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Sample records for dynamic analysis reveals

  1. Genomic analysis of regulatory network dynamics reveals large topological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Madan Babu, M.; Yu, Haiyuan; Snyder, Michael; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-09-01

    Network analysis has been applied widely, providing a unifying language to describe disparate systems ranging from social interactions to power grids. It has recently been used in molecular biology, but so far the resulting networks have only been analysed statically. Here we present the dynamics of a biological network on a genomic scale, by integrating transcriptional regulatory information and gene-expression data for multiple conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We develop an approach for the statistical analysis of network dynamics, called SANDY, combining well-known global topological measures, local motifs and newly derived statistics. We uncover large changes in underlying network architecture that are unexpected given current viewpoints and random simulations. In response to diverse stimuli, transcription factors alter their interactions to varying degrees, thereby rewiring the network. A few transcription factors serve as permanent hubs, but most act transiently only during certain conditions. By studying sub-network structures, we show that environmental responses facilitate fast signal propagation (for example, with short regulatory cascades), whereas the cell cycle and sporulation direct temporal progression through multiple stages (for example, with highly inter-connected transcription factors). Indeed, to drive the latter processes forward, phase-specific transcription factors inter-regulate serially, and ubiquitously active transcription factors layer above them in a two-tiered hierarchy. We anticipate that many of the concepts presented here-particularly the large-scale topological changes and hub transience-will apply to other biological networks, including complex sub-systems in higher eukaryotes.

  2. In vivo dynamics of skeletal muscle Dystrophin in zebrafish embryos revealed by improved FRAP analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Gonzalez-Perez, Vinicio; Gillespie, Sean J; Beley, Cyriaque; Garcia, Luis; Theveneau, Eric; Sear, Richard P; Hughes, Simon M

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophin forms an essential link between sarcolemma and cytoskeleton, perturbation of which causes muscular dystrophy. We analysed Dystrophin binding dynamics in vivo for the first time. Within maturing fibres of host zebrafish embryos, our analysis reveals a pool of diffusible Dystrophin and complexes bound at the fibre membrane. Combining modelling, an improved FRAP methodology and direct semi-quantitative analysis of bleaching suggests the existence of two membrane-bound Dystrophin populations with widely differing bound lifetimes: a stable, tightly bound pool, and a dynamic bound pool with high turnover rate that exchanges with the cytoplasmic pool. The three populations were found consistently in human and zebrafish Dystrophins overexpressed in wild-type or dmdta222a/ta222a zebrafish embryos, which lack Dystrophin, and in Gt(dmd-Citrine)ct90a that express endogenously-driven tagged zebrafish Dystrophin. These results lead to a new model for Dystrophin membrane association in developing muscle, and highlight our methodology as a valuable strategy for in vivo analysis of complex protein dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06541.001 PMID:26459831

  3. Dynamics of natural killer cell receptor revealed by quantitative analysis of photoswitchable protein.

    PubMed

    Pageon, Sophie V; Aquino, Gerardo; Lagrue, Kathryn; Köhler, Karsten; Endres, Robert G; Davis, Daniel M

    2013-11-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cell activation is dynamically regulated by numerous activating and inhibitory surface receptors that accumulate at the immune synapse. Quantitative analysis of receptor dynamics has been limited by methodologies that rely on indirect measurements such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Here, we report an apparently novel approach to study how proteins traffic to and from the immune synapse using NK cell receptors tagged with the photoswitchable fluorescent protein tdEosFP, which can be irreversibly photoswitched from a green to red fluorescent state by ultraviolet light. Thus, after a localized switching event, the movement of the photoswitched molecules can be temporally and spatially resolved by monitoring fluorescence in two regions of interest. By comparing images with mathematical models, we evaluated the diffusion coefficient of the receptor KIR2DL1 (0.23 ± 0.06 μm(2) s(-1)) and assessed how synapse formation affects receptor dynamics. Our data conclude that the inhibitory NK cell receptor KIR2DL1 is continually trafficked into the synapse, and remains surprisingly stable there. Unexpectedly, however, in NK cells forming synapses with multiple target cells simultaneously, KIR2DL1 at one synapse can relocate to another synapse. Thus, our results reveal a previously undetected intersynaptic exchange of protein. PMID:24209843

  4. Multifractal analysis of Barkhausen noise reveals the dynamic nature of criticality at hysteresis loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadić, Bosiljka

    2016-06-01

    The field-driven magnetisation reversal processes in disordered systems exhibit a collective behaviour that is manifested in the scale-invariance of avalanches, closely related to underlying dynamical mechanisms. Using the multifractal time series analysis, we study the structure of fluctuations at different scales in the accompanying Barkhausen noise. The stochastic signal represents the magnetisation discontinuities along the hysteresis loop of a three-dimensional random field Ising model simulated for varied disorder strength and driving rates. The analysis of the spectrum of the generalised Hurst exponents reveals that the dominant segments of the signal with large fluctuations represent two distinct classes of stochastic processes in weak and strong pinning regimes. Furthermore, in the weak pinning regime, the part of the signal originating from the beginning of the hysteresis loop has a different multifractal spectrum than the signal near the coercive field. The enhanced fluctuations (primarily in the central part of the hysteresis loop) for increased driving rate and larger system size, lead to a further broadening of the spectrum. The analysed Barkhausen signals are also shown to exhibit temporal correlations and power-law distributions of the magnetisation discontinuity and avalanche sizes, in agreement with previous studies. The multifractal properties of Barkhausen noise describe the dynamical state of domains and precisely discriminate the weak pinning, permitting the motion of individual walls, from the mechanisms occurring in strongly disordered systems.

  5. Particle Motion Analysis Reveals Nanoscale Bond Characteristics and Enhances Dynamic Range for Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Visser, Emiel W A; van IJzendoorn, Leo J; Prins, Menno W J

    2016-03-22

    Biofunctionalized colloidal particles are widely used as labels in bioanalytical assays, lab-on-chip devices, biophysical research, and in studies on live biological systems. With detection resolution going down to the level of single particles and single molecules, understanding the nature of the interaction of the particles with surfaces and substrates becomes of paramount importance. Here, we present a comprehensive study of motion patterns of colloidal particles maintained in close proximity to a substrate by short molecular tethers (40 nm). The motion of the particles (500-1000 nm) was optically tracked with a very high localization accuracy (below 3 nm). A surprisingly large variation in motion patterns was observed, which can be attributed to properties of the particle-molecule-substrate system, namely the bond number, the nature of the bond, particle protrusions, and substrate nonuniformities. Experimentally observed motion patterns were compared to numerical Monte Carlo simulations, revealing a close correspondence between the observed motion patterns and properties of the molecular system. Particles bound via single tethers show distinct disc-, ring-, and bell-shaped motion patterns, where the ring- and bell-shaped patterns are caused by protrusions on the particle in the direct vicinity of the molecular attachment point. Double and triple tethered particles exhibit stripe-shaped and triangular-shaped motion patterns, respectively. The developed motion pattern analysis allows for discrimination between particles bound by different bond types, which opens the possibility to improve the limit of detection and the dynamic range of bioanalytical assays, with a projected increase of dynamic range by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. PMID:26913834

  6. Revealing spatio-spectral electroencephalographic dynamics of musical mode and tempo perception by independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Music conveys emotion by manipulating musical structures, particularly musical mode- and tempo-impact. The neural correlates of musical mode and tempo perception revealed by electroencephalography (EEG) have not been adequately addressed in the literature. Method This study used independent component analysis (ICA) to systematically assess spatio-spectral EEG dynamics associated with the changes of musical mode and tempo. Results Empirical results showed that music with major mode augmented delta-band activity over the right sensorimotor cortex, suppressed theta activity over the superior parietal cortex, and moderately suppressed beta activity over the medial frontal cortex, compared to minor-mode music, whereas fast-tempo music engaged significant alpha suppression over the right sensorimotor cortex. Conclusion The resultant EEG brain sources were comparable with previous studies obtained by other neuroimaging modalities, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). In conjunction with advanced dry and mobile EEG technology, the EEG results might facilitate the translation from laboratory-oriented research to real-life applications for music therapy, training and entertainment in naturalistic environments. PMID:24581119

  7. iRED analysis of TAR RNA reveals motional coupling, long-range correlations, and a dynamical hinge.

    PubMed

    Musselman, Catherine; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2007-07-15

    The HIV-1 transactivation response RNA element (TAR), which is essential to the lifecycle of the virus, has been suggested, based on NMR and hydrodynamic measurements, to undergo substantial, collective, structural dynamics that are important for its function. To deal with the significant coupling between overall diffusional rotation and internal motion expected to exist in TAR, here we utilize an isotropic reorientational eigenmode dynamics analysis of simulated molecular trajectories to obtain a detailed description of TAR dynamics and an accurately quantified pattern of dynamical correlations. The analysis demonstrates the inseparability of internal and overall motional modes, confirms the existence and reveals the nature of collective domain dynamics, and additionally reveals that the hinge for these motions is centered on residues U23, C24, and C41. Results also indicate the existence of long-range communication between the loop and the core of the RNA, and between the loop and the bulge. Additionally, the isotropic reorientational eigenmode dynamics analysis explains, from a dynamical perspective, several existing biochemical mutational studies and suggests new mutations for future structural dynamics studies. PMID:17449677

  8. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-07

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of C{sub α} atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  9. Slow dynamics of a protein backbone in molecular dynamics simulation revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2013-12-01

    We recently proposed the method of time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA) to examine the slow dynamics involved in conformational fluctuations of a protein as estimated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation [Y. Naritomi and S. Fuchigami, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 065101 (2011)]. Our previous study focused on domain motions of the protein and examined its dynamics by using rigid-body domain analysis and tICA. However, the protein changes its conformation not only through domain motions but also by various types of motions involving its backbone and side chains. Some of these motions might occur on a slow time scale: we hypothesize that if so, we could effectively detect and characterize them using tICA. In the present study, we investigated slow dynamics of the protein backbone using MD simulation and tICA. The selected target protein was lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO), which comprises two domains and undergoes large domain motions. MD simulation of LAO in explicit water was performed for 1 μs, and the obtained trajectory of Cα atoms in the backbone was analyzed by tICA. This analysis successfully provided us with slow modes for LAO that represented either domain motions or local movements of the backbone. Further analysis elucidated the atomic details of the suggested local motions and confirmed that these motions truly occurred on the expected slow time scale.

  10. Genome-wide analysis reveals gene expression and metabolic network dynamics during embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Daoquan; Venglat, Prakash; Tibiche, Chabane; Yang, Hui; Risseeuw, Eddy; Cao, Yongguo; Babic, Vivijan; Cloutier, Mathieu; Keller, Wilf; Wang, Edwin; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-05-01

    Embryogenesis is central to the life cycle of most plant species. Despite its importance, because of the difficulty associated with embryo isolation, global gene expression programs involved in plant embryogenesis, especially the early events following fertilization, are largely unknown. To address this gap, we have developed methods to isolate whole live Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryos as young as zygote and performed genome-wide profiling of gene expression. These studies revealed insights into patterns of gene expression relating to: maternal and paternal contributions to zygote development, chromosomal level clustering of temporal expression in embryogenesis, and embryo-specific functions. Functional analysis of some of the modulated transcription factor encoding genes from our data sets confirmed that they are critical for embryogenesis. Furthermore, we constructed stage-specific metabolic networks mapped with differentially regulated genes by combining the microarray data with the available Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes metabolic data sets. Comparative analysis of these networks revealed the network-associated structural and topological features, pathway interactions, and gene expression with reference to the metabolic activities during embryogenesis. Together, these studies have generated comprehensive gene expression data sets for embryo development in Arabidopsis and may serve as an important foundational resource for other seed plants. PMID:21402797

  11. Pyrosequencing Analysis Reveals High Population Dynamics of the Soil Microcosm Degrading Octachlorodibenzofuran

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Jer-Horng; Chang, Juu-En

    2014-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the microbial community structure is very important in bioremediation for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). However, this has been insufficiently addressed in previous studies. To obtain more information, we pyrosequenced the V4/V5 regions of the 16S rRNA genes of bacterial communities transited from polluted soil to batch microcosms that rapidly degraded high concentrations of octachlorodibenzofuran (OCDF). The analysis results contained an average of 11,842 reads per sample, providing the first detailed description of bacterial communities associated with PCDD/Fs. The community composition markedly changed to be concomitant with the degradation of OCDF, indicating that a distinctive population structure developed rapidly in the microcosm. Although oxygen gas was provided weekly to the microcosm, the growth of potential degraders, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, and Clostridium, was observed, but in consistently low quantities. While anaerobic Sedimentibacter initially emerged as an abundant pioneer, several aerobic participants, such as the genera Brevundimonas, Pseudoxanthomonas, and Lysobacter, exhibited a large increase in their 16S rRNA gene copies within the timeframe, which showed a temporal population dynamic, and indicated their collaborative contributions to the degradation of OCDF under hypoxic conditions. These results have provided a deeper insight into the microbial community structure and population dynamics of the OCDF-degrading microcosm. PMID:25491754

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Statistics Analysis Reveals the Defense Response Mechanism in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhichao; Zhao, Yunjie; Zeng, Chen; Computational Biophysics Lab Team

    As the main protein of the bacterial flagella, flagellin plays an important role in perception and defense response. The newly discovered locus, FLS2, is ubiquitously expressed. FLS2 encodes a putative receptor kinase and shares many homologies with some plant resistance genes and even with some components of immune system of mammals and insects. In Arabidopsis, FLS2 perception is achieved by the recognition of epitope flg22, which induces FLS2 heteromerization with BAK1 and finally the plant immunity. Here we use both analytical methods such as Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) and Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations to get a better understanding of the defense mechanism of FLS2. This may facilitate a redesign of flg22 or de-novo design for desired specificity and potency to extend the immune properties of FLS2 to other important crops and vegetables.

  13. Low-level chemiluminescent analysis of nondiluted human blood reveals its dynamic system properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voeikov, Vladimir L.; Novikov, Cyril N.; Vilenskaya, Natalia D.

    1999-01-01

    Lucigenin- and luminol-dependent chemiluminescence [(LC- CL) and (LM-CL)] in nondiluted human blood was studied. LM-CL was low in fresh blood and disappeared after its storage for 3 h, though the respiratory burst (RB) stimulated in blood was followed by high intensity and long- lasting LM-CL. LC-CL was high in fresh blood and was steadily increasing with blood storage. Blood dilution with saline resulted in LC-CL attenuation and LM-CL elevation. LC-CL did not depend on air supply to blood, while LM-CL elevation during RB needed constant blood aeration. The results suggest that besides a well-known mechanism of reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils during RB, another process of electron excited state generation reflected by LC-CL operates in blood. It needs blood integrity for its manifestation and uses oxygen supplied by erythrocytes. Dynamic system properties of blood were revealed also in experiments with blood transfer from one sample to another in the course of RB. Highly nonlinear changes of CL intensity both in a `donor' and in a `recipient' sample resulted in strong differences in CL levels in two samples, one of which was prepared by blood subtraction, and another by blood addition. We suggest that CL data from measurements on nondiluted blood may be informative of integrative properties of blood tissue in addition to its being a measure of some sort of oxidative metabolism in it.

  14. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    PubMed Central

    Galati, Domenico F.; Abuin, David S.; Tauber, Gabriel A.; Pham, Andrew T.; Pearson, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  15. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays.

    PubMed

    Galati, Domenico F; Abuin, David S; Tauber, Gabriel A; Pham, Andrew T; Pearson, Chad G

    2015-01-01

    Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs) use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array) to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs) that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D). Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs. PMID:26700722

  16. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development. PMID:26786896

  17. Atmospheric CO2 Dynamics During the Holocene Revealed by Stomatal Frequency Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; McElwain, J.; Kouwenberg, L. L.; Beerling, D. J.; Kuerschner, W. M.; Visscher, H.

    2002-12-01

    A variety of land plants are capable of sustained adjustment of the number of leaf stomata (gas pores) to changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Measured on fossil leaves, and calibrated against modern training sets, stomatal frequency data are increasingly applied as a proxy for palaeo-atmospheric CO2 reconstructions. These data demonstrate with high temporal resolution and accuracy that century-scale CO2 fluctuations contributed to Holocene climate evolution. We here present a composite record of Holocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations based on stomatal frequency analysis. The CO2 estimations are derived from fossil leaf assemblages preserved in peat and lake deposits in Europe, Canada and the USA. The leaf material studied originates from deciduous trees, conifers and shrubs. Independent of site locality and plant species studied, CO2 reconstructions from the individual sections correspond well in the overlapping parts of the records. The combined data sets provide convincing evidence for a highly dynamic atmospheric CO2 regime during the Holocene. A fast CO2 increase occurs at the Younger Dryas / Holocene transition. Short-term CO2 reductions are associated with three major cool pulses known from marine and terrestrial records: the Preboreal Oscillation, the 8.2 kyr event and the Little Ice Age.

  18. Revealing the pure confinement effect in glass-forming liquids by dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppensteiner, J.; Schranz, W.; Carpenter, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical response of mesoporous silica with coated inner surfaces confining the glass-forming liquid salol is measured as a function of temperature and frequency (1-100 Hz) for various pore sizes (2.4-7.3 nm). Compared to former results on natural pores, a distinct acceleration of dynamics due to the removal of surface-related retardation of molecular dynamics is found now, which can be fitted by a homogeneous relaxation using an unmodified Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation. This lubrication effect leads to a stronger decrease in the glass transition temperature Tg with decreasing pore size. The present data allow to quantify and separate competing side effects as surface bondings and negative pressure from the pure confinement induced acceleration of molecular dynamics with decreasing pore size. We analyze the dynamic elastic susceptibility data in terms of a recently proposed procedure [C. Dalle-Ferrier , Phys. Rev. E 76, 041510 (2007)], which relates the number Ncorr,T of molecules, whose dynamics is correlated with a local enthalpy fluctuation, to the three-point dynamic susceptibility χT . The observed increase of Ncorr,T with decreasing temperature strongly indicates that the size ξ of dynamic heterogeneities increases when approaching the glass transition.

  19. Integrated Experimental and Model-based Analysis Reveals the Spatial Aspects of EGFR Activation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Zhang, Yi; Chrisler, William B.; Ewald, Jonathan A.; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2012-10-02

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) belongs to the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and controls a diverse set of cellular responses relevant to development and tumorigenesis. ErbB activation is a complex process involving receptor-ligand binding, receptor dimerization, phosphorylation, and trafficking (internalization, recycling and degradation), which together dictate the spatio-temporal distribution of active receptors within the cell. The ability to predict this distribution, and elucidation of the factors regulating it, would help to establish a mechanistic link between ErbB expression levels and the cellular response. Towards this end, we constructed mathematical models for deconvolving the contributions of receptor dimerization and phosphorylation to EGFR activation, and to examine the dependence of these processes on sub-cellular location. We collected experimental datasets for EGFR activation dynamics in human mammary epithelial cells, with the specific goal of model parameterization, and used the data to estimate parameters for several alternate models. Model-based analysis indicated that: 1) signal termination via receptor dephosphorylation in late endosomes, prior to degradation, is an important component of the response, 2) less than 40% of the receptors in the cell are phosphorylated at any given time, even at saturating ligand doses, and 3) receptor dephosphorylation rates at the cell surface and early endosomes are comparable. We validated the last finding by measuring EGFR dephosphorylation rates at various times following ligand addition both in whole cells, and in endosomes using ELISAs and fluorescent imaging. Overall, our results provide important information on how EGFR phosphorylation levels are regulated within cells. Further, the mathematical model described here can be extended to determine receptor dimer abundances in cells co-expressing various levels of ErbB receptors. This study demonstrates that an iterative cycle of

  20. The dynamics of attentional sampling during visual search revealed by Fourier analysis of periodic noise interference.

    PubMed

    Dugué, Laura; Vanrullen, Rufin

    2014-01-01

    What are the temporal dynamics of perceptual sampling during visual search tasks, and how do they differ between a difficult (or inefficient) and an easy (or efficient) task? Does attention focus intermittently on the stimuli, or are the stimuli processed continuously over time? We addressed these questions by way of a new paradigm using periodic fluctuations of stimulus information during a difficult (color-orientation conjunction) and an easy (+ among Ls) search task. On each stimulus, we applied a dynamic visual noise that oscillated at a given frequency (2-20 Hz, 2-Hz steps) and phase (four cardinal phase angles) for 500 ms. We estimated the dynamics of attentional sampling by computing an inverse Fourier transform on subjects' d-primes. In both tasks, the sampling function presented a significant peak at 2 Hz; we showed that this peak could be explained by nonperiodic search strategies such as increased sensitivity to stimulus onset and offset. Specifically in the difficult task, however, a second, higher-frequency peak was observed at 9 to 10 Hz, with a similar phase for all subjects; this isolated frequency component necessarily entails oscillatory attentional dynamics. In a second experiment, we presented difficult search arrays with dynamic noise that was modulated by the previously obtained grand-average attention sampling function or by its converse function (in both cases omitting the 2 Hz component to focus on genuine oscillatory dynamics). We verified that performance was higher in the latter than in the former case, even for subjects who had not participated in the first experiment. This study supports the idea of a periodic sampling of attention during a difficult search task. Although further experiments will be needed to extend these findings to other search tasks, the present report validates the usefulness of this novel paradigm for measuring the temporal dynamics of attention. PMID:24525262

  1. Stochastic expression dynamics of a transcription factor revealed by single-molecule noise analysis.

    PubMed

    Hensel, Zach; Feng, Haidong; Han, Bo; Hatem, Christine; Wang, Jin; Xiao, Jie

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is inherently stochastic; precise gene regulation by transcription factors is important for cell-fate determination. Many transcription factors regulate their own expression, suggesting that autoregulation counters intrinsic stochasticity in gene expression. Using a new strategy, cotranslational activation by cleavage (CoTrAC), we probed the stochastic expression dynamics of cI, which encodes the bacteriophage λ repressor CI, a fate-determining transcription factor. CI concentration fluctuations influence both lysogenic stability and induction of bacteriophage λ. We found that the intrinsic stochasticity in cI expression was largely determined by CI expression level irrespective of autoregulation. Furthermore, extrinsic, cell-to-cell variation was primarily responsible for CI concentration fluctuations, and negative autoregulation minimized CI concentration heterogeneity by counteracting extrinsic noise and introducing memory. This quantitative study of transcription factor expression dynamics sheds light on the mechanisms cells use to control noise in gene regulatory networks. PMID:22751020

  2. Proteomic analysis reveals the dynamic association of proteins with translated mRNAs in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Alves, Lysangela R; Avila, Andréa R; Correa, Alejandro; Holetz, Fabíola B; Mansur, Fernanda C B; Manque, Patrício A; de Menezes, Juliana P B; Buck, Gregory A; Krieger, Marco A; Goldenberg, Samuel

    2010-03-01

    Gene regulation is mainly post-transcriptional in trypanosomatids. The stability of mRNA and access to polysomes are thought to be tightly regulated, allowing Trypanosoma cruzi to adapt to the different environmental conditions during its life cycle. Post-transcriptional regulation requires the association between mRNAs and certain proteins to form mRNP complexes. We investigated the dynamic association between proteins and mRNAs, using poly(T) beads to isolate and characterize proteins and protein complexes bound to poly-A+ mRNAs. The protein content of these fractions was analyzed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We identified 542 protein component of the mRNP complexes associated with mRNAs. Twenty-four of the proteins obtained were present in all fractions, whereas some other proteins were exclusive to a particular fraction: epimastigote polysomal (0.37%) and post-polysomal (2.95%) fractions; stress polysomal (13.8%) and post-polysomal (40.78%) fractions. Several proteins known to be involved in mRNA metabolism were identified, and this was considered important as it made it possible to confirm the reliability of our mRNP isolation approach. This procedure allowed us to have a first insight into the composition and dynamics of mRNPs in T. cruzi. PMID:20060445

  3. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.

  4. Conformational selection in a protein-protein interaction revealed by dynamic pathway analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-12-24

    Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsinmore » kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Lastly, protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding.« less

  5. Conformational Selection in a Protein-Protein Interaction revealed by Dynamic Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Kalyan S.; Agafonov, Roman V.; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Higgins, Matthew K.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Oprian, Daniel D.; Kern, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Molecular recognition plays a central role in biology, and protein dynamics has been acknowledged to be important in this process. However, it is highly debated whether conformational changes happen before ligand binding to produce a binding-competent state (conformational selection) or are caused in response to ligand binding (induced fit). Proposals for both mechanisms in protein/protein recognition have been primarily based on structural arguments. However, the distinction between them is a question of the probabilities of going via these two opposing pathways. Here we present a direct demonstration of exclusive conformational selection in protein/protein recognition by measuring the flux for rhodopsin kinase binding to its regulator recoverin, an important molecular recognition in the vision system. Using NMR spectroscopy, stopped-flow kinetics and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that recoverin populates a minor conformation in solution that exposes a hydrophobic binding pocket responsible for binding rhodopsin kinase. Protein dynamics in free recoverin limits the overall rate of binding. PMID:26725117

  6. Dynamic transcriptome analysis reveals AP2/ERF transcription factors responsible for cold stress in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Chunfang; Hu, Kaining; Xian, Shuanshi; Liu, Chunqing; Fan, Jianchun; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2016-06-01

    The APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor (TF) superfamily plays an important regulatory role in signal transduction of the plant responses to various stresses including low temperature. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanism of cold resistance in Brassica napus, an important oilseed crop. However, comprehensive studies on the induction and activity of these TFs under low temperature have been lacking. In this study, 132 AP2/ERF genes were identified by transcriptome sequencing of rapeseed leaves exposed to 0, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h of low (4 °C) temperature stress. The genes were classified into 4 subfamilies (AP2, DREB, ERF, and RAV) and 13 subgroups, among which the DREB subfamily and ERF subfamily contained 114 genes, no genes were assigned to soloist or DREB A3 subgroups. One hundred and eighteen genes were located on chromosomes A1 to C9. GO functional analysis and promoter sequence analysis revealed that these genes are involved in many molecular pathways that may enhance cold resistance in plants, such as the low-temperature responsiveness, methyl jasmonate, abscisic acid, and ethylene-responsiveness pathways. Their expression patterns revealed dynamic control at different times following initiation of cold stress; the RAV and DREB subfamilies were expressed at the early stage of cold stress, whereas the AP2 subfamily was expressed later. Quantitative PCR analyses of 13 cold-induced AP2/ERF TFs confirmed the accuracy of above results. This study is the first dynamic analysis of the AP2/ERF TFs responsible for cold stress in rapeseed. These findings will serve as a reference for future functional research on transcription in rapeseed. PMID:26728151

  7. A dynamic and complex monochloramine stress response in Escherichia coli revealed by transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Holder, Diane; Berry, David; Dai, Dongjuan; Raskin, Lutgarde; Xi, Chuanwu

    2013-09-15

    Despite the widespread use of monochloramine in drinking water treatment, there is surprisingly little information about its mode of action. In this study, DNA microarrays were used to investigate the global gene expression of Escherichia coli cells exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of monochloramine, with a focus on temporal dynamics. Genes induced by monochloramine were associated with several stress response functions, including oxidative stress, DNA repair, multidrug efflux, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, and cell wall repair. The diversity of functional associations supports a model of monochloramine action involving multiple cellular targets including cell membranes, nucleic acids, and proteins. These data suggest that E. coli responds to monochloramine exposure by activating diverse defense responses rather than a single antioxidant system and the exposure may also induce biofilm formation. The induction of multidrug efflux pumps and specific antibiotic resistance genes further suggests that exposure to monochloramine may contribute to reduced susceptibility to some antibiotics. PMID:23866139

  8. Dynamics and Predictability of Hurricane Humberto (2007) Revealed from Ensemble Analysis and Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sippel, Jason A.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2009-01-01

    This study uses short-range ensemble forecasts initialized with an Ensemble-Kalman filter to study the dynamics and predictability of Hurricane Humberto, which made landfall along the Texas coast in 2007. Statistical correlation is used to determine why some ensemble members strengthen the incipient low into a hurricane and others do not. It is found that deep moisture and high convective available potential energy (CAPE) are two of the most important factors for the genesis of Humberto. Variations in CAPE result in as much difference (ensemble spread) in the final hurricane intensity as do variations in deep moisture. CAPE differences here are related to the interaction between the cyclone and a nearby front, which tends to stabilize the lower troposphere in the vicinity of the circulation center. This subsequently weakens convection and slows genesis. Eventually the wind-induced surface heat exchange mechanism and differences in landfall time result in even larger ensemble spread. 1

  9. Data-driven mechanistic analysis method to reveal dynamically evolving regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Intosalmi, Jukka; Nousiainen, Kari; Ahlfors, Helena; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Mechanistic models based on ordinary differential equations provide powerful and accurate means to describe the dynamics of molecular machinery which orchestrates gene regulation. When combined with appropriate statistical techniques, mechanistic models can be calibrated using experimental data and, in many cases, also the model structure can be inferred from time–course measurements. However, existing mechanistic models are limited in the sense that they rely on the assumption of static network structure and cannot be applied when transient phenomena affect, or rewire, the network structure. In the context of gene regulatory network inference, network rewiring results from the net impact of possible unobserved transient phenomena such as changes in signaling pathway activities or epigenome, which are generally difficult, but important, to account for. Results: We introduce a novel method that can be used to infer dynamically evolving regulatory networks from time–course data. Our method is based on the notion that all mechanistic ordinary differential equation models can be coupled with a latent process that approximates the network structure rewiring process. We illustrate the performance of the method using simulated data and, further, we apply the method to study the regulatory interactions during T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation using time–course RNA sequencing data. The computational experiments with the real data show that our method is capable of capturing the experimentally verified rewiring effects of the core Th17 regulatory network. We predict Th17 lineage specific subnetworks that are activated sequentially and control the differentiation process in an overlapping manner. Availability and Implementation: An implementation of the method is available at http://research.ics.aalto.fi/csb/software/lem/. Contacts: jukka.intosalmi@aalto.fi or harri.lahdesmaki@aalto.fi PMID:27307629

  10. Analysis of marker-defined HNSCC subpopulations reveals a dynamic regulation of tumor initiating properties.

    PubMed

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49f(high)/ALDH1A1(high)/H3K4/K27me3(low) subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49f(high)/H3K27me3(low) subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49f(low)/ALDH(low), non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49f(high)/ALDH(high), label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f- cells can "reprogram" and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a "moving target" and their eradication might

  11. Analysis of Marker-Defined HNSCC Subpopulations Reveals a Dynamic Regulation of Tumor Initiating Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bragado, Paloma; Estrada, Yeriel; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Cannan, David; Genden, Eric; Teng, Marita; Ranganathan, Aparna C.; Wen, Huei-Chi; Kapoor, Avnish; Bernstein, Emily; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors carry dismal long-term prognosis and the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in this cancer is unclear. We investigated in HNSCC xenografts whether specific tumor subpopulations contributed to tumor growth. We used a CFSE-based label retentions assay, CD49f (α6-integrin) surface levels and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity to profile HNSCC subpopulations. The tumorigenic potential of marker-positive and -negative subpopulations was tested in nude (Balb/c nu/nu) and NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Here we identified in HEp3, SQ20b and FaDu HNSCC xenografts a subpopulation of G0/G1-arrested slow-cycling CD49fhigh/ALDH1A1high/H3K4/K27me3low subpopulation (CD49f+) of tumor cells. A strikingly similar CD49fhigh/H3K27me3low subpopulation is also present in primary human HNSCC tumors and metastases. While only sorted CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells (LRC) proliferated immediately in vivo, with time the CD49flow/ALDHlow, non-LRC (NLRC) tumor cell subpopulations were also able to regain tumorigenic capacity; this was linked to restoration of CD49fhigh/ALDHhigh, label retaining cells. In addition, CD49f is required for HEp3 cell tumorigenicity and to maintain low levels of H3K4/K27me3. CD49f+ cells also displayed reduced expression of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase EZH2 and ERK1/2phosphorylation. This suggests that although transiently quiescent, their unique chromatin structure is poised for rapid transcriptional activation. CD49f− cells can “reprogram” and also achieve this state eventually. We propose that in HNSCC tumors, epigenetic mechanisms likely driven by CD49f signaling dynamically regulate HNSCC xenograft phenotypic heterogeneity. This allows multiple tumor cell subpopulations to drive tumor growth suggesting that their dynamic nature renders them a “moving target” and their eradication might require more

