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Sample records for dynamic hopkinson bar

  1. Implementation of viscoelastic Hopkinson bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, R.; Cloete, T.; Govender, R.

    2012-08-01

    Knowledge of the properties of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates are important in furthering our understanding of their role during blast or impact events. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. Implementing polymeric Hopkinson bars requires characterization of the viscoelastic properties of the material used. In this paper, 30 mm diameter Polymethyl Methacrylate bars are used as Hopkinson pressure bars. This testing technique is applied to polymeric foam called Divinycell H80 and H200. Although there is a large body of of literature containing compressive data, this rarely deals with strain rates above 250s-1 which becomes increasingly important when looking at the design of composite structures where energy absorption during impact events is high on the list of priorities. Testing of polymeric foams at high strain rates allows for the development of better constitutive models.

  2. Dynamic photoelasticity with a split Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, David R.; Watson, A. J.

    1991-04-01

    To observe the behaviour of materials subject to impact shock loads, accurate high frequency measurements are vital. The measurement of ultra short pulses (less than 50 microseconds) can be carried out by means of electrical resistance strain guages (ERSGs) . The ERSG's also pick up electromagnetic interference signals. Dynamic photoelasticity was used as a check for the ERSG records. Dynamic photoelastic tests were carried out using a Barr and Stroud CP5 high speed rotating mirror camera. The timing of the event and illumination was critical. Important confirmatory results were obtained by this technique.

  3. Hopkinson pressure bar set-up for the measurement of Bauschinger effect under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Bonora, Nicola; Iannitti, Gianluca

    2013-06-01

    Metals and alloys show different stress-strain characteristics under reverse loading cycle (Bauschinger effect). The knowledge of the effective material response is important in impact dynamics where material is subjected to compression-tension loading as a result of stress wave propagation. In this paper an experimental set-up of the Hopkinson pressure bar to characterize the material response under dynamic loading cycle is presented. In the proposed configuration, in one single test, the sample is subjected to tension and compression loading with same absolute stress intensity and duration. Also this solution allows the possibility to select the load cycle sequence (tension-compression or compression-tension). Relationships to determine the stress, strain rate and strain from the elastic signals at the bars which are also effective for the second stress pulse, are presented. The method was verified with FEM and used to determine the Bauschinger effect for AISI 316L stainless steel.

  4. A regularized model for impact in explicit dynamics applied to the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Peter; De Lorenzis, Laura; Unger, Jörg F.

    2016-07-01

    In the numerical simulation of impact phenomena, artificial oscillations can occur due to an instantaneous change of velocity in the contact area. In this paper, a nonlinear penalty regularization is used to avoid these oscillations. A particular focus is the investigation of higher order methods in space and time to increase the computational efficiency. The spatial discretization is realized by higher order spectral element methods that are characterized by a diagonal mass matrix. The time integration scheme is based on half-explicit Runge-Kutta scheme of fourth order. For the conditionally stable scheme, the critical time step is influenced by the penalty regularization. A framework is presented to adjust the penalty stiffness and the time step for a specific mesh to avoid oscillations. The methods presented in this paper are applied to 1D-simulations of a split Hopkinson pressure bar, which is commonly used for the investigation of materials under dynamic loading.

  5. Experimental issues and interpretation of the necking phenomena in the dynamic characterization via Hopkinson bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirone, Giuseppe; Corallo, Domenico

    2015-09-01

    The usual procedures for processing experimental data from Hopkinson bars (HB) are based on modeling hypotheses which, in some cases, may lead to considerable approximations. The effects of the specimen geometry and of the necking are analysed, both experimentally and by FE analyses, for assessing how much the conventional values of strain rate, strain and stress, based on strain gauges readings along the HB, are affected by approximations in different testing conditions. Also, from the way the necking affects the load/area ratio, useful considerations arise about the hardening response of metal alloys under high strain rates. The sensitivity of stress-strain curves to the time-translations of strain waves along the bars is assessed by comparing the above curves to others where the strain, the strain rate and the current cross section come from speed camera image analyses. This clearly shows that the effective strain rate in the most strained areas of the specimens is many times higher than the nominal value, and also allows to explore how much the engineering curve is poorly representative of the material response, due to strain localization in the post-necking phase. The necking-affected length compared to the total gauge length is also found to significantly influence the strain response of the specimens, in a way that can easily mislead the experimenters in the derivation of the material ductility. An empirical relationship, already found to be valid in the post-necking quasi-static regime for transforming the true stress (load / current area) into an estimation of the cross section-averaged equivalent stress, is also found to apply at high strain rates if only the appropriate considerations are done on the way the equivalent stress is considered.

  6. High speed synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging of dynamic material response to split Hopkinson bar loading.

    PubMed

    Hudspeth, M; Claus, B; Dubelman, S; Black, J; Mondal, A; Parab, N; Funnell, C; Hai, F; Qi, M L; Fezzaa, K; Luo, S N; Chen, W

    2013-02-01

    The successful process of amalgamating both the time-resolved imaging capabilities present at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID-B and the proficiency of high-rate loading offered by the split Hopkinson or Kolsky compression/tension bar apparatus is discussed and verification of system effectiveness is expressed via dynamic experiments on various material systems. Single particle sand interaction along with glass cracking during dynamic compression, and fiber-epoxy interfacial failure, ligament-bone debonding, and single-crystal silicon fragmentation due to dynamic tension, were imaged with 0.5 μs temporal resolution and μm-level spatial resolution. Synchrotron x-ray phase contrast imaging of said material systems being loaded with the Kolsky bar apparatus demonstratively depicts the effectiveness of the novel union between these two powerful techniques, thereby allowing for in situ analysis of the interior of the material system during high-rate loading for a variety of applications. PMID:23464246

  7. Blast Quantification Using Hopkinson Pressure Bars.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Samuel D; Fay, Stephen D; Rigby, Samuel E; Tyas, Andrew; Warren, James A; Reay, Jonathan J; Fuller, Benjamin J; Gant, Matthew T A; Elgy, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Near-field blast load measurement presents an issue to many sensor types as they must endure very aggressive environments and be able to measure pressures up to many hundreds of megapascals. In this respect the simplicity of the Hopkinson pressure bar has a major advantage in that while the measurement end of the Hopkinson bar can endure and be exposed to harsh conditions, the strain gauge mounted to the bar can be affixed some distance away. This allows protective housings to be utilized which protect the strain gauge but do not interfere with the measurement acquisition. The use of an array of pressure bars allows the pressure-time histories at discrete known points to be measured. This article also describes the interpolation routine used to derive pressure-time histories at un-instrumented locations on the plane of interest. Currently the technique has been used to measure loading from high explosives in free air and buried shallowly in various soils. PMID:27404117

  8. New experimental techniques with the split Hopkinson pressure bar

    SciTech Connect

    Frantz, C.E.; Follansbee, P.S.; Wright, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The split Hopkinson pressure bar or Kolsky bar has provided for many years a technique for performing compression tests at strain rates approaching 10/sup 4/ s/sup -1/. At these strain rates, the small dimensions possible in a compression test specimen give an advantage over a dynamic tensile test by allowing the stress within the specimen to equilibrate within the shortest possible time. The maximum strain rates possible with this technique are limited by stress wave propagation in the elastic pressure bars as well as in the deforming specimen. This subject is reviewed in this paper, and it is emphasized that a slowly rising excitation is preferred to one that rises steeply. Experimental techniques for pulse shaping and a numerical procedure for correcting the raw data for wave dispersion in the pressure bars are presented. For tests at elevated temperature a bar mover apparatus has been developed which effectively brings the cold pressure bars into contact with the specimen, which is heated with a specially designed furnace, shortly before the pressure wave arrives. This procedure has been used successfully in tests at temperatures as high as 1000/sup 0/C.

  9. Strain rate change tests with the Split Hopkinson Bar method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakov, M.; Kokkonen, J.; Östman, K.; Kuokkala, V.-T.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, methods to produce rapid strain rate changes for strain rate sensitivity measurements in Split Hopkinson Bar arrangements are presented and discussed. Two different cases are considered: a strain rate change test within the high strain rate region in compression, and a tension test incorporating a large strain rate jump directly from the low strain rate region to high strain rates. The former method is based on the loading wave amplitude manipulation, while the latter method is based on the incorporation of a low strain rate loading device into a Tensile Split Hopkinson Bar apparatus.

  10. Numerical Investigation of Dynamic Rock Fracture Toughness Determination Using a Semi-Circular Bend Specimen in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Dai, F.; Xu, N. W.; Zhao, T.

    2016-03-01

    The International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM) has suggested a notched semi-circular bend technique in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing to determine the dynamic mode I fracture toughness of rock. Due to the transient nature of dynamic loading and limited experimental techniques, the dynamic fracture process associated with energy partitions remains far from being fully understood. In this study, the dynamic fracturing of the notched semi-circular bend rock specimen in SHPB testing is numerically simulated for the first time by the discrete element method (DEM) and evaluated in both microlevel and energy points of view. The results confirm the validity of this DEM model to reproduce the dynamic fracturing and the feasibility to simultaneously measure key dynamic rock fracture parameters, including initiation fracture toughness, fracture energy, and propagation fracture toughness. In particular, the force equilibrium of the specimen can be effectively achieved by virtue of a ramped incident pulse, and the fracture onset in the vicinity of the crack tip is found to synchronize with the peak force, both of which guarantee the quasistatic data reduction method employed to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. Moreover, the energy partition analysis indicates that simplifications, including friction energy neglect, can cause an overestimation of the propagation fracture toughness, especially under a higher loading rate.

  11. Improved specimen recovery in tensile split Hopkinson bar

    PubMed Central

    Isakov, Matti; Hiermaier, Stefan; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an improved specimen recovery method for the tensile split Hopkinson bar (TSHB) technique. The method is based on the trapping of residual stress waves with the use of momentum trap bars. As is well known, successful momentum trapping in TSHB is highly sensitive to experimental uncertainties, especially on the incident bar side of the set-up. However, as is demonstrated in this paper, significant improvement in the reliability of specimen recovery is obtained by using two momentum trap bars in contact with the incident bar. This makes the trapping of the reflected wave insensitive to striker speed and removes the need for a precision set gap between the incident bar and the momentum trap. PMID:25071235

  12. Improved specimen recovery in tensile split Hopkinson bar.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Matti; Hiermaier, Stefan; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2014-08-28

    This paper presents an improved specimen recovery method for the tensile split Hopkinson bar (TSHB) technique. The method is based on the trapping of residual stress waves with the use of momentum trap bars. As is well known, successful momentum trapping in TSHB is highly sensitive to experimental uncertainties, especially on the incident bar side of the set-up. However, as is demonstrated in this paper, significant improvement in the reliability of specimen recovery is obtained by using two momentum trap bars in contact with the incident bar. This makes the trapping of the reflected wave insensitive to striker speed and removes the need for a precision set gap between the incident bar and the momentum trap. PMID:25071235

  13. Calibration of a Hopkinson Bar with a Transfer Standard

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Leisher, William B.; Brown, Fred A.; Davie, Neil T.

    1993-01-01

    A program requirement for field test temperatures that are beyond the test accelerometer operational limits of −30° F and +150° F required the calibration of accelerometers at high shock levels and at the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F. The purposes of these calibrations were to insure that the accelerometers operated at the field test temperatures and to provide an accelerometer sensitivity at each test temperature. Because there is no National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable calibration capability at shock levels of 5,000–15,000 g for the temperature extremes of −50° F and +160° F, a method for calibrating and certifying the Hopkinson barmore » with a transfer standard was developed. Time domain and frequency domain results are given that characterize the Hopkinson bar. The National Institute of Standards and Technology traceable accuracy for the standard accelerometer in shock is ±5%. The Hopkinson bar has been certified with an uncertainty of 6%.« less

  14. Analysis of Hopkinson bar pressure gage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baylot, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) designed Hopkinson pressure bar gages were fielded on the Dilute Explosive Tile (DET) test along with New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) designed bar gages and pressure gages manufactured by PCB Piezotronics, Inc. On the Mineral Find 3 (MF3) explosive test, WES bar gages were fielded along with pressure transducers manufactured by Kulite. The peak pressures recorded by the PCB ages were much higher than those recorded by the WES bar gages on the DET test. The peak stresses were higher for the Kulite gages than for the WES bar gages in the MF3 test. In each of these tests, the stresses recorded later in time for the bar gage were higher than those recorded for the other types of gages. The NMERI gages indicated that the pressure time-history had two significant peaks while the WES gages indicated only one significant peak. One-half of the surviving PCB gages agreed with the WES gages, while one-half agreed with the NMERI gages. Analytical and finite element (FE) calculations were performed to assess the response of the bar gages in these tests. The analytical solutions included only the bar and agreed extremely well with comparable FE calculations. These calculations indicated that the primary reason for the low peak stress readings in the bar gages was the lower frequency response capability of the recording system used to record the bar gage data. The calculations also indicated that the presence of water around the bar did not significantly affect the measured peak stress in the bar, and that the drag of the water past the bar did not cause significant forces to be developed in the bar.

  15. Using the split Hopkinson pressure bar to validate material models

    PubMed Central

    Church, Philip; Cornish, Rory; Cullis, Ian; Gould, Peter; Lewtas, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives a discussion of the use of the split-Hopkinson bar with particular reference to the requirements of materials modelling at QinetiQ. This is to deploy validated material models for numerical simulations that are physically based and have as little characterization overhead as possible. In order to have confidence that the models have a wide range of applicability, this means, at most, characterizing the models at low rate and then validating them at high rate. The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) is ideal for this purpose. It is also a very useful tool for analysing material behaviour under non-shock wave loading. This means understanding the output of the test and developing techniques for reliable comparison of simulations with SHPB data. For materials other than metals comparison with an output stress v strain curve is not sufficient as the assumptions built into the classical analysis are generally violated. The method described in this paper compares the simulations with as much validation data as can be derived from deployed instrumentation including the raw strain gauge data on the input and output bars, which avoids any assumptions about stress equilibrium. One has to take into account Pochhammer–Chree oscillations and their effect on the specimen and recognize that this is itself also a valuable validation test of the material model. PMID:25071238

  16. Using the split Hopkinson pressure bar to validate material models.

    PubMed

    Church, Philip; Cornish, Rory; Cullis, Ian; Gould, Peter; Lewtas, Ian

    2014-08-28

    This paper gives a discussion of the use of the split-Hopkinson bar with particular reference to the requirements of materials modelling at QinetiQ. This is to deploy validated material models for numerical simulations that are physically based and have as little characterization overhead as possible. In order to have confidence that the models have a wide range of applicability, this means, at most, characterizing the models at low rate and then validating them at high rate. The split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) is ideal for this purpose. It is also a very useful tool for analysing material behaviour under non-shock wave loading. This means understanding the output of the test and developing techniques for reliable comparison of simulations with SHPB data. For materials other than metals comparison with an output stress v strain curve is not sufficient as the assumptions built into the classical analysis are generally violated. The method described in this paper compares the simulations with as much validation data as can be derived from deployed instrumentation including the raw strain gauge data on the input and output bars, which avoids any assumptions about stress equilibrium. One has to take into account Pochhammer-Chree oscillations and their effect on the specimen and recognize that this is itself also a valuable validation test of the material model. PMID:25071238

  17. On backward dispersion correction of Hopkinson pressure bar signals

    PubMed Central

    Tyas, A.; Ozdemir, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Elastic theory shows that wide spectrum signals in the Hopkinson pressure bar suffer two forms of distortion as they propagate from the loaded bar face. These must be accounted for if accurate determination of the impact load is to be possible. The first form of distortion is the well-known phase velocity dispersion effect. The second form, which can be equally deleterious, is the prediction that at high frequencies, the stress and strain generated in the bar varies with radial position on the cross section, even for a uniformly applied loading. We consider the consequences of these effects on our ability to conduct accurate backward dispersion correction of bar signals, that is, to derive the impact face load from the dispersed signal recorded at some other point on the bar. We conclude that there is an upper limit on the frequency for which the distortion effects can be accurately compensated, and that this can significantly affect the accuracy of experimental results. We propose a combination of experimental studies and detailed numerical modelling of the impact event and wave propagation along the bar to gain better understanding of the frequency content of the impact event, and help assess the accuracy of experimental predictions of impact face load. PMID:25071236

  18. Hopkinson bar techniques for the intermediate strain rate testing of bovine cortical bone

    PubMed Central

    Cloete, T. J.; Paul, G.; Ismail, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the dynamic viscoelastic properties of bone is required to understand the mechanisms of macroscopic bone fracture in humans, and other terrestrial mammals, during impact loading events (e.g. falls, vehicle accidents, etc.). While the dynamic response of bone has been studied for several decades, high-quality data remain limited, and it is only within the last decade that techniques for conducting dynamic compression tests on bone at near-constant strain rates have been developed. Furthermore, there appears to be a lack of published bone data in the intermediate strain rate (ISR) range (i.e. 1–100 s−1), which represents a regime in which many dynamic bone fractures occur. In this paper, preliminary results for the dynamic compression of bovine cortical bone in the ISR regime are presented. The results are obtained using two Hopkinson-bar-related techniques, namely the conventional split Hopkinson bar arrangement incorporating a novel cone-in-tube striker design, and the recently developed wedge bar apparatus. The experimental results show a rapid transition in the strain rate sensitive behaviour of bovine cortical bone in the ISR range. Finally, a new viscoelastic model is proposed that captures the observed transition behaviour. PMID:24711493

  19. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Davie, N.T.

    1996-03-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, the beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration with a laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is described. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer for frequencies of dc-50 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 70,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar are presented. Preliminary results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross-axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are presented.

  20. An experimental technique of split Hopkinson pressure bar using fiber micro-displacement interferometer system for any reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Tang, X. R.; Li, J. L.; Tan, D. W.

    2014-04-01

    A novel non-contact measurement technique had been developed for the mechanical properties of materials in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars (SHPB). Instead of the traditional strain gages mounted on the surfaces of bars, two shutters were mounted on the end of bars to directly measure interfacial velocity using Fiber Micro-Displacement Interferometer System for Any Reflector. Using the new technique, the integrated stress-strain responses could be determined. The experimental technique was validated by SHPB test simulation. The technique had been used to investigate the dynamic response of a brittle explosive material. The results showed that the new experimental technique could be applied to the dynamic behavior in SHPB test.

  1. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  2. An experimental technique of split Hopkinson pressure bar using fiber micro-displacement interferometer system for any reflector.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Tang, X R; Li, J L; Tan, D W

    2014-04-01

    A novel non-contact measurement technique had been developed for the mechanical properties of materials in Split Hopkinson Pressure Bars (SHPB). Instead of the traditional strain gages mounted on the surfaces of bars, two shutters were mounted on the end of bars to directly measure interfacial velocity using Fiber Micro-Displacement Interferometer System for Any Reflector. Using the new technique, the integrated stress-strain responses could be determined. The experimental technique was validated by SHPB test simulation. The technique had been used to investigate the dynamic response of a brittle explosive material. The results showed that the new experimental technique could be applied to the dynamic behavior in SHPB test. PMID:24784672

  3. Application of the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Seismic Property Characterization of Hydrate-bearing Sand Undergoing Water Saturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2011-05-03

    Conventional resonant bar tests allow the measurement of seismic properties of rocks and sediments at low frequencies (several kilohertz). However, the tests require a long, slender sample which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface and weak and fractured formations. We present an alternative low-frequency measurement technique to the conventional resonant bar tests. This technique involves a jacketed core sample placed between a pair of long, metal extension rods with attached seismic source and receiver—the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the added length and mass to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The proposed “Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB)” test is applied in two steps. In the first step, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the system are measured. Then, numerical inversions for the compressional and shear wave velocities and attenuation are performed. We initially applied the SHRB test to synthetic materials (plastics) for testing its accuracy, then used it for measuring the seismic velocities and attenuation of a rock core containing supercritical CO{sub 2}, and a sediment core while methane hydrate formed in the pore space.

  4. Constant strain rate compression of bovine cortical bone on the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar.

    PubMed

    Bekker, A; Cloete, T J; Chinsamy-Turan, A; Nurick, G N; Kok, S

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a visco-elastic material which implies that strain rate will affect its response. Although the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar is an accepted technique for determining the dynamic compressive properties of cortical bone it has been shown that the strain rate of compression does not remain constant throughout the duration of a classical experiment with a uniform striker. This raises concerns as to the measurement of smeared responses. This paper presents a shaped striker technique whereby the incident pulse can be shaped to attain a constant strain rate experiment for bovine bone. Shaped strikers offer benefits such as re-usability and increased test repeatability. A comparison of the stress-strain-strain rate responses attained through classical and constant strain rate experiments shows that the shape of the stress-strain curves from conventional experiments is adversely affected in the portion where the strain rate varies. The dynamic response corridors for the two tests are similar, however the ultimate properties are affected. It is concluded that the strain rate history should be presented with dynamic stress-strain responses since the instantaneous strain rate is a likely contributor to potential constitutive models. PMID:25492009

  5. Investigations on specimen design and mounting for Split Hopkinson Tension Bar (SHTB) experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledford, Noah; Paul, Hanna; Ganzenmüller, Georg; May, Michael; Höfemann, Matthias; Otto, Manuel; Petrinic, Nikica

    2015-09-01

    Split Hopkinson Tension Bar (SHTB) experiments can be used to test the material behavior with high strain rates in tension loading. The influence of the specimen mounting and the specimen design on the test results was investigated. Three mounting methods were tested. The best signal is achieve using a mounting based on form fit. The three tested specimen designs all lead to a valid fracture behavior, but result in a different local strain rate.

  6. Image-based stress and strain measurement of wood in the split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moilanen, C. S.; Saarenrinne, P.; Engberg, B. A.; Björkqvist, T.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of wood must be considered when designing mechanical pulping machinery. The composition of wood within the annual ring is important. This paper proposes a novel image-based method to measure stress and planar strain distribution in soft, heterogeneous materials. The main advantage of this method in comparison to traditional methods that are based on strain gauges is that it captures local strain gradients and not only average strains. Wood samples were subjected to compression at strain rates of 1000-2500 s-1 in an encapsulated split-Hopkinson device. High-speed photography captured images at 50 000-100 000 Hz and different magnifications to achieve spatial resolutions of 2.9 to 9.7 µm pixels-1. The image-based analysis utilized an image correlation technique with a method that was developed for particle image velocimetry. The image analysis gave local strain distribution and average stress as a function of time. Two stress approximations, using the material properties of the split-Hopkinson bars and the displacement of the transmitter bar/sample interface, are presented. Strain gauges on the bars of the split-Hopkinson device give the reference average stress and strain. The most accurate image-based stress approximation differed from the strain gauge result by 5%.

  7. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars.

    PubMed

    Lea, Lewis J; Jardine, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials. PMID:26931828

  8. Application of photon Doppler velocimetry to direct impact Hopkinson pressure bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2016-02-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion, and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently, these advantages are gained at the expense of all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the experimental determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. In this paper, we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using photon Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and the precision of measurements. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains in fully dense metals, and improvement for all strains in slow and non-equilibrating materials.

  9. Evaluation of a Hopkinson bar fly-away technique for high amplitude shock accelerometer calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Togami, T.C.; Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    A split Hopkinson bar technique has been developed to evaluate the performance of accelerometers that measure large amplitude pulses. An evaluation of this technique has been conducted in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to determine its use in the practical calibration of accelerometers. This evaluation consisted of three tasks. First, the quartz crystal was evaluated in a split Hopkinson bar configuration to evaluate the quartz gage`s sensitivity and frequency response at force levels of 18,000, 35,000 and 53,000 N at ambient temperature, {minus}48 C and +74 C. Secondly, the fly away technique was evaluated at shock amplitudes of 50,000, 100,000, 150,000 and 200,000 G (1 G = 9.81 m/s{sup 2}) at ambient temperature, {minus}48 C and +74 C. Lastly, the technique was performed using a NIST calibrated reference accelerometer. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz gage data and the measured acceleration data have shown very good agreement. Based on this evaluation, the authors expect this split Hopkinson fly away technique to be certified by the SNL Primary Standards Laboratory.

  10. High Strain Rate Characterization of Laminate Composites Using Direct-Tension Split Hopkinson Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkala, S.; Hommeida, A.; Brar, N. S.

    1999-06-01

    Data on high strain rate response of laminate composites is required to numerically simulate penetration/perforation events. Tension specimens of laminate composites can only be fabricated in dog-bone shape and, therefore, a direct tension Hopkinson bar configuration is more appropriate for acquiring high strain data. Launching a 6.35-mm wall thickness aluminum tube around 25.4 diameter aluminum incident bar produces the tension pulse in the incident bar. Ends of the composite specimens in the dog-bone configuration are placed in specially designed grips, which are screwed in the incident and transmitter bars. The configuration allows testing of specimens with threaded ends. Stress-strain data on 6061-T6 aluminum and titanium 6-4 at a strain rate of 10^3/s agree with the published data. High strain rate data on laminate composite specimens reinforced with graphite and glass fibers will be presented.

  11. High Strain Rate Characterization of Plastics and Foams Using Polymeric Split Hopkinson Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawas, Omar; Brar, N. S.

    1997-07-01

    High strain rate and high/low temperature response of engineered plastics and foams is relevant and important for the design and development of fighter aircraft canopies, submarine interiors and automobile exterior and interior systems. The mechanical impedance of conventional split Hopkinson bar materials (aluminum or steel) is extremely large compared to those of plastic or foam specimens. To overcome this difficulty of impedance mismatch we have developed the Polymeric Split Hopkinson Bar (PSHB). A viscoelastic model for cast acrylic bar material, which relates stresses and strains as well as particle velocity and strain, is developed to account for the wave dispersion along the bar. The model is verified by comparing the stress strain data on 1100 aluminum and polycarbonate specimens obtained using PSHB and conventional aluminum SHB. Stress-strain data at a strain rate of 103/s on low strength polyurethane foam (density = 0.57 g/cm3) following this technique show that the foam has a recoverable compressive strain of 0.4 at a stress of 2.9 MPa. High strain rate (2x102-2x103/s) data on polycarbonate, generic elastomer, and styrofoam will also be presented.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations on the use of polymer Hopkinson pressure bars.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, John J; Ahonsi, Bright; Palamidi, Elisavet; Reid, Steve R

    2014-08-28

    Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) testing has traditionally been carried out using metal bars. For testing low stiffness materials such as rubbers or low strength materials such as low density cellular solids considered primarily herein, there are many advantages to replacing the metal bars with polymer bars. An investigation of a number of aspects associated with the accuracy of SHPB testing of these materials is reported. Test data are used to provide qualitative comparisons of accuracy using different bar materials and wave-separation techniques. Sample results from SHPB tests are provided for balsa, Rohacell foam and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene. The techniques used are verified by finite-element (FE) analysis. Experimentally, the material properties of the bars are determined from impact tests in the form of a complex elastic modulus without curve fitting to a rheological model. For the simulations, a rheological model is used to define the bar properties by curve fitting to the experimentally derived properties. Wave propagation in a polymer bar owing to axial impact of a steel bearing ball is simulated. The results indicate that the strain histories can be used to determine accurately the viscoelastic properties of polymer bars. An FE model of the full viscoelastic SHPB set-up is then used to simulate tests on hyperelastic materials. PMID:25071237

  13. Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar Test for Sonic-Frequency Acoustic Velocity and Attenuation Measurements of Small, Isotropic Geologic Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, S.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical properties (seismic velocities and attenuation) of geological materials are often frequency dependent, which necessitates measurements of the properties at frequencies relevant to a problem at hand. Conventional acoustic resonant bar tests allow measuring seismic properties of rocks and sediments at sonic frequencies (several kilohertz) that are close to the frequencies employed for geophysical exploration of oil and gas resources. However, the tests require a long, slender sample, which is often difficult to obtain from the deep subsurface or from weak and fractured geological formations. In this paper, an alternative measurement technique to conventional resonant bar tests is presented. This technique uses only a small, jacketed rock or sediment core sample mediating a pair of long, metal extension bars with attached seismic source and receiver - the same geometry as the split Hopkinson pressure bar test for large-strain, dynamic impact experiments. Because of the length and mass added to the sample, the resonance frequency of the entire system can be lowered significantly, compared to the sample alone. The experiment can be conducted under elevated confining pressures up to tens of MPa and temperatures above 100 C, and concurrently with x-ray CT imaging. The described Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar (SHRB) test is applied in two steps. First, extension and torsion-mode resonance frequencies and attenuation of the entire system are measured. Next, numerical inversions for the complex Young's and shear moduli of the sample are performed. One particularly important step is the correction of the inverted Young's moduli for the effect of sample-rod interfaces. Examples of the application are given for homogeneous, isotropic polymer samples and a natural rock sample.

  14. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G. III; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125-fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical system. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two part study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. This paper reports the first part of the shock mitigating materials study. A study to compare three thicknesses (0.125, 0.250, and 0.500 in.) of seventeen, unconfined materials for their shock mitigating characteristics has been completed with a split Hopkinson bar configuration. The nominal input as measured by strain gages on the incident Hopkinson bar is 50 fps {at} 100 {micro}s for these tests. It is hypothesized that a shock mitigating material has four purposes: to lengthen the shock pulse, to attenuate the shock pulse, to mitigate high frequency content in the shock pulse, and to absorb energy. Both time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare the materials` achievement of these purposes.

  15. High Strain Rate Testing of Rocks using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwiessler, Ruprecht; Kenkmann, Thomas; Poelchau, Michael; Nau, Siegfried; Hess, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic mechanical testing of rocks is important to define the onset of rate dependency of brittle failure. The strain rate dependency occurs through the propagation velocity limit (Rayleigh wave speed) of cracks and their reduced ability to coalesce, which, in turn, significantly increases the strength of the rock. We use a newly developed pressurized air driven Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB), that is specifically designed for the investigation of high strain rate testing of rocks, consisting of several 10 to 50 cm long strikers and bar components of 50 mm in diameter and 2.5 meters in length each. The whole set up, composed of striker, incident- and transmission bar is available in aluminum, titanium and maraging steel to minimize the acoustic impedance contrast, determined by the change of density and speed of sound, to the specific rock of investigation. Dynamic mechanical parameters are obtained in compression as well as in spallation configuration, covering a wide spectrum from intermediate to high strain rates (100-103 s‑1). In SHPB experiments [1] one-dimensional longitudinal compressive pulses of diverse shapes and lengths - formed with pulse shapers - are used to generate a variety of loading histories under 1D states of stress in cylindrical rock samples, in order to measure the respective stress-strain response at specific strain rates. Subsequent microstructural analysis of the deformed samples is aimed at quantification fracture orientation, fracture pattern, fracture density, and fracture surface properties as a function of the loading rate. Linking mechanical and microstructural data to natural dynamic deformation processes has relevance for the understanding of earthquakes, landslides, impacts, and has several rock engineering applications. For instance, experiments on dynamic fragmentation help to unravel super-shear rupture events that pervasively pulverize rocks up to several hundred meters from the fault core [2, 3, 4]. The dynamic

  16. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  17. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Frew, Danny Joe; Duong, Henry

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40 microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.

  18. The Use of a Beryllium Hopkinson Bar to Characterize In-Axis and Cross-Axis Accelerometer Response in Shock Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments have been studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability with diameters of 0.75 in. and 2.0 in has been developed to extend our understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. The in-axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar and a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement is presented. The cross-axis performance of the accelerometer subjected to static compression on a beryllium cylinder, static strain on a steel beam, dynamic strain on a steel beam (ISA-RP 37.2, Paragraph 6.6), and compressive shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration is also presented. The performance of the accelerometer in a combined in-axis and cross-axis shock environment is shown for one configuration. Finally, a failure analysis conducted in cooperation with ENDEVCO gives a cause for the occasional unexplained failures that have occurred in some applications.

  19. Split Hopkinson bar measurement using high-speed full-spectrum fiber Bragg grating interrogation.

    PubMed

    Seng, Frederick; Hackney, Drew; Goode, Tyler; Shumway, LeGrand; Hammond, Alec; Shoemaker, George; Pankow, Mark; Peters, Kara; Schultz, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    The development and validation of a high-speed, full-spectrum measurement technique is described for fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. A FBG is surface-mounted to a split-Hopkinson tensile bar specimen to induce high strain rates. The high strain gradients and large strains that indicate material failure are analyzed under high strain rates up to 500  s-1. The FBG is interrogated using a high-speed full-spectrum solid-state interrogator with a repetition rate of 100 kHz. The captured deformed spectra are analyzed for strain gradients using a default interior point algorithm in combination with the modified transfer matrix approach. This paper shows that by using high-speed full-spectrum interrogation of an FBG and the modified transfer matrix method, highly localized strain gradients and discontinuities can be measured without a direct line of sight. PMID:27607299

  20. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  1. Crack initiation at high loading rates applying the four-point bending split Hopkinson pressure bar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henschel, Sebastian; Krüger, Lutz

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic crack initiation with crack-tip loading rates of K˙ ≈ 2.106MPa√ms-1 in a high strength G42CrMoS4 steel was investigated. To this end, a previously developed split Hopkinson pressure bar with four-point bending was utilised. V-notched and pre-cracked Charpy specimens were tested. The detection of dynamic crack initiation was performed by analysing the dynamic force equilibrium between the incident and the transmission bar. Additionally, the signal of a near-field strain gauge and high-speed photography were used to determine the instant of crack initiation. To account for vibrations of the sample, a dynamic analysis of the stress intensity factor was performed. The dynamic and static analyses of the tests produced nearly the same results when a force equilibrium was achieved. Fracture-surface analysis revealed that elongated MnS inclusions strongly affected both the dynamic crack initiation and growth. Blunting of the precrack did not take place when a group of MnS inclusions was located directly at the precrack tip. Due to the direction of the elongated MnS inclusions perpendicular to the direction of crack growth, the crack could be deflected. The comparison with a 42CrMo4 steel without elongated MnS inclusions revealed the detrimental effect in terms of resistance to crack initiation. Taking the loading-rate dependency into consideration, it was shown that there was no pronounced embrittlement due to the high loading rates.

  2. The use of a beryllium Hopkinson bar to characterize in-axis and cross-axis accelerometer response in shock environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1997-05-01

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments are being studied at Sandia National Laboratories in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory. A beryllium Hopkinson bar capability has been developed to extend the understanding of the piezoresistive accelerometer, in two mechanical configurations and with and without mechanical isolation, in the high frequency, high shock environments where measurements are being made. In this paper, recent measurements with beryllium single and split-Hopkinson bar configurations are described. The in axis performance of the piezoresistive accelerometer in mechanical isolation for frequencies of dc-30 kHz and shock magnitudes of up to 6,000 g as determined from measurements with a beryllium Hopkinson bar with a certified laser doppler vibrometer as the reference measurement are presented. Results of characterizations of the accelerometers subjected to cross axis shocks in a split beryllium Hopkinson bar configuration are also presented.

  3. Characterization and modeling of mechanical behavior of single crystal titanium deformed by split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morrow, B. M.; Lebensohn, R. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Martinez, D. T.; Addessio, F. L.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Lookman, T.; Cerreta, E. K.

    2016-07-01

    Single crystal titanium samples were dynamically loaded using split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and the resulting microstructures were examined. Characterization of the twins and dislocations present in the microstructure was conducted to understand the pathway for observed mechanical behavior. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to measure textures and quantify twinning. Microstructures were profusely twinned after loading, and twin variants and corresponding textures were different as a function of initial orientation. Focused ion beam (FIB) foils were created to analyze dislocation content using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Large amounts of dislocations were present, indicating that plasticity was achieved through slip andmore » twinning together. Viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) modeling was used to confirm the complex order of operations during deformation. The activation of different mechanisms was highly dependent upon crystal orientation. For [0001] and View the MathML source[101¯1]-oriented crystals, compressive twinning was observed, followed by secondary tensile twinning. Furthermore, dislocations though prevalent in the microstructure, contributed to final texture far less than twinning.« less

  4. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 {micro}{var_epsilon} peak) amplitude and a 100 {micro}s duration (measured at 10% amplitude).

  5. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  6. A modified split Hopkinson torsional bar system for correlated study of τ–γ relations, shear localization and microstructural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong; Zhang, Husheng; Shen, Letian; Xu, Yongbo; Bai, Yilong; Dodd, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    The conventional split Hopkinson torsional bar (SHTB) system consists of two bars, which can successfully produce the data for the construction of dynamic torsional shear stress and strain relationships. However, the system cannot provide reliable information on the progression of the deformed micro-structure during the test. The reverberation of waves in the bars and the tested specimen can spoil the microstructural pattern formed during the effective loading. This paper briefly reviews a modified version of the SHTB system consisting of four bars that has been developed. This modified system can eliminate the reverberation of waves in the specimen and provide only a single rectangular torsional stress pulse, thus it can properly freeze the microstructure formed during the effective period of loading in the specimen. By using the advantage of the modified SHTB system, together with a new design of specimen, it is possible to perform a correlated study of the dynamic stress–strain response, shear localization and the evolution of the microstructure at a fixed view-field (position) on a given specimen during the sequence of the loading time. The principles, experimental set-up and procedure, calibration and some preliminary results of the correlated study are reported in this paper. PMID:24711492

  7. Geomechanics of penetration :laboratory analog experiments using a modified split hopkinson pressure bar/impact testing procedure.

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, David Joseph; Gettemy, Glen L.; Bronowski, David R.

    2005-11-01

    This research continues previous efforts to re-focus the question of penetrability away from the behavior of the penetrator itself and toward understanding the dynamic, possibly strain-rate dependent, behavior of the affected materials. A modified split Hopkinson pressure bar technique is prototyped to determine the value of reproducing the stress states, and mechanical responses, of geomaterials observed in actual penetrator tests within a laboratory setting. Conceptually, this technique simulates the passage of the penetrator surface past any fixed point in the penetrator trajectory by allowing for a controlled stress-time function to be transmitted into a sample, thereby mimicking the 1D radial projection inherent to analyses of the cavity expansion problem. Test results from a suite of weak (unconfined compressive strength, or UCS, of 22 MPa) concrete samples, with incident strain rates of 100-250 s{sup -1}, show that the complex mechanical response includes both plastic and anelastic wave propagation, and is critically dependent on incident particle velocity and saturation state. For instance, examination of the transmitted stress-time data, and post-test volumetric measurements of pulverized material, provide independent estimates of the plasticized zone length (1-2 cm) formed for incident particle velocity of {approx}16.7 m/s. The results also shed light on the elastic or energy propagation property changes that occur in the concrete. For example, the pre- and post-test zero-stress elastic wave propagation velocities show that the Young's modulus drops from {approx}19 GPa to <8 GPa for material within the first centimeter from the plastic transition front, while the Young's modulus of the dynamically confined, axially-stressed (in 6-18 MPa range) plasticized material drops to 0.5-0.6 GPa. The data also suggest that the critical particle velocity for formation of a plastic zone in the weak concrete is 13-15 m/s, with increased saturation tending to increase

  8. Measurement of local strain and heat propagation during high-temperature testing in a split-Hopkinson tension bar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilamosa, V.; Clausen, A. H.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Børvik, T.; Skjervold, S.

    2012-08-01

    Aluminium alloys are commonly used by the industry due to their good mechanical properties and their relatively low density. An accurate prediction of the behaviour of aluminium alloys under a wide range of temperatures and strain rates is important in numerical simulations of forming processes or applications involving adiabatic heating like penetration and crash situations. Several tests are needed at low, medium and high strain rates to study this behaviour. This paper will focus on the high strain rate test rig, which is a split- Hopkinson tension bar system (SHTB), the acquisition system for strain measurements, and a thermal analysis of the bars due to heating of the sample. A new way of doing local measurements with a high-speed camera will be presented. The thermal boundary conditions of the tests have been measured and simulated, and the results indicate that the stress wave propagation in the bars is not significantly affected by a local heating of the part of the bars which is closest to the sample.

  9. Development of a new testing equipment that combines the working principles of both the split Hopkinson bar and the drop weight testers.

    PubMed

    Adas, Rateb; Haiba, Majed

    2016-01-01

    In the current work, a new high strain rate tensile testing equipment is proposed. The equipment uses a pendulum device to generate an impact load and a three-bar mechanism to bring that load to act upon a specially designed specimen. As the standard impact testing apparatus uses pendulum device and the well-known SHB high strain rate tester adopts the above-mentioned mechanism, the introduced equipment can be dealt with as an impact apparatus in which the base that supports the V-shape specimen is replaced with the three-bar configuration that the traditional SHB uses. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the new tester, virtual design tools were used to determine the most appropriate configuration for it. Then, a detailed design was created, and a full-scale prototype was produced, calibrated, instrumented and tested. The obtained results demonstrate that the new tester is capable of axially straining steel specimens up to failure at a maximum rate of about 250 s(-1), which is reasonable when compared with a more established high strain rate testers. PMID:27504253

  10. Development of new Hopkinson's device dedicated to rib's bone characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayeur, O.; Haugou, G.; Chaâri, F.; Delille, R.; Drazetic, P.; Markiewicz, E.

    2012-08-01

    This study presents an original approach for the design of adapted Hopkinson device dedicated to the characterisation of human ribs' cortical bone. The quasi-static study carried out on flat samples coming from this anatomical part highlighted the importance of the critical effect of sample shape and location on the accuracy of identify mechanical behaviour. The access to higher rates of strains, Hopkinson bars technique are classically required whatever compression or tension loadings. Classical designs of measurement bars are not suitable for this purpose due to the complexity of specimen's geometry (thickness variation). In this context, a new design of SHTB is studied here on the basis on a Finite Element approach of the set measurement bars/biological coupon. Finite Element simulations have been conducted using Abaqus explicit code by varying the design configuration. The comparison on input and output elastic waves suggests a set of small diameter bars in polyamide 66 for a better signal measurement.

  11. First application of the 3D-MHB on dynamic compressive behavior of UHPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Riganti, Gianmario; Albertini, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    In order to study the dynamic behaviour of material in confined conditions a new machine was conceived and called 3D-Modified Hopkinson Bar (3D-MHB). It is a Modified Hopkinson Bar apparatus designed to apply dynamic loading in materials having a tri-axial stress state. It consists of a pulse generator system (with pre-tensioned bar and brittle joint), 1 input bar, and 5 output bars. The first results obtained on Ultra High Performance Concrete in compression with three different mono-axial compression states are presented. The results show how the pre-stress states minimize the boundary condition and a more uniform response is obtained.

  12. Dynamical and Kinematic Structure of Bars with Supermassive Black Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Monica

    2014-05-01

    Observational studies have shown that nearly 65% of disk galaxies in the local Universe are barred. Furthermore, there is evidence that nearly every galaxy with a substantial central light concentration contains a supermassive black hole. This implies that bars frequently (or perhaps always) co-exist with supermassive black holes. Our recent studies have shown that the dynamical influence of a bar (e.g. its ability to transport angular momentum) and its orbital structure alters the observable kinematics in galactic nuclei. I will describe independent yet complementary sets of simulations that show that the effect of a bar is to increase the velocity dispersion within the effective radius on average by between 7% and 12% depending on when the black hole forms relative to the formation of the bar. This predicted effect is somewhat less than previous claims of the offset observed in data. Our investigations of the orbital structure of N-body bars (using automated orbit classification methods that rely on orbital spectral analysis) show that their self-consistent distribution functions comprise significantly fewer varieties of orbits than have previously been found in analytic bar potentials. The principle orbit families of N-body bars bear surprising similarity to those of slowly rotating triaxial potentials. Finally, the presence of a galactic bar can result in an overestimate of the stellar dynamical measurement of the black hole mass. I will present a new stellar dynamical model for the nucleus of the galaxy NGC 4151 which illustrates some of the problems associated with measuring the black hole mass in this barred Seyfert I galaxy.

  13. Introducing a New 3D Dynamical Model for Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christof; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-11-01

    The regular or chaotic dynamics of an analytical realistic three dimensional model composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar and a flat disk is investigated. For describing the properties of the bar, we introduce a new simple dynamical model and we explore the influence on the character of orbits of all the involved parameters of it, such as the mass and the scale length of the bar, the major semi-axis and the angular velocity of the bar, as well as the energy. Regions of phase space with ordered and chaotic motion are identified in dependence on these parameters and for breaking the rotational symmetry. First, we study in detail the dynamics in the invariant plane z = pz = 0 using the Poincaré map as a basic tool and then study the full three-dimensional case using the Smaller Alignment index method as principal tool for distinguishing between order and chaos. We also present strong evidence obtained through the numerical simulations that our new bar model can realistically describe the formation and the evolution of the observed twin spiral structure in barred galaxies.

  14. A comparative study on the restrictions of dynamic test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, GH.; Lahmi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic behavior of materials is investigated using different devices. Each of the devices has some restrictions. For instance, the stress-strain curve of the materials can be captured at high strain rates only with Hopkinson bar. However, by using a new approach some of the other techniques could be used to obtain the constants of material models such as Johnson-Cook model too. In this work, the restrictions of some devices such as drop hammer, Taylor test, Flying wedge, Shot impact test, dynamic tensile extrusion and Hopkinson bars which are used to characterize the material properties at high strain rates are described. The level of strain and strain rate and their restrictions are very important in examining the efficiency of each of the devices. For instance, necking or bulging in tensile and compressive Hopkinson bars, fragmentation in dynamic tensile extrusion and petaling in Taylor test are restricting issues in the level of strain rate attainable in the devices.

  15. The Development of a Dual-Warhead Impact System for Dynamic Linearity Measurement of a High-g Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) Accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunbo; Yang, Zhicai; Ma, Zongmin; Cao, Huiliang; Kou, Zhiwei; Zhi, Dan; Chen, Yanxiang; Feng, Hengzhen; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Despite its extreme significance, dynamic linearity measurement for high-g accelerometers has not been discussed experimentally in previous research. In this study, we developed a novel method using a dual-warhead Hopkinson bar to measure the dynamic linearity of a high-g acceleration sensor with a laser interference impact experiment. First, we theoretically determined that dynamic linearity is a performance indicator that can be used to assess the quality merits of high-g accelerometers and is the basis of the frequency response. We also found that the dynamic linearity of the dual-warhead Hopkinson bar without an accelerometer is 2.5% experimentally. Further, we verify that dynamic linearity of the accelerometer is 3.88% after calibrating the Hopkinson bar with the accelerometer. The results confirm the reliability and feasibility of measuring dynamic linearity for high-g accelerometers using this method. PMID:27338383

  16. The Development of a Dual-Warhead Impact System for Dynamic Linearity Measurement of a High-g Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yunbo; Yang, Zhicai; Ma, Zongmin; Cao, Huiliang; Kou, Zhiwei; Zhi, Dan; Chen, Yanxiang; Feng, Hengzhen; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Despite its extreme significance, dynamic linearity measurement for high-g accelerometers has not been discussed experimentally in previous research. In this study, we developed a novel method using a dual-warhead Hopkinson bar to measure the dynamic linearity of a high-g acceleration sensor with a laser interference impact experiment. First, we theoretically determined that dynamic linearity is a performance indicator that can be used to assess the quality merits of high-g accelerometers and is the basis of the frequency response. We also found that the dynamic linearity of the dual-warhead Hopkinson bar without an accelerometer is 2.5% experimentally. Further, we verify that dynamic linearity of the accelerometer is 3.88% after calibrating the Hopkinson bar with the accelerometer. The results confirm the reliability and feasibility of measuring dynamic linearity for high-g accelerometers using this method. PMID:27338383

  17. Dynamic high-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified for dynamic high-temperature tensile characterization of thin-sheet alloys. An induction coil heater was used to heat the specimen while a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. As an example, the high-temperature Kolsky tension bar was used to characterize a DOP-26 iridium alloy in high-strain-rate tension at 860 s-1/1030 ∘C.

