribution of Neutron Star and Black Hole Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marka, Zsuzsa; Bartos, Imre; Marka, Szabolcs; LIGO Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We explore the advantage of focusing on regions of the parameter space in gravitational-wave searches for the binary mergers of neutron stars and black holes. For neutron star binaries, we show that taking advantage of their narrow observed mass distribution could improve detection rates, in some cases by more than 50%. A reduced template bank can also represent significant improvement in technical cost. We present a detailed search method using binary mass distribution to incorporate information on the mass distribution.

  10. Phase shifts and nonellipsoidal light curves: Challenges from mass determinations in x-ray binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, Andrew Glenn

    We consider two types of anomalous observations which have arisen from efforts to measure dynamical masses of X-ray binary stars: (1) Radial velocity curves which seemingly show the primary and the secondary out of antiphase in most systems, and (2) The observation of double-waved light curves which deviate significantly from the ellipsoidal modulations expected for a Roche lobe filling star. We consider both problems with the joint goals of understanding the physical origins of the anomalous observations, and using this understanding to allow robust dynamical determinations of mass in X-ray binary systems. In our analysis of phase-shifted radial velocity curves, we discuss a comprehensive sample of X-ray binaries with published phase-shifted radial velocity curves. We show that the most commonly adopted explanation for phase shifts is contradicted by many observations, and consider instead a generalized form of a model proposed by Smak in 1970. We show that this model is well supported by a range of observations, including some systems which had previously been considered anomalous. We lay the groundwork for the derivation of mass ratios based on our explanation for phase shifts, and we discuss the work necessary to produce more detailed physical models of the phase shift. In our analysis of non-ellipsoidal light curves, we focus on the very well-studied system A0620-00. We present new VIH SMARTS photometry spanning 1999-2007, and supplement this with a comprehensive collection of archival data obtained since 1981. We show that A0620-00 undergoes optical state changes within X-ray quiescence and argue that not all quiescent data should be used for determinations of the inclination. We identify twelve light curves which may reliably be used for determining the inclination. We show that the accretion disk contributes significantly to all twelve curves and is the dominant source of nonellipsoidal variations. We derive the disk fraction for each of the twelve curves

  11. TYPE Ib/c SUPERNOVAE IN BINARY SYSTEMS. I. EVOLUTION AND PROPERTIES OF THE PROGENITOR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S.-C.; Woosley, S. E.

    2010-12-10

    We investigate the evolution of Type Ib/c supernova (SN Ib/c) progenitors in close binary systems, using new evolutionary models that include the effects of rotation, with initial masses of 12-25 M{sub sun} for the primary components, and of single helium stars with initial masses of 2.8-20 M{sub sun}. We find that, despite the impact of tidal interaction on the rotation of primary stars, the amount of angular momentum retained in the core at the presupernova stage in different binary model sequences converges to a value similar to those found in previous single star models. This amount is large enough to produce millisecond pulsars, but too small to produce magnetars or long gamma-ray bursts. We employ the most up-to-date estimate for the Wolf-Rayet mass-loss rate, and its implications for SN Ib/c progenitors are discussed in detail. In terms of stellar structure, SN Ib/c progenitors in binary systems at solar metallicity are predicted to have a wide range of final masses up to about 7 M{sub sun}, with helium envelopes of M{sub He} {approx_equal} 0.16-1.5 M{sub sun}. Our results indicate that, if the lack of helium lines in the spectra of SNe Ic were due to small amounts of helium (e.g., M{sub He} {approx}< 0.5), the distribution of both initial and final masses of SN Ic progenitors should be bimodal. Furthermore, we find that a thin hydrogen layer (0.001 M{sub sun} {approx}< M{sub H} {approx}< 0.01 M{sub sun}) is expected to be present in many SN Ib progenitors at the presupernova stage. We show that the presence of hydrogen, together with a rather thick helium envelope, can lead to a significant expansion of some SN Ib/c progenitors by the time of supernova explosion. This may have important consequences for the shock break-out and supernova light curve. We also argue that some SN progenitors with thin hydrogen layers produced via Case AB/B transfer might be related to Type IIb supernova progenitors with relatively small radii of about 10 R{sub sun}.

  12. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  13. Photometric monitoring of open clusters: Low-mass eclipsing binary stars and the stellar mass-luminosity-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, Leslie

    2006-06-01

    This thesis describes a photometric monitoring survey of Galactic star clusters designed to detect low-mass eclipsing binary star systems through variations in their relative lightcurves. The aim is to use cluster eclipsing binaries to measure the masses and radii of M-dwarf stars with ages and metallicities known from studies of brighter cluster stars. This information will provide an improved calibration of the mass-luminosity-radius relation for low-mass stars, be used to test stellar structure and evolution models, and help quantify the contribution of low-mass stars to the global mass census in the Galaxy. The survey is designed to detect eclipse events in stars of ~0.3 M_sun and consists of 600 Gbytes of raw imaging data on six open clusters with a range of ages (~ 0.15 - 4 Gyr) and metallicites (~ -0.2 - 0.0 dex). The clusters NGC 1647 and M 35 contain excellent candidate systems showing eclipse like variations in brightness and photometry consistent with cluster membership. The analysis of these clusters and the eclipsing M-dwarf stars detected in them are presented. Analysis of the candidate system in NGC 1647 confirms the object as a newly discovered M-dwarf eclipsing binary in the cluster with compenent masses of M 1 = 0.47 ± 0.05[Special characters omitted.] and M 2 = 0.19 ± 0.02[Special characters omitted.]