  12. Late quaternary dynamics in the Madeira River basin, southern Amazonia (Brazil), as revealed by paleomorphological analysis.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Ericson H; Rossetti, Dilce F

    2015-03-01

    Ancient drainage systems are being increasingly documented in the Amazon basin and their characterization is crucial for reconstructing fluvial evolution in this area. Fluvial morphologies, including elongate belts, are well preserved along the Madeira River. Digital Elevation Model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission favored the detection of these features even where they are covered by dense rainforest. These paleomorphologies are attributed to the shifting position of past tributaries of the Madeira River through avulsions. These radial paleodrainage networks produced fan-shaped morphologies that resemble distributary megafans. Distinguishing avulsive tributary systems from distributary megafans in the sedimentary record is challenging. Madeira´s paleodrainage reveals the superposition of tributary channels formed by multiple avulsions within a given time period, rather than downstream bifurcation of coexisting channels. Channel avulsion in this Amazonian area during the late Quaternary is related to tectonics due to features as: (i) straight lineaments coincident with fault directions; (ii) northeastward tilting of the terrain with Quaternary strata; and (iii) several drainage anomalies, including frequent orthogonal drainage inflections. These characteristics altogether lead to propose that the radial paleodrainage present at the Madeira River margin results from successive avulsions of tributary channels over time due to tectonics. PMID:25806978

  13. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase. PMID:27535992

  14. Transcript and metabolite analysis in Trincadeira cultivar reveals novel information regarding the dynamics of grape ripening

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    metabolism. These results were integrated with transcriptional profiling obtained using genome array to provide new information regarding the network of events leading to grape ripening. Conclusions Altogether the data obtained provides the most extensive survey obtained so far for gene expression and metabolites accumulated during grape ripening. Moreover, it highlighted information obtained in a poorly known variety exhibiting particular characteristics that may be cultivar specific or dependent upon climatic conditions. Several genes were identified that had not been previously reported in the context of grape ripening namely genes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolisms as well as in growth regulators; metabolism, epigenetic factors and signaling pathways. Some of these genes were annotated as receptors, transcription factors, and kinases and constitute good candidates for functional analysis in order to establish a model for ripening control of a non-climacteric fruit. PMID:22047180

  15. Comparative Genomics Analysis of Streptococcus Isolates from the Human Small Intestine Reveals their Adaptation to a Highly Dynamic Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Boekhorst, Jos; Herrmann, Ruth; Smid, Eddy J.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    The human small-intestinal microbiota is characterised by relatively large and dynamic Streptococcus populations. In this study, genome sequences of small-intestinal streptococci from S. mitis, S. bovis, and S. salivarius species-groups were determined and compared with those from 58 Streptococcus strains in public databases. The Streptococcus pangenome consists of 12,403 orthologous groups of which 574 are shared among all sequenced streptococci and are defined as the Streptococcus core genome. Genome mining of the small-intestinal streptococci focused on functions playing an important role in the interaction of these streptococci in the small-intestinal ecosystem, including natural competence and nutrient-transport and metabolism. Analysis of the small-intestinal Streptococcus genomes predicts a high capacity to synthesize amino acids and various vitamins as well as substantial divergence in their carbohydrate transport and metabolic capacities, which is in agreement with observed physiological differences between these Streptococcus strains. Gene-specific PCR-strategies enabled evaluation of conservation of Streptococcus populations in intestinal samples from different human individuals, revealing that the S. salivarius strains were frequently detected in the small-intestine microbiota, supporting the representative value of the genomes provided in this study. Finally, the Streptococcus genomes allow prediction of the effect of dietary substances on Streptococcus population dynamics in the human small-intestine. PMID:24386196

  16. Comparative metabolomic analysis reveals a reactive oxygen species-dominated dynamic model underlying chilling environment adaptation and tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Luo, Wei; Zhao, Yuan; Xu, Yunyuan; Song, Shuhui; Chong, Kang

    2016-09-01

    Cold, a major environmental stress for plants, has been studied intensively for decades. Its response system has been revealed, especially at the transcriptional level. The mechanisms underlying recovery growth and environmental adaptation, however, remain unknown. Taking advantage of a naturally existing system, two subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) with significant divergence in chilling tolerance, we analyzed representative japonica and indica varieties, Nipponbare and 93-11, using comparative metabolomic analysis at six time points covering chilling treatment and recovery. In total, 223 known metabolites were detected. During chilling treatment, significant biochemical changes were centered on antioxidation. During recovery, a wide-ranging chilling response was observed. Large-scale amino acid accumulation occurred, consistent with the appearance of chilling injury. At the mid-treatment stage, the accumulation of antioxidation-related compounds appeared earlier in Nipponbare than in 93-11, consistent with the higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in japonica vs indica varieties. A significant contribution of ROS-mediated gene regulation, rather than the C-repeat binding factor/dehydration-responsive-element binding factor (CBF/DREB) regulon, to the more vigorous transcriptional stress response in Nipponbare was revealed by RNA-seq. Accordingly, during recovery, the induction of stress-tolerant-related metabolites was more active in the chilling-tolerant variety Nipponbare. Senescence-related compounds accumulated only in the chilling-sensitive variety 93-11. Our study uncovers the dynamic metabolic models underlying chilling response and recovery, and reveals a ROS-dominated rice adaptation mechanism to low-temperature environments. PMID:27198693

  17. Dynamic full field optical coherence tomography: subcellular metabolic contrast revealed in tissues by interferometric signals temporal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Apelian, Clement; Harms, Fabrice; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, A. Claude

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new endogenous approach to reveal subcellular metabolic contrast in fresh ex vivo tissues taking advantage of the time dependence of the full field optical coherence tomography interferometric signals. This method reveals signals linked with local activity of the endogenous scattering elements which can reveal cells where other OCT-based techniques fail or need exogenous contrast agents. We benefit from the micrometric transverse resolution of full field OCT to image intracellular features. We used this time dependence to identify different dynamics at the millisecond scale on a wide range of organs in normal or pathological conditions. PMID:27446672

  18. Systems Analysis of the Dynamic Inflammatory Response to Tissue Damage Reveals Spatiotemporal Properties of the Wound Attractant Gradient.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Liepe, Juliane; Sim, Aaron; Wood, Will; Martin, Paul; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-08-01

    In the acute inflammatory phase following tissue damage, cells of the innate immune system are rapidly recruited to sites of injury by pro-inflammatory mediators released at the wound site. Although advances in live imaging allow us to directly visualize this process in vivo, the precise identity and properties of the primary immune damage attractants remain unclear, as it is currently impossible to directly observe and accurately measure these signals in tissues. Here, we demonstrate that detailed information about the attractant signals can be extracted directly from the in vivo behavior of the responding immune cells. By applying inference-based computational approaches to analyze the in vivo dynamics of the Drosophila inflammatory response, we gain new detailed insight into the spatiotemporal properties of the attractant gradient. In particular, we show that the wound attractant is released by wound margin cells, rather than by the wounded tissue per se, and that it diffuses away from this source at rates far slower than those of previously implicated signals such as H2O2 and ATP, ruling out these fast mediators as the primary chemoattractant. We then predict, and experimentally test, how competing attractant signals might interact in space and time to regulate multi-step cell navigation in the complex environment of a healing wound, revealing a period of receptor desensitization after initial exposure to the damage attractant. Extending our analysis to model much larger wounds, we uncover a dynamic behavioral change in the responding immune cells in vivo that is prognostic of whether a wound will subsequently heal or not. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27426513

  19. Structure and dynamics of photosystem II light-harvesting complex revealed by high-resolution FTICR mass spectrometric proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Galetskiy, Dmitry; Susnea, Iuliana; Reiser, Verena; Adamska, Iwona; Przybylski, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Structure and dynamics of membrane-bound light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes (LHCs), which collect and transmit light energy for photosynthesis and thereby play an essential role in the regulation of photosynthesis and photoprotection, were identified and characterized using high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). LHCs from photosystem II (LHCII) were isolated from the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves after light stress treatment using sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and separated by gel-filtration into LHCII subcomplexes. Using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis, the LHCII proteins, Lhcb1-6 and fibrillins, were efficiently separated and identified by FTICR-MS. Some of the LHCII subcomplexes were shown to migrate from photosystem II to photosystem I as a result of short-term adaptation to changes in light intensity. In the mobile LHCII subcomplexes, decreased levels of fibrillins and a modified composition of LHCII protein isoforms were identified compared to the tightly bound LHCII subcomplexes. In addition, FTICR-MS analysis revealed several oxidative modifications of LHCII proteins. A number of protein spots in 2D gels were found to contain a mixture of proteins, illustrating the feasibility of high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins that remain unseparated in 2D gels even upon extended pH gradients. PMID:18455927

  20. Phosphate/Zinc Interaction Analysis in Two Lettuce Varieties Reveals Contrasting Effects on Biomass, Photosynthesis, and Dynamics of Pi Transport

    PubMed Central

    Bouain, Nadia; Kisko, Mushtak; Rouached, Aida; Dauzat, Myriam; Lacombe, Benoit; Belgaroui, Nibras; Ghnaya, Tahar; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Berthomieu, Pierre; Abdelly, Chedly

    2014-01-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) and Zinc (Zn) are essential nutrients for normal plant growth. Interaction between these elements has been observed in many crop plants. Despite its agronomic importance, the biological significance and genetic basis of this interaction remain largely unknown. Here we examined the Pi/Zn interaction in two lettuce (Lactuca sativa) varieties, namely, “Paris Island Cos” and “Kordaat.” The effects of variation in Pi and Zn supply were assessed on biomass and photosynthesis for each variety. Paris Island Cos displayed better growth and photosynthesis compared to Kordaat under all the conditions tested. Correlation analysis was performed to determine the interconnectivity between Pi and Zn intracellular contents in both varieties. Paris Island Cos showed a strong negative correlation between the accumulation levels of Pi and Zn in shoots and roots. However, no relation was observed for Kordaat. The increase of Zn concentration in the medium causes a decrease in dynamics of Pi transport in Paris Island Cos, but not in Kordaat plants. Taken together, results revealed a contrasting behavior between the two lettuce varieties in terms of the coregulation of Pi and Zn homeostasis and provided evidence in favor of a genetic basis for the interconnection of these two elements. PMID:25025059

  1. Switch of sensitivity dynamics revealed with DyGloSA toolbox for dynamical global sensitivity analysis as an early warning for system's critical transition.

    PubMed

    Baumuratova, Tatiana; Dobre, Simona; Bastogne, Thierry; Sauter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Systems with bifurcations may experience abrupt irreversible and often unwanted shifts in their performance, called critical transitions. For many systems like climate, economy, ecosystems it is highly desirable to identify indicators serving as early warnings of such regime shifts. Several statistical measures were recently proposed as early warnings of critical transitions including increased variance, autocorrelation and skewness of experimental or model-generated data. The lack of automatized tool for model-based prediction of critical transitions led to designing DyGloSA - a MATLAB toolbox for dynamical global parameter sensitivity analysis (GPSA) of ordinary differential equations models. We suggest that the switch in dynamics of parameter sensitivities revealed by our toolbox is an early warning that a system is approaching a critical transition. We illustrate the efficiency of our toolbox by analyzing several models with bifurcations and predicting the time periods when systems can still avoid going to a critical transition by manipulating certain parameter values, which is not detectable with the existing SA techniques. DyGloSA is based on the SBToolbox2 and contains functions, which compute dynamically the global sensitivity indices of the system by applying four main GPSA methods: eFAST, Sobol's ANOVA, PRCC and WALS. It includes parallelized versions of the functions enabling significant reduction of the computational time (up to 12 times). DyGloSA is freely available as a set of MATLAB scripts at http://bio.uni.lu/systems_biology/software/dyglosa. It requires installation of MATLAB (versions R2008b or later) and the Systems Biology Toolbox2 available at www.sbtoolbox2.org. DyGloSA can be run on Windows and Linux systems, -32 and -64 bits. PMID:24367574

  2. Conformational dynamics of abasic DNA upon interactions with AP endonuclease 1 revealed by stopped-flow fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yury N; Fedorova, Olga S

    2012-02-14

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are abundant DNA lesions arising from exposure to UV light, ionizing radiation, alkylating agents, and oxygen radicals. In human cells, AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes this mutagenic lesion and initiates its repair via a specific incision of the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. We have investigated a detailed mechanism of APE1 functioning using fluorescently labeled DNA substrates. A fluorescent adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, was introduced into DNA substrates adjacent to the abasic site to serve as an on-site reporter of conformational transitions in DNA during the catalytic cycle. Application of a pre-steady-state stopped-flow technique allows us to observe changes in the fluorescence intensity corresponding to different stages of the process in real time. We also detected an intrinsic Trp fluorescence of the enzyme during interactions with 2-aPu-containing substrates. Our data have revealed a conformational flexibility of the abasic DNA being processed by APE1. Quantitative analysis of fluorescent traces has yielded a minimal kinetic scheme and appropriate rate constants consisting of four steps. The results obtained from stopped-flow data have shown a substantial influence of the 2-aPu base location on completion of certain reaction steps. Using detailed molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA substrates, we have attributed structural distortions of AP-DNA to realization of specific binding, effective locking, and incision of the damaged DNA. The findings allowed us to accurately discern the step that corresponds to insertion of specific APE1 amino acid residues into the abasic DNA void in the course of stabilization of the precatalytic complex. PMID:22243137

  3. Slow dynamics in protein fluctuations revealed by time-structure based independent component analysis: The case of domain motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naritomi, Yusuke; Fuchigami, Sotaro

    2011-02-01

    Protein dynamics on a long time scale was investigated using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and time-structure based independent component analysis (tICA). We selected the lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAO) as a target protein and focused on its domain motions in the open state. A MD simulation of the LAO in explicit water was performed for 600 ns, in which slow and large-amplitude domain motions of the LAO were observed. After extracting domain motions by rigid-body domain analysis, the tICA was applied to the obtained rigid-body trajectory, yielding slow modes of the LAO's domain motions in order of decreasing time scale. The slowest mode detected by the tICA represented not a closure motion described by a largest-amplitude mode determined by the principal component analysis but a twist motion with a time scale of tens of nanoseconds. The slow dynamics of the LAO were well described by only the slowest mode and were characterized by transitions between two basins. The results show that tICA is promising for describing and analyzing slow dynamics of proteins.

  4. Higher Dimensional Meta-State Analysis Reveals Reduced Resting fMRI Connectivity Dynamism in Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robyn L.; Yaesoubi, Maziar; Turner, Jessica A.; Mathalon, Daniel; Preda, Adrian; Pearlson, Godfrey; Adali, Tulay; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional brain imaging studies of network connectivity have long assumed that functional connections are stationary on the timescale of a typical scan. Interest in moving beyond this simplifying assumption has emerged only recently. The great hope is that training the right lens on time-varying properties of whole-brain network connectivity will shed additional light on previously concealed brain activation patterns characteristic of serious neurological or psychiatric disorders. We present evidence that multiple explicitly dynamical properties of time-varying whole-brain network connectivity are strongly associated with schizophrenia, a complex mental illness whose symptomatic presentation can vary enormously across subjects. As with so much brain-imaging research, a central challenge for dynamic network connectivity lies in determining transformations of the data that both reduce its dimensionality and expose features that are strongly predictive of important population characteristics. Our paper introduces an elegant, simple method of reducing and organizing data around which a large constellation of mutually informative and intuitive dynamical analyses can be performed. This framework combines a discrete multidimensional data-driven representation of connectivity space with four core dynamism measures computed from large-scale properties of each subject’s trajectory, ie., properties not identifiable with any specific moment in time and therefore reasonable to employ in settings lacking inter-subject time-alignment, such as resting-state functional imaging studies. Our analysis exposes pronounced differences between schizophrenia patients (Nsz = 151) and healthy controls (Nhc = 163). Time-varying whole-brain network connectivity patterns are found to be markedly less dynamically active in schizophrenia patients, an effect that is even more pronounced in patients with high levels of hallucinatory behavior. To the best of our knowledge this is

  5. Higher Dimensional Meta-State Analysis Reveals Reduced Resting fMRI Connectivity Dynamism in Schizophrenia Patients.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robyn L; Yaesoubi, Maziar; Turner, Jessica A; Mathalon, Daniel; Preda, Adrian; Pearlson, Godfrey; Adali, Tulay; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional brain imaging studies of network connectivity have long assumed that functional connections are stationary on the timescale of a typical scan. Interest in moving beyond this simplifying assumption has emerged only recently. The great hope is that training the right lens on time-varying properties of whole-brain network connectivity will shed additional light on previously concealed brain activation patterns characteristic of serious neurological or psychiatric disorders. We present evidence that multiple explicitly dynamical properties of time-varying whole-brain network connectivity are strongly associated with schizophrenia, a complex mental illness whose symptomatic presentation can vary enormously across subjects. As with so much brain-imaging research, a central challenge for dynamic network connectivity lies in determining transformations of the data that both reduce its dimensionality and expose features that are strongly predictive of important population characteristics. Our paper introduces an elegant, simple method of reducing and organizing data around which a large constellation of mutually informative and intuitive dynamical analyses can be performed. This framework combines a discrete multidimensional data-driven representation of connectivity space with four core dynamism measures computed from large-scale properties of each subject's trajectory, ie., properties not identifiable with any specific moment in time and therefore reasonable to employ in settings lacking inter-subject time-alignment, such as resting-state functional imaging studies. Our analysis exposes pronounced differences between schizophrenia patients (Nsz = 151) and healthy controls (Nhc = 163). Time-varying whole-brain network connectivity patterns are found to be markedly less dynamically active in schizophrenia patients, an effect that is even more pronounced in patients with high levels of hallucinatory behavior. To the best of our knowledge this is the

  6. A dynamic pathway analysis approach reveals a limiting futile cycle in N-acetylglucosamine overproducing Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfeng; Link, Hannes; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Sauer, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genome engineering have further widened the gap between our ability to implement essentially any genetic change and understanding the impact of these changes on cellular function. We lack efficient methods to diagnose limiting steps in engineered pathways. Here, we develop a generally applicable approach to reveal limiting steps within a synthetic pathway. It is based on monitoring metabolite dynamics and simplified kinetic modelling to differentiate between putative causes of limiting product synthesis during the start-up phase of the pathway with near-maximal rates. We examine the synthetic N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) pathway in Bacillus subtilis and find none of the acetyl-, amine- or glucose-moiety precursors to limit synthesis. Our dynamic metabolomics approach predicts an energy-dissipating futile cycle between GlcNAc6P and GlcNAc as the primary problem in the pathway. Deletion of the responsible glucokinase more than doubles GlcNAc productivity by restoring healthy growth of the overproducing strain. PMID:27324299

  7. Eye Movements Reveal Dynamics of Task Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Kuhns, David; Rieter, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    With the goal to determine the cognitive architecture that underlies flexible changes of control settings, we assessed within-trial and across-trial dynamics of attentional selection by tracking of eye movements in the context of a cued task-switching paradigm. Within-trial dynamics revealed a switch-induced, discrete delay in onset of…

  8. Dynamics of H2 adsorbed in porous materials as revealed by computational analysis of inelastic neutron scattering spectra.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Space, Brian; Eckert, Juergen

    2016-06-29

    The inelastic scattering of neutrons from adsorbed H2 is an effective and highly sensitive method for obtaining molecular level information on the type and nature of H2 binding sites in porous materials. While these inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of the hindered rotational and translational excitations on the adsorbed H2 contain a significant amount of information, much of this can only be reliably extracted by means of a detailed analysis of the spectra through the utilization of models and theoretical calculations. For instance, the rotational tunneling transitions observed in the INS spectra can be related to a value for the barrier to rotation for the adsorbed H2 with the use of a simple phenomenological model. Since such an analysis is dependent on the model, it is far more desirable to use theoretical methods to compute a potential energy surface (PES), from which the rotational barriers for H2 adsorbed at a particular site can be determined. Rotational energy levels and transitions for the hindered rotor can be obtained by quantum dynamics calculations and compared directly with experiment with an accuracy subject only to the quality of the theoretical PES. In this paper, we review some of the quantum and classical mechanical calculations that have been performed on H2 adsorbed in various porous materials, such as clathrate hydrates, zeolites, and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The principal aims of these calculations have been the interpretation of the INS spectra for adsorbed H2 along with the extraction of atomic level details of its interaction with the host. We describe calculations of the PES used for two-dimensional quantum rotation as well as rigorous five-dimensional quantum coupled translation-rotation dynamics, and demonstrate that the combination of INS measurements and computational modeling can provide important and detailed insights into the molecular mechanism of H2 adsorption in porous materials. PMID:27160665

  9. Analysis of NDVI-rainfall relationships reveals vegetation structure and ANPP dynamics in a Chihuahuan grassland-shrubland ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Diaz-Sierra, Ruben; Turnbull, Laura; Wainwright, John

    2015-04-01

    Shrub encroachment is perceived as a symptom of land degradation in the American Southwest, where large areas of grasslands dominated by black and blue grama have transitioned over the last 150 years to shrublands dominated by woody species (mainly creosotebush and mesquite), accompanied by accelerated water and wind erosion. In this study, simulations of plant biomass dynamics indicate that herbaceous and shrub vegetation in drylands have different responses to antecedent precipitation due to functional differences in plant growth and water-use patterns, and therefore shrub encroachment may be reflected in the analysis of landscape-scale vegetation-rainfall relationships. We analyze the structure and dynamics of vegetation at an 18-km2 grassland-shrubland ecotone in the northern edge of the Chihuahuan Desert (Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico, USA) by investigating the relationship between 2000-13 records of remotely sensed MODIS NDVI and precipitation. Spatial analysis of NDVI-rainfall relationships at the studied ecotone indicates that herbaceous vegetation shows quick growth pulses associated with short-term (previous 2 months) precipitation, while shrubs show a slow response to medium-term (previous 5 months) precipitation. We use these relationships to (a) classify landscape types as a function of the spatial distribution of dominant vegetation, and (b) decompose the NDVI signal into partial primary production components for herbaceous vegetation and shrubs across the study site. We further apply remote-sensed annual net primary production (ANPP) estimations and landscape-type classification to explore the influence of inter-annual variations in seasonal precipitation on the production of herbaceous and shrub vegetation. Our results suggest that changes in the amount and temporal pattern of precipitation comprising reductions in monsoonal summer rainfall and/or increases in winter precipitation may enhance the shrub-encroachment process in the

  10. Structural Basis of Pullulanase Membrane Binding and Secretion Revealed by X-Ray Crystallography, Molecular Dynamics and Biochemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    East, Alexandra; Mechaly, Ariel E; Huysmans, Gerard H M; Bernarde, Cédric; Tello-Manigne, Diana; Nadeau, Nathalie; Pugsley, Anthony P; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Alzari, Pedro M; Bond, Peter J; Francetic, Olivera

    2016-01-01

    The Klebsiella lipoprotein pullulanase (PulA) is exported to the periplasm, triacylated, and anchored via lipids in the inner membrane (IM) prior to its transport to the bacterial surface through a type II secretion system (T2SS). X-Ray crystallography and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of PulA in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) model membrane provided an unprecedented molecular view of an N-terminal unstructured tether and the IM lipoprotein retention signal, and revealed novel interactions with the IM via N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domains in PulA. An efficiently secreted nonacylated variant (PulANA) showed similar peripheral membrane association during MD simulations, consistent with the binding of purified PulANA to liposomes. Remarkably, combined X-ray, MD, and functional studies identified a novel subdomain, Ins, inserted in the α-amylase domain, which is required for PulA secretion. Available data support a model in which PulA binding to the IM promotes interactions with the T2SS, possibly via the Ins subdomain. PMID:26688215

  11. Transcriptome analysis of different developmental stages of amphioxus reveals dynamic changes of distinct classes of genes during development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kevin Yi; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Zuming; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Zhou, Wayne Junwei; Zhang, Yinfeng; Liu, Minghua; Chen, Junyuan; Mao, Bingyu; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrates diverged from other chordates approximately 500 million years ago and have adopted several modifications of developmental processes. Amphioxus is widely used in evolutionary developmental biology research, such as on the basic patterning mechanisms involved in the chordate body plan and the origin of vertebrates. The fast development of next-generation sequencing has advanced knowledge of the genomic organization of amphioxus; however, many aspects of gene regulation during amphioxus development have not been fully characterized. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing on the transcriptomes of 13 developmental stages of Chinese amphioxus to gain a comprehensive understanding of transcriptional processes occurring from the fertilized egg to the adult stage. The expression levels of 3,423 genes were significantly changed (FDR ≤ 0.01). All of these genes were included in a clustering analysis, and enrichment of biological functions associated with these clusters was determined. Significant changes were observed in several important processes, including the down-regulation of the cell cycle and the up-regulation of translation. These results should build a foundation for identifying developmentally important genes, especially those regulatory factors involved in amphioxus development, and advance understanding of the developmental dynamics in vertebrates. PMID:26979494

  12. iTRAQ-based analysis of developmental dynamics in the soybean leaf proteome reveals pathways associated with leaf photosynthetic rate.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jun; Zhang, Jianan; Liu, Duan; Yin, Changcheng; Wang, Fengmin; Chen, Pengyin; Chen, Hao; Ma, Jinbing; Zhang, Bo; Xu, Jin; Zhang, Mengchen

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic rate which acts as a vital limiting factor largely affects the potential of soybean production, especially during the senescence phase. However, the physiological and molecular mechanisms that underlying the change of photosynthetic rate during the developmental process of soybean leaves remain unclear. In this study, we compared the protein dynamics during the developmental process of leaves between the soybean cultivar Hobbit and the high-photosynthetic rate cultivar JD 17 using the iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification) method. A total number of 1269 proteins were detected in the leaves of these two cultivars at three different developmental stages. These proteins were classified into nine expression patterns depending on the expression levels at different developmental stages, and the proteins in each pattern were also further classified into three large groups and 20 small groups depending on the protein functions. Only 3.05-6.53 % of the detected proteins presented a differential expression pattern between these two cultivars. Enrichment factor analysis indicated that proteins involved in photosynthesis composed an important category. The expressions of photosynthesis-related proteins were also further confirmed by western blotting. Together, our results suggested that the reduction in photosynthetic rate as well as chloroplast activity and composition during the developmental process was a highly regulated and complex process which involved a serial of proteins that function as potential candidates to be targeted by biotechnological approaches for the improvement of photosynthetic rate and production. PMID:27048574

  13. Evolutionary Dynamics of Local Pandemic H1N1/2009 Influenza Virus Lineages Revealed by Whole-Genome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Gregory J.; Galiano, Monica; Agapow, Paul-Michael; Myers, Richard; Chiam, Rachael; Gall, Astrid; Palser, Anne L.; Watson, Simon J.; Hedge, Jessica; Underwood, Anthony; Platt, Steven; McLean, Estelle; Pebody, Richard G.; Rambaut, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Daniels, Rod; Pybus, Oliver G.; Zambon, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Virus gene sequencing and phylogenetics can be used to study the epidemiological dynamics of rapidly evolving viruses. With complete genome data, it becomes possible to identify and trace individual transmission chains of viruses such as influenza virus during the course of an epidemic. Here we sequenced 153 pandemic influenza H1N1/09 virus genomes from United Kingdom isolates from the first (127 isolates) and second (26 isolates) waves of the 2009 pandemic and used their sequences, dates of isolation, and geographical locations to infer the genetic epidemiology of the epidemic in the United Kingdom. We demonstrate that the epidemic in the United Kingdom was composed of many cocirculating lineages, among which at least 13 were exclusively or predominantly United Kingdom clusters. The estimated divergence times of two of the clusters predate the detection of pandemic H1N1/09 virus in the United Kingdom, suggesting that the pandemic H1N1/09 virus was already circulating in the United Kingdom before the first clinical case. Crucially, three clusters contain isolates from the second wave of infections in the United Kingdom, two of which represent chains of transmission that appear to have persisted within the United Kingdom between the first and second waves. This demonstrates that whole-genome analysis can track in fine detail the behavior of individual influenza virus lineages during the course of a single epidemic or pandemic. PMID:22013031

  14. Evolutionary dynamics of local pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza virus lineages revealed by whole-genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Gregory J; Galiano, Monica; Agapow, Paul-Michael; Myers, Richard; Chiam, Rachael; Gall, Astrid; Palser, Anne L; Watson, Simon J; Hedge, Jessica; Underwood, Anthony; Platt, Steven; McLean, Estelle; Pebody, Richard G; Rambaut, Andrew; Green, Jonathan; Daniels, Rod; Pybus, Oliver G; Kellam, Paul; Zambon, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Virus gene sequencing and phylogenetics can be used to study the epidemiological dynamics of rapidly evolving viruses. With complete genome data, it becomes possible to identify and trace individual transmission chains of viruses such as influenza virus during the course of an epidemic. Here we sequenced 153 pandemic influenza H1N1/09 virus genomes from United Kingdom isolates from the first (127 isolates) and second (26 isolates) waves of the 2009 pandemic and used their sequences, dates of isolation, and geographical locations to infer the genetic epidemiology of the epidemic in the United Kingdom. We demonstrate that the epidemic in the United Kingdom was composed of many cocirculating lineages, among which at least 13 were exclusively or predominantly United Kingdom clusters. The estimated divergence times of two of the clusters predate the detection of pandemic H1N1/09 virus in the United Kingdom, suggesting that the pandemic H1N1/09 virus was already circulating in the United Kingdom before the first clinical case. Crucially, three clusters contain isolates from the second wave of infections in the United Kingdom, two of which represent chains of transmission that appear to have persisted within the United Kingdom between the first and second waves. This demonstrates that whole-genome analysis can track in fine detail the behavior of individual influenza virus lineages during the course of a single epidemic or pandemic. PMID:22013031

  15. Transcriptome analysis of different developmental stages of amphioxus reveals dynamic changes of distinct classes of genes during development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kevin Yi; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Zuming; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Zhou, Wayne Junwei; Zhang, Yinfeng; Liu, Minghua; Chen, Junyuan; Mao, Bingyu; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrates diverged from other chordates approximately 500 million years ago and have adopted several modifications of developmental processes. Amphioxus is widely used in evolutionary developmental biology research, such as on the basic patterning mechanisms involved in the chordate body plan and the origin of vertebrates. The fast development of next-generation sequencing has advanced knowledge of the genomic organization of amphioxus; however, many aspects of gene regulation during amphioxus development have not been fully characterized. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing on the transcriptomes of 13 developmental stages of Chinese amphioxus to gain a comprehensive understanding of transcriptional processes occurring from the fertilized egg to the adult stage. The expression levels of 3,423 genes were significantly changed (FDR ≤ 0.01). All of these genes were included in a clustering analysis, and enrichment of biological functions associated with these clusters was determined. Significant changes were observed in several important processes, including the down-regulation of the cell cycle and the up-regulation of translation. These results should build a foundation for identifying developmentally important genes, especially those regulatory factors involved in amphioxus development, and advance understanding of the developmental dynamics in vertebrates. PMID:26979494

  16. Analysis of gene expression dynamics revealed delayed and abnormal epidermal repair process in aged compared to young skin.