  18. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  19. Short-term dynamical evolution of grand-design spirals in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Junichi

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the short-term dynamical evolution of stellar grand-design spiral arms in barred spiral galaxiesusing a three-dimensional (3D) N-body/hydrodynamic simulation. Similar to previous numerical simulations of unbarred, multiple-arm spirals, we find that grand-design spiral arms in barred galaxies are not stationary, but rather dynamic. This means that the amplitudes, pitch angles, and rotational frequencies of the spiral arms are not constant, but change within a few hundred million years (i.e. the typical rotational period of a galaxy). We also find that the clear grand-design spirals in barred galaxies appear only when the spirals connect with the ends of the bar. Furthermore, we find that the short-term behaviour of spiral arms in the outer regions (R > 1.5-2 bar radius) can be explained by the swing amplification theory and that the effects of the bar are not negligible in the inner regions (R < 1.5-2 bar radius). These results suggest that although grand-design spiral arms in barred galaxies are affected by the stellar bar, the grand-design spiral arms essentially originate not as bar-driven stationary density waves, but rather as self-excited dynamic patterns. We imply that a rigidly rotating grand-design spiral could not be a reasonable dynamical model for investigating gas flows and cloud formation even in barred spiral galaxies.

  20. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of C-4 and primasheet P1000 explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; De Luca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Todd, Steven N

    2010-01-01

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of C-4 and Primasheet P1000 explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Primasheet P1000 is a pentaerythritol tetranitrate-based rubberized explosive. C-4 is a RDX-based moldable explosive. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on load frames and on a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Split-Hopkinson and quasi-static tests were done at five temperatures from -50 C to 50 C. Acoustic velocities were measured at, above, and below room temperature.

  1. Dynamic fragmentation of ferroelectric ceramics using the torsional Kolsky bar

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, L S; Grady, D E

    1983-10-01

    This paper studied the dynamic loading and subsequent fragmentation of four different load zirconate titanate (95/5 PZT) ferroelectric ceramics using a torsional Kolsky bar apparatus. Solid cylinders of the four materials were loaded in torsion at shear strain rates in the range 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/s/sup -1/. Using the strain gage recordings of the incident, reflected and transmitted pulses, the energy required to fragment the specimen was determined for each test. In addition, the fragments resulting from each test were collected and analyzed by various technciques to determine their mass and size distributions. Results show some differences in particle distributions between the different batches of material. However, there is a more significant and consistent difference between the dynamic strength (as measured by the maximum shear stress) and the fragment mass distributions of the virgin material and the pressure depoled material, despite the fact that no differences were detected in the energy of fragmentation. Using earlier analytical results which relate the local kinetic energy of a potential fragment to the surface energy required to create that fragment, a relationship between the distribution of fragments from a test and material properties was derived. Results of tests on PZT as well as other materials such as oil shale, graphite, uranium dioxide and glass indicate a good correlation between the fragment distribution parameter, n, and material properties as predicted by the theory. Finally, the results are analyzed to determine the potential effects of internal stresses on the dynamic strength of the material and its fragmentation characteristics.

  2. 2-D stationary gas dynamics in a barred galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, W. A.

    2015-06-01

    A code for solving the 2-D isothermal Euler equations of gas dynamics in a rotating disc is presented. The gravitational potential represents a weak bar and controls the flow. A damped Newton method solves the second-order upwind discretisation of the equations for a steady-state solution, using a consistent linearisation and a direct solver. Successive grid refinement, starting from a finite-volume grid with 8 by 8 cells, is applied to find solutions on subsequently finer meshes. On coarser meshes, a first-order spatial discretisation is used. The method obtains quadratic convergence once the solution approaches the steady state. The initial search is quick with the first-order scheme and slower with the second-order discretisation, up to 256 by 256 cells. Beyond, with 512 by 512 cells, the number of iterations becomes too large to be of practical use. Potential causes are discussed. The code can be applied as a tool for generating flow models if used on not too fine meshes.

  3. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  4. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-08-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  5. Dynamics of membrane nanotubes coated with I-BAR

    PubMed Central

    Barooji, Younes F.; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Semsey, Szabolcs; Reihani, S. Nader S.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane deformation is a necessary step in a number of cellular processes such as filopodia and invadopodia formation and has been shown to involve membrane shaping proteins containing membrane binding domains from the IRSp53-MIM protein family. In reconstituted membranes the membrane shaping domains can efficiently deform negatively charged membranes into tubules without any other proteins present. Here, we show that the IM domain (also called I-BAR domain) from the protein ABBA, forms semi-flexible nanotubes protruding into Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). By simultaneous quantification of tube intensity and tubular shape we find both the diameter and stiffness of the nanotubes. I-BAR decorated tubes were quantified to have a diameter of ~50 nm and exhibit no stiffening relative to protein free tubes of the same diameter. At high protein density the tubes are immobile whereas at lower density the tubes diffuse freely on the surface of the GUV. Bleaching experiments of the fluorescently tagged I-BAR confirmed that the mobility of the tubes correlates with the mobility of the I-BAR on the GUV membrane. Finally, at low density of I-BAR the protein upconcentrates within tubes protruding into the GUVs. This implies that I-BAR exhibits strong preference for negatively curved membranes. PMID:27444356

  6. Dynamics of membrane nanotubes coated with I-BAR.

    PubMed

    Barooji, Younes F; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Semsey, Szabolcs; Reihani, S Nader S; Bendix, Poul M

    2016-01-01

    Membrane deformation is a necessary step in a number of cellular processes such as filopodia and invadopodia formation and has been shown to involve membrane shaping proteins containing membrane binding domains from the IRSp53-MIM protein family. In reconstituted membranes the membrane shaping domains can efficiently deform negatively charged membranes into tubules without any other proteins present. Here, we show that the IM domain (also called I-BAR domain) from the protein ABBA, forms semi-flexible nanotubes protruding into Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). By simultaneous quantification of tube intensity and tubular shape we find both the diameter and stiffness of the nanotubes. I-BAR decorated tubes were quantified to have a diameter of ~50 nm and exhibit no stiffening relative to protein free tubes of the same diameter. At high protein density the tubes are immobile whereas at lower density the tubes diffuse freely on the surface of the GUV. Bleaching experiments of the fluorescently tagged I-BAR confirmed that the mobility of the tubes correlates with the mobility of the I-BAR on the GUV membrane. Finally, at low density of I-BAR the protein upconcentrates within tubes protruding into the GUVs. This implies that I-BAR exhibits strong preference for negatively curved membranes. PMID:27444356

  7. Dynamics of membrane nanotubes coated with I-BAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barooji, Younes F.; Rørvig-Lund, Andreas; Semsey, Szabolcs; Reihani, S. Nader S.; Bendix, Poul M.

    2016-07-01

    Membrane deformation is a necessary step in a number of cellular processes such as filopodia and invadopodia formation and has been shown to involve membrane shaping proteins containing membrane binding domains from the IRSp53-MIM protein family. In reconstituted membranes the membrane shaping domains can efficiently deform negatively charged membranes into tubules without any other proteins present. Here, we show that the IM domain (also called I-BAR domain) from the protein ABBA, forms semi-flexible nanotubes protruding into Giant Unilamellar lipid Vesicles (GUVs). By simultaneous quantification of tube intensity and tubular shape we find both the diameter and stiffness of the nanotubes. I-BAR decorated tubes were quantified to have a diameter of ~50 nm and exhibit no stiffening relative to protein free tubes of the same diameter. At high protein density the tubes are immobile whereas at lower density the tubes diffuse freely on the surface of the GUV. Bleaching experiments of the fluorescently tagged I-BAR confirmed that the mobility of the tubes correlates with the mobility of the I-BAR on the GUV membrane. Finally, at low density of I-BAR the protein upconcentrates within tubes protruding into the GUVs. This implies that I-BAR exhibits strong preference for negatively curved membranes.

  8. The Dynamical Relationship between the Bar and Spiral Patterns of NGC 1365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speights, Jason C.; Rooke, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    Theories that attempt to explain the dynamical relationship between bar and spiral patterns in galactic disks make different predictions about the radial profile of the pattern speed. These are tested for the H-alpha bar and spiral patterns of NGC 1365. The radial profile of the pattern speed is measured by fitting mathematical models that are based on the Tremaine–Weinberg method. The results show convincing evidence for the bar rotating at a faster rate than the spiral pattern, inconsistent with a global wave mode or a manifold. There is evidence for mode coupling of the bar and spiral patterns at the overlap of corotation and inner Lindblad resonances (ILRs), but the evidence is unreliable and inconsistent. The results are the most consistent with the bar and spiral patterns being dynamically distinct features. The pattern speed of the bar begins near an ILR and ends near the corotation resonance (CR). The radial profile of the pattern speed beyond the bar most closely resembles what is expected for coupled spiral modes and tidal interactions.

  9. The Dynamical Relationship Between the Bar and Spiral Patterns of NGC 1365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speights, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Theories describing the dynamical relationship between bar and spiral patterns in galaxy disks make different predictions about the radial profile of the pattern speed. The purpose of this poster is to test these predictions for the bar and spiral patterns of NGC 1365. The pattern speed is measured by fitting different forms of the Tremaine-Weinberg equations to H-alpha intensity and velocity maps. The results are the most consistent with the currently observed bar and spiral patterns being dynamically distinct features. They show compelling evidence for the bar rotating faster than the spiral pattern, inconsistent with a global wave mode or a manifold. The evidence for mode coupling of the bar and spiral patterns is weak due to inconsistencies in the results for different solution methods. The bar pattern speed is approximately constant between the inner Lindblad and corotation resonances, demonstrating that the solutions can detect large-scale, rigid patterns. Beyond the bar, the results resemble what is expected for coupled spiral modes and tidal interactions.

  10. Gas dynamics in the Milky Way: the nuclear bar and the 3-kpc arms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, N. J.

    We discuss the results of the first model of the gas dynamics in the Milky Way in the presence of two bars: the large scale primary bar or boxy bulge and a secondary bar in the Galactic center region. We have obtained an accurate potential by modeling 2MASS star counts and we have used this potential to simulate the gas dynamics. As a first approximation we have used one single pattern speed Omega_p . The models with Omega_p =30-40 km s-1kpc and a primary bar orientation of 20º-35o reproduce successfully many characteristics of the observed longitude-velocity diagrams as the terminal velocity curve or the spiral arm tangent points. The Galactic Molecular Ring is not an actual ring but the inner part of the spiral arms, within corotation. The model reproduces quantitatively the `3-kpc arm' and the recently found far-side counterpart, which are the lateral arms that contour the bar. In the Galactic center region, the model reproduces the 1-kpc HI ring and the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), which is the gas response to the secondary bar. In order to reproduce the observed parallelogram shape of the CO longitude velocity diagram of the CMZ, the secondary bar should be oriented by and angle of 60o-70o with respect to the Sun-GC line. The mass of the secondary bar amounts to (2-5.5) × 109 M_⊙, which is 10-25% of the mass of the primary bar.

  11. A Plausible Explanation for the Steep Redshift Decline in Barred Spirals: Dynamically Hot Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Melbourne, J.; Kassin, S.; Elmegreen, D. M.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Athanassoula, E.; Abraham, R. G.; Ellis, R. S.; Weiner, B.

    2012-05-01

    We present the first observational evidence for the inhibition of bar formation in dispersion dominated (dynamically hot) galaxies. We compare the presence of galactic structures (bars) and the host galaxy kinematics in a sample of 200 disk galaxies from the All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS) and the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 (DEEP2) survey. We find that bars are preferentially found in galaxies that lie on the Tully-Fisher relationship and are rotation-dominated, whereas few bars are found in galaxies that are dispersion dominated. The data provide at least one explanation for the steep (x3) decline in the bar fraction from z=0 to z=0.84 previously observed in L* disk galaxies in the COSMOS field. In the COSMOS data, the decline in bars is primarily found in the low mass, late-type systems. A proposed explanation for the trend was that at higher redshifts, lower mass systems were more dispersion dominated because they were more easily harassed by the increased interaction and merger rate. The data presented here provides observational support for this hypothesis.

  12. Development of a miniature tensile Kolsky bar for dynamic testing of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jastin V.

    Mechanical properties such as yield stress and ultimate strength are most commonly obtained under quasi-static (strain rate of 10--4 s--1) loading conditions Materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers may exhibit significant changes in mechanical response when subjected to high strain rate (102 --105 per second) conditions. The loading rate or strain rate can affect the material properties such as elastic modulus, yield strength, work hardening, and ductility. To ensure product quality and reliability under impact conditions, the mechanical responses of materials under dynamic loading conditions must be characterized. A Kolsky bar is a tool that can be used to study the uniaxial compressive constitutive behavior of materials under high strain rates. The goal of this thesis is to develop a miniature Tensile Kolsky bar that can be used to test materials with thickness on the order of 200 micrometers (thin foils). The system consists of a cylindrical launch tube with an internal striker, a rectangular incident bar and a transmitted bar. The specimen is held in pockets that were milled directly into the incident and transmitted bar. The rectangular incident and transmitted bars facilitate specimen and strain gage mounting. The rectangular section also provides a reduced cross sectional bar area compared to a bar of circular cross section with diameter equivalent to the width of the rectangular bar, which increases the system sensitivity. This thesis presents the detailed description of the miniature Kolsky bar device, specimen geometry, diagnostic techniques and different calibration and validation techniques used for developing the system. The Kolsky bar setup was used to test 99.9 percent pure magnesium at two different strain rates (5000 and 10000 per second). Specimens were cut from billets processed via the 4Bc equal channel angular extrusion route and were tested in three different directions: extrusion, longitudinal and transverse. The results from the

  13. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of PBXN-5 and comp-B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Ten Cate, James A; Deluca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Todd, Steven N

    2009-03-12

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of PBXN-5 and Comp-B explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on a load frame. Hopkinson bar and quasistatic testing was done at five temperatures from -50{sup o}C to 50{sup o}C. Our results were dominated by the low density of the samples and showed up as low acoustic velocities and lower strengths, as compared to other materials of the same or similar formulations. The effects seem to be consistent with the high porosity of the materials. The data do provide useful input to models that include density as a parameter and suggest caution when using measurements of ideal materials to predict behavior of damaged materials.

  14. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics and analysis of a four-bar linkage with clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yuanguang; Chang, Zongyu; Dong, Xiaogang; Hu, Yafei; Yu, Zhenjiang

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, nonlinear dynamic behavior of a four-bar linkage considering clearance is studied. The dynamic model of the linkage with a clearance between coupler and rocker is developed firstly. Then the dynamic equations of this mechanism are solved by a numerical method. According to the calculated response, compliance, force and trajectory of pin in joint bearing are obtained. Effects of clearance magnitude and the relationship between a mechanism with clearance and without clearance are studied. By using Poincare Map, it is proved that strange attractors or chaos exist in the dynamic response. In addition, phenomena of chaos, periodic response and subharmonic response also can be found in the special condition. Bifurcation diagram is used to suggest that bifurcation and fractal phenomena exist in the dynamic response of this mechanism.

  16. Braid bar and island dynamics of the multi-threaded Rio Paraná, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, A.; Ashworth, P.; Sandbach, S.; Amsler, M.; Best, J.; Hardy, R.; Lane, S.; Orfeo, O.; Parsons, D.; Reesink, A.; Sambrook Smith, G.; Szupiany, R.

    2012-04-01

    Here we report results from a three year study of channel dynamics and bar evolution in one of the World's largest rivers, the multi-threaded Rio Paraná, Argentina. The Rio Paraná is a sand-bed river (D50 ~ 0.35 mm) with a channel pattern that is characterised by stable vegetated islands, dynamic sandy braid bars, partially-coupled floodplain wetlands and, in many reaches, a dominant meandering thalweg. Mean channel width and depth at bankfull conditions are ~2-3 km and ~7-8 m, respectively. Thalweg scour depths are up to 25-30 m. Channel and bar morphodynamics were monitored during this study using a range of techniques including repeat bathymetric surveys, using single- and multi-beam echo sounding, acoustic Doppler current profiler surveys of flow structure and suspended sediment concentration, and analysis of historic bathymetric maps and satellite imagery. Channel hydrodynamics and morphodynamics were also investigated using a range of numerical modelling strategies. These included a 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics model, a 2D physically-based morphodynamic model that solves the shallow water form of the Navier-Stokes equations, and a reduced-complexity model that neglects much of the physics governing fluvial processes. Here we focus on a comparison of numerical model results and field evidence in order to evaluate which modelling strategies have the greatest potential for elucidating process-form relationships within the World's largest multi-threaded rivers. We show that all three modelling approaches are capable of predicting observed depth-mean flow structures within a 30 km study reach of the Rio Paraná. However, we conclude that models of intermediate complexity, based on the depth-averaged shallow water equations, may provide the most effective tools for simulating bar formation and river evolution over time periods of decades to centuries. Results from our morphodynamic model simulations and field data analysis provide insight into mechanisms of

  17. Modeling the dynamic properties of conventional and high-damping boring bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sortino, M.; Totis, G.; Prosperi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the availability of reliable mathematical models of machining system dynamics is a key issue for achieving high quality standards in precision machining. Dynamic models can indeed be applied for tooling system design, preventive evaluation of cutting process stability and optimization of cutting parameters. This is of particular concern in internal turning, where the cutting process is greatly affected by the compliance of the tooling system. In this paper, an innovative hybrid dynamic model of the tooling system in internal turning, based on FE beams and empirical models, is presented. The model was based on physical and geometrical assumptions and it was refined by using experimental observations derived from modal testing of boring bars with different geometries and made of different materials, i.e. alloy steel and high-damping carbide. The predicted modal parameters of the tooling system (tool tip static compliance, natural frequency and damping coefficient of the dominant mode) are in good accordance with experimental values.

  18. Gas Dynamics and Outflow in the Barred Starburst Galaxy NGC 1808 Revealed with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salak, Dragan; Nakai, Naomasa; Hatakeyama, Takuya; Miyamoto, Yusuke

    2016-05-01

    NGC 1808 is a nearby barred starburst galaxy with an outflow from the nuclear region. To study the inflow and outflow processes related to star formation and dynamical evolution of the galaxy, we have carried out 12CO (J=1-0) mapping observations of the central r ∼ 4 kpc of NGC 1808 using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. Four distinct components of molecular gas are revealed at high spatial resolution of 2″ (∼100 pc): (1) a compact (r < 200 pc) circumnuclear disk (CND), (2) r ∼ 500 pc ring, (3) gas-rich galactic bar, and (4) spiral arms. Basic geometric and kinematic parameters are derived for the central 1 kpc region using tilted-ring modeling. The derived rotation curve reveals multiple mass components that include (1) a stellar bulge, (2) a nuclear bar and molecular CND, and (3) an unresolved massive (∼107 M ⊙) core. Two systemic velocities, 998 km s‑1 for the CND and 964 km s‑1 for the 500 pc ring, are revealed, indicating a kinematic offset. The pattern speed of the primary bar, derived by using a cloud-orbit model, is 56 ± 11 km s‑1 kpc‑1. Noncircular motions are detected associated with a nuclear spiral pattern and outflow in the central 1 kpc region. The ratio of the mass outflow rate to the star formation rate is {\\dot{M}}{out}/{SFR}∼ 0.2 in the case of optically thin CO (1–0) emission in the outflow, suggesting low efficiency of star formation quenching.

  19. Definition of a dynamic optical sensor for measuring unsteady pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chapuis, P.; Maillard, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    This study presents the authors` contribution to define an optical dynamic sensor. Given that the studies carried out are of an exploratory nature, the first task was to validate the mechanical behavior of the specimen body in the sensor and to check that the signals recorded were reproducible. To subject the sensor to deformation rates of 10 to 10{sup 2} per second, tests were carried out using the Kolsky-Hopkinson apparatus. The results show that specimen body responds in a satisfactory manner. This result leads the authors to opt for the use of a polarimetric apparatus using birefringent shaping fibers in order to limit the intrinsic sensitivity of the two-arm apparatus. The fact that the fiber is sensitive to deformation rates does not appear in the bibliographical references. They identified it on the basis of tests on the traction/compression machine by varying the load climb rate and on the basis of Hopkinson bar dynamic tests.

  20. Computer simulations of channel meandering and the formation of point bars: Linking channel dynamics to the preserved stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Covault, J. A.; Pyrcz, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Meandering rivers are probably one of the most recognizable geomorphic features on earth. As they meander across alluvial and delta plains, channels migrate laterally and develop point bars, splays, levees and other geomorphic and sedimentary features that compose substantial portions of the fill within many sedimentary basins. These basins can include hydrocarbon producing fields. Therefore, a good understanding of the processes of meandering channels and their associated deposits is critical for exploiting these reservoirs in the subsurface. In the past couple of decades, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the morphodynamics of channel meandering. Basic fluid dynamics and sediment transport (Ikeda and Parker, 1981; Howard, 1992) has shown that many characteristic features of meandering rivers, such as the meandering wavelength, growth rate and downstream migration rate, can be predicted quantitatively. As a result, a number of variations and improvement of the theory have emerged (e.g., Blondeaux and Seminara, 1985; Parker and Andrews, 1985, 1986; and Sun et al., 2001a, b).The main improvements include the recognition of so called "bar-bend" interactions, where the development of bars on the channel bed and their interactions with the channel bend is recognized as a primary cause for meandering channels to develop greater complexity than the classic goose-neck meander bend shapes, such as compound bend. Recently, Sun and others have shown that the spatial patterns of width variations in meandering channels can be explained by an extrinsic periodic flow variations coupled with the intrinsic bend instability dynamics. In contrast to the significant improvement of our understanding of channel meandering, little work has been done to link the geomorphic features of meandering channels to the geometry and heterogeneity of the deposits they form and ultimately preserves. A computer simulation model based on the work of Sun and others (1996, 2001

  1. MASSIVE CLUSTERS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF NGC 1365: CLUSTER FORMATION AND GAS DYNAMICS IN GALACTIC BARS

    SciTech Connect

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Galliano, Emmanuel; Alloin, Danielle E-mail: egallian@on.b

    2009-10-01

    Cluster formation and gas dynamics in the central regions of barred galaxies are not well understood. This paper reviews the environment of three 10{sup 7} M {sub sun} clusters near the inner Lindblad resonance (ILR) of the barred spiral NGC 1365. The morphology, mass, and flow of H I and CO gas in the spiral and barred regions are examined for evidence of the location and mechanism of cluster formation. The accretion rate is compared with the star formation rate to infer the lifetime of the starburst. The gas appears to move from inside corotation in the spiral region to looping filaments in the interbar region at a rate of approx6 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} before impacting the bar dustlane somewhere along its length. The gas in this dustlane moves inward, growing in flux as a result of the accretion to approx40 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} near the ILR. This inner rate exceeds the current nuclear star formation rate by a factor of 4, suggesting continued buildup of nuclear mass for another approx0.5 Gyr. The bar may be only 1-2 Gyr old. Extrapolating the bar flow back in time, we infer that the clusters formed in the bar dustlane outside the central dust ring at a position where an interbar filament currently impacts the lane. The ram pressure from this impact is comparable to the pressure in the bar dustlane, and both are comparable to the pressure in the massive clusters. Impact triggering is suggested. The isothermal assumption in numerical simulations seems inappropriate for the rarefaction parts of spiral and bar gas flows. The clusters have enough lower-mass counterparts to suggest they are part of a normal power-law mass distribution. Gas trapping in the most massive clusters could explain their [Ne II] emission, which is not evident from the lower-mass clusters nearby.

  2. Factors Influencing Local Membrane Curvature Induction by N-BAR Domains as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Philip D.; Swenson, Richard D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    N-BAR domains are protein modules that bind to and induce curvature in membranes via a charged concave surface and N-terminal amphipathic helices. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations have demonstrated that the N-BAR domain can induce a strong local curvature that matches the curvature of the BAR domain surface facing the bilayer. Here we present further molecular dynamics simulations that examine in greater detail the roles of the concave surface and amphipathic helices in driving local membrane curvature. We find that the strong curvature induction observed in our previous simulations requires the stable presentation of the charged concave surface to the membrane and is not driven by the membrane-embedded amphipathic helices. Nevertheless, without these amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane, the N-BAR domain does not maintain a close association with the bilayer, and fails to drive membrane curvature. Increasing the membrane negative charge through the addition of PIP2 facilitates closer association with the membrane in the absence of embedded helices. At sufficiently high concentrations, amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane drive membrane curvature independently of the BAR domain. PMID:18469070

  3. Bar dimensions and bar shapes in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuven, Jasper; Kleinhans, Maarten; Weisscher, Steven; van der Vegt, Maarten

    2016-04-01

    Estuaries cause fascinating patterns of dynamic channels and shoals. Intertidal sandbars are valuable habitats, whilst channels provide access to harbors. We still lack a full explanation and classification scheme for the shapes and dimensions of bar patterns in natural estuaries, in contrast with bars in rivers. Analytical physics-based models suggest that bar length in estuaries increases with flow velocity, tidal excursion length or estuary width, depending on which model. However, these hypotheses were never validated for lack of data and experiments. We present a large dataset and determine the controls on bar shape and dimensions in estuaries, spanning bar lengths from centimeters (experiments) to 10s of kilometers length. First, we visually identified and classified 190 bars, measured their dimensions (width, length, height) and local braiding index. Data on estuarine geometry and tidal characteristics were obtained from governmental databases and literature on case studies. We found that many complex bars can be seen as simple elongated bars partly cut by mutually evasive ebb- and flood-dominated channels. Data analysis shows that bar dimensions scale with estuary dimensions, in particular estuary width. Breaking up the complex bars in simple bars greatly reduced scatter. Analytical bar theory overpredicts bar dimensions by an order of magnitude in case of small estuarine systems. Likewise, braiding index depends on local width-to-depth ratio, as was previously found for river systems. Our results suggest that estuary dimensions determine the order of magnitude of bar dimensions, while tidal characteristics modify this. We will continue to model bars numerically and experimentally. Our dataset on tidal bars enables future studies on the sedimentary architecture of geologically complex tidal deposits and enables studying effects of man-induced perturbations such as dredging and dumping on bar and channel patterns and habitats.

  4. A technique for combined dynamic compression-shear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.; Chen, R.; Lin, Y. L.; Li, J. L.; Lu, L.; Sun, G. L.

    2011-03-01

    It is critically important to study the dynamic response of materials under a combined compression-shear loading for developing constitutive laws more accurately and fully. We present a novel technique to achieve the combined compression and shear loadings at high strain rates. The main apparatus consists of a strike bar, an incident bar, and two transmission bars. The close-to-specimen end of the incident bar is wedge-shaped with 90°. In each experiment, there are two identical specimens, respectively, agglutinated between one side of the wedge and one of transmission bars. When a loading impulse travels to specimens along the incident bar, because of the special geometrical shape, the specimen-incident bar interface gets an axial and a transverse velocity. Specimens endure a combined compression-shear loading at high strain rates. The compression stress and strain of the specimens are deduced from signals recorded by strain gages mounted on the bars. The shear stress is measured by two piezoelectric transducers of quartz (Y-cut with rotation angle 17.7°) embedded at the close-to-specimen end of transmission bars; the shear strain is measured with a novel optical technique, which is based on the luminous flux method. An analytic model was proposed and validated by the numerical simulations. The simulation results yield good agreement with the analytic results. The proposed technique was then validated through experiments carried out on lead specimens, by comparing experimental results with that of the split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments.

  5. Interactions between bar dynamics and herbaceous vegetation in gravel bed rivers: numerical simulations using BASEMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviglia, Annunziato; Tettamanti, Stefano; Bertoldi, Walter; Toffolon, Marco; Vetsch, David; Francalanci, Simona

    2014-05-01

    A new 2D morphodynamic model for gravel bed rivers have been used to investigate the interaction between alternate bar dynamics and herbaceous vegetation. In particular, bed topography evolution has been coupled with the growth of vegetation, included as a function of the access to ground water. Numerical simulations were performed using the code BASEMENT (Vetsch et al., 2013), with the addition of a new submodel, dealing with the numerical description of the vegetation. The vegetation was allowed to grow during the dry season on exposed areas, and the vertical distribution of peak biomass was modeled as a function of the bed elevation, using a simple analytical formulation, following Marani et al. (2013). Flow resistance was divided into a component exerted by the bed and a component exerted by vegetation (Crosato and Saleh, 2010; Li and Millar, 2011); in this way we reproduced both the decrease in bed shear stress, reducing the sediment transport capacity of the flow within the plants, and the increase in hydraulic resistance, reducing flow velocity. The model was applied to a hypothetical case study, with grain size, longitudinal slope, and hydrological regime similar to that of the Magra River (Italy). A straight river reach, 125 m wide and 20 km long was simulated. Starting from an initially flat configuration, the river developed its own bar morphology, under steady formative conditions. After reaching a dynamic equilibrium, we allowed the vegetation to grow and interact with the morphodynamic evolution, reproducing a sequence of floods and growing seasons at low flow. We assumed that vegetation can be uprooted only if the bed shear stress exceeds a fixed threshold. Different scenarios were examined, varying the effect of vegetation in terms of increased resistance and threshold for uprooting (i.e. added sediment cohesion). Preliminary results confirmed that the herbaceous vegetation has a stabilizing effect on river morphology. As the density and strength of

  6. The e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}DD-bar, J/{psi}DD-bar* reactions with dynamically generated resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Gamermann, D.; Oset, E.

    2008-08-31

    In two recent reactions by Belle producing DD-bar and DD-bar* meson pairs, peaks above threshold have been measured in the differential cross sections, possibly indicating new resonances in these channels. We want to study such reactions from the point of view that the D meson pairs are produced from already known or predicted resonances below threshold. Our study shows that the peak in the DD-bar* production is not likely to be caused by the X(3872) resonance, but the peak seen in DD-bar invariant mass can be well described if the DD-bar pair comes from the already predicted scalar X(3700) resonance.

  7. Rotational reorientation dynamics at high pressures: rhodamine 6G in ethanol from 1 bar to 6 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, L.A.; Webb, S.P.; Yeh, S.W.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-03

    Picosecond, time-resolved fluorescence depolarization spectroscopy has been used to measure the rotational reorientation time (tau/sub or/) of electronically excited rhodamine 6G. When the dependence of tau/sub or/ on solvent viscosity for a series of linear alcohols is compared with that for ethanol as a function of pressure over the range from 1 bar to 6 kbar, substantially different rotational reorientation dynamics are found for identical macroscopic viscosities. 31 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  8. A test of the association of infrared activity with bars. [Intragalactic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pompea, S.M.; Rieke, G.H. )

    1990-06-01

    The hypothesis that high FIR luminosities in noninteracting galaxies are dependent on material fed into their nuclei or into circumnuclear rings along bars can be tested by NIR imaging. A sample of 22 galaxies was selected from the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog, that have FIR luminosities greater than 10 to the 10th lunar luminosities and hot colors between 60 and 100 microns, indicative of possible nuclear starbursts, but are not interacting or classified as Seyfert galaxies. Fifteen galaxies of the sample of 16 that are not clearly barred from optical data and are isolated were imaged at 1.6 micron and 2.2 microns. In an evaluation of the IR images, at least eight of these galaxies do not appear to have bars. Strong bars therefore do not appear to be an absolute requirement for high IR luminosity. 21 refs.

  9. A test of the association of infrared activity with bars. [intragalactic dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Rieke, G. H.

    1990-01-01

    The hypothesis that high FIR luminosities in noninteracting galaxies are dependent on material fed into their nuclei or into circumnuclear rings along bars can be tested by NIR imaging. A sample of 22 galaxies was selected from the Revised Shapley-Ames Catalog, that have FIR luminosities greater than 10 to the 10th lunar luminosities and hot colors between 60 and 100 microns, indicative of possible nuclear starbursts, but are not interacting or classified as Seyfert galaxies. Fifteen galaxies of the sample of 16 that are not clearly barred from optical data and are isolated were imaged at 1.6 micron and 2.2 microns. In an evaluation of the IR images, at least eight of these galaxies do not appear to have bars. Strong bars therefore do not appear to be an absolute requirement for high IR luminosity.

  10. Dynamics of a nearshore bar system in the northern Adriatic: A video-based morphological classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armaroli, Clara; Ciavola, Paolo

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to define a simplified morphodynamic classification suitable for low energy beaches exposed to microtidal conditions. The study site is located in the northern Adriatic (in Italy), it is an almost 2 km-long rectilinear beach bordered at the northern edge by coastal structures and at the southern end by a small river inlet. The mechanisms related to the evolution of the submerged part of the beach were derived from video-monitoring using Argus technology. The morphodynamic evolution of the system was studied using an automatic procedure on images for the characterisation of nearshore bars that showed good correspondence with hand-based (visual) interpretation. To apply this automatic procedure, the bar's plan crest shape was mapped using cross-shore pixel luminosity transects traced on time-averaged video images. A careful sensitivity analysis was undertaken to determine the best spacing between transects for the correct tracing of the shape of the bar crest. The error associated to a transect spacing every 25 m resulted in being comparable with the pixel resolution in the area and with the error found comparing the video interpretation with bathymetric surveys. From the study of a four and a half year dataset (February 2003-May 2007), the submerged beach was found to be characterised by the presence of a single bar in the area next to coastal protection structures. However, moving southwards of these, inner and outer bars were present. The morphodynamics of the outer bar and its plan shape modifications were dominated by rhythmic forms. Occasionally, after high energy events, the bar became rectilinear but during the following lower energy periods rhythmicity was re-established, supporting the hypothesis of self-organization mechanisms. The cross-shore position of the bar's crests only showed limited cross-shore mobility through time.

  11. Equilibrium of a galactic bar. II. Stellar-dynamical counterparts of the S-type Riemann ellipsoids

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervoort, P.O.; Welty, D.E.

    1982-12-15

    The family of triaxial stellar systems described in Paper I of this series is generalized to include, in addition to the previous dependence on Jacobi's integral, a dependence of the distribution function on a second isolating integral of the motion of a star in the prevailing gravitational field. The second integral is approximated with the aid of a model of the stellar orbits which is valid in the absence of important resonances and which should be accurate in the systems of relatively small central concentration on which this investigation concentrates. The new stellar systems are stellar-dynamical counterparts of the classical S-type Riemann ellipsoids well known in the study of self-gravitating fluid systems, and, within the framework of stellar dynamics, they are also three-dimensional counterparts of the elliptical disks studied by Freeman and by Hunter. The Riemann-like stellar systems form an extensive family, and they exhibit a rich interplay of effects of the rotations of their triaxial figures and effects of the dependence of their distribution functions on the second integral of the motion. The family includes stellar-dynamical counterparts of the classical Maclaurin spheroids, Jacobi ellipsoids, and Dedekind ellipsoids. The study of triaxial, Riemann-like systems is related to the study of bar modes of oscillation in corresponding axisymmetric, Maclaurin-like systems. On the basis of this relationship, it is shown that an axisymmetric stellar system having the structure of a uniformly rotating polytrope of index n = 0.5 is dynamically unstable with respect to a bar mode if the ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to the magnitude of the gravitational potential energy exceeds 0.166.

  12. Experimental and numerical analysis of the dynamic behaviour in tension of an armour steel for applications in defence industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadoni, Ezio; Dotta, Matteo; Forni, Daniele; Riganti, Gianmario; Kaufmann, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    The dynamic behaviour of armour steel in tension was investigated over a wide range of strain-rates on round specimens. The experiments were carried out by means of a Split Hopkinson Tensile Bar device and by a Hydro Pneumatic Machine. The target strain rate were set at the following six levels: 10-3, 5, 25, 100, 500 and 1000 s-1. Two material models were calibrated and used to replicate the experiments and to simulate blasting event on steel plate. Finally, the two responses are compared.

  13. The fate of Salicaceae seedlings related to the dynamics of alluvial bars during floods: differentiating bed erosion, uprooting and burying.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintenberger, C. L.; Rodrigues, S.; Bréhéret, J. G.; Juge, P.; Villar, M.

    2014-12-01

    Riparian vegetation is a key factor of the morphological evolution of river. In Europe, riparian Salicaceae is declining following the loss of potential recruitment areas associated with river management. As an exception for lowland rivers, the Loire River (France) shows, in its middle reaches, an efficient sexual regeneration of Populus nigra and Salix alba on bare sediments deposited during flood events. In the literature, the influence of hydrological patterns as a key factor of the seedlings survival is well documented. Some studies focused on seedlings ability to withstand flood constraints and detailed the effect of duration and intensity of floods but few studies characterized precisely the processes applied on seedlings. As a working hypothesis, we consider that three types of flood stresses can induce mortality of seedlings: (i) uprooting by drag applied on the seedlings without sediment erosion, (ii) erosion of the recruited areas and (iii) burying. The distinction of these three processes allows identifying the importance of survival factors due to a strong sediment dynamics (e.g. erosion height > root height) or to the anchorage and resprouting ability. The main issues are: what are the governing processes (type and intensity) determining survival or death of seedlings and which factor (fluvial dynamics vs. own characteristics of seedlings) controls their survival? In-situ measurements were performed on a forced alluvial bar (20.000 m2) to detail the bar dynamics (bathymetry, topography, scour/fill processes, grain size surveys, flow velocity) and to survey the associated recruitment. On 48 plots (1.410 m2) the density, height and species (P. nigra and S. alba) were surveyed the year of recruitment (after dry period) and the next year after flood period. We highlight the following phases of processes during floods. The erosion of substrate dominates at the beginning of the rising limb. The erosion or uprooting processes depend of the balance between

  14. Finite Element Simulations to Explore Assumptions in Kolsky Bar Experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Crum, Justin

    2015-08-05

    The chief purpose of this project has been to develop a set of finite element models that attempt to explore some of the assumptions in the experimental set-up and data reduction of the Kolsky bar experiment. In brief, the Kolsky bar, sometimes referred to as the split Hopkinson pressure bar, is an experimental apparatus used to study the mechanical properties of materials at high strain rates. Kolsky bars can be constructed to conduct experiments in tension or compression, both of which are studied in this paper. The basic operation of the tension Kolsky bar is as follows: compressed air is inserted into the barrel that contains the striker; the striker accelerates towards the left and strikes the left end of the barrel producing a tensile stress wave that propogates first through the barrel and then down the incident bar, into the specimen, and finally the transmission bar. In the compression case, the striker instead travels to the right and impacts the incident bar directly. As the stress wave travels through an interface (e.g., the incident bar to specimen connection), a portion of the pulse is transmitted and the rest reflected. The incident pulse, as well as the transmitted and reflected pulses are picked up by two strain gauges installed on the incident and transmitted bars as shown. By interpreting the data acquired by these strain gauges, the stress/strain behavior of the specimen can be determined.

  15. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  16. Chatter resistance of non-uniform turning bars with attached dynamic absorbers—Analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffury, J.; Altus, E.

    2010-05-01

    Forced harmonic vibration of a non-uniform elastic beam with attached dynamic vibration absorbers (DVA) is studied. Analytical approximation of the solution is obtained by the functional perturbation method (FPM). The problem has application to cutting tools operations where the resistance of the tool holder against regenerative chatter can be enhanced by optimizing the real part of the frequency response function (FRF). A test case of a beam with step-like heterogeneity and single DVA at the tip shows that the FPM solution is very accurate for up to ˜40 percent deviation in both stiffness and mass density. Using the analytical results and Sims approach, optimal DVA tuning is found for each set of beam heterogeneity parameters by solving a set of nonlinear algebraic equations numerically. It is found that the optimum can be further improved by searching for the best step location. The system optimization is then expanded to a general heterogeneous beam with a DVA at its tip. The mass and stiffness distribution is optimized by applying the Lagrange variation method on the FPM solution yielding Fredholm integral equations. The optimized morphology is found to be approximately linear and far from the "intuitive" step-like one (Rivin and Kang, 1992) and yields better chatter-resistance.

  17. Dark Matter Trapping by Stellar Bars: The Shadow Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Michael S.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the complex interactions between the stellar disc and the dark-matter halo during bar formation and evolution using N-body simulations with fine temporal resolution and optimally chosen spatial resolution. We find that the forming stellar bar traps dark matter in the vicinity of the stellar bar into bar-supporting orbits. We call this feature the shadow bar. The shadow bar modifies both the location and magnitude of the angular momentum transfer between the disc and dark matter halo and adds 10 per cent to the mass of the stellar bar over 4 Gyr. The shadow bar is potentially observable by its density and velocity signature in spheroid stars and by direct dark matter detection experiments. Numerical tests demonstrate that the shadow bar can diminish the rate of angular momentum transport from the bar to the dark matter halo by more than a factor of three over the rate predicted by dynamical friction with an untrapped dark halo, and thus provides a possible physical explanation for the observed prevalence of fast bars in nature.

  18. Dynamic Tensile Failure of the Rock Interface Between Tuff and Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Feng, Xia-Ting; Chen, Rong; Xia, Kaiwen; Jin, Changyu

    2012-05-01

    The dynamic tensile strength properties of the rock interface and its host rocks sampled from the Baihetan Hydropower Station from Western China were measured using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The results were compared with those for its two host rocks. The dynamic tensile strengths of the two host rocks, tuff and basalt have typical loading rate dependence. However, the dynamic response of the rock interface is much more complicated and at a given loading rate, varies between those of tuff and basalt. To explain the observation, numerical simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) was conducted to determine the detailed tensile failure process of the rock interface. The numerical simulation verifies that the variation of the dynamic tensile strength of the rock interface is a result of the variation of the interface geometry.

  19. Dynamic Strength of Tantalum under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glam, Benny; Werdiger, Meir; Pistinner, Shlomi

    2013-06-01

    Plane impact experiments of double shock and shock-rarefaction in Tantalum were carried out in a gas gun. VISAR diagnostics has been implemented to measure the particle velocity and the free surface velocity. The VISAR information was utilized to study the dynamic strength of Tantalum under compression and tension. The pressure in the experiments was below 35 GPa. In this pressure range the dominant mechanism is expected to be dislocation motion. A 1-d hydrodynamic code was used in order to match various strength models. As expected, both the Johnson-Cook and the Guinan-Steinberg models do not reproduce the experimental results. Therefore in this paper we compare the Zerilli-Armstrong model which has been recently calibrated at strain rate of 6 x 103 s-1 using the split Kowalsky-Hopkinson bar to our experimental results at strain rate of 106 s-1.

  20. A dynamic ball compression test for understanding rock crushing.

    PubMed

    Huang, S; Liu, H; Xia, K

    2014-12-01

    During crushing, rock particles are subjected to complicated loading. It is desired to establish the relation between the loading and the fragmentation parameters for better understanding rock crushing mechanism. In this work, a split Hopkinson pressure bar system in combination with high speed cameras is utilized in the dynamic ball compression test, in which the spherical rock sample is adopted to avoid the shape effect. Using elasticity theory, the loading rate and the dynamic indirect tensile strength are first calculated. With the aid of the moment-trap technique and high speed cameras, the surface energy is determined for each sample. The relations between the loading rate and the fragmentation parameters, i.e., the number of fragments and the surface energy are established. The application of this method to a granitic rock shows that it is flexible and can be applied to the crushing study of generic brittle solids. PMID:25554304

  1. Application of the dynamic characterization of metals in automotive industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Aiuto, Fabio; De Caro, Daniele; Federici, Claudio; Tedesco, Michele M.; Ziggiotti, Alessandro; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the experimental methodology used by R&D EMEA - Global Materials Labs Department to test metals at high strain rate of 500 s-1. The implementation of dynamic results in commercial FEM Software LS - DYNA for crash simulation are presented. The effects of the strain rate on the tensile properties of metals, used in automotive field, are evaluated using results obtained from a direct tension split Hopkinson bar, built in collaboration with the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland DynaMat Lab. Finally the complete mechanical characterization of the Magnesium alloy AZ31B is presented, from static up to dynamic tests, showing its applications in FCA (Fiat Chrysler Automobiles), problems and future developments.

  2. Measurement of the $B^+\\rightarrow p \\bar{p} K^{+}$ Branching Fraction and Study of the Decay Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-06

    With a sample of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector, we study the decay B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} excluding charmonium decays to p{bar p}. We measure a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +}) = (6.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed and the Dalitz plot asymmetry suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this B decay. We search for a pentaquark candidate {Theta}*{sup ++} decaying into pK{sup +} in the mass range 1.43 to 2.00 GeV/c{sup 2} and set limits on {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {Theta}*{sup ++} {bar p}) x {Beta}({Theta}*{sup ++} {yields} pK{sup +}) at the 10{sup -7} level.

  3. Barred beaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnberg, Kathelijne M.; Kroon, Aart

    2002-11-01

    Seven different bar types are distinguished to provide a framework for comparing morphodynamic studies conducted in different areas. Five types occur in semiprotected or open coast settings, of which two are intertidal and three are subtidal. Two types occur in highly protected settings. The occurrence of a certain bar type is generally determined by the wave energy and tidal range, although the nearshore slope may also be a differentiating boundary condition. The theory behind the generation, evolution and decay of bars has evolved most for the subtidal bars in the semiprotected and open coast settings, for which three types of competing mechanisms have been formulated (breakpoint, infragravity waves, self-organisational). Most research has focused on these processes on the time scale of storm events and post-storm recovery. However, to understand the longer-term behavior of bar systems, knowledge of the role of relaxation time and morphologic feedback is needed as well. At present, such knowledge is very limited. We think it can best be obtained from the analysis of long time series of morphology and forcing conditions, rather than from intensive field experiments. In case of a feedback-dominated response (self-organisational), we expect to find no correlation between the time series of external forcing and the morphologic response. In case of a relaxation time-dominated response, we do expect to find such a correlation, albeit filtered. This discussion is illustrated by a case study of the Dutch coast.