    PubMed

    Sextius, Peggy; Marionnet, Claire; Tacheau, Charlotte; Bon, François-Xavier; Bastien, Philippe; Mauviel, Alain; Bernard, Bruno A; Bernerd, Françoise; Dubertret, Louis

    2015-05-01

    With aging, epidermal homeostasis and barrier function are disrupted. In a previous study, we analyzed the transcriptomic response of young skin epidermis after stratum corneum removal, and obtained a global kinetic view of the molecular processes involved in barrier function recovery. In the present study, the same analysis was performed in aged skin in order to better understand the defects which occur with aging. Thirty healthy male volunteers (67 ± 4 years old) were involved. Tape-strippings were carried out on the inner face of one forearm, the other unstripped forearm serving as control. At 2, 6, 18, 30 and 72 h after stripping, TEWL measurements were taken, and epidermis samples were collected. Total RNA was extracted and analyzed using DermArray(®) cDNA microarrays. The results highlighted that barrier function recovery and overall kinetics of gene expression were delayed following stripping in aged skin. Indeed, the TEWL measurements showed that barrier recovery in the young group appeared to be dramatically significant during the overall kinetics, while there were no significant evolution in the aged group until 30 h. Moreover, gene expression analysis revealed that the number of modulated genes following tape stripping increased as a function of time and reached a peak at 6 h after tape stripping in young skin, while it was at 30 h in aged skin, showing that cellular activity linked to the repair process may be engaged earlier in young epidermis than in aged epidermis. A total of 370 genes were modulated in the young group. In the aged group, 382 genes were modulated, whose 184 were also modulated in the young group. Only eight genes that were modulated in both groups were significantly differently modulated. The characterization of these genes into 15 functional families helped to draw a scenario for the aging process affecting epidermal repair capacity. PMID:25740152

  17. Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial-Associated ER Membranes (MAM) during RNA Virus Infection Reveals Dynamic Changes in Protein and Organelle Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.; Wilkins, Courtney; Badil, Samantha; Iskarpatyoti, Jason; Gale, Michael

    2015-01-01

    RIG-I pathway signaling of innate immunity against RNA virus infection is organized between the ER and mitochondria on a subdomain of the ER called the mitochondrial-associated ER membrane (MAM). The RIG-I adaptor protein MAVS transmits downstream signaling of antiviral immunity, with signaling complexes assembling on the MAM in association with mitochondria and peroxisomes. To identify components that regulate MAVS signalosome assembly on the MAM, we characterized the proteome of MAM, ER, and cytosol from cells infected with either chronic (hepatitis C) or acute (Sendai) RNA virus infections, as well as mock-infected cells. Comparative analysis of protein trafficking dynamics during both chronic and acute viral infection reveals differential protein profiles in the MAM during RIG-I pathway activation. We identified proteins and biochemical pathways recruited into and out of the MAM in both chronic and acute RNA viral infections, representing proteins that drive immunity and/or regulate viral replication. In addition, by using this comparative proteomics approach, we identified 3 new MAVS-interacting proteins, RAB1B, VTN, and LONP1, and defined LONP1 as a positive regulator of the RIG-I pathway. Our proteomic analysis also reveals a dynamic cross-talk between subcellular compartments during both acute and chronic RNA virus infection, and demonstrates the importance of the MAM as a central platform that coordinates innate immune signaling to initiate immunity against RNA virus infection. PMID:25734423

  18. Bacterial community dynamics in a swine wastewater anaerobic reactor revealed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-Chi; Chou, Chu-Yang; Chen, Ling-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-20

    Anaerobic digestion is a microbiological process of converting organic wastes into digestate and biogas in the absence of oxygen. In practice, disturbance to the system (e.g., organic shock loading) may cause imbalance of the microbial community and lead to digester failure. To examine the bacterial community dynamics after a disturbance, this study simulated an organic shock loading that doubled the chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading using a 4.5L swine wastewater anaerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Before the shock (loading rate=0.65gCOD/L/day), biogas production rate was about 1-2L/L/day. After the shock, three periods representing increased biogas production rates were observed during days 1-7 (∼4.0L/L/day), 13 (3.3L/L/day), and 21-23 (∼6.1L/L/day). For culture-independent assessments of the bacterial community composition, the 454 pyrosequencing results indicated that the community contained >2500 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and was dominated by three phyla: Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. The shock induced dynamic changes in the community composition, which was re-stabilized after approximately threefold hydraulic retention time (HRT). Intriguingly, upon restabilization, the community composition became similar to that observed before the shock, rather than reaching a new equilibrium. PMID:25500375

  19. Plant-Symbiotic Fungi as Chemical Engineers: Multi-Genome Analysis of the Clavicipitaceae Reveals Dynamics of Alkaloid Loci

    PubMed Central

    Schardl, Christopher L.; Young, Carolyn A.; Hesse, Uljana; Amyotte, Stefan G.; Andreeva, Kalina; Calie, Patrick J.; Fleetwood, Damien J.; Haws, David C.; Moore, Neil; Oeser, Birgitt; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Schweri, Kathryn K.; Voisey, Christine R.; Farman, Mark L.; Jaromczyk, Jerzy W.; Roe, Bruce A.; O'Sullivan, Donal M.; Scott, Barry; Tudzynski, Paul; An, Zhiqiang; Arnaoudova, Elissaveta G.; Bullock, Charles T.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Chen, Li; Cox, Murray; Dinkins, Randy D.; Florea, Simona; Glenn, Anthony E.; Gordon, Anna; Güldener, Ulrich; Harris, Daniel R.; Hollin, Walter; Jaromczyk, Jolanta; Johnson, Richard D.; Khan, Anar K.; Leistner, Eckhard; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Li, Chunjie; Liu, JinGe; Liu, Jinze; Liu, Miao; Mace, Wade; Machado, Caroline; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Pan, Juan; Schmid, Jan; Sugawara, Koya; Steiner, Ulrike; Takach, Johanna E.; Tanaka, Eiji; Webb, Jennifer S.; Wilson, Ella V.; Wiseman, Jennifer L.; Yoshida, Ruriko; Zeng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The fungal family Clavicipitaceae includes plant symbionts and parasites that produce several psychoactive and bioprotective alkaloids. The family includes grass symbionts in the epichloae clade (Epichloë and Neotyphodium species), which are extraordinarily diverse both in their host interactions and in their alkaloid profiles. Epichloae produce alkaloids of four distinct classes, all of which deter insects, and some—including the infamous ergot alkaloids—have potent effects on mammals. The exceptional chemotypic diversity of the epichloae may relate to their broad range of host interactions, whereby some are pathogenic and contagious, others are mutualistic and vertically transmitted (seed-borne), and still others vary in pathogenic or mutualistic behavior. We profiled the alkaloids and sequenced the genomes of 10 epichloae, three ergot fungi (Claviceps species), a morning-glory symbiont (Periglandula ipomoeae), and a bamboo pathogen (Aciculosporium take), and compared the gene clusters for four classes of alkaloids. Results indicated a strong tendency for alkaloid loci to have conserved cores that specify the skeleton structures and peripheral genes that determine chemical variations that are known to affect their pharmacological specificities. Generally, gene locations in cluster peripheries positioned them near to transposon-derived, AT-rich repeat blocks, which were probably involved in gene losses, duplications, and neofunctionalizations. The alkaloid loci in the epichloae had unusual structures riddled with large, complex, and dynamic repeat blocks. This feature was not reflective of overall differences in repeat contents in the genomes, nor was it characteristic of most other specialized metabolism loci. The organization and dynamics of alkaloid loci and abundant repeat blocks in the epichloae suggested that these fungi are under selection for alkaloid diversification. We suggest that such selection is related to the variable life histories of the

  20. Dynamic Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Mesenchyme Reveals Novel Factors That Enhance Human Embryonic Stem Cell to Pancreatic Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Holger A.; Landsman, Limor; Moss, Christopher L.; Higdon, Roger; Greer, Renee L.; Kaihara, Kelly; Salamon, Randy; Kolker, Eugene; Hebrok, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Current approaches in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) to pancreatic beta cell differentiation have largely been based on knowledge gained from developmental studies of the epithelial pancreas, while the potential roles of other supporting tissue compartments have not been fully explored. One such tissue is the pancreatic mesenchyme that supports epithelial organogenesis throughout embryogenesis. We hypothesized that detailed characterization of the pancreatic mesenchyme might result in the identification of novel factors not used in current differentiation protocols. Supplementing existing hESC differentiation conditions with such factors might create a more comprehensive simulation of normal development in cell culture. To validate our hypothesis, we took advantage of a novel transgenic mouse model to isolate the pancreatic mesenchyme at distinct embryonic and postnatal stages for subsequent proteomic analysis. Refined sample preparation and analysis conditions across four embryonic and prenatal time points resulted in the identification of 21,498 peptides with high-confidence mapping to 1,502 proteins. Expression analysis of pancreata confirmed the presence of three potentially important factors in cell differentiation: Galectin-1 (LGALS1), Neuroplastin (NPTN), and the Laminin α-2 subunit (LAMA2). Two of the three factors (LGALS1 and LAMA2) increased expression of pancreatic progenitor transcript levels in a published hESC to beta cell differentiation protocol. In addition, LAMA2 partially blocks cell culture induced beta cell dedifferentiation. Summarily, we provide evidence that proteomic analysis of supporting tissues such as the pancreatic mesenchyme allows for the identification of potentially important factors guiding hESC to pancreas differentiation. PMID:26681951

  1. Integrated transcriptome sequencing and dynamic analysis reveal carbon source partitioning between terpenoid and oil accumulation in developing Lindera glauca fruits

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jun; Chen, Yinlei; An, Jiyong; Hou, Xinyu; Cai, Jian; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Zhixiang; Lin, Shanzhi

    2015-01-01

    Lindera glauca fruits (LGF) with the abundance of terpenoid and oil has emerged as a novel specific material for industrial and medicinal application in China, but the complex regulatory mechanisms of carbon source partitioning into terpenoid biosynthetic pathway (TBP) and oil biosynthetic pathway (OBP) in developing LGF is still unknown. Here we perform the analysis of contents and compositions of terpenoid and oil from 7 stages of developing LGF to characterize a dramatic difference in temporal accumulative patterns. The resulting 3 crucial samples at 50, 125 and 150 days after flowering (DAF) were selected for comparative deep transcriptome analysis. By Illumina sequencing, the obtained approximately 81 million reads are assembled into 69,160 unigenes, among which 174, 71, 81 and 155 unigenes are implicated in glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), TBP and OBP, respectively. Integrated differential expression profiling and qRT-PCR, we specifically characterize the key enzymes and transcription factors (TFs) involved in regulating carbon allocation ratios for terpenoid or oil accumulation in developing LGF. These results contribute to our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of carbon source partitioning between terpenoid and oil in developing LGF, and to the improvement of resource utilization and molecular breeding for L. glauca. PMID:26446413

  2. Global Analysis of Mouse Polyomavirus Infection Reveals Dynamic Regulation of Viral and Host Gene Expression and Promiscuous Viral RNA Editing

    PubMed Central

    Garren, Seth B.; Kondaveeti, Yuvabharath; Duff, Michael O.; Carmichael, Gordon G.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) lytically infects mouse cells, transforms rat cells in culture, and is highly oncogenic in rodents. We have used deep sequencing to follow MPyV infection of mouse NIH3T6 cells at various times after infection and analyzed both the viral and cellular transcriptomes. Alignment of sequencing reads to the viral genome illustrated the transcriptional profile of the early-to-late switch with both early-strand and late-strand RNAs being transcribed at all time points. A number of novel insights into viral gene expression emerged from these studies, including the demonstration of widespread RNA editing of viral transcripts at late times in infection. By late times in infection, 359 host genes were seen to be significantly upregulated and 857 were downregulated. Gene ontology analysis indicated transcripts involved in translation, metabolism, RNA processing, DNA methylation, and protein turnover were upregulated while transcripts involved in extracellular adhesion, cytoskeleton, zinc finger binding, SH3 domain, and GTPase activation were downregulated. The levels of a number of long noncoding RNAs were also altered. The long noncoding RNA MALAT1, which is involved in splicing speckles and used as a marker in many late-stage cancers, was noticeably downregulated, while several other abundant noncoding RNAs were strongly upregulated. We discuss these results in light of what is currently known about the MPyV life cycle and its effects on host cell growth and metabolism. PMID:26407100

  3. Dynamic Environmental Photosynthetic Imaging Reveals Emergent Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jeffrey A; Savage, Linda J; Zegarac, Robert; Hall, Christopher C; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Davis, Geoffry A; Kovac, William Kent; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M

    2016-06-22

    Understanding and improving the productivity and robustness of plant photosynthesis requires high-throughput phenotyping under environmental conditions that are relevant to the field. Here we demonstrate the dynamic environmental photosynthesis imager (DEPI), an experimental platform for integrated, continuous, and high-throughput measurements of photosynthetic parameters during plant growth under reproducible yet dynamic environmental conditions. Using parallel imagers obviates the need to move plants or sensors, reducing artifacts and allowing simultaneous measurement on large numbers of plants. As a result, DEPI can reveal phenotypes that are not evident under standard laboratory conditions but emerge under progressively more dynamic illumination. We show examples in mutants of Arabidopsis of such "emergent phenotypes" that are highly transient and heterogeneous, appearing in different leaves under different conditions and depending in complex ways on both environmental conditions and plant developmental age. These emergent phenotypes appear to be caused by a range of phenomena, suggesting that such previously unseen processes are critical for plant responses to dynamic environments. PMID:27336966

  4. Single-Molecule Analysis of PIP2;1 Dynamics and Partitioning Reveals Multiple Modes of Arabidopsis Plasma Membrane Aquaporin Regulation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Xiaohua; Yang, Yong; Li, Ruili; He, Qihua; Fang, Xiaohong; Luu, Doan-Trung; Maurel, Christophe; Lin, Jinxing

    2011-01-01

    PIP2;1 is an integral membrane protein that facilitates water transport across plasma membranes. To address the dynamics of Arabidopsis thaliana PIP2;1 at the single-molecule level as well as their role in PIP2;1 regulation, we tracked green fluorescent protein–PIP2;1 molecules by variable-angle evanescent wave microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Single-particle tracking analysis revealed that PIP2;1 presented four diffusion modes with large dispersion of diffusion coefficients, suggesting that partitioning and dynamics of PIP2;1 are heterogeneous and, more importantly, that PIP2;1 can move into or out of membrane microdomains. In response to salt stress, the diffusion coefficients and percentage of restricted diffusion increased, implying that PIP2;1 internalization was enhanced. This was further supported by the decrease in PIP2;1 density on plasma membranes by FCS. We additionally demonstrated that PIP2;1 internalization involves a combination of two pathways: a tyrphostin A23-sensitive clathrin-dependent pathway and a methyl-β-cyclodextrin–sensitive, membrane raft–associated pathway. The latter was efficiently stimulated under NaCl conditions. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PIP2;1 molecules are heterogeneously distributed on the plasma membrane and that clathrin and membrane raft pathways cooperate to mediate the subcellular trafficking of PIP2;1, suggesting that the dynamic partitioning and recycling pathways might be involved in the multiple modes of regulating water permeability. PMID:22010034

  5. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms

    PubMed Central

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-01-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1–Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats. PMID:26428853

  6. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Jeffrey; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Kang, Misun; Voisin, Sophie; Cheng, Chu-Lin; Horita, Jusuke; Perfect, Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Many terrestrial ecosystem processes are constrained by water availability and transport within the soil. Knowledge of plant water fluxes is thus critical for assessing mechanistic processes linked to biogeochemical cycles, yet resolution of root structure and xylem water transport dynamics has been a particularly daunting task for the ecologist. Through neutron imaging, we demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor individual root functionality and water fluxes within Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings growing in a sandy medium. Root structure and growth were readily imaged by neutron radiography and neutron computed tomography. Seedlings were irrigated with water or deuterium oxide and imaged through time as a growth lamp was cycled on to alter leaf demand for water. Sub-millimeter scale resolution reveals timing and magnitudes of root water uptake, redistribution within the roots, and root-shoot hydraulic linkages, relationships not well characterized by other techniques.

  7. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  8. Neutron Imaging Reveals Internal Plant Hydraulic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ quantification of soil-plant water fluxes have not been fully successful due to a lack of non-destructive techniques capable of revealing roots or water fluxes at relevant spatial scales. Neutron imaging is a unique non-invasive tool that can assess sub-millimeter scale material properties and transport in situ, and which has been successfully applied to characterize soil and plant water status. Here, we have applied neutron radiography and tomography to quantify water transport through individual maize roots in response to internal plant demand. Zea mays seedlings were grown for 10 days in Flint silica sand within 2.6 cm diameter Al chambers. Using a reactor-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (HFIR), water fluxes were tracked through the maize soil-root systems by collecting consecutive neutron radiographs over a 12 h period following irrigation with D2O. D has a much lower neutron attenuation than H, thus D2O displacement of existing H2O within the plant vascular system, or influx of D2O into previously dry tissue or soil is readily tracked by changes in image intensity through time. Plant water release and uptake was regulated by periodically cycling on a high-intensity grow light. From each maize replicate, selected regions of interest (ROI) were delineated around individual roots, root free soil, stem and leaf segments. Changes in ROI were tracked through time to reveal patterns of water flux. The hydration of root and stem tissue cycled in response to illumination; root water content often increased during darkness, then decreased with illumination as water was transported from the root into the stem. Relative root-shoot hydration through time illustrates the balance between demand, storage capacity and uptake, which varies depending on root characteristics and its localized soil environment. The dynamic transport of water between soil, individual roots, stems and leaves was readily visualized and quantified illustrating the value

  9. System-wide Analysis of SUMOylation Dynamics in Response to Replication Stress Reveals Novel Small Ubiquitin-like Modified Target Proteins and Acceptor Lysines Relevant for Genome Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chang, Jer-Gung; Hendriks, Ivo A.; Sigurðsson, Jón Otti; Olsen, Jesper V.; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic agents can cause replication fork stalling in dividing cells because of DNA lesions, eventually leading to replication fork collapse when the damage is not repaired. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifiers (SUMOs) are known to counteract replication stress, nevertheless, only a small number of relevant SUMO target proteins are known. To address this, we have purified and identified SUMO-2 target proteins regulated by replication stress in human cells. The developed methodology enabled single step purification of His10-SUMO-2 conjugates under denaturing conditions with high yield and high purity. Following statistical analysis on five biological replicates, a total of 566 SUMO-2 targets were identified. After 2 h of hydroxyurea treatment, 10 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation and two proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation, whereas after 24 h, 35 proteins were up-regulated for SUMOylation, and 13 proteins were down-regulated for SUMOylation. A site-specific approach was used to map over 1000 SUMO-2 acceptor lysines in target proteins. The methodology is generic and is widely applicable in the ubiquitin field. A large subset of these identified proteins function in one network that consists of interacting replication factors, transcriptional regulators, DNA damage response factors including MDC1, ATR-interacting protein ATRIP, the Bloom syndrome protein and the BLM-binding partner RMI1, the crossover junction endonuclease EME1, BRCA1, and CHAF1A. Furthermore, centromeric proteins and signal transducers were dynamically regulated by SUMOylation upon replication stress. Our results uncover a comprehensive network of SUMO target proteins dealing with replication damage and provide a framework for detailed understanding of the role of SUMOylation to counteract replication stress. Ultimately, our study reveals how a post-translational modification is able to orchestrate a large variety of different proteins to integrate different nuclear processes with the

  10. Personal Omics Profiling Reveals Dynamic Molecular and Medical Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Mias, George I.; Li-Pook-Than, Jennifer; Jiang, Lihua; Lam, Hugo Y. K.; Chen, Rong; Miriami, Elana; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Hariharan, Manoj; Dewey, Frederick E.; Cheng, Yong; Clark, Michael J.; Im, Hogune; Habegger, Lukas; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; O'Huallachain, Maeve; Dudley, Joel T.; Hillenmeyer, Sara; Haraksingh, Rajini; Sharon, Donald; Euskirchen, Ghia; Lacroute, Phil; Bettinger, Keith; Boyle, Alan P.; Kasowski, Maya; Grubert, Fabian; Seki, Scott; Garcia, Marco; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gallardo, Mercedes; Blasco, Maria A.; Greenberg, Peter L.; Snyder, Phyllis; Klein, Teri E.; Altman, Russ B.; Butte, Atul; Ashley, Euan A.; Nadeau, Kari C.; Gerstein, Mark; Tang, Hua; Snyder, Michael

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Personalized medicine is expected to benefit from combining genomic information with regular monitoring of physiological states by multiple high-throughput methods. Here we present an integrative Personal Omics Profile (iPOP), an analysis that combines genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and autoantibody profiles from a single individual over a 14-month period. Our iPOP analysis revealed various medical risks, including Type II diabetes. It also uncovered extensive, dynamic changes in diverse molecular components and biological pathways across healthy and diseased conditions. Extremely high coverage genomic and transcriptomic data, which provide the basis of our iPOP, discovered extensive heteroallelic changes during healthy and diseased states and an unexpected RNA editing mechanism. This study demonstrates that longitudinal iPOP can be used to interpret healthy and disease states by connecting genomic information with additional dynamic omics activity. PMID:22424236

  11. Dispersion of Response Times Reveals Cognitive Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Holden, John G.; Van Orden, Guy C.; Turvey, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Trial to trial variation in word pronunciation times exhibits 1/f scaling. One explanation is that human performances are consequent on multiplicative interactions among interdependent processes – interaction dominant dynamics. This article describes simulated distributions of pronunciation times in a further test for multiplicative interactions and interdependence. Individual participant distributions of ≈1100 word pronunciation times are successfully mimicked for each participant in combinations of lognormal and power law behavior. Successful hazard function simulations generalize these results to establish interaction dominant dynamics, in contrast with component dominant dynamics, as a likely mechanism for cognitive activity. PMID:19348544

  12. Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-level characterization of deformation dynamics is crucial for understanding organ morphogenetic mechanisms, especially the interhierarchical links among molecular activities, cellular behaviors and tissue/organ morphogenetic processes. Limb development is a well-studied topic in vertebrate organogenesis. Nevertheless, there is still little understanding of tissue-level deformation relative to molecular and cellular dynamics. This is mainly because live recording of detailed cell behaviors in whole tissues is technically difficult. To overcome this limitation, by applying a recently developed Bayesian approach, we here constructed tissue deformation maps for chick limb development with high precision, based on snapshot lineage tracing using dye injection. The precision of the constructed maps was validated with a clear statistical criterion. From the geometrical analysis of the map, we identified three characteristic tissue growth modes in the limb and showed that they are consistent with local growth factor activity and cell cycle length. In particular, we report that SHH signaling activity changes dynamically with developmental stage and strongly correlates with the dynamic shift in the tissue growth mode. We also found anisotropic tissue deformation along the proximal-distal axis. Morphogenetic simulation and experimental studies suggested that this directional tissue elongation, and not local growth, has the greatest impact on limb shaping. This result was supported by the novel finding that anisotropic tissue elongation along the proximal-distal axis occurs independently of cell proliferation. Our study marks a pivotal point for multi-scale system understanding in vertebrate development. PMID:25858459

  13. Dispersion of Response Times Reveals Cognitive Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, John G.; Van Orden, Guy C.; Turvey, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Trial-to-trial variation in word-pronunciation times exhibits 1/f scaling. One explanation is that human performances are consequent on multiplicative interactions among interdependent processes-interaction dominant dynamics. This article describes simulated distributions of pronunciation times in a further test for multiplicative interactions and…

  14. Peptide crystal simulations reveal hidden dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Pawel A.; Cerutti, David S.; Holton, James; Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular crystals at atomic resolution have the potential to recover information on dynamics and heterogeneity hidden in the X-ray diffraction data. We present here 9.6 microseconds of dynamics in a small helical peptide crystal with 36 independent copies of the unit cell. The average simulation structure agrees with experiment to within 0.28 Å backbone and 0.42 Å all-atom rmsd; a model refined against the average simulation density agrees with the experimental structure to within 0.20 Å backbone and 0.33 Å all-atom rmsd. The R-factor between the experimental structure factors and those derived from this unrestrained simulation is 23% to 1.0 Å resolution. The B-factors for most heavy atoms agree well with experiment (Pearson correlation of 0.90), but B-factors obtained by refinement against the average simulation density underestimate the coordinate fluctuations in the underlying simulation where the simulation samples alternate conformations. A dynamic flow of water molecules through channels within the crystal lattice is observed, yet the average water density is in remarkable agreement with experiment. A minor population of unit cells is characterized by reduced water content, 310 helical propensity and a gauche(−) side-chain rotamer for one of the valine residues. Careful examination of the experimental data suggests that transitions of the helices are a simulation artifact, although there is indeed evidence for alternate valine conformers and variable water content. This study highlights the potential for crystal simulations to detect dynamics and heterogeneity in experimental diffraction data, as well as to validate computational chemistry methods. PMID:23631449

  15. Auxiliary tRNAs: large-scale analysis of tRNA genes reveals patterns of tRNA repertoire dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Naama; Margalit, Hanah

    2014-01-01

    Decoding of all codons can be achieved by a subset of tRNAs. In bacteria, certain tRNA species are mandatory, while others are auxiliary and are variably used. It is currently unknown how this variability has evolved and whether it provides an adaptive advantage. Here we shed light on the subset of auxiliary tRNAs, using genomic data from 319 bacteria. By reconstructing the evolution of tRNAs we show that the auxiliary tRNAs are highly dynamic, being frequently gained and lost along the phylogenetic tree, with a clear dominance of loss events for most auxiliary tRNA species. We reveal distinct co-gain and co-loss patterns for subsets of the auxiliary tRNAs, suggesting that they are subjected to the same selection forces. Controlling for phylogenetic dependencies, we find that the usage of these tRNA species is positively correlated with GC content and may derive directly from nucleotide bias or from preference of Watson–Crick codon–anticodon interactions. Our results highlight the highly dynamic nature of these tRNAs and their complicated balance with codon usage. PMID:24782525

  16. AVHRR imagery reveals Antarctic ice dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bindschadler, R.A.; Vornberger, P.L. STX Corp., Lanham, MD )

    1990-06-01

    A portion of AVHRR data taken on December 5, 1987 at 06:15 GMT over a part of Antarctica is used here to show that many of the most significant dynamic features of ice sheets can be identified by a careful examination of AVHRR imagery. The relatively low resolution of this instrument makes it ideal for obtaining a broad view of the ice sheets, while its wide swath allows coverage of areas beyond the reach of high-resolution imagers either currently in orbit or planned. An interpretation is given of the present data, which cover the area of ice streams that drain the interior of the West Antarctic ice sheet into the Ross Ice Shelf. 21 refs.

  17. Revealing protein dynamics by photobleaching techniques.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used tools to visualize proteins and study their intracellular distribution. One feature of working with GFP variants, photobleaching, has recently been combined with an older technique known as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to study protein kinetics in vivo. During photobleaching, fluorochromes get destroyed irreversibly by repeated excitation with an intensive light source. When the photobleaching is applied to a restricted area or structure, recovery of fluorescence will be the result of active or passive diffusion from fluorescent molecules from unbleached surrounding areas. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) is a variant of FRAP where an area is bleached, and loss of fluorescence in surrounding areas is observed. FLIP can be used to study the dynamics of different pools of a protein or can show how a protein diffuses, or is transported through a cell or cellular structure. Here, we discuss these photobleaching fluorescent imaging techniques, illustrated with examples of these techniques applied to proteins of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pheromone response MAPK pathway. PMID:15173624

  18. Complex dynamics of text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yongqiang; Ma, Qinghua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the analysis of nonlinear text quality in Chinese language. Texts produced by university students in China were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and network dynamics were obtained. The method integrates the classical concepts of network feature representation and text quality series variation. The analytical and numerical scheme leads to a parameter space representation that constitutes a valid alternative to represent the network features. The results reveal that complex network features of different text qualities can be clearly revealed and applied to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  19. Structural analysis of a class III preQ1 riboswitch reveals an aptamer distant from a ribosome-binding site regulated by fast dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Suddala, Krishna C.; Aytenfisu, Asaminew; Chan, Dalen; Belashov, Ivan A.; Salim, Mohammad; Mathews, David H.; Spitale, Robert C.; Walter, Nils G.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    PreQ1-III riboswitches are newly identified RNA elements that control bacterial genes in response to preQ1 (7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine), a precursor to the essential hypermodified tRNA base queuosine. Although numerous riboswitches fold as H-type or HLout-type pseudoknots that integrate ligand-binding and regulatory sequences within a single folded domain, the preQ1-III riboswitch aptamer forms a HLout-type pseudoknot that does not appear to incorporate its ribosome-binding site (RBS). To understand how this unusual organization confers function, we determined the crystal structure of the class III preQ1 riboswitch from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii at 2.75 Å resolution. PreQ1 binds tightly (KD,app 6.5 ± 0.5 nM) between helices P1 and P2 of a three-way helical junction wherein the third helix, P4, projects orthogonally from the ligand-binding pocket, exposing its stem-loop to base pair with the 3′ RBS. Biochemical analysis, computational modeling, and single-molecule FRET imaging demonstrated that preQ1 enhances P4 reorientation toward P1–P2, promoting a partially nested, H-type pseudoknot in which the RBS undergoes rapid docking (kdock ∼0.6 s−1) and undocking (kundock ∼1.1 s−1). Discovery of such dynamic conformational switching provides insight into how a riboswitch with bipartite architecture uses dynamics to modulate expression platform accessibility, thus expanding the known repertoire of gene control strategies used by regulatory RNAs. PMID:26106162

  20. Structural analysis of a class III preQ1 riboswitch reveals an aptamer distant from a ribosome-binding site regulated by fast dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Suddala, Krishna C; Aytenfisu, Asaminew; Chan, Dalen; Belashov, Ivan A; Salim, Mohammad; Mathews, David H; Spitale, Robert C; Walter, Nils G; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    PreQ1-III riboswitches are newly identified RNA elements that control bacterial genes in response to preQ1 (7-aminomethyl-7-deazaguanine), a precursor to the essential hypermodified tRNA base queuosine. Although numerous riboswitches fold as H-type or HLout-type pseudoknots that integrate ligand-binding and regulatory sequences within a single folded domain, the preQ1-III riboswitch aptamer forms a HLout-type pseudoknot that does not appear to incorporate its ribosome-binding site (RBS). To understand how this unusual organization confers function, we determined the crystal structure of the class III preQ1 riboswitch from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii at 2.75 Å resolution. PreQ1 binds tightly (KD,app 6.5 ± 0.5 nM) between helices P1 and P2 of a three-way helical junction wherein the third helix, P4, projects orthogonally from the ligand-binding pocket, exposing its stem-loop to base pair with the 3' RBS. Biochemical analysis, computational modeling, and single-molecule FRET imaging demonstrated that preQ1 enhances P4 reorientation toward P1-P2, promoting a partially nested, H-type pseudoknot in which the RBS undergoes rapid docking (kdock ∼ 0.6 s(-1)) and undocking (kundock ∼ 1.1 s(-1)). Discovery of such dynamic conformational switching provides insight into how a riboswitch with bipartite architecture uses dynamics to modulate expression platform accessibility, thus expanding the known repertoire of gene control strategies used by regulatory RNAs. PMID:26106162

  1. Dynamics of Gene Expression Revealed by Comparison of Serial Analysis of Gene Expression Transcript Profiles from Yeast Grown on Two Different Carbon SourcesD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kal, Arnoud J.; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Benes, Vladimir; van den Berg, Marlene; Koerkamp, Marian Groot; Albermann, Kaj; Strack, Normann; Ruijter, Jan M.; Richter, Alexandra; Dujon, Bernard; Ansorge, Wilhelm; Tabak, Henk F.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a genome-wide characterization of mRNA transcript levels in yeast grown on the fatty acid oleate, determined using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). Comparison of this SAGE library with that reported for glucose grown cells revealed the dramatic adaptive response of yeast to a change in carbon source. A major fraction (>20%) of the 15,000 mRNA molecules in a yeast cell comprised differentially expressed transcripts, which were derived from only 2% of the total number of ∼6300 yeast genes. Most of the mRNAs that were differentially expressed code for enzymes or for other proteins participating in metabolism (e.g., metabolite transporters). In oleate-grown cells, this was exemplified by the huge increase of mRNAs encoding the peroxisomal β-oxidation enzymes required for degradation of fatty acids. The data provide evidence for the existence of redox shuttles across organellar membranes that involve peroxisomal, cytoplasmic, and mitochondrial enzymes. We also analyzed the mRNA profile of a mutant strain with deletions of the PIP2 and OAF1 genes, encoding transcription factors required for induction of genes encoding peroxisomal proteins. Induction of genes under the immediate control of these factors was abolished; other genes were up-regulated, indicating an adaptive response to the changed metabolism imposed by the genetic impairment. We describe a statistical method for analysis of data obtained by SAGE. PMID:10359602

  2. Novel Comparative Pattern Count Analysis Reveals a Chronic Ethanol-Induced Dynamic Shift in Immediate Early NF-κB Genome-wide Promoter Binding During Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a clinically important process that is impaired by adaptation to chronic alcohol intake. We focused on the initial time points following partial hepatectomy (PHx) to analyze genome-wide binding activity of NF-κB, a key immediate early regulator. We investigated the effect of chronic alcohol intake on immediate early NF-κB genome-wide localization, in the adapted state as well as in response to partial hepatectomy, using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promoter microarray analysis. We found many ethanol-specific NF-κB binding target promoters in the ethanol-adapted state, corresponding to regulation of biosynthetic processes, oxidation-reduction and apoptosis. Partial hepatectomy induced a diet-independent shift in NF-κB binding loci relative to the transcription start sites. We employed a novel pattern count analysis to exhaustively enumerate and compare the number of promoters corresponding to the temporal binding patterns in ethanol and pair-fed control groups. The highest pattern count corresponded to promoters with NF-κB binding exclusively in the ethanol group at 1h post PHx. This set was associated with regulation of cell death, response to oxidative stress, histone modification, mitochondrial function, and metabolic processes. Integration with the global gene expression profiles to identify putative transcriptional consequences of NF-κB binding patterns revealed that several of ethanol-specific 1h binding targets showed ethanol-specific differential expression through 6h post PHx. Motif analysis yielded co-incident binding loci for STAT3, AP-1, CREB, C/EBP-β, PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α, likely participating in co-regulatory modules with NF-κB in shaping the immediate early response to PHx. We conclude that adaptation to chronic ethanol intake disrupts the NF-κB promoter binding landscape with consequences for the immediate early gene regulatory response to the acute challenge of PHx. PMID:26847025

  3. COMBINED DELAY AND GRAPH EMBEDDING OF EPILEPTIC DISCHARGES IN EEG REVEALS COMPLEX AND RECURRENT NONLINEAR DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Erem, B.; Hyde, D.E.; Peters, J.M.; Duffy, F.H.; Brooks, D.H.; Warfield, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamical structure of the brain’s electrical signals contains valuable information about its physiology. Here we combine techniques for nonlinear dynamical analysis and manifold identification to reveal complex and recurrent dynamics in interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). Our results suggest that recurrent IEDs exhibit some consistent dynamics, which may only last briefly, and so individual IED dynamics may need to be considered in order to understand their genesis. This could potentially serve to constrain the dynamics of the inverse source localization problem. PMID:26366250

  4. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L; Angel, Thomas E; Holmes, William E; Li, Kelvin W; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C; Turner, Scott M; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L; Miller, Benjamin F; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  5. Circulating protein synthesis rates reveal skeletal muscle proteome dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; King, Chelsea L.; Angel, Thomas E.; Holmes, William E.; Li, Kelvin W.; Colangelo, Marc; Price, John C.; Turner, Scott M.; Bell, Christopher; Hamilton, Karyn L.; Miller, Benjamin F.; Hellerstein, Marc K.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have described and validated a strategy for monitoring skeletal muscle protein synthesis rates in rodents and humans over days or weeks from blood samples. We based this approach on label incorporation into proteins that are synthesized specifically in skeletal muscle and escape into the circulation. Heavy water labeling combined with sensitive tandem mass spectrometric analysis allowed integrated synthesis rates of proteins in muscle tissue across the proteome to be measured over several weeks. Fractional synthesis rate (FSR) of plasma creatine kinase M-type (CK-M) and carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA-3) in the blood, more than 90% of which is derived from skeletal muscle, correlated closely with FSR of CK-M, CA-3, and other proteins of various ontologies in skeletal muscle tissue in both rodents and humans. Protein synthesis rates across the muscle proteome generally changed in a coordinate manner in response to a sprint interval exercise training regimen in humans and to denervation or clenbuterol treatment in rodents. FSR of plasma CK-M and CA-3 revealed changes and interindividual differences in muscle tissue proteome dynamics. In human subjects, sprint interval training primarily stimulated synthesis of structural and glycolytic proteins. Together, our results indicate that this approach provides a virtual biopsy, sensitively revealing individualized changes in proteome-wide synthesis rates in skeletal muscle without a muscle biopsy. Accordingly, this approach has potential applications for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of muscle disorders. PMID:26657858

  6. Cytoplasmic Dynamics Reveals Two Modes of Nucleoid-Dependent Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Stylianidou, Stella; Kuwada, Nathan J.; Wiggins, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that forces resulting from the physical exclusion of macromolecules from the bacterial nucleoid play a central role in organizing the bacterial cell, yet this proposal has not been quantitatively tested. To investigate this hypothesis, we mapped the generic motion of large protein complexes in the bacterial cytoplasm through quantitative analysis of thousands of complete cell-cycle trajectories of fluorescently tagged ectopic MS2-mRNA complexes. We find the motion of these complexes in the cytoplasm is strongly dependent on their spatial position along the long axis of the cell, and that their dynamics are consistent with a quantitative model that requires only nucleoid exclusion and membrane confinement. This analysis also reveals that the nucleoid increases the mobility of MS2-mRNA complexes, resulting in a fourfold increase in diffusion coefficients between regions of the lowest and highest nucleoid density. These data provide strong quantitative support for two modes of nucleoid action: the widely accepted mechanism of nucleoid exclusion in organizing the cell and a newly proposed mode, in which the nucleoid facilitates rapid motion throughout the cytoplasm. PMID:25468347

  7. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Tom; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in fiscal year 2000. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics, spacecraft trajectory, attitude analysis, and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  8. Functional conformations of the L11–ribosomal RNA complex revealed by correlative analysis of cryo-EM and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Sengupta, Jayati; Rath, Bimal K.; Frank, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between the GTPase-associated center (GAC) and the aminoacyl-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex is of crucial importance in the dynamic process of decoding and tRNA accommodation. The GAC includes protein L11 and helices 43–44 of 23S rRNA (referred to as L11–rRNA complex). In this study, a method of fitting based on a systematic comparison between cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) density maps and structures obtained by molecular dynamics simulations has been developed. This method has led to the finding of atomic models of the GAC that fit the EM maps with much improved cross-correlation coefficients compared with the fitting of the X-ray structure. Two types of conformations of the L11–rRNA complex, produced by the simulations, match the cryo-EM maps representing the states either bound or unbound to the aa-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex. In the bound state, the N-terminal domain of L11 is extended from its position in the crystal structure, and the base of nucleotide A1067 in the 23S ribosomal RNA is flipped out. This position of the base allows the RNA to reach the elbow region of the aminoacyl-tRNA when the latter is bound in the A/T site. In the unbound state, the N-terminal domain of L11 is rotated only slightly, and A1067 of the RNA is flipped back into the less-solvent-exposed position, as in the crystal structure. By matching our experimental cryo-EM maps with much improved cross-correlation coefficients compared to the crystal structure, these two conformations prove to be strong candidates of the two functional states. PMID:16682558

  9. Motorcycle dynamics by multibody dynamics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Imaizumi, Hirohide; Fujioka, Takehiko

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to construct simulation models of a motorcycle with a rider by use of multibody dynamics analysis (MDA). Three types of MDA models are developed for evaluation of the effectiveness of MDA for motorcycle dynamics. Impulse responses with parameter study and lane change maneuvers are calculated. The results of simulations agree with that of experiments well and effectiveness of MDA to the motorcycle dynamics field is shown.

  10. Topological structure dynamics revealing collective evolution in active nematics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xia-qing; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2013-01-01

    Topological defects frequently emerge in active matter like bacterial colonies, cytoskeleton extracts on substrates, self-propelled granular or colloidal layers and so on, but their dynamical properties and the relations to large-scale organization and fluctuations in these active systems are seldom touched. Here we reveal, through a simple model for active nematics using self-driven hard elliptic rods, that the excitation, annihilation and transportation of topological defects differ markedly from those in non-active media. These dynamical processes exhibit strong irreversibility in active nematics in the absence of detailed balance. Moreover, topological defects are the key factors in organizing large-scale dynamic structures and collective flows, resulting in multi-spatial temporal effects. These findings allow us to control the self-organization of active matter through topological structures. PMID:24346733

  11. Dynamic Coupling among Protein Binding, Sliding, and DNA Bending Revealed by Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheng; Terakawa, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2016-07-13

    Protein binding to DNA changes the DNA's structure, and altered DNA structure can, in turn, modulate the dynamics of protein binding. This mutual dependency is poorly understood. Here we investigated dynamic couplings among protein binding to DNA, protein sliding on DNA, and DNA bending by applying a coarse-grained simulation method to the bacterial architectural protein HU and 14 other DNA-binding proteins. First, we verified our method by showing that the simulated HU exhibits a weak preference for A/T-rich regions of DNA and a much higher affinity for gapped and nicked DNA, consistent with biochemical experiments. The high affinity was attributed to a local DNA bend, but not the specific chemical moiety of the gap/nick. The long-time dynamic analysis revealed that HU sliding is associated with the movement of the local DNA bending site. Deciphering single sliding steps, we found the coupling between HU sliding and DNA bending is akin to neither induced-fit nor population-shift; instead they moved concomitantly. This is reminiscent of a cation transfer on DNA and can be viewed as a protein version of polaron-like sliding. Interestingly, on shorter time scales, HU paused when the DNA was highly bent at the bound position and escaped from pauses once the DNA spontaneously returned to a less bent structure. The HU sliding is largely regulated by DNA bending dynamics. With 14 other proteins, we explored the generality and versatility of the dynamic coupling and found that 6 of the 15 assayed proteins exhibit the polaron-like sliding. PMID:27309278

  12. Secretome analysis of chickpea reveals dynamic extracellular remodeling and identifies a Bet v1-like protein, CaRRP1 that participates in stress response.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonika; Wardhan, Vijay; Kumar, Amit; Rathi, Divya; Pandey, Aarti; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Secreted proteins maintain cell structure and biogenesis besides acting in signaling events crucial for cellular homeostasis during stress adaptation. To understand the underlying mechanism of stress-responsive secretion, the dehydration-responsive secretome was developed from suspension-cultured cells of chickpea. Cell viability of the suspension culture remained unaltered until 96 h, which gradually declined at later stages of dehydration. Proteomic analysis led to the identification of 215 differentially regulated proteins, involved in a variety of cellular functions that include metabolism, cell defence, and signal transduction suggesting their concerted role in stress adaptation. One-third of the secreted proteins were devoid of N-terminal secretion signals suggesting a non-classical secretory route. Screening of the secretome identified a leaderless Bet v 1-like protein, designated CaRRP1, the export of which was inhibited by brefeldin A. We investigated the gene structure and genomic organization and demonstrated that CaRRP1 may be involved in stress response. Its expression was positively associated with abiotic and biotic stresses. CaRRP1 could complement the aberrant growth phenotype of yeast mutant, deficient in vesicular transport, indicating a partial overlap of protein secretion and stress response. Our study provides the most comprehensive analysis of dehydration-responsive secretome and the complex metabolic network operating in plant extracellular space. PMID:26678784

  13. Secretome analysis of chickpea reveals dynamic extracellular remodeling and identifies a Bet v1-like protein, CaRRP1 that participates in stress response

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonika; Wardhan, Vijay; Kumar, Amit; Rathi, Divya; Pandey, Aarti; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2015-01-01

    Secreted proteins maintain cell structure and biogenesis besides acting in signaling events crucial for cellular homeostasis during stress adaptation. To understand the underlying mechanism of stress-responsive secretion, the dehydration-responsive secretome was developed from suspension-cultured cells of chickpea. Cell viability of the suspension culture remained unaltered until 96 h, which gradually declined at later stages of dehydration. Proteomic analysis led to the identification of 215 differentially regulated proteins, involved in a variety of cellular functions that include metabolism, cell defence, and signal transduction suggesting their concerted role in stress adaptation. One-third of the secreted proteins were devoid of N-terminal secretion signals suggesting a non-classical secretory route. Screening of the secretome identified a leaderless Bet v 1-like protein, designated CaRRP1, the export of which was inhibited by brefeldin A. We investigated the gene structure and genomic organization and demonstrated that CaRRP1 may be involved in stress response. Its expression was positively associated with abiotic and biotic stresses. CaRRP1 could complement the aberrant growth phenotype of yeast mutant, deficient in vesicular transport, indicating a partial overlap of protein secretion and stress response. Our study provides the most comprehensive analysis of dehydration-responsive secretome and the complex metabolic network operating in plant extracellular space. PMID:26678784

  14. Integrative effect of drought and low temperature on litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) floral initiation revealed by dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiyuan; Xiao, Qiusheng; Qiu, Haiji; Chen, Chengjie; Chen, Houbin

    2016-01-01

    Floral induction in litchi is influenced by multiple environment cues including temperature and soil water condition. In the present study, we determined that a combined treatment consisting of 14-day drought imposed prior to exposure to 35-day low temperature (T3) significantly promoted litchi flowering relative to the low temperature alone (T2), suggesting an integrative effect of drought and low temperature on litchi floral initiation. Analysis of transcriptomic changes in leaves from different treatments showed that 2,198 and 4,407 unigenes were differentially expressed in response to drought and low temperature, respectively. 1,227 of these unigenes were expressed in response to both treatments, implying an interaction of drought and low temperature on expression of genes involved in litchi floral initiation. Additionally, 932 unigenes were consistently differentially expressed during floral induction between T2 and T3 plants, which potentially accounts for the difference of flowering time. Thirty-eight transcription factors out of these 932 unigenes were identified as hub genes with central roles in regulation of litchi floral induction. The expression of litchi homologs of well-known flowering genes was also investigated, and one Flowering Locus T (FT) homolog may play a crucial role in litchi flowering in responses to drought and low temperature. PMID:27557749

  15. Geometrical and topological analysis of in vivo confocal microscopy images reveals dynamic maturation of epidermal structures during the first years of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensaci, Jalil; Chen, Zhao Yang; Mack, M. Catherine; Guillaud, Martial; Stamatas, Georgios N.

    2015-09-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy is successfully used in infant skin research. Infant skin structure, function, and composition are undergoing a maturation process. We aimed to uncover how the epidermal architecture and cellular topology change with time. Images were collected from three age groups of healthy infants between one and four years of age and adults. Cell centers were manually identified on the images at the stratum granulosum (SG) and stratum spinosum (SS) levels. Voronoi diagrams were used to calculate geometrical and topological parameters. Infant cell density is higher than that of adults and decreases with age. Projected cell area, cell perimeter, and average distance to the nearest neighbors increase with age but do so distinctly between the two layers. Structural entropy is different between the two strata, but remains constant with time. For all ages and layers, the distribution of the number of nearest neighbors is typical of a cooperator network architecture. The topological analysis provides evidence of the maturation process in infant skin. The differences between infant and adult are more pronounced in the SG than SS, while cell cooperation is evident in all cases of healthy skin examined.

  16. Integrative effect of drought and low temperature on litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) floral initiation revealed by dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jiyuan; Xiao, Qiusheng; Qiu, Haiji; Chen, Chengjie; Chen, Houbin

    2016-01-01

    Floral induction in litchi is influenced by multiple environment cues including temperature and soil water condition. In the present study, we determined that a combined treatment consisting of 14-day drought imposed prior to exposure to 35-day low temperature (T3) significantly promoted litchi flowering relative to the low temperature alone (T2), suggesting an integrative effect of drought and low temperature on litchi floral initiation. Analysis of transcriptomic changes in leaves from different treatments showed that 2,198 and 4,407 unigenes were differentially expressed in response to drought and low temperature, respectively. 1,227 of these unigenes were expressed in response to both treatments, implying an interaction of drought and low temperature on expression of genes involved in litchi floral initiation. Additionally, 932 unigenes were consistently differentially expressed during floral induction between T2 and T3 plants, which potentially accounts for the difference of flowering time. Thirty-eight transcription factors out of these 932 unigenes were identified as hub genes with central roles in regulation of litchi floral induction. The expression of litchi homologs of well-known flowering genes was also investigated, and one Flowering Locus T (FT) homolog may play a crucial role in litchi flowering in responses to drought and low temperature. PMID:27557749

  17. Proteomic analysis of Brassica stigmatic proteins following the self-incompatibility reaction reveals a role for microtubule dynamics during pollen responses.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Marcus A; Tang, Wenqiang; Jamshed, Muhammad; Northey, Julian; Patel, Darshan; Smith, Daryl; Siu, K W Michael; Muench, Douglas G; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Goring, Daphne R

    2011-12-01

    Mate selection and maintenance of genetic diversity is crucial to successful reproduction and species survival. Plants utilize self-incompatibility system as a genetic barrier to prevent self pollen from developing on the pistil, leading to hybrid vigor and diversity. In Brassica (canola, kale, and broccoli), an allele-specific interaction between the pollen SCR/SP11 (S-locus cysteine rich protein/S locus protein 11) and the pistil S Receptor Kinase, results in the activation of SRK which recruits the Arm Repeat Containing 1 (ARC1) E3 ligase to the proteasome. The targets of Arm Repeat Containing 1 are proposed to be compatibility factors, which when targeted for degradation by Arm Repeat Containing 1 results in pollen rejection. Despite the fact that protein degradation is predicted to be important for successful self-pollen rejection, the identity of the various proteins whose abundance is altered by the SI pathway has remained unknown. To identify potential candidate proteins regulated by the SI response, we have used the two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis analysis, coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight/MS. We identified 56 differential protein spots with 19 unique candidate proteins whose abundance is down-regulated following self-incompatible pollinations. The identified differentials are predicted to function in various pathways including biosynthetic pathways, signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and exocytosis. From the 19 unique proteins identified, we investigated the role of tubulin and the microtubule network during both self-incompatible and compatible pollen responses. Moderate changes in the microtubule network were observed with self-incompatible pollinations; however, a more distinct localized break-down of the microtubule network was observed during compatible pollinations, that is likely mediated by EXO70A1, leading to successful pollination. PMID:21890472

  18. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  19. Charge-dependent conformations and dynamics of pamam dendrimers revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin

    spatial instrumental scales, understanding experimental results involves extensive and difficult data analysis based on liquid theory and condensed matter physics. Therefore, a model that successfully describes the inter- and intra-dendrimer correlations is crucial in obtaining and delivering reliable information. On the other hand, making meaningful comparisons between molecular dynamics and neutron scattering is a fundamental challenge to link simulations and experiments at the nano-scale. This challenge stems from our approach to utilize MD simulation to explain the underlying mechanism of experimental observation. The SANS measurements were conducted on a series of SANS spectrometers including the Extended Q-Range Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer (EQ-SANS) and the General-Purpose Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Diffractometer (GP-SANS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and NG7 Small Angle Neutron Scattering Spectrometer at National Institute of Standards (NIST) and Technology in U.S.A., large dynamic range small-angle diffractometer D22 at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in France, and 40m-SANS Spectrometer at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) in Korea. On the other hand, the Amber molecular dynamics simulation package is utilized to carry out the computational study. In this dissertation, the following observations have been revealed. The previously developed theoretical model for polyelectrolyte dendrimers are adopted to analyze SANS measurements and superb model fitting quality is found. Coupling with advanced contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (CVSANS) data analysis scheme reported recently, the intra-dendrimer hydration and hydrocarbon components distributions are revealed experimentally. The results indeed indicate that the maximum density is located in the molecular center rather than periphery, which is consistent to previous SANS studies and the back-folding picture of PAMAM dendrimers. According to this picture

  20. Structure and Dynamics of Four-way DNA Junctions Dynamics Revealed by Single-Molecule AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubchenko, Yuri

    2004-03-01

    For-way DNA junctions (Holliday junctions) are critical intermediates for homologous, site-specific recombination, DNA repair and replication. A wealth of structural information is available for immobile four-way junctions. However, these data cannot give the answer on the mechanism of branch migration, the major property of the Holliday junction. Two models for the mechanism of branch migration were suggested. According to the early model of Alberts-Meselson-Sigal, exchanging DNA strands around the junction remain parallel during branch migration. Kinetic studies of branch migration suggest an alternative model in which the junction adopts an extended conformation. We tested these models using a Holliday junction undergoing branch migration. Note that it was the first time when the dynamics of the four-way DNA junction capable of branch migration had been analyzed. We applied time-lapse atomic force microscopy (single molecule dynamics AFM) to image directly loosely bound DNA at liquid-surface interface. These experiments show that mobile Holliday junctions adopt an unfolded conformation during branch migration. This conformation of the junction remains unchanged until strand separation. The data obtained support the model for branch migration having the extended conformation of the Holliday junction. The analysis of the Holliday junctions dynamics at conditions limiting branch migration revealed a broad movement of the arms suggesting that the range of mobility of these junctions is much wider than detected before. Further applications of the time-lapse AFM approach in attempt to resolve the subpopulations of the junctions conformers and the prospects for analyses of dynamics of complex biological systems will be discussed.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Reveals Correlated Inter-Lobe Motion in Protein Lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2

    PubMed Central

    Spellmon, Nicholas; Sun, Xiaonan; Sirinupong, Nualpun; Edwards, Brian; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    SMYD proteins are an exciting field of study as they are linked to many types of cancer-related pathways. Cardiac and skeletal muscle development and function also depend on SMYD proteins opening a possible avenue for cardiac-related treatment. Previous crystal structure studies have revealed that this special class of protein lysine methyltransferases have a bilobal structure, and an open–closed motion may regulate substrate specificity. Here we use the molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the still-poorly-understood SMYD2 dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis reveals that SMYD2 exhibits a negative correlated inter-lobe motion. Principle component analysis suggests that this correlated dynamic is contributed to by a twisting motion of the C-lobe with respect to the N-lobe and a clamshell-like motion between the lobes. Dynamical network analysis defines possible allosteric paths for the correlated dynamics. There are nine communities in the dynamical network with six in the N-lobe and three in the C-lobe, and the communication between the lobes is mediated by a lobe-bridging β hairpin. This study provides insight into the dynamical nature of SMYD2 and could facilitate better understanding of SMYD2 substrate specificity. PMID:26717235

  2. Ultrafast cooling reveals microsecond-scale biomolecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Polinkovsky, Mark E; Gambin, Yann; Banerjee, Priya R; Erickstad, Michael J; Groisman, Alex; Deniz, Ashok A

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-jump technique, in which the sample is rapidly heated by a powerful laser pulse, has been widely used to probe the fast dynamics of folding of proteins and nucleic acids. However, the existing temperature-jump setups tend to involve sophisticated and expensive instrumentation, while providing only modest temperature changes of ~10-15 °C, and the temperature changes are only rapid for heating, but not cooling. Here we present a setup comprising a thermally conductive sapphire substrate with light-absorptive nano-coating, a microfluidic device and a rapidly switched moderate-power infrared laser with the laser beam focused on the nano-coating, enabling heating and cooling of aqueous solutions by ~50 °C on a 1-μs time scale. The setup is used to probe folding and unfolding dynamics of DNA hairpins after direct and inverse temperature jumps, revealing low-pass filter behaviour during periodic temperature variations. PMID:25517430

  3. Rhodopsin Photoactivation Dynamics Revealed by Quasi-Elastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Shrestha, Utsab; Perera, Suchhithranga M. C. D.; Chawla, Udeep; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Michael; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) responsible for vision. During photoactivation, the chromophore retinal dissociates from protein yielding the opsin apoprotein. What are the changes in protein dynamics that occur during the photoactivation process? Here, we studied the microscopic dynamics of dark-state rhodopsin and the ligand-free opsin using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The QENS technique tracks individual hydrogen atom motion because of the much higher neutron scattering cross-section of hydrogen than other atoms. We used protein with CHAPS detergent hydrated with heavy water. The activation of proteins is confirmed at low temperatures up to 300 K by mean-square displacement (MSD) analysis. The QENS experiments at temperatures ranging from 220 K to 300 K clearly indicate an increase in protein dynamic behavior with temperature. The relaxation time for the ligand-bound protein rhodopsin is faster compared to opsin, which can be correlated with the photoactivation. Moreover, the protein dynamics are orders of magnitude slower than the accompanying CHAPS detergent, which unlike protein, manifests localized motions.

  4. Oscillatory Enzyme Dynamics Revealed by Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Philip; Guo, Qi; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    Enzymes move on a variety of length and time scales. While much is known about large structural fluctuations that impact binding of the substrates and release of products, little is known about faster motions of enzymes and how these motions may influence enzyme-catalyzed reactions. This Letter reports frequency fluctuations of the azide anion bound to the active site of formate dehydrogenase measured via 2D IR spectroscopy. These measurements reveal an underdamped oscillatory component to the frequency-frequency correlation function when the azide is bound to the NAD(+) ternary complex. This oscillation disappears when the reduced cofactor is added, indicating that the oscillating contributions most likely come from the charged nicotinamide ring. These oscillatory motions may be relevant to donor-acceptor distance sampling of the catalyzed hydride transfer and therefore may give future insights into the dynamic behavior involved in enzyme catalysis. PMID:27305279

  5. Stochastic heart-rate model can reveal pathologic cardiac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom

    2004-03-01

    A simple one-dimensional Langevin-type stochastic difference equation can simulate the heart-rate fluctuations in a time scale from minutes to hours. The model consists of a deterministic nonlinear part and a stochastic part typical of Gaussian noise, and both parts can be directly determined from measured heart-rate data. Data from healthy subjects typically exhibit the deterministic part with two or more stable fixed points. Studies of 15 congestive heart-failure subjects reveal that the deterministic part of pathologic heart dynamics has no clear stable fixed points. Direct simulations of the stochastic model for normal and pathologic cases can produce statistical parameters similar to those of real subjects. Results directly indicate that pathologic situations simplify the heart-rate control system.

  6. Spectrins in axonal cytoskeletons: Dynamics revealed by extensions and fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Lipeng; Cao, Jianshu

    2014-07-01

    The macroscopic properties, the properties of individual components, and how those components interact with each other are three important aspects of a composited structure. An understanding of the interplay between them is essential in the study of complex systems. Using axonal cytoskeleton as an example system, here we perform a theoretical study of slender structures that can be coarse-grained as a simple smooth three-dimensional curve. We first present a generic model for such systems based on the fundamental theorem of curves. We use this generic model to demonstrate the applicability of the well-known worm-like chain (WLC) model to the network level and investigate the situation when the system is stretched by strong forces (weakly bending limit). We specifically studied recent experimental observations that revealed the hitherto unknown periodic cytoskeleton structure of axons and measured the longitudinal fluctuations. Instead of focusing on single molecules, we apply analytical results from the WLC model to both single molecule and network levels and focus on the relations between extensions and fluctuations. We show how this approach introduces constraints to possible local dynamics of the spectrin tetramers in the axonal cytoskeleton and finally suggests simple but self-consistent dynamics of spectrins in which the spectrins in one spatial period of axons fluctuate in-sync.

  7. A novel dynamics combination model reveals the hidden information of community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Jia; Li, Huiying; Jia, Chuanliang

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of the dynamic details of community structure is an important question for scientists from many fields. In this paper, we propose a novel Markov-Potts framework to uncover the optimal community structures and their stabilities across multiple timescales. Specifically, we model the Potts dynamics to detect community structure by a Markov process, which has a clear mathematical explanation. Then the local uniform behavior of spin values revealed by our model is shown that can naturally reveal the stability of hierarchical community structure across multiple timescales. To prove the validity, phase transition of stochastic dynamic system is used to indicate that the stability of community structure we proposed is able to describe the significance of community structure based on eigengap theory. Finally, we test our framework on some example networks and find it does not have resolute limitation problem at all. Results have shown the model we proposed is able to uncover hierarchical structure in different scales effectively and efficiently.

  8. Population dynamics of flaviviruses revealed by molecular phylogenies.

    PubMed Central

    Zanotto, P M; Gould, E A; Gao, G F; Harvey, P H; Holmes, E C

    1996-01-01

    The phylogeny of 123 complete envelope gene sequences was reconstructed in order to understand the evolution of tick- and mosquito-borne flaviviruses. An analysis of phylogenetic tree structure reveals a continual and asymmetric branching process in the tick-borne flaviviruses, compared with an explosive radiation in the last 200 years in viruses transmitted by mosquitoes. The distinction between these two viral groups probably reflects differences in modes of dispersal, propagation, and changes in the size of host populations. The most serious implication of this work is that growing human populations are being exposed to an expanding range of increasingly diverse viral strains. PMID:8570593

  9. Photon echo spectroscopy reveals structure-dynamics relationships in carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensson, N.; Polivka, T.; Yartsev, A.; Pullerits, T.

    2009-06-01

    Based on simultaneous analysis of the frequency-resolved transient grating, peak shift, and echo width signals, we present a model for the third-order optical response of carotenoids including population dynamics and system-bath interactions. Our frequency-resolved photon echo experiments show that the model needs to incorporate the excited-state absorption from both the S2 and the S1 states. We apply our model to analyze the experimental results on astaxanthin and lycopene, aiming to elucidate the relation between structure and system-bath interactions. Our analysis allows us to relate structural motifs to changes in the energy-gap correlation functions. We find that the terminal rings of astaxanthin lead to increased coupling between slow molecular motions and the electronic transition. We also find evidence for stronger coupling to higher frequency overdamped modes in astaxanthin, pointing to the importance of the functional groups in providing coupling to fluctuations influencing the dynamics in the passage through the conical intersection governing the S2-S1 relaxation.

  10. Unsupervised Deconvolution of Dynamic Imaging Reveals Intratumor Vascular Heterogeneity and Repopulation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Choyke, Peter L.; Wang, Niya; Clarke, Robert; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Wang, Ge; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    With the existence of biologically distinctive malignant cells originated within the same tumor, intratumor functional heterogeneity is present in many cancers and is often manifested by the intermingled vascular compartments with distinct pharmacokinetics. However, intratumor vascular heterogeneity cannot be resolved directly by most in vivo dynamic imaging. We developed multi-tissue compartment modeling (MTCM), a completely unsupervised method of deconvoluting dynamic imaging series from heterogeneous tumors that can improve vascular characterization in many biological contexts. Applying MTCM to dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast cancers revealed characteristic intratumor vascular heterogeneity and therapeutic responses that were otherwise undetectable. MTCM is readily applicable to other dynamic imaging modalities for studying intratumor functional and phenotypic heterogeneity, together with a variety of foreseeable applications in the clinic. PMID:25379705

  11. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  12. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O'Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.

  13. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-21

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolutionmore » inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. We find our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. Lastly, these observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture.« less

  14. Revealing the Dynamics of Thylakoid Membranes in Living Cyanobacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stingaciu, Laura-Roxana; O’Neill, Hugh; Liberton, Michelle; Urban, Volker S.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Ohl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that make major contributions to the production of the oxygen in the Earth atmosphere. The photosynthetic machinery in cyanobacterial cells is housed in flattened membrane structures called thylakoids. The structural organization of cyanobacterial cells and the arrangement of the thylakoid membranes in response to environmental conditions have been widely investigated. However, there is limited knowledge about the internal dynamics of these membranes in terms of their flexibility and motion during the photosynthetic process. We present a direct observation of thylakoid membrane undulatory motion in vivo and show a connection between membrane mobility and photosynthetic activity. High-resolution inelastic neutron scattering experiments on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 assessed the flexibility of cyanobacterial thylakoid membrane sheets and the dependence of the membranes on illumination conditions. We observed softer thylakoid membranes in the dark that have three-to four fold excess mobility compared to membranes under high light conditions. Our analysis indicates that electron transfer between photosynthetic reaction centers and the associated electrochemical proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane result in a significant driving force for excess membrane dynamics. These observations provide a deeper understanding of the relationship between photosynthesis and cellular architecture. PMID:26790980

  15. Substrate Channel in Nitrogenase Revealed by a Molecular Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle; Danyal, Karamatullah; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2014-03-22

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N2 to 2NH3 at the FeMo-cofactor buried deep inside the MoFe protein. Access of substrates, such as N2, to the active site is likely restricted by the surrounding protein, requiring substrate channels that lead from the surface to the active site. Earlier studies on crystallographic structures of the MoFe protein have suggested three putative substrate channels. Here, we have utilized sub-microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to allow the nitrogenase MoFe protein to explore its conformational space in an aqueous solution at physiological ionic strength, revealing a putative substrate channel not previously reported. The viability of the proposed channel was tested by examining the free energy of passage of N2 from the surface through the channel to FeMo-cofactor, with discovery of a very low energy barrier. These studies point to a viable substrate channel in nitrogenase that appears during thermal motions of the protein in an aqueous environment that approaches a face of FeMo-cofactor earlier implicated in substrate binding.

  16. Global dynamic topography observations reveal limited influence of large-scale mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoggard, M. J.; White, N.; Al-Attar, D.

    2016-06-01

    Convective circulation of the Earth's mantle maintains some fraction of surface topography that varies with space and time. Most predictive models show that this dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-2 km, dominated by wavelengths of 104 km. Here, we test these models against our comprehensive observational database of 2,120 spot measurements of dynamic topography that were determined by analysing oceanic seismic surveys. These accurate measurements have typical peak amplitudes of +/-1 km and wavelengths of approximately 103 km, and are combined with limited continental constraints to generate a global spherical harmonic model, the robustness of which has been carefully tested and benchmarked. Our power spectral analysis reveals significant discrepancies between observed and predicted dynamic topography. At longer wavelengths (such as 104 km), observed dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-500 m. At shorter wavelengths (such as 103 km), significant dynamic topography is still observed. We show that these discrepancies can be explained if short-wavelength dynamic topography is generated by temperature-driven density anomalies within a sub-plate asthenospheric channel. Stratigraphic observations from adjacent continental margins show that these dynamic topographic signals evolve quickly with time. More rapid temporal and spatial changes in vertical displacement of the Earth's surface have direct consequences for fields as diverse as mantle flow, oceanic circulation and long-term climate change.