  4. Numerical Simulations of the Kolsky Compression Bar Test

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Edmundo

    2015-10-01

    The Kolsky compression bar, or split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB), is an ex- perimental apparatus used to obtain the stress-strain response of material specimens at strain rates in the order of 10 2 to 10 4 1/s. Its operation and associated data re- duction are based on principles of one-dimensional wave propagation in rods. Second order effects such as indentation of the bars by the specimen and wave dispersion in the bars, however, can significantly affect aspects of the measured material response. Finite element models of the experimental apparatus were used here to demonstrate these two effects. A procedure proposed by Safa and Gary (2010) to account for bar indentation was also evaluated and shown to improve the estimation of the strain in the bars significantly. The use of pulse shapers was also shown to alleviate the effects of wave dispersion. Combining the two can lead to more reliable results in Kolsky compression bar testing.

  5. Size and Geometry Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Carrara Marble Under Dynamic Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chunjiang; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The effects of specimen size and geometry on the dynamic mechanical properties of Carrara marble including compressive strength, failure strain and elastic modulus are investigated in this research. Four different groups of specimens of different sizes and cross-sectional geometries are loaded under a wide range of strain rates by the split Hopkinson pressure bar setup. The experimental results indicate that all these mechanical properties are significantly influenced by the specimen size and geometry to different extent, hence highlighting the importance of taking into account of the specimen size and geometry in dynamic tests on rock materials. In addition, the transmission coefficient and the determination of strain rate under dynamic tests are discussed in detail.

  6. Measurement of the B0 -> Lambda-bar p pi Branching Fraction andStudy of the Decay Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bondioli, M

    2006-08-16

    We present a measurement of the B{sup 0} {center_dot} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -} branching fraction performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Based on a 232 million B{bar B} pairs data sample we measure: {center_dot} (B{sup 0} {center_dot} {bar {Lambda}}p{pi}{sup -}) = [3.30 {center_dot} 0.53(stat.) {center_dot} 0.31 (syst.)] {center_dot} 10{sup -6}. A measurement of the differential spectrum as a function of the di-baryon invariant mass m({Lambda}p) is also presented; this shows a near-threshold enhancement similar to that observed in other baryonic B decays.

  7. Servohydraulic methods for mechanical testing in the Sub-Hopkinson rate regime up to strain rates of 500 1/s.

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, Thomas B.; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2005-10-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain experiments on metals at strain rates in the range of 1-1000 1/s are relevant to many applications such as gravity-dropped munitions and airplane accidents. While conventional test methods cover strain rates up to {approx}10 s{sup -1} and split-Hopkinson and other techniques cover strain rates in excess of {approx}1000 s{sup -1}, there are no well defined techniques for the intermediate or ''Sub-Hopkinson'' strain-rate regime. The current work outlines many of the challenges in testing in the Sub-Hopkinson regime, and establishes methods for addressing these challenges. The resulting technique for obtaining intermediate rate stress-strain data is demonstrated in tension on a high-strength, high-toughness steel alloy (Hytuf) that could be a candidate alloy for earth penetrating munitions and in compression on a Au-Cu braze alloy.

  8. Experimental analysis of quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armor steel material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Guo, Zitao

    Quasi-static and dynamic fracture initiation toughness of gy4 armour steel material are investigated using three point bend specimen. The modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus with digital image correlation (DIC) system is applied to dynamic loading experiments. Full-field deformation measurements are obtained by using DIC to elucidate on the strain fields associated with the mechanical response. A series of experiments are conducted at different strain rate ranging from 10-3 s-1 to 103 s-1, and the loading rate on the fracture initiation toughness is investigated. Specially, the scanning electron microscope imaging technique is used to investigate the fracture failure micromechanism of fracture surfaces. The gy4 armour steel material fracture toughness is found to be sensitive to strain rate and higher for dynamic loading as compared to quasi-static loading. This work is supported by National Nature Science Foundation under Grant 51509115.

  9. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in compression at high strain rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John L.; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750ÀC and 1030ÀC). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  10. Dynamic compressive properties of bovine knee layered tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Hino, Yuki; Todo, Mitsugu

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, the most common articular disease is knee osteoarthritis. Among many treatment methodologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine have recently received a lot of attention. In this field, cells and scaffolds are important, both ex vivo and in vivo. From the viewpoint of effective treatment, in addition to histological features, the compatibility of mechanical properties is also important. In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were measured using a universal testing machine and a split Hopkinson pressure bar method. The compressive behaviors of bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were examined. The effects of strain rate on the maximum stress and the slope of stress-strain curves of the bovine articular cartilage-cancellous bone layered tissue were discussed.

  11. Dynamic mechanical characterization and modelling of polypropylene based organoclay nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kui; Matadi Boumbimba, Rodrigue; Bahlouli, Nadia; Ahzi, Said; Muller, René

    2015-09-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic behaviour of polypropylene based organoclay nanocomposite, the polypropylene matrix and a master batch of polypropylene modified anhydrid maleic were mixed by means of melt mixing technique. The experimental characterization was performed by using split Hopkinson pressure bars (SHPB), at different strain rates and temperatures. A significant increase of the yield stress of nanocomposite was shown with the present of organoclay, comparing to neat PP. A three-phase approach based on the micromechanical formulation of the cooperative model is proposed to model the yield behaviour of the polymer nanocomposite. Our proposed approach accounts for strain rate and temperature effects as well as the organoclay exfoliation effect. The predictions of models for the nanocomposite yield behaviour showed a good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgoyne, Hayden A.; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading.

  13. Strain-rate-dependent model for the dynamic compression of elastoplastic spheres.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Hayden A; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-03-01

    We present a force-displacement contact model for the compressive loading of elastoplastic spheres. This model builds from the well known Hertz contact law for elastic, quasistatic compression to incorporate a material's strain-rate-dependent plasticity in order to describe collisions between particles. In the quasistatic regime, finite-element analysis is used to derive an empirical function of the material properties. A Johnson-Cook strain rate dependence is then included into the model to study dynamic effects. We validate the model using split Hopkinson bar experiments and show that the model can accurately simulate the force-displacement response of strain-rate-dependent elastoplastic spheres during dynamic compression and unloading. PMID:24730833

  14. Modeling and Characterization of Dynamic Failure of Soda-lime Glass Under High Speed Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Chen, Weinong W.; Templeton, Douglas W.

    2012-05-27

    In this paper, the impact-induced dynamic failure of a soda-lime glass block is studied using an integrated experimental/analytical approach. The Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique is used to conduct dynamic failure test of soda-lime glass first. The damage growth patterns and stress histories are reported for various glass specimen designs. Making use of a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model, the initial failure and subsequent stiffness reduction of glass are simulated and investigated. Explicit finite element analyses are used to simulate the glass specimen impact event. A maximum shear stress-based damage evolution law is used in describing the glass damage process under combined compression/shear loading. The impact test results are used to quantify the critical shear stress for the soda-lime glass under examination.

  15. Dynamic testing of concrete under high confined pressure. Influence of saturation ratio and aggregate size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.; Piotrowska, E.; Gary, G.

    2015-09-01

    Concrete structures can be exposed to intense pressure loadings such as projectile-impact or detonation near a concrete structural element. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confining pressure, dynamic quasi-oedometric compression tests have been performed with a large diameter (80 mm) Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. The concrete sample is placed within a steel confining ring and compressed along its axial direction. Hydrostatic pressures as high as 800 MPa and axial strain of about - 10% are reached during the tests. In the present work, experiments have been conducted on two types of concrete: MB50 microconcrete with a maximum grain size of 2 mm and R30A7 ordinary concrete of maximum grain size about 8 mm. Both concretes are tested in dry or saturated conditions. According to these dynamic experiments it is noted that grain size has a small influence whereas water content has a strong effect on the confined behaviour of concrete.

  16. Dynamic tensile response of a carbon-fiber-reinforced LCP composite and its temperature sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Victor P. W.; Yuan, J.; Lim, C. T.

    2001-06-01

    The tensile mechanical behavior of a short carbon fiber filled liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) composite, Vectra A230, was examined under static extension and dynamic loading at three temperatures. Dynamic tension was applied using a pendulum-type tensile spilt Hopkinson bar device. Specimens fabricated according to both the mould flow and transverse directions were tested. The stress-strain curves at various strain rates and temperatures were determined and found to be sensitive to strain rate as well as temperature for both types of specimens. With reference to the properties of pure LCP, mechanical anisotropy and fiber reinforcement effects were characterized and are discussed. Failed specimens were observed suing an optical microscope. Deformation and failure mechanisms in the microstructure of the LCP composite were studied to understand the effects of strain rate and temperature on material strength and failure strain.

  17. Inner shelf morphologic controls on the dynamics of the beach and bar system, Fire Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Schwab, William C.; Gayes, P.; McCoy, Clay; Viso, Richard; Lentz, Erika E.

    2011-01-01

    he mechanism of sediment exchange between offshore sand ridges and the beach at Fire Island, New York is largely unknown. However, recent evidence from repeat nearshore bathymetry surveys, coupled with the complex but consistent bar morphology and patterns of shoreline change demonstrate that there is a feedback occurring between the regional geologic framework and modern processes. Analysis of bathymetric survey data provides direct confirmation that the offshore ridges are connected to the shoreface and are spatially persistent. The fixed nature of the nearshore morphology is further supported by time series camera data that indicate persistent bars with breaks that re-form in the same locations. A long-term time series of shoreline change shows distinct zones of erosion and accretion that are pervasive over time scales greater than a half-century, and their length-scales are similar to the spacing of the offshore ridge-trough system. The first-order geologic framework is responsible for the existence and locations of the ridges and troughs, which then influence the morphodynamics of the beach and bar system.

  18. Galaxy Zoo: CANDELS barred discs and bar fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, B. D.; Melvin, Thomas; Lintott, Chris; Masters, Karen L.; Willett, Kyle W.; Keel, William C.; Smethurst, R. J.; Cheung, Edmond; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Rutkowski, Michael; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Bell, Eric F.; Casteels, Kevin R. V.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Almaini, Omar; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fortson, Lucy; Hartley, William; Kocevski, Dale; Koekemoer, Anton M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Mortlock, Alice; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ownsworth, Jamie; Bamford, Steven; Dahlen, Tomas; Faber, Sandra M.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Fontana, Adriano; Galametz, Audrey; Grogin, N. A.; Grützbauch, Ruth; Guo, Yicheng; Häußler, Boris; Jek, Kian J.; Kaviraj, Sugata; Lucas, Ray A.; Peth, Michael; Salvato, Mara; Wiklind, Tommy; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-12-01

    The formation of bars in disc galaxies is a tracer of the dynamical maturity of the population. Previous studies have found that the incidence of bars in discs decreases from the local Universe to z ˜ 1, and by z > 1 simulations predict that bar features in dynamically mature discs should be extremely rare. Here, we report the discovery of strong barred structures in massive disc galaxies at z ˜ 1.5 in deep rest-frame optical images from the Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. From within a sample of 876 disc galaxies identified by visual classification in Galaxy Zoo, we identify 123 barred galaxies. Selecting a subsample within the same region of the evolving galaxy luminosity function (brighter than L*), we find that the bar fraction across the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z ≤ 2 ( f_{bar} = 10.7^{+6.3}_{-3.5} per cent after correcting for incompleteness) does not significantly evolve. We discuss the implications of this discovery in the context of existing simulations and our current understanding of the way disc galaxies have evolved over the last 11 billion years.

  19. Dynamic Brazilian Test of Rock Under Intermediate Strain Rate: Pendulum Hammer-Driven SHPB Test and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. C.; Niu, L. L.; Li, S. H.; Xu, Z. H.

    2015-09-01

    The tensile strength of rock subjected to dynamic loading constitutes many engineering applications such as rock drilling and blasting. The dynamic Brazilian test of rock specimens was conducted with the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) driven by pendulum hammer, in order to determine the indirect tensile strength of rock under an intermediate strain rate ranging from 5.2 to 12.9 s-1, which is achieved when the incident bar is impacted by pendulum hammer with different velocities. The incident wave excited by pendulum hammer is triangular in shape, featuring a long rising time, and it is considered to be helpful for achieving a constant strain rate in the rock specimen. The dynamic indirect tensile strength of rock increases with strain rate. Then, the numerical simulator RFPA-Dynamics, a well-recognized software for simulating the rock failure under dynamic loading, is validated by reproducing the Brazilian test of rock when the incident stress wave retrieved at the incident bar is input as the boundary condition, and then it is employed to study the Brazilian test of rock under the higher strain rate. Based on the numerical simulation, the strain-rate dependency of tensile strength and failure pattern of the Brazilian disc specimen under the intermediate strain rate are numerically simulated, and the associated failure mechanism is clarified. It is deemed that the material heterogeneity should be a reason for the strain-rate dependency of rock.

  20. Effects of laser power density on static and dynamic mechanical properties of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yan-Peng; Li, Mao-Hui; Yu, Gang; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang; Duan, Zhu-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of laser welded joints under impact loadings such as explosion and car crash etc. are critical for the engineering designs. The hardness, static and dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304 and AISI316 L dissimilar stainless steel welded joints by CO2 laser were experimentally studied. The dynamic strain-stress curves at the strain rate around 103 s-1 were obtained by the split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). The static mechanical properties of the welded joints have little changes with the laser power density and all fracture occurs at 316 L side. However, the strain rate sensitivity has a strong dependence on laser power density. The value of strain rate factor decreases with the increase of laser power density. The welded joint which may be applied for the impact loading can be obtained by reducing the laser power density in the case of welding quality assurance.

  1. Dynamic Compression Properties of an Ultrafine-Grained Al-26 wt.% Si Alloy Fabricated by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jinghua; Shi, Jun; Yao, YiHong; Ma, Aibin; Song, Dan; Yang, Donghui; Chen, Jianqing; Lu, Fumin

    2015-05-01

    The grains of a hypereutectic Al-26 wt.% Si alloy were drastically refined by multi-pass equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP). Compression deformation characteristics of the alloy with different microstructure were examined at two dynamic strain rates (700, 1000 s-1) by a split-Hopkinson pressure bar system and at a quasi-static strain rate (0.001 s-1) by a universal testing machine, respectively. The results reveal that the Al-26 wt.% Si alloy is strain-rate sensitive under those compression conditions, i.e., the initial yield stress and the flow stress considerably increase with the strain rate. Grain refinement through ECAP improves the strain-rate sensitivity of the alloy. With rising the ECAP temperature, the yield stress of the ultrafine-grained alloy decreases but the strain value increases during dynamic compression.

  2. Fabrication and dynamic mechanical behavior of nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evora, Victor Manuel Fortes

    Polyester/TiO2 nanocomposites have been fabricated using an in-situ polymerization technique coupled with ultrasonics, and an investigation has been conducted to characterize their mechanical and fracture behavior under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. The presence of the particles had the greatest effect on fracture toughness; negligible particle influence was observed in the remaining mechanical properties obtained using quasi-static loading. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of fracture surfaces was carried out to identify toughening mechanisms. Dynamic fracture toughness testing was carried out, and an increase in dynamic fracture toughness relative to quasi-static fracture toughness was observed. High strain rate testing conducted using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus revealed a moderate stiffening effect with increasing particle volume fraction. Dynamic photoelasticity coupled with high-speed photography was used to obtain the dynamic fracture constitutive behavior of polyester and nanocomposites. Birefringent coatings were used to conduct the photoelastic study due to the opaqueness of the nanocomposites. Two different specimen geometries were employed to obtain a broad range of crack velocities. Crack run-arrest, propagation, and branching events in polyester and nanocomposites were investigated and compared. Crack arrest toughness in nanocomposites was found to be 60% greater than that in polyester. Crack propagation velocities in nanocomposites were found to be 50% greater than those in polyester. Incipient branching values were 2.4 and 2.6 times the corresponding values of KIC in polyester and nanocomposites, respectively. A one-point strain measurement technique using a modified Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus was employed in a parametric study to evaluate the limiting conditions of validity of employment of quasi-static relations in the determination of dynamic fracture initiation toughness in brittle and moderately brittle

  3. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using the current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.

  4. Dynamic High-temperature Testing of an Iridium Alloy in Compression at High-strain Rates: Dynamic High-temperature Testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, B.; Nelson, K.; Lipinski, R.; Bignell, J.; Ulrich, G.; George, E. P.

    2014-08-21

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-strain -rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain -rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. In our study, we analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens in compression. We made appropriate modifications using themore » current high-temperature Kolsky bar technique in order to obtain reliable compressive stress–strain response of an iridium alloy at high-strain rates (300–10 000 s-1) and temperatures (750 and 1030°C). The compressive stress–strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to both strain rate and temperature.« less

  5. Controls on sediment dynamics and medium-term morphological change in a barred microtidal beach (Cala Millor, Mallorca, Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Pujol, Lluís; Orfila, Alejandro; Álvarez-Ellacuría, Amaya; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the sedimentological and morphological evolution of a microtidal beach over an eight-month period under varying hydrodynamic conditions. During the monitoring a set of transverse to crescentic bars migrated onshore welded to the upper beach and then they were flattened under energetic wave conditions. The grain size distribution of surficial sediments did vary consistently across the beach profile and temporal changes in the sedimentology were mostly related to the seasonal morphological response. From our results we can state that changes in the beach morphology resulting from erosion and deposition might induce, at least to some degree, concomitant changes in the beach when hydrodynamics exceed some intensity and duration levels (Hs > 1 m). Wave climate, rather than wave forcing is the major control on sediment and morphological change co-variation.

  6. Structural-temporal approach for dynamic strength characterization of gabbro-diabase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Y.; Bragov, A.; Evstifeev, A.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents some of the results of dynamic compression, splitting and direct-tensile tests of gabbro-diabase using two split Hopkinson bar apparatus. The results of laboratory experiments on specimens without and with notch for a wide range of loading parameters are given. Strength and deformation characteristics of gabbro-diabase were determined experimentally at high strain rates up to 103 s-1. Mechanical characteristics were found to be strongly depended on the strain rate. A uniform interpretation of the rate effects of fracture of the tested gabbro-diabase is given on the basis of structural-temporal approach based on a set of fixed material constants. It is shown that temporal dependences of both the compressive and tensile strengths of the tested material can be effectively calculated using the incubation time fracture criterion.

  7. Measurement of intergranular stress and porosity during dynamic compaction of porous beds of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenaway, M. W.

    2005-05-01

    The dynamic compaction of granular beds of the propellant cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) has been investigated using a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Intergranular stress and bed porosity were simultaneously measured during controlled loading. The importance of grain size was investigated by comparing conventional HMX (mean particle size ˜260μm) to microfine HMX (<5μm). Samples were radially confined and compression was predetermined using special end caps. Initial porosity was varied by hydraulically pressing the beds prior to testing. With large grains, resistance to compaction increased with the solid volume fraction. Microfine HMX behaved like low porosity conventional HMX beds in all cases. Porosity was typically reduced by 5%-10% during compaction and intergranular stresses below the yield stress were ensured. Energy dissipation to plastic flow and fracture were largely eliminated. Optical particle size analysis and electron microscopy support the experimental observations.

  8. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  9. Thermal imaging of metals in a Kolsky-bar apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Howard W.; Basak, Debasis; Rhorer, Richard L.; Whitenton, Eric; Burns, Timothy J.; Fields, Richard; Levine, Lyle

    2003-04-01

    Since the modeling of machining processes relies on high-strain-rate, high-temperature material properties, NIST has built a split-Hopkinson (or Kolsky) bar to determine the stress-strain behavior of rapidly heated materials at high temperatures. Our Kolsky bar has been constructed in the NIST high current pulse-heating facility, which enables electrically heating the samples within ~ 100 milliseconds time duration, immediately before the mechanical impact in the bar. Due to the rapid heating, we avoid possible structural changes in the sample, and a stress-strain relationship can be determined at different temperatures for various test materials. We describe the design and the development of the resistively-heated Kolsky-bar apparatus. The incident and the transmitted bars are constructed of 1.5 m long, 15 mm diameter maraging steel, and a typical sample is a 4 mm-diameter, 2 mm-long cylinder of 1045 steel. The sample is placed between the bars and held by friction. The current is transmitted through the graphite-sleeve bushings of the two bars. The non-contact temperatures are measured using an InGaAs near-infrared micro-pyrometer (NIMPY) and an InSb focal-plane (320 by 256) array (thermal camera). The NIMPY and the thermal camera are both calibrated using a variable-temperature blackbody, and the thermodynamic temperature of the metal is determined using the emissivity determined from the measured infrared spectral reflectance of the metal. Thermal videos of the electrically-heated and the room-temperature impacts will be shown with 1 kHz frame rates, and the changes in the stress-strain curves with the temperature of the samples will be discussed.

  10. Application of a PVDF-based stress gauge in determining dynamic stress-strain curves of concrete under impact testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yi; Yi, Weijian

    2011-06-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) piezoelectric material has been successfully applied in many engineering fields and scientific research. However, it has rarely been used for direct measurement of concrete stresses under impact loading. In this paper, a new PVDF-based stress gauge was developed to measure concrete stresses under impact loading. Calibrated on a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) with a simple measurement circuit of resistance strain gauges, the PVDF gauge was then used to establish dynamic stress-strain curves of concrete cylinders from a series of axial impact testing on a drop-hammer test facility. Test results show that the stress curves measured by the PVDF-based stress gauges are more stable and cleaner than that of the stress curves calculated with the impact force measured from a load cell.

  11. A Method for Selecting Software for Dynamic Event Analysis II: the Taylor Anvil and Dynamic Brazilian Tests

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Richins; J. M. Lacy; T. K. Larson; S. R. Novascone

    2008-05-01

    New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and structure. Several software codes are available for the study of blast, impact, and other shock phenomena. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a study is underway to investigate the comparative characteristics of a group of shock and high-strain rate physics codes including ABAQUS, LS-DYNA, CTH, ALEGRA, and ALE-3D. In part I of this report, a series of five benchmark problems to exercise some important capabilities of the subject software was identified. The benchmark problems selected are a Taylor cylinder test, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test, a free air blast, the dynamic splitting tension (Brazilian) test, and projectile penetration of a concrete slab. Part II-- this paper-- reports the results of two of the benchmark problems: the Taylor cylinder and the dynamic Brazilian test. The Taylor cylinder test is a method to determine the dynamic yield properties of materials. The test specimen is a right circular cylinder which is impacted against a theoretically rigid target. The cylinder deforms upon impact, with the final shape depending upon the dynamic yield stress, in turn a function of strain and strain rate. The splitting tension test, or Brazilian test, is a method to measure the tensile strength of concrete using a cylindrical specimen. The specimen is loaded diametrically in compression, producing a

  12. Microsecond Time-Resolved Pyrometry during Rapid Resistive Heating of Samples in a Kolsky Bar Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, D.; Yoon, H. W.; Rhorer, R.; Burns, T.

    2003-09-01

    Analysis of machining processes is important in the understanding and improving of manufacturing methods. The modeling of machining processes relies on high-strain rate, high-temperature material properties. A split-Hopkinson pressure bar (or Kolsky bar) is being installed in a NIST high-current pulse-heating facility. By heating the material sample rapidly with a controlled current pulse immediately before the mechanical impact in the bar, structural changes in the sample are inhibited, thus better simulating conditions during machining. A stress-strain relationship can be determined at various temperatures for test materials. We describe the design and the development of a millisecond-resolution split-Hopkinson apparatus, where the sample is resistively heated by the passage of a sub-second-duration electric current pulse. The impact bar is constructed out of maraging steel and the sample is a cylinder of AISI 1045 steel. The current is transmitted through the oiled-bronze sleeve bushing of the impact bar. The temperature measurements are performed using a near-infrared micro-pyrometer (NIMPY). The NIMPY consists of a refractive 5× microscope objective with a numerical aperture of 0.14 attached to a traditional microscope body. The thermal measurement is performed with an InGaAs detector with ˜ 1 μs response time. The procedure used to calibrate the pyrometer with a variable temperature blackbody is described. A brief description of a model of the pulse heating process is given and the predicted sample temperature history is compared with measured temperature data.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of \\langle \\mathbf{1}\\,\\mathbf{0}\\,\\mathbf{\\bar{1}}\\,\\mathbf{0}\\rangle /\\boldsymbol{\\psi } tilt grain boundaries in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Prinzio, C. L.; Pereyra, R. G.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) of < 1 0 \\bar{1} 0> /\\psi symmetric tilt ice grain boundaries are presented. The MDS were carried out using the GROMACS v4.5.5 program, and the water molecules were described using the TIP5P-Ew model. The grain boundary energies, {γ\\text{gb}} , relative to those of the surface free energies, {γ\\text{s}} , were obtained as a function of the misorientation angle Ψ, and compared with the {γ\\text{gb}}/{γ\\text{s}} values experimentally obtained. The results show a good correspondence between the experimental and simulated values. The planar density of coincidence sites at the grain boundary planes, Γ, was obtained as a function of ψ. The Γ values were compared with the simulated {γ\\text{gb}}/{γ\\text{s}} values and a relation between the minimum of the simulated {γ\\text{gb}}/{γ\\text{s}} values and the maximum of the Γ values was observed, suggesting that the CSL theory is a good starting point to detect low energy ice GBs.

  14. Hot Disks and Delayed Bar Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Melbourne, Jason; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2012-10-01

    We present observational evidence for the inhibition of bar formation in dispersion-dominated (dynamically hot) galaxies by studying the relationship between galactic structure and host galaxy kinematics in a sample of 257 galaxies between 0.1 < z <= 0.84 from the All-Wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey and the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe 2 survey. We find that bars are preferentially found in galaxies that are massive and dynamically cold (rotation-dominated) and on the stellar Tully-Fisher relationship, as is the case for barred spirals in the local universe. The data provide at least one explanation for the steep (×3) decline in the overall bar fraction from z = 0 to z = 0.84 in L* and brighter disks seen in previous studies. The decline in the bar fraction at high redshift is almost exclusively in the lower mass (10 < log M *(M ⊙) < 11), later-type, and bluer galaxies. A proposed explanation for this "downsizing" of the bar formation/stellar structure formation is that the lower mass galaxies may not form bars because they could be dynamically hotter than more massive systems from the increased turbulence of accreting gas, elevated star formation, and/or increased interaction/merger rate at higher redshifts. The evidence presented here provides observational support for this hypothesis. However, the data also show that not every disk galaxy that is massive and cold has a stellar bar, suggesting that mass and dynamic coldness of a disk are necessary but not sufficient conditions for bar formation—a secondary process, perhaps the interaction history between the dark matter halo and the baryonic matter, may play an important role in bar formation.

  15. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P K; Hustedt, C J; Vecchio, K S; Huskins, E L; Casem, D T; Gruner, S M; Tate, M W; Philipp, H T; Woll, A R; Purohit, P; Weiss, J T; Kannan, V; Ramesh, K T; Kenesei, P; Okasinski, J S; Almer, J; Zhao, M; Ananiadis, A G; Hufnagel, T C

    2014-09-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ~10(3)-10(4) s(-1) in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10-20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (~40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation. PMID:25273733

  16. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Woll, A. R.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup −1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  17. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Vecchio, K. S.; Huskins, E. L.; Casem, D. T.; Gruner, S. M.; Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Woll, A. R.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T.; Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T.; Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ∼103–104 s−1 in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (∼40 μs) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation. PMID:25273733

  18. Ensemble Canonical Correlation Prediction of Seasonal Precipitation Over the United States: Raising the Bar for Dynamical Model Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Shen, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of an ensemble canonical correlation (ECC) prediction scheme developed at the Climate and Radiation Branch, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center for determining the potential predictability of regional precipitation, and for climate downscaling studies. The scheme is tested on seasonal hindcasts of anomalous precipitation over the continental United States using global sea surface temperature (SST) for 1951-2000. To maximize the forecast skill derived from SST, the world ocean is divided into non-overlapping sectors. The canonical SST modes for each sector are used as the predictor for the ensemble hindcasts. Results show that the ECC yields a substantial (10-25%) increase in prediction skills for all the regions of the US in every season compared to traditional CCA prediction schemes. For the boreal winter, the tropical Pacific contributes the largest potential predictability to precipitation in the southwestern and southeastern regions, while the North Pacific and the North Atlantic are responsible to the enhanced forecast skills in the Pacific Northwest, the northern Great Plains and Ohio Valley. Most importantly, the ECC increases skill for summertime precipitation prediction and substantially reduces the spring predictability barrier over all the regions of the US continent. Besides SST, the ECC is designed with the flexibility to include any number of predictor fields, such as soil moisture, snow cover and additional local observations. The enhanced ECC forecast skill provides a new benchmark for evaluating dynamical model forecasts.

  19. A study on the dynamic behavior of the Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Kaiser, P. K.; Suorineni, F.; Su, K.

    Excavation of underground tunnels can be conducted by tunnel boring machines (TBM) or drill-and-blast. TBMs cause minimum damage to excavation walls. Blasting effects on excavation walls depend on the care with which the blasting is executed. For blast-induced damage in excavation walls, two issues have to be addressed: rate of loss of confinement (rate of excavation) and dynamic loading from wave propagation that causes both intended and unintended damage. To address these two aspects, laboratory dynamic tests were conducted for the determination of the dynamic properties of the Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite. In the present study, 17 tensile (Brazilian) and 15 compression split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted. The test revealed that the dynamic strengths of the argillite are strain rate dependent. The average dynamic increase factors (ratio of dynamic strength to static strength) for tensile and compressive strength are about 3.3 and 2.4, respectively. A high-speed video camera was used to visualize the initiation of failure and subsequent deformation of the specimens. The direct compression specimens were found to deform and fail uniformly around the circumference of the specimen, by a spalling process. The SHPB Brazilian tests indicated that failure occurred in tension along the line of load application. Radial fractures were also observed. The test results can be used for the development of a dynamic constitutive model for the argillite for the prediction of damage in underground excavation utilizing the drill-and blast method.

  20. Membrane-Sculpting BAR Domains Generate Stable Lipid Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxia; Michelot, Alphée; Koskela, Essi V.; Tkach, Vadym; Stamou, Dimitrios; Drubin, David G.; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins are central regulators of many cellular processes involving membrane dynamics. BAR domains sculpt phosphoinositide-rich membranes to generate membrane protrusions or invaginations. Here, we report that, in addition to regulating membrane geometry, BAR domains can generate extremely stable lipid microdomains by “freezing” phosphoinositide dynamics. This is a general feature of BAR domains, because the yeast endocytic BAR and Fes/CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) domains, the inverse BAR domain of Pinkbar, and the eisosomal BAR protein Lsp1 induced phosphoinositide clustering and halted lipid diffusion, despite differences in mechanisms of membrane interactions. Lsp1 displays comparable low diffusion rates in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that BAR domain proteins also generate stable phosphoinositide microdomains in cells. These results uncover a conserved role for BAR superfamily proteins in regulating lipid dynamics within membranes. Stable microdomains induced by BAR domain scaffolds and specific lipids can generate phase boundaries and diffusion barriers, which may have profound impacts on diverse cellular processes. PMID:24055060

  1. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  2. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected. PMID:25273746

  3. Dynamics of wave-induced currents over an alongshore non-uniform multiple-barred sandy beach on the Aquitanian Coast, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelle, Bruno; Bonneton, Philippe; Sénéchal, Nadia; Dupuis, Hélène; Butel, Rémi; Michel, Denis

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents field investigation and numerical modelling of waves and wave-induced currents on a wave-dominated and non-alongshore uniform multiple barred beach. This study aims at establishing the first analysis of the dynamics of horizontal flows on the French Aquitanian coast. The spectral wave program SWAN is coupled with the time- and depth-averaged (2DH) coastal area model MORPHODYN. This coupled-model is applied to Truc Vert Beach, and results are compared with field data. From the 14th to the 19th of October 2001, a field experiment was carried out in order to characterize hydrodynamics and sediment transport over a complex bathymetry in the presence of oceanic wave conditions. From this data we calibrated three parameters: the bottom friction for wave propagation from the Aquitanian continental shelf to the nearshore zone, the spatially constant bottom friction coefficient due to waves and currents, and lateral mixing. Despite model approximations and the fact that the offshore wave boundary condition was located 15 km off the coast, the model is in good agreement with measurements. During weak wind conditions, computed waves and longshore currents fit well with field data on the ridge and runnel system. The strong tidal modulation of surf zone processes over this system is revealed. Hydrodynamics are strongly controlled by the beach morphology. For near-normally incident swells, the ridge and runnel system is responsible for a strong rip current located at the runnel outlet, associated with a circulation cell. Prediction of the tidal modulation and the sensitivity of the rip current to offshore wave conditions are in agreement with observations. Maximum rip current flow velocities occur approximately at mid-tide, which differs from what most researchers have found in other environments.

  4. Observation of microscopic damage accumulation in brittle solids subjected to dynamic compressive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Xia, K.; Zheng, H.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic failure of brittle materials is a fundamental physical problem that has significantly impacts to many science and engineering disciplines. As the first and the most important step towards the full understanding of this problem, one has to observe dynamic damage accumulation in brittle solids. In this work, we proposed a methodology to do that and demonstrated it by studying the dynamic compressive damage evolution of a granitic rock loaded with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system. To ensure consistency of the experimental results, we used cylindrical rock samples fabricated from the same rock core and subjected them to identical incident loading pulse. Using a special soft recovery technique, we stopped the dynamic loading on the samples at different strain levels, ranging from 0.3% to 1.4%. Therefore, we were able to recover intact samples loaded all the way to the post-peak deformation stage. The recovered samples were subsequently examined with X-ray micro-CT scanning machine. Three dimensional microcrack network induced by the dynamic loading was observed and the evolution of microcracks as a function of the dynamic loading strain was obtained.

  5. Determination of dynamic fracture-initiation toughness using a novel impact bend test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, T. . Faculty of Engineering Okayama Univ. of Science . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A novel impact bend test procedure is described for determining the dynamic fracture-initiation toughness, K[sub Id], at a loading rate (stress intensity factor rate), K[sub I], of the order of 10[sup 6] MPa [radical]m/s. A special arrangement of the split Hopkinson pressure bar is adopted to measure accurately dynamic loads applied to a fatigue-precracked bend specimen. The dynamic stress intensity factor history for the bend specimen is evaluated by means of a dynamic finite element technique. The onset of crack initiation is detected using a string gage attached on the side of the specimen near a crack tip. The value of K[sub Id] is determined from the critical dynamic stress intensity factor at crack initiation. A series of dynamic fracture tests is carried out on a 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, a Ti-6246 alloy and an AISI 4340 steel. The K[sub Id] values obtained for the three structural materials are compared with the corresponding values obtained under quasi-static loading conditions.

  6. Interferometry-based Kolsky bar apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinadav, C.; Ashuach, Y.; Kreif, R.

    2011-07-01

    A new experimental approach of the Kolsky bar system using optical interferometry is presented for determination of dynamic behavior of materials. Conventional measurements in the Kolsky bar system are based on recording the strain histories on the incident and transmitter bars with two strain gauges, and require good adhesion between the gauge and the bar. We suggest an alternative approach, based on measuring the actual velocities of the bars by using fiber-based velocity interferometry. Two fiber focusers illuminate the bars at a small angle and collect reflected Doppler-shifted light, which is interfered with a reference beam. Velocities are calculated from short-time Fourier transform and phase-based analysis, and the dynamic stress-strain curve is derived directly from the measured velocity traces. We demonstrate that the results coincide with those obtained by conventional strain gauge measurements. The new method is non-intervening and thus not affected by bar impacts, making it more robust and reliable than strain gauges.

  7. A newly developed Kolsky tension bar.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin; Korellis, John S.

    2010-03-01

    Investigation of damage and failure of materials under impact loading relies on reliable dynamic tensile experiments. A precise Kolsky tension bar is highly desirable. Based on the template of the Kolsky compression bar that we recently developed and presented at 2009 SEM conference, a new Kolsky tension bar apparatus was completed at Sandia National Laboratories, California. It is secured to the same optical table. Linear bearings with interior Frelon coating were employed to support the whole tension bar system including the bars and gun barrel. The same laser based alignment system was used to efficiently facilitate highly precise alignment of the bar system. However, the gun part was completely re-designed. One end of the gun barrel, as a part of loading device, was directly jointed to the bar system. A solid cylindrical striker is launched inside the gun barrel and then impacts on a flange attached to the other end of the gun barrel to facilitate a sudden tensile loading on the whole system. This design improves the quality of impact to easily produce a perfect stress wave and is convenient to utilize pulse shaping technique. A calibration and dynamic characterization of an aluminum specimen are presented.

  8. The four bars problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauroy, Alexandre; Taslakian, Perouz; Langerman, Stefan; Jungers, Raphaël

    2016-09-01

    A four-bar linkage is a mechanism consisting of four rigid bars which are joined by their endpoints in a polygonal chain and which can rotate freely at the joints (or vertices). We assume that the linkage lies in the 2-dimensional plane so that one of the bars is held horizontally fixed. In this paper we consider the problem of reconfiguring a four-bar linkage using an operation called a pop. Given a four-bar linkage, a pop reflects a vertex across the line defined by its two adjacent vertices along the polygonal chain. Our main result shows that for certain conditions on the lengths of the bars, the neighborhood of any configuration that can be reached by smooth motion can also be reached by pops. The proof relies on the fact that pops are described by a map on the circle with an irrational number of rotation.

  9. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  10. Gap Formations Along Specimen-Bar Interfaces in Numerical Simulations of SHPB Tests on Elastic Materials Soft in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftenberg, Martin N.; Scheidler, Mike

    2009-06-01

    Simulations of split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests on elastic materials were performed using LS-DYNA. The specimens were much stiffer in dilatation than in shear. A compressible form of Mooney-Rivlin elasticity was applied with parameters evaluated from ballistic gelatin data. The bars were aluminum. The velocity prescribed on the incident bar increased over a rise time until attaining a steady-state value corresponding to a nominal strain rate of 2500/s. The rise time was varied to observe effects of pulse shaping. All calculations were 2D axisymmetric. A penalty-based contact algorithm was applied at the specimen-bar interfaces. This algorithm introduced a stiffness and a viscosity parameter. In sensitivity studies we varied the radius of the bars, the specimen's mesh, and the two contact parameters. In all calculations with the Mooney-Rivlin model, gaps formed at both specimen-bar interfaces over a wide range of strains. This gap phenomenon appears not to have been previously reported in the SHPB literature. We replaced the Mooney-Rivlin model with linear elasticity in order to explore whether the gaps were associated with material nonlinearity. We fixed Young's modulus at a value much smaller than that of aluminum. For sufficiently large Poisson ratios, we again observed gap formations at both specimen-bar interfaces.

  11. Static and Dynamic Flexural Strength Anisotropy of Barre Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Zuo, J. P.; Zhang, R.; Xu, N. W.

    2013-11-01

    Granite exhibits anisotropy due to pre-existing microcracks under tectonic loadings; and the mechanical property anisotropy such as flexural/tensile strength is vital to many rock engineering applications. In this paper, Barre Granite is studied to understand the flexural strength anisotropy under a wide range of loading rates using newly proposed semi-circular bend tests. Static tests are conducted with a MTS hydraulic servo-control testing machine and dynamic tests with a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Six samples groups are fabricated with respect to the three principle directions of Barre granite. Pulse shaping technique is used in all dynamic SHPB tests to facilitate dynamic stress equilibrium. Finite element method is utilized to build up equations calculating the flexural tensile strength. For samples in the same orientation group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength is observed. The measured flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength measured using Brazilian disc method at given loading rate and this scenario has been rationalized using a non-local failure theory. The flexural tensile strength anisotropy features obvious dependence on the loading rates, the higher the loading rate, the less the anisotropy and this phenomenon may be explained considering the interaction of the preferentially oriented microcracks.

  12. Dynamic behaviour of HPFRCC: The influence of fibres dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caverzan, Alessio; di Prisco, Marco; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    The promise of fibre-reinforced cementitious composites for dynamic loading application stems from their observed good response under static loading mainly due to fibre contribution. An experimental research aimed at contributing to the understanding of the behaviour of advanced fibre-reinforced cementitious composites subjected to low and high strain rates was carried out underlining the influence of fibres. The material behaviour was investigated at three strain rates (0.1, 1, and 150 s-1) and the tests results were compared with their static behaviour. Tests at intermediate strain rates (0.1-1 s-1) were carried out by means of a hydro-pneumatic machine (HPM), while high strain rates (150 s-1) were investigated by exploiting a modified Hopkinson bar (MHB). Particular attention has been placed on the influence of fibre and fibre dispersion on the dynamic behaviour of the materials: matrix, HPFRCC with random fibre distribution and aligned fibres were compared. The comparison between static and dynamic tests highlighted several relevant aspects regarding the influence of fibres on the peak strength and post-peak behaviour at high strain rates.

  13. Microlensing by the galactic bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Spergel, David N.; Rich, R. Michael

    1995-01-01

    We compute the optical depth and duration distribution of microlensing events towrd Baade's window in a model composed of a Galactic disk and a bar. The bar model is a self-consistent dynamical model built out of individual orbits that has been populated to be consistent with the COBE maps of the Galaxy and kinematic observations of the Galactic bulge. We find that most of the lenses are in the bulge with a line-of-sight distance 6.25 kpc (adopting R(sub 0) = 8 kpc). The microlensing optical depth of a 2 x 10(exp 10) solar mass bar plus a truncated disk is (2.2 +/- 0.45) x 10(exp -6), consistent with the large optical depth (3.2 +/- 1.2) x 10(exp -6) found by Udalski et al. (1994). This model optical depth is enhanced over the predictions of axisymmetric models by Kiraga & Paczynski (1994) by slightly more than a factor of 2, since the bar is elongated along the line of sight. The large Einstein radius and small transverse velocity dispersion also predict a longer event duration in the self-consistent bar model than in the Kiraga-Paczynski model. The event rate and duration distribution also depend on the lower mass cutoff of the lens mass function. With a 0.1 solar mass cutoff, five to seven events (depending on the contribution of disk lenses) with a logarithmic mean duration of 20 days are expected for the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) according to our model, while Udalski et al. (1994) observed nine events with durations from 8 to 62 days. On the other hand, if most of the lenses are brown dwarfs, our model predicts too many short-duration events. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test finds only 7% probability for the model with 0.01 solar mass cutoff to be consistent with current data.

  14. Experiment investigation for dynamic behavior of hybrid fiber effects on reactive powder concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liwen; Pang, Baojun; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2010-03-01

    The influences of different hybrid fibers (steel fibers add polyvinyl-alcohol fibers) mixture rates for reactive power concrete's (RPC) dynamic mechanical behavior after high temperature burnt was investigated by the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device. A plumbic pulse shaper technique was applied in the experiment, PVDF stress gauge was used to monitor the stress uniformity state within the specimen. The strain rate was between 75~85s-1, base on the stressstrain curves and dynamic modes of concrete specimen, the hybrid fiber effect on the dynamic properties was determined. The results show, dynamic compression strength of specimens which mixed with steel fibers (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.1% PVA fibers is higher than normal reactive powder concrete (NRPC), but the toughness improves unconspicuous; while strength of the one which has both steel fiber (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.2%PVA fiber declines than NRPC but the toughness improves and the plastic behaviors strengthened, stress-strain curve has evident rising and plate portions. It can be deduced that the concrete with mixed two kinds of fibers has improved dynamic mechanical properties after high temperature burnt. By compounding previous literature results, the mechanism of the experimental results can be explained.

  15. Experiment investigation for dynamic behavior of hybrid fiber effects on reactive powder concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liwen; Pang, Baojun; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-12-01

    The influences of different hybrid fibers (steel fibers add polyvinyl-alcohol fibers) mixture rates for reactive power concrete's (RPC) dynamic mechanical behavior after high temperature burnt was investigated by the Split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) device. A plumbic pulse shaper technique was applied in the experiment, PVDF stress gauge was used to monitor the stress uniformity state within the specimen. The strain rate was between 75~85s-1, base on the stressstrain curves and dynamic modes of concrete specimen, the hybrid fiber effect on the dynamic properties was determined. The results show, dynamic compression strength of specimens which mixed with steel fibers (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.1% PVA fibers is higher than normal reactive powder concrete (NRPC), but the toughness improves unconspicuous; while strength of the one which has both steel fiber (1.0%,1.5%,2.0% vol. rate) and 0.2%PVA fiber declines than NRPC but the toughness improves and the plastic behaviors strengthened, stress-strain curve has evident rising and plate portions. It can be deduced that the concrete with mixed two kinds of fibers has improved dynamic mechanical properties after high temperature burnt. By compounding previous literature results, the mechanism of the experimental results can be explained.

  16. Bar-biting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bar biting is regarded as a stereotypic behavior in which the animal carries out repetitive mouthing and biting of the metal bars in its environmental enclosure. It is commonly seen in sows housed in close confinement, in barren environments, and with restricted access to food. However, it has also ...

  17. The behavior of cancellous bone from quasi-static to dynamic strain rates with emphasis on the intermediate regime.

    PubMed

    Prot, M; Cloete, T J; Saletti, D; Laporte, S

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies, conducted using quasi-static and dynamic compression tests, have shown that the mechanical strength of cancellous bone is strain rate dependent. However, these studies have not included the intermediate strain rate (ISR) regime (1/s to 100/s), which is important since it is representative of the loading rates at which non-fatal injuries typically occur. In this study, 127 bovine bone specimens were compressed in 3 regimes spanning 8 distinct strain rates, from 0.001/s to 600/s, using three different devices: a conventional quasi-static testing machine, a wedge-bar (WB) apparatus and a conventional split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) implemented with a cone-in-tube (CiT) striker and a tandem momentum trap. Due to the large sample size, a new robust automated algorithm was developed with which the material properties, such as the apparent Young׳s modulus and the yield and ultimate values of stress and strain, were identified for each individual specimen. A statistical summary of the data is presented. Finally, this study demonstrates that results obtained at intermediate strain rates are essential for a fuller understanding of cancellous bone behavior by providing new data describing the transition between the quasi-static and dynamic regimes. PMID:26970887

  18. Slow bars in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhii, O. V.

    2000-11-01

    Here we put forward some arguments in favour of the existence of slow bars. More then a half of spiral galaxies have in their central regions a bar - a structure in the form of triaxial ellipsoid. Historically two models of the bar were developed - those of the so called ``slow'' and ``fast'' bars. In both cases the bar is in some resonance with the galactic disc region near the bar ends - it is the corotation resonance for a fast bar and the inner Lindblad resonance for a slow bar. For the same angular velocity the fast bar would be larger then the slow bar. Alternatively, for the same size the fast bar would have much higher angular velocity, that being the reason for the terminology used. Up till now, the direct measurement of angular velocity of a bar has been an open problem. This is why all arguments on the nature of bar observed in some particular galaxy are inevitably indirect. Despite the fact that the model of slow bars was developed slightly earlier, the main part of attention was focused on the fast bars. Presently many researchers believe in the existence of the fast bars in real galaxies, while discussions on the existence of the slow bars continue so far. In this Letter we demonstrate that the bar detected in the grand design spiral galaxy NGC 157 is the slow bar.