  17. Revealing the dynamic heterogeneity of PMMA/PVDF blends: from microscopic dynamics to macroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Lamnawar, Khalid; Maazouz, Abderrahim; Zhang, Huagui

    2016-04-01

    An effort was made to demonstrate the dynamic heterogeneity of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) blends, where its composition dependence and the role of interphase were probed. Firstly, the composition dependence of thermorheological complexity of PMMA/PVDF blends in the melt was revealed. The molecular entanglement state involving intra- and interchain entanglements was found to govern the scenario of thermorheological complexity. Intriguingly, local heterogeneity was further demonstrated to exist in the melt-state blends with intermediate compositions, and its origin was depicted to be the interphase. The interphase, coupled with unfavourable interchain entanglements in those blends, could explain the reduced viscosity and speed-up relaxations, contributing to the overall thermorheological complexity. Besides, two experimental glass transition temperatures of blends were resolved in view of segment motions in the miscible phase and the crystal-amorphous interphase, and further assessed via the "self-concentration" concept. The presence of a crystal-amorphous interphase, likely leading to three distinct dynamics of segments in blends, was supposed to contribute to the dynamic heterogeneity in segment relaxations for PMMA/PVDF blends in the solid state. Lastly, effects of dynamic heterogeneity on dynamic mechanical properties were also evaluated. PMID:26932245

  18. Dynamic functional network connectivity reveals unique and overlapping profiles of insula subdivisions.

    PubMed

    Nomi, Jason S; Farrant, Kristafor; Damaraju, Eswar; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Calhoun, Vince D; Uddin, Lucina Q

    2016-05-01

    The human insular cortex consists of functionally diverse subdivisions that engage during tasks ranging from interoception to cognitive control. The multiplicity of functions subserved by insular subdivisions calls for a nuanced investigation of their functional connectivity profiles. Four insula subdivisions (dorsal anterior, dAI; ventral, VI; posterior, PI; middle, MI) derived using a data-driven approach were subjected to static- and dynamic functional network connectivity (s-FNC and d-FNC) analyses. Static-FNC analyses replicated previous work demonstrating a cognition-emotion-interoception division of the insula, where the dAI is functionally connected to frontal areas, the VI to limbic areas, and the PI and MI to sensorimotor areas. Dynamic-FNC analyses consisted of k-means clustering of sliding windows to identify variable insula connectivity states. The d-FNC analysis revealed that the most frequently occurring dynamic state mirrored the cognition-emotion-interoception division observed from the s-FNC analysis, with less frequently occurring states showing overlapping and unique subdivision connectivity profiles. In two of the states, all subdivisions exhibited largely overlapping profiles, consisting of subcortical, sensory, motor, and frontal connections. Two other states showed the dAI exhibited a unique connectivity profile compared with other insula subdivisions. Additionally, the dAI exhibited the most variable functional connections across the s-FNC and d-FNC analyses, and was the only subdivision to exhibit dynamic functional connections with regions of the default mode network. These results highlight how a d-FNC approach can capture functional dynamics masked by s-FNC approaches, and reveal dynamic functional connections enabling the functional flexibility of the insula across time. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1770-1787, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26880689

  19. Dynamic analysis of process reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shadle, L.J.; Lawson, L.O.; Noel, S.D.

    1995-06-01

    The approach and methodology of conducting a dynamic analysis is presented in this poster session in order to describe how this type of analysis can be used to evaluate the operation and control of process reactors. Dynamic analysis of the PyGas{trademark} gasification process is used to illustrate the utility of this approach. PyGas{trademark} is the gasifier being developed for the Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) by Jacobs-Siffine Engineering and Riley Stoker. In the first step of the analysis, process models are used to calculate the steady-state conditions and associated sensitivities for the process. For the PyGas{trademark} gasifier, the process models are non-linear mechanistic models of the jetting fluidized-bed pyrolyzer and the fixed-bed gasifier. These process sensitivities are key input, in the form of gain parameters or transfer functions, to the dynamic engineering models.

  20. Cilium transition zone proteome reveals compartmentalization and differential dynamics of ciliopathy complexes.

    PubMed

    Dean, Samuel; Moreira-Leite, Flavia; Varga, Vladimir; Gull, Keith

    2016-08-30

    The transition zone (TZ) of eukaryotic cilia and flagella is a structural intermediate between the basal body and the axoneme that regulates ciliary traffic. Mutations in genes encoding TZ proteins (TZPs) cause human inherited diseases (ciliopathies). Here, we use the trypanosome to identify TZ components and localize them to TZ subdomains, showing that the Bardet-Biedl syndrome complex (BBSome) is more distal in the TZ than the Meckel syndrome (MKS) complex. Several of the TZPs identified here have human orthologs. Functional analysis shows essential roles for TZPs in motility, in building the axoneme central pair apparatus and in flagellum biogenesis. Analysis using RNAi and HaloTag fusion protein approaches reveals that most TZPs (including the MKS ciliopathy complex) show long-term stable association with the TZ, whereas the BBSome is dynamic. We propose that some Bardet-Biedl syndrome and MKS pleiotropy may be caused by mutations that impact TZP complex dynamics. PMID:27519801

  1. Dynamic changes in brewing yeast cells in culture revealed by statistical analyses of yeast morphological data.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Enomoto, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The vitality of brewing yeasts has been used to monitor their physiological state during fermentation. To investigate the fermentation process, we used the image processing software, CalMorph, which generates morphological data on yeast mother cells and bud shape, nuclear shape and location, and actin distribution. We found that 248 parameters changed significantly during fermentation. Successive use of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed several important features of yeast, providing insight into the dynamic changes in the yeast population. First, PCA indicated that much of the observed variability in the experiment was summarized in just two components: a change with a peak and a change over time. Second, PCA indicated the independent and important morphological features responsible for dynamic changes: budding ratio, nucleus position, neck position, and actin organization. Thus, the large amount of data provided by imaging analysis can be used to monitor the fermentation processes involved in beer and bioethanol production. PMID:24012106

  2. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  3. Dynamic Zebrafish Interactome Reveals Transcriptional Mechanisms of Dioxin Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Alexeyenko, Andrey; Wassenberg, Deena M.; Lobenhofer, Edward K.; Yen, Jerry; Linney, Elwood; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Meyer, Joel N.

    2010-01-01

    Background In order to generate hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) causes toxicity, we analyzed global gene expression changes in developing zebrafish embryos exposed to this potent toxicant in the context of a dynamic gene network. For this purpose, we also computationally inferred a zebrafish (Danio rerio) interactome based on orthologs and interaction data from other eukaryotes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using novel computational tools to analyze this interactome, we distinguished between dioxin-dependent and dioxin-independent interactions between proteins, and tracked the temporal propagation of dioxin-dependent transcriptional changes from a few genes that were altered initially, to large groups of biologically coherent genes at later times. The most notable processes altered at later developmental stages were calcium and iron metabolism, embryonic morphogenesis including neuronal and retinal development, a variety of mitochondria-related functions, and generalized stress response (not including induction of antioxidant genes). Within the interactome, many of these responses were connected to cytochrome P4501A (cyp1a) as well as other genes that were dioxin-regulated one day after exposure. This suggests that cyp1a may play a key role initiating the toxic dysregulation of those processes, rather than serving simply as a passive marker of dioxin exposure, as suggested by earlier research. Conclusions/Significance Thus, a powerful microarray experiment coupled with a flexible interactome and multi-pronged interactome tools (which are now made publicly available for microarray analysis and related work) suggest the hypothesis that dioxin, best known in fish as a potent cardioteratogen, has many other targets. Many of these types of toxicity have been observed in mammalian species and are potentially caused by alterations to cyp1a. PMID:20463971

  4. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan D.; Schweppe, Devin K.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for ‘edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  5. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Juan D; Schweppe, Devin K; Eng, Jimmy K; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for 'edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  6. Laser altimetry reveals complex pattern of Greenland Ice Sheet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Csatho, Beata M; Schenk, Anton F; van der Veen, Cornelis J; Babonis, Gregory; Duncan, Kyle; Rezvanbehbahani, Soroush; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Simonsen, Sebastian B; Nagarajan, Sudhagar; van Angelen, Jan H

    2014-12-30

    We present a new record of ice thickness change, reconstructed at nearly 100,000 sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) from laser altimetry measurements spanning the period 1993-2012, partitioned into changes due to surface mass balance (SMB) and ice dynamics. We estimate a mean annual GrIS mass loss of 243 ± 18 Gt ⋅ y(-1), equivalent to 0.68 mm ⋅ y(-1) sea level rise (SLR) for 2003-2009. Dynamic thinning contributed 48%, with the largest rates occurring in 2004-2006, followed by a gradual decrease balanced by accelerating SMB loss. The spatial pattern of dynamic mass loss changed over this time as dynamic thinning rapidly decreased in southeast Greenland but slowly increased in the southwest, north, and northeast regions. Most outlet glaciers have been thinning during the last two decades, interrupted by episodes of decreasing thinning or even thickening. Dynamics of the major outlet glaciers dominated the mass loss from larger drainage basins, and simultaneous changes over distances up to 500 km are detected, indicating climate control. However, the intricate spatiotemporal pattern of dynamic thickness change suggests that, regardless of the forcing responsible for initial glacier acceleration and thinning, the response of individual glaciers is modulated by local conditions. Recent projections of dynamic contributions from the entire GrIS to SLR have been based on the extrapolation of four major outlet glaciers. Considering the observed complexity, we question how well these four glaciers represent all of Greenland's outlet glaciers. PMID:25512537

  7. Automatic generation of predictive dynamic models reveals nuclear phosphorylation as the key Msn2 control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sunnåker, Mikael; Zamora-Sillero, Elias; Dechant, Reinhard; Ludwig, Christina; Busetto, Alberto Giovanni; Wagner, Andreas; Stelling, Joerg

    2013-05-28

    Predictive dynamical models are critical for the analysis of complex biological systems. However, methods to systematically develop and discriminate among systems biology models are still lacking. We describe a computational method that incorporates all hypothetical mechanisms about the architecture of a biological system into a single model and automatically generates a set of simpler models compatible with observational data. As a proof of principle, we analyzed the dynamic control of the transcription factor Msn2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, specifically the short-term mechanisms mediating the cells' recovery after release from starvation stress. Our method determined that 12 of 192 possible models were compatible with available Msn2 localization data. Iterations between model predictions and rationally designed phosphoproteomics and imaging experiments identified a single-circuit topology with a relative probability of 99% among the 192 models. Model analysis revealed that the coupling of dynamic phenomena in Msn2 phosphorylation and transport could lead to efficient stress response signaling by establishing a rate-of-change sensor. Similar principles could apply to mammalian stress response pathways. Systematic construction of dynamic models may yield detailed insight into nonobvious molecular mechanisms. PMID:23716718

  8. OLIGOMERIZATION STATE OF RUBISCO ACTIVASE REVEALED BY DYNAMIC LIGHT SCATTERING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The self-association of Rubisco activase has been suggested to be required for Rubisco activation via ATP hydrolysis. To study the oligmerization patterns in detail, we initially measured the size of each isoform (42 KDa and 45 KDa) of recombinant spinach activase using dynamic light scattering spec...

  9. Model-driven mapping of transcriptional networks reveals the circuitry and dynamics of virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Maier, Ezekiel J; Haynes, Brian C; Gish, Stacey R; Wang, Zhuo A; Skowyra, Michael L; Marulli, Alyssa L; Doering, Tamara L; Brent, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Key steps in understanding a biological process include identifying genes that are involved and determining how they are regulated. We developed a novel method for identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in a specific process and used it to map regulation of the key virulence factor of a deadly fungus-its capsule. The map, built from expression profiles of 41 TF mutants, includes 20 TFs not previously known to regulate virulence attributes. It also reveals a hierarchy comprising executive, midlevel, and "foreman" TFs. When grouped by temporal expression pattern, these TFs explain much of the transcriptional dynamics of capsule induction. Phenotypic analysis of TF deletion mutants revealed complex relationships among virulence factors and virulence in mice. These resources and analyses provide the first integrated, systems-level view of capsule regulation and biosynthesis. Our methods dramatically improve the efficiency with which transcriptional networks can be analyzed, making genomic approaches accessible to laboratories focused on specific physiological processes. PMID:25644834

  10. Model-driven mapping of transcriptional networks reveals the circuitry and dynamics of virulence regulation

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Ezekiel J.; Haynes, Brian C.; Gish, Stacey R.; Wang, Zhuo A.; Skowyra, Michael L.; Marulli, Alyssa L.; Doering, Tamara L.; Brent, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Key steps in understanding a biological process include identifying genes that are involved and determining how they are regulated. We developed a novel method for identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in a specific process and used it to map regulation of the key virulence factor of a deadly fungus—its capsule. The map, built from expression profiles of 41 TF mutants, includes 20 TFs not previously known to regulate virulence attributes. It also reveals a hierarchy comprising executive, midlevel, and “foreman” TFs. When grouped by temporal expression pattern, these TFs explain much of the transcriptional dynamics of capsule induction. Phenotypic analysis of TF deletion mutants revealed complex relationships among virulence factors and virulence in mice. These resources and analyses provide the first integrated, systems-level view of capsule regulation and biosynthesis. Our methods dramatically improve the efficiency with which transcriptional networks can be analyzed, making genomic approaches accessible to laboratories focused on specific physiological processes. PMID:25644834

  11. Dynamical transition of myoglobin revealed by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doster, Wolfgang; Cusack, Stephen; Petry, Winfried

    1989-02-01

    Structural fluctuations in proteins on the picosecond timescale have been studied in considerable detail by theoretical methods such as molecular dynamics simulation1,2, but there exist very few experimental data with which to test the conclusions. We have used the technique of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate atomic motion in hydrated myoglobin over the temperature range 4 350 K and on the molecular dynamics timescale 0.1 100 ps. At temperatures below 180 K myglobin behaves as a harmonic solid, with essentially only vibrational motion. Above 180 K there is a striking dynamic transition arising from the excitation of non-vibrational motion, which we interpret as corresponding to tor-sional jumps between states of different energy, with a mean energy asymmetry of KJ mol -1. This extra mobility is reflected in a strong temperature dependence of the mean-square atomic displacements, a phenomenon previously observed specifically for the heme iron by Mossbauer spectroscopy3 5, but on a much slower timescale (10-7 s). It also correlates with a glass-like transition in the hydration shell of myoglobin6 and with the temperature-dependence of ligand-binding rates at the heme iron, as monitored by flash photolysis7. In contrast, the crystal structure of myoglobin determined down to 80 K shows no significant structural transition8 10. The dynamical behaviour we find for myoglobin (and other globular proteins) suggests a coupling of fast local motions to slower collective motions, which is a characteristic feature of other dense glass-forming systems.

  12. Fluctuation power spectra reveal dynamical heterogeneity of peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Bhavin; Yew, Zu Thur; Krivov, Sergei; McLeish, Tom; Paci, Emanuele

    2010-07-01

    Characterizing the conformational properties and dynamics of biopolymers and their relation to biological activity and function is an ongoing challenge. Single molecule techniques have provided a rich experimental window on these properties, yet they have often relied on simple one-dimensional projections of a multidimensional free energy landscape for a practical interpretation of the results. Here, we study three short peptides with different structural propensity (α helical, β hairpin, and random coil) in the presence (or absence) of a force applied to their ends using Langevin dynamics simulation and an all-atom model with implicit solvation. Each peptide produces fluctuation power spectra with a characteristic dynamic fingerprint consistent with persistent structural motifs of helices, hairpins, and random coils. The spectra for helix formation shows two well-defined relaxation modes, corresponding to local relaxation and cooperative coil to uncoil interconversion. In contrast, both the hairpin and random coil are polymerlike, showing a broad and continuous range of relaxation modes giving characteristic power laws of ω-5/4 and ω-3/2, respectively; the -5/4 power law for hairpins is robust and has not been previously observed. Langevin dynamics simulations of diffusers on a potential of mean force derived from the atomistic simulations fail to reproduce the fingerprints of each peptide motif in the power spectral density, demonstrating explicitly that such information is lacking in such one-dimensional projections. Our results demonstrate the yet unexploited potential of single molecule fluctuation spectroscopy to probe more fine scaled properties of proteins and biological macromolecules and how low dimensional projections may cause the loss of relevant information.

  13. Optogenetic perturbations reveal the dynamics of an oculomotor integrator

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Pedro J.; Arrenberg, Aristides B.; Hablitzel, Bastian; Baier, Herwig; Machens, Christian K.

    2014-01-01

    Many neural systems can store short-term information in persistently firing neurons. Such persistent activity is believed to be maintained by recurrent feedback among neurons. This hypothesis has been fleshed out in detail for the oculomotor integrator (OI) for which the so-called “line attractor” network model can explain a large set of observations. Here we show that there is a plethora of such models, distinguished by the relative strength of recurrent excitation and inhibition. In each model, the firing rates of the neurons relax toward the persistent activity states. The dynamics of relaxation can be quite different, however, and depend on the levels of recurrent excitation and inhibition. To identify the correct model, we directly measure these relaxation dynamics by performing optogenetic perturbations in the OI of zebrafish expressing halorhodopsin or channelrhodopsin. We show that instantaneous, inhibitory stimulations of the OI lead to persistent, centripetal eye position changes ipsilateral to the stimulation. Excitatory stimulations similarly cause centripetal eye position changes, yet only contralateral to the stimulation. These results show that the dynamics of the OI are organized around a central attractor state—the null position of the eyes—which stabilizes the system against random perturbations. Our results pose new constraints on the circuit connectivity of the system and provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent activity. PMID:24616666

  14. Dynamic Monitoring Reveals Motor Task Characteristics in Prehistoric Technical Gestures

    PubMed Central

    Pfleging, Johannes; Stücheli, Marius; Iovita, Radu; Buchli, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing ancient technical gestures associated with simple tool actions is crucial for understanding the co-evolution of the human forelimb and its associated control-related cognitive functions on the one hand, and of the human technological arsenal on the other hand. Although the topic of gesture is an old one in Paleolithic archaeology and in anthropology in general, very few studies have taken advantage of the new technologies from the science of kinematics in order to improve replicative experimental protocols. Recent work in paleoanthropology has shown the potential of monitored replicative experiments to reconstruct tool-use-related motions through the study of fossil bones, but so far comparatively little has been done to examine the dynamics of the tool itself. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can statistically differentiate gestures used in a simple scraping task through dynamic monitoring. Dynamics combines kinematics (position, orientation, and speed) with contact mechanical parameters (force and torque). Taken together, these parameters are important because they play a role in the formation of a visible archaeological signature, use-wear. We present our new affordable, yet precise methodology for measuring the dynamics of a simple hide-scraping task, carried out using a pull-to (PT) and a push-away (PA) gesture. A strain gage force sensor combined with a visual tag tracking system records force, torque, as well as position and orientation of hafted flint stone tools. The set-up allows switching between two tool configurations, one with distal and the other one with perpendicular hafting of the scrapers, to allow for ethnographically plausible reconstructions. The data show statistically significant differences between the two gestures: scraping away from the body (PA) generates higher shearing forces, but requires greater hand torque. Moreover, most benchmarks associated with the PA gesture are more highly variable than in the PT gesture

  15. Dynamic Monitoring Reveals Motor Task Characteristics in Prehistoric Technical Gestures.

    PubMed

    Pfleging, Johannes; Stücheli, Marius; Iovita, Radu; Buchli, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing ancient technical gestures associated with simple tool actions is crucial for understanding the co-evolution of the human forelimb and its associated control-related cognitive functions on the one hand, and of the human technological arsenal on the other hand. Although the topic of gesture is an old one in Paleolithic archaeology and in anthropology in general, very few studies have taken advantage of the new technologies from the science of kinematics in order to improve replicative experimental protocols. Recent work in paleoanthropology has shown the potential of monitored replicative experiments to reconstruct tool-use-related motions through the study of fossil bones, but so far comparatively little has been done to examine the dynamics of the tool itself. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can statistically differentiate gestures used in a simple scraping task through dynamic monitoring. Dynamics combines kinematics (position, orientation, and speed) with contact mechanical parameters (force and torque). Taken together, these parameters are important because they play a role in the formation of a visible archaeological signature, use-wear. We present our new affordable, yet precise methodology for measuring the dynamics of a simple hide-scraping task, carried out using a pull-to (PT) and a push-away (PA) gesture. A strain gage force sensor combined with a visual tag tracking system records force, torque, as well as position and orientation of hafted flint stone tools. The set-up allows switching between two tool configurations, one with distal and the other one with perpendicular hafting of the scrapers, to allow for ethnographically plausible reconstructions. The data show statistically significant differences between the two gestures: scraping away from the body (PA) generates higher shearing forces, but requires greater hand torque. Moreover, most benchmarks associated with the PA gesture are more highly variable than in the PT gesture

  16. A single double-strand break system reveals repair dynamics and mechanisms in heterochromatin and euchromatin.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Aniek; Breuer, Gregory A; Brinkman, Eva K; van der Meulen, Annelot I; Borden, Sean V; van Steensel, Bas; Bindra, Ranjit S; LaRocque, Jeannine R; Karpen, Gary H

    2016-07-15

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be properly orchestrated in diverse chromatin regions to maintain genome stability. The choice between two main DSB repair pathways, nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR), is regulated by the cell cycle as well as chromatin context.Pericentromeric heterochromatin forms a distinct nuclear domain that is enriched for repetitive DNA sequences that pose significant challenges for genome stability. Heterochromatic DSBs display specialized temporal and spatial dynamics that differ from euchromatic DSBs. Although HR is thought to be the main pathway used to repair heterochromatic DSBs, direct tests of this hypothesis are lacking. Here, we developed an in vivo single DSB system for both heterochromatic and euchromatic loci in Drosophila melanogaster Live imaging of single DSBs in larval imaginal discs recapitulates the spatio-temporal dynamics observed for irradiation (IR)-induced breaks in cell culture. Importantly, live imaging and sequence analysis of repair products reveal that DSBs in euchromatin and heterochromatin are repaired with similar kinetics, employ both NHEJ and HR, and can use homologous chromosomes as an HR template. This direct analysis reveals important insights into heterochromatin DSB repair in animal tissues and provides a foundation for further explorations of repair mechanisms in different chromatin domains. PMID:27474442

  17. Visibility graph analysis on heartbeat dynamics of meditation training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sen; Bian, Chunhua; Ning, Xinbao; Ma, Qianli D. Y.

    2013-06-01

    We apply the visibility graph analysis to human heartbeat dynamics by constructing the complex networks of heartbeat interval time series and investigating the statistical properties of the network before and during chi and yoga meditation. The experiment results show that visibility graph analysis can reveal the dynamical changes caused by meditation training manifested as regular heartbeat, which is closely related to the adjustment of autonomous neural system, and visibility graph analysis is effective to evaluate the effect of meditation.

  18. Dynamics of water-in-oil nanoemulsions revealed by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Orte, Angel; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Paredes, Jose M; Crovetto, Luis; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2011-11-01

    The size, diffusional properties, and dynamics of reverse water-in-oil nanoemulsions, or reverse micelles (RMs), have been widely investigated because of interest in this system as a model for biological compartmentalization. Here, we have employed fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) to reveal the dynamics and sizes of aerosol-OT (AOT)/isooctane RMs using a fluorescent xanthene derivative called Tokyo Green II (TG-II). The dye undergoes a partition and a shift in its tautomeric equilibrium such that the TG-II anion remains in the inner micellar aqueous core, and the neutral quinoid form lies in the interfacial region. By applying FLCS, we specifically obtained the lifetime filtered autocorrelation curves of the anionic TG-II, which shows a characteristic lifetime of approximately 4 ns. Analysis of the FLCS curves provides the diffusion coefficient and hydrodynamic radius of the RMs as well as micelle dynamics in the same experiment. The FLCS curves show dynamics in the microsecond time range, which represents an interconversion rate that changes the distribution of the TG-II neutral and anionic forms in the hydrophobic interface and the water core. PMID:21913723

  19. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets' spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar; Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-01

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet's spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  20. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals regulatory mechanisms at the kidney filtration barrier.

    PubMed

    Rinschen, Markus M; Wu, Xiongwu; König, Tim; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hagmann, Henning; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Kohli, Priyanka; Schnell, Nicole; Schermer, Bernhard; Dryer, Stuart; Brooks, Bernard R; Beltrao, Pedro; Krueger, Marcus; Brinkkoetter, Paul T; Benzing, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Diseases of the kidney filtration barrier are a leading cause of ESRD. Most disorders affect the podocytes, polarized cells with a limited capacity for self-renewal that require tightly controlled signaling to maintain their integrity, viability, and function. Here, we provide an atlas of in vivo phosphorylated, glomerulus-expressed proteins, including podocyte-specific gene products, identified in an unbiased tandem mass spectrometry-based approach. We discovered 2449 phosphorylated proteins corresponding to 4079 identified high-confidence phosphorylated residues and performed a systematic bioinformatics analysis of this dataset. We discovered 146 phosphorylation sites on proteins abundantly expressed in podocytes. The prohibitin homology domain of the slit diaphragm protein podocin contained one such site, threonine 234 (T234), located within a phosphorylation motif that is mutated in human genetic forms of proteinuria. The T234 site resides at the interface of podocin dimers. Free energy calculation through molecular dynamic simulations revealed a role for T234 in regulating podocin dimerization. We show that phosphorylation critically regulates formation of high molecular weight complexes and that this may represent a general principle for the assembly of proteins containing prohibitin homology domains. PMID:24511133

  1. Invisible Electronic States and Their Dynamics Revealed by Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merer, Anthony J.

    2011-06-01

    Sooner or later everyone working in the field of spectroscopy encounters perturbations. These can range in size from a small shift of a single rotational level to total destruction of the vibrational and rotational patterns of an electronic state. To some workers perturbations are a source of terror, but to others they are the most fascinating features of molecular spectra, because they give information about molecular dynamics, and about states that would otherwise be invisible as a result of unfavorable selection rules. An example of the latter is the essentially complete characterization of the tilde{b}^3A_2 state of SO_2 from the vibronic perturbations it causes in the tilde{a}^3B_1 state. The S_1-trans state of acetylene is a beautiful example of dynamics in action. The level patterns of the three bending vibrations change dramatically with increasing vibrational excitation as a result of the vibrational angular momentum and the approach to the isomerization barrier. Several vibrational levels of the S_1-cis isomer, previously thought to be unobservable, can now be assigned. They obtain their intensity through interactions with nearby levels of the trans isomer.

  2. Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Buck, Moritz; Nilsson, Louise K J; Brunius, Carl; Dabiré, Roch K; Hopkins, Richard; Terenius, Olle

    2016-01-01

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21(st) century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world. PMID:26960555

  3. Blood Sugar Measurement in Zebrafish Reveals Dynamics of Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Stefani C.; Philipson, Louis H.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The adult zebrafish has the potential to become an important model for diabetes-related research. To realize this potential, small-scale methods for analyzing pancreas function are required. The measurement of blood glucose level is a commonly used method for assessing β-cell function, but the small size of the zebrafish presents challenges both for collecting blood samples and for measuring glucose. We have developed methods for collecting microsamples of whole blood and plasma for the measurement of hematocrit and blood glucose. We demonstrate that two hand-held glucose meters designed for use by human diabetics return valid results with zebrafish blood. Additionally, we present methods for fasting and for performing postprandial glucose and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests. We find that the dynamics of zebrafish blood glucose homeostasis are consistent with patterns reported for other omnivorous teleost fish. PMID:20515318

  4. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets’ spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-15

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet’s spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  5. Bacterial associations reveal spatial population dynamics in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Moritz; Nilsson, Louise K. J.; Brunius, Carl; Dabiré, Roch K.; Hopkins, Richard; Terenius, Olle

    2016-01-01

    The intolerable burden of malaria has for too long plagued humanity and the prospect of eradicating malaria is an optimistic, but reachable, target in the 21st century. However, extensive knowledge is needed about the spatial structure of mosquito populations in order to develop effective interventions against malaria transmission. We hypothesized that the microbiota associated with a mosquito reflects acquisition of bacteria in different environments. By analyzing the whole-body bacterial flora of An. gambiae mosquitoes from Burkina Faso by 16 S amplicon sequencing, we found that the different environments gave each mosquito a specific bacterial profile. In addition, the bacterial profiles provided precise and predicting information on the spatial dynamics of the mosquito population as a whole and showed that the mosquitoes formed clear local populations within a meta-population network. We believe that using microbiotas as proxies for population structures will greatly aid improving the performance of vector interventions around the world. PMID:26960555

  6. Single-cell dynamics reveals sustained growth during diauxic shifts.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Sarah; Tostevin, Filipe; Kiviet, Daniel J; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J

    2013-01-01

    Stochasticity in gene regulation has been characterized extensively, but how it affects cellular growth and fitness is less clear. We study the growth of E. coli cells as they shift from glucose to lactose metabolism, which is characterized by an obligatory growth arrest in bulk experiments that is termed the lag phase. Here, we follow the growth dynamics of individual cells at minute-resolution using a single-cell assay in a microfluidic device during this shift, while also monitoring lac expression. Mirroring the bulk results, the majority of cells displays a growth arrest upon glucose exhaustion, and resume when triggered by stochastic lac expression events. However, a significant fraction of cells maintains a high rate of elongation and displays no detectable growth lag during the shift. This ability to suppress the growth lag should provide important selective advantages when nutrients are scarce. Trajectories of individual cells display a highly non-linear relation between lac expression and growth, with only a fraction of fully induced levels being sufficient for achieving near maximal growth. A stochastic molecular model together with measured dependencies between nutrient concentration, lac expression level, and growth accurately reproduces the observed switching distributions. The results show that a growth arrest is not obligatory in the classic diauxic shift, and underscore that regulatory stochasticity ought to be considered in terms of its impact on growth and survival. PMID:23637881

  7. Phase Resetting Reveals Network Dynamics Underlying a Bacterial Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yihan; Li, Ying; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2012-01-01

    Genomic and proteomic methods yield networks of biological regulatory interactions but do not provide direct insight into how those interactions are organized into functional modules, or how information flows from one module to another. In this work we introduce an approach that provides this complementary information and apply it to the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus, a paradigm for cell-cycle control. Operationally, we use an inducible promoter to express the essential transcriptional regulatory gene ctrA in a periodic, pulsed fashion. This chemical perturbation causes the population of cells to divide synchronously, and we use the resulting advance or delay of the division times of single cells to construct a phase resetting curve. We find that delay is strongly favored over advance. This finding is surprising since it does not follow from the temporal expression profile of CtrA and, in turn, simulations of existing network models. We propose a phenomenological model that suggests that the cell-cycle network comprises two distinct functional modules that oscillate autonomously and couple in a highly asymmetric fashion. These features collectively provide a new mechanism for tight temporal control of the cell cycle in C. crescentus. We discuss how the procedure can serve as the basis for a general approach for probing network dynamics, which we term chemical perturbation spectroscopy (CPS). PMID:23209388

  8. A novel, dynamic pattern-based analysis of NF-κB binding during the priming phase of liver regeneration reveals switch-like functional regulation of target genes

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Patra, Biswanath; Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Hoek, Jan B.; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2015-01-01

    Following partial hepatectomy, a coordinated series of molecular events occurs to regulate hepatocyte entry into the cell cycle to recover lost mass. In rats during the first 6 h following resection, hepatocytes are primed by a tightly controlled cytokine response to prepare hepatocytes to begin replication. Although it appears to be a critical element driving regeneration, the cytokine response to resection has not yet been fully characterized. Specifically, the role of one of the key response elements to cytokine signaling (NF-κB) remains incompletely characterized. In this study, we present a novel, genome-wide, pattern-based analysis characterizing NF-κB binding during the priming phase of liver regeneration. We interrogated the dynamic regulation of priming by NF-κB through categorizing NF-κB binding in different temporal profiles: immediate sustained response, early transient response, and delayed response to partial hepatectomy. We then identified functional regulation of NF-κB binding by relating the temporal response profile to differential gene expression. We found that NF-κB bound genes govern negative regulation of cell growth and inflammatory response immediately following hepatectomy. NF-κB also transiently regulates genes responsible for lipid biosynthesis and transport as well as induction of apoptosis following hepatectomy. By the end of the priming phase, NF-κB regulation of genes involved in inflammatory response, negative regulation of cell death, and extracellular structure organization became prominent. These results suggest that NF-κB regulates target genes through binding and unbinding in immediate, transient, and delayed patterns. Such dynamic switch-like patterns of NF-κB binding may govern different functional transitions that drive the onset of regeneration. PMID:26217230

  9. EEG microstate sequences in healthy humans at rest reveal scale-free dynamics.

    PubMed

    Van de Ville, Dimitri; Britz, Juliane; Michel, Christoph M

    2010-10-19

    Recent findings identified electroencephalography (EEG) microstates as the electrophysiological correlates of fMRI resting-state networks. Microstates are defined as short periods (100 ms) during which the EEG scalp topography remains quasi-stable; that is, the global topography is fixed but strength might vary and polarity invert. Microstates represent the subsecond coherent activation within global functional brain networks. Surprisingly, these rapidly changing EEG microstates correlate significantly with activity in fMRI resting-state networks after convolution with the hemodynamic response function that constitutes a strong temporal smoothing filter. We postulate here that microstate sequences should reveal scale-free, self-similar dynamics to explain this remarkable effect and thus that microstate time series show dependencies over long time ranges. To that aim, we deploy wavelet-based fractal analysis that allows determining scale-free behavior. We find strong statistical evidence that microstate sequences are scale free over six dyadic scales covering the 256-ms to 16-s range. The degree of long-range dependency is maintained when shuffling the local microstate labels but becomes indistinguishable from white noise when equalizing microstate durations, which indicates that temporal dynamics are their key characteristic. These results advance the understanding of temporal dynamics of brain-scale neuronal network models such as the global workspace model. Whereas microstates can be considered the "atoms of thoughts," the shortest constituting elements of cognition, they carry a dynamic signature that is reminiscent at characteristic timescales up to multiple seconds. The scale-free dynamics of the microstates might be the basis for the rapid reorganization and adaptation of the functional networks of the brain. PMID:20921381

  10. Revealing the dynamics of Class 0 protostellar discs with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifried, D.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Walch, S.; Banerjee, R.

    2016-06-01

    We present synthetic ALMA observations of Keplerian, protostellar discs in the Class 0 stage studying the emission of molecular tracers like 13CO, C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, N2H+, and H2CO. We model the emission of discs around low- and intermediate-mass protostars. We show that under optimal observing conditions ALMA is able to detect the discs already in the earliest stage of protostellar evolution, although the emission is often concentrated to the innermost 50 au. Therefore, a resolution of a few 0.1 arcsec might be too low to detect Keplerian discs around Class 0 objects. We also demonstrate that under optimal conditions for edge-on discs Keplerian rotation signatures are recognisable, from which protostellar masses can be inferred. For this we here introduce a new approach, which allows us to determine protostellar masses with higher fidelity than before. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to reveal Keplerian rotation even for strongly inclined discs and that ALMA should be able to detect possible signs of fragmentation in face-on discs. In order to give some guidance for future ALMA observations, we investigate the influence of varying observing conditions and source distances. We show that it is possible to probe Keplerian rotation in inclined discs with an observing time of 2 h and a resolution of 0.1 arcsec, even in the case of moderate weather conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that under optimal conditions, Keplerian discs around intermediate-mass protostars should be detectable up to kpc distances.

  11. Oman metamorphic sole formation reveals early subduction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soret, Mathieu; Agard, Philippe; Dubacq, Benoît; Plunder, Alexis; Ildefonse, Benoît; Yamato, Philippe; Prigent, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic soles correspond to m to ~500m thick tectonic slices welded beneath most of the large-scale ophiolites. They typically show a steep inverted metamorphic structure where the pressure and temperature conditions of crystallization increase upward (from 500±100°C at 0.5±0.2 GPa to 800±100°C at 1.0±0.2 GPa), with isograds subparallel to the contact with the overlying ophiolitic peridotite. The proportion of mafic rocks in metamorphic soles also increases from the bottom (meta-sediments rich) to the top (approaching the ophiolite peridotites). These soles are interpreted as the result of heat transfer from the incipient mantle wedge toward the nascent slab (associated with large-scale fluid transfer and possible shear heating) during the first My of intra-oceanic subduction (as indicated by radiometric ages). Metamorphic soles provide therefore major constraints on early subduction dynamics (i.e., thermal structure, fluid migration and rheology along the nascent slab interface). We present a detailed structural and petrological study of the metamorphic sole from 4 major cross-sections along the Oman ophiolite. We show precise pressure-temperature estimates obtained by pseudosection modelling and EBSD measurements performed on both the garnet-bearing and garnet-free high-grade sole. Results allow quantification of the micro-scale deformation and highlight differences in pressure-temperature-deformation conditions between the 4 different locations, showing that the inverted metamorphic gradient through the sole is not continuous in all locations. Based on these new constraints, we suggest a new tectonic-petrological model for the formation of metamorphic soles below ophiolites. This model involves the stacking of several homogeneous slivers of oceanic crust leading to the present-day structure of the sole. In this view, these thrusts are the result of rheological contrasts between the sole and the peridotite as the plate interface progressively cools down

  12. Transcriptome-wide mapping reveals reversible and dynamic N(1)-methyladenosine methylome.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Xiong, Xushen; Wang, Kun; Wang, Lixia; Shu, Xiaoting; Ma, Shiqing; Yi, Chengqi

    2016-05-01

    N(1)-Methyladenosine (m(1)A) is a prevalent post-transcriptional RNA modification, yet little is known about its abundance, topology and dynamics in mRNA. Here, we show that m(1)A is prevalent in Homo sapiens mRNA, which shows an m(1)A/A ratio of ∼0.02%. We develop the m(1)A-ID-seq technique, based on m(1)A immunoprecipitation and the inherent ability of m(1)A to stall reverse transcription, as a means for transcriptome-wide m(1)A profiling. m(1)A-ID-seq identifies 901 m(1)A peaks (from 600 genes) in mRNA and noncoding RNA and reveals a prominent feature, enrichment in the 5' untranslated region of mRNA transcripts, that is distinct from the pattern for N(6)-methyladenosine, the most abundant internal mammalian mRNA modification. Moreover, m(1)A in mRNA is reversible by ALKBH3, a known DNA/RNA demethylase. Lastly, we show that m(1)A methylation responds dynamically to stimuli, and we identify hundreds of stress-induced m(1)A sites. Collectively, our approaches allow comprehensive analysis of m(1)A modification and provide tools for functional studies of potential epigenetic regulation via the reversible and dynamic m(1)A methylation. PMID:26863410

  13. HUBBLE IMAGES REVEAL A YOUNG STAR'S DYNAMIC DISK AND JETS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These images of HH 30 show changes over only a five-year period in the disk and jets of this newborn star, which is about half a million years old. The pictures were taken between 1995 and 2000 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomers are interested in the disk because it is probably similar to the one from which the Sun and the planets in our solar system formed. Hubble reveals an edge-on disk (located at the bottom of the images), which appears as a flattened cloud of dust split into two halves by a dark lane. The disk blocks light from the central star. All that is visible is the reflection of the star's light by dust above and below the plane of the disk. The disk's diameter is 450 astronomical units (one astronomical unit equals the Earth-Sun distance). Shadows billions of miles in size can be seen moving across the disk. In 1995 and 2000, the left and right sides of the disk were about the same brightness, but in 1998 the right side was brighter. These patterns may be caused by bright spots on the star or variations in the disk near the star. The dust cloud near the top of these frames is illuminated by the star and reflects changes in its brightness. The star's magnetic field plays a major role in forming the jets (located above and below the disk), which look like streams of water from a fire hose. The powerful magnetic field creates the jets by channeling gas from the disk along the magnetic poles above and below the star. The gaps between the compact knots of gas seen in the jet above the disk indicate that this is a sporadic process. By tracking the motion of these knots over time, astronomers have measured the jet's speed at between 200,000 to 600,000 miles per hour (160,000 and 960,000 kilometers per hour). Oddly, the jet below the disk is moving twice as fast as the one above it. Credits: NASA, Alan Watson (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico), Karl Stapelfeldt (Jet Propulsion Laboratory), John

  14. Self-similar multiscale structure of lignin revealed by neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Urban, Volker; Heller, William T; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Foston, Marcus B; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    Lignin, a major polymeric component of plant cell walls, forms aggregates in vivo and poses a barrier to cellulosic ethanol production. Here, neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that lignin aggregates are characterized by a surface fractal dimension that is invariant under change of scale from 1 1000 A. The simulations also reveal extensive water penetration of the aggregates and heterogeneous chain dynamics corresponding to a rigid core with a fluid surface.

  15. Automated live cell imaging systems reveal dynamic cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Chirieleison, Steven M; Bissell, Taylor A; Scelfo, Christopher C; Anderson, Jordan E; Li, Yong; Koebler, Doug J; Deasy, Bridget M

    2011-07-01

    Automated time-lapsed microscopy provides unique research opportunities to visualize cells and subcellular components in experiments with time-dependent parameters. As accessibility to these systems is increasing, we review here their use in cell science with a focus on stem cell research. Although the use of time-lapsed imaging to answer biological questions dates back nearly 150 years, only recently have the use of an environmentally controlled chamber and robotic stage controllers allowed for high-throughput continuous imaging over long periods at the cell and subcellular levels. Numerous automated imaging systems are now available from both companies that specialize in live cell imaging and from major microscope manufacturers. We discuss the key components of robots used for time-lapsed live microscopic imaging, and the unique data that can be obtained from image analysis. We show how automated features enhance experimentation by providing examples of uniquely quantified proliferation and migration live cell imaging data. In addition to providing an efficient system that drastically reduces man-hours and consumes fewer laboratory resources, this technology greatly enhances cell science by providing a unique dataset of temporal changes in cell activity. PMID:21692197

  16. Dynamic scalp topography reveals neural signs just before performance errors

    PubMed Central

    Ora, Hiroki; Sekiguchi, Tatsuhiko; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Performance errors may cause serious consequences. It has been reported that ongoing activity of the frontal control regions across trials associates with the occurrence of performance errors. However, neural mechanisms that cause performance errors remain largely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that some neural functions required for correct outcomes are lacking just before performance errors, and to determine this lack of neural function we applied a spatiotemporal analysis to high-density electroencephalogram signals recorded during a visual discrimination task, a d2 test of attention. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a difference in the temporal development of scalp ERP between trials with error, and correct outcomes as seen by topography during the d2 test of attention. We observed differences in the signal potential in the frontal region and then the occipital region between reaction times matched with correct and error outcomes. Our observations suggest that lapses of top-down signals from frontal control regions cause performance errors just after the lapses. PMID:26289925

  17. Health trajectories reveal the dynamic contributions of host genetic resistance and tolerance to infection outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lough, Graham; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Bergmann, Silke; Lengeling, Andreas; Doeschl-Wilson, Andrea B.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance and tolerance are two alternative strategies hosts can adopt to survive infections. Both strategies may be genetically controlled. To date, the relative contribution of resistance and tolerance to infection outcome is poorly understood. Here, we use a bioluminescent Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) infection challenge model to study the genetic determination and dynamic contributions of host resistance and tolerance to listeriosis in four genetically diverse mouse strains. Using conventional statistical analyses, we detect significant genetic variation in both resistance and tolerance, but cannot capture the time-dependent relative importance of either host strategy. We overcome these limitations through the development of novel statistical tools to analyse individual infection trajectories portraying simultaneous changes in infection severity and health. Based on these tools, early expression of resistance followed by expression of tolerance emerge as important hallmarks for surviving Lm infections. Our trajectory analysis further reveals that survivors and non-survivors follow distinct infection paths (which are also genetically determined) and provides new survival thresholds as objective endpoints in infection experiments. Future studies may use trajectories as novel traits for mapping and identifying genes that control infection dynamics and outcome. A Matlab script for user-friendly trajectory analysis is provided. PMID:26582028

  18. Degradation dynamics of microRNAs revealed by a novel pulse-chase approach

    PubMed Central

    Marzi, Matteo J.; Ghini, Francesco; Cerruti, Benedetta; de Pretis, Stefano; Bonetti, Paola; Giacomelli, Chiara; Gorski, Marcin M.; Kress, Theresia; Pelizzola, Mattia; Muller, Heiko; Amati, Bruno; Nicassio, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of miRNAs is critical to the definition of cell identity and behavior in normal physiology and disease. To date, the dynamics of miRNA degradation and the mechanisms involved in remain largely obscure, in particular, in higher organisms. Here, we developed a pulse-chase approach based on metabolic RNA labeling to calculate miRNA decay rates at genome-wide scale in mammalian cells. Our analysis revealed heterogeneous miRNA half-lives, with many species behaving as stable molecules (T1/2 > 24 h), while others, including passenger miRNAs and a number (25/129) of guide miRNAs, are quickly turned over (T1/2 = 4–14 h). Decay rates were coupled with other features, including genomic organization, transcription rates, structural heterogeneity (isomiRs), and target abundance, measured through quantitative experimental approaches. This comprehensive analysis highlighted functional mechanisms that mediate miRNA degradation, as well as the importance of decay dynamics in the regulation of the miRNA pool under both steady-state conditions and during cell transitions. PMID:26821571

  19. Degradation dynamics of microRNAs revealed by a novel pulse-chase approach.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Matteo J; Ghini, Francesco; Cerruti, Benedetta; de Pretis, Stefano; Bonetti, Paola; Giacomelli, Chiara; Gorski, Marcin M; Kress, Theresia; Pelizzola, Mattia; Muller, Heiko; Amati, Bruno; Nicassio, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The regulation of miRNAs is critical to the definition of cell identity and behavior in normal physiology and disease. To date, the dynamics of miRNA degradation and the mechanisms involved in remain largely obscure, in particular, in higher organisms. Here, we developed a pulse-chase approach based on metabolic RNA labeling to calculate miRNA decay rates at genome-wide scale in mammalian cells. Our analysis revealed heterogeneous miRNA half-lives, with many species behaving as stable molecules (T1/2> 24 h), while others, including passenger miRNAs and a number (25/129) of guide miRNAs, are quickly turned over (T1/2= 4-14 h). Decay rates were coupled with other features, including genomic organization, transcription rates, structural heterogeneity (isomiRs), and target abundance, measured through quantitative experimental approaches. This comprehensive analysis highlighted functional mechanisms that mediate miRNA degradation, as well as the importance of decay dynamics in the regulation of the miRNA pool under both steady-state conditions and during cell transitions. PMID:26821571

  20. Dynamic feature analysis in bidirectional pedestrian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xia, Yang; Winnie, Daamen; Serge, Paul Hoogendoorn; Hai-Rong, Dong; Xiu-Ming, Yao

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of dynamic features of pedestrian flows is one of the most exciting topics in pedestrian dynamics. This paper focuses on the effect of homogeneity and heterogeneity in three parameters of the social force model, namely desired velocity, reaction time, and body size, on the moving dynamics of bidirectional pedestrian flows in the corridors. The speed and its deviation in free flows are investigated. Simulation results show that the homogeneous higher desired speed which is less than a critical threshold, shorter reaction time or smaller body size results in higher speed of flows. The free dynamics is more sensitive to the heterogeneity in desired speed than that in reaction time or in body size. In particular, an inner lane formation is observed in normal lanes. Furthermore, the breakdown probability and the start time of breakdown are focused on. This study reveals that the sizes of homogeneous desired speed, reaction time or body size play more important roles in affecting the breakdown than the heterogeneities in these three parameters do. Project supported jointly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61233001) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2013JBZ007).

  1. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  2. Cortical mechanisms of smooth eye movements revealed by dynamic covariations of neural and behavioral responses.

    PubMed

    Schoppik, David; Nagel, Katherine I; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2008-04-24

    Neural activity in the frontal eye fields controls smooth pursuit eye movements, but the relationship between single neuron responses, cortical population responses, and eye movements is not well understood. We describe an approach to dynamically link trial-to-trial fluctuations in neural responses to parallel variations in pursuit and demonstrate that individual neurons predict eye velocity fluctuations at particular moments during the course of behavior, while the population of neurons collectively tiles the entire duration of the movement. The analysis also reveals the strength of correlations in the eye movement predictions derived from pairs of simultaneously recorded neurons and suggests a simple model of cortical processing. These findings constrain the primate cortical code for movement, suggesting that either a few neurons are sufficient to drive pursuit at any given time or that many neurons operate collectively at each moment with remarkably little variation added to motor command signals downstream from the cortex. PMID:18439409

  3. Nonlinear analysis of pupillary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Onorati, Francesco; Mainardi, Luca Tommaso; Sirca, Fabiola; Russo, Vincenzo; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Pupil size reflects autonomic response to different environmental and behavioral stimuli, and its dynamics have been linked to other autonomic correlates such as cardiac and respiratory rhythms. The aim of this study is to assess the nonlinear characteristics of pupil size of 25 normal subjects who participated in a psychophysiological experimental protocol with four experimental conditions, namely “baseline”, “anger”, “joy”, and “sadness”. Nonlinear measures, such as sample entropy, correlation dimension, and largest Lyapunov exponent, were computed on reconstructed signals of spontaneous fluctuations of pupil dilation. Nonparametric statistical tests were performed on surrogate data to verify that the nonlinear measures are an intrinsic characteristic of the signals. We then developed and applied a piecewise linear regression model to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Two joinpoints and three scaling intervals were identified: slope α0, at slow time scales, represents a persistent nonstationary long-range correlation, whereas α1 and α2, at middle and fast time scales, respectively, represent long-range power-law correlations, similarly to DFA applied to heart rate variability signals. Of the computed complexity measures, α0 showed statistically significant differences among experimental conditions (p<0.001). Our results suggest that (a) pupil size at constant light condition is characterized by nonlinear dynamics, (b) three well-defined and distinct long-memory processes exist at different time scales, and (c) autonomic stimulation is partially reflected in nonlinear dynamics. PMID:26351899

  4. Slow dynamics of nanocomposite polymer aerogels as revealed by X-ray photocorrelation spectroscopy (XPCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Rebeca E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Mijangos, Carmen; Nogales, Aurora E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Ezquerra, Tiberio A.; Sprung, Michael

    2014-01-14

    We report on a novel slow dynamics of polymer xerogels, aerogels, and nanocomposite aerogels with iron oxide nanoparticles, as revealed by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The polymer aerogel and its nanocomposite aerogels, which are porous in nature, exhibit hyper-diffusive dynamics at room temperature. In contrast, non-porous polymer xerogels exhibit an absence of this peculiar dynamics. This slow dynamical process has been assigned to a relaxation of the characteristic porous structure of these materials and not to the presence of nanoparticles.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal specific interactions of post-translational palmitoyl modifications with rhodopsin in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Bjoern E.S.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Brown, Michael F.; Feller, Scott E.; Vogel, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the behavior of the highly flexible post-translational lipid modifications of rhodopsin from multiple-microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Rhodopsin was studied in a realistic membrane environment that includes cholesterol, as well as saturated and polyunsaturated lipids with phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine headgroups. The simulation reveals striking differences between the palmitoylations at Cys322 and Cys323 as well as between the palmitoyl chains and the neighboring lipids. Notably the palmitoyl group at Cys322 shows considerably greater contact with helix H1 of rhodopsin, yielding frequent chain upturns with longer reorientational correlation times, and relatively low order parameters. While the palmitoylation at Cys323 makes fewer protein contacts and has increased order compared to Cys322, it nevertheless exhibits greater flexibility with smaller order parameters than the stearoyl chains of the surrounding lipids. The dynamical structure of the palmitoylations—as well as their extensive fluctuations—suggests a complex function for the post-translational modifications in rhodopsin and potentially other G protein-coupled receptors, going beyond their role as membrane anchoring elements. Rather, we propose that the palmitoylation at Cys323 has a potential role as a lipid anchor, whereas the palmitoyl-protein interaction observed for Cys322 suggests a more specific interaction that affects the stability of the dark state of rhodopsin. PMID:22280374

  6. Revealing nonergodic dynamics in living cells from a single particle trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanoiselée, Yann; Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2016-05-01

    We propose the improved ergodicity and mixing estimators to identify nonergodic dynamics from a single particle trajectory. The estimators are based on the time-averaged characteristic function of the increments and can thus capture additional information on the process as compared to the conventional time-averaged mean-square displacement. The estimators are first investigated and validated for several models of anomalous diffusion, such as ergodic fractional Brownian motion and diffusion on percolating clusters, and nonergodic continuous-time random walks and scaled Brownian motion. The estimators are then applied to two sets of earlier published trajectories of mRNA molecules inside live Escherichia coli cells and of Kv2.1 potassium channels in the plasma membrane. These statistical tests did not reveal nonergodic features in the former set, while some trajectories of the latter set could be classified as nonergodic. Time averages along such trajectories are thus not representative and may be strongly misleading. Since the estimators do not rely on ensemble averages, the nonergodic features can be revealed separately for each trajectory, providing a more flexible and reliable analysis of single-particle tracking experiments in microbiology.

  7. Complex and dynamic landscape of RNA polyadenylation revealed by PAS-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Peter J.; Choi, Eun-A; Lu, Jente; Flanagan, Lisa A.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Shi, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) of mRNAs has emerged as an important mechanism for post-transcriptional gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. Although microarrays have recently been used to characterize APA globally, they have a number of serious limitations that prevents comprehensive and highly quantitative analysis. To better characterize APA and its regulation, we have developed a deep sequencing-based method called Poly(A) Site Sequencing (PAS-Seq) for quantitatively profiling RNA polyadenylation at the transcriptome level. PAS-Seq not only accurately and comprehensively identifies poly(A) junctions in mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, but also provides quantitative information on the relative abundance of polyadenylated RNAs. PAS-Seq analyses of human and mouse transcriptomes showed that 40%–50% of all expressed genes produce alternatively polyadenylated mRNAs. Furthermore, our study detected evolutionarily conserved polyadenylation of histone mRNAs and revealed novel features of mitochondrial RNA polyadenylation. Finally, PAS-Seq analyses of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, neural stem/progenitor (NSP) cells, and neurons not only identified more poly(A) sites than what was found in the entire mouse EST database, but also detected significant changes in the global APA profile that lead to lengthening of 3′ untranslated regions (UTR) in many mRNAs during stem cell differentiation. Together, our PAS-Seq analyses revealed a complex landscape of RNA polyadenylation in mammalian cells and the dynamic regulation of APA during stem cell differentiation. PMID:21343387

  8. Dynamical regime shifts in the North Atlantic climate variability during the last 2 ka as revealed by terrestrial proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Jasper G.; Donner, Reik V.

    2016-04-01

    The climate during the last two millennia is in general considered to be exceptionally stable compared to prior times. Nevertheless, there have been different episodes of distinguishable climate dynamics, most prominently the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). In this study, we test a set of terrestrial paleoclimate records from Northern Europe for indications of temporary time-reversal asymmetry implying that during the thus identified periods of time, the data cannot be described by a linear Gaussian process and thus exhibit marked (possibly nonlinear) dynamics. Our analysis reveals that the onsets of both the MCA and the LIA are characterized by such complex dynamics indicating possible dynamical regime shifts in the regional climate system. Furthermore, the end of the Roman Warm Period as well as the 1.4k event are accompanied by similar signatures of time-reversal asymmetry.

  9. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  10. Metabolomics Reveals Dynamic Metabolic Changes Associated with Age in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chih-Yung; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Lin, Gigin; Chiang, Meng-Han; Yang, Shu-Chen; Chao, Wei-Ju; Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-Han; Hua, Man-Chin; Liao, Sui-Ling; Lai, Shen-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A detailed understanding of the metabolic processes governing rapid growth in early life is still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the age-related metabolic changes in healthy children throughout early childhood. Methods Healthy children from a birth cohort were enrolled in this study from birth through 4 years of age. Urinary metabolites were assessed at 6 months, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 yr of age by using 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis including principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Metabolic pathway analysis was performed using the MetPA web tool. Results A total of 105 urine samples from 30 healthy children were collected and analyzed. Metabolites contributing to the discrimination between age groups were identified by using supervised PLS-DA (Q2 = 0.60; R2 = 0.66). A significantly higher urinary trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and betaine level was found in children aged 6 months. Urinary glycine and glutamine levels declined significantly after 6 months of age and there was a concomitant compensatory increase in urinary creatine and creatinine. Metabolic pathway analysis using MetPA revealed similar nitrogen metabolism associated energy production across all ages assessed. Pathways associated with amino acid metabolism were significantly different between infants aged 6 months and 1 year, whereas pathways associated with carbohydrate metabolism were significantly different between children at ages 2 and 3 years. Conclusions Urine metabolomics ideally represents dynamic metabolic changes across age. Urinary metabolic profiles change significantly within the first year of life, which can potentially provide crucial information about infant nutrition and growth. PMID:26914934

  11. NERVA 400E thrust train dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vronay, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    The natural frequencies and dynamic responses of the NERVA 400E engine thrust train were determined for nuclear space operations (NSO), and earth-orbital shuttle (EOS) during launch and boost conditions. For NSO, a mini-tank configuration was analyzed with the forward end of the upper truss assumed fixed at the stage/mini-tank interface. For EOS, both a mini-tank and an engine only configuration were analyzed for a specific engine assembly support (EAS) stiffness. For all cases the effect of the shield on dynamic response characteristics was determined by performing parallel analyses with and without the shield. Gimbaling loads were not generated as that effort was scheduled after the termination date. The analysis, while demonstrating the adequacy of the engine design, revealed serious deficiencies in the EAS. Responses at the unsupported ends of the engine are excessive. Responses at the nuclear subsystem interface appear acceptable. It is recommended that additional analysis and design effort be expended upon the EAS to ensure that all engine responses stay within reasonable bounds.

  12. Mechanically Untying a Protein Slipknot: Multiple Pathways Revealed by Force Spectroscopy and Steered Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    He, Chengzhi; Genchev, Georgi Z.; Lu, Hui; Li, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure is highly diverse when considering a wide range of protein types, helping to give rise to the multitude of functions that proteins perform. In particular, certain proteins are known to adopt a knotted or slipknotted fold. How such proteins undergo mechanical unfolding was investigated utilizing a combination of single molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM), protein engineering and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to show the mechanical unfolding mechanism of the slipknotted protein AFV3-109. Our results reveal that the mechancial unfolding of AFV3-109 can proceed via multiple parallel unfolding pathways that all cause the protein slipknot to untie, and the polypeptide chain to completely extend. These distinct unfolding pathways proceed either via a two-state or three-state unfolding process involving the formation of a well-defined, stable intermediate state. SMD simulations predict the same contour length increments for different unfolding pathways as single molecule AFM results, thus provding a plausible molecular mechanism for the mechanical unfolding of AFV3-109. These SMD simulations also reveal that two-state unfolding is initiated from both the N- and C-termini, while three-state unfolding is initiated only from the C-terminus. In both pathways, the protein slipknot was untied during unfolding, and no tightened slipknot conformation observed. Detailed analysis revealed that interactions between key structural elements lock the knotting loop in place, preventing it from shrinking and the formation of a tightened slipknot conformation. Our results demonstrate the bifurcation of the mechancial unfolding pathway of AFV3-109, and point to the generality of a kinetic partitioning mechanism for protein folding/unfolding. PMID:22626004

  13. Seasonal-Resolution δ18O in Speleothems by Ion Microprobe: Revealing Asian Monsoon Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orland, I. J.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.; Kozdon, R.; Valley, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, ion microprobe analysis of speleothems (cave carbonates) has increased the temporal resolution of their oxygen isotope (δ18O) paleoclimate proxy records. Recent improvements in methodology, standardization, and imaging at the WiscSIMS lab make it possible to examine sub-annual patterns of δ18O variability at 10-µm-scale, revealing new seasonal paleoenvironmental information. We applied this technique to an important suite of Chinese stalagmites with conventional drill-sampled δ18O records that reflect changes in Asian Monsoon dynamics across the last deglaciation. Seasonal-resolution δ18O analyses in the Chinese stalagmites reveal regular patterns of annual δ18O variability. Quantitative assessment of the patterns identifies two important components in the δ18O records. First, the source and rainout histories of water vapors that ultimately yield rainfall over China play a primary role in determining the δ18O value of speleothem calcite year-round. Second, intra-annual patterns of calcite δ18O variability indicate that the annual proportion of monsoon precipitation changes systematically during the last deglaciation; the annual proportion of monsoon rainfall is greater during the Holocene and Bølling-Allerød than during the Younger Dryas. This is the first time these components have been characterized in any speleothem δ18O record of monsoon dynamics because seasonal δ18O variability is lost by conventional drill-sampling. Ion microprobe analysis of speleothems can also produce year-by-year records of δ18O across abrupt climate change events. At the Younger Dryas-Holocene transition in a Kulishu Cave stalagmite, which spanned 16 years at 11.53 ky BP, there is a relatively smooth decrease in year-round δ18O(calcite). In contrast, the intra-annual δ18O patterns indicate that the increase in the annual proportion of monsoon rainfall across this transition is stochastic, implying that this record can distinguish the regional

  14. Dynamic Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic hurricane data analysis tool allows users of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) to analyze data over a Web medium. The TCIS software is described in the previous article, Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) (NPO-45748). This tool interfaces with the TCIS database to pull in data from several different atmospheric and oceanic data sets, both observed by instruments. Users can use this information to generate histograms, maps, and profile plots for specific storms. The tool also displays statistical values for the user-selected parameter for the mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values. There is little wait time, allowing for fast data plots over date and spatial ranges. Users may also zoom-in for a closer look at a particular spatial range. This is version 1 of the software. Researchers will use the data and tools on the TCIS to understand hurricane processes, improve hurricane forecast models and identify what types of measurements the next generation of instruments will need to collect.

  15. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  16. Longitudinal Alterations in the Dynamic Autoregulation of Optic Nerve Head Blood Flow Revealed in Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Cull, Grant; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Thompson, Simon; Fortune, Brad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To use a novel dynamic autoregulation analysis (dAR) to test the hypothesis that the optic nerve head (ONH) blood flow (BF) autoregulation is disrupted during early stages of experimental glaucoma (EG) in nonhuman primates. Methods. Retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT, assessed by optical coherence tomography) and ONH BF (assessed by laser speckle imaging technique) were measured biweekly before and after unilateral laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork. Each nonhuman primate was followed until reaching either an early stage of damage (RNFLT loss < 20%, n = 6) or moderate to advanced stages of damage (RNFLT loss > 20%, n = 9). At each test, dAR was assessed by characterizing ONH BF changes during the first minute of rapid manometrical intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation from 10 to 40 mm Hg. The dAR analysis extracted the following parameters: baseline BF, average BF 10 seconds before IOP elevation; BFΔmax, maximum BF change from baseline BF; Tr, time from baseline BF to the BFΔmax; Kr, average descending BF rate. Results. Mean postlaser IOP was 20.2 ± 5.9 and 12.3 ± 2.6 mm Hg in EG and control eyes, respectively (P < 0.0001). Compared with prelaser values, baseline BF was higher in early EG, but lower in moderate to advanced EG (P = 0.01). Tr was increased and Kr was reduced in both stages (P < 0.01). BFΔmax was smaller in the early EG (P = 0.05) and remained low in the moderate to advanced EG (P = 0.15). No changes in the parameters were observed in control eyes. Conclusions. Chronic IOP elevation causes ONH autoregulation dysfunction in the early stage of EG, characterized by a disrupted BF response and delayed Tr, revealed by dAR analysis. PMID:24812551

  17. Molecular Dynamic Simulations Reveal the Structural Determinants of Fatty Acid Binding to Oxy-Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Chintapalli, Sree V.; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a “U” shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  18. The neural dynamics of face detection in the wild revealed by MVPA.