  19. Bars within bars - A mechanism for fuelling active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlosman, Isaac; Frank, Juhan; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1989-01-01

    A mechanism, applicable to AGN and nuclear starburst galaxies in which there is accretion onto a supermassive black hole (SBH), is proposed which brings in gas from large to small scales by successive dynamical instabilities. On the large scale, a stellar bar sweeps the interstellar medium into a gaseous disk a few hundred pc in radius. Under certain conditions, this disk can become unstable again, allowing material to flow inwards until turbulent viscous processes control angular-momentum transport. This flow pattern may feed viscosity-driven accretion flows around an SBH or lead to the formation of an SBH if none was present initially.

  20. Effect of Ductile Agents on the Dynamic Behavior of SiC3D Network Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Yangwei; Wang, Fuchi; Fan, Qunbo

    2016-07-01

    Co-continuous SiC ceramic composites using pure aluminum, epoxy, and polyurethane (PU) as ductile agents were developed. The dynamic mechanical behavior and failure mechanisms were investigated experimentally using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) method and computationally by finite element (FE) simulations. The results show that the SiC3D/Al composite has the best overall performance in comparison with SiC3D/epoxy and SiC3D/PU composites. FE simulations are generally consistent with experimental data. These simulations provide valuable help in predicting mechanical strength and in interpreting the experimental results and failure mechanisms. They may be combined with micrographs for fracture characterizations of the composites. We found that interactions between the SiC phase and ductile agents under dynamic compression in the SHPB method are complex, and that interfacial condition is an important parameter that determines the mechanical response of SiC3D composites with a characteristic interlocking structure during dynamic compression. However, the effect of the mechanical properties of ductile agents on dynamic behavior of the composites is a second consideration in the production of the composites.

  1. The role of the modified taylor impact test in dynamic material research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagusat, Frank; Rohr, Ingmar

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic material research with strain rates of more than 1000 1/s is experimentally very often done with a Split-Hopkinson Bar, Taylor impact tests or planar plate impact test investigations. At the Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), a variant of an inverted classical Taylor impact test is used by application of velocity interferometers of the VISAR type ("Modified Taylor Impact Test", MTT). The conduction of the experiments is similar to that of planar plate impact tests. The data reduction and derivation of dynamic material data can also be restricted to an analysis of the VISAR signal. Due to these properties, nearly each highly dynamic material characterization in our institute done by planar plate investigations is usually accompanied by MTT experiments. The extended possibilities and usefulness of a combined usage of these two highly dynamic characterization methods are explained. Recently, further developed MTT experiments with very small specimen sizes are presented. For the first time, Taylor impact and planar impact specimen can be used for which the load directions even in case of thin plate test material are identical and not perpendicular to each other. Consequences for testing construction elements are discussed.

  2. Dynamic compressive behavior of Pr-Nd alloy at high strain rates and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Huanran; Cai Canyuan; Chen Danian; Ma Dongfang

    2012-07-01

    Based on compressive tests, static on 810 material test system and dynamic on the first compressive loading in split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens at high strain rates and temperatures, this study determined a J-C type [G. R. Johnson and W. H. Cook, in Proceedings of Seventh International Symposium on Ballistics (The Hague, The Netherlands, 1983), pp. 541-547] compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. It was recorded by a high speed camera that the Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens fractured during the first compressive loading in SHPB tests at high strain rates and temperatures. From high speed camera images, the critical strains of the dynamic shearing instability for Pr-Nd alloy in SHPB tests were determined, which were consistent with that estimated by using Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion [R. C. Batra and Z. G. Wei, Int. J. Impact Eng. 34, 448 (2007)] and the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy. The transmitted and reflected pulses of SHPB tests for Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens computed with the determined compressive constitutive equation of Pr-Nd alloy and Batra and Wei's dynamic shearing instability criterion could be consistent with the experimental data. The fractured Pr-Nd alloy cylinder specimens of compressive tests were investigated by using 3D supper depth digital microscope and scanning electron microscope.

  3. Experimental study on the dynamic mechanical properties of titanium alloy after thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Yingjie; Ma, Lianhua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic compressive properties of thermally oxidized TC4 (Ti-6Al-4V) titanium alloys were studied with split Hopkinson pressure bar. The dynamic tests were conducted under multiple strain rates from 400 to 2000 s-1 and different testing temperatures from 25 to 200 °C. Data for the true stress-strain curves of thermally oxidized TC4 titanium alloy are presented. They show that the thermal oxidation increases both the dynamic compressive strength of TC4 titanium and the rate of strain hardening. Higher compressive strengths of the material were obtained by applying higher strain rates. Under a strain rate of 2000 s-1, the stress-strain curves of TC4 titanium alloys exhibit both strain-rate-hardening behavior and thermal softening behavior. The oxidation temperature has little effect on dynamic properties of TC4 titanium alloy, but choosing different holding time for oxidation could greatly affect the initiation of plastic deformation and thus might potentially improve the ductility of the treated material. Furthermore, the data show that the increase in the testing temperature results in much lower yield stresses of the treated material.

  4. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Carl M.; Liu, Cheng; Lovato, Manuel L.

    2015-09-01

    In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ˜0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC) will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  5. Mass modeling for bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Thomas G.

    1987-01-01

    Methods of modeling mass for bars are surveyed. A method for extending John Archer's concept of consistent mass beyond just translational inertia effects is included. Recommendations are given for various types of modeling situations.

  6. Dynamic mechanical response of magnesium single crystal under compression loading: Experiments, model, and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qizhen

    2011-05-01

    Magnesium single crystal samples are compressed at room temperature under quasistatic (˜0.001 s-1) loading in a universal testing machine and dynamic (430, 1000, and 1200 s-1) loading in a split Hopkinson pressure bar system. Stress-strain curves show that (a) the fracture strain slightly increases with the strain rate; and (b) the maximum strength and strain hardening rate increase significantly when the testing changes from quasistatic to dynamic, although they do not vary much when the strain rate for dynamic testing varies in the range of 430-1200 s-1. The operation of the secondary pyramidal slip system is the dominating deformation mechanism, which leads to a fracture surface with an angle of ˜42° with respect to the loading axial direction. A theoretical material model based on Johnson-Cook law is also derived. The model includes the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms, and provides the stress-strain relations matching with the experimental results. Finite element simulations for the strain rates used in the experiments predict the mechanical responses of the material that agree well with the experimental data.

  7. Comparative experimental study of dynamic compressive strength of mortar with glass and basalt fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruszka, Leopold; Moćko, Wojciech; Fenu, Luigi; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Specimen reinforced with glass and basalt fibers were prepared using Standard Portland cement (CEM I, 52.5 R as prescribed by EN 197-1) and standard sand, in accordance with EN 196-1. From this cementitious mixture, a reference cement mortar without fibers was first prepared. Compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and mod of fracture were determined for all specimens. Static and dynamic properties were investigated using Instron testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar, respectively. Content of the glass fibers in the mortar does not influence the fracture stress at static loading conditions in a clearly observed way. Moreover at dynamic range 5% content of the fiber results in a significant drop of fracture stress. Analysis of the basalt fibers influence on the fracture stress shows that optimal content of this reinforcement is equal to 3% for both static and dynamic loading conditions. Further increase of the fiber share gives the opposite effect, i.e. drop of the fracture stress.

  8. Dynamic fracturing by successive coseismic loadings leads to pulverization in active fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aben, F. M.; Doan, M.-L.; Mitchell, T. M.; Toussaint, R.; Reuschlé, T.; Fondriest, M.; Gratier, J.-P.; Renard, F.

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies show that pulverized rocks observed along large faults can be created by single high-strain rate loadings in the laboratory, provided that the strain rate is higher than a certain pulverization threshold. Such loadings are analogous to large seismic events. In reality, pulverized rocks have been subject to numerous seismic events rather than one single event. Therefore, the effect of successive "milder" high-strain rate loadings on the pulverization threshold is investigated by applying loading conditions below the initial pulverization threshold. Single and successive loading experiments were performed on quartz-monzonite using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. Damage-dependent petrophysical properties and elastic moduli were monitored by applying incremental strains. Furthermore, it is shown that the pulverization threshold can be reduced by successive "milder" dynamic loadings from strain rates of ~180 s-1 to ~90 s-1. To do so, it is imperative that the rock experiences dynamic fracturing during the successive loadings prior to pulverization. Combined with loading conditions during an earthquake rupture event, the following generalized fault damage zone structure perpendicular to the fault will develop: furthest from the fault plane, there is a stationary outer boundary that bounds a zone of dynamically fractured rocks. Closer to the fault, a pulverization boundary delimits a band of pulverized rock. Consecutive seismic events will cause progressive broadening of the band of pulverized rocks, eventually creating a wider damage zone observed in mature faults.

  9. Crack-resistance and spall strength of cerium under dynamic loading.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkov, Victor; Ogorodnikov, Vladimir; Erunov, Sergey

    2007-06-01

    There is poor knowledge on cerium characteristics under dynamic loading, such as dynamic crack-resistance and spall strength, which are important for some applications. For example, material crack-resistance is one of parameters of the model, which is used for numerical description of the dispersion process [1]. Tests were performed for determination of dynamic crack-resistance by the split Hopkinson pressure bar method. However, significant plasticity of cerium caused failure of crack-resistance determination. Therefore crack-resistance evaluation was performed by study of material spall strength σ0. Considering value σ0, it is possible to determine specific work for material break λ [2], and, basing on it, then it is possible to determine crack-resistance value by the Irvine-Griffiths criterion. [1] A.K.Zhiembetov, G.S.Smirnov, A.L.Mikhaylov et al. Cavitational method for determination of parameters of melting of shock-compressed substances at volume expansion. Chemical Physics, 2005, v.24, #10, p.57-65. [2] Fracture of different-scale objects. Edited by A.G.Ivanov, RFNC-VNIIEF, Sarov, 2001.

  10. Dynamic versus quasi-static loading of X65 offshore steel pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoffersen, M.; Børvik, T.; Langseth, M.; Hopperstad, O. S.

    2016-05-01

    Anchors or trawl gear occasionally impact offshore pipelines, resulting in large local and global deformations. Impact velocities are typically less than 5 m/s, but local strain rates may be very high. In this study strain rate effects in an X65 offshore material was characterised by split Hopkinson bar tests, while the cross-section homogeneity and possible anisotropic behaviour were determined by quasi-static material tests. Further, dynamic impact tests at prescribed velocities were carried out on simply supported full scale X65 steel pipes. Next, deformation-controlled quasi-static tests with the same boundary conditions were conducted. The level of deformation in the quasi-static tests was set to be equal to that attained in the dynamic tests. Finally, an assessment of the differences between the dynamically and quasi-statically loaded pipes was made in terms of force-displacement response, energy absorbed, and fracture. An optical light microscope and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate fracture surfaces arising from the various tests.

  11. Estimation of reliability and dynamic property for polymeric material at high strain rate using SHPB technique and probability theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Hyeok; Lee, Ouk Sub; Kim, Hong Min; Choi, Hye Bin

    2008-11-01

    A modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique with aluminum pressure bars and a pulse shaper technique to achieve a closer impedance match between the pressure bars and the specimen materials such as hot temperature degraded POM (Poly Oxy Methylene) and PP (Poly Propylene). The more distinguishable experimental signals were obtained to evaluate the more accurate dynamic deformation behavior of materials under a high strain rate loading condition. A pulse shaping technique is introduced to reduce the non-equilibrium on the dynamic material response by modulation of the incident wave during a short period of test. This increases the rise time of the incident pulse in the SHPB experiment. For the dynamic stress strain curve obtained from SHPB experiment, the Johnson-Cook model is applied as a constitutive equation. The applicability of this constitutive equation is verified by using the probabilistic reliability estimation method. Two reliability methodologies such as the FORM and the SORM have been proposed. The limit state function(LSF) includes the Johnson-Cook model and applied stresses. The LSF in this study allows more statistical flexibility on the yield stress than a paper published before. It is found that the failure probability estimated by using the SORM is more reliable than those of the FORM/ It is also noted that the failure probability increases with increase of the applied stress. Moreover, it is also found that the parameters of Johnson-Cook model such as A and n, and the applied stress are found to affect the failure probability more severely than the other random variables according to the sensitivity analysis.

  12. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  13. Experimental study on the dynamic mechanical behaviors of polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yubo; Cai, Xuanming; Ye, Nan; Huang, Wei; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) is a widely used engineering material in aerospace field, since it has excellent mechanical and optical property. In present study, both compress and tensile tests of PC were conducted at high strain rates by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar. The high-speed camera and 2D digital speckle correlation method (DIC) were used to analyze the dynamic deformation behavior of PC. Meanwhile, the plate impact experiment was carried out to measure the equation of state of PC in a single-stage gas gun, which consists of asymmetric impact technology, manganin gauges, PVDF, electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. The results indicate that the yield stress of PC increased with the strain rates. The strain softening occurred when the stress over yield point except the tensile tests in the strain rates of 1076s-1 and 1279s-1. The ZWT model can describe the constitutive behaviors of PC accurately in different strain rates by contrast with the results of 2D-DIC. At last, The D-u Hugoniot curve of polycarbonate in high pressure was fitted by the least square method. And the final results showed more closely to Cater and Mash than other previous data.

  14. Experimental study on dynamic splitting of recycled concrete using SHPB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yubin; Yu, Shuisheng; Cai, Yong

    2015-09-01

    To study the recycled concrete splitting tensile properties and fracture state with various recycled coarse aggregate replacement percentage (i.e. 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%), the dynamic splitting test of recycled concrete was carried out using large diameter (75 mm) split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The results show that the recycled concrete splitting tensile strength increases with the increase of loading rate, and the loading rate also affects the recycled concrete fracture state, which indicates that the recycled concrete has obvious rate sensitivity. The damage state of the recycled concrete is not only the destruction of the interface between coarse aggregate and cement mortar, but also associates with the fracture damage of aggregates. Under the same water cement ratio, when the replacement percentage of coarse aggregates is around 50%-75%, the gradation of natural and recycled coarse aggregate is optimal, and thus the splitting tensile strength is the largest. This study offers theoretical basis for the engineering applications of recycled concrete.

  15. A theoretical and experimental study of the dynamics of a four-bar chain with bearing clearance: Pin motion, contact loss and impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stammers, C. W.; Ghazavi, M.

    1991-10-01

    An experimental and theoretical study has been made of the behaviour of a four-bar chain having a clearance in the coupler-follower bearing. An electrical circuit method has been used to establish contact loss at the bearing, with care being taken that pin misalignment did not produce spurious results. The pin path was monitored by two eddy current transducers, recording motion in two perpendicular directions. The follower acceleration was also monitored by means of an accelerometer. Contact loss correlates with rapid changes of pin motion. Runs with the bearing chemically cleaned and with the bearing lightly greased indicated that considerably more pin oscillation occurred in the former case than in the latter. The theoretical predictions of pin motion agreed quite well when damping of pin motion was introduced. The implication is that fats and greases on the notionally unlubricated bearing suppress major pin oscillations.

  16. BARS/SSC/SPHINX

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W. )

    1993-06-06

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shock compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  17. BARS/SSC/SPHINX

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W. )

    1993-06-06

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shoch compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  18. Toll Bar on Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Dave

    2008-01-01

    In the summer of 2007 the United Kingdom experienced some of the heaviest rainfall since records began. Toll Bar in South Yorkshire featured prominently in media coverage as the village and the homes surrounding it began to flood. Many people lost everything: their homes, their furniture, their possessions. In an effort to come to terms with what…

  19. Warp evidence in precessing galactic bar models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Martín, P.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Masdemont, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Most galaxies have a warped shape when they are seen edge-on. The reason for this curious form is not completely known so far, so in this work we apply dynamical system tools to contribute to its explanation. Starting from a simple, but realistic model formed by a bar and a disc, we study the effect of a small misalignment between the angular momentum of the system and its angular velocity. To this end, a precession model was developed and considered, assuming that the bar behaves like a rigid body. After checking that the periodic orbits inside the bar continue to be the skeleton of the inner system even after inflicting a precession to the potential, we computed the invariant manifolds of the unstable periodic orbits departing from the equilibrium points at the ends of the bar to find evidence of their warped shapes. As is well known, the invariant manifolds associated with these periodic orbits drive the arms and rings of barred galaxies and constitute the skeleton of these building blocks. Looking at them from a side-on viewpoint, we find that these manifolds present warped shapes like those recognised in observations. Lastly, test particle simulations have been performed to determine how the stars are affected by the applied precession, this way confirming the theoretical results.

  20. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-07-01

    The age old method of physically taking an inventory of materials by listing each item's identification number has lived beyond its usefulness. In this age of computerization, which offers the local grocery store a quick, sure, and easy means to inventory, it is time for nuclear materials facilities to automate accountability activities. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At that time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable; however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented.

  1. Bar code usage in nuclear materials accountability

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, W.T.

    1983-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant began investigating the use of automated data collection devices in 1979. At this time, bar code and optical-character-recognition (OCR) systems were reviewed with the purpose of directly entering data into DYMCAS (Dynamic Special Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability System). Both of these systems appeared applicable, however, other automated devices already employed for production control made implementing the bar code and OCR seem improbable. However, the DYMCAS was placed on line for nuclear material accountability, a decision was made to consider the bar code for physical inventory listings. For the past several months a development program has been underway to use a bar code device to collect and input data to the DYMCAS on the uranium recovery operations. Programs have been completed and tested, and are being employed to ensure that data will be compatible and useful. Bar code implementation and expansion of its use for all nuclear material inventory activity in Y-12 is presented.

  2. Dynamic tensile deformation and fracture of a highly particle-filled composite using SHPB and high-speed DIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Chen, P.; Guo, B.; Huang, F.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, various tensile tests, including Brazilian disc test (BDT), flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) test and semi-circular bending (SCB) test, were carried out on a highly particle-filled composite by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). With the consideration of low strength and low wave impedance of the materials, a quartz crystal transducer was embedded in SHPB to measure the loading forces. A high-speed camera was used to capture the deformation and fracture process of materials. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to process these digital images to obtain the dynamic deformation information. Based on the measured strain fields, the crack growth path was determined and the failure mechanism of samples was analyzed. Combining SHPB and DIC method, the indirect tensile stress strain plots of disc samples were obtained, and the dynamic fracture toughness of materials was measured using both FBD and SCB tests. The results show that the tensile failure strength and fracture toughness increases with the increase of strain rates, exhibiting strain rate dependence. The high-speed DIC method combined with SHPB is effective to study the dynamic tensile behaviour of brittle materials with low strengths.

  3. Effects of Dynamic Multi-directional Loading on the Microstructural Evolution and Thermal Stability of Pure Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Yadong

    2016-07-01

    Microstructural evolution and thermal stability of 1050 commercial pure aluminum processed by means of split Hopkinson pressure bar and Instron-3369 mechanical testing machine to an accumulated strain of 3.6 were investigated. The nominal strain rates reached up to 3.0 × 103 and 1 × 10-3/s, respectively. Samples in the deformed state and annealed in the temperature interval 423-523 K for 1 h were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations reveal that the initial coarse grains are refined significantly, and the deformed structures mainly consist of equiaxed subgrains and dislocation cells with a high density of interior dislocation. In addition, the average subgrain/cell sizes of these two kinds of deformed samples are nearly the same. As to recovery behavior, recovered subgrains are observed at 473 (dynamic) versus 523 K (quasi-static), that is to say, recovery is fairly slow in the quasi-static deformed samples. It is therefore to be expected that thermal stability of this dynamic deformed aluminum is weaker than that of the quasi-static compressed one, which is due to the higher density of dislocation and nonequilibrium dislocation configurations produced during dynamic loading.

  4. Dynamic tensile stress-strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The effect of strain rate up to approximately ɛ˙ = 102/s on the tensile stress-strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress-strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB). The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress-strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  5. Quantitative analysis of morphology of the fracture surface AlMg6 alloy with consecutive dynamic and gigacycle loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oborin, Vladimir; Sokovikov, Mikhail; Bilalov, Dmitry; Naimark, Oleg

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we investigated the influence of consecutive dynamic and gigacycle fatigue loads on the lifetime of aluminum-magnesium alloy AlMg6. Preloading of samples was achieved during dynamic tensile tests in the split-Hopkinson bar device. Fatigue tests were conducted on Shimadzu USF-2000 ultrasonic fatigue testing machine. The New-View 5010 interferometer-profiler of high structural resolution (resolution of 0.1 nm) was used for qualitative fracture surface analysis, which provided the data allowing us to find correlation between mechanical properties and scale-invariant characteristics of damage induced roughness formed under dynamic and gigacycle fatigue loading conditions. Original form of the kinetic equation was proposed, which links the rate of the fatigue crack growth and the stress intensity factor using the scale invariant parameters of fracture surface roughness. The scale invariance characterizes the correlated behavior of multiscale damage provides the link of crack growth kinetics and the power exponent of the modified Paris law.

  6. Predictions for the $$\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\bar{K}^{\\ast 0}$$ X(YZ) and $$\\bar{B}^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow\\phi$$ X(YZ) with X(4160), Y(3940), Z(3930)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liang, Wei -Hong; Molina, R.; Xie, Ju -Jun; Doring, M.; Oset, E.

    2015-05-22

    We investigate the decay ofmore » $$\\bar B^0 \\to \\bar K^{*0} R$$ and $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$$ with $R$ being the $X(4160)$, $Y(3940)$, $Z(3930)$ resonances. Under the assumption that these states are dynamically generated from the vector-vector interaction, as has been concluded from several theoretical studies, we use a reaction mechanism of quark production at the elementary level, followed by hadronization of one final $$q \\bar q$$ pair into two vectors and posterior final state interaction of this pair of vector mesons to produce the resonances. With this procedure we are able to predict five ratios for these decays, which are closely linked to the dynamical nature of these states, and also predict the order of magnitude of the branching ratios which we find of the order of $$10^{-4}$$, well within the present measurable range. In order to further test the dynamical nature of these resonances we study the $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D^* \\bar D^*$$ and $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$$ decays close to the $$D^* \\bar D^*$$ and $$D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$$ thresholds and make predictions for the ratio of the mass distributions in these decays and the $$\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$$ decay widths. In conclusion, the measurement of these decays rates can help unravel the nature of these resonances.« less

  7. Predictions for the $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\bar{K}^{\\ast 0}$ X(YZ) and $\\bar{B}^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow\\phi$ X(YZ) with X(4160), Y(3940), Z(3930)

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Wei -Hong; Molina, R.; Xie, Ju -Jun; Doring, M.; Oset, E.

    2015-05-22

    We investigate the decay of $\\bar B^0 \\to \\bar K^{*0} R$ and $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$ with $R$ being the $X(4160)$, $Y(3940)$, $Z(3930)$ resonances. Under the assumption that these states are dynamically generated from the vector-vector interaction, as has been concluded from several theoretical studies, we use a reaction mechanism of quark production at the elementary level, followed by hadronization of one final $q \\bar q$ pair into two vectors and posterior final state interaction of this pair of vector mesons to produce the resonances. With this procedure we are able to predict five ratios for these decays, which are closely linked to the dynamical nature of these states, and also predict the order of magnitude of the branching ratios which we find of the order of $10^{-4}$, well within the present measurable range. In order to further test the dynamical nature of these resonances we study the $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D^* \\bar D^*$ and $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$ decays close to the $D^* \\bar D^*$ and $D_s^* \\bar D_s^*$ thresholds and make predictions for the ratio of the mass distributions in these decays and the $\\bar B^0_s \\to \\phi R$ decay widths. In conclusion, the measurement of these decays rates can help unravel the nature of these resonances.

  8. Full Field Measurement of The Dynamic Response of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy under High Strain Rate Compression and Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel Oghenekewhe Oluwatobi

    The dynamic response of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy under high strain rate loading in compression and torsion loading conditions was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar, the Kolsky torsion bar, and the high speed digital image correlation system. AA6061-T6 alloy, the most widely used in the AA6000 series, is a multi-purpose Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy containing about 0.4 % wt. of Cu and other alloying additives. The properties of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy including medium to high strength, good fracture toughness, and high corrosion resistance make it to find application in high performance structures such as the automotive parts, panels, and armored carriers. In this work, the effect of strain rate during dynamic test on formation of adiabatic shear bands in AA6061-T6 alloy was investigated. A post deformation analysis of the tested specimen was performed in order to determine the damage evolution and strain localization along the narrow adiabatic shear bands within the specimen. The formation of an adiabatic shear band in the aluminum alloy tested was found to depend on the strain rate at which the test was conducted. Stress, strain, and strain rate data obtained from the elastic waves in the compression and torsion bar tests were also compared with those obtained using the high speed digital cameras. Results show good agreement between both measurement techniques with the 3D digital image correlation technique giving a slightly lower result. Scanning and electron microscopy results show that both deformed and transformed bands can be formed in AA6061-T6 alloy during dynamic loading. The type of adiabatic shear band formed depends on the strain rate at which test was performed.

  9. The dynamic Virtual Fields Method on rubbers at medium and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sung-Ho; Siviour, Clive R.

    2015-09-01

    Elastomeric materials are widely used for energy absorption applications, often experiencing high strain rate deformations. The mechanical characterization of rubbers at high strain rates presents several experimental difficulties, especially associated with achieving adequate signal to noise ratio and static stress equilibrium, when using a conventional technique such as the split Hopkinson pressure bar. In the present study, these problems are avoided by using the dynamic Virtual Fields Method (VFM) in which acceleration fields, clearly generated by the non-equilibrium state, are utilized as a force measurement with in the frame work of the principle of virtual work equation. In this paper, two dynamic VFM based techniques are used to characterise an EPDM rubber. These are denoted as the linear and nonlinear VFM and are developed for (respectively) medium (drop-weight) and high (gas-gun) strain-rate experiments. The use of the two VFMs combined with high-speed imaging analysed by digital imaging correlation allows the identification of the parameters of a given rubber mechanical model; in this case the Ogden model is used.

  10. Dynamic fracture resilience of elk antler: Biomimetic inspiration for improved crashworthiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulin, Robb M.; Chen, Po-Yu; Jiang, Fengchun; McKittrick, Joanna; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2010-01-01

    The antler of the North American elk has been shown to have impressive fracture resistance under quasi-static loads, but given its viscoelastic behavior and impact nature of loading, questions remain as to its mechanical, and in particular, fracture behavior under dynamic loading. Samples were tested using a unique split-pressure Hopkin-son bar (SPHB) for four-point bending experiments in order to measure the fracture toughness of this material Interestingly, the hierarchical structure of antler had a strong influence on crack propagation characteristics, and cracks tended to propagate along the osteonal growth direction, whether loaded parallel or perpendicular to the osteonal growth direction. This occurred to such a degree so as to stop all crack propagation through the sample on transverse specimens, thus inhibiting the ability to measure a valid crack initiation toughness and demonstrating the extreme resilience of antler to resist dynamic fracture. The high resilience of antler to impact loading may serve as biomimetic inspiration to future material development for crashworthiness and defense applications.

  11. Dynamic Mechanical Response of Biomedical 316L Stainless Steel as Function of Strain Rate and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woei-Shyan; Chen, Tao-Hsing; Lin, Chi-Feng; Luo, Wen-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    A split Hopkinson pressure bar is used to investigate the dynamic mechanical properties of biomedical 316L stainless steel under strain rates ranging from 1 × 103 s−1 to 5 × 103 s−1 and temperatures between 25°C and 800°C. The results indicate that the flow stress, work-hardening rate, strain rate sensitivity, and thermal activation energy are all significantly dependent on the strain, strain rate, and temperature. For a constant temperature, the flow stress, work-hardening rate, and strain rate sensitivity increase with increasing strain rate, while the thermal activation energy decreases. Catastrophic failure occurs only for the specimens deformed at a strain rate of 5 × 103 s−1 and temperatures of 25°C or 200°C. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the specimens fracture in a ductile shear mode. Optical microscopy analyses reveal that the number of slip bands within the grains increases with an increasing strain rate. Moreover, a dynamic recrystallisation of the deformed microstructure is observed in the specimens tested at the highest temperature of 800°C. PMID:22216015

  12. A search for a promising tetraquark candidate X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s}) in pn → ΛΛX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Hai; Zhao, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    We propose to search for a tetraquark candidate X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s}) in pn\\to \\Lambda\\Lambda X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s})\\to \\Lambda\\Lambda K^+K^0 or ΛΛKK*. The existence of a tetraquark state X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s}) with JP = 0+, 1- or 1+ was predicted in the literature based on specific diquark effective degrees of freedom inside hadrons. In order to understand the underlying dynamics for exotic hadrons, a search for the tetraquark X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s}) is strongly recommended. The proposed reaction involves two Λ production, of which the narrow widths make it a great advantage in the analysis of the final-state missing mass spectrum. We make an estimate of the production rate of X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s}) in an effective Lagrangian theory and find that for JP = 1- the sample events of ~2200nb-1 will be able to identify X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s}) with five standard deviations at a width of 10 MeV to K+K0 near threshold. For JP = 1+ with a width of 20 MeV to KK*, the sample events of ~130nb-1 will be needed. Large production cross sections are expected in a kinematic region beyond the threshold. We emphasize the advantage of low background in this transition channel, and in the meantime caution the large uncertainties in the present estimate due to a lack of knowledge about the X(ud\\bar{s}\\hspace*{.1pt}\\bar{s}) state. Implications for its heavy-flavored partners qq\\bar{c}\\bar{c} and qq\\bar{b}\\bar{b} are briefly discussed.

  13. THE MASS PROFILE AND SHAPE OF BARS IN THE SPITZER SURVEY OF STELLAR STRUCTURE IN GALAXIES (S{sup 4}G): SEARCH FOR AN AGE INDICATOR FOR BARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Sheth, Kartik; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos; Zaritsky, Dennis; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Holwerda, Benne; Ho, Luis C.; Comerón, Sébastien; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Knapen, Johan H.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Hinz, Joannah L.; Buta, Ronald J.; Kim, Minjin; Madore, Barry F.; and others

    2015-01-20

    We have measured the radial light profiles and global shapes of bars using two-dimensional 3.6 μm image decompositions for 144 face-on barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. The bar surface brightness profile is correlated with the stellar mass and bulge-to-total (B/T) ratio of their host galaxies. Bars in massive and bulge-dominated galaxies (B/T > 0.2) show a flat profile, while bars in less massive, disk-dominated galaxies (B/T ∼ 0) show an exponential, disk-like profile with a wider spread in the radial profile than in the bulge-dominated galaxies. The global two-dimensional shapes of bars, however, are rectangular/boxy, independent of the bulge or disk properties. We speculate that because bars are formed out of disks, bars initially have an exponential (disk-like) profile that evolves over time, trapping more disk stars to boxy bar orbits. This leads bars to become stronger and have flatter profiles. The narrow spread of bar radial profiles in more massive disks suggests that these bars formed earlier (z > 1), while the disk-like profiles and a larger spread in the radial profile in less massive systems imply a later and more gradual evolution, consistent with the cosmological evolution of bars inferred from observational studies. Therefore, we expect that the flatness of the bar profile can be used as a dynamical age indicator of the bar to measure the time elapsed since the bar formation. We argue that cosmic gas accretion is required to explain our results on bar profile and the presence of gas within the bar region.

  14. Measurements of vertical bar Vcb vertical bar and vertical bar Vub vertical bar at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Rotondo, M.

    2005-10-12

    We report results from the BABAR Collaboration on the semileptonic B decays, highlighting the measurements of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements Vub and Vcb. We describe the techniques used to obtain the matrix element |Vcb| using the measurement of the inclusive B {yields} Xclv process and a large sample of exclusive B {yields} D*lv decays. The vertical bar Vub vertical bar matrix elements has been measured studying different kinematic variables of the B {yields} Xulv process, and also with the exclusive reconstruction of B {yields} {pi}({rho})lv decays.

  15. Musculoskeletal demands of progressions for the longswing on high bar.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Gareth; Kerwin, David G

    2007-09-01

    Kinetic analyses of the chalked bar longswing on high bar and its associated progressions were used to explain musculoskeletal contributions during the performance of these skills. Data on four international male gymnasts performing three series of chalked bar longswings and eight progressions were recorded. Customized body segment inertia parameters, two-dimensional kinematics (50 Hz), and bar forces (1000 Hz) were used as input to inverse dynamic modelling. The analysis focused on the relative contributions of the knees, hips, and shoulders with root mean squared differences between the chalked bar longswing and the progressions being used to rank the progressions. Seventy per cent of the total work occurred between 200 degrees and 240 degrees of angular rotation in the longswing, 67% of which was contributed by the shoulders. The shoulders were also dominant in all progressions, with the largest such contribution occurring in the looped bar longswing with "no action". The least similar progression was the looped bar pendulum swing, while the most similar was the chalked bar bent knee longswing. This study provides a useful means for ranking progressions based on their kinetic similarity to the chalked bar longswing and builds on earlier research in identifying that progressions can be classified into those similar in physical demand (kinetics) and those similar in geometry (kinematics). PMID:17933198

  16. On the bar formation mechanism in galaxies with cuspy bulges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyachenko, E. V.; Berczik, P.; Just, A.

    2016-08-01

    We show by numerical simulations that a purely stellar dynamical model composed of an exponential disc, a cuspy bulge, and an NFW halo with parameters relevant to the Milky Way Galaxy is subject to bar formation. Taking into account the finite disc thickness, the bar formation can be explained by the usual bar instability, in spite of the presence of an inner Lindblad resonance, that is believed to damp any global modes. The effect of replacing the live halo and bulge by a fixed external axisymmetric potential (rigid models) is studied. It is shown that while the e-folding time of bar instability increases significantly (from 250 to 500 Myr), the bar pattern speed remains almost the same. For the latter, our average value of 55 km/s/kpc agrees with the assumption that the Hercules stream in the solar neighbourhood is an imprint of the bar-disc interaction at the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar. Vertical averaging of the radial force in the central disc region comparable to the characteristic scale length allows us to reproduce the bar pattern speed and the growth rate of the rigid models, using normal mode analysis of linear perturbation theory in a razor thin disc. The strong increase of the e-folding time with decreasing disc mass predicted by the mode analysis suggests that bars in galaxies similar to the Milky Way have formed only recently.

  17. Morphologies introduced by bistability in barred-spiral galactic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridi, L.; Patsis, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the orbital dynamics of a barred-spiral model when the system is rotating slowly and corotation is located beyond the end of the spiral arms. In the characteristic of the central family of periodic orbits, we find a `bistable region'. In the response model, we observe a ring surrounding the bar and spiral arms starting tangential to the ring. This is a morphology resembling barred-spiral systems with inner rings. However, the dynamics associated with this structure in the case we study is different from that of a typical bar ending close to corotation. The ring of our model is round, or rather elongated perpendicular to the bar. It is associated with a folding (an `S'-shaped feature) of the characteristic of the central family, which is typical in bistable bifurcations. Along the `S' part of the characteristic, we have a change in the orientation of the periodic orbits from an x1-type to an x2-type morphology. The orbits populated in the response model change rather abruptly their orientation when reaching the lowest energy of the `S'. The spirals of the model follow a standard `precessing ellipses flow' and the orbits building them have energies beyond the `S' region. The bar is structured mainly by sticky orbits from regions around the stability islands of the central family. This leads to the appearance of X features in the bars on the galactic plane. Such a bar morphology appears in the unsharp-masked images of some moderately inclined galaxies.

  18. Bar formation and evolution in disc galaxies with gas and a triaxial halo: morphology, bar strength and halo properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.; Machado, Rubens E. G.; Rodionov, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    particles that stay located relatively near the disc for long periods of time. Another part generates halo bulk rotation, which, contrary to that of the bar, increases with time but stays small. Thus, in our models there are two non-axisymmetric components rotating with different pattern speeds, namely the halo and the bar, so that the resulting dynamics have strong similarities to the dynamics of double bar systems.

  19. Breaking through the Bar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Katti

    2011-01-01

    Howard University School of Law had a problem, and school officials knew it. Over a 20-year period, 40 percent of its graduates who took the Maryland bar exam failed it on their first try. During the next 24 months--the time frame required to determine its "eventual pass rate"--almost 90 percent of the students did pass. What they did not know was…

  20. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  1. Morphodynamic controls on redox conditions and on nitrogen dynamics within the hyporheic zone: Application to gravel bed rivers with alternate-bar morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, A.; Tonina, D.; Bellin, A.

    2012-09-01

    Hyporheic flows, which stem from the interaction between stream flow and bedform, transport solute-laden surface waters into the streambed sediments, where reactive solutes undergo biogeochemical transformations. Despite the importance of hyporheic exchange on riverine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles, research is limited on the effects of hyporheic fluxes on the fate of reactive solutes within the hyporheic zone. Consequently, we investigate the controls of hyporheic flowpaths, which we link to stream morphology and streamflow, on prevailing hyporheic redox conditions and on biogeochemical transformations occurring within streambeds. We focus on the dissolved inorganic reactive forms of nitrogen, ammonium and nitrate, because nitrogen is one of the most common reactive solutes and an essential nutrient found in stream waters. Our objectives are to explore the influence of stream morphology, hyporheic water temperature and relative abundance of ammonium and nitrate, on transformation of ammonium, removal of nitrates and production of nitrous oxide, a potent greenhouse gas. We address our objectives with analytical solutions of the Multispecies Reactive Advection-Dispersion Equation coupled with linearized Monod's kinetics and analytical solutions of the hyporheic flow for alternate-bar morphology. We introduce a new Damköhler number,Da, defined as the ratio between the median hyporheic residence time and the time scale of oxygen consumption, which we prove to be a good indicator of where aerobic or anaerobic conditions prevail. In addition, Dais a key index to quantify hyporheic nitrification and denitrification efficiencies and defines a new theoretical framework for scaling results at both the morphological-unit and stream-reach scales.

  2. Structural Properties of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taehyun; Gadotti, D. A.; Sheth, K.; Lee, M.; S4G Team

    2014-01-01

    We have performed two-dimensional multicomponent decomposition of 144 local barred spiral galaxies using 3.6 micron images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. Our model fit includes up to four components (bulge, disk, bar, and a point source) and, most importantly, takes into account disk breaks. We present that ignoring the disk break and using a single disk scale length in the model fit for Type II (down- bending) disk galaxies can lead to differences of 40% in the disk scale length, 10% in bulge-to-total luminosity ratio (B/T), and 25% in bar-to-total luminosity ratios. We show that for galaxies with B/T > 0.1, the break radius to bar radius, r_br/R_bar, varies between 1 and 3, but as a function of B/T the ratio remains roughly constant. This suggests that in bulge-dominated galaxies the disk break is likely related to the outer Lindblad Resonance (OLR) of the bar, and thus the OLR also moves outwards at the same rate as the bar grows. For galaxies with B/T < 0.1, r_br/R_bar, spans a wide range from 1 to 6. This suggests that the mechanism that produces the break in these galaxies may be different from that in galaxies with more massive bulges. Consistent with previous studies, we conclude that disk breaks in galaxies with small bulges may originate from bar resonances that may be also coupled with the spiral arms, or be related to star formation thresholds. We quantifiy shapes of bar radial surface brightness profiles by measuring their Sersic indices and show that bars in higher B/T galaxies have flatter radial surface brightness profile than bulgeless galaxies do. In particular, bulgeless galaxies mostly have bars with steep profiles. We show that the normalized bar length is correlated with B/T, which is consistent with bars growing longer with time.

  3. Effect of microstructure on static and dynamic mechanical properties of high strength steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinbo

    The high speed deformation behavior of a commercially available dual phase (DP) steel was studied by means of split Hopkinson bar apparatus in shear punch (25m/s) and tension (1000s-1) modes with an emphasis on the influence of microstructure. The cold rolled sheet material was subjected to a variety of heat treatment conditions to produce several different microstructures, namely ferrite plus pearlite, ferrite plus bainite and/or acicular ferrite, ferrite plus bainite and martensite, and ferrite plus different fractions of martensite. Static properties (0.01mm/s for shear punch and 0.001s -1 for tension) of all the microstructures were also measured by an MTS hydraulic machine and compared to the dynamic properties. The effects of low temperature tempering and bake hardening were investigated for some ferrite plus martensite microstructures. In addition, two other materials, composition designed as high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel, were heat treated and tested to study the effect of alloy chemistry on the microstructure and property relationship. A strong effect of microstructure on both static and dynamic properties and on the relationship between static and dynamic properties was observed. According to the variation of dynamic factor with static strength, three groups of microstructures with three distinct behaviors were identified, i.e. classic dual phase (ferrite plus less than 50% martensite), martensite-matrix dual phase (ferrite plus more than 50% martensite), and non-dual phase (ferrite plus non-martensite). Under the same static strength level, the dual phase microstructure was found to absorb more dynamic energy than other microstructures. It was also observed that the general dependence of microstructure on static and dynamic property relationship was not strongly influenced by chemical composition, except the ferrite plus martensite microstructures generated by the TRIP chemistry, which exhibited

  4. Mechanics of dynamic fracture in notched polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Anshul; Parmeswaran, Venkitanarayanan; Basu, Sumit

    2015-04-01

    Fracture toughness of brittle amorphous polymers (e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)) has been reported to decrease with loading rate at moderate rates and increase abruptly thereafter to close to 5 times the static value at very high loading rates. Dynamic fracture toughness that is much higher than the static values has attractive technological possibilities. However, the reasons for the sharp increase remain unclear. Motivated by these observations, the present work focuses on the dynamic fracture behavior of polycarbonate (PC), which is also an amorphous polymer but unlike PMMA, is ductile at room temperature. Towards this end, a combined experimental and numerical approach is adopted. Dynamic fracture experiments at various loading rates are conducted on single edge notched (SEN) specimens with a notch of radius 150 μm, using a Hopkinson bar setup equipped with ultra high-speed imaging (>105 fps) for real-time observation of dynamic processes during fracture. Concurrently, 3D dynamic finite element simulations are performed using a well calibrated material model for PC. Experimentally, we were able to clearly capture the intricate details of the process, for both slowly and dynamically loaded samples, of damage nucleation and growth ahead of the notch tip followed by unstable crack propagation. These observations coupled with fractography and computer simulations led us to conclude that in PC, the fracture toughness remains invariant with loading rate at Jfrac = 12 ± 3 kN / m for the entire range of loading rates (J ˙) from static to 1 ×106 kN / m - s. However, the damage initiation toughness is significantly higher in dynamic loading compared to static situations. In dynamic situations, damage nucleation is quickly followed by initiation of radial crazes from around the void periphery that initiate and quickly bridge the ligament between the initial damaged region and the notch. Thus for PC, two criteria for two major stages in the failure process emerge

  5. Dynamic behaviors of various volume rate steel-fiber reinforced reactive powder concrete after high temperature burnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Baojun; Wang, Liwen; Yang, Zhenqi; Chi, Runqiang

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic strain-stress curves of reactive powder concrete under high strain rate (10/s-100/s) were determined by improved split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A plumbum pulse shaper was used to ensure the symmetrical stress in the specimens before fracture and avoid the fluctuation of test data due to input shaky stress pulse. A time modified method was induced for data processing in order to get accurate SHPB results. The results of experiment showed after high temperature burnt, different volume rate (0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%) steel-fiber reinforced reactive power concrete had the same changing tendency of residual mechanics behaviors, e.g. after 400 centigrade burnt, the residual compression strength was about 70% of material strength without burnt under 100/s. After 800 centigrade burnt, the compression strength is about 30% under 100/s while the deformation ability increased. At meanwhile, steel fiber had improved the mechanism of reinforcing effect and toughening effect of concrete material after burnt. With increasing of steel fiber volume rate, dynamic residual behavior of samples was improved. Microcosmic characteristics and energy absorption were induced for explaining the experiment results.

  6. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  7. Grain size dependence of dynamic mechanical behavior of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under compressive shock loading

    SciTech Connect

    Asgari, H.; Odeshi, A.G.; Szpunar, J.A.; Zeng, L.J.; Olsson, E.

    2015-08-15

    The effects of grain size on the dynamic deformation behavior of rolled AZ31B alloy at high strain rates were investigated. Rolled AZ31B alloy samples with grain sizes of 6, 18 and 37 μm, were subjected to shock loading tests using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar at room temperature and at a strain rate of 1100 s{sup −} {sup 1}. It was found that a double-peak basal texture formed in the shock loaded samples. The strength and ductility of the alloy under the high strain-rate compressive loading increased with decreasing grain size. However, twinning fraction and strain hardening rate were found to decrease with decreasing grain size. In addition, orientation imaging microscopy showed a higher contribution of double and contraction twins in the deformation process of the coarse-grained samples. Using transmission electron microscopy, pyramidal dislocations were detected in the shock loaded sample, proving the activation of pyramidal slip system under dynamic impact loading. - Highlights: • A double-peak basal texture developed in all shock loaded samples. • Both strength and ductility increased with decreasing grain size. • Twinning fraction and strain hardening rate decreased with decreasing grain size. • ‘g.b’ analysis confirmed the presence of dislocations in shock loaded alloy.

  8. The dynamic mechanical properties study on the sandwich panel of different thickness steel plate-foam aluminum core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhongliang; Zou, Guangping; Zhao, Weiling; Xia, Peixiu

    2009-12-01

    The foam aluminum belongs to multi-cell materials, and it has good mechanical performance, such as large deformation capacity and good energy absorption, and usually used as core material of sandwich panel, now it is widely used in automotive, aviation, aerospace and other fields, particularly suitable for various anti-collision structure and buffer structure. In this article, based on an engineering background, the INSTRON4505 electronic universal testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) were used for testing the static and dynamic mechanical properties of sandwich panel with different thickness steel plate- foam aluminum core, from the results we can see that the steel plate thickness has big influence on the stress-strain curve of the sandwich panel, and also takes the sandwich panel with 1mm steel panel to study the material strain rate dependence which under different high shock wave stress loaded, the results show that the sandwich panel is strain rate dependence material. And also, in order to get good waveforms in the SHPB experiment, the waveform shaped technique is used in the dynamic experiments, and the study of this paper will good to sandwich panel used in the engineering.