    PubMed

    Cauchoix, Maxime; Barragan-Jason, Gladys; Serre, Thomas; Barbeau, Emmanuel J

    2014-01-15

    Previous magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography (M/EEG) studies have suggested that face processing is extremely rapid, indeed faster than any other object category. Most studies, however, have been performed using centered, cropped stimuli presented on a blank background resulting in artificially low interstimulus variability. In contrast, the aim of the present study was to assess the underlying temporal dynamics of face detection presented in complex natural scenes. We recorded EEG activity while participants performed a rapid go/no-go categorization task in which they had to detect the presence of a human face. Subjects performed at ceiling (94.8% accuracy), and traditional event-related potential analyses revealed only modest modulations of the two main components classically associated with face processing (P100 and N170). A multivariate pattern analysis conducted across all EEG channels revealed that face category could, however, be readout very early, under 100 ms poststimulus onset. Decoding was linked to reaction time as early as 125 ms. Decoding accuracy did not increase monotonically; we report an increase during an initial 95-140 ms period followed by a plateau ∼140-185 ms-perhaps reflecting a transitory stabilization of the face information available-and a strong increase afterward. Further analyses conducted on individual images confirmed these phases, further suggesting that decoding accuracy may be initially driven by low-level stimulus properties. Such latencies appear to be surprisingly short given the complexity of the natural scenes and the large intraclass variability of the face stimuli used, suggesting that the visual system is highly optimized for the processing of natural scenes. PMID:24431443

  19. Molecular dynamic simulations reveal the structural determinants of Fatty Acid binding to oxy-myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Chintapalli, Sree V; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Patel, Reema; Shah, Natasha; Patterson, Randen L; van Rossum, Damian B; Anishkin, Andriy; Adams, Sean H

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which fatty acids are sequestered and transported in muscle have not been fully elucidated. A potential key player in this process is the protein myoglobin (Mb). Indeed, there is a catalogue of empirical evidence supporting direct interaction of globins with fatty acid metabolites; however, the binding pocket and regulation of the interaction remains to be established. In this study, we employed a computational strategy to elucidate the structural determinants of fatty acids (palmitic & oleic acid) binding to Mb. Sequence analysis and docking simulations with a horse (Equus caballus) structural Mb reference reveals a fatty acid-binding site in the hydrophobic cleft near the heme region in Mb. Both palmitic acid and oleic acid attain a "U" shaped structure similar to their conformation in pockets of other fatty acid-binding proteins. Specifically, we found that the carboxyl head group of palmitic acid coordinates with the amino group of Lys45, whereas the carboxyl group of oleic acid coordinates with both the amino groups of Lys45 and Lys63. The alkyl tails of both fatty acids are supported by surrounding hydrophobic residues Leu29, Leu32, Phe33, Phe43, Phe46, Val67, Val68 and Ile107. In the saturated palmitic acid, the hydrophobic tail moves freely and occasionally penetrates deeper inside the hydrophobic cleft, making additional contacts with Val28, Leu69, Leu72 and Ile111. Our simulations reveal a dynamic and stable binding pocket in which the oxygen molecule and heme group in Mb are required for additional hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, these findings support a mechanism in which Mb acts as a muscle transporter for fatty acid when it is in the oxygenated state and releases fatty acid when Mb converts to deoxygenated state. PMID:26030763

  20. Single Centrosome Manipulation Reveals Its Electric Charge and Associated Dynamic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Hormeño, S.; Ibarra, B.; Chichón, F.J.; Habermann, K.; Lange, B.M.H.; Valpuesta, J.M.; Carrascosa, J.L.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The centrosome is the major microtubule-organizing center in animal cells and consists of a pair of centrioles surrounded by a pericentriolar material. We demonstrate laser manipulation of individual early Drosophila embryo centrosomes in between two microelectrodes to reveal that it is a net negatively charged organelle with a very low isoelectric region (3.1 ± 0.1). From this single-organelle electrophoresis, we infer an effective charge smaller than or on the order of 103 electrons, which corresponds to a surface-charge density significantly smaller than that of microtubules. We show, however, that the charge of the centrosome has a remarkable influence over its own structure. Specifically, we investigate the hydrodynamic behavior of the centrosome by measuring its size by both Stokes law and thermal-fluctuation spectral analysis of force. We find, on the one hand, that the hydrodynamic size of the centrosome is 60% larger than its electron microscopy diameter, and on the other hand, that this physiological expansion is produced by the electric field that drains to the centrosome, a self-effect that modulates its structural behavior via environmental pH. This methodology further proves useful for studying the action of different environmental conditions, such as the presence of Ca2+, over the thermally induced dynamic structure of the centrosome. PMID:19686649

  1. Diversity of sharp-wave–ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Besserve, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Sharp-wave–ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R–triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  2. Diversity of sharp-wave-ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F; Logothetis, Nikos K; Besserve, Michel

    2015-11-17

    Sharp-wave-ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R-triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  3. The nucleosome landscape of Plasmodium falciparum reveals chromatin architecture and dynamics of regulatory sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kensche, Philip Reiner; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke Anna Maria; Toenhake, Christa Geeke; Bras, Maaike; Chappell, Lia; Berriman, Matthew; Bártfai, Richárd

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the chromatin architecture has a pivotal role in regulating all DNA-associated processes and it is central to the control of gene expression. For Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of human malaria, the nucleosome positioning profile of regulatory regions deserves particular attention because of their extreme AT-content. With the aid of a highly controlled MNase-seq procedure we reveal how positioning of nucleosomes provides a structural and regulatory framework to the transcriptional unit by demarcating landmark sites (transcription/translation start and end sites). In addition, our analysis provides strong indications for the function of positioned nucleosomes in splice site recognition. Transcription start sites (TSSs) are bordered by a small nucleosome-depleted region, but lack the stereotypic downstream nucleosome arrays, highlighting a key difference in chromatin organization compared to model organisms. Furthermore, we observe transcription-coupled eviction of nucleosomes on strong TSSs during intraerythrocytic development and demonstrate that nucleosome positioning and dynamics can be predictive for the functionality of regulatory DNA elements. Collectively, the strong nucleosome positioning over splice sites and surrounding putative transcription factor binding sites highlights the regulatory capacity of the nucleosome landscape in this deadly human pathogen. PMID:26578577

  4. Adiponectin fine-tuning of liver regeneration dynamics revealed through cellular network modelling.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Jason M; Cook, Daniel; Aksamitiene, Edita; Swarup, Aditi; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-15

    Following partial hepatectomy, the liver initiates a regenerative programme involving hepatocyte priming and replication driven by the coordinated actions of cytokine and growth factors. We investigated the mechanisms underlying adiponectin's (Adn) regulation of liver regeneration through modulation of these mediators. Adn(-/-) mice showed delayed onset of hepatocyte replication, but accelerated cell cycle progression relative to wild-type mice, suggesting Adn has multiple effects fine-tuning the kinetics of liver regeneration. We developed a computational model describing the molecular and physiological kinetics of liver regeneration in Adn(-/-) mice. We employed this computational model to evaluate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Our analysis predicted that Adn is required for an efficient early cytokine response to partial hepatectomy, but is inhibitory to later growth factor actions. Consistent with this prediction, Adn knockout reduced hepatocyte responses to interleukin-6 during the priming phase, but enhanced growth factor levels through peak hepatocyte replication. By contrast, supraphysiological concentrations of Adn resulting from rosiglitazone treatment suppressed regeneration by reducing growth factor levels during S phase, consistent with computational predictions. Together, these results revealed that Adn fine-tunes the progression of liver regeneration through dynamically modulating molecular mediator networks and cellular interactions within the liver. PMID:25630259

  5. Adiponectin fine-tuning of liver regeneration dynamics revealed through cellular network modelling

    PubMed Central

    Correnti, Jason M; Cook, Daniel; Aksamitiene, Edita; Swarup, Aditi; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-01

    Following partial hepatectomy, the liver initiates a regenerative programme involving hepatocyte priming and replication driven by the coordinated actions of cytokine and growth factors. We investigated the mechanisms underlying adiponectin's (Adn) regulation of liver regeneration through modulation of these mediators. Adn–/– mice showed delayed onset of hepatocyte replication, but accelerated cell cycle progression relative to wild-type mice, suggesting Adn has multiple effects fine-tuning the kinetics of liver regeneration. We developed a computational model describing the molecular and physiological kinetics of liver regeneration in Adn–/– mice. We employed this computational model to evaluate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Our analysis predicted that Adn is required for an efficient early cytokine response to partial hepatectomy, but is inhibitory to later growth factor actions. Consistent with this prediction, Adn knockout reduced hepatocyte responses to interleukin-6 during the priming phase, but enhanced growth factor levels through peak hepatocyte replication. By contrast, supraphysiological concentrations of Adn resulting from rosiglitazone treatment suppressed regeneration by reducing growth factor levels during S phase, consistent with computational predictions. Together, these results revealed that Adn fine-tunes the progression of liver regeneration through dynamically modulating molecular mediator networks and cellular interactions within the liver. PMID:25630259

  6. Size distribution dynamics reveal particle-phase chemistry in organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Shiraiwa, Manabu; Yee, Lindsay D; Schilling, Katherine A; Loza, Christine L; Craven, Jill S; Zuend, Andreas; Ziemann, Paul J; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-07-16

    Organic aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and play a central role in climate, air quality, and public health. The aerosol size distribution is key in determining its optical properties and cloud condensation nucleus activity. The dominant portion of organic aerosol is formed through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, so-called secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Typical experimental measurements of SOA formation include total SOA mass and atomic oxygen-to-carbon ratio. These measurements, alone, are generally insufficient to reveal the extent to which condensed-phase reactions occur in conjunction with the multigeneration gas-phase photooxidation. Combining laboratory chamber experiments and kinetic gas-particle modeling for the dodecane SOA system, here we show that the presence of particle-phase chemistry is reflected in the evolution of the SOA size distribution as well as its mass concentration. Particle-phase reactions are predicted to occur mainly at the particle surface, and the reaction products contribute more than half of the SOA mass. Chamber photooxidation with a midexperiment aldehyde injection confirms that heterogeneous reaction of aldehydes with organic hydroperoxides forming peroxyhemiacetals can lead to a large increase in SOA mass. Although experiments need to be conducted with other SOA precursor hydrocarbons, current results demonstrate coupling between particle-phase chemistry and size distribution dynamics in the formation of SOAs, thereby opening up an avenue for analysis of the SOA formation process. PMID:23818634

  7. Genome-wide analysis reveals rapid and dynamic changes in miRNA and siRNA sequence and expression during ovule and fiber development in allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cotton fiber development undergoes rapid and dynamic changes in a single cell type, from fiber initiation, elongation, primary and secondary wall biosynthesis, to fiber maturation. Previous studies showed that cotton genes encoding putative MYB transcription factors and phytohormone responsive factors were induced during early stages of ovule and fiber development. Many of these factors are targets of microRNAs (miRNAs) that mediate target gene regulation by mRNA degradation or translational repression. Results Here we sequenced and analyzed over 4 million small RNAs derived from fiber and non-fiber tissues in cotton. The 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were more abundant and highly enriched in ovules and fiber-bearing ovules relative to leaves. A total of 31 miRNA families, including 27 conserved, 4 novel miRNA families and a candidate-novel miRNA, were identified in at least one of the cotton tissues examined. Among 32 miRNA precursors representing 19 unique miRNA families identified, 7 were previously reported, and 25 new miRNA precursors were found in this study. Sequencing, miRNA microarray, and small RNA blot analyses showed a trend of repression of miRNAs, including novel miRNAs, during ovule and fiber development, which correlated with upregulation of several target genes tested. Moreover, 223 targets of cotton miRNAs were predicted from the expressed sequence tags derived from cotton tissues, including ovules and fibers. The cotton miRNAs examined triggered cleavage in the predicted sites of the putative cotton targets in ovules and fibers. Conclusions Enrichment of siRNAs in ovules and fibers suggests active small RNA metabolism and chromatin modifications during fiber development, whereas general repression of miRNAs in fibers correlates with upregulation of a dozen validated miRNA targets encoding transcription and phytohormone response factors, including the genes found to be highly expressed in cotton fibers. Rapid and dynamic

  8. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons - An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-03-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 - 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 - 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic. PMID:27010206

  9. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons — An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model

    PubMed Central

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 – 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 – 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic. PMID:27010206

  10. Structural dynamics of potassium channel gating revealed by single molecule FRET

    PubMed Central

    Borschel, William F.; Ha, Taekjip; Nichols, Colin G.

    2016-01-01

    Crystallography has provided invaluable insights to ion channel selectivity and gating, but to advance understanding to a new level, dynamic views of channel structures within membranes are essential. We labeled tetrameric KirBac1.1 potassium channels with single donor and acceptor fluorophores at different sites, and examined structural dynamics within lipid membranes by single molecule FRET. We found that the extracellular region is structurally rigid in both closed and open states, whereas the N-terminal slide helix undergoes marked conformational fluctuations. The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain fluctuates between two major structural states both of which become less dynamic and move away from the pore axis and away from the membrane in closed channels. Our results reveal mobile and rigid conformations of functionally relevant KirBac1.1 channel motifs, implying similar dynamics for similar motifs in eukaryotic Kir channels and for cation channels in general. PMID:26641713

  11. Mathematical Analysis of Biomolecular Network Reveals Connections Between Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu

    2012-02-01

    Connections between cancer and metabolic diseases may consist in the complex network of interactions among a common set of biomolecules. By applying singularity and bifurcation analysis, the phenotypes constrained by the AKT signaling pathway are identified and mapped onto the parameter space, which include cancer and certain metabolic diseases. By considering physiologic properties (sensitivity, robustness and adaptivity) the AKT pathway must possess in order to efficiently sense growth factors and nutrients, the region of normal responses is located. The analysis illuminates the parameter space and reveals system-level mechanisms in regulating biological functions (cell growth, survival, proliferation and metabolism) and how their deregulation may lead to the development of diseases. The analytical expressions summarize the synergistic interactions among many molecules, which provides valuable insights into therapeutic interventions.

  12. Dynamic changes in network synchrony reveal resting-state functional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuksanović, Vesna; Hövel, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    Experimental functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that spontaneous brain activity, i.e., in the absence of any external input, exhibit complex spatial and temporal patterns of co-activity between segregated brain regions. These so-called large-scale resting-state functional connectivity networks represent dynamically organized neural assemblies interacting with each other in a complex way. It has been suggested that looking at the dynamical properties of complex patterns of brain functional co-activity may reveal neural mechanisms underlying the dynamic changes in functional interactions. Here, we examine how global network dynamics is shaped by different network configurations, derived from realistic brain functional interactions. We focus on two main dynamics measures: synchrony and variations in synchrony. Neural activity and the inferred hemodynamic response of the network nodes are simulated using a system of 90 FitzHugh-Nagumo neural models subject to system noise and time-delayed interactions. These models are embedded into the topology of the complex brain functional interactions, whose architecture is additionally reduced to its main structural pathways. In the simulated functional networks, patterns of correlated regional activity clearly arise from dynamical properties that maximize synchrony and variations in synchrony. Our results on the fast changes of the level of the network synchrony also show how flexible changes in the large-scale network dynamics could be.

  13. Revealing glacier flow and surge dynamics from animated satellite image sequences: examples from the Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, F.

    2015-04-01

    Although animated images are very popular on the Internet, they have so far found only limited use for glaciological applications. With long time-series of satellite images becoming increasingly available and glaciers being well recognized for their rapid changes and variable flow dynamics, animated sequences of multiple satellite images reveal glacier dynamics in a time-lapse mode, making the otherwise slow changes of glacier movement visible and understandable for a wide public. For this study animated image sequences were created from freely available image quick-looks of orthorectified Landsat scenes for four regions in the central Karakoram mountain range. The animations play automatically in a web-browser and might help to demonstrate glacier flow dynamics for educational purposes. The animations revealed highly complex patterns of glacier flow and surge dynamics over a 15-year time period (1998-2013). In contrast to other regions, surging glaciers in the Karakoram are often small (around 10 km2), steep, debris free, and advance for several years at comparably low annual rates (a few hundred m a-1). The advance periods of individual glaciers are generally out of phase, indicating a limited climatic control on their dynamics. On the other hand, nearly all other glaciers in the region are either stable or slightly advancing, indicating balanced or even positive mass budgets over the past few years to decades.

  14. Geometric morphometric analysis reveals sexual dimorphism in the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Cavaignac, Etienne; Savall, Frederic; Faruch, Marie; Reina, Nicolas; Chiron, Philippe; Telmon, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    An individual's sex can be determined by the shape of their distal femur. The goal of this study was to show that differences in distal femur shape related to sexual dimorphism could be identified, visualized, and quantified using 3D geometric morphometric analysis. Geometric morphometric analysis was carried out on CT scans of the distal femur of 256 subjects living in the south of France. Ten landmarks were defined on 3D reconstructions of the distal femur. Both traditional metric and geometric morphometric analyses were carried out on these bone reconstructions; these analyses identified trends in bone shape in sex-based subgroups. Sex-related differences in shape were statistically significant. The subject's sex was correctly assigned in 77.3% of cases using geometric morphometric analysis. This study has shown that geometric morphometric analysis of the distal femur is feasible and has revealed sexual dimorphism differences in this bone segment. This reliable, accurate method could be used for virtual autopsy and be used to perform diachronic and interethnic comparisons. Moreover, this study provides updated morphometric data for a modern population in the south of France. PMID:26743712

  15. Dynamics of methane ebullition from a peat monolith revealed from a dynamic flux chamber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhongjie; Slater, Lee D.; Schäfer, Karina V. R.; Reeve, Andrew S.; Varner, Ruth K.

    2014-09-01

    Methane (CH4) ebullition in northern peatlands is poorly quantified in part due to its high spatiotemporal variability. In this study, a dynamic flux chamber (DFC) system was used to continuously measure CH4 fluxes from a monolith of near-surface Sphagnum peat at the laboratory scale to understand the complex behavior of CH4 ebullition. Coincident transmission ground penetrating radar measurements of gas content were also acquired at three depths within the monolith. A graphical method was developed to separate diffusion, steady ebullition, and episodic ebullition fluxes from the total CH4 flux recorded and to identify the timing and CH4 content of individual ebullition events. The results show that the application of the DFC had minimal disturbance on air-peat CH4 exchange and estimated ebullition fluxes were not sensitive to the uncertainties associated with the graphical model. Steady and episodic ebullition fluxes were estimated to be averagely 36 ± 24% and 38 ± 24% of the total fluxes over the study period, respectively. The coupling between episodic CH4 ebullition and gas content within the three layers supports the existence of a threshold gas content regulating CH4 ebullition. However, the threshold at which active ebullition commenced varied between peat layers with a larger threshold (0.14 m3 m-3) observed in the deeper layers, suggesting that the peat physical structure controls gas bubble dynamics in peat. Temperature variation (23°C to 27°C) was likely only responsible for small episodic ebullition events from the upper peat layer, while large ebullition events from the deeper layers were most likely triggered by drops in atmospheric pressure.

  16. Top-down label-free LC-MALDI analysis of the peptidome during neural progenitor cell differentiation reveals complexity in cytoskeletal protein dynamics and identifies progenitor cell markers.

    PubMed

    Maltman, Daniel J; Brand, Sven; Belau, Eckhard; Paape, Rainer; Suckau, Detlev; Przyborski, Stefan A

    2011-10-01

    In the field of stem cell research, there is a strong requirement for the discovery of new biomarkers that more accurately define stem and progenitor cell populations, as well as their differentiated derivatives. The very-low-molecular-weight (<5 kDa) proteome/peptidome remains a poorly investigated but potentially rich source of cellular biomarkers. Here we describe a label-free LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF quantification approach to screen the very-low-molecular-weight proteome, i.e. the peptidome, of neural progenitor cells and derivative populations to identify potential neural stem/progenitor cell biomarkers. Twelve different proteins were identified on the basis of MS/MS analysis of peptides, which displayed differential abundance between undifferentiated and differentiated cultures. These proteins included major cytoskeletal components such as nestin, vimentin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which are all associated with neural development. Other cytoskeletal proteins identified were dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, prothymosin (thymosin α-1), and thymosin β-10. These findings highlight novel stem cell/progenitor cell marker candidates and demonstrate proteomic complexity, which underlies the limitations of major intermediate filament proteins long established as neural markers. PMID:21761558

  17. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2015-06-01

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function.

  18. Time-Frequency Analysis Reveals Pairwise Interactions in Insect Swarms.

    PubMed

    Puckett, James G; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2015-06-26

    The macroscopic emergent behavior of social animal groups is a classic example of dynamical self-organization, and is thought to arise from the local interactions between individuals. Determining these interactions from empirical data sets of real animal groups, however, is challenging. Using multicamera imaging and tracking, we studied the motion of individual flying midges in laboratory mating swarms. By performing a time-frequency analysis of the midge trajectories, we show that the midge behavior can be segmented into two distinct modes: one that is independent and composed of low-frequency maneuvers, and one that consists of higher-frequency nearly harmonic oscillations conducted in synchrony with another midge. We characterize these pairwise interactions, and make a hypothesis as to their biological function. PMID:26197145

  19. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  20. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-10-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  1. Combined TMS and FMRI reveal dissociable cortical pathways for dynamic and static face perception.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, David; Duchaine, Bradley; Walsh, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Faces contain structural information, for identifying individuals, as well as changeable information, which can convey emotion and direct attention. Neuroimaging studies reveal brain regions that exhibit preferential responses to invariant [1, 2] or changeable [3-5] facial aspects but the functional connections between these regions are unknown. We addressed this issue by causally disrupting two face-selective regions with thetaburst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) and measuring the effects of this disruption in local and remote face-selective regions with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were scanned, over two sessions, while viewing dynamic or static faces and objects. During these sessions, TBS was delivered over the right occipital face area (rOFA) or right posterior superior temporal sulcus (rpSTS). Disruption of the rOFA reduced the neural response to both static and dynamic faces in the downstream face-selective region in the fusiform gyrus. In contrast, the response to dynamic and static faces was doubly dissociated in the rpSTS. Namely, disruption of the rOFA reduced the response to static but not dynamic faces, while disruption of the rpSTS itself reduced the response to dynamic but not static faces. These results suggest that dynamic and static facial aspects are processed via dissociable cortical pathways that begin in early visual cortex, a conclusion inconsistent with current models of face perception [6-9]. PMID:25131678

  2. Light-induced nuclear export reveals rapid dynamics of epigenetic modifications.

    PubMed

    Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Lerner, Andrew Michael; Zimmerman, Seth Parker; Hahn, Klaus; Bear, James E; Strahl, Brian D; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-06-01

    We engineered a photoactivatable system for rapidly and reversibly exporting proteins from the nucleus by embedding a nuclear export signal in the LOV2 domain from phototropin 1. Fusing the chromatin modifier Bre1 to the photoswitch, we achieved light-dependent control of histone H2B monoubiquitylation in yeast, revealing fast turnover of the ubiquitin mark. Moreover, this inducible system allowed us to dynamically monitor the status of epigenetic modifications dependent on H2B ubiquitylation. PMID:27089030

  3. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis. PMID:24389050

  4. Interactome Analysis Reveals Ezrin Can Adopt Multiple Conformational States*

    PubMed Central

    Viswanatha, Raghuvir; Wayt, Jessica; Ohouo, Patrice Y.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Bretscher, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM), is an essential regulator of the structure of microvilli on the apical aspect of epithelial cells. Ezrin provides a linkage between membrane-associated proteins and F-actin, oscillating between active/open and inactive/closed states, and is regulated in part by phosphorylation of a C-terminal threonine. In the open state, ezrin can bind a number of ligands, but in the closed state the ligand-binding sites are inaccessible. In vitro analysis has proposed that there may be a third hyperactivated form of ezrin. To gain a better understanding of ezrin, we conducted an unbiased proteomic analysis of ezrin-binding proteins in an epithelial cell line, Jeg-3. We refined our list of interactors by comparing the interactomes using quantitative mass spectrometry between wild-type ezrin, closed ezrin, open ezrin, and hyperactivated ezrin. The analysis reveals several novel interactors confirmed by their localization to microvilli, as well as a significant class of proteins that bind closed ezrin. Taken together, the data indicate that ezrin can exist in three different conformational states, and different ligands “perceive” ezrin conformational states differently. PMID:24151071

  5. Bimolecular dynamics by computer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    As numerical tools (computers and display equipment) become more powerful and the atomic structures of important biological molecules become known, the importance of detailed computation of nonequilibrium biomolecular dynamics increases. In this manuscript we report results from a well developed study of the hydrogen bonded polypeptide crystal acetanilide, a model protein. Directions for future research are suggested. 9 references, 6 figures.

  6. Graph analysis of cortical networks reveals complex anatomical communication substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Sensory information entering the nervous system follows independent paths of processing such that specific features are individually detected. However, sensory perception, awareness, and cognition emerge from the combination of information. Here we have analyzed the corticocortical network of the cat, looking for the anatomical substrate which permits the simultaneous segregation and integration of information in the brain. We find that cortical communications are mainly governed by three topological factors of the underlying network: (i) a large density of connections, (ii) segregation of cortical areas into clusters, and (iii) the presence of highly connected hubs aiding the multisensory processing and integration. Statistical analysis of the shortest paths reveals that, while information is highly accessible to all cortical areas, the complexity of cortical information processing may arise from the rich and intricate alternative paths in which areas can influence each other.

  7. Ideal probe single-molecule experiments reveal the intrinsic dynamic heterogeneity of a supercooled liquid

    PubMed Central

    Paeng, Keewook; Park, Heungman; Hoang, Dat Tien; Kaufman, Laura J.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of dynamic heterogeneity and the picture of the supercooled liquid as a mosaic of environments with distinct dynamics that interchange in time have been invoked to explain the nonexponential relaxations measured in these systems. The spatial extent and temporal persistence of these regions of distinct dynamics have remained challenging to identify. Here, single-molecule fluorescence measurements using a probe similar in size and mobility to the host o-terphenyl unambiguously reveal exponential relaxations distributed in time and space and directly demonstrate ergodicity of the system down to the glass transition temperature. In the temperature range probed, at least 200 times the structural relaxation time of the host is required to recover ensemble-averaged relaxation at every spatial region in the system. PMID:25825739

  8. Multiple Differential Networks Strategy Reveals Carboplatin and Melphalan-Induced Dynamic Module Changes in Retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cui; Ma, Feng-Wei; Du, Cui-Yun; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common malignant tumor of the eye in childhood. The objective of this paper was to investigate carboplatin (CAR)- and melphalan (MEL)-induced dynamic module changes in RB based on multiple (M) differential networks, and to generate systems-level insights into RB progression. MATERIAL AND METHODS To achieve this goal, we constructed M-differential co-expression networks (DCNs), assigned a weight to each edge, and identified seed genes in M DCNs by ranking genes based on their topological features. Starting with seed genes, a module search was performed to explore candidate modules in CAR and MEL condition. M-DMs were detected according to significance evaluations of M-modules, which originated from refinement of candidate modules. Further, we revealed dynamic changes in M-DM activity and connectivity on the basis of significance of Module Connectivity Dynamic Score (MCDS). RESULTS In the present study, M=2, a total of 21 seed genes were obtained. By assessing module search, refinement, and evaluation, we gained 18 2-DMs. Moreover, 3 significant 2-DMs (Module 1, Module 2, and Module 3) with dynamic changes across CAR and MEL condition were determined, and we denoted them as dynamic modules. Module 1 had 27 nodes of which 6 were seed genes and 56 edges. Module 2 was composed of 28 nodes and 54 edges. A total of 28 nodes interacted with 45 edges presented in Module 3. CONCLUSIONS We have identified 3 dynamic modules with changes induced by CAR and MEL in RB, which might give insights in revealing molecular mechanism for RB therapy. PMID:27144687

  9. Single cell transcriptional analysis reveals novel innate immune cell types.

    PubMed

    Kippner, Linda E; Kim, Jinhee; Gibson, Greg; Kemp, Melissa L

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has the potential to provide us with a host of new knowledge about biological systems, but it comes with the challenge of correctly interpreting the biological information. While emerging techniques have made it possible to measure inter-cellular variability at the transcriptome level, no consensus yet exists on the most appropriate method of data analysis of such single cell data. Methods for analysis of transcriptional data at the population level are well established but are not well suited to single cell analysis due to their dependence on population averages. In order to address this question, we have systematically tested combinations of methods for primary data analysis on single cell transcription data generated from two types of primary immune cells, neutrophils and T lymphocytes. Cells were obtained from healthy individuals, and single cell transcript expression data was obtained by a combination of single cell sorting and nanoscale quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) for markers of cell type, intracellular signaling, and immune functionality. Gene expression analysis was focused on hierarchical clustering to determine the existence of cellular subgroups within the populations. Nine combinations of criteria for data exclusion and normalization were tested and evaluated. Bimodality in gene expression indicated the presence of cellular subgroups which were also revealed by data clustering. We observed evidence for two clearly defined cellular subtypes in the neutrophil populations and at least two in the T lymphocyte populations. When normalizing the data by different methods, we observed varying outcomes with corresponding interpretations of the biological characteristics of the cell populations. Normalization of the data by linear standardization taking into account technical effects such as plate effects, resulted in interpretations that most closely matched biological expectations. Single cell transcription profiling provides

  10. Distributed Modeling Reveals the Ecohydrological Dynamics Linked with Woody Plant Encroachment in the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, N. A.; Vivoni, E. R.; Anderson, C.; Saripalli, S.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2012-12-01

    moisture and temperature distributions through comparisons of canopy and intercanopy sites. The field and remote sensing observations are then used in simulations using the TIN-based Real-time Integrated Basin Simulator (tRIBS) at high spatiotemporal resolutions over the two study years (2011-2012). Numerical experiments are designed to reveal the influence of the mesquite encroachment patterns on the watershed dynamics. Through the spatiotemporal analysis of model outputs, we identify how and when mesquite trees affect the spatial patterns of energy and water fluxes and their linkage to runoff production. As a result, the distributed model application provides a more complete understanding of the impact of woody encroachment on watershed-scale hydrologic patterns.

  11. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  12. Analysis of dynamic multiplicity fluctuations at PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Zhengwei; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the dynamic fluctuations in the inclusive charged particle multiplicity measured by PHOBOS for Au+Au collisions at surdsNN = 200GeV within the pseudo-rapidity range of -3 < η < 3. First the definition of the fluctuations observables used in this analysis is presented, together with the discussion of their physics meaning. Then the procedure for the extraction of dynamic fluctuations is described. Some preliminary results are included to illustrate the correlation features of the fluctuation observable. New dynamic fluctuations results will be available in a later publication.

  13. Detrended fluctuation analysis of heart intrabeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Eduardo; Echeverria, Juan C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2007-10-01

    We investigate scaling properties of electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings of healthy subjects and heart failure patients based on detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). While the vast majority of scaling analysis has focused on the characterization of the long-range correlations of interbeat (i.e., beat-to-beat) dynamics, in this work we consider instead the characterization of intrabeat dynamics. That is, here we use DFA to study correlations for time scales smaller than one heart beat period (about 0.75 s). Our results show that intrabeat dynamics of healthy subject are less correlated than for heart failure dynamics. As in the case of interbeat dynamics, the DFA scaling exponents can be used to discriminate healthy and pathological data. It is shown that 0.5 h recordings suffices to characterize the ECG correlation properties.

  14. Session 6: Dynamic Modeling and Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey; Chapman, Jeffryes; May, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    These presentations cover some of the ongoing work in dynamic modeling and dynamic systems analysis. The first presentation discusses dynamic systems analysis and how to integrate dynamic performance information into the systems analysis. The ability to evaluate the dynamic performance of an engine design may allow tradeoffs between the dynamic performance and operability of a design resulting in a more efficient engine design. The second presentation discusses the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a Simulation system with a library containing the basic building blocks that can be used to create dynamic Thermodynamic Systems. Some of the key features include Turbo machinery components, such as turbines, compressors, etc., and basic control system blocks. T-MAT is written in the Matlab-Simulink environment and is open source software. The third presentation focuses on getting additional performance from the engine by allowing the limit regulators only to be active when a limit is danger of being violated. Typical aircraft engine control architecture is based on MINMAX scheme, which is designed to keep engine operating within prescribed mechanical/operational safety limits. Using a conditionally active min-max limit regulator scheme, additional performance can be gained by disabling non-relevant limit regulators

  15. Obtaining railpad properties via dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; de Man, A.; Woldekidan, M. F.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose combining dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and the time-temperature superposition principle to determine various railpad dynamic properties. Having accurate information regarding the dynamic properties of a railpad is a fundamental requirement for designing tracks and understanding track deterioration. By testing three different railpad types, we demonstrate that the dynamic behavior of railpads over a wide frequency range can be successfully obtained under different preloads and temperatures if time-temperature superposition can be applied. To investigate railpad aging, worn railpads taken from a mainline in the Netherlands are tested. In this case, worn railpads are softer and possess a lower damping capacity than new railpads. In addition to performing these measurements, a Prony series material model is proposed to reproduce the dynamic behavior of railpads. The Prony series model is in good agreement with the measurements. Measured railpad dynamic properties and the corresponding Prony series numerical model provide valuable information for track design and modeling.

  16. A model of gene expression based on random dynamical systems reveals modularity properties of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Antoneli, Fernando; Ferreira, Renata C; Briones, Marcelo R S

    2016-06-01

    Here we propose a new approach to modeling gene expression based on the theory of random dynamical systems (RDS) that provides a general coupling prescription between the nodes of any given regulatory network given the dynamics of each node is modeled by a RDS. The main virtues of this approach are the following: (i) it provides a natural way to obtain arbitrarily large networks by coupling together simple basic pieces, thus revealing the modularity of regulatory networks; (ii) the assumptions about the stochastic processes used in the modeling are fairly general, in the sense that the only requirement is stationarity; (iii) there is a well developed mathematical theory, which is a blend of smooth dynamical systems theory, ergodic theory and stochastic analysis that allows one to extract relevant dynamical and statistical information without solving the system; (iv) one may obtain the classical rate equations form the corresponding stochastic version by averaging the dynamic random variables (small noise limit). It is important to emphasize that unlike the deterministic case, where coupling two equations is a trivial matter, coupling two RDS is non-trivial, specially in our case, where the coupling is performed between a state variable of one gene and the switching stochastic process of another gene and, hence, it is not a priori true that the resulting coupled system will satisfy the definition of a random dynamical system. We shall provide the necessary arguments that ensure that our coupling prescription does indeed furnish a coupled regulatory network of random dynamical systems. Finally, the fact that classical rate equations are the small noise limit of our stochastic model ensures that any validation or prediction made on the basis of the classical theory is also a validation or prediction of our model. We illustrate our framework with some simple examples of single-gene system and network motifs. PMID:27036626

  17. DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

  18. Transcriptome meta-analysis reveals dysregulated pathways in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tulalamba, Warut; Larbcharoensub, Noppadol; Sirachainan, Ekaphop; Tantiwetrueangdet, Aunchalee; Janvilisri, Tavan

    2015-08-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant cancer arising from the epithelial surface of the nasopharynx that mostly appears in advanced stages of the disease, leading to a poor prognosis. To date, a number of mRNA profiling investigations on NPC have been reported in order to identify suitable biomarkers for early detection. However, the results may be specific to each study with distinct sample types. In this study, an integrative meta-analysis of NPC transcriptome data was performed to determine dysregulated pathways, potentially leading to identification of molecular markers. Ten independent NPC gene expression profiling microarray datasets, including 135 samples from NPC cell lines, primary cell lines, and tissues were assimilated into a meta-analysis and cross-validation to identify a cohort of genes that were significantly dysregulated in NPC. Bioinformatics analyses of these genes revealed the significant pathways and individual players involving in cellular metabolism, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair, as well as ErbB pathway. Altogether, we propose that dysregulation of these molecular pathways in NPC might play a role in the NPC pathogenesis, providing clues, which could eventually translate into diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25724187

  19. Effects of pressure on the dynamics of a hyperthermophilic protein revealed by quasielastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, U. R.; Bhowmik, D.; Copley, J. R. D.; Tyagi, M.; Leao, J. B.; Chu, X.-Q.

    Inorganic pyrophosphatase (IPPase) from Thermococcus thioreducens is a large oligomeric protein derived from hyperthermophilic microorganism that is found near hydrothermal vents deep under the sea, where the pressure is nearly 100 MPa. Here we study the effects of pressure on the conformational flexibility and relaxation dynamics of IPPase over a wide temperature range using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. Two spectrometers were used to investigate the β-relaxation dynamics of proteins in time ranges from 2 to 25 ps, and from 100 ps to 2 ns. Our results reveal that, under the pressure of 100 MPa, IPPase displays much faster relaxation dynamics than a mesophilic model protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), opposite to what we observed previously under the ambient pressure. These contradictory observations imply that high pressure affects the dynamical properties of proteins by distorting their energy landscapes. Accordingly, we derived a general schematic denaturation phase diagram that can be used as a general picture to understand the effects of pressure on protein dynamics and activities Wayne State Univ Startup Fund.

  20. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Overlapping Functions of Clustered Protocadherins*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Meng-Hsuan; Lin, Chengyi; Meng, Shuxia; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    The three tandem-arrayed protocadherin (Pcdh) gene clusters, namely Pcdh-α, Pcdh-β, and Pcdh-γ, play important roles in the development of the vertebrate central nervous system. To gain insight into the molecular action of PCDHs, we performed a systematic proteomics analysis of PCDH-γ-associated protein complexes. We identified a list of 154 non-redundant proteins in the PCDH-γ complexes. This list includes nearly 30 members of clustered Pcdh-α, -β, and -γ families as core components of the complexes and additionally over 120 putative PCDH-associated proteins. We validated a selected subset of PCDH-γ-associated proteins using specific antibodies. Analysis of the identities of PCDH-associated proteins showed that the majority of them overlap with the proteomic profile of postsynaptic density preparations. Further analysis of membrane protein complexes revealed that several validated PCDH-γ-associated proteins exhibit reduced levels in Pcdh-γ-deficient brain tissues. Therefore, PCDH-γs are required for the integrity of the complexes. However, the size of the overall complexes and the abundance of many other proteins remained unchanged, raising a possibility that PCDH-αs and PCDH-βs might compensate for PCDH-γ function in complex formation. As a test of this idea, RNA interference knockdown of both PCDH-αs and PCDH-γs showed that PCDHs have redundant functions in regulating neuronal survival in the chicken spinal cord. Taken together, our data provide evidence that clustered PCDHs coexist in large protein complexes and have overlapping functions during vertebrate neural development. PMID:19843561

  1. Continuous probabilistic analysis to evolutionary game dynamics in finite populations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng

    2009-07-01

    Evolutionary game dynamics of two strategies in finite population is studied by continuous probabilistic approach. Besides frequency dependent selection, mutation was also included in this study. The equilibrium probability density functions of abundance, expected time to extinction or fixation were derived and their numerical solutions are calculated as illustrations. Meanwhile, individual-based computer simulations are also done. A comparison reveals the consistency between theoretical analysis and simulations. PMID:19219510

  2. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Christina A; Desjardins, Christopher A; Bakowski, Malina A; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T; Becnel, James J; Didier, Elizabeth S; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I; Levin, Joshua Z; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R

    2012-12-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites. PMID:22813931

  3. Microsporidian genome analysis reveals evolutionary strategies for obligate intracellular growth

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Christina A.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Bakowski, Malina A.; Goldberg, Jonathan; Ma, Amy T.; Becnel, James J.; Didier, Elizabeth S.; Fan, Lin; Heiman, David I.; Levin, Joshua Z.; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Troemel, Emily R.

    2012-01-01

    Microsporidia comprise a large phylum of obligate intracellular eukaryotes that are fungal-related parasites responsible for widespread disease, and here we address questions about microsporidia biology and evolution. We sequenced three microsporidian genomes from two species, Nematocida parisii and Nematocida sp1, which are natural pathogens of Caenorhabditis nematodes and provide model systems for studying microsporidian pathogenesis. We performed deep sequencing of transcripts from a time course of N. parisii infection. Examination of pathogen gene expression revealed compact transcripts and a dramatic takeover of host cells by Nematocida. We also performed phylogenomic analyses of Nematocida and other microsporidian genomes to refine microsporidian phylogeny and identify evolutionary events of gene loss, acquisition, and modification. In particular, we found that all microsporidia lost the tumor-suppressor gene retinoblastoma, which we speculate could accelerate the parasite cell cycle and increase the mutation rate. We also found that microsporidia acquired transporters that could import nucleosides to fuel rapid growth. In addition, microsporidian hexokinases gained secretion signal sequences, and in a functional assay these were sufficient to export proteins out of the cell; thus hexokinase may be targeted into the host cell to reprogram it toward biosynthesis. Similar molecular changes appear during formation of cancer cells and may be evolutionary strategies adopted independently by microsporidia to proliferate rapidly within host cells. Finally, analysis of genome polymorphisms revealed evidence for a sexual cycle that may provide genetic diversity to alleviate problems caused by clonal growth. Together these events may explain the emergence and success of these diverse intracellular parasites. PMID:22813931

  4. STEP Tether Dynamics Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    2000-01-01

    The General Tethered Object Simulation System (GTOSS) has been successfully converted to the PC environment. GTOSS has been run under Microsoft Windows 95, 98 and NT4.0 with no problems noted. Adaptation to the PC environment and definition of the 3 three body configuration required resizing some of the GTOSS internal data arrays. To allow studies of the tether dynamics accompanying electrodynamic thrust, a tether current flow model has also been developed for GTOSS. This model includes effects due to the earth's magnetic field and ionosphere, tether conductivity, temperature, motion, shape and available power. Sample cases have been defined for a proposed STEP-AIRSEDS (Space Transfer using Electrodynamic Propulsion-The Michigan Technic Corporation proposed tether missions for commercial applications) three body configuration. This required definition of a 6th power scenario for GTOSS. This power scenario allows a user to specify whether orbit raising or orbit lowering is to be performed by selecting the number of the tether. Orbit raising and orbit lowering sample cases have been run successfully. Results from these runs have been included in this report. Results have only been generated so far for a three body configuration. Only point end masses have been represented. No attitude dynamics have been included. Initial results suggest that tether current can have significant and detrimental effects on tether dynamics and provisions will have to be made for control of it. This control will have to be considered in connection with desired target orbits for electrodynamic thrusting, as well as end body attitude control, momentum management of proposed control moment gyros, solar array pointing. All of these items will interact and thus, any system simulation will have to have each of these effects modeled in sufficient detail to display these interactions.

  5. NERVA dynamic analysis methodology, SPRVIB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vronay, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    The general dynamic computer code called SPRVIB (Spring Vib) developed in support of the NERVA (nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application) program is described. Using normal mode techniques, the program computes kinematical responses of a structure caused by various combinations of harmonic and elliptic forcing functions or base excitations. Provision is made for a graphical type of force or base excitation input to the structure. A description of the required input format and a listing of the program are presented, along with several examples illustrating the use of the program. SPRVIB is written in FORTRAN 4 computer language for use on the CDC 6600 or the IBM 360/75 computers.

  6. Nonlinear Analysis Of Rotor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, William B.; Zalik, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Study explores analytical consequences of nonlinear Jeffcott equations of rotor dynamics. Section 1: Summary of previous studies. Section 2: Jeffcott Equations. Section 3: Proves two theorems that provide inequalities on coefficients of differential equations and magnitude of forcing function in absence of side force. Section 4: Numerical investigation of multiple-forcing-function problem by introducing both side force and mass imbalance. Section 5: Examples of numberical solutions of complex generalized Jeffcott equation with two forcing functions of different frequencies f1 and f2. Section 6: Boundedness and stability of solutions.Section 7: Concludes report reviewing analytical results and significance.

  7. Analysis of Multidomain Protein Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amitava; Hua, Duy P; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-01-12

    Proteins with a modular architecture of multiple domains connected by linkers often exhibit diversity in the relative positions of domains, while the domain tertiary structure remains unchanged. The biological function of these modular proteins, or the regulation of their activity, depends on the variation in domain orientation and separation. Accordingly, careful characterization of interdomain motion and correlated fluctuations of multidomain systems is relevant for understanding the functional behavior of modular proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a powerful approach to study these motions in atomic detail. Nevertheless, the common procedure for analyzing fluctuations from MD simulations after rigid-body alignment fails for multidomain proteins; it greatly overestimates correlated positional fluctuations in the presence of relative domain motion. We show here that expressing the atomic motions of a multidomain protein as a combination of displacement within the domain reference frame and motion of the relative domains correctly separates the internal motions to allow a useful description of correlated fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology of separating the domain fluctuations and local fluctuations by application to the tandem SH2 domains of human Syk protein kinase and by characterizing an effect of phosphorylation on the dynamics. Correlated motions are assessed from a distance covariance rather than the more common vector-coordinate covariance. The approach makes it possible to calculate the proper correlations in fluctuations internal to a domain as well as between domains. PMID:26675644

  8. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis of Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerin, John A.; Sporrer, Justin M.; Egolf, David A.

    2013-03-01

    The development of spatiotemporal chaotic behavior in heart tissue, termed fibrillation, is a devastating, life-threatening condition. The chaotic behavior of electrochemical signals, in the form of spiral waves, causes the muscles of the heart to contract in an incoherent manner, hindering the heart's ability to pump blood. We have applied the mathematical tools of nonlinear dynamics to large-scale simulations of a model of fibrillating heart tissue to uncover the dynamical modes driving this chaos. By studying the evolution of Lyapunov vectors and exponents over short times, we have found that the fibrillating tissue is sensitive to electrical perturbations only in narrow regions immediately in front of the leading edges of spiral waves, especially when these waves collide, break apart, or hit the edges of the tissue sample. Using this knowledge, we have applied small stimuli to areas of varying sensitivity. By studying the evolution of the effects of these perturbations, we have made progress toward controlling the electrochemical patterns associated with heart fibrillation. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0094178) and Research Corporation.

  9. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners.

    PubMed

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W Thomas; Bush, Nicole R; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of "reciprocal" interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  10. Layered Social Network Analysis Reveals Complex Relationships in Kindergarteners

    PubMed Central

    Golemiec, Mireille; Schneider, Jonathan; Boyce, W. Thomas; Bush, Nicole R.; Adler, Nancy; Levine, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between individuals forms building blocks for social structure. Here, we examine the structure of behavioral interactions among kindergarten classroom with a hierarchy-neutral approach to examine all possible underlying patterns in the formation of layered networks of “reciprocal” interactions. To understand how these layers are coordinated, we used a layered motif approach. Our dual layered motif analysis can therefore be thought of as the dynamics of smaller groups that tile to create the group structure, or alternatively they provide information on what the average child would do in a given local social environment. When we examine the regulated motifs in layered networks, we find that transitivity is at least partially involved in the formation of these layered network structures. We also found complex combinations of the expected reciprocal interactions. The mechanisms used to understand social networks of kindergarten children here are also applicable on a more general scale to any group of individuals where interactions and identities can be readily observed and scored. PMID:26973572

  11. Lipidome analysis reveals antifungal polyphenol curcumin affects membrane lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Singh, Ashutosh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    This study shows that antifungal curcumin (CUR), significantly depletes ergosterol levels in Candida albicans. CUR while displaying synergy with fluconazole (FLC) lowers ergosterol. However, CUR alone at its synergistic concentration (lower than MIC50), could not affect ergosterol contents. For deeper insight of CUR effects on lipids, we performed high throughput mass spectroscopy (MS) based lipid profiling of C. albicans cells. The lipidome analysis revealed that there were no major changes in phosphoglycerides (PGLs) composition following CUR treatment of Candida, however, significant differences in molecular species of PGLs were detected. Among major SPLs, CUR treatment resulted in the reduction of ceramide and accumulation of IPCs levels. The lipidome of CUR treated cells confirmed a dramatic drop in the ergosterol levels with a simultaneous accumulation of its biosynthetic precursors. This was further supported by the fact that the mutants defective in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG2 and ERG11) and those lacking the transcription factor regulating ergosterol biosynthesis, UPC2, were highly susceptible to CUR. Our study first time shows that CUR, for its antifungal activity, targets and down regulates delta 5, 6 desaturase (ERG3) resulting in depletion of ergosterol. This results in parallel accumulation of ergosterol biosynthetic precursors, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. PMID:22201946

  12. Point-of-gaze analysis reveals visual search strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajashekar, Umesh; Cormack, Lawrence K.; Bovik, Alan C.

    2004-06-01

    Seemingly complex tasks like visual search can be analyzed using a cognition-free, bottom-up framework. We sought to reveal strategies used by observers in visual search tasks using accurate eye tracking and image analysis at point of gaze. Observers were instructed to search for simple geometric targets embedded in 1/f noise. By analyzing the stimulus at the point of gaze using the classification image (CI) paradigm, we discovered CI templates that indeed resembled the target. No such structure emerged for a random-searcher. We demonstrate, qualitatively and quantitatively, that these CI templates are useful in predicting stimulus regions that draw human fixations in search tasks. Filtering a 1/f noise stimulus with a CI results in a 'fixation prediction map'. A qualitative evaluation of the prediction was obtained by overlaying k-means clusters of observers' fixations on the prediction map. The fixations clustered around the local maxima in the prediction map. To obtain a quantitative comparison, we computed the Kullback-Leibler distance between the recorded fixations and the prediction. Using random-searcher CIs in Monte Carlo simulations, a distribution of this distance was obtained. The z-scores for the human CIs and the original target were -9.70 and -9.37 respectively indicating that even in noisy stimuli, observers deploy their fixations efficiently to likely targets rather than casting them randomly hoping to fortuitously find the target.

  13. Sequential analysis of the numerical Stroop effect reveals response suppression.

    PubMed

    Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Gevers, Wim; Notebaert, Wim

    2011-09-01

    Automatic processing of irrelevant stimulus dimensions has been demonstrated in a variety of tasks. Previous studies have shown that conflict between relevant and irrelevant dimensions can be reduced when a feature of the irrelevant dimension is repeated. The specific level at which the automatic process is suppressed (e.g., perceptual repetition, response repetition), however, is less understood. In the current experiment we used the numerical Stroop paradigm, in which the processing of irrelevant numerical values of 2 digits interferes with the processing of their physical size, to pinpoint the precise level of the suppression. Using a sequential analysis, we dissociated perceptual repetition from response repetition of the relevant and irrelevant dimension. Our analyses of reaction times, error rates, and diffusion modeling revealed that the congruity effect is significantly reduced or even absent when the response sequence of the irrelevant dimension, rather than the numerical value or the physical size, is repeated. These results suggest that automatic activation of the irrelevant dimension is suppressed at the response level. The current results shed light on the level of interaction between numerical magnitude and physical size as well as the effect of variability of responses and stimuli on automatic processing. PMID:21500951

  14. Specialized Dynamical Properties of Promiscuous Residues Revealed by Simulated Conformational Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Fornili, Arianna; Pandini, Alessandro; Lu, Hui-Chun; Fraternali, Franca

    2013-11-12

    The ability to interact with different partners is one of the most important features in proteins. Proteins that bind a large number of partners (hubs) have been often associated with intrinsic disorder. However, many examples exist of hubs with an ordered structure, and evidence of a general mechanism promoting promiscuity in ordered proteins is still elusive. An intriguing hypothesis is that promiscuous binding sites have specific dynamical properties, distinct from the rest of the interface and pre-existing in the protein isolated state. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the intrinsic dynamics of promiscuous residues in a large protein data set. Different computational methods, from coarse-grained elastic models to geometry-based sampling methods and to full-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations, were used to generate conformational ensembles for the isolated proteins. The flexibility and dynamic correlations of interface residues with a different degree of binding promiscuity were calculated and compared considering side chain and backbone motions, the latter both on a local and on a global scale. The study revealed that (a) promiscuous residues tend to be more flexible than nonpromiscuous ones, (b) this additional flexibility has a higher degree of organization, and (c) evolutionary conservation and binding promiscuity have opposite effects on intrinsic dynamics. Findings on simulated ensembles were also validated on ensembles of experimental structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Additionally, the low occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms observed for promiscuous residues indicated a tendency to preserve binding diversity at these positions. A case study on two ubiquitin-like proteins exemplifies how binding promiscuity in evolutionary related proteins can be modulated by the fine-tuning of the interface dynamics. The interplay between promiscuity and flexibility highlighted here can inspire new directions in protein

  15. Specialized Dynamical Properties of Promiscuous Residues Revealed by Simulated Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The ability to interact with different partners is one of the most important features in proteins. Proteins that bind a large number of partners (hubs) have been often associated with intrinsic disorder. However, many examples exist of hubs with an ordered structure, and evidence of a general mechanism promoting promiscuity in ordered proteins is still elusive. An intriguing hypothesis is that promiscuous binding sites have specific dynamical properties, distinct from the rest of the interface and pre-existing in the protein isolated state. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of the intrinsic dynamics of promiscuous residues in a large protein data set. Different computational methods, from coarse-grained elastic models to geometry-based sampling methods and to full-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations, were used to generate conformational ensembles for the isolated proteins. The flexibility and dynamic correlations of interface residues with a different degree of binding promiscuity were calculated and compared considering side chain and backbone motions, the latter both on a local and on a global scale. The study revealed that (a) promiscuous residues tend to be more flexible than nonpromiscuous ones, (b) this additional flexibility has a higher degree of organization, and (c) evolutionary conservation and binding promiscuity have opposite effects on intrinsic dynamics. Findings on simulated ensembles were also validated on ensembles of experimental structures extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Additionally, the low occurrence of single nucleotide polymorphisms observed for promiscuous residues indicated a tendency to preserve binding diversity at these positions. A case study on two ubiquitin-like proteins exemplifies how binding promiscuity in evolutionary related proteins can be modulated by the fine-tuning of the interface dynamics. The interplay between promiscuity and flexibility highlighted here can inspire new directions in protein

  16. Dynamic localization of electronic excitation in photosynthetic complexes revealed with chiral two-dimensional spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-02-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging because of the small signal and large achiral background. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic states following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability because of the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments.

  17. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  18. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  19. Capturing Arabidopsis root architecture dynamics with ROOT-FIT reveals diversity in responses to salinity.

    PubMed

    Julkowska, Magdalena M; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Mol, Selena; Feron, Richard; de Boer, Gert-Jan; Haring, Michel A; Testerink, Christa

    2014-11-01

    The plant root is the first organ to encounter salinity stress, but the effect of salinity on root system architecture (RSA) remains elusive. Both the reduction in main root (MR) elongation and the redistribution of the root mass between MRs and lateral roots (LRs) are likely to play crucial roles in water extraction efficiency and ion exclusion. To establish which RSA parameters are responsive to salt stress, we performed a detailed time course experiment in which Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings were grown on agar plates under different salt stress conditions. We captured RSA dynamics with quadratic growth functions (root-fit) and summarized the salt-induced differences in RSA dynamics in three growth parameters: MR elongation, average LR elongation, and increase in number of LRs. In the ecotype Columbia-0 accession of Arabidopsis, salt stress affected MR elongation more severely than LR elongation and an increase in LRs, leading to a significantly altered RSA. By quantifying RSA dynamics of 31 different Arabidopsis accessions in control and mild salt stress conditions, different strategies for regulation of MR and LR meristems and root branching were revealed. Different RSA strategies partially correlated with natural variation in abscisic acid sensitivity and different Na(+)/K(+) ratios in shoots of seedlings grown under mild salt stress. Applying root-fit to describe the dynamics of RSA allowed us to uncover the natural diversity in root morphology and cluster it into four response types that otherwise would have been overlooked. PMID:25271266

  20. Fractal dynamics in self-evaluation reveal self-concept clarity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alexander E; Vallacher, Robin R; Nowak, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    The structural account of self-esteem and self-evaluation maintains that they are distinct constructs. Trait self-esteem is stable and is expressed over macro timescales, whereas state self-evaluation is unstable and experienced on micro timescales. We compared predictions based on the structural account with those derived from a dynamical systems perspective on the self, which maintains that self-esteem and self-evaluation are hierarchically related and share basic dynamic properties. Participants recorded a 3-minute narrative about themselves, then used the mouse paradigm (Vallacher, Nowak, Froehlich, & Rockloff, 2002) to track the momentary self-evaluation in their narrative. Multiple methods converged to reveal fractal patterns in the resultant temporal patterns, indicative of nested timescales that link micro and macro selfevaluation and thus supportive of the dynamical account. The fractal dynamics were associated with participants' self-concept clarity, suggesting that the hierarchical relation between macro self-evaluation (self-esteem) and momentary self-evaluation is predicted by the coherence of self-concept organization. PMID:25196705

  1. Dynamics and Organization of Cortical Microtubules as Revealed by Superresolution Structured Illumination Microscopy1[W

    PubMed Central

    Komis, George; Mistrik, Martin; Šamajová, Olga; Doskočilová, Anna; Ovečka, Miroslav; Illés, Peter; Bartek, Jiri; Šamaj, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Plants employ acentrosomal mechanisms to organize cortical microtubule arrays essential for cell growth and differentiation. Using structured illumination microscopy (SIM) adopted for the optimal documentation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hypocotyl epidermal cells, dynamic cortical microtubules labeled with green fluorescent protein fused to the microtubule-binding domain of the mammalian microtubule-associated protein MAP4 and with green fluorescent protein-fused to the alpha tubulin6 were comparatively recorded in wild-type Arabidopsis plants and in the mitogen-activated protein kinase mutant mpk4 possessing the former microtubule marker. The mpk4 mutant exhibits extensive microtubule bundling, due to increased abundance and reduced phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein MAP65-1, thus providing a very useful genetic tool to record intrabundle microtubule dynamics at the subdiffraction level. SIM imaging revealed nano-sized defects in microtubule bundling, spatially resolved microtubule branching and release, and finally allowed the quantification of individual microtubules within cortical bundles. Time-lapse SIM imaging allowed the visualization of subdiffraction, short-lived excursions of the microtubule plus end, and dynamic instability behavior of both ends during free, intrabundle, or microtubule-templated microtubule growth and shrinkage. Finally, short, rigid, and nondynamic microtubule bundles in the mpk4 mutant were observed to glide along the parent microtubule in a tip-wise manner. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential of SIM for superresolution time-lapse imaging of plant cells, showing unprecedented details accompanying microtubule dynamic organization. PMID:24686112

  2. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics

    PubMed Central

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J.; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  3. Single-molecule spectroscopy reveals how calmodulin activates NO synthase by controlling its conformational fluctuation dynamics.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Stuehr, Dennis J; Lu, H Peter

    2015-09-22

    Mechanisms that regulate the nitric oxide synthase enzymes (NOS) are of interest in biology and medicine. Although NOS catalysis relies on domain motions, and is activated by calmodulin binding, the relationships are unclear. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy to elucidate the conformational states distribution and associated conformational fluctuation dynamics of the two electron transfer domains in a FRET dye-labeled neuronal NOS reductase domain, and to understand how calmodulin affects the dynamics to regulate catalysis. We found that calmodulin alters NOS conformational behaviors in several ways: It changes the distance distribution between the NOS domains, shortens the lifetimes of the individual conformational states, and instills conformational discipline by greatly narrowing the distributions of the conformational states and fluctuation rates. This information was specifically obtainable only by single-molecule spectroscopic measurements, and reveals how calmodulin promotes catalysis by shaping the physical and temporal conformational behaviors of NOS. PMID:26311846

  4. Something in the way she moves--movement trajectories reveal dynamics of self-control.

    PubMed

    Dignath, David; Pfister, Roland; Eder, Andreas B; Kiesel, Andrea; Kunde, Wilfried

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the dynamic impact of self-control conflict on action execution. We reasoned that the tug-of-war between antagonistic action tendencies is not ultimately solved before movement initiation but leaks into action execution. To this end, we measured mouse trajectories to quantify the dynamic competition between initial temptations and the struggle to overcome them. Participants moved the mouse cursor from a start location to one of two targets. Each target represented a gain or a loss of points. Although participants earned points on the majority of the trials, they also had to make movements to the loss target on some trials to prevent an even higher loss. Two experiments found that movement trajectories on these loss trials deviate toward the tempting stimulus: The way we move reveals self-control conflicts that have not been resolved prior to action execution. PMID:24254808

  5. Simultaneous Measurement of Amyloid Fibril Formation by Dynamic Light Scattering and Fluorescence Reveals Complex Aggregation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Aaron M.; Sourigues, Yannick; Kopito, Ron R.; Melki, Ronald; Quake, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:23349924

  6. Revealing glacier flow and surge dynamics from animated satellite image sequences: examples from the Karakoram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, F.

    2015-11-01

    Although animated images are very popular on the internet, they have so far found only limited use for glaciological applications. With long time series of satellite images becoming increasingly available and glaciers being well recognized for their rapid changes and variable flow dynamics, animated sequences of multiple satellite images reveal glacier dynamics in a time-lapse mode, making the otherwise slow changes of glacier movement visible and understandable to the wider public. For this study, animated image sequences were created for four regions in the central Karakoram mountain range over a 25-year time period (1990-2015) from freely available image quick-looks of orthorectified Landsat scenes. The animations play automatically in a web browser and reveal highly complex patterns of glacier flow and surge dynamics that are difficult to obtain by other methods. In contrast to other regions, surging glaciers in the Karakoram are often small (10 km2 or less), steep, debris-free, and advance for several years to decades at relatively low annual rates (about 100 m a-1). These characteristics overlap with those of non-surge-type glaciers, making a clear identification difficult. However, as in other regions, the surging glaciers in the central Karakoram also show sudden increases of flow velocity and mass waves travelling down glacier. The surges of individual glaciers are generally out of phase, indicating a limited climatic control on their dynamics. On the other hand, nearly all other glaciers in the region are either stable or slightly advancing, indicating balanced or even positive mass budgets over the past few decades.

  7. Visual Analysis of Dynamic Data Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Singhal, Mudita; Nakamura, Grant C.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Freeman-Cadoret, Natalie A.

    2009-09-01

    For scientific data visualizations, real-time data streams present many interesting challenges when compared to static data. Real-time data are dynamic, transient, high-volume, and temporal. Effective visualizations need to be able to accommodate dynamic data behavior as well as abstract and present the data in ways that make sense to and are usable by humans. The Visual Content Analysis of Real-Time Data Streams project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is researching and prototyping dynamic visualization techniques and tools to help facilitate human understanding and comprehension of high-volume, real-time data. The general strategy of the project is to develop and evolve visual contexts that will organize and orient complex dynamic data in conceptual and perceptive views. The goal is to allow users to quickly grasp dynamic data in forms that are intuitive and natural without requiring intensive training in the use of specific visualization or analysis tools and methods. Thus far, the project has prototyped four different visualization prototypes that represents and convey dynamic data through human-recognizable contexts and paradigms such as hierarchies, relationships, time, and geography. We describe the design considerations and unique features of these dynamic visualization prototypes as well as our findings in the exploration and evaluation of their use.

  8. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter M.; George, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors’ dynamics that may be of utility in drug design. PMID:26975976

  9. Computational analysis of the MCoTI-II plant defence knottin reveals a novel intermediate conformation that facilitates trypsin binding.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; George, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    MCoTI-I and II are plant defence proteins, potent trypsin inhibitors from the bitter gourd Momordica cochinchinensis. They are members of the Knottin Family, which display exceptional stability due to unique topology comprising three interlocked disulfide bridges. Knottins show promise as scaffolds for new drug development. A crystal structure of trypsin-bound MCoTI-II suggested that loop 1, which engages the trypsin active site, would show decreased dynamics in the bound state, an inference at odds with an NMR analysis of MCoTI-I, which revealed increased dynamics of loop 1 in the presence of trypsin. To investigate this question, we performed unrestrained MD simulations of trypsin-bound and free MCoTI-II. This analysis found that loop 1 of MCoTI-II is not more dynamic in the trypsin-bound state than in the free state. However, it revealed an intermediate conformation, transitional between the free and bound MCoTI-II states. The data suggest that MCoTI-II binding involves a process in which initial interaction with trypsin induces transitions between the free and intermediate conformations, and fluctuations between these states account for the increase in dynamics of loop 1 observed for trypsin-bound MCoTI-I. The MD analysis thus revealed new aspects of the inhibitors' dynamics that may be of utility in drug design. PMID:26975976

  10. Intricate phase diagram of a prevalent visual circuit reveals universal dynamics, phase transitions, and resonances.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Matthew S; Brandt, Sebastian F; Nussinov, Zohar; Wessel, Ralf

    2009-11-01

    Neural feedback-triads consisting of two feedback loops with a nonreciprocal lateral connection from one loop to the other are ubiquitous in the brain. We show analytically that the dynamics of this network topology are determined by algebraic combinations of its five synaptic weights. Exploration of network activity over the parameter space demonstrates the importance of the nonreciprocal lateral connection and reveals intricate behavior involving continuous transitions between qualitatively different activity states. In addition, we show that the response to periodic inputs is narrowly tuned around a center frequency determined by the effective synaptic parameters. PMID:20365022