  9. The dynamic mechanical properties study on the sandwich panel of different thickness steel plate-foam aluminum core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zhongliang; Zou, Guangping; Zhao, Weiling; Xia, Peixiu

    2010-03-01

    The foam aluminum belongs to multi-cell materials, and it has good mechanical performance, such as large deformation capacity and good energy absorption, and usually used as core material of sandwich panel, now it is widely used in automotive, aviation, aerospace and other fields, particularly suitable for various anti-collision structure and buffer structure. In this article, based on an engineering background, the INSTRON4505 electronic universal testing machine and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) were used for testing the static and dynamic mechanical properties of sandwich panel with different thickness steel plate- foam aluminum core, from the results we can see that the steel plate thickness has big influence on the stress-strain curve of the sandwich panel, and also takes the sandwich panel with 1mm steel panel to study the material strain rate dependence which under different high shock wave stress loaded, the results show that the sandwich panel is strain rate dependence material. And also, in order to get good waveforms in the SHPB experiment, the waveform shaped technique is used in the dynamic experiments, and the study of this paper will good to sandwich panel used in the engineering.

  10. Large strain dynamic compression for soft materials using a direct impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meenken, T.; Hiermaier, S.

    2006-08-01

    Measurement of strain rate dependent material data of low density low strength materials like polymeric foams and rubbers still poses challenges of a different kind to the experimental set up. For instance, in conventional Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar tests the impedance mismatch between the bars and the specimen makes strain measurement almost impossible. Application of viscoelastic bars poses new problems with wave dispersion. Also, maximum achievable strains and strain rates depend directly on the bar lengths, resulting in large experimental set ups in order to measure relevant data for automobile crash applications. In this paper a modified SHPB will be presented for testing low impedance materials. High strains can be achieved with nearly constant strain rate. A thin film stress measurement has been applied to the specimen/bar interfaces to investigate the initial sample ring up process. The process of stress homogeneity within the sample was investigated on EPDM and PU rubber.

  11. The Role of 2D Circulation in Sand Bar Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splinter, K. D.; Holman, R. A.; Plant, N. G.; Holland, K. T.

    2006-12-01

    Models of bar dynamics typically involve moments of the cross-shore flow, with offshore movement associated with the strong offshore directed undertow and onshore migration related to wave asymmetry and skewness [Gallagher, et al., 1998]. Based on these hypotheses, models and laboratory studies have used the alongshore-mean bar position and alongshore-uniform wave conditions (a 1DH approach) to study bar response to varying wave conditions. Commonly, cases of offshore migration were reproduced with reasonable accuracy, but predictions of onshore migration were less successful. However, examination of time-exposure images of waves show that during periods of offshore migration, bars tend to be alongshore uniform and move rapidly offshore, but during onshore migration, sand bars are rarely straight, instead becoming very sinuous, violating the 1DH approach. We hypothesize that under milder wave conditions, the 2DH circulation associated with this alongshore-variable morphology is, in fact, largely responsible for increased onshore net sand transport and the resulting onshore bar movement. We extend the work of Plant et al. [in review] that relates bar position, sinuosity, and wave forcing within a dynamical feedback model. The model consists of coupled differential equations that govern the rates of change of cross-shore position and horizontal sinuosity as a function of the current cross-shore position and sinuosity and a proxy for wave forcing. Using a short data set from Duck, NC, they solve for the unknown coupling coefficients by doing a least-squares fit. They find that the coefficients for the self-interaction terms have a negative sign, indicating the overall system is stable. The coefficients of the cross-interaction terms (the effect of sinuosity on rate of change of bar position and visa versa), however, are non-zero and have opposite signs indicating the systems are coupled and stability is not affected by these terms. We expand this study, relating bar

  12. Shepherding Tidal Debris with the Galactic Bar: The Ophiuchus Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kohei; Erkal, Denis; Sanders, Jason L.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of stellar streams in rotating barred potentials is explained for the first time. Naturally, neighbouring stream stars reach pericentre at slightly different times. In the presence of a rotating bar, these neighbouring stream stars experience different bar orientations during pericentric passage and hence each star receives a different torque from the bar. These differing torques reshape the angular momentum and energy distribution of stars in the stream, which in turn changes the growth rate of the stream. For a progenitor orbiting in the same sense as the bar's rotation and satisfying a resonance condition, the resultant stream can be substantially shorter or longer than expected, depending on whether the pericentric passages of the progenitor occur along the bar's minor or major axis respectively. We present a full discussion of this phenomenon focusing mainly on streams confined to the Galactic plane. In stark contrast with the evolution in static potentials, which give rise to streams that grow steadily in time, rotating barred potentials can produce dynamically old, short streams. This challenges the traditional viewpoint that the inner halo necessarily consists of well phase-mixed material whilst the tidally-disrupted structures in the outer halo are more spatially coherent. We argue that this mechanism may play an important role in explaining the mysteriously short Ophiuchus stream that was recently discovered near the bulge region of the Milky Way.

  13. Shepherding tidal debris with the Galactic bar: the Ophiuchus stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kohei; Erkal, Denis; Sanders, Jason L.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of stellar streams in rotating barred potentials is explained for the first time. Naturally, neighbouring stream stars reach pericentre at slightly different times. In the presence of a rotating bar, these neighbouring stream stars experience different bar orientations during pericentric passage and hence each star receives a different torque from the bar. These differing torques reshape the angular momentum and energy distribution of stars in the stream, which in turn changes the growth rate of the stream. For a progenitor orbiting in the same sense as the bar's rotation and satisfying a resonance condition, the resultant stream can be substantially shorter or longer than expected, depending on whether the pericentric passages of the progenitor occur along the bar's minor or major axis, respectively. We present a full discussion of this phenomenon focusing mainly on streams confined to the Galactic plane. In stark contrast with the evolution in static potentials, which give rise to streams that grow steadily in time, rotating barred potentials can produce dynamically old, short streams. This challenges the traditional viewpoint that the inner halo necessarily consists of well phase-mixed material whilst the tidally disrupted structures in the outer halo are more spatially coherent. We argue that this mechanism may play an important role in explaining the mysteriously short Ophiuchus stream that was recently discovered near the bulge region of the Milky Way.

  14. Microstructures Induced in Porous Limestone by Dynamic Loading, and Fracture Healing: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Julie; Doan, Mai-Linh; Gratier, Jean-Pierre; Renard, François

    2015-05-01

    Fracturing and healing are crucial processes inducing changes in the permeability and mechanical behavior of fault zones. Fracturing increases the permeability of fault rocks, creating flow-channels for fluid circulation and enhancing the kinetics of such fluid-rock processes as pressure solution or metamorphism. Conversely, healing processes reduce permeability by closing the fractures and lead to rock strengthening. Consequently, the timescales of these two processes are important in determining the strength of fault zones and their ability to rupture during earthquakes. This article reports observations of the microstructure of porous limestone samples subjected to rapid dynamic loading, and long-term healing as a result of fluid percolation. Dynamic loading was performed by impacting the samples with steel bars inside a split Hopkinson pressure bar apparatus. Healing was performed by leaving the samples for three months within a triaxial machine with percolation of supersaturated fluids for five weeks. Two kinds of fracture network were observed in samples damaged at high strain rate: a series of radial and circular macrofractures and an incipient pulverization zone at the center of the sample loaded at the highest strain rate. Fracture density determined microscopically from X-ray images correlates with dissipated energy computed from macro-mechanical data. X-ray images enable good quantification of the damaged state of the samples. Percolation experiments under stress with high-solubility fluid at room temperature show that the main healing processes promoting closure of the fractures in the sample are a combination of mechanical and chemical compaction. Microfracturing networks were found to heal faster than the largest fractures, leading to heterogeneous strengthening of the rock. This feature affects the processes of earthquake nucleation and rupture propagation.

  15. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Mechanical Behaviors and Anti-Projectile Capabilities of Extruded Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yafu; Zhao, Baorong

    Dynamic mechanical behaviors of Mg-Gd-Y series extruded magnesium alloy and its σ-ɛcurves are measured by using of Hopkinson pressure bar technique. According to the concept of efficiency of absorption energy, this thesis compares Mg-Gd-Y series extruded alloy with ZK60 extruded magnesium alloy. Being obtained similitude numbers by means of normalizing processing for governing equations of the continuum mechanics and according to the viewpoint of equal density of area, the comparative experiment of anti-projectile capabilities is elaborately designed between Mg-Gd-Y alloy and the 7A52 aluminum alloy. The result has validated that anti-projectile capability of Mg-Gd-Y alloy is better than those of 7A52 alloy under the condition of equal density of area. The relative technique approaches for improving anti-projectile capability of Mg-Gd-Y alloy are put forward making use of similitude numbers. Finally, the basic characters of effect of adiabatic shear are revealed by micro analysis.

  16. Static and dynamic tensile behaviour of aluminium processed by high pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verleysen, Patricia; Oelbrandt, Wouter; Naghdy, Soroosh; Kestens, Leo

    2015-09-01

    High pressure torsion (HPT) is a severe plastic deformation technique in which a small, disk-like sample is subjected to a torsional deformation under a high hydrostatic pressure. In present study, the static and dynamic tensile behaviour of commercially pure aluminium (99.6 wt%) processed by HPT is studied. The high strain rate tensile behaviour is characterized using a purpose-developed miniature split Hopkinson tensile bar setup by which strain rates up to 5 × 103 s-1 can be reached. During the tests, the deformation of a speckle pattern applied to the samples is recorded, by which local information on the strain is obtained using a digital image correlation technique. Electron back scatter diffraction images are used to investigate the microstructural evolution, more specifically the grain refinement obtained by HPT. The fracture surfaces of the tensile samples are studied by scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the imposed severe plastic deformation significantly increases the tensile strength, however, at the expense of ductility. The strain rate only has a minor influence on the materials tensile behaviour.

  17. Study of the dynamic Bauschinger effect in Ti6Al4V by torsion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirs, J.; Verleysen, P.; Degrieck, J.

    2012-08-01

    The materials kinematic hardening behaviour and Bauschinger effect is indispensible to describe complex deformation processes involving strain path changes. Moreover, the Bauschinger effect provides valuable information about underlying microstructural plasticity mechanisms. Until now, the Bauschinger effect at high strain rates remains a largely unexplored topic. However, different studies demonstrated the strain rate dependent character of the Bauschinger effect. The aim of this work is to study the dynamic Bauschinger effect by means of a novel experimental technique. A modified torsional split Hopkinson bar setup is used to conduct Bauschinger experiments on Ti6Al4V. Forward and reverse loading of the specimen take place successively in only one experiment. This has the advantage of having the same thermal conditions during the two loading cycles. Besides high strain rate tests, quasi-static torsional Bauschinger experiments are conducted. The Bauschinger effect at the different strain rates is quantified with a dimensionless Bauschinger stress parameter. It is found that the Bauschinger effect is present at all tested strain rates. However, it is more pronounced at high strain rates. This implies that the kinematic hardening of Ti6Al4V is strain rate sensitive.

  18. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  19. Bar-Code-Scribing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badinger, Michael A.; Drouant, George J.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed hand-held tool applies indelible bar code to small parts. Possible to identify parts for management of inventory without tags or labels. Microprocessor supplies bar-code data to impact-printer-like device. Device drives replaceable scribe, which cuts bar code on surface of part. Used to mark serially controlled parts for military and aerospace equipment. Also adapts for discrete marking of bulk items used in food and pharmaceutical processing.

  20. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  1. Dynamic crushing behaviour of aluminium tubes filled with cork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gameiro, C. P.; Cirne, J.; Gary, G.

    2006-08-01

    Cork is a natural cellular material with unique remarkable properties such as low density, great elasticity, chemical stability and resilience, no permeability to liquid and gases and resistance to wear and fire. Besides, it is ecological, hygienic, easy to maintain and a very durable material. Unfortunately, there are still application fields that have not been explored yet for the use of cork, possibly due to the fact that it is a complex cellular material, characterized by very variable mechanical properties which clearly depend on its microstructure. The fundamental aspects of the static and dynamic mechanical behaviour of natural and agglomerate cork, used alone and as filler inside a tube with small dimensions, under axial compressive loading, have already been studied by the authors. Aluminium cork-filled tubes and their empty counterparts were tested experimentally and numerically at quasi-static and dynamic strain rates from 10 - 3s - 1 to 600 s - 1. Data from the Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar and “deconvolution” techniques were used to generate stress-strain curves for the structures composed of natural and agglomerate cork. The numerical simulations of the dynamic compression of the specimens were carried out using the finite element method software LS-DYNA^TM and showed quite good agreement with the experimental results. Hence, in this work, in order to extend the study started previously and investigate the possible advantages of cork-filling in longer tubes with a different section, the authors simulate, using the same software, the influence of the introduction of agglomerate cork in square and circular aluminium tubes with a diameter/width of 80 mm, a length of 300mm and a variable thickness. The mechanical properties of the structures composed of cork may constitute a potential for this material to be used in innovative applications related to diverse fields such as automotive, transport, ships and military applications.

  2. Ladder supported ring bar circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmahl, H. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An improved slow wave circuit especially useful in backward wave oscillators includes a slow wave circuit in a waveguide. The slow wave circuit is comprised of rings disposed between and attached to respective stubs. The stubs are attached to opposing sidewalls of the waveguide. To the end that opposed, interacting magnetic fields will be established to provide a very high coupling impedance for the slow wave structure, axially orientated bars are connected between rings in alternate spaces and adjacent to the attachment points of stubs. Similarly, axial bars are connected between rings in the spaces which do not include bars and at points adjacent to the attachment of bars.

  3. Effects of Magnetic Fields on Bar Substructures in Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae

    2015-03-01

    To study the effects of magnetic fields on the properties of bar substructures, we run two-dimensional, ideal MHD simulations of barred galaxies under the influence of a non-axisymmetric bar potential. In the bar regions, magnetic fields reduce density compression in the dust-lane shocks, while removing angular momentum further from the gas at the shocks. This evidently results in a smaller and more distributed ring, and a larger mass inflows rate to the galaxy center in models with stronger magnetic fields. In the outer regions, an MHD dynamo due to the combined action of the bar potential and background shear operates, amplifying magnetic fields near the corotation resonance. In the absence of spiral arms, the amplified fields naturally shape into trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The reader is refereed to Kim & Stone (2012) for a detailed presentation of the simulation outcomes.

  4. GASEOUS STRUCTURES IN BARRED GALAXIES: EFFECTS OF THE BAR STRENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yonghwi

    2012-10-10

    Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the physical properties of gaseous substructures in barred galaxies and their relationships with the bar strength. The gaseous medium is assumed to be isothermal and unmagnetized. The bar potential is modeled as a Ferrers prolate with index n. To explore situations with differing bar strength, we vary the bar mass f{sub bar} relative to the spheroidal component as well as its aspect ratio R. We derive expressions as functions of f{sub bar} and R for the bar strength Q{sub b} and the radius r(Q{sub b} ) where the maximum bar torque occurs. When applied to observations, these expressions suggest that bars in real galaxies are most likely to have f{sub bar} {approx} 0.25-0.50 and n {approx}< 1. Dust lanes approximately follow one of the x{sub 1}-orbits and tend to be straighter under a stronger and more elongated bar, but are insensitive to the presence of self-gravity. A nuclear ring of a conventional x{sub 2} type forms only when the bar is not so massive or elongated. The radius of an x{sub 2}-type ring is generally smaller than the inner Lindblad resonance, decreases systematically with increasing Q{sub b} , and is slightly larger when self-gravity is included. This is evidence that the ring position is not determined by the resonance, but instead by the amount of angular momentum loss at dust-lane shocks. Nuclear spirals exist only when the ring is of the x{sub 2} type and is sufficiently large in size. Unlike the other features, nuclear spirals are transient in that they start out being tightly wound and weak, and then, due to the nonlinear effect, unwind and become stronger until they turn into shocks, with an unwinding rate that is higher for larger Q{sub b} . The mass inflow rate to the galaxy center is found to be less than 0.01 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for models with Q{sub b} {approx}< 0.2, while becoming larger than 0.1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} when Q{sub b} {approx}> 0.2 and self-gravity is included.

  5. Vision system for gauging and automatic straightening of steel bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidla, Oliver; Wilding, Ernst; Niel, Albert; Barg, Herbert

    2001-02-01

    A machine vision application for the fully automatic straightening of steel bars is presented. The bars with lengths of up to 6000 mm are quite bent on exit of the rolling mill and need to be straightened prior to delivery to a customer. The shape of the steel bar is extracted and measured by two video resolution cameras which are calibrated in position and viewing angle relative to a coordinate system located in the center of the roller table. Its contour is tracked and located with a dynamic programming method utilizing several constraints to make the algorithm as robust as possible. 3D camera calibration allows the transformation of image coordinates to real-world coordinates. After smoothing and spline fitting the curvature of the bar is computed. A deformation model of the effect of force applied to the steel allows the system to generate press commands which state where and with what specific pressure the bar has to be processed. The model can be used to predict the straightening of the bar over some consecutive pressing events helping to optimize the operation. The process of measurement and pressing is repeated until the straightness of the bar reaches a predefined limit.

  6. Alluvial Bars of the Obed Wild and Scenic River, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, W.J.; Fitch, K.C.; Ladd, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Park Service (NPS) initiated a reconnaissance study of alluvial bars along the Obed Wild and Scenic River (Obed WSR), in Cumberland and Morgan Counties, Tennessee. The study was partly driven by concern that trapping of sand by upstream impoundments might threaten rare, threatened, or endangered plant habitat by reducing the supply of sediment to the alluvial bars. The objectives of the study were to: (1) develop a preliminary understanding of the distribution, morphology, composition, stability, and vegetation structure of alluvial bars along the Obed WSR, and (2) determine whether evidence of human alteration of sediment dynamics in the Obed WSR warrants further, more detailed examination. This report presents the results of the reconnaissance study of alluvial bars along the Obed River, Clear Creek, and Daddys Creek in the Obed WSR. The report is based on: (1) field-reconnaissance visits by boat to 56 alluvial bars along selected reaches of the Obed River and Clear Creek; (2) analysis of aerial photographs, topographic and geologic maps, and other geographic data to assess the distribution of alluvial bars in the Obed WSR; (3) surveys of topography, surface particle size, vegetation structure, and ground cover on three selected alluvial bars; and (4) analysis of hydrologic records.

  7. BAR EFFECTS ON CENTRAL STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seulhee; Oh, Kyuseok; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2012-01-01

    Galactic bars are often suspected to be channels of gas inflow to the galactic center and to trigger central star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity. However, the current status on this issue based on empirical studies is unsettling, especially regarding AGNs. We investigate this question based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. From the nearby (0.01 < z < 0.05) bright (M{sub r} < -19) database, we have constructed a sample of 6658 relatively face-on late-type galaxies through visual inspection. We found 36% of them to have a bar. Bars are found to be more common in galaxies with earlier morphology. This makes sample selection critical. Parameter-based selections would miss a large fraction of barred galaxies of early morphology. Bar effects on star formation or AGNs are difficult to understand properly because multiple factors (bar frequency, stellar mass, black hole mass, gas contents, etc.) seem to contribute to them in intricate manners. In the hope of breaking these degeneracies, we inspect bar effects for fixed galaxy properties. Bar effects on central star formation seem higher in redder galaxies. Bar effects on AGNs on the other hand are higher in bluer and less massive galaxies. These effects seem more pronounced with increasing bar length. We discuss possible implications in terms of gas contents, bar strength, bar evolution, fueling timescale, and the dynamical role of supermassive black hole.

  8. Formation of crescentic bars in double sandbar systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvete Manrique, D.; Coco, G.; Ribas Prats, F.; de Swart, H. E.

    2012-04-01

    The development of crescentic bars in multiple sandbar systems have been studied both through observations (e.g. Price and Ruessink, Cont. Shelf Res. 2011) and numerical studies (e.g. Thiebot et al., Cont. Shelf Res. 2012). Recent studies (Castelle et al., Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 2010; Quartel , Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 2009) have focus special attention on the dynamics of crescentic bars in multiple sandbar systems and their coupling. However these studies under with conditions the dynamics of the crescentic patterns are the results of a coupled dynamics or it is just the independent evolution of each single sand bar. The objective of the present work is to investigate under witch conditions the initial formation crescentic bars in a double sand bar system are the results of a coupled dynamics. Here we use a numerical model based on linear stability analysis to study initial evolution of the double sandbar system. The model, in addition the to processes accounted by Calvete et al. (2005) also incorporate the surface rollers, both in the hydrodynamics and sediment transport, following Ribas et al. (2011). Preliminary results shows that patterns can be coupled from their initial formation for particular forcing conditions and cross-shore beach profiles.

  9. The Effects of Specimen Geometry and Size on the Dynamic Failure of Aluminum Alloy 2219-T8 Under Impact Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolling, Denzell Tamarcus

    A significant amount of research has been devoted to the characterization of new engineering materials. Searching for new alloys which may improve weight, ultimate strength, or fatigue life are just a few of the reasons why researchers study different materials. In support of that mission this study focuses on the effects of specimen geometry and size on the dynamic failure of AA2219 aluminum alloy subjected to impact loading. Using the Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system different geometric samples including cubic, rectangular, cylindrical, and frustum samples are loaded at different strain rates ranging from 1000s-1 to 6000s-1. The deformation properties, including the potential for the formation of adiabatic shear bands, of the different geometries are compared. Overall the cubic geometry achieves the highest critical strain and the maximum stress values at low strain rates and the rectangular geometry has the highest critical strain and the maximum stress at high strain rates. The frustum geometry type consistently achieves the lowest the maximum stress value compared to the other geometries under equal strain rates. All sample types clearly indicated susceptibility to strain localization at different locations within the sample geometry. Micrograph analysis indicated that adiabatic shear band geometry was influenced by sample geometry, and that specimens with a circular cross section are more susceptible to shear band formation than specimens with a rectangular cross section.

  10. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of texture evolution in 904L stainless steel under dynamic shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nanan; Wang, Y. D.; Peng, R. Lin; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Wang, L.; Cai, H. N.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of strain rate on development of deformation texture under a dynamic shock compression of a 904L stainless steel was quantitatively investigated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and crystallographic orientation distribution function (ODF) analysis. Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique was used to generate a high strain rate of > 103 s-1 for preparing the deformed samples. Starting with an almost random texture in a solution treatment condition, the deformed material developed several typical texture components, such as ‘Goss’ texture and ‘Brass’ texture. Compared to the texture components displayed in the state of quasi-static compression deformation, it was found that the high-speed deformation generated much weaker texture components. In combination with the change in microstructures observed by EBSD and TEM technique, the high-energy X-ray diffraction provides a powerful tool for characterizing the strain-rate dependence of grain rotation at each stage of deformation. The deformation heterogeneity evident in our experiment can be explained by a transition of deformation mechanism from the dislocation/twin-dominated mode to shear-band-dominated one with increasing strain rate.

  11. CULTURAL FACTORS RELATED TO SMOKING IN SAN FRANCISCO’S IRISH BARS

    PubMed Central

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M.J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California’s Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In bars serving primarily Irish migrants, tight-knit relations within the local Irish bar community together with a reluctance to be the first Irish bar to ban smoking were found to contribute to continued indoor smoking. The findings illustrate challenges to implementing tobacco control policies within ethnic subpopulations and particularly highlight the importance of considering how cultural dynamics within subpopulations may help or hinder such policies. PMID:19999704

  12. Blurring in bar code signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong

    1997-10-01

    When a bar code symbol is passed over a scanner, it is struck across by a fast moving laser beam. The laser light is scattered by the bar code. The total scattered power is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces in the symbol. A fraction of the scattered light is collected and focused onto a photodetector that converts the light variation into an electronic signal. The electronic signal is then digitized for analysis by a computer. The scanning and detection process can be modeled by a convolution of the laser beam profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The switching between states in the digitized bar code signal, which represents transitions from a space to a bar or vice versa, is determined by a zero-crossing point in the second derivative of the analog signal. The laser profile acts like a smoothing function. It blurs the analog electronic signal. If the width of the laser profile is less than the minimum width of bars and spaces in the bar code reflectivity function, the transition point is not affected by the location of its neighboring edges. If the laser profile is wider than the minimum width in the bar code, the transition point can be shifted due to the locations of its neighboring edges. The behavior of the shift of transition is analyzed here for all cases in a UPC symbol. It is found that the amount of shift in the transition point is almost the same for several different cases within the depth of field of the scanner. The knowledge of the behavior of transition point shift can be used to accurately compensate printing errors in an over-printed bar code. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal function of the scanning laser beam. The MTF through focus for a scanning system is presented. By using an aperture with central obscuration in the laser focusing system, the high frequency resolution of bar code scanning can be enhanced and the depth of field of the scanner can

  13. Metal complexation and ion hydration in low density hydrothermal fluids: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of Cu(I) and Au(I) in chloride solutions (25-1000 °C, 1-5000 bar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuan; Liu, Weihua; Sherman, David M.; Brugger, Joël

    2014-04-01

    Low-density supercritical fluids are suspected of being able to transport metals, but it is unclear what the speciation/complexation would be in such conditions. In this work, we used ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the complexation, ion association and hydration of Cu+ and Au+ in NaCl brines as a function of solution density, from ambient to supercritical conditions (to 1000 °C, 5000 bar). Cu(I) and Au(I) form distorted linear complexes with two chloride ligands (i.e., CuCl2- and AuCl2-) in subcritical chloride brines. We have discovered that these charged complexes remain in high density supercritical fluids even at high temperature; however, with decreasing density, these complexes become progressively neutralized by ion association with Na+ to form low-charge (NanCuCl2)n-1 and (NanAuCl2)n-1 complexes. In these species, the Na+ ion is very weakly bonded in the outer coordination sphere, resulting in highly disordered structures and fast (few picoseconds) exchange among coordinated and solvent Na+ ions. Thermodynamic models to predict the solubility of metals in low-density magmatic or metamorphic fluids must account for these species. In addition, we found that the number of water molecules (i.e., the hydration number) surrounding the Cu+, Au+, Na+ and Cl- ions decreases linearly when fluid density decreases; this supports empirical thermodynamic models that correlate the stability constants of complexation reactions with solvent density. The traditional Born-model description explains the ion association as resulting from the decreased dielectric constant of the solvent. However at a molecular level, the increased ion association results from the increase in translational entropy associated with ion dehydration.

  14. Experimental serpentinization of dunite cores at 150-200ºC and 150 bar: Importance of open system dynamics for hydrogen generation and stabilization of ferric-rich serpentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Bagley, B. C.; Mildner, D. F. R.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic processes often exhume mantle peridotite to environments near the Earth's surface, where serpentinization occurs and involves the hydration of peridotite at relatively low temperatures. This process oxidizes ferrous iron in olivine, which produces hydrogen (H2), creating environments that are conducive to abiotic synthesis of organic compounds and H2-based microbial communities. To understand better chemical and physical processes associated with serpentinization, two flow-through experiments (>30 days) were conducted at 150 and 200°C and 150 bar on intact dunite cores. Permeability decreased by a factor of 31 during the 200°C experiment, more than an order of magnitude larger than that at 150°C. Furthermore, H2 and methane concentrations exceeded 600 µmol/kg and 300 µmol/kg during the 200°C experiment, and were one and two orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than the 150°C experiment. H2 was primarily generated during the conversion of olivine to ferric serpentine at 200°C, since vibrating sample magnetometer analysis indicated little to no magnetite production. Secondary mineralization was identified on the core from this experiment, but X-ray computed tomography scans indicated little change. Furthermore, (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering datasets indicated that any change in nano-porosity and surface area was smaller than the natural variability of the dunite. Even though there was little evidence of alteration, the initial stage of serpentinization at 200°C was sufficient to produce a dramatic effect on flow fields in the core. Furthermore, this experiment generated significant dissolved H2 concentrations, while simulating open system dynamics. Thus, the experimental data provide insight on mass transfer processes in open geochemical systems, which effectively prevent highly elevated H2 concentrations due to continual loss. We speculate that this process is responsible for stabilizing unusually ferric-rich serpentine in nature.

  15. System analysis of bar code laser scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianpu; Chen, Zhaofeng; Lu, Zukang

    1996-10-01

    This paper focuses on realizing the three important aspects of bar code scanner: generating a high quality scanning light beam, acquiring a fairly even distribution characteristic of light collection, achieving a low signal dynamic range over a large depth of field. To do this, we analyze the spatial distribution and propagation characteristics of scanning laser beam, the vignetting characteristic of optical collection system and their respective optimal design; propose a novel optical automatic gain control method to attain a constant collection over a large working depth.

  16. Bar Mode Instability in Gravitational Collapsing Cloud Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanawa, T.

    1999-12-01

    We discuss dynamical collapse of a dense core with emphasis on the bar mode instability. Recent numerical simulations show that a dynamically collapsing core changes its form from sphere through disk to filament. The filament is much longer than the Jeans length and likely to be unstable against fragmentation. We discuss the mechanism of filament formation on the basis of linear stability analysis. According to our analysis, a dynamically collapsing gas sphere is unstable against the bar mode, i.e., a non-spherical density perturbation proportional to, Y 2 m(θ,ϕ) . The filament formation is due to the bar mode instability. The bar mode grows with the time, t , in proportion to ěrt t - t 0 ěrt -σ while the central density increases in proportion to (t - t 0 ) -2 . When the collapse is isothermal, the growth rate is σ = 0.354 . The growth rate is larger when the sound speed decreases with the increase in the density. This bar mode instability may lead to fragmentation in a core and may be related to binary formation.

  17. Processing, Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation of Heterogeneous Materials (Aluminum-Tungsten Composites and Aluminum-Nickel Laminates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Po-Hsun

    Two types of heterogeneous reactive materials, Aluminum-Tungsten composites and Aluminum-Nickel laminates were investigated. The current interest in these materials is their ability to combine the high strength and energy output under critical condition of the mechanical deformation which may include their fragmentation. Mesoscale properties of reactive materials are very important for the generation of local hot spots to ignite reactions and generate critical size of debris suitable for fast oxidation kinetics. Samples with different mesostructures (e.g., coarse vs. fine W particles, bonded vs. non-bonded Al particles, W particles vs. W wires and concentric vs. corrugated Al-Ni laminates) were prepared by Cold Isostatic Pressing, Hot Isostatic Pressing and Swaging. Several dynamic tests were utilized including Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, Drop Weight Test, Explosively Driven Fragmentation Test, and Thick-Walled Cylinder Method. A high speed camera was used to record images of the in situ behavior of materials under dynamic loading. Pre- and post-experiment analyses and characterization were done using Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Powder Diffraction, and Laser Diffraction. The numerical simulations were conducted to monitor the in situ dynamic behavior of materials and elucidate the mesoscale mechanisms of the plastic strain accommodation under high-strain, high-strain-rate conditions in investigated heterogeneous m aterials. Several interesting results should be specifically mentioned. They include observation that the fracture and dynamic properties of the Al-W composites are sensitive to porosity of samples, particles sizes of rigid inclusions (W particles or wires), and bonding strength between Al particles in the matrix. Soft Al particles were heavily deformed between the rigid W particles/wires during dynamic tests. Three plastic strain accommodation mechanisms are observed in Al-Ni laminates. They depend on the initial

  18. Swinging around the high bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiley, M. J.; Yeadon, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    The motion of a gymnast around the high bar is modelled first as swinging around a rigid rod then more accurately when the rod is considered to be elastic. How the gymnast should best move his hips is also considered.

  19. Property Control through Bar Coding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingma, Gerben J.

    1984-01-01

    A public utility company uses laser wands to read bar-coded labels on furniture and equipment. The system allows an 80 percent savings of the time required to create reports for inventory control. (MLF)

  20. Triple bar, high efficiency mechanical sealer

    DOEpatents

    Pak, Donald J.; Hawkins, Samantha A.; Young, John E.

    2013-03-19

    A clamp with a bottom clamp bar that has a planar upper surface is provided. The clamp may also include a top clamp bar connected to the bottom clamp bar, and a pressure distribution bar between the top clamp bar and the bottom clamp bar. The pressure distribution bar may have a planar lower surface in facing relation to the upper surface of the bottom clamp bar. An object is capable of being disposed in a clamping region between the upper surface and the lower surface. The width of the planar lower surface may be less than the width of the upper surface within the clamping region. Also, the pressure distribution bar may be capable of being urged away from the top clamp bar and towards the bottom clamp bar.

  1. BAR FORMATION FROM GALAXY FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Meagan; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybys—fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos—are surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities ≳ 0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ∼5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with interactions than previously thought.

  2. Maximal dismounts from high bar.

    PubMed

    Hiley, Michael J; Yeadon, Maurice R

    2005-11-01

    In men's artistic gymnastics the triple straight somersault dismount from the high bar has yet to be performed in competition. The present study used a simulation model of a gymnast and the high bar apparatus (J. Appl. Biomech. 19(2003a) 119) to determine whether a gymnast could produce the required angular momentum and flight to complete a triple straight somersault dismount. Optimisations were carried out to maximise the margin for error in timing the bar release for a given number of straight somersaults in flight. The amount of rotation potential (number of straight somersaults) the model could produce whilst maintaining a realistic margin for error was determined. A simulation model of aerial movement (J. Biomech.23 (1990) 85) was used to find what would be possible with this amount of rotation potential. The model was able to produce sufficient angular momentum and time in the air to complete a triple straight somersault dismount. The margin for error when releasing the bar using the optimum technique was 28 ms, which is small when compared with the mean margin for error determined for high bar finalists at the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games (55 ms). Although the triple straight somersault dismount is theoretically possible, it would require close to maximum effort and precise timing of the release from the bar. However, when the model was required to have a realistic margin for error, it was able to produce sufficient angular momentum for a double twisting triple somersault dismount. PMID:16154409

  3. Bar Formation from Galaxy Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2016-05-01

    Both simulations and observations reveal that flybys—fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos—are surprisingly common, comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar; bars form in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities >0.5, sizes on the order of the scale length of the disk, and persist to the end of our simulations, ~5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with flyby interactions than previously thought.

  4. Hercules and Wolf 630 stellar streams and galactic bar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobylev, V. V.; Bajkova, A. T.

    2016-04-01

    We have identified the four most significant features in the UV velocity distribution of solarneighborhood stars: H1, H2 in the Hercules stream and W1, W2 in the Wolf 630 stream. We have formulated the problemof determining several characteristics of the centralGalactic bar independently from each of the identified features by assuming that the Hercules and Wolf 630 streams are of a bar-induced dynamical nature. The problem has been solved by constructing 2: 1 resonant orbits in the rotating bar frame for each star in these streams. Analysis of the resonant orbits found has shown that the bar pattern speed is 45-55 km s-1 kpc-1, while the bar angle lies within the range 40°-60°. The results obtained are consistent with the view that the Hercules andWolf 630 streams could be formed by a long-term influence of the Galactic bar leading to a characteristic bimodal splitting of the UV velocity plane.

  5. Low energy [bar p] physics at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hsueh, S.Y.

    1992-12-01

    The charmonium formation experiment is the only low energy [bar p] experiment at FNAL. This paper describes the performance of the Fermilab [bar p] Accumulator during fixed target run for the experiment and the planned upgrades. We also discuss the proposal for the direct CP violation search in [bar p] + p [yields] [bar [Lambda

  6. The statistics and kinematics of transverse sand bars on an open coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konicki, K.M.; Holman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Ten years (1987-1996) of time exposure video images of the nearshore region at Duck, NC were used to study transverse sand bars, bathymetric features of intermediate length scales (10-200 m) oriented oblique or perpendicular to the shoreline. These transverse sand bars extend seaward from both the shoreline (trough transverse bars) and the shore-parallel sand bar (offshore transverse bars). Transverse bars had not previously been observed in an energetic Coastal environment such as that at Duck, and their dynamics and role in nearshore processes is unknown. Frequency of occurrence statistics and length scales of the transverse bars were calculated using the video images. Trough and offshore transverse bars appeared a mean of 39 and 73 days per year, respectively. The offshore bars were found to be much larger features than the trough bars, with mean wavelengths (alongshore spacing between consecutive crests) of 79 and 172 m for trough and offshore bars, respectively. Both the trough and offshore bars were found to persist for periods of days to months. The alongshore movement of the bars was measured and compared to estimates of surf zone longshore currents which were calculated from wave height and wave angle data. Both sets of bars were observed to move at rates up to 40 m/day. At times, both trough and offshore bars were observed shifting in the same direction as the current was flowing, and at other times, both sets of bars remained stationary, even under relatively strong longshore currents. Trough bars were also observed moving against the current. An hypothesis, proposed by Barcilon and Lau (1973) [J. Geophys. Res. 78(15): 2656-2664], that the transverse bars were created as a sea bed instability under longshore currents, was tested by comparing the magnitude of estimated surf zone longshore currents with times of formation or presence of transverse bars. There was no evidence to suggest that the bars were formed by this simple longshore current instability

  7. Electrical response of carbon nanotube reinforced nanocomposites under static and dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeder, Nicholas J.

    The electrical response of multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced epoxy nanocomposites under quasi-static and dynamic compressive loading is experimentally investigated. The objective of this project was to study the electrical response of CNT-reinforced nanocomposites under mechanical loading where the carbon nanotubes are used to create an internal sensory network within, capable of detecting important information such as strain and damage. Experimental techniques were developed to effectively obtain the bulk resistance change of the nanocomposite material while subjected to quasi-static and dynamic loading. A combination of shear mixing and ultrasonication was used to fabricate the low resistance nanocomposite material. The fabrication process parameters and the optimum weight fraction of MWCNTs for generating a well-dispersed percolation network were first determined. A screw-driven testing machine, a drop weight tower, and a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) apparatus were utilized to load the specimens. Absolute resistance values were measured with a high-resolution four-point probe method for both quasi-static and dynamic loading. In addition to measuring the percentage change in electrical resistance, real-time damage was captured using high-speed photography. The real-time damage was correlated to both load and percentage change in resistance profiles to better understand the electrical behavior of CNT reinforced nanocomposites under mechanical loading. The experimental findings indicate that the bulk electrical resistance of the nanocomposites, under both quasi-static and drop weight loading conditions, initially decreased between 40%--60% during compression and then increased as damage initiated and propagated. Similarly, a 65%--85% decrease in resistance was observed when the nanocomposites were subjected to SHPB loading. Damage initiation and propagation was also captured by the resistance measurements owing to the ability of the CNTs to be

  8. Modulation transfer function of bar code scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Milster, Tom D.

    1998-09-01

    Bar code scanners are ubiquitous in supermarkets. As a bar code is passed over a scanner, a laser beam scans across the bar code. The scattered light is modulated by the reflectivity of the bars and spaces of the bar code. The bar code scanning process can be described as a 1D convolution of the scanning laser profile and the bar code reflectivity function. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of bar code scanning is the Fourier transform of the marginal profile of the laser beam. The properties of the MTF of bar code scanning is similar to that of an incoherent imaging system. Measurements of the MTF of bar code scanning at one focus position are presented. The experimental results are then discussed.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Barred Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W.-T.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic fields are pervasive in barred galaxies, especially in gaseous substructures such as dust lanes and nuclear rings. To explore the effects of magnetic fields on the formation of the substructures as well as on the mass inflow rates to the galaxy center, we run two-dimensional, ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We use a modified version of the Athena code whose numerical magnetic diffusivity is shown to be of third order in space. In the bar regions, magnetic fields are compressed and abruptly bent around the dust-lane shocks. The associated magnetic stress not only reduces the peak density of the dust-lane shocks but also removes angular momentum further from the gas that is moving radially in. Nuclear rings that form at the location of centrifugal barrier rather than resonance with the bar are smaller and more radially distributed, and the mass flow rate to the galaxy center is correspondingly larger in models with stronger magnetic fields. Outside the bar regions, the bar potential and strong shear conspire to amplify the field strength near the corotation resonance. The amplified fields transport angular momentum outward, producing trailing magnetic arms with strong fields and low density. The base of the magnetic arms are found to be unstable to a tearing-mode instability of magnetic reconnection. This produces numerous magnetic islands that eventually make the outer regions highly chaotic.

  10. Novel experimental methods for investigating high speed friction of titanium-aluminum-vanadium/tool steel interface and dynamic failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Mohammad Abdulaziz

    effects the sliding resistance of the interface. The experimental results deduced from the response of the sliding interface to step changes in normal pressure and the applied shear stress reinforce the importance of including frictional memory in the development of rate dependent state variable friction models. The second part of the thesis presents an investigation into the dynamic deformation and failure of extrinsically toughened DRA composites. Experiments were conducted using the split Hopkinson pressure bar to investigate the deformation and flow behavior under dynamic compression loading. A modified Hopkinson bar apparatus was used to explore the dynamic fracture behavior of three different extrinsically toughened DRA composites. The study was paralleled by systematic exploration of the failure modes in each composite. For all the composites evaluated the dynamic crack propagation characteristics of the composites are observed to be strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the ductile phase reinforcement in the composite, the yield stress of the ductile phase reinforcement, the micro-structural arrangement of the ductile phase reinforcements with respect to the notch, and the impact velocity employed in the particular experiment.

  11. Galaxy Zoo: AGN may be fueled by stellar bars in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melanie; Willett, Kyle; Fortson, Lucy; Galaxy Zoo Science Team

    2015-01-01

    Bars are a mechanism that have been proposed to explain how gas in the outer regions of a galaxy can be channeled inward and fuel AGN. Multiple observational studies have reported a significantly higher bar fraction in AGN than non-AGN. To accurately probe whether an excess of bars in AGN host galaxies exists because the galaxies host a bar, it is necessary to compare bar and AGN fractions at fixed mass and color, because the presence of bars strongly correlates with both. Thus, a sufficiently large sample is necessary to maintain adequate numbers in subsets of fixed mass and color. We have created a large, volume-limited sample of 19,765 disc galaxies using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By using morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we identify stellar bars in 51.8% of AGN hosts and 37.1% of star-forming disk galaxies. Once mass and color are fixed, there remains a statistically significant increase in the fraction of barred AGN over their unbarred counterparts. Using the L[O III]/MBH ratio as a measure of accretion efficiency, we also show that barred AGN do not exhibit stronger accretion than unbarred AGN at fixed mass or color. The data are consistent with a model in which bar-driven fueling does contribute to the probability of an actively growing black hole, but in which other dynamical mechanisms must contribute to AGN fueling via smaller, non-axisymmetric perturbations.

  12. Universal precision sine bar attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to an attachment for a sine bar which can be used to perform measurements during lathe operations or other types of machining operations. The attachment can be used for setting precision angles on vises, dividing heads, rotary tables and angle plates. It can also be used in the inspection of machined parts, when close tolerances are required, and in the layout of precision hardware. The novelty of the invention is believed to reside in a specific versatile sine bar attachment for measuring a variety of angles on a number of different types of equipment.

  13. BARS/SSC/SPHINX. BARS Bibliographic Data Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.

    1993-06-06

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shock compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  14. BARS/SSC/SPHINX. BARS Bibliographic Data Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.

    1993-05-01

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shock compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  15. Photometric Surveys of the Galactic Bulge and Long Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, O.; Wegg, C.; Portail, M.

    The Galactic bar and box/peanut bulge can be studied in an unrivaled manner, star-by-star, with detailed chemical information and full 3D kinematics. Because of intervening dust this is greatly facilitated by the availability of wide field deep NIR photometric surveys. Here we summarize recent results on the three-dimensional structure of the bulge and the long bar region, based on 2MASS, UKIDSS, and particularly the ongoing VVV survey. We also summarize results from dynamical models for the Galactic bulge constructed with the Made-to-Measure method.

  16. Development of an active boring bar for increased chatter immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Redmond, J.; Barney, P.; Smith, D.

    1997-03-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a prototype boring bar featuring active vibration control for increased chatter immunity is described. The significance of active damping both normal and tangential to the workpiece surface is evaluated, indicating the need for two axis control to ensure adequate performance over expected variations in tool mounting procedures. The prototype tool features a commercially available boring bar modified to accommodate four PZT stack actuators for two axis bending control. Measured closed-loop dynamics are combined with a computer model of the boring process to simulate increased metal removal rate and improved workpiece surface finish through active control.

  17. Bar-spheroid interaction in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Weinberg, Martin D.

    1992-01-01

    N-body simulation and linear analysis is employed to investigate the secular evolution of barred galaxies, with emphasis on the interaction between bars and spheroidal components of galaxies. This interaction is argued to drive secular transfer of angular momentum from bars to spheroids, primarily through resonant coupling. A moderately strong bar, having mass within corotation about 0.3 times the enclosed spheroid mass, is predicted to shed all its angular momentum typically in less than about 10 exp 9 yr. Even shorter depletion time scales are found for relatively more massive bars. It is suggested either that spheroids around barred galaxies are structured so as to inhibit strong coupling with bars, or that bars can form by unknown processes long after disks are established. The present models reinforce the notion that bars can drive secular evolution in galaxies.

  18. The Myth-Making Function of the Rhetoric of the American Revolution: Francis Hopkinson as a Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Kurt W.

    The author suggests a critical approach to the rhetoric of the American Revolution focusing on the concept of "myth-making. This operates in revolutionary rhetoric when the revolutionist creates a spiritual dynamism for his movement through appeals that suggest the sanction of supra-rational forces. The author applies this concept to the…

  19. Demographic response of northern spotted owls to barred owl removal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diller, V. Lowell; Hamm, Keith A; Early, Desiree A; Lamphear, David W; Katie Dugger; Yackulic, Charles B.; Schwarz, Carl J.; Carlson, Peter C.; McDonald, Trent L.

    2016-01-01

    Federally listed as threatened in 1990 primarily because of habitat loss, the northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) has continued to decline despite conservation efforts resulting in forested habitat being reserved throughout its range. Recently, there is growing evidence the congeneric invasive barred owl (Strix varia) may be responsible for the continued decline primarily by excluding spotted owls from their preferred habitat. We used a long-term demographic study for spotted owls in coastal northern California as the basis for a pilot barred owl removal experiment. Our demography study used capture–recapture, reproductive output, and territory occupancy data collected from 1990 to 2013 to evaluate trends in vital rates and populations. We used a classic before-after-control-impact (BACI) experimental design to investigate the demographic response of northern spotted owls to the lethal removal of barred owls. According to the best 2-species dynamic occupancy model, there was no evidence of differences in barred or northern spotted owl occupancy prior to the initiation of the treatment (barred owl removal). After treatment, barred owl occupancy was lower in the treated relative to the untreated areas and spotted owl occupancy was higher relative to the untreated areas. Barred owl removal decreased spotted owl territory extinction rates but did not affect territory colonization rates. As a result, spotted owl occupancy increased in the treated area and continued to decline in the untreated areas. Prior to and after barred owl removal, there was no evidence that average fecundity differed on the 2 study areas. However, the greater number of occupied spotted owl sites on the treated areas resulted in greater productivity in the treated areas based on empirical counts of fledged young. Prior to removal, survival was declining at a rate of approximately 0.2% per year for treated and untreated areas. Following treatment, estimated survival was 0.859 for

  20. Swinging around the High Bar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiley, M. J.; Yeadon, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    Models the motion of a gymnast around the high bar first as swinging around a rigid rod, then more accurately when the rod is considered to be elastic. Also considers how the gymnast should best move his hips. (Author/ASK)

  1. Dynamical properties measurements for asteroid, comet and meteorite material applicable to impact modeling and mitigation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Boslough, M.B.; Gray, G.T. III; Remo, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We describe methods for measuring dynamical properties for two material categories of interest in understanding large-scale extraterrestrial impacts: iron-nickel and underdense materials (e.g. snow). Particular material properties measured by the present methods include Hugoniot release paths and constitutive properties (stress vs. strain). The iron-nickel materials lend themselves well to conventional shock and quasi-static experiments. As examples, a suite of experiments is described including six impact tests (wave profile compression/release) over the stress range 2--20 GPa, metallography, quasi-static and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) mechanical testing, and ultrasonic mapping and sound velocity measurements. Temperature sensitivity of the dynamic behavior was measured at high and low strain rates. Among the iron-nickel materials tested, an octahedrite was found to have behavior close to that of Armco iron under shock and quasi-static conditions, while an ataxite exhibited a significantly larger quasi-static yield strength than did the octahedrite or a hexahedrite. The underdense materials pose three primary experimental difficulties. First, the samples are friable; they can melt or sublimate during storage, preparation and testing. Second, they are brittle and crushable; they cannot withstand such treatment as traditional machining or launch in a gun system. Third, with increasing porosity the calculated Hugoniot density becomes rapidly more sensitive to errors in wave time-of-arrival measurements. Carefully chosen simulants eliminate preservation (friability) difficulties, but the other difficulties remain. A family of 36 impact tests was conducted on snow and snow simulants at Sandia, yielding reliable Hugoniot and reshock states, but limited release property information. Other methods for characterizing these materials are discussed.

  2. Dynamic testing of old and young baboon cortical bone with numerical validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocron, S.; Nicolella, D.; Nicholls, A. E.; Bredbenner, T.; Havill, L.

    2012-08-01

    Cortical bone tensile mechanical properties at quasistatic and high rates (˜300s-1) were determined ex vivo using the right femurs of 12 female baboons, (Papio hamadryas spp.) from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute/Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio, Texas. The animals were divided into two age groups: a young age group (6.63 ± 0.6 years) and an old age group (26.96 ± 1.3 years). Seven specimens per group were monotonically loaded to failure to determine their mechanical properties. The quasistatic strength of the bone for the old group was just a little (but not significantly) lower than the young group. High strain rate tests performed with the Hopkinson bar indicate that baboon bone from the older group was significantly weaker under impact loads than that from the younger group. This observation is particularly important due to the similarities between baboon and human bone tissue. Typical strain rates for these tests ranged from 130s-1 to 250s-1. A full-size 3-D simulation of the Hopkinson bar test was performed to confirm that the bone specimen was under stress equilibrium and to evaluate the consistency of the modulus and strength inferred from the tests. Simulations were performed in which the modulus, strength and failure strain were varied to see the sensitivity of the results. Additionally, simplified simulations were performed to estimate the strain rate environment of a femur during a fall at an impact velocity of 5 m/s, similar to a free fall velocity from a height of 1.3 meters. The simulations confirm that strain rates obtained in the Hopkinson bar are relevant because they are similar to those expected inr such a fall.

  3. Intertidal finger bars at El Puntal, Bay of Santander, Spain: observation and forcing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellón, E.; Garnier, R.; Medina, R.

    2013-11-01

    A system of 15 small-scale finger bars has been observed, by using video imagery, between 23 June 2008 and 2 June 2010. The bar system is located in the intertidal zone of the swell-protected beaches of El Puntal Spit, in the Bay of Santander (Northern coast of Spain). It appears on a planar beach (slope = 1.5%) with fine uniform sand (D50 = 0 .27 mm) and extends 600 m alongshore. The cross-shore span of the bars is determined by the tidal horizontal excursion (between 70 and 130 m). They have an oblique orientation with respect to the low-tide shoreline being up-current oriented with respect to the ebb-flow (mean angle of 26° from the shore normal). Their mean wavelength is 26 m and their amplitude varies between 10 and 20 cm. The full system slowly migrates to the east (opposite to the ebb-flow) with a mean speed of 0.06 m day-1, a maximum speed in winter (up to 0.15 m day-1) and a minimum speed in summer. An episode of merging has been identified as bars with larger wavelength seem to migrate slower than shorter bars. Several forcings can act on the bar dynamics being the wind, blowing predominantly from the west, the main candidate to explain the eastward migration of the system. In particular, the wind can generate waves of up to 20 cm (root-mean-squared wave height) over a fetch that can reach 4.5 km at high tide. The astronomical tide seems to be important in the bar dynamics, as the tidal range conditions the mean (daily) fetch and also the time of exposure of the bars to the marine dynamics. Furthermore, the river discharges could act as input of suspended sediment in the bar system and play a role in the bar dynamics.

  4. Adventures of a tidally induced bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łokas, E. L.; Athanassoula, E.; Debattista, V. P.; Valluri, M.; Pino, A. del; Semczuk, M.; Gajda, G.; Kowalczyk, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the properties of a bar induced in a discy dwarf galaxy as a result of tidal interaction with the Milky Way. The bar forms at the first pericentre passage and survives until the end of the evolution at 10 Gyr. Fourier decomposition of the bar reveals that only even modes are significant and preserve a hierarchy so that the bar mode is always the strongest. They show a characteristic profile with a maximum, similar to simulated bars forming in isolated galaxies and observed bars in real galaxies. We adopt the maximum of the bar mode as a measure of the bar strength and we estimate the bar length by comparing the density profiles along the bar and perpendicular to it. The bar strength and the bar length decrease with time, mainly at pericentres, as a result of tidal torques acting at those times and not to secular evolution. The pattern speed of the bar varies significantly on a time-scale of 1 Gyr and is controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the Milky Way. The bar is never tidally locked, but we discover a hint of a 5/2 orbital resonance between the third and fourth pericentre passage. The speed of the bar decreases in the long run so that the bar changes from initially rather fast to slow in the later stages. The boxy/peanut shape is present for some time and its occurrence is preceded by a short period of buckling instability.

  5. Hierarchical tapered bar elements undergoing axial deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, N.; Thampi, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described to model the dynamics of tapered axial bars of various cross sections based on the well-known Craig/Bampton component mode synthesis technique. This element is formed in terms of the static constraint modes and interface restrained normal modes. This is in contrast with the finite elements as implemented in NASTRAN where the interface restrained normal modes are neglected. These normal modes are in terms of Bessel functions. Restoration of a few of these modes leads to higher accuracy with fewer generalized coordinates. The proposed models are hierarchical so that all lower order element matrices are embedded in higher order element matrices. The advantages of this formulation compared to standard NASTRAN truss element formulation are demonstrated through simple numerical examples.

  6. Formation of membrane ridges and scallops by the F-BAR protein Nervous Wreck

    PubMed Central

    Becalska, Agata N.; Kelley, Charlotte F.; Berciu, Cristina; Stanishneva-Konovalova, Tatiana B.; Fu, Xiaofeng; Wang, ShiYu; Sokolova, Olga S.; Nicastro, Daniela; Rodal, Avital A.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells are defined by extensive intracellular compartmentalization, which requires dynamic membrane remodeling. FER/Cip4 homology-Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) domain family proteins form crescent-shaped dimers, which can bend membranes into buds and tubules of defined geometry and lipid composition. However, these proteins exhibit an unexplained wide diversity of membrane-deforming activities in vitro and functions in vivo. We find that the F-BAR domain of the neuronal protein Nervous Wreck (Nwk) has a novel higher-order structure and membrane-deforming activity that distinguishes it from previously described F-BAR proteins. The Nwk F-BAR domain assembles into zigzags, creating ridges and periodic scallops on membranes in vitro. This activity depends on structural determinants at the tips of the F-BAR dimer and on electrostatic interactions of the membrane with the F-BAR concave surface. In cells, Nwk-induced scallops can be extended by cytoskeletal forces to produce protrusions at the plasma membrane. Our results define a new F-BAR membrane-deforming activity and illustrate a molecular mechanism by which positively curved F-BAR domains can produce a variety of membrane curvatures. These findings expand the repertoire of F-BAR domain mediated membrane deformation and suggest that unique modes of higher-order assembly can define how these proteins sculpt the membrane. PMID:23761074

  7. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  8. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  9. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  10. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  11. 49 CFR 236.705 - Bar, locking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bar, locking. 236.705 Section 236.705..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.705 Bar, locking. A bar in an interlocking machine to which the locking dogs are attached....

  12. ARL Explosive Blast Bar Gauge Response Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Gerrit; Boyle, Vincent; Benjamin, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Simulations allow us to optimize the design of a bar gauge. The incident blast wave imparts a wave that travels down the metal bar. Strain gauges positioned along the bar measure the strain produced by the bar wave, allowing determination of pressure and impulse at the bar face. The measured pressure history depends on the arrangement of the bar gauge. If a large metal plate surrounds the bar face, a reflected blast pressure is measured. If a metal fixture that forms a nozzle surrounds the bar face, the initial pressure will be the same as above. In time, release waves emanating from the nozzle edge will decrease the pressure at the bar face. The bar diameter and size of strain gauges control the time response or gauge bandwidth. CTH hydrocode simulations allow optimization of bar gauge features for various size explosive charges. The simulations predicted the response of the metal plate arrangement to a blast from a spherical composition C4 charge. The simulations predicted the proper metal plate diameter for a reflected pressure measurement. Other simulations compared the response of the bar gauge for both configurations (nozzle or plate surround) when subjected to the same blast loading. Pressure histories from simulations were compared to those from experiment and those predicted by the CONWEP blast code. The initial experimental and CONWEP pressures were in reasonable agreement.

  13. Intertidal finger bars at El Puntal, Bay of Santander, Spain: observation and forcing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellón, E.; Garnier, R.; Medina, R.

    2014-06-01

    A system of 15 small-scale finger bars has been observed, by using video imagery, between 23 June 2008 and 2 June 2010. The bar system is located in the intertidal zone of the swell-protected beaches of El Puntal Spit, in the Bay of Santander (northern coast of Spain). The bars appear on a planar beach (slope = 0.015) with fine, uniform sand (D50 = 0.27 mm) and extend 600 m alongshore. The cross-shore span of the bars is determined by the tidal horizontal excursion (between 70 and 130 m). They have an oblique orientation with respect to the low-tide shoreline; specifically, they are down-current-oriented with respect to the dominant sand transport computed (mean angle of 26° from the shore normal). Their mean wavelength is 26 m and their amplitude varies between 10 and 20 cm. The full system slowly migrates to the east (sand transport direction) with a mean speed of 0.06 m day-1, a maximum speed in winter (up to 0.15 m day-1) and a minimum speed in summer. An episode of merging has been identified as bars with larger wavelength seem to migrate more slowly than shorter bars. The wind blows predominantly from the west, generating waves that transport sediment across the bars during high-tide periods. This is the main candidate to explain the eastward migration of the system. In particular, the wind can generate waves of up to 20 cm (root-mean-squared wave height) over a fetch that can reach 4.5 km at high tide. The astronomical tide seems to be important in the bar dynamics, as the tidal level changes the fetch and also determines the time of exposure of the bars to the surf-zone waves and currents. Furthermore, the river discharge could act as input of suspended sediment in the bar system and play a role in the bar dynamics.

  14. Bar morphodynamics in the tidally-influenced fluvial zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Daniel; Ashworth, Philip; Best, James; Nicholas, Andrew; Prokocki, Eric; Sambrook-Smith, Greg; Keevil, Claire; Sandbach, Steve

    2015-04-01

    The hydrodynamics and deposits of the Tidally-Influenced Fluvial Zone (TIFZ) are complex because it experiences competing fluvial and tidal flows and spatially and temporally variable rates of sediment transport and deposition. This paper presents a new integrated field dataset from the Columbia River Estuary, USA, that quantifies the morphodynamic response the bed morphology and bar stratigraphy to fluvial-tidal flows. A 3-year, field and modelling program that started in 2011, has been monitoring the dynamics and deposits of a 40 km-reach of the Columbia River Estuary. Data obtained so far throughout the TIFZ include: bathymetry using MBES, flow using ADCP, subsurface sedimentology using GPR and shallow coring to 5 m. Initial results from the programme suggest there is a complex spatial and temporal lag in the response of the bed morphology and deposits to the fluvial-tidal flows. Zones of strong ebb and flood flow do not necessarily produce channel beds dominated by bi-directional bedforms. Many mid-channel bars are stable over decadal time periods. This paper will illustrate the variety in bar morphologies and channel change throughout the fluvial-tidal zone and contrast these bar dynamics with examples from purely fluvial environments.

  15. Bar formation as driver of gas inflows in isolated disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanali, R.; Dotti, M.; Fiacconi, D.; Haardt, F.

    2015-12-01

    Stellar bars are a common feature in massive disc galaxies. On a theoretical ground, the response of gas to a bar is generally thought to cause nuclear starbursts and, possibly, AGN activity once the perturbed gas reaches the central supermassive black hole. By means of high-resolution numerical simulations, we detail the purely dynamical effects that a forming bar exerts on the gas of an isolated disc galaxy. The galaxy is initially unstable to the formation of non-axisymmetric structures, and within ˜1 Gyr it develops spiral arms that eventually evolve into a central stellar bar on kpc scale. A first major episode of gas inflow occurs during the formation of the spiral arms while at later times, when the stellar bar is establishing, a low-density region is carved between the bar corotational and inner Lindblad resonance radii. The development of such `dead zone' inhibits further massive gas inflows. Indeed, the gas inflow reaches its maximum during the relatively fast bar-formation phase and not, as often assumed, when the bar is fully formed. We conclude that the low efficiency of long-lived, evolved bars in driving gas towards galactic nuclei is the reason why observational studies have failed to establish an indisputable link between bars and AGNs. On the other hand, the high efficiency in driving strong gas inflows of the intrinsically transient process of bar formation suggests that the importance of bars as drivers of AGN activity in disc galaxies has been overlooked so far. We finally prove that our conclusions are robust against different numerical implementations of the hydrodynamics routinely used in galaxy evolution studies.

  16. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  17. Galaxy Zoo: Observing secular evolution through bars

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Edmond; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Melvin, Thomas; Bell, Eric F.; Lintott, Chris; Schawinski, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A.; Willett, Kyle W.

    2013-12-20

    In this paper, we use the Galaxy Zoo 2 data set to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR) and bulge prominence. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall (strong) bar fraction of 23.6% ± 0.4%, of which 1154 barred galaxies also have bar length (BL) measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in galaxy evolution. We find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anticorrelated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. We find that the trends of bar likelihood and BL with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR. We interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution that include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. We suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks, a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. We interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as being due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies but are a critical evolutionary driver of their host galaxies in the local universe (z < 1).

  18. Bar Coding and Tracking in Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2015-06-01

    Bar coding and specimen tracking are intricately linked to pathology workflow and efficiency. In the pathology laboratory, bar coding facilitates many laboratory practices, including specimen tracking, automation, and quality management. Data obtained from bar coding can be used to identify, locate, standardize, and audit specimens to achieve maximal laboratory efficiency and patient safety. Variables that need to be considered when implementing and maintaining a bar coding and tracking system include assets to be labeled, bar code symbologies, hardware, software, workflow, and laboratory and information technology infrastructure as well as interoperability with the laboratory information system. This article addresses these issues, primarily focusing on surgical pathology. PMID:26065787

  19. DD-bar production and their interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yanrui; Oka, Makoto; Takizawa, Makoto; Liu Xiang

    2011-05-23

    We have explored the bound state problem and the scattering problem of the DD-bar pair in a meson exchange model. When considering their production in the e{sup +}e{sup -} process, we included the DD-bar rescattering effect. Although it is difficult to answer whether the S-wave DD-bar bound state exists or not from the binding energies and the phase shifts, one may get an upper limit of the binding energy from the production of the BB-bar, the bottom analog of DD-bar.

  20. Bar Coding and Tracking in Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Matthew G; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-03-01

    Bar coding and specimen tracking are intricately linked to pathology workflow and efficiency. In the pathology laboratory, bar coding facilitates many laboratory practices, including specimen tracking, automation, and quality management. Data obtained from bar coding can be used to identify, locate, standardize, and audit specimens to achieve maximal laboratory efficiency and patient safety. Variables that need to be considered when implementing and maintaining a bar coding and tracking system include assets to be labeled, bar code symbologies, hardware, software, workflow, and laboratory and information technology infrastructure as well as interoperability with the laboratory information system. This article addresses these issues, primarily focusing on surgical pathology. PMID:26851661

  1. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Edmond; Athanassoula, L.; Masters, K.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Zoo, Galaxy

    2014-01-01

    In this talk, I use the Galaxy Zoo 2 dataset to study the behavior of bars in disk galaxies as a function of specific star formation rate (SSFR), and inner galactic structure, i.e., the prominence of the bulge as parameterized by Sérsic index and central surface stellar mass density. Our sample consists of 13,295 disk galaxies, with an overall bar fraction of 23.6 ± 0.4%, of which 1,154 barred galaxies also have bar length measurements. These samples are the largest ever used to study the role of bars in disk galaxy evolution. I find that the likelihood of a galaxy hosting a bar is anti-correlated with SSFR, regardless of stellar mass or bulge prominence. I find that the trends of bar likelihood with bulge prominence are bimodal with SSFR, i.e., in star-forming galaxies, bulges are more prominent in galaxies more likely to host bars, while in quiescent disk galaxies, bars are less frequent where there are prominent bulges. Our observations of bar length reveal a complex picture. In star-forming disks, longer bars are found where the bulges are more prominent, while in quiescent disks there is a maximum in the average bar length as a function of bulge prominence. I interpret these observations using state-of-the-art simulations of bar evolution which include live halos and the effects of gas and star formation. I suggest our observed trends of bar likelihood with SSFR are driven by the gas fraction of the disks; a factor demonstrated to significantly retard both bar formation and evolution in models. I interpret the bimodal relationship between bulge prominence and bar properties as due to the complicated effects of classical bulges and central mass concentrations on bar evolution, and also to the growth of disky pseudobulges by bar evolution. These results represent empirical evidence for secular evolution driven by bars in disk galaxies. This work suggests that bars are not stagnant structures within disk galaxies, but are a critical evolutionary driver of their

  2. In-Axis and Cross-Axid Accelerometer Response in Shock Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1999-03-10

    The characteristics of a piezoresistive accelerometer in shock environments have been studied at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the Mechanical Shock Testing Laboratory for ten years The SNL Shock Laboratory has developed a capability to characterize accelerometers and other transducers with shocks aligned with the transducer's sensing axis and perpendicular to the transducer's sensing axis. This unique capability includes Hopkinson bars made of aluminum, steel, titanium, and beryllium. The bars are configured as both single and split Hopkinson bars. Four different areas that conclude this study are summarized in this paper: characterization of the cross-axis response of the accelerometer in the four environments of static compression, static strain on a beam, dynamic strain, and mechanical shock, the accelerometer's response on a titanium Hopkinson bar with two 45{degree} flats on the end of the bar; failure analysis of the accelerometer; and measurement of the accelerometer's self-generating cable response in a shock environment.

  3. Origin of the high vlos feature in the Galactic bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumer, Michael; Schönrich, Ralph

    2015-12-01

    We analyse a controlled N-body+smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of a growing disc galaxy within a non-growing, live dark halo. The disc is continuously fed with gas and star particles on near-circular orbits and develops a bar comparable in size to the one of the Milky Way (MW). We extract line-of-sight velocity vlos distributions from the model and compare it to data recently obtained from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey which show distinct high-velocity features around vlos ˜ 200 km s-1. With an APOGEE-like selection function, but without any scaling nor adjustment, we find vlos distributions very similar to those in APOGEE. The stars that make up the high vlos features at positive longitudes l are preferentially young bar stars (age τ ≲ 2-3 Gyr) which move away from us along the rear side of the bar. At negative l, we find the corresponding low vlos feature from stars moving towards us. At l > 10 deg, the highest vlos stars are a mixture of bar and background disc stars which complicates the interpretation of observations. The main peak in vlos is dominated by fore- and background stars. At a given time, ˜40-50 per cent of high vlos stars occupy x1-like orbits, but a significant fraction are on more complex orbits. The observed feature is likely due to a population of dynamically cool, young stars formed from gas just outside the bar and subsequently captured by the growing bar. The high vlos features disappear at high latitudes |b| ≳ 2 deg which explains the non-detection of such features in other surveys.

  4. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, I.; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the bar, estimating that the bar pattern speed is Ωb/Ω0=1.87+/-0.04, where Ω0 is the local circular frequency, and the bar angle lies within 20deg<=φ0<=45deg. We find that the Galactic bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than ~2 km s-1 kpc-1 for the hot stars.

  5. New Constraints on the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchev, Ivan; Nordhaus, J.; Quillen, A. C.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work has related the Galactic Bar to structure in the local stellar velocity distribution. Here we show that the Bar also influences the spatial gradients of the velocity vector via the Oort constants. By numerical integration of test-particles we simulate measurements of the Oort C-value in a gravitational potential including the Galactic Bar. We account for the observed trend that C is increasingly negative for stars with higher velocity dispersion. By comparing measurements of C with our simulations we improve on previous models of the Bar, estimating that the Bar pattern speed is Omega_b/Omega_0=1.87\\pm0.04, where Omega_0 is the local circular frequency, and the Bar angle lies within 20Bar affects measurements of the Oort constants A and B less than 2 km/s/kpc for the hot stars.

  6. Improved Kolsky-bar design for mechanical characterization of materials at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Connelly, Kevin; Korellis, John; Lu, Wei-Yang; Antoun, Bonnie R.

    2009-11-01

    A Kolsky apparatus with numerous modifications has been designed for mechanical characterization of materials at high strain rates. These modifications include employing a highly precise optical table, pillow blocks with Frelon®-coated linear bearings as bar supports and a laser system for better precision bar alignment, etc. In addition, the striker bars were coated with Teflon® to minimize the friction with the gun barrel after removal of the conventional plastic sabots. This new design significantly simplifies the alignment process, improving the final alignment and calibration in the bar system; both are critical for validity and accuracy of the resulting data. An example of a dynamic experiment on a 6061 aluminum specimen by using this newly designed Kolsky bar is also presented.

  7. The ({h_bar}/2{pi}) expansion in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hoyer, Paul

    2011-02-15

    We show how expansions in powers of Planck's constant ({h_bar}/2{pi})=h/2{pi} can give new insights into perturbative and nonperturbative properties of quantum field theories. Since ({h_bar}/2{pi}) is a fundamental parameter, exact Lorentz invariance and gauge invariance are maintained at each order of the expansion. The physics of the ({h_bar}/2{pi}) expansion depends on the scheme; i.e., different expansions are obtained depending on which quantities (momenta, couplings, and masses) are assumed to be independent of ({h_bar}/2{pi}). We show that if the coupling and mass parameters appearing in the Lagrangian density are taken to be independent of ({h_bar}/2{pi}), then each loop in perturbation theory brings a factor of ({h_bar}/2{pi}). In the case of quantum electrodynamics, this scheme implies that the classical charge e, as well as the fine structure constant are linear in ({h_bar}/2{pi}). The connection between the number of loops and factors of ({h_bar}/2{pi}) is more subtle for bound states since the binding energies and bound-state momenta themselves scale with ({h_bar}/2{pi}). The ({h_bar}/2{pi}) expansion allows one to identify equal-time relativistic bound states in QED and QCD which are of lowest order in ({h_bar}/2{pi}) and transform dynamically under Lorentz boosts. The possibility to use retarded propagators at the Born level gives valencelike wave functions which implicitly describe the sea constituents of the bound states normally present in its Fock state representation.

  8. Galaxy Zoo: Observing Secular Evolution Through Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, E.; Athanassoula, E.; Masters, K. L.; Nichol, R. C.; Bosma, A.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Koo, D. C.; Lintott, C.; Melvin, T.; Schawinski, K.; Skibba, R. A.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    Although often seen in galaxies, the role that bars play in galaxy evolution has been largely overlooked. Observations show that bars — stellar linear-shaped structures — have been present in galaxies since z ˜ 1, about 8 billion years ago, and that more and more galaxies are becoming barred with time. This trend has continued to the present, where about two-thirds of all disk galaxies are barred. Observations have also shown that there is a connection between the presence of a bar and the properties of a galaxy, including morphology, star formation, chemical abundance gradients, and nuclear activity. These trends are consistent with the predicted effects of bars on galaxy evolution, i.e., secular evolution. Thus, observations and simulations indicate that bars are important drivers of galaxy evolution. But despite these evidence, bars are still commonly omitted in the lore of galaxy evolution. This proceeding briefly highlights work by Cheung et al. (2013), which tries to change this common omission by presenting the best evidence of bar-driven secular evolution yet. This work implies that bars are not stagnant structures within galaxies, but are instead, critical drivers of galaxy evolution.

  9. Determining the type of orbits in the central regions of barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.; Caranicolas, Nicolaos D.

    2016-02-01

    We use a simple dynamical model which consists of a harmonic oscillator and a spherical component, in order to investigate the regular or chaotic character of orbits in a barred galaxy with a central spherically symmetric nucleus. Our aim is to explore how the basic parameters of the galactic system influence the nature of orbits, by computing in each case the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of different types of regular orbits. We also give emphasis to the types of regular orbits that support either the formation of nuclear rings or the barred structure of the galaxy. We provide evidence that the traditional x1 orbital family does not always dominate in barred galaxy models since we found several other types of resonant orbits which can also support the barred structure. We also found that sparse enough nuclei, fast rotating bars and high energy models can support the galactic bars. On the other hand, weak bars, dense central nuclei, slowly rotating bars and low energy models favor the formation of nuclear rings. We also compare our results with previous related work.

  10. Simulating a slow bar in the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chequers, Matthew H.; Spekkens, Kristine; Widrow, Lawrence M.; Gilhuly, Colleen

    2016-08-01

    We present a disc-halo N-body model of the low surface brightness galaxy UGC 628, one of the few systems that harbours a "slow" bar with a ratio of corotation radius to bar length of mathcal {R} equiv R_c/a_b ˜ 2. We select our initial conditions using SDSS DR10 photometry, a physically motivated radially variable mass-to-light ratio profile, and rotation curve data from the literature. A global bar instability grows in our submaximal disc model, and the disc morphology and dynamics agree broadly with the photometry and kinematics of UGC 628 at times between peak bar strength and the onset of buckling. Prior to bar formation, the disc and halo contribute roughly equally to the potential in the galaxy's inner region, giving the disc enough self gravity for bar modes to grow. After bar formation there is significant mass redistribution, creating a baryon dominated inner and dark matter dominated outer disc. This implies that, unlike most other low surface brightness galaxies, UGC 628 is not dark matter dominated everywhere. Our model nonetheless implies that UGC 628 falls on same the relationship between dark matter fraction and rotation velocity found for high surface brightness galaxies, and lends credence to the argument that the disc mass fraction measured at the location where its contribution to the potential peaks is not a reliable indicator of its dynamical importance at all radii.

  11. Dynamic Response of Monolithic and Laminate/Particulate Reactive Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chung-Ting

    Two dynamic compression methods were applied to a monolithic metal and reactive mixtures to investigate their responses: (a) Dynamic experiments using a split Hopkinson pressure bar were applied to reactive mixtures densified by explosive consolidation in order to establish their mechanical response and failure mechanisms. (b) Laser compression and release, which can impart high stresses, up to hundreds GPa, in times of nanoseconds and fractions thereof, was applied to establish the spalling strength of vanadium and the reaction threshold for Ni/Al laminates. The spallation and fragmentation exhibited by recovered mono- and poly-crystalline vanadium prove that the laser intensities and crystal structure play important roles in determining spall strength, fragmentation, and microstructural processes. Densified reactive mixtures with different microstructures (Ni, Mo, W, Nb and Ta with Al) were subjected to the quasi-static and dynamic strain rates. Two distinct failure mechanisms, axial splitting and shear failure, were observed in the recovered specimens. Axial splitting occurred when the bonding between the powders was poor; shear failure was primarily associated with extensive deformation of continuous Ta and Nb phases. Finite element simulations provided valuable information in interpreting the experimental results and predicting failure mechanisms akin to those observed. Ni/Al laminates were subjected to laser compression. The strain rates varied from 105 to 108 s-1, and the initial stress varied from 30 to ˜300 GPa. It is found the thickness of the lamellar and the interlaminar bonding strength are the two critical factors in determining mechanical failure. The intermetallic reaction leading to Ni3Al and NiAl were produced by the laser energies and laser pulse durations in direct laser shock experiments. Laser-driven compression was also applied to study the high temperature synthesis in nano-scale Ni/Al laminates with bilayer thickness 54 nm. Intermetallic

  12. Optimization of the dynamic behavior of strongly nonlinear heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbold, Eric B.

    New aspects of strongly nonlinear wave and structural phenomena in granular media are developed numerically, theoretically and experimentally. One-dimensional chains of particles and compressed powder composites are the two main types of materials considered here. Typical granular assemblies consist of linearly elastic spheres or layers of masses and effective nonlinear springs in one-dimensional columns for dynamic testing. These materials are highly sensitive to initial and boundary conditions, making them useful for acoustic and shock-mitigating applications. One-dimensional assemblies of spherical particles are examples of strongly nonlinear systems with unique properties. For example, if initially uncompressed, these materials have a sound speed equal to zero (sonic vacuum), supporting strongly nonlinear compression solitary waves with a finite width. Different types of assembled metamaterials will be presented with a discussion of the material's response to static compression. The acoustic diode effect will be presented, which may be useful in shock mitigation applications. Systems with controlled dissipation will also be discussed from an experimental and theoretical standpoint emphasizing the critical viscosity that defines the transition from an oscillatory to monotonous shock profile. The dynamic compression of compressed powder composites may lead to self-organizing mesoscale structures in two and three dimensions. A reactive granular material composed of a compressed mixture of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), tungsten (W) and aluminum (Al) fine-grain powders exhibit this behavior. Quasistatic, Hopkinson bar, and drop-weight experiments show that composite materials with a high porosity and fine metallic particles exhibit a higher strength than less porous mixtures with larger particles, given the same mass fraction of constituents. A two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode is implemented to investigate the mechanical deformation and failure of the compressed

  13. ON THE FRACTION OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Preethi B.; Abraham, Roberto G. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.c

    2010-05-10

    We investigate the stellar masses of strongly barred spiral galaxies. Our analysis is based on a sample of {approx}14,000 visually classified nearby galaxies given by Nair and Abraham. The fraction of barred spiral galaxies is found to be a strong function of stellar mass and star formation history, with a minimum near the characteristic mass at which bimodality is seen in the stellar populations of galaxies. We also find that bar fractions are very sensitive to the central concentration of galaxies below the transition mass but not above it. This suggests that whatever process is causing the creation of the red and blue sequences is either influencing, or being influenced by, structural changes which manifest themselves in the absence of bars. As a consequence of strong bar fractions being sensitive to the mass range probed, our analysis helps resolve discrepant results on the reported evolution of bar fractions with redshift.

  14. DO BARS DRIVE SPIRAL DENSITY WAVES?

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, Ronald J.; Knapen, Johan H.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Salo, Heikki; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Debra Meloy; Puerari, Ivanio; Block, David L. E-mail: jhk@iac.es E-mail: hsalo@sun3.oulu.fi E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu E-mail: David.Block@wits.ac.za

    2009-05-15

    We present deep near-infrared K{sub s} -band Anglo-Australian Telescope Infrared Imager and Spectrograph observations of a selected sample of nearby barred spiral galaxies, including some with the strongest known bars. The sample covers a range of Hubble types from SB0{sup -} to SBc. The goal is to determine if the torque strengths of the spirals correlate with those of the bars, which might be expected if the bars actually drive the spirals as has been predicted by theoretical studies. This issue has implications for interpreting bar and spiral fractions at high redshift. Analysis of previous samples suggested that such a correlation exists in the near-infrared, where effects of extinction and star formation are less important. However, the earlier samples had only a few excessively strong bars. Our new sample largely confirms our previous studies, but still any correlation is relatively weak. We find two galaxies, NGC 7513 and UGC 10862, where there is only a weak spiral in the presence of a very strong bar. We suggest that some spirals probably are driven by their bars at the same pattern speed, but that this may be only when the bar is growing or if there is abundant gas and dissipation.

  15. Basic physics of xylophone and marimba bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suits, B. H.

    2001-07-01

    The frequency-dependent wave velocity and nonsinusoidal spatial dependence found for transverse waves in finite vibrating bars stands in stark contrast to the solutions to the one-dimensional wave equation, for example for the idealized vibrating string. The difference is particularly important when the resulting vibrations are used to produce music. Here, the appropriate approximate equations for transverse vibrations on a uniform bar are developed and compared to measurements using wooden bars. The results are extended using a simple finite element model to provide a means to predict normal mode behavior in nonuniform wooden bars such as those used for xylophones, marimbas, and related musical instruments.

  16. PREDICTIONS FOR $B \\to \\tau \\bar{\\mu} + \\mu \\bar{\\tau}$

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubaa, Dris; Datta, Alakabha; Duraisamy, Murugeswaran; Khalil, Shaaban

    2013-12-01

    The observation of B -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ } at present experiments would be a clear sign of new physics. In this paper, we calculate this process in an extended Higgs sector framework where the decay is mediated by the exchange of spin zero particle with flavor changing neutral current couplings. If we identify the scalar with the newly discovered state at LHC with a mass 125 GeV then we find that, after imposing all experimental constraints, the BR(Bs -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) can be as high as 10-6 and BR (Bd -> τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) can be as high as 10-7. We also calculate this process in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and find the BR(Bs ->τ \\bar {μ } + μ \\bar {τ }) is typically of the order 10-8.

  17. Taylor impact of glass bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Natalie; Bourne, Neil; Field, John

    1997-07-01

    Brar and Bless pioneeered the use of plate impact upon bars as a technique for investigating the 1D stress loading of glass. We wish to extend this technique by applying VISAR and embedded stress gauge measurements to a symmetrical version of the test. In this configuration two rods impact one upon the other in a symmetrical version of the Taylor test geometry in which the impact is perfectly rigid in the centre of mass frame. Previous work in the laboratory has characterised the three glass types (float, borosilicate and a high density lead glass). These experiments will identify the 1D stress failure mechanisms from high-speed photography and the stress and particle velocity histories will be interpreted in the light of these results. The differences in response of the three glasses will be highlighted.

  18. Gas flow in barred potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sormani, Mattia C.; Binney, James; Magorrian, John

    2015-05-01

    We use a Cartesian grid to simulate the flow of gas in a barred Galactic potential and investigate the effects of varying the sound speed in the gas and the resolution of the grid. For all sound speeds and resolutions, streamlines closely follow closed orbits at large and small radii. At intermediate radii shocks arise and the streamlines shift between two families of closed orbits. The point at which the shocks appear and the streamlines shift between orbit families depends strongly on sound speed and resolution. For sufficiently large values of these two parameters, the transfer happens at the cusped orbit as hypothesized by Binney et al. over two decades ago. For sufficiently high resolutions, the flow downstream of the shocks becomes unsteady. If this unsteadiness is physical, as appears to be the case, it provides a promising explanation for the asymmetry in the observed distribution of CO.

  19. Quasielastic hyperon production in {{\\bar{\

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafi Alam, M.; Athar, M. Sajjad; Chauhan, S.; Singh, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    We have studied quasielastic charged current hyperon production induced by {{\\bar{ν }}μ } from a free nucleon and the nucleons bound inside the nucleus. The calculations are performed for several nuclear targets, for example 12C, 40Ar, 56Fe and 208Pb, which are currently being used in various oscillation experiments using accelerator neutrinos. The inputs are the hyperon-nucleon transition form factors determined from neutrino-nucleon scattering as well as from semileptonic decays of neutron and hyperons, using SU(3) symmetry. The calculations for the nuclear targets are done using the local density approximation. The nuclear medium effects due to the Fermi motion and Pauli blocking, and the final state interaction effects due to hyperon-nucleon scattering have been taken into account.

  20. Bars Triggered By Galaxy Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2015-05-01

    Galaxy mergers drive galaxy evolution and are a key mechanism by which galaxies grow and transform. Unlike galaxy mergers where two galaxies combine into one remnant, galaxy flybys occur when two independent galaxy halos interpenetrate but detach at a later time; these one-time events are surprisingly common and can even out-number galaxy mergers at low redshift for massive halos. Although these interactions are transient and occur far outside the galaxy disk, flybys can still drive a rapid and large pertubations within both the intruder and victim halos. We explored how flyby encounters can transform each galaxy using a suite of N-body simulations. We present results from three co-planar flybys between disk galaxies, demonstrating that flybys can both trigger strong bar formation and can spin-up dark matter halos.

  1. Kinematic Properties of Double-barred Galaxies: Simulations versus Integral-field Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Min; Debattista, Victor P.; Shen, Juntai; Cappellari, Michele

    2016-09-01

    Using high-resolution N-body simulations, we recently reported that a dynamically cool inner disk embedded in a hotter outer disk can naturally generate a steady double-barred (S2B) structure. Here we study the kinematics of these S2B simulations, and compare them to integral-field observations from ATLAS 3D and SAURON. We show that S2B galaxies exhibit several distinct kinematic features, namely: (1) significantly distorted isovelocity contours at the transition region between the two bars, (2) peaks in σ LOS along the minor axis of inner bars, which we term “σ-humps,” that are often accompanied by ring/spiral-like features of increased σ LOS, (3) {h}3{--}\\bar{v} anti-correlations in the region of the inner bar for certain orientations, and (4) rings of positive h 4 when viewed at low inclinations. The most impressive of these features are the σ-humps these evolve with the inner bar, oscillating in strength just as the inner bar does as it rotates relative to the outer bar. We show that, in cylindrical coordinates, the inner bar has similar streaming motions and velocity dispersion properties as normal large-scale bars, except for σ z , which exhibits peaks on the minor axis, i.e., humps. These σ z humps are responsible for producing the σ-humps. For three well-resolved early-type S2Bs (NGC 2859, NGC 2950, and NGC 3941) and a potential S2B candidate (NGC 3384), the S2B model qualitatively matches the integral-field data well, including the “σ-hollows” previously identified. We also discuss the kinematic effect of a nuclear disk in S2Bs.

  2. Populating Stellar Orbits inside a Rotating, Gaseous Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Eric I.; Tohline, Joel E.

    2001-04-01

    In an effort to understand better the formation and evolution of barred galaxies, we have examined the properties of equatorial orbits in the effective potential of one specific model of a rapidly rotating, steady state gasdynamical bar that has been constructed via a self-consistent hydrodynamical simulation. At a given value of the Jacobi constant, roughly half of all test particles (stars) that are injected into the equatorial plane of this potential follow quasi-ergodic orbits; most regular prograde orbits have an overall ``bow tie'' shape; and some trace out trajectories that resemble the x4 family of regular, retrograde orbits. The bow tie orbits appear to be related to the 4/1 orbit family discussed by Contopoulous in 1988, but particles moving along a bow tie orbit pass very close to the center of the bar twice each orbit. Unlike the barlike configurations that previously have been constructed using dissipationless, N-body simulation techniques, the effective potential of our gasdynamical bar is very shallow and generally does not support the x1 family of orbits. If primordial galaxies evolve to a rapidly rotating barlike configuration before a significant amount of star formation has taken place and then stars form from the gas that makes up the bar, the initial stellar distribution function should consist of orbits that are (1) supported by the gaseous barlike potential and (2) restricted to have initial conditions dictated by the gasdynamics of the bar. With this ``restriction hypothesis'' in mind, we propose that stellar dynamical systems that form from gaseous bars will have characteristics that differ significantly from systems that form from a bisymmetric instability in an initially axisymmetric stellar system. Since bow tie orbits are preferred over x1 orbits, for example, such systems should have a more boxy or peanut shape when seen face-on there will be a mechanism for funneling material more directly into the center of the galaxy; and, near the

  3. Too Much Bar and Not Enough Mitzvah? A Proposed Research Agenda on Bar/Bat Mitzvah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Jewish educators are understandably interested in research on how bar/bat mitzvah affect Jewish education or research on what Jewish schools have done to avoid the distortions of a focus on bar/bat mitzvah. Research might also focus on the somewhat different and more ambitious topic of the role that bar/bat mitzvah play in contemporary Jewish…

  4. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as <1% of the earthquake energy budget; however these estimates are difficult to confirm due to (A) challenges associated with accurate particle size measurement and (B) uncertainty regarding the variety of (not-necessarily coseismic) physico-chemical processes that may contribute to the observed grain size reduction. Here we study the micromechanics and energy budget of dynamic rock fragmentation under impulsive compressive loads using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. We present new experimental results on Arkansas Novaculite and Westerly Granite coupled with microstructural observations and BET surface area measurements of post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  5. Bar Study Stories. Issues in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This issue of "Issues in Prevention" focuses on the impact of the availability of drinks in licensed establishments, such as bars and taverns on student drinking. This issue contains the following articles: (1) Cheap Drinks at College Bars Can Escalate Student Drinking (John D. Clapp); (2) High Alcohol Outlet Density: A Problem for Campuses and…

  6. The Bar Tack Machine. Module 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on the bar tack machine, one in a series dealing with industrial sewing machines, their attachments, and operation, covers one topic: performing special operations on the bar tack machine. These components are provided: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, a student self-check, and a…

  7. Needle bar for warp knitting machines

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, Adolf; Thumling, Manfred

    1979-01-01

    Needle bar for warp knitting machines with a number of needles individually set into slits of the bar and having shafts cranked to such an extent that the head section of each needle is in alignment with the shaft section accommodated by the slit. Slackening of the needles will thus not influence the needle spacing.

  8. Conservative Groups Threaten to Sue Bar Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    A proposed revision in the American Bar Association's accrediting standards for law schools is coming under fire from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, which says the proposal seems to require the schools to use racial preferences in hiring and admissions despite federal and state laws limiting such policies. Although a bar-association official…

  9. Charm Physics at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunhui; /Maryland U.

    2005-06-29

    Large production of the c{bar c} pairs and high integrated luminosity make the PEPII B Factory an excellent place for studying the charm hadrons. In this paper, we present a few most recent results from BaBar collaboration in charm sector.

  10. Projection techniques for iterative solution of A(bar x) equals (bar b) with successive right-hand sides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, Paul F.

    1993-01-01

    Two projection techniques for computing approximate solutions to linear systems of the form A(bar x)(sup n) = (bar b)(sup n), for a sequence n = 1, 2, ..., e.g., such as arises from time discretization of a partial differential equation, are presented. The inexpensive approximate solutions can be used as initial guesses for iterative solution of the system, resulting in significantly reduced computational expense. Examples of two- and three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes calculations are presented in which x represents the pressure, and A is a discrete Poisson operator. In flows containing significant dynamic activity, these projection techniques lead to as much as a two-fold reduction in solution time.

  11. Design and Evaluation of a Prosthetic Knee Joint Using the Geared Five-Bar Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanxi; Ge, Wenjie; Zheng, Jia; Dong, Dianbiao

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical design, dynamics analysis and ankle trajectory analysis of a prosthetic knee joint using the geared five-bar mechanism. Compared with traditional four-bar or six-bar mechanisms, the geared five-bar mechanism is better at performing diverse movements and is easy to control. This prosthetic knee joint with the geared five-bar mechanism is capable of fine-tuning its relative instantaneous center of rotation and ankle trajectory. The centrode of this prosthetic knee joint, which is mechanically optimized according to the centrode of human knee joint, is better in the bionic performance than that of a prosthetic knee joint using the four-bar mechanism. Additionally, the stability control of this prosthetic knee joint during the swing and stance phase is achieved by a motor. By adjusting the gear ratio of this prosthetic knee joint, the ankle trajectories of both unilateral and bilateral amputees show less deviations from expected than that of the four-bar knee joint. PMID:25675463

  12. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  13. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  14. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  15. 15. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR MILL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR MILL SHIPPING BUILDING No. 1 AT THE 10' SUTTON BAR STRAIGHTENER. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, 22-Inch Bar Mill, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  16. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  17. 33 CFR 13.01-40 - Miniature medals and bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-40 Miniature medals and bars. (a) Miniature Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals and bars...

  18. Cam-controlled boring bar

    DOEpatents

    Glatthorn, Raymond H.

    1986-01-01

    A cam-controlled boring bar system (100) includes a first housing (152) which is rotatable about its longitudinal axis (154), and a second housing in the form of a cam-controlled slide (158) which is also rotatable about the axis (154) as well as being translatable therealong. A tool-holder (180) is mounted within the slide (158) for holding a single point cutting tool. Slide (158) has a rectangular configuration and is disposed within a rectangularly configured portion of the first housing (152). Arcuate cam slots (192) are defined within a side plate (172) of the housing (152), while cam followers (194) are mounted upon the cam slide (158) for cooperative engagement with the cam slots (192). In this manner, as the housing (152) and slide (158) rotate, and as the slide (158) also translates, a through-bore (14) having an hourglass configuration will be formed within a workpiece (16) which may be, for example, a nuclear reactor steam generator tube support plate.

  19. Highly reliable qcw laser bars and stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichsel, E.; Schröder, D.; Meusel, J.; Hülsewede, R.; Sebastian, J.; Ludwig, S.; Hennig, P.

    2008-02-01

    Based on a well established technology for continuous-wave (cw) diode lasers, further development and optimization lead to high performance laser bars for quasi-continuous-wave (qcw) operation suitable for pumping applications. Mounted on standard heat sinks, these 808nm laser bars exhibit more than 300W (400W) qcw output power with 50% (75%) filling factors. Reliability tests of these bars are running at >200W. Several GShots at 2, 4 and 10% duty cycle (d.c.) were already achieved. With this high performance qcw laser bars, passively cooled laser stacks were developed and tested using a new design compatible to high power operation. Thermal expansion matched materials and hard solder techniques allow reliable operation, even under rough environmental conditions. Output powers of 2.5kW (>300W per bar) were demonstrated from a stack with 8 bars. After environmental tests (vibration and thermal cycles), an ongoing life test exhibits more than 2.5GShots with 1.6kW (~200W per bar) at 4% duty cycle.

  20. Distributary-mouth bar development and role of submarine landslides in delta growth, South Pass, Mississippi delta

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, J.F.; Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.

    1984-11-01

    Submarine landslides play a major role in the development of distributary-mouth bars and are of major importance in transporting sediment from the bar front to deeper water along the Mississippi delta front. Historic maps of the South Pass of the Mississippi delta show that the bar advanced seaward more than 1 mi (1.6 km) between 1867 and 1953. Details of the growth of the bar have been elucidated using an elaborate computer modeling program to analyze these historic maps. The analysis has shown that the geometry of the bar was controlled by the dynamics of the freshwater plume of river water as it mixed with saline Gulf water. Approximately half the sediment deposited on the bar was moved into deeper water by submarine landslides. The underlying causes of bar failure were established during major floods with the deposition of thick blankets of unstable, watersaturated sediments on the bar front. Failure occurred one to four years later in response to a variety of triggering mechanisms, which either changed the shear strength of the sediment or modified local bottom slope. The triggering mechanisms include: major storms and hurricanes, mudlump activity, and possibly, increased pore pressures resulting from generation of biogenic gas. Bar growth and basinward movement of sediment thus represent a multilvariate problem that can be approached by means of a computer analysis of bathymetric data.

  1. Is bar-holding with negative reinforcement preparatory or perseverative.

    PubMed

    Keehn, J D

    1967-09-01

    Three of four white rats learned to press first one bar and then another to escape or avoid electric shocks. Cumulative bar-holding-time records showed that holding occurred frequently on the second bar but hardly ever on the first, indicating that bar-holding is more "perserverative" than "preparatory". The response chain, first-bar press second-bar press, was more easily established by a forward than by a backward chaining procedure. PMID:6050058

  2. Tidally Induced Bars of Galaxies in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łokas, Ewa L.; Ebrová, Ivana; del Pino, Andrés; Sybilska, Agnieszka; Athanassoula, E.; Semczuk, Marcin; Gajda, Grzegorz; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2016-08-01

    Using N-body simulations, we study the formation and evolution of tidally induced bars in disky galaxies in clusters. Our progenitor is a massive, late-type galaxy similar to the Milky Way, composed of an exponential disk and a Navarro-Frenk-White dark matter halo. We place the galaxy on four different orbits in a Virgo-like cluster and evolve it for 10 Gyr. As a reference case, we also evolve the same model in isolation. Tidally induced bars form on all orbits soon after the first pericenter passage and survive until the end of the evolution. They appear earlier, are stronger and longer, and have lower pattern speeds for tighter orbits. Only for the tightest orbit are the properties of the bar controlled by the orientation of the tidal torque from the cluster at pericenter. The mechanism behind the formation of the bars is the angular momentum transfer from the galaxy stellar component to its halo. All of the bars undergo extended periods of buckling instability that occur earlier and lead to more pronounced boxy/peanut shapes when the tidal forces are stronger. Using all simulation outputs of galaxies at different evolutionary stages, we construct a toy model of the galaxy population in the cluster and measure the average bar strength and bar fraction as a function of clustercentric radius. Both are found to be mildly decreasing functions of radius. We conclude that tidal forces can trigger bar formation in cluster cores, but not in the outskirts, and thus can cause larger concentrations of barred galaxies toward the cluster center.

  3. The BaLROG project - II. Quantifying the influence of bars on the stellar populations of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Pérez, I.; Peletier, R.; Vazdekis, A.

    2016-08-01

    We continue the exploration of the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample: 16 large mosaics of barred galaxies observed with the integral field unit SAURON. We quantify the influence of bars on the composition of the stellar component. We derive linestrength indices of H${\\beta}$, Fe5015 and Mgb. Based on single stellar population (SSP) models, we calculate ages, metallicities and [Mg/Fe] abundances and their gradients along the bar major and minor axes. The high spatial resolution of our data allows us to identify breaks among index and SSP profiles, commonly at 0.13$\\pm$0.06 bar length, consistent with kinematic features. Inner gradients are about ten times steeper than outer gradients and become larger when there is a central rotating component, implying that the gradients are not independent of dynamics and orbits. Central ages appear to be younger for stronger bars. Yet, the bar regions are usually old. We find a flattening of the iron (Fe5015) and magnesium (Mgb) outer gradients along the bar major axis, translating into a flattening of the metallicity gradient. This gradient is found to be 0.03$\\pm$0.07 dex/kpc along the bar major axis while the mean value of the bar minor axis compares well with that of an unbarred control sample and is significantly steeper, namely -0.20$\\pm$0.04 dex/kpc. These results confirm recent simulations and discern the important localized influence of bars. The elevated [Mg/Fe] abundances of bars and bulges compared to the lower values of discs suggest an early formation, in particular for early type galaxies.

  4. The BaLROG project - II. Quantifying the influence of bars on the stellar populations of nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, M. K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Martínez-Valpuesta, I.; Sánchez-Blázquez, P.; Pérez, I.; Peletier, R.; Vazdekis, A.

    2016-08-01

    We continue the exploration of the BaLROG (Bars in Low Redshift Optical Galaxies) sample: 16 large mosaics of barred galaxies observed with the integral field unit Spectrographic Areal Unit for Research on Optical Nebulae. We quantify the influence of bars on the composition of the stellar component. We derive line-strength indices of H β, Fe5015 and Mgb. Based on single stellar population (SSP) models, we calculate ages, metallicities and [Mg/Fe] abundances and their gradients along the bar major and minor axes. The high spatial resolution of our data allows us to identify breaks among index and SSP profiles, commonly at 0.13 ± 0.06 bar length, consistent with kinematic features. Inner gradients are about 10 times steeper than outer gradients and become larger when there is a central rotating component, implying that the gradients are not independent of dynamics and orbits. Central ages appear to be younger for stronger bars. Yet, the bar regions are usually old. We find a flattening of the iron (Fe5015) and magnesium (Mgb) outer gradients along the bar major axis, translating into a flattening of the metallicity gradient. This gradient is found to be 0.03 ± 0.07 dex kpc-1 along the bar major axis while the mean value of the bar minor axis compares well with that of an unbarred control sample and is significantly steeper, namely -0.20 ± 0.04 dex kpc-1. These results confirm recent simulations and discern the important localized influence of bars. The elevated [Mg/Fe] abundances of bars and bulges compared to the lower values of discs suggest an early formation, in particular for early-type galaxies.

  5. Infragravity waves over a natural barred profile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, A.H., Jr.; Holman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of cross-shore flow were made across the surf zone during a storm as a nearshore bar became better developed and migrated offshore. Measured infragravity band spectra were compared to synthetic spectra calculated numerically over the natural barred profile assuming a white run-up spectrum of leaky mode or high-mode edge waves. The dominant wave observed early in the storm was consistent with Symond and Bowen's (1984) theoretical prediction of resonant amplification of discrete frequencies over a barred profile. -from Authors

  6. MOEM scan engine for bar code reading and factory automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motamedi, M. Edward; Park, Sangtae; Melendes, Robert; Wang, A.; Andrews, Angus P.; Garcia-Nunez, Dawn S.; Jinar, Dan; Richardson, Patti D.; Studer, J.; Chen, J. K.; DeNatale, Jeffrey F.; Moranski, Jeffrey A.

    1998-03-01

    Rockwell is in the state of technology transfer to manufacturing of a micro-opto-electro-mechanical scan engine with superior scanning performance for bar code reading and factory automation. The scan engine consists of three main components: actuator, mirrors, and control electronics. The first two components are fabricated on a silicon cantilever beam while the control electronics are presently hybrid. The actuator comprises of a bimorph layer covered with two metal layers. The mirror has a large area (several mm2) and it is micromachined with a surface flatness better than (lambda) /2. Actuator scan-angles greater than 22 degree(s) with high repeatability in performance are achieved. The scan engine was integrated with an existing Rockwell commercial bar code reader/decoder and successfully proven to read a two-character code 39 bar code. The system was capable of decoding the 13-mil label at 360 scans per second with a 100% successful read performance. Environmental testing of the device indicates that the scanner can operate at elevated temperatures up to 70 degree(s)C with minor fluctuations in frequency and scan angle. The scanner has also gone through a lifetime cycle test and it has survived more than 8 billion cycles during a period of 18 months. To increase the yield and the performance level of the device, theoretical study as well as dynamic simulation by finite elements modeling have been investigated and will be reported separately.

  7. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  8. Impact resistance of bar glasses.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J P; Huggett, R H; Kidner, G

    1993-12-01

    Bar glasses are often used as weapons in interpersonal violence. Violence often erupts spontaneously and assailants use objects close to hand as weapons. After an initial national Accident and Emergency Department study to identify glass designs most often implicated in interpersonal violence, the impact resistance of 1-pint beer glasses was tested in a materials laboratory with a Zwick 5102 pendulum impact tester. Both straight-sided (nonik) glasses (annealed and tempered) and handled tankards (annealed) were tested to destruction. The impact resistance of new glasses was compared with that of glasses subjected to wear. The mean impact resistance of new annealed noniks did not differ significantly although new glasses were significantly more resistant than worn glasses (p < 0.01). It was not possible to break any of the tempered glasses with the pendulum used (maximum impact energy, 4 J). When noniks had been scratched at the rim to mimic wear, tempered glasses also had the highest impact resistance (p < 0.01) whereas the mean resistance of the annealed noniks was not significantly different. When tempered glasses failed during testing, they all disintegrated into relatively harmless cubes of glass, particularly the thicker bases of glasses. In contrast, annealed designs fractured leaving sharp shards although the thicker bases remained intact. The mean impact resistance of new annealed noniks was 0.5 J, of worn annealed noniks 0.08 J, of tempered new noniks > 4 J, of worn tempered noniks 0.18 J, and of tankards, 1.7 J.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8263994

  9. The BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, A.

    1997-07-01

    The progress on the design and construction of the BaBar electromagnetic calorimeter including its mechanical structure, the readout system, the mechanical and optical properties of the crystals, and the schedule for the final assembly and testing is summarized.

  10. HOW DIFFERENT ARE NORMAL AND BARRED SPIRALS?

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Bergh, Sidney

    2011-06-15

    No significant color differences are found between normal and barred spirals over the range of Hubble stages a-ab-b-bc. Furthermore, no significant difference is seen between the luminosity distributions of normal and barred galaxies over the same range of Hubble stages. However, SBc galaxies are found to be systematically fainter than Sc galaxies at 99% confidence. The observation that normal and barred spirals with Hubble stages a-ab-b-bc have indistinguishable intrinsic colors hints at the possibility that the bars in such spiral galaxies might be ephemeral structures. Finally, it is pointed out that lenticular galaxies of types S0 and SB0 are systematically fainter than are other early-type galaxies, suggesting that such galaxies are situated on evolutionary tracks that differ systematically from those of galaxies that lie along the E-Sa-Sb-Sc and E-SBa-SBb-SBc sequences.

  11. Theory of twisted nonuniformly heated bars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shorr, B. F.

    1980-01-01

    Nonlineary distributed stresses in twisted nonuniformly heated bars of arbitrary cross section are calculated taking into account various elasticity parameters. The approximate theory is shown to be sufficiently general and accurate by comparison with experimental data.

  12. ${{\\bar{d}} - {\\bar{u}}}$ Flavor Asymmetry in the Proton in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salamu, Y.; Ji, Cheung-Ryong; Melnitchouk, Wally; Wang, P.

    2015-09-01

    The ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton arising from pion loops is computed using chiral effective field theory. The calculation includes both nucleon and Δ intermediate states, and uses both the fully relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. The x dependence of ${\\bar d - \\bar u}$ extracted from the Fermilab E866 Drell–Yan data can be well reproduced in terms of a single transverse momentum cutoff parameter regulating the ultraviolet behavior of the loop integrals. In addition to the distribution at x > 0, corrections to the integrated asymmetry from zero momentum contributions are computed, which arise from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at x = 0. These have not been accounted for in previous analyses, and can make important contributions to the lowest moment of ${\\bar d-\\bar u}$ .

  13. Intelligent Bar Chart Plagiarism Detection in Documents

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dabbagh, Mohammed Mumtaz; Salim, Naomie; Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Saba, Tanzila; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel features mining approach from documents that could not be mined via optical character recognition (OCR). By identifying the intimate relationship between the text and graphical components, the proposed technique pulls out the Start, End, and Exact values for each bar. Furthermore, the word 2-gram and Euclidean distance methods are used to accurately detect and determine plagiarism in bar charts. PMID:25309952

  14. $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory

    SciTech Connect

    Salamu, Yusupujiang; Ji, Chueng -Ryong; Melnitchouk, W.; Wang, P.

    2015-03-25

    We compute the $\\bar d - \\bar u$ asymmetry in the proton in chiral effective theory, including both nucleon and Δ degrees of freedom, within both relativistic and heavy baryon frameworks. In addition to the distribution at $x>0$, we estimate the correction to the integrated asymmetry arising from zero momentum contributions from pion rainbow and bubble diagrams at $x=0$, which have not been accounted for in previous analyses. In conclusion, we find that the empirical $x$ dependence of $\\bar d - \\bar u$ as well as the integrated asymmetry can be well reproduced in terms of a transverse momentum cutoff parameter.

  15. Phenomenological study of a cellular material behaviour under dynamic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouix, R.; Viot, Ph.; Lataillade, J.-L.

    2006-08-01

    Polypropylene foams are cellular materials, which are often use to fill structures subjected to crash or violent impacts. Therefore, it is necessary to know and to characterise in experiments their mechanical behaviour in compression at high strain rates. So, several apparatus have been used in order to highlight the influence of strain rate, material density and also temperature. A split Hopkinson Pressure Bar has been used for impact tests, a fly wheel to test theses materials at medium strain rate and an electro-mechanical testing machine associated to a climatic chamber for temperature tests. Then, a rheological model has been used in order to describe the material behaviour. The mechanical response to compression of these foams presents three typical domains: a linear elastic step, a wide collapse plateau stress, which leads to a densification, which are related to a standard rheological model.

  16. Dynamic properties of a shock loaded tungsten composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, W. H.; Wilson, L. T.; Mock, W.; Simpson, B.

    2000-04-01

    Disks of a 90% tungsten, 9% nickel, 1% cobalt composite have been shock loaded in momentum trapping assemblies using a 40 mm bore gas gun, and recovered in water bags. The specimen disks were 30.5 mm in diameter and 7.2 mm thick. The larger-diameter impactor disks had the same composition. Impact speeds for the three experiments were 0.073, 0.148, and 0.405 km/sec, respectively. The specimen disks were shocked and recovered without fracture only for the two lower impact speeds. Portions of the recovered material for these experiments were machined into specimens for Hopkinson bar measurements. These measurements indicated minor differences in the constitutive response of the shocked and "as received" material.

  17. The near-infrared structure of the barred galaxy NGC 253 from VISTA⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iodice, E.; Arnaboldi, M.; Rejkuba, M.; Neeser, M. J.; Greggio, L.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Irwin, M.; Emerson, J. P.

    2014-07-01

    Context. The presence of a bar affects the distribution and dynamics of a stellar disk at all scales, from a fraction of a kpc in the inner central region to tens of kpc at the disk's edge. The quantitative study of the disk response to a bar can be hampered by the presence of dust, which is common in late type spirals. Aims: We want to quantify the structures in the stellar disk of the barred Sc galaxy NGC 253 located in the Sculptor group, at 3.47 Mpc distance. Methods: We use J and Ks band images acquired with the VISTA telescope as part of the Science Verification. The wide field of view and the high angular resolution of this survey facility allow the mapping of the large and small scale structure of the stellar disk in NGC 253. We use unsharp masking and two dimensional modelling of the smooth light distribution in the disk to identify and measure the sub-structures induced by the bar in the stellar disk of NGC 253. We build azimuthally-averaged profiles in the J and Ks bands to measure the radial surface brightness profile of the central bulge, bar and disk. Results: Moving outward from the galaxy center, we find a nuclear ring within the bright 1 kpc diameter nucleus, then a bar, a ring with 2.9 kpc radius, and spiral arms in the outer disk. From the Ks image we obtain a new measure of the de-projected length of the bar of 2.5 kpc. The bar's strength, as derived from the curvature of the dust lanes in the J-Ks image, is typical of weak bars with Δα = 25 degree/kpc. From the de-projected length of the bar, we establish the co-rotation radius (RCR = 3 kpc) and bar pattern speed (Ωb = 61.3 km s-1 kpc-1), which provides the connection between the high frequency structures in the disk and the orbital resonances induced by the bar. The nuclear ring is located at the Inner Lindblad resonance. The second ring (at 2.9 kpc) does not have a resonant origin, but it could be a merger remnant or a transient structure formed during an intermediate stage of the bar

  18. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually...

  19. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually...

  20. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually...

  1. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually...

  2. 21 CFR 886.1650 - Ophthalmic bar prism.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar prism. 886.1650 Section 886.1650...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1650 Ophthalmic bar prism. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar prism is a device that is a bar composed of fused prisms of gradually...

  3. Cultural Factors Related to Smoking in San Francisco's Irish Bars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlund, Travis D.; Antin, Tamar M. J.; Lee, Juliet P.; Moore, Roland S.

    2009-01-01

    California's Smoke-Free Workplace Act was extended to include bars in 1998. While the majority of bars in the state have become smoke free, in many bars patrons and staff continue to smoke despite the law. The authors present findings from a study which assessed cultural factors related to continued smoking in bars in the city of San Francisco. In…

  4. 32 CFR 776.66 - Bar admission and disciplinary matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bar admission and disciplinary matters. 776.66... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.66 Bar admission and disciplinary matters. (a) Bar admission and disciplinary matters. A covered attorney, in connection with any application for bar...

  5. 32 CFR 776.66 - Bar admission and disciplinary matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bar admission and disciplinary matters. 776.66... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.66 Bar admission and disciplinary matters. (a) Bar admission and disciplinary matters. A covered attorney, in connection with any application for bar...

  6. 32 CFR 776.66 - Bar admission and disciplinary matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bar admission and disciplinary matters. 776.66... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.66 Bar admission and disciplinary matters. (a) Bar admission and disciplinary matters. A covered attorney, in connection with any application for bar...

  7. 32 CFR 776.66 - Bar admission and disciplinary matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bar admission and disciplinary matters. 776.66... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.66 Bar admission and disciplinary matters. (a) Bar admission and disciplinary matters. A covered attorney, in connection with any application for bar...

  8. 32 CFR 776.66 - Bar admission and disciplinary matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bar admission and disciplinary matters. 776.66... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.66 Bar admission and disciplinary matters. (a) Bar admission and disciplinary matters. A covered attorney, in connection with any application for bar...

  9. The Economic Impact of Smoke-Free Laws on Restaurants and Bars in 9 States

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Paul R.; van Hasselt, Martijn

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Smoke-free air laws in restaurants and bars protect patrons and workers from involuntary exposure to secondhand smoke, but owners often express concern that such laws will harm their businesses. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the association between local smoke-free air laws and economic outcomes in restaurants and bars in 8 states without statewide smoke-free air laws: Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, South Carolina, Texas, and West Virginia. A secondary objective was to examine the economic impact of a 2010 statewide smoke-free restaurant and bar law in North Carolina. Methods Using quarterly data from 2000 through 2010, we estimated dynamic panel data models for employment and sales in restaurants and bars. The models controlled for smoke-free laws, general economic activity, cigarette sales, and seasonality. We included data from 216 smoke-free cities and counties in the analysis. During the study period, only North Carolina had a statewide law banning smoking in restaurants or bars. Separate models were estimated for each state. Results In West Virginia, smoke-free laws were associated with a significant increase of approximately 1% in restaurant employment. In the remaining 8 states, we found no significant association between smoke-free laws and employment or sales in restaurants and bars. Conclusion Results suggest that smoke-free laws did not have an adverse economic impact on restaurants or bars in any of the states studied; they provided a small economic benefit in 1 state. On the basis of these findings, we would not expect a statewide smoke-free law in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas, or West Virginia to have an adverse economic impact on restaurants or bars in those states. PMID:23906328

  10. Decreased Frequency of Strong Bars in S0 Galaxies: Evidence for Secular Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, R.; Laurikainen, E.; Salo, H.; Knapen, J. H.

    2010-09-01

    Using data from the Near-Infrared S0 Survey of nearby, early-type galaxies, we examine the distribution of bar strengths in S0 galaxies as compared to S0/a and Sa galaxies, and as compared to previously published bar strength data for Ohio State University Bright Spiral Galaxy Survey spiral galaxies. Bar strengths based on the gravitational torque method are derived from 2.2 μm Ks -band images for a statistical sample of 138 (98 S0, 40 S0/a,Sa) galaxies having a mean total blue magnitude lang BT rang <= 12.5 and generally inclined less than 65°. We find that S0 galaxies have weaker bars on average than spiral galaxies in general, even compared to their closest spiral counterparts, S0/a and Sa galaxies. The differences are significant and cannot be entirely due to uncertainties in the assumed vertical scale heights or in the assumption of constant mass-to-light ratios. Part of the difference is likely simply due to the dilution of the bar torques by the higher mass bulges seen in S0s. If spiral galaxies accrete external gas, as advocated by Bournaud & Combes, then the fewer strong bars found among S0s imply a lack of gas accretion according to this theory. If S0s are stripped former spirals, or else are evolved from former spirals due to internal secular dynamical processes which deplete the gas as well as grow the bulges, then the weaker bars and the prevalence of lenses in S0 galaxies could further indicate that bar evolution continues to proceed during and even after gas depletion.

  11. THE IMPACT OF BARS ON DISK BREAKS AS PROBED BY S{sup 4}G IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Sheth, Kartik; Kim, Taehyun; Meidt, Sharon; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comeron, Sebastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Hinz, Joannah L.; Ho, Luis C.; Madore, Barry F.; Holwerda, Benne; Jarrett, Thomas H.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We have analyzed the radial distribution of old stars in a sample of 218 nearby face-on disks, using deep 3.6 {mu}m images from the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies. In particular, we have studied the structural properties of those disks with a broken or down-bending profile. We find that, on average, disks with a genuine single-exponential profile have a scale length and a central surface brightness which are intermediate to those of the inner and outer components of a down-bending disk with the same total stellar mass. In the particular case of barred galaxies, the ratio between the break and the bar radii (R{sub br}/R{sub bar}) depends strongly on the total stellar mass of the galaxy. For galaxies more massive than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, the distribution is bimodal, peaking at R{sub br}/R{sub bar} {approx} 2 and {approx}3.5. The first peak, which is the most populated one, is linked to the outer Lindblad resonance of the bar, whereas the second one is consistent with a dynamical coupling between the bar and the spiral pattern. For galaxies below 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }, breaks are found up to {approx}10 R{sub bar}, but we show that they could still be caused by resonances given the rising nature of rotation curves in these low-mass disks. While not ruling out star formation thresholds, our results imply that radial stellar migration induced by non-axisymmetric features can be responsible not only for those breaks at {approx}2 R{sub bar}, but also for many of those found at larger radii.

  12. Origin, structure, and evolution of a reattachment bar, Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, David M.; Schmidt, John C.; Moore, Johnnie N.

    1990-01-01

    In a channel expansion, flow can separate from the bank, creating a zone of relatively weak recirculating current. Bars that accumulate in this weak flow near the point where flow reattaches to the bank are called reattachment bars. As a reattachment bar evolves, the recirculation zone may fill with sediment and restrict flow from the main channel. The increasingly restricted flow over the bar causes ripples to replace dunes and causes the sediment size to fine; the resulting vertical sequence resembles that of point bars. Seasonal and daily flow fluctuations in the Grand Canyon complicate this idealized sequence. Changes in discharge alter the geometry of recirculation zones, flow within the recirculation zones, the location of depositional and erosional sites, the kind of bedform and migration direction of bedforms on the bar, and the transported sediment size. Dunes and ripples within a recirculation zone migrate in a rotary pattern in response to the recirculating flow. Ripples near the reattachment point often resemble oscillation ripples in morphology and dynamics. The reversing flow that creates these ripples is caused by fluctuations in location of the reattachment point. These fluctuations cause flow near the reattachment point to reverse in an upstream-downstream direction, thereby producing symmetrical, reversing ripples with crests that trend normal to the bank. Low rates of ripple migration in the reversing flow, accompanied by rapid deposition, cause these ripples to climb at a high angle. At increasing distances from the reattachment point, the reversing flow is less balanced, and the ripples climb at lower angles as they migrate upstream and downstream. Although these observations were made in a bedrock canyon, the same processes operate in alluvial and tidal channels and are important in adjusting the shape of channels on point bars and concave benches and behind bedforms that become emergent at low stage. Reattachment bars can be recognized by the

  13. Social Organization in Bars: Implications for Tobacco Control Policy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juliet P.; Antin, Tamar M.J.; Moore, Roland S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers social roles and relationships of the patrons, staff and owners of bars as critical factors determining adherence to public health policies, and specifically California’s smokefree workplace law. Specific elements of social organization in bars affecting health policy include the community within which the bar is set, the unique identity the bar creates, the bar staff and patrons who enact this identity, and their bar society. These elements were found to contribute to the development of power relations within the bar and solidarity against the outside world, resulting in either resistance to or compliance with smokefree workplace policy. PMID:22522904

  14. Bars, Lines, & Pies: A Graphing Skills Program. Expect the Unexpected with Math[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Actuarial Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Bars, Lines, & Pies" is a dynamic math program designed to build graphing skills in students, while also showing them the relevance of math in their lives. Developed by The Actuarial Foundation along with Scholastic, the graphing lessons and activities involve engaging, real-world examples about the environment and recycling. In these lessons,…

  15. Measurement of B0bar -> D(*)0 K(*)0bar BranchingFractions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-10

    The authors present a study of the decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)0}{bar K}{sup (*)0} using a sample of 226 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. They report evidence for the decay of B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} mesons to the D*{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} final state with an average branching fraction {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) {triple_bond} {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}K{sup 0})/2 = (3.6 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5}.

  16. Bar Admission--Default on Student Loan Warrants Denial of Admission to Minnesota Bar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Mitchell Law Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    The Minnesota Supreme Court upheld a decision that student loan default, and subsequent dismissal through bankruptcy, is sufficient reason to deny a law student's bar admission. The bar's requirement of good moral character was interpreted as financial integrity in the Gahan case. (MSE)

  17. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Booth, D.B.; Burges, S.J.; Montgomery, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial patterns of bed material entrainment by floods were documented at seven gravel bars using arrays of metal washers (bed tags) placed in the streambed. The observed patterns were used to test a general stochastic model that bed material entrainment is a spatially independent, random process where the probability of entrainment is uniform over a gravel bar and a function of the peak dimensionless shear stress ??*0 of the flood. The fraction of tags missing from a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect to ??*0 with a mean value (50% of the tags entrained) of 0.085 and standard deviation of 0.022 (root-mean-square error of 0.09). Variation in partial entrainment for a given ??*0 demonstrated the effects of flow conditioning on bed strength, with lower values of partial entrainment after intermediate magnitude floods (0.065 < ??*0 < 0.08) than after higher magnitude floods. Although the probability of bed material entrainment was approximately uniform over a gravel bar during individual floods and independent from flood to flood, regions of preferential stability and instability emerged at some bars over the course of a wet season. Deviations from spatially uniform and independent bed material entrainment were most pronounced for reaches with varied flow and in consecutive floods with small to intermediate magnitudes.

  18. On the Galactic Spin of Barred Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Li, Cheng; Park, Changbom; Wang, Lixin

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter (λ d ) and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into one of three groups: non-barred galaxies and galaxies hosting long or short bars, respectively. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting long bars having the lowest λ d values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with short bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate λ d values for the case of long bars, while the maximum for short bars is at high λ d . This bimodality is in good agreement with previous studies finding longer bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with a low content of cold gas, while short bars were found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies that were typically gas rich. In addition, the rise and fall of the bar fraction as a function of λ d , within the long-bar sample shown in our results, can be explained as a result of two competing factors: the self-gravity of the disk that enhances bar instabilities and the support by random motions, instead of ordered rotational motion, that prevents the formation/growth of bars.

  19. ON THE GALACTIC SPIN OF BARRED DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes-Sodi, Bernardo; Li, Cheng; Wang, Lixin; Park, Changbom

    2013-09-20

    We present a study of the connection between the galactic spin parameter (λ{sub d}) and the bar fraction in a volume-limited sample of 10,674 disk galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. The galaxies in our sample are visually classified into one of three groups: non-barred galaxies and galaxies hosting long or short bars, respectively. We find that the spin distributions of these three classes are statistically different, with galaxies hosting long bars having the lowest λ{sub d} values, followed by non-barred galaxies, while galaxies with short bars present typically high spin parameters. The bar fraction presents its maximum at low to intermediate λ{sub d} values for the case of long bars, while the maximum for short bars is at high λ{sub d}. This bimodality is in good agreement with previous studies finding longer bars hosted by luminous, massive, red galaxies with a low content of cold gas, while short bars were found in low luminosity, low mass, blue galaxies that were typically gas rich. In addition, the rise and fall of the bar fraction as a function of λ{sub d}, within the long-bar sample shown in our results, can be explained as a result of two competing factors: the self-gravity of the disk that enhances bar instabilities and the support by random motions, instead of ordered rotational motion, that prevents the formation/growth of bars.

  20. Rotational evolution of a symmetric gyrostat with visco-elastic bars around the center of mass in a circular orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Hafiez Aly, Samy Ahmed

    1987-09-01

    The motion of a gyrostat in a circular orbit in a Newtonian field of force is considered. The gyrostat has four homogeneous viscoelastic bars attached to it. Rotation of the symmetric rotor inside the rigid body is statically and dynamically balanced. Bending deformations of the bars, accompanied by dissipation of energy, are the cause of the evolution of the system's rotational motion. Approximate equations describing this evolution are derived, together with averaged equations in Andoyer variables.

  1. Measuring the Fraction of Bars and Offset Bars Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Alexa

    2012-01-01

    Using the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies at 3.6 and 4.5μm, I have measured a preliminary bar fraction and offset bar fraction in the local universe by visually identifying bar structure within a sample of 2,140 local galaxies. A sample this large has not been used since 1963, when Gerard de Vaucouleurs found the bar fraction to be roughly fbar ˜ 0.6 in the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies. Since then, there has been much debate over the true value of the bar fraction. The purpose of finding a bar fraction using S4G is to provide a final say in this debate. I have found that the bar fraction in the local universe is fbar = 0.69 when including both definite bars (SB) and candidate bars (SAB). I have also measured a preliminary value for the fraction of offset bars using the same sample. Offset bars are a very rare phenomenon. Of the sample used, 91 galaxies are found to be definite offset bars while an additional 39 are found to be candidate offset bars. When including both definite offset bars and candidate offset bars, the offset bar fraction in the local universe becomes fob = 0.12. I also measure the fraction of offset bars as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass. We find that 54% of offset bars are found in disks having a stellar mass of M ≤ 108 M⊙. Late-type disks possess significantly more offset bars than early-type with 60% of offset bars being found in disks having a Hubble type t ≥ 6.

  2. Evidence for B+ -> K*0bar K*+

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and fraction of longitudinal polarization for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +} with a sample of 467 {+-} 5 million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We obtain the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K*{sup +}) = (1.2 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup ?6} with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties. We measure the fraction of longitudinal polarization f{sub L} = 0.75{sub -0.26}{sup +0.16} {+-} 0.03. The first error quoted is statistical and the second is systematic.

  3. B Counting at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Grant Duncan

    2008-12-16

    In this thesis we examine the method of counting B{bar B} events produced in the BABAR experiment. The original method was proposed in 2000, but improvements to track reconstruction and our understanding of the detector since that date make it appropriate to revisit the B Counting method. We propose a new set of cuts designed to minimize the sensitivity to time-varying backgrounds. We find the new method counts B{bar B} events with an associated systematic uncertainty of {+-} 0.6%.

  4. Sine-Bar Attachment For Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Franklin D.

    1988-01-01

    Sine-bar attachment for collets, spindles, and chucks helps machinists set up quickly for precise angular cuts that require greater precision than provided by graduations of machine tools. Machinist uses attachment to index head, carriage of milling machine or lathe relative to table or turning axis of tool. Attachment accurate to 1 minute or arc depending on length of sine bar and precision of gauge blocks in setup. Attachment installs quickly and easily on almost any type of lathe or mill. Requires no special clamps or fixtures, and eliminates many trial-and-error measurements. More stable than improvised setups and not jarred out of position readily.

  5. Newtorites in bar detectors of gravitational wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronga, F.; ROG Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The detection of particles with only gravitational interactions (Newtorites) in gravitational bar detectors was studied in 1984 by Bernard, De Rujula and Lautrup. The negative results of dark matter searches suggest to look to exotic possibilities like Newtorites. The limits obtained with the Nautilus bar detector will be presented and the possible improvements will be discussed. Since the gravitational coupling is very weak, the possible limits are very far from what is needed for dark matter, but for large masses are the best limits obtained on the Earth. An update of limits for MACRO particles will be given.

  6. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  7. Dynamic failure mechanisms in armor grade ceramics (the effect of lateral confinement and membrane restraint)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarva, Sai Sushilkumar

    Light weight ceramics such as SiC and Al2O3, have been used in impact related applications such as integrated armor for more than a decade and are an excellent prospect for the next-generation multi-functional armor systems. It is known that ceramics fail under a wide variety of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile depending on the deformation conditions, such as the strain rate and the state of stress. The dynamic properties are dependent on the underlying failure mechanisms. The underpinning mechanisms of compression failure and their effect on the mechanical properties have been examined over a range of deformation rates from quasi-static to ballistic strain rates. Under moderate confining pressures [˜350 MPa] and at moderate deformation rates [strain-rates up to a few thousand per second], occurring during quasi-static and Hopkinson bar experiments, brittle failure involves initiation of micro-cracks at dominant micro-flaws and pre-existing micro-cracks and their subsequent interactive growth leading to axial splitting, faulting or a mixture of brittle-ductile failure. Experimental results relating to SiC have been compared to a wing-crack array model, developed by Nemat-Nasser and Deng, which describes the influence of microstructure on the dynamic behavior of materials. Under extreme conditions of stress, attained during shock impact, ceramics pulverize into fine powder. Classical crack-growth models seem inadequate for representing the actual failure initiation and evolution. Experiments have also been conducted to study the ballistic performance and failure of ceramic tiles. It has been observed that the defeat capability can be vastly improved by restraining the impact-face of ceramic tiles with a membrane of suitable tensile strength. The comparative effect of restraint by materials such as E-glass/epoxy pre-preg, carbon-fiber/epoxy pre-preg and Ti-3%Al-2.5%V alloy has been studied. Tungsten heavy alloy was used as the projectile material. The

  8. Formation of q{bar q} resonances in the {bar N}N system

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, N.Ya.

    1995-11-01

    The formation of q{bar q} resonances lying on the leading Regge trajectories in the {bar N}N system is studied in the quark-gluon string model. The model predicts strong suppression of the decays of q{bar q} states into {bar N}N pairs in relation to two-meson modes. The author`s analysis shows that the contributions of the resonances f{sub 4}(2050) (I{sup G}J{sup PC}= 0{sup +}4{sup ++}), {rho}{sub 5}(2240) (I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 1{sup +}5{sup {minus}{minus}}), and f{sub 6}(2510) (I{sup G}J{sup PC} = 0{sup +}6{sup ++}) to the processes of two-meson {bar N}N annihilation ({bar p}p {yields} {pi}{pi}, {bar K}K, {hor_ellipsis}) are about 1% of the corresponding experimental integrated cross sections. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Topics in galactic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Frank Blane

    1989-01-01

    The distant satellites of the Milky Way Galaxy are used to probe the distribution of dark matter in the Galactic halo. A new method of statistical analysis based on Bayes' theorem was devised, which directly yields confidence intervals for the mass of the Galaxy once the eccentricity distribution of the satellites is specified. Assuming an isotropic velocity distribution for 10 objects at distances of 50 to 140 kiloparsecs, mass results suggest that the Galaxy's massive dark halo extends to approximately less than 50 kiloparsecs from the Galactic center. A model galaxy with an artificial bar is used to explore the effect of dynamical friction on a galactic bar. An analytic formula is provided which correctly predicts angular momentum changes for a bar in interaction with a non self-gravitating disk. N-body simulations further show that disk self-gravity tends to make a bar without inner Lindblad resonances spin down more rapidly, and tends to make a bar dominated by inner Lindblad resonances spin up less rapidly. The long-term dynamical evolution of galactic bars is investigated using fully self gravitating bar-unstable disk-halo models. The models develop rapidly rotating bars which then slow down through transfers of angular momentum both to the outer disk and to the halo. The models suggest that the distance between the end of a bar and its corotation circle is proportional to the bar's age, and an approximate formula is presented which expresses this relationship. It is also concluded that the average tangential velocity within a barlike object drops by a factor of about 2 over approximately 45 initial rotation periods.

  10. Generation and nonlinear evolution of shore-oblique/transverse sand bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, R.; Calvete, D.; Falques, A.; Caballeria, M.

    2006-11-01

    The coupling between topography, waves and currents in the surf zone may self-organize to produce the formation of shore-transverse or shore-oblique sand bars on an otherwise alongshore uniform beach. In the absence of shore-parallel bars, this has been shown by previous studies of linear stability analysis, but is now extended to the finite-amplitude regime. To this end, a nonlinear model coupling wave transformation and breaking, a shallow-water equations solver, sediment transport and bed updating is developed. The sediment flux consists of a stirring factor multiplied by the depth-averaged current plus a downslope correction. It is found that the cross-shore profile of the ratio of stirring factor to water depth together with the wave incidence angle primarily determine the shape and the type of bars, either transverse or oblique to the shore. In the latter case, they can open an acute angle against the current (up-current oriented) or with the current (down-current oriented). At the initial stages of development, both the intensity of the instability which is responsible for the formation of the bars and the damping due to downslope transport grow at a similar rate with bar amplitude, the former being somewhat stronger. As bars keep on growing, their finite-amplitude shape either enhances downslope transport or weakens the instability mechanism so that an equilibrium between both opposing tendencies occurs, leading to a final saturated amplitude. The overall shape of the saturated bars in plan view is similar to that of the small-amplitude ones. However, the final spacings may be up to a factor of 2 larger and final celerities can also be about a factor of 2 smaller or larger. In the case of alongshore migrating bars, the asymmetry of the longshore sections, the lee being steeper than the stoss, is well reproduced. Complex dynamics with merging and splitting of individual bars sometimes occur. Finally, in the case of shore-normal incidence the rip currents in

  11. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production in $$p \\bar{p}$$ collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2016-02-09

    Here, we studymore » $$\\Lambda$$ and $$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$ production asymmetries in $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$, and $$p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow \\mu^\\pm \\Lambda (\\bar{\\Lambda}) X$$ events recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV. We find an excess of $$\\Lambda$$'s ($$\\bar{\\Lambda}$$'s) produced in the proton (antiproton) direction. This forward-backward asymmetry is measured as a function of rapidity. We confirm that the $$\\bar{\\Lambda}/\\Lambda$$ production ratio, measured by several experiments with various targets and a wide range of energies, is a universal function of "rapidity loss", i.e., the rapidity difference of the beam proton and the lambda.« less

  12. Divorce and Bar Mitzvah: A First Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geffen, Michael; Kaplan, Earl

    After an introductory discussion and review of literature on divorce among Jewish families, this document presents and analyzes two case studies which show the adverse effect of divorce and child-custody battles on the children of Jewish families who subsequently plan a B'nai Mitzvah (Bar or Bat Mitzvah) ceremony--a joyous ritual of initiation…

  13. Materials management with a bar code reader.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, R S

    1990-01-01

    A materials management system capable of inventory control, accounting and the automatic recording of supplies for a clinical department has been developed for the George Washington University Hospital Department of Anesthesia. This system combines a microprocessor-based computer for data storage and a hand-held bar code reader to record the bar code scan of each item in the inventory. A relational software program with easy-to-use menus and help keys was written. Bar code information stored for each item includes item number, quantity, date and time of issue. Accumulated bar code scans are loaded into the computer by use of a serial port and then used to update current inventory in the computer. Comparison between current inventory and reorder levels by the computer will initiate automatic printing of appropriate purchase orders. Reorder levels are adjusted regularly, by comparing previous year or month usage to current needs; items already on order, items on back order and delivery lag time are also taken into account. PMID:10104851

  14. Unitarity Triangles at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Vidal, Fernando; /Valencia U., IFIC

    2011-11-23

    The BaBar experiment has used a variety of methods to determine the angles {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Unitarity Triangle, which give insight into the Standard Model description of CP violation in the quark sector of the electroweak interactions. Here we review the main experimental techniques and analyses, with emphasis in the most recent results.

  15. A piezo-bar pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, W. H.; Murphy, C. L.; Shanfield, I.

    1967-01-01

    Piezo-bar pressure type probe measures the impact velocity or pressure of a moving debris cloud. It measures pressures up to 200,000 psi and peak pressures may be recorded with a total pulse duration between 5 and 65 musec.

  16. Semileptonic B decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, D.; /Montreal U.

    2007-05-23

    This paper summarizes the content of a talk given by the author at the Lake Louise Winter Institute, on February 21st 2007. It presents recent measurements of the rates for semileptonic B decays using data collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  17. My Bar Graph Tells a Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, Sue; McMillen, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Connecting stories to qualitative coordinate graphs has been suggested as an effective instructional strategy. Even students who are able to "create" bar graphs may struggle to correctly "interpret" them. Giving children opportunities to work with qualitative graphs can help them develop the skills to interpret, describe, and compare information…

  18. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  19. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique

    2011-10-24

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  20. Bar Instability in Disk-Halo Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellwood, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    We show that the exponential growth rate of a bar in a stellar disk is substantially greater when the disk is embedded in a live halo than in a rigid one having the same mass distribution. We also find that the vigor of the instability in disk-halo systems varies with the shape of the halo velocity ellipsoid. Disks in rigid halos that are massive enough to be stable by the usual criteria, quickly form bars in isotropic halos and much greater halo mass is needed to avoid a strong bar; thus stability criteria derived for disks in rigid halos do not apply when the halo is responsive. The study presented here is of an idealized family of models with near uniform central rotation and that lack an extended halo; we present more realistic models with extended halos in a companion paper. The puzzle presented by the absence of strong bars in some galaxies having gently rising inner rotation curves is compounded by the results presented here.

  1. Striking Agreement Between Galactic Bulge Kinematics from the BRAVA Survey, and an N-body Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Robert Michael; Shen, J.; Howard, C. D.; de Propris, R.; Koch, A.; Reitzel, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    The Bulge Radial Velocity Assay has surveyed radial velocities for Galactic bulge M giants at b=-4 deg, b=-8 deg, and a range of fields on the minor axis. We report a striking agreement between a model N-body bar and our radial velocity data, obtained using Hydra at the CTIO 4m telescope. This is the closest agreement ever reported between radial velocity data in the bulge, and a largescale dynamical model. The N-body bar secularly evolves from a massive disk, after experiencing a buckling instability. We use the results to place upper limits on the fraction of the population that might belong to a "classical" bulge population that is not part of the bar. We also report the first analysis of metallicities from the Ca infrared triplet method, for our dataset, and how kinematics and metallicities are correlated. This research was supported by grant AST-0709479 from the National Science Foundation.

  2. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars... Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame ER19DE96.002...

  3. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars... Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame ER19DE96.002...

  4. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars... 223—Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

  5. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars... 223—Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

  6. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars... 223—Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

  7. Star formation properties in barred galaxies. III. Statistical study of bar-driven secular evolution using a sample of nearby barred spirals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhi-Min; Wu, Hong; Cao, Chen E-mail: hwu@bao.ac.cn

    2015-01-01

    Stellar bars are important internal drivers of secular evolution in disk galaxies. Using a sample of nearby spiral galaxies with weak and strong bars, we explore the relationships between the star formation feature and stellar bars in galaxies. We find that galaxies with weak bars tend coincide with low concentrical star formation activity, while those with strong bars show a large scatter in the distribution of star formation activity. We find enhanced star formation activity in bulges toward stronger bars, although not predominantly, consistent with previous studies. Our results suggest that different stages of the secular process and many other factors may contribute to the complexity of the secular evolution. In addition, barred galaxies with intense star formation in bars tend to have active star formation in their bulges and disks, and bulges have higher star formation densities than bars and disks, indicating the evolutionary effects of bars. We then derived a possible criterion to quantify the different stages of the bar-driven physical process, while future work is needed because of the uncertainties.

  8. Vegetal Encroachment on Point Bar Deposits as a Control on Width Variation in Meandering Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, G.; Eke, E.; Asahi, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Nelson, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Most meandering rivers have vegetated floodplains. As this vegetation encroaches on point bars, it helps stabilize the sediment there. The river can then undergo slow migration and channel deformation, all the while maintaining channel coherence. Yet streams that appear to have the same degree of meandering can nevertheless show marked variation in channel width, as measured from vegetation line to vegetation line. The top image shows a reach of a tributatary of the Ob River, Russia, and the bottom image shows a reach of the Trinity River, Texas. In both cases, the flow is from right to left. In the case of the Ob tributary, the point bars are completely vegetated, and streamwise variation in width is rather muted. In the case of the Trinity River, the point bars are not completely vegetated, and streamwise variation in width is rather strong. Here we present two numerical models of migrating, meandering rivers in which channel width is self-specified in terms of the dynamics of bank erosion and deposition. In one of these models, bank vegetation is assumed to immediately encroach on newly-created point bar deposits. This mode of encroachment is shown to strongly contain the channel, so muting width variation. In the other model, newly-created point bar deposits remain bare for a period of time before vegetation is allowed to stabilize them. This results in less effective containment of the channel and stronger streamwise width variation.

  9. Musculoskeletal work preceding the outward and inward Tkachev on uneven bars in artistic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, David G; Irwin, Gareth

    2010-03-01

    Outward facing Tkachevs on uneven bars have been the traditional technique employed by artistic gymnasts. Changes in bar spacing and judging have increased the popularity of the inward version of the skill, in which the gymnast faces towards the low bar as she straddles over the high bar. The purpose of this study was to compare these two variants of the women's Tkachev to examine the influence of the positioning of the low bar on the musculoskeletal demands placed on the gymnast. 3-D DLT reconstructed data sets from digitised video images of straddle Tkachevs performed at the 2000 Sydney Olympics were analysed. Five performances of each variant were compared using kinematics and inverse dynamics. Mean hip and shoulder kinematics were similar for both variants of the Tkachev, but for the inward, gymnasts released later, travelled higher and re-grasped earlier than for the outward. Hip joint moments were similar for both variants while shoulder moments were different. Total musculoskeletal demands were similar for both variants, although the distribution was markedly different with the shoulders contributing positively for the outward and negatively for the inward. Implications for training specificity, along with potential future developments for the inward variant, have been highlighted. PMID:20446636

  10. Near-infrared mapping of spiral barred galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallais, P.; Rouan, D.; Lacombe, F.

    1990-01-01

    In external galaxies, near-infrared emission originates from stellar populations, hot dust, free-free emission from H+ regions, gaseous emission, non-thermal nucleus if any. Because of the low extinction compared to the visible, infrared wavelengths are useful to probe regions obscured by dust such as central parts where starburst phenomena can occur because of the large quantity of matter. The results presented were obtained with a 32 x 32 InSb charge injection device (CID) array cooled at 4K, at the f/36 cassegrain focus of the 3m60 Canada-France-Hawaii telescope with a spatial resolution of 0.5 inches per pixel. The objects presented are spiral barred galaxies mapped at J(1.25 microns), H(1.65 microns) and K(2.2 microns). The non-axisymetric potential due to the presence of a bar induces dynamical processes leading to the confinement of matter and peculiar morphologies. Infrared imaging is used to study the link between various components. Correlations with other wavelengths ranges and 2-colors diagrams ((J-H), (H-K)) lead to the identification of star forming regions, nucleus. Maps show structures connected to the central core. The question is, are they flowing away or toward the nucleus. Observations of M83 lead to several conclusions. The star forming region, detected in the visible and the infrared cannot be very compact and must extend to the edge of the matter concentration. The general shape of the near-infrared emission and the location of radio and 10 micron peaks suggest the confinement of matter between the inner Linblad resonances localized from CO measurements about 100 and 400 pc. The distribution of color indices in the arc from southern part to the star forming region suggests an increasing amount of gas and a time evolution eventually triggered by supernova explosions. Close to the direction of the bar, a bridge-like structure connects the arc to the nucleus with peculiar color indices. Perhaps, this structure can be linked to a height velocity

  11. nu. (nu-bar)+d. --> nu. (nu-bar)+n+p at intermediate energies

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Khan, S.A.

    1981-03-01

    The deuteron disintegration processes ..nu..(nu-bar)+d..--> nu..(nu-bar)+n+p have been studied at intermediate energies in impulse approximation using closure over the final dinucleon states. The disintegration cross section sigma has been discussed as a function of neutrino (antineutrino) energy in various SU(2) x U(1) models for the helicity conserving weak neutral currents. A discussion on the helicity flipping weak neutral currents models of S, P, T couplings is also given.

  12. 14. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR STOCKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR STOCKING AND FINISHING BUILDING AT THE PICKLING VATS. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, 22-Inch Bar Mill, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. 11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of horse lamp fixture in original Clubhouse bar. Fixture is at north end of bar. Camera pointed up and NW. (July 1993) - Longacres, Clubhouse & Additions, 1621 Southwest Sixteenth Street, Renton, King County, WA

  14. Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ransom, Barbara

    1984-04-01

    Dynamics!” she said, as she buried her head deep in a book on tectonics. “Must be the key to explain what we see the ignorance of which seems to be chronic.”Convection below, then density flow and phase changes are not withstanding; Thermal gradient change and compositional range are things our minds should be commanding.

  15. Laboratory and workplace assessments of rivet bucking bar vibration emissions.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Thomas W; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S; Welcome, Daniel E; Dong, Ren G

    2015-04-01

    Sheet metal workers operating rivet bucking bars are at risk of developing hand and wrist musculoskeletal disorders associated with exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations and forceful exertions required to operate these hand tools. New bucking bar technologies have been introduced in efforts to reduce workplace vibration exposures to these workers. However, the efficacy of these new bucking bar designs has not been well documented. While there are standardized laboratory-based methodologies for assessing the vibration emissions of many types of powered hand tools, no such standard exists for rivet bucking bars. Therefore, this study included the development of a laboratory-based method for assessing bucking bar vibrations which utilizes a simulated riveting task. With this method, this study evaluated three traditional steel bucking bars, three similarly shaped tungsten alloy bars, and three bars featuring spring-dampeners. For comparison the bucking bar vibrations were also assessed during three typical riveting tasks at a large aircraft maintenance facility. The bucking bars were rank-ordered in terms of unweighted and frequency-weighted acceleration measured at the hand-tool interface. The results suggest that the developed laboratory method is a reasonable technique for ranking bucking bar vibration emissions; the lab-based riveting simulations produced similar rankings to the workplace rankings. However, the laboratory-based acceleration averages were considerably lower than the workplace measurements. These observations suggest that the laboratory test results are acceptable for comparing and screening bucking bars, but the laboratory measurements should not be directly used for assessing the risk of workplace bucking bar vibration exposures. The newer bucking bar technologies exhibited significantly reduced vibrations compared to the traditional steel bars. The results of this study, together with other information such as rivet quality, productivity, tool

  16. Laboratory and Workplace Assessments of Rivet Bucking Bar Vibration Emissions

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Thomas W.; Warren, Christopher; Xu, Xueyan S.; Welcome, Daniel E.; Dong, Ren G.

    2016-01-01

    Sheet metal workers operating rivet bucking bars are at risk of developing hand and wrist musculoskeletal disorders associated with exposures to hand-transmitted vibrations and forceful exertions required to operate these hand tools. New bucking bar technologies have been introduced in efforts to reduce workplace vibration exposures to these workers. However, the efficacy of these new bucking bar designs has not been well documented. While there are standardized laboratory-based methodologies for assessing the vibration emissions of many types of powered hand tools, no such standard exists for rivet bucking bars. Therefore, this study included the development of a laboratory-based method for assessing bucking bar vibrations which utilizes a simulated riveting task. With this method, this study evaluated three traditional steel bucking bars, three similarly shaped tungsten alloy bars, and three bars featuring spring-dampeners. For comparison the bucking bar vibrations were also assessed during three typical riveting tasks at a large aircraft maintenance facility. The bucking bars were rank-ordered in terms of unweighted and frequency-weighted acceleration measured at the hand-tool interface. The results suggest that the developed laboratory method is a reasonable technique for ranking bucking bar vibration emissions; the lab-based riveting simulations produced similar rankings to the workplace rankings. However, the laboratory-based acceleration averages were considerably lower than the workplace measurements. These observations suggest that the laboratory test results are acceptable for comparing and screening bucking bars, but the laboratory measurements should not be directly used for assessing the risk of workplace bucking bar vibration exposures. The newer bucking bar technologies exhibited significantly reduced vibrations compared to the traditional steel bars. The results of this study, together with other information such as rivet quality, productivity, tool

  17. The F-BAR domain of srGAP2 induces membrane protrusions required for neuronal migration and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guerrier, Sabrice; Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Sassa, Takayuki; Gresset, Aurélie; Jordan, Nicole Vincent; Cheng, Ken; Jin, Wei-Lin; Frost, Adam; Polleux, Franck

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY During brain development, proper neuronal migration and morphogenesis is critical for the establishment of functional neural circuits. Here we report that srGAP2 negatively regulates neuronal migration and induces neurite outgrowth and branching through the ability of its F-BAR domain to induce filopodia-like membrane protrusions resembling those induced by I-BAR domains in vivo and in vitro. Previous work has suggested that in non-neuronal cells, filopodia dynamics decreases the rate of cell migration and the persistence of leading edge protrusions. srGAP2 knockdown reduces leading process branching and increases the rate of neuronal migration in vivo. Overexpression of srGAP2 or its F-BAR domain has the opposite effects, increasing leading process branching and decreasing migration. These results (1) suggest that F-BAR domains are functionally diverse and (2) highlight the functional importance of proteins directly regulating membrane deformation for proper neuronal migration and morphogenesis. PMID:19737524

  18. Modelling of nonlinear wave scattering in a delaminated elastic bar

    PubMed Central

    Khusnutdinova, K. R.; Tranter, M. R.

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of layered structures, extensively used in modern industry, strongly depends on the quality of their interfaces; poor adhesion or delamination can lead to a failure of the structure. Can nonlinear waves help us to control the quality of layered structures? In this paper, we numerically model the dynamics of a long longitudinal strain solitary wave in a split, symmetric layered bar. The recently developed analytical approach, based on matching two asymptotic multiple-scales expansions and the integrability theory of the Korteweg–de Vries equation by the inverse scattering transform, is used to develop an effective semi-analytical numerical approach for these types of problems. We also employ a direct finite-difference method and compare the numerical results with each other, and with the analytical predictions. The numerical modelling confirms that delamination causes fission of an incident solitary wave and, thus, can be used to detect the defect. PMID:26730218

  19. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  20. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  1. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  2. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  3. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  4. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  5. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  6. 21 CFR 886.5800 - Ophthalmic bar reader.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 886.5800 Ophthalmic bar reader. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic bar reader is a device that consists of a magnifying lens intended for use by a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ophthalmic bar reader. 886.5800 Section...

  7. Orbits of selected stars in a barred Galactic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega-Mendoza, Hector; Allen, Christine; Moreno, Edmundo

    2008-10-01

    Stellar orbits were numerically integrated in the barred Galactic potential of Pichardo, Martos and Moreno (2004). The stellar sample was taken from the catalog of low-metallicity stars of Beers et al. (2000) with known kinematic information. We present a preliminary comparison of orbital parameters in both axisymmetric and barred potentials, emphasizing the dispersive effects introduced by the central Galactic bar.

  8. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  9. 33 CFR 13.01-10 - Gold and silver bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold and silver bars. 13.01-10... DECORATIONS, MEDALS, RIBBONS AND SIMILAR DEVICES Gold and Silver Lifesaving Medals, Bars, and Miniatures § 13.01-10 Gold and silver bars. No person shall receive more than one Gold Lifesaving Medal and...

  10. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject to these bar code...

  11. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  12. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  13. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  14. 21 CFR 201.25 - Bar code label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... drug product from the bar code label requirements set forth in this section. The exemption request must... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bar code label requirements. 201.25 Section 201.25...: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.25 Bar code label requirements. (a) Who is subject...

  15. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  16. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  17. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  18. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  19. 10 CFR 39.49 - Uranium sinker bars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uranium sinker bars. 39.49 Section 39.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.49 Uranium sinker bars. The licensee may use a uranium sinker bar in well logging applications only if it is...

  20. Chord, Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Detail in Plan; Crossbracing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord, Tie Bar & Crossbracing Joint Detail in Plan; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail in Plan; Chord Joining Detail in Plan & Elevation; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail in Section; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar & Horizontal Brace Joint Detail - Narrows Bridge, Spanning Sugar Creek at Old County Road 280 East, Marshall, Parke County, IN

  1. 12 CFR 380.32 - Claims bar date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Claims bar date. 380.32 Section 380.32 Banks... LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.32 Claims bar date. Upon its... bar date by which date creditors of the covered financial company shall present their claims,...

  2. 12. LOOKING NORTH INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR STOCKING AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. LOOKING NORTH INSIDE OF THE 22' BAR STOCKING AND FINISHING BUILDING AT THE 22' BAR MILL. RUNOUT TABLE ON LEFT AND THE SLOW COOLING PITS ON THE RIGHT. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, 22-Inch Bar Mill, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  3. 5 CFR 9701.305 - Bar on collective bargaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bar on collective bargaining. 9701.305... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration General § 9701.305 Bar on collective... established under authority of this subpart is not subject to collective bargaining. This bar on...

  4. 5 CFR 9701.205 - Bar on collective bargaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bar on collective bargaining. 9701.205... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification General § 9701.205 Bar on collective bargaining. As... under this subpart is not subject to collective bargaining. This bar on collective bargaining applies...

  5. 12 CFR 380.32 - Claims bar date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Claims bar date. 380.32 Section 380.32 Banks... LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.32 Claims bar date. Upon its... bar date by which date creditors of the covered financial company shall present their claims,...

  6. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  7. 12 CFR 380.32 - Claims bar date.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Claims bar date. 380.32 Section 380.32 Banks... LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.32 Claims bar date. Upon its... bar date by which date creditors of the covered financial company shall present their claims,...

  8. 5 CFR 9701.205 - Bar on collective bargaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bar on collective bargaining. 9701.205... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification General § 9701.205 Bar on collective bargaining. As... under this subpart is not subject to collective bargaining. This bar on collective bargaining applies...

  9. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  10. 5 CFR 9701.205 - Bar on collective bargaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bar on collective bargaining. 9701.205... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification General § 9701.205 Bar on collective bargaining. As... under this subpart is not subject to collective bargaining. This bar on collective bargaining applies...

  11. 5 CFR 9701.205 - Bar on collective bargaining.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bar on collective bargaining. 9701.205... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Classification General § 9701.205 Bar on collective bargaining. As... under this subpart is not subject to collective bargaining. This bar on collective bargaining applies...

  12. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  13. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  14. 33 CFR 110.130 - Bar Harbor, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bar Harbor, Maine. 110.130... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.130 Bar Harbor, Maine. (a) Anchorage grounds. (1) Anchorage “A” is that portion of Frenchman Bay, Bar Harbor, ME enclosed by a rhumb line connecting the...

  15. Access to Bathtub Grab Bars: Evidence of a Policy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkett, Nicholas; Nair, Rama; Murphy, Maureen; Roberge, Ginette; Lockett, Donna

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines access to bathtub grab bars in privately and publicly owned apartment buildings and explores the profile of seniors who have access to bathtub grab bars. Results indicate that bathtub grab bars were significantly more prevalent in apartments that were publicly owned (91.3%) as compared to privately owned (37.8%) (p lesser than…

  16. EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, BUFFALO PLANT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ROLL SHOP. 8" BAR MILL DESIGNED AND BUILT BY DONNER STEEL CO. (PREDECESSOR OF REPUBLIC), 1919-1920. FOR DESCRIPTION OF ORIGINAL MILL SEE "IRON AGE", 116\\4 (23 JULY 1925): 201-204. - LTV Steel, 8-inch Bar Mill, Buffalo Plant, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  17. A Local Reference For Bar Studies In The Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Sheth, Kartik; S4G Team

    2015-08-01

    Stellar bars are present in ~2/3 of nearby spirals and play a critical role in the evolution of their hosts. With the advent of large high-resolution imaging surveys, bar studies are being extended to distant galaxies. However, photometric studies of the distant universe are invariably subject to the effects of band-shifting, the progressive shift of the photometric band to bluer rest-frame wavelengths. In order to reliably characterize the intrinsic evolution of bars with redshift, safe from band-shifting effects, it is necessary to establish a local anchor of how bar properties vary with wavelength. We present a detailed multi-band study of bar properties from UV through mid-infrared for a sample of 16 large nearby barred galaxies. Based on ellipticity and position angle profiles resulting from fitting elliptical isophotes to the 2D light distribution of each galaxy, we find that both the bar length and the bar ellipticity increase at bluer wavebands. We attribute the increase in bar length to the frequent presence of prominent star forming knots at the end of bars: these regions are significantly brighter in bluer bands, resulting in the “artificial” lengthening of the bar. The increase in bar ellipticity, on the other hand, is driven by the bulge size: the bulge, composed primarily of old/red stars, is less prominent at bluer bands, allowing for thinner ellipses to be fit within the bar region. The resulting effect is that bars appear longer and thinner at bluer bands. Although we find that ~50% of the bars disappear in the UV, the results on bar ellipticity and length extend to those cases in which the bar is still visible in the UV. These results imply that careful correction for band-shifting effects is necessary for high-z studies to reliably gauge any intrinsic evolution of the bar properties with redshift. In the light of the ample space-based optical data now available, this study may be used as a reference to implement band-shifting corrections to

  18. Characterization of galactic bars from 3.6 μm S4G imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-García, S.; Salo, H.; Laurikainen, E.; Herrera-Endoqui, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Stellar bars play an essential role in the secular evolution of disk galaxies because they are responsible for the redistribution of matter and angular momentum. Dynamical models predict that bars become stronger and longer in time, while their rotation speed slows down. Aims: We use the Spitzer Survey of Stellar Structure in Galaxies (S4G) 3.6 μm imaging to study the properties (length and strength) and fraction of bars at z = 0 over a wide range of galaxy masses (M∗ ≈ 108-1011 M⊙) and Hubble types (-3 ≤ T ≤ 10). Methods: We calculated gravitational forces from the 3.6 μm images for galaxies with a disk inclination lower than 65°. We used the maximum of the tangential-to-radial force ratio in the bar region (Qb) as a measure of the bar-induced perturbation strength for a sample of ~600 barred galaxies. We also used the maximum of the normalized m = 2 Fourier density amplitude (A2max) to characterize the bar. Bar sizes were estimated i) visually; ii) from ellipse fitting; iii) from the radii of the strongest torque; and iv) from the radii of the largest m = 2 Fourier amplitude in the bar region. By combining our force calculations with the H i kinematics from the literature, we estimated the ratio of the halo-to-stellar mass (Mh/M∗) within the optical disk and by further using the universal rotation curve models, we obtained a first-order model of the rotation curve decomposition of 1128 disk galaxies. Results: We probe possible sources of uncertainty in our Qb measurements: the assumed scale height and its radial variation, the influence of the spiral arms torques, the effect of non-stellar emission in the bar region, and the dilution of the bar forces by the dark matter halo (our models imply that only ~10% of the disks in our sample are maximal). We find that for early- and intermediate-type disks (-3 ≤ T< 5), the relatively modest influence of the dark matter halo leads to a systematic reduction of the mean Qb by about 10-15%, which is

  19. [x, p] = i{h_bar} ?

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jau

    1996-03-01

    Heisenberg`s commutation relation for position x and momentum p, and its validity for relativistic harmonic oscillators are examined, using the techniques of Lie algebra and dual-bosonic representation of x, p and the Hamiltonian H. A modification with [x, p] =i{h_bar}({minus_plus} 1 + H/m{sub 0}c{sup 2}) is proposed for a particle and an antiparticle in a harmonic potential. For a 2 {times} 2 matrix representation for x, p and H operators, the quantized eigenenergy E is given by (E - m{sub 0}c{sup 2})/{h_bar}{omega} = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2, ..., where 1/2 is not allowed.

  20. ALIP with conducting bars in the channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishbergs, R.

    2009-03-01

    Electromagnetic processes in the channel of a cylindrical induction pump having longitudinal copper bars of large electric conductivity have been analyzed. The possibility to increase the pressure developed by the pump if compared to the usual pump (ALIP) is considered as well as the increase of the coefficient of pressure head weakening k_{0 c} more than unity and its effects on the efficiency coefficient. Figs 5, Refs 5.

  1. Hadron Physics in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lafferty, G.D.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-29

    Some recent results in hadron physics from the BaBar experiment are discussed. In particular, the observation of two new charmed states, the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and the D*{sub sJ}{sup +}(2457), is described, and results are presented on the first measurement of the rare decay mode of the B meson, B{sup 0} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}.

  2. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Barred Owl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the barred owl (Strix varia). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  3. Gas and Dust in the Orion Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab, H.; Compiègne, M.; Habart, E.; Abergel, A.

    2011-11-01

    We use the DustEM model coupled with a radiative transfer code to fit the Herschel and Spitzer emission of the Orion Bar. The thermal dust emission at the 250-μm peak position is well reproduced but we overestimate the stochastically heated grain emission. The dust model parameters are checked with the Meudon PDR code and are consistent with the spectroscopic data from the SPIRE FTS.

  4. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  5. New Spectroscopy at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzoni, M.A.; /INFN, Rome

    2007-04-18

    The Babar experiment at the SLAC B factory has accumulated a high luminosity that offers the possibility of systematic studies of quarkonium spectroscopy and of investigating rare new phenomena. Recent results in this field are presented. In recent times spectroscopy has become exciting again, after the discovery of new states that are not easily explained by conventional models. States such as the X(3872) and the Y(4260) could be new excited charmonium states, but require precise measurements for positive identification. The BaBar experiment [1] is installed at the asymmetric storage ring PEP-II. 90% of the data accumulated by BaBar are taken at the Y(4S) (10.58 GeV) and 10% just below (10.54 GeV). The BaBar detector includes a 5-layer, double-sided silicon vertex tracker and a 40-layer drift chamber in a 1.5 T solenoidal magnetic field, which detect charged particles and measures their momenta and ionization energy losses. Photons, electrons, and neutral hadrons are detected with a CsI(Tl)-crystal electromagnetic calorimeter. An internally reflecting ring-imaging Cherenkov is also used for particle id. Penetrating muon and neutral hadrons are identified by an array of resistive-plate chambers embedded in the steel of the flux return. The detector allows good track and vertex resolution, good particle id and good photon detection so it is especially suited for spectroscopy studies.

  6. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  7. Development of immersion quenching of small diameter bars

    SciTech Connect

    Bunte, C.

    1996-12-31

    A change of process in the quenching of 25.40 mm (1 inch) bars in UNI41Cr4 (SAE 5140) was implemented. The change consisted in the passage from induction quenching to immersion quenching in a polymer solution bath. The tests were made on bars of 6.00 meters long, disposed in separate layers. The results were satisfactory: (a) A good homogeneity in the average center hardness of bars. (b) Low distortion of bars. (c) No cracks were found. Afterwards, tests were made on longer bars (9.50 meters) with the same results. This change of process allowed an important reduction of fabrication costs.

  8. The structure of the Milky Way's bar outside the bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegg, Christopher; Gerhard, Ortwin; Portail, Matthieu

    2015-07-01

    While it is incontrovertible that the inner Galaxy contains a bar, its structure near the Galactic plane has remained uncertain, where extinction from intervening dust is greatest. We investigate here the Galactic bar outside the bulge, the long bar, using red clump giant (RCG) stars from United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey, Two Micron All Sky Survey, Vista Variables in the Via Lactea and Galactic Legacy Infrared Midplane Survey Extraordinaire. We match and combine these surveys to investigate a wide area in latitude and longitude, |b| ≤ 9° and |l| ≤ 40°. We find (i) the bar extends to l ˜ 25° at |b| ˜ 5° from the Galactic plane, and to l ˜ 30° at lower latitudes; (ii) the long bar has an angle to the line-of-sight in the range (28°-33°), consistent with studies of the bulge at |l| < 10°; (iii) the scale height of RCG stars smoothly transitions from the bulge to the thinner long bar; (iv) there is evidence for two scale heights in the long bar; we find a ˜180 pc thin bar component reminiscent of the old thin disc near the Sun, and a ˜45 pc superthin bar components which exist predominantly towards the bar end; (v) constructing parametric models for the red clump magnitude distributions, we find a bar half-length of 5.0 ± 0.2 kpc for the two-component bar, and 4.6 ± 0.3 kpc for the thin bar component alone. We conclude that the Milky Way contains a central box/peanut bulge which is the vertical extension of a longer, flatter bar, similar as seen in both external galaxies and N-body models.

  9. Kinematic imprints from the bar and spiral structures in the galatic disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueras, F.; Antoja, T.; Valenzuela, O.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.

    2011-12-01

    At 140 years of the discovery of the moving groups, these stellar streams are emerging as powerful tools to constrain the models for the spiral arms and the Galactic bar in the Gaia era. From the kinematic-age-metallicity analysis in the solar neighbourhood it is now well established that some of these kinematic structures have a dynamical origin, different from the classical cluster disruption hypothesis. Test particle simulations allow us to definitively establish that these local structures can be created by the dynamical resonances of material spiral arms and not exclusively by the Galactic bar. First studies to evaluate the capabilities of the future Gaia data to detect and characterize moving groups at 2-6 kpc from the solar neighborhood are discussed.

  10. Discovering shared segments on the migration route of the bar-headed goose by time-based plane-sweeping trajectory clustering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luo, Ze; Baoping, Yan; Takekawa, John Y.; Prosser, Diann J.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new method to help ornithologists and ecologists discover shared segments on the migratory pathway of the bar-headed geese by time-based plane-sweeping trajectory clustering. We present a density-based time parameterized line segment clustering algorithm, which extends traditional comparable clustering algorithms from temporal and spatial dimensions. We present a time-based plane-sweeping trajectory clustering algorithm to reveal the dynamic evolution of spatial-temporal object clusters and discover common motion patterns of bar-headed geese in the process of migration. Experiments are performed on GPS-based satellite telemetry data from bar-headed geese and results demonstrate our algorithms can correctly discover shared segments of the bar-headed geese migratory pathway. We also present findings on the migratory behavior of bar-headed geese determined from this new analytical approach.

  11. Observation of B+ -> K0bar K+ and B0 -> K0 K0bar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-08-16

    The authors report observations of the b {yields} d penguin-dominated decays B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0} in approximately 350 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +}) = (1.61 {+-} 0.44 {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0}) = (1.08 {+-} 0.28 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -6}, and the CP-violating charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub CP} ({bar K}{sup 0} K{sup +}) = 0.10 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.03. Using a vertexing technique previously employed in several analyses of all-neutral final states containing kaons, they report the first measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, obtaining S = -1.28{sub -0.73 -0.16}{sup +0.80 +0.11} and C = -0.40 {+-} 0.41 {+-} 0.06. They also report improved measurements of the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0} {pi}{sup +}) = (23.9 {+-} 1.1 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup -6} and CP-violating charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub CP} (K{sup 0} {pi}{sup +}) = -0.029 {+-} 0.039 {+-} 0.010.

  12. The Nature and Nurture of Bars and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Abreu, J.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Corsini, E. M.; Zarattini, S.

    2012-12-01

    The effects that interactions produce on galaxy disks and how they modify the subsequent formation of bars need to be distinguished to fully understand the relationship between bars and environment. To this aim we derive the bar fraction in three different environments ranging from the field to Virgo and Coma Clusters, covering an unprecedentedly large range of galaxy luminosities (or, equivalently, stellar masses). We confirm that the fraction of barred galaxies strongly depends on galaxy luminosity. We also show that the difference between the bar fraction distributions as a function of galaxy luminosity (and mass) in the field and Coma Cluster is statistically significant, with Virgo being an intermediate case. The fraction of barred galaxies shows a maximum of about 50% at Mr ~= - 20.5 in clusters, whereas the peak is shifted to Mr ~= - 19 in the field. We interpret this result as a variation of the effect of environment on bar formation depending on galaxy luminosity. We speculate that brighter disk galaxies are stable enough against interactions to keep their cold structure, thus, the interactions are able to trigger bar formation. For fainter galaxies, the interactions become strong enough to heat up the disks inhibiting bar formation and even destroying the disks. Finally, we point out that the controversy regarding whether the bar fraction depends on environment could be resolved by taking into account the different luminosity ranges probed by the galaxy samples studied so far.

  13. THE NATURE AND NURTURE OF BARS AND DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Abreu, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Zarattini, S.; Corsini, E. M.

    2012-12-10

    The effects that interactions produce on galaxy disks and how they modify the subsequent formation of bars need to be distinguished to fully understand the relationship between bars and environment. To this aim we derive the bar fraction in three different environments ranging from the field to Virgo and Coma Clusters, covering an unprecedentedly large range of galaxy luminosities (or, equivalently, stellar masses). We confirm that the fraction of barred galaxies strongly depends on galaxy luminosity. We also show that the difference between the bar fraction distributions as a function of galaxy luminosity (and mass) in the field and Coma Cluster is statistically significant, with Virgo being an intermediate case. The fraction of barred galaxies shows a maximum of about 50% at M{sub r} {approx_equal} - 20.5 in clusters, whereas the peak is shifted to M{sub r} {approx_equal} - 19 in the field. We interpret this result as a variation of the effect of environment on bar formation depending on galaxy luminosity. We speculate that brighter disk galaxies are stable enough against interactions to keep their cold structure, thus, the interactions are able to trigger bar formation. For fainter galaxies, the interactions become strong enough to heat up the disks inhibiting bar formation and even destroying the disks. Finally, we point out that the controversy regarding whether the bar fraction depends on environment could be resolved by taking into account the different luminosity ranges probed by the galaxy samples studied so far.

  14. CP Violation at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Yeche, Christophe; /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2011-11-15

    We report recent measurements of the three CKM angles of the Unitarity Triangle using about 383 millions b{bar b} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. The results of the angles ({beta}, {alpha}, {gamma}) of the unitarity triangle are consistent with Belle results, and with other CKM constraints such as the measurement of {epsilon}{sub K}, the length of the sides of the unitarity triangle determined from the measurements of {Delta}m{sub d}, {Delta}m{sub s}, |V{sub ub}|. This is an impressive confirmation of Standard Model in quark-flavor sector.

  15. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  16. Fast scintillation counters with WLS bars

    SciTech Connect

    Bezzubov, V.; Denisov, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Evdokimov, V.; Galyaev, A.; Goncharov, P.; Gurzhiev, S.; Kostritsky, A.; Kozelov, A.; Stoianova, D.; Denisov, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Ito, A.S.; Johns, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Do/ collaboration is building 4608 scintillation counters to upgrade forward muon system for the next Fermilab Collider run. Each counter consists of 12.7 mm thick scintillator plate with two WLS bars along two sides for the light collection. With average 10{sup 2} photoelectrons from {ital mip} particle the counters provide time resolution below 1ns and have good energy resolution. Results of Bicron 404A scintillator and Kumarin 30 WLS aging under irradiation up to 3Mrad are presented. With specially designed magnetic shielding counters can operate in magnetic filed up to 500G. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Hadron Physics at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, David; /SLAC

    2005-10-26

    The BaBar experiment at SLAC is designed to measure CP violation in the B meson system, however the very high statistics combined with the different e{sup +} and e{sup -} beam energies, the detector design and the open trigger allow a wide variety of spectroscopic measurements. We are beginning to tap this potential via several production mechanisms. Here we present recent results from initial state radiation, hadronic jets, few body B and D hadron decays, and interactions in the detector material. We also summarize measurements relevant to D{sub s} meson spectroscopy, pentaquarks and charmonium spectroscopy from multiple production mechanisms.

  18. Predicting Error Bars for QSAR Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeter, Timon; Schwaighofer, Anton; Mika, Sebastian; Ter Laak, Antonius; Suelzle, Detlev; Ganzer, Ursula; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2007-09-01

    Unfavorable physicochemical properties often cause drug failures. It is therefore important to take lipophilicity and water solubility into account early on in lead discovery. This study presents log D7 models built using Gaussian Process regression, Support Vector Machines, decision trees and ridge regression algorithms based on 14556 drug discovery compounds of Bayer Schering Pharma. A blind test was conducted using 7013 new measurements from the last months. We also present independent evaluations using public data. Apart from accuracy, we discuss the quality of error bars that can be computed by Gaussian Process models, and ensemble and distance based techniques for the other modelling approaches.

  19. Predicting Error Bars for QSAR Models

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeter, Timon; Mika, Sebastian; Ter Laak, Antonius; Suelzle, Detlev; Ganzer, Ursula; Heinrich, Nikolaus; Mueller, Klaus-Robert

    2007-09-18

    Unfavorable physicochemical properties often cause drug failures. It is therefore important to take lipophilicity and water solubility into account early on in lead discovery. This study presents log D{sub 7} models built using Gaussian Process regression, Support Vector Machines, decision trees and ridge regression algorithms based on 14556 drug discovery compounds of Bayer Schering Pharma. A blind test was conducted using 7013 new measurements from the last months. We also present independent evaluations using public data. Apart from accuracy, we discuss the quality of error bars that can be computed by Gaussian Process models, and ensemble and distance based techniques for the other modelling approaches.

  20. Failure Waves in Cylindrical Glass Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazamias, James U.; Bless, Stephan J.; Marder, Michael P.

    1997-07-01

    Failure waves, a propagating front separating virgin and comminuted material, have been receiving a fair amount of attention the last couple of years. While most scientists have been looking at failure waves in plate impact geometries, we have conducted a series of experiments on Pyrex bars. In this paper, we present two types of photographic data from a series of tests. A streak camera was used to determine velocities of the failure front as a function of impact stress. A polaroid camera and a flash lamp provide detailed pictures of the actual event. Attempts were made to observe failure waves in amorphous quartz and acrylic.

  1. Changes in Bar Morphology in an Aggrading Gravel Bed River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    The River Wharfe, UK, is an aggrading gravel bed river, with frequent gravel bars. Management of the river system requires information about the rate and processes of change occurring to the gravel storage within the bars. From a scientific perspective, there are questions about how bar morphology changes as bars are deposited and eroded in this single thread system, about the extent to which flow conditions drive morphological change, and about the extent to which morphological changes can be predicted. Morphological changes of ten bars along the River Wharfe are reported between early 2012 and late 2014. The bars span a 6 km long length of river, downstream of the point where the river emerges from a confined valley. The bars range in length from 25 to 135 m. Bar grain size decreases downstream as a consequence of strong downstream fining. Bar morphology was surveyed using Terrestrial Laser Scanning at four time periods between early 2012 and late 2014. Each bar was surveyed from at least two scan positions, and georeferenced using a network of permanent survey markers. After initial processing to register the point clouds and remove vegetation, the change detection algorithm M3C2 was used to identify areas of significant volumetric change. The measured morphological changes between 2012 and 2013 indicate predominantly depositional changes on the bars, with an overall downstream decrease in the volume of change. However, there are local variations superimposed on this pattern. The mechanisms by which the bars change vary between bars, and include downstream progression of an avalanche face and gravel sheet infilling of local hollows. The measured changes are compared to flow data over the study period to identify the extent to which they are driven by flow.

  2. DEPENDENCE OF BARRED GALAXY FRACTION ON GALAXY PROPERTIES AND ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gwang-Ho; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: yy.choi@khu.ac.kr

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the dependence of the occurrence of bars in galaxies on galaxy properties and environment. We use a volume-limited sample of 33,391 galaxies brighter than M{sub r} = -19.5 + 5logh at 0.02 {<=} z {<=} 0.05489, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. We classify the galaxies into early and late types, and identify bars by visual inspection. Among 10,674 late-type galaxies with axis ratio b/a > 0.60, we find 3240 barred galaxies (f{sub bar} = 30.4%) which divide into 2542 strong bars (f{sub SB1} = 23.8%) and 698 weak bars (f{sub SB2} = 6.5%). We find that f{sub SB1} increases as u - r color becomes redder and that it has a maximum value at intermediate velocity dispersion ({sigma} {approx_equal}150 km s{sup -1}). This trend suggests that strong bars are dominantly hosted by intermediate-mass systems. Weak bars prefer bluer galaxies with lower mass and lower concentration. In the case of strong bars, their dependence on the concentration index appears only for massive galaxies with {sigma} > 150 km s{sup -1}. We also find that f{sub bar} does not directly depend on the large-scale background density when other physical parameters (u - r color or {sigma}) are fixed. We discover that f{sub SB1} decreases as the separation to the nearest neighbor galaxy becomes smaller than 0.1 times the virial radius of the neighbor regardless of neighbor's morphology. These results imply that strong bars are likely to be destroyed during strong tidal interactions and that the mechanism for this phenomenon is gravitational and not hydrodynamical. The fraction of weak bars has no correlation with environmental parameters. We do not find any direct evidence for environmental stimulation of bar formation.

  3. Search for the decay of a B0 or B0bar meson to K*0bar K0 or K*0 K0bar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-06-27

    The authors present a search for the decay of a B{sup 0} or {bar B}{sup 0} meson to a {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0} or K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0} final state, using a sample of approximately 232 million B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. The measured branching fraction is {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) = (0.2{sub -0.8, -0.3}{sup +0.9, +0.1}) x 10{sup -6}. They obtain the following upper limit for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0} K{sup 0}) + {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {bar K}{sup 0}) < 1.9 x 10{sup -6}. They use our result to constrain the Standard Model prediction for the deviation of the CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sup 0} from sin 2{beta}.

  4. Galaxy Zoo: the effect of bar-driven fuelling on the presence of an active galactic nucleus in disc galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, Melanie A.; Willett, Kyle W.; Fortson, Lucy F.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Schawinski, Kevin; Cheung, Edmond; Lintott, Chris J.; Masters, Karen L.; Melvin, Thomas; Simmons, Brooke D.

    2015-04-01

    We study the influence of the presence of a strong bar in disc galaxies which host an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and morphological classifications from the Galaxy Zoo 2 project, we create a volume-limited sample of 19 756 disc galaxies at 0.01 < z < 0.05 which have been visually examined for the presence of a bar. Within this sample, AGN host galaxies have a higher overall percentage of bars (51.8 per cent) than inactive galaxies exhibiting central star formation (37.1 per cent). This difference is primarily due to known effects: that the presence of both AGN and galactic bars is strongly correlated with both the stellar mass and integrated colour of the host galaxy. We control for this effect by examining the difference in AGN fraction between barred and unbarred galaxies in fixed bins of mass and colour. Once this effect is accounted for, there remains a small but statistically significant increase that represents 16 per cent of the average barred AGN fraction. Using the L_{[O III]}/MBH ratio as a measure of AGN strength, we show that barred AGNs do not exhibit stronger accretion than unbarred AGNs at a fixed mass and colour. The data are consistent with a model in which bar-driven fuelling does contribute to the probability of an actively growing black hole, but in which other dynamical mechanisms must contribute to the direct AGN fuelling via smaller, non-axisymmetric perturbations.

  5. Mapping the Anapa bay bar geosystems on the basis of satellite remote sensing and ground data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, Valentina I.; Tutubalina, Olga V.; Krylenko, Vyacheslav V.; Krylenko, Marina V.; Chalova, Ekaterina R.

    2015-06-01

    Our study is focused on the Anapa Bay Bar, a 43-km long body of sand on the Black Sea coast, which stretches from the Russian town of Anapa to the Zhelezny Rog Cape on the Taman' peninsula. It is a major recreational resource and a host to unique ecosystems of beaches and partially vegetated sand dunes. Due to large recreational pressure, it is important to identify features of the bay bar that have to be preserved in order to keep this resource sustainable. We have conducted landscape and morphological mapping with WorldView-2 images. Methods included field research, analysis of multitemporal stereopairs and automated image interpretation to create maps of key areas of the Anapa Bay Bar. In our paper we showcase the map for a section of the Anapa Bay Bar created through visual image interpretation. It presents all morphological elements such as beaches, sand dunes, sand ridges and lowlands adjoining lagoons. Each element has its specific vegetation and sustainability against recreational pressure. We also present results of automated image analysis of seasonal dynamics of the beach and dunes on the basis of multitemporal imagery.

  6. Moving Groups in the Milky Way Halo and Disk Induced by the Bar and Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, William John

    2015-08-01

    In a previous study (Moreno et al. 2015), the use of a detailed Milky Way potential (observationally and dynamically constrained) has shown that the Galactic bar is able to efficiently concentrate stars of the stellar halo and disk into several main resonances. With the tools introduced here, the Galactic bar is shown to produce significant phase-space structure attracting stars to several main resonances. This new study is dedicated to the study of known groups of the Galactic halo and disk, and their relation to these resonances. Stars belonging to some known halo and disk moving groups have settled down along these bar resonant families, showing, in some cases, a likely Galactic secular origin. In general, the 2D resonant orbits of the disk produced by the bar, seem to dominate at large scale-heights (several kiloparsecs) into the Galactic halo. In particular, provisionally six of the members of the Kapteyn halo moving group seem to be associated with one of these resonances, and also the Groombridge 1830 (Eggen 1996a; Eggen & Sandage 1959) and especially the newer halo moving groups G21-22 and G18-39 (Silva et al. 2012) show some correlation with these resonances suggesting possible secular origins, while the halo moving group Ross 451 (Eggen 1996b) does not show any such correlation, indicating a more probable cosmological (non-secular) ancestry. All Galactic disk moving groups (such as Arcturus, Hercules, Castor, IC 2391, Hyades, Pleiades, and Ursa Major) show considerable association with these resonances.

  7. Structure of Dimeric and Tetrameric Complexes of the BAR Domain Protein PICK1 Determined by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten L; Thorsen, Thor S; Johner, Niklaus; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Erlendsson, Simon; Tian, Xinsheng; Simonsen, Jens B; Høiberg-Nielsen, Rasmus; Christensen, Nikolaj M; Khelashvili, George; Streicher, Werner; Teilum, Kaare; Vestergaard, Bente; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Arleth, Lise; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2015-07-01

    PICK1 is a neuronal scaffolding protein containing a PDZ domain and an auto-inhibited BAR domain. BAR domains are membrane-sculpting protein modules generating membrane curvature and promoting membrane fission. Previous data suggest that BAR domains are organized in lattice-like arrangements when stabilizing membranes but little is known about structural organization of BAR domains in solution. Through a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis, we determine the structure of dimeric and tetrameric complexes of PICK1 in solution. SAXS and biochemical data reveal a strong propensity of PICK1 to form higher-order structures, and SAXS analysis suggests an offset, parallel mode of BAR-BAR oligomerization. Furthermore, unlike accessory domains in other BAR domain proteins, the positioning of the PDZ domains is flexible, enabling PICK1 to perform long-range, dynamic scaffolding of membrane-associated proteins. Together with functional data, these structural findings are compatible with a model in which oligomerization governs auto-inhibition of BAR domain function. PMID:26073603

  8. On the nature of high-mass states observed in {bar N}N annihilation at rest into 3 pseudoscalars

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, A.A.; Montanet, L.

    1994-09-01

    The peaks at large masses of systems {pi}{pi}, {pi}{eta}, and {eta}{eta} produced in {bar N}N annihilation at rest into 3 pseudoscalars are shown to be connected to the dynamics of the nucleon-exchange mechanism. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  9. $D^0 \\bar{D}^0$ Mixing at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Jonathon; /SLAC

    2011-10-26

    This article reviews the recent measurement of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with the D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi} decay channel from the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B-Factory. Averages from the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group between this result and a previous result from BELLE are also presented.

  10. BARS/SSC/SPHINX4.0. BARS Bibliographic Data Retrieval System

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W.

    1993-06-01

    BARS is a program which allows retrieval of information from suitable bibliographic databases. Two databases are included, SSC and SPHINX, which together list bibliographic information for some 12,000 references related to the fields of shock compression of condensed media, high rate deformation of solids, and detonation.

  11. Bar slowdown and the distribution of dark matter in barred galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    2014-02-01

    `Conspiracy' between the dark and the baryonic matter prohibits an unambiguous decomposition of disc galaxy rotation curves into the corresponding components. Several methods have been proposed to counter this difficulty, but their results are widely discrepant. In this paper, I revisit one of these methods, which relies on the relation between the halo density and the decrease of the bar pattern speed. The latter is routinely characterized by the ratio R of the corotation radius RCR to the bar length Lb, R = R_CR/L_b. I use a set of N-body+SPH simulations, including subgrid physics, whose initial conditions cover a range of gas fractions and halo shapes. The models, by construction, have roughly the same azimuthally averaged circular velocity curve and halo density and they are all submaximal, i.e. according to previous works, they are expected to have all roughly the same R value, well outside the fast bar range (1.2 ± 0.2). Contrary to these expectations, however, these simulations end up having widely different R values, either within the fast bar range or well outside it. This shows that the R value cannot constrain the halo density, nor determine whether galactic discs are maximal or submaximal. I argue that this is true even for early-type discs (S0s and Sas).

  12. Automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction using robust montmorillonite/epoxy-coated stir bars.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Milad; Saraji, Mohammad; Maya, Fernando; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Herein we present a simple, rapid and low cost strategy for the preparation of robust stir bar coatings based on the combination of montmorillonite with epoxy resin. The composite stir bar was implemented in a novel automated multisyringe stir bar sorptive extraction system (MS-SBSE), and applied to the extraction of four chlorophenols (4-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol) as model compounds, followed by high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection. The different experimental parameters of the MS-SBSE, such as sample volume, selection of the desorption solvent, desorption volume, desorption time, sample solution pH, salt effect and extraction time were studied. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were between 0.02 and 0.34μgL(-1). Relative standard deviations (RSD) of the method for the analytes at 10μgL(-1) concentration level ranged from 3.5% to 4.1% (as intra-day RSD) and from 3.9% to 4.3% (as inter-day RSD at 50μgL(-1) concentration level). Batch-to-batch reproducibility for three different stir bars was 4.6-5.1%. The enrichment factors were between 30 and 49. In order to investigate the capability of the developed technique for real sample analysis, well water, wastewater and leachates from a solid waste treatment plant were satisfactorily analyzed. PMID:27062720

  13. Strain-induced folding on [ 1 1 bar 1 bar ]-copper single crystals under uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagin, D. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Alfyorova, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    Using uniaxial compression we studied the mechanical instability by folded structure formation on initially smooth and plain faces of copper single crystals with deformation axis orientation along [ 1 1 bar 1 bar ]. These folded structures can be found within several zones on the crystal's faces after compression test. We classified the folds based upon their scale, localization, state of the interfold boundaries, presence and amount of the slip bands in the folds. Subsurface crystalline lattice reorientation by deformation banding has been found to be the reason for folded structures generation. We suggest that folds generated on the [ 1 1 bar 1 bar ]-single crystals under compression are the inherent surface relief components which denote the deformation processes occurring both in the subsurface and in the bulk of the sample. In view of that, they can be used for analyzing the deformation under compression along with other surface structural components. The main specificity behind the folded structure generation mechanism which differs them from other orientations is slipping by parallel octahedral planes in some specific local areas.

  14. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; /SLAC

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  15. Sillicon Photomultiplier and Scintillator Bar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To analyze extraterrestrial cosmic rays via precise measurements of airshower axes directions of penetrating particles such as muons, we constructed a model detector consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is fitted with green wavelength shifting fibers to modulate input for two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the performance of these devices. Two makes of SiPMs were evaluated - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. In order to filter out noise, timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detector arrays in self-triggered mode. The DRS4 Digitizer 4-channel fast waveform sampler digitized SiPM detector waveforms. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. The speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules was found to be approximately 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  16. Boxy/Peanut/X Bulges, Barlenses and the Thick Part of Galactic Bars: What Are They and How Did They Form?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanassoula, E.

    Bars have a complex three-dimensional shape. In particular their inner part is vertically much thicker than the parts further out. Viewed edge-on, the thick part of the bar is what is commonly known as a boxy-, peanut-, or X- bulge and viewed face-on it is referred to as a barlens. These components are due to disc and bar instabilities and are composed of disc material. I review here their formation, evolution and dynamics, using simulations, orbital structure theory and comparisons to observations.

  17. A comparative study of mineralized biocomposites: Hierarchical structure, quasi-static and dynamic mechanical behavior, and toughening mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Yu

    Antlers have a primary function in combat and are designed for sustaining high impact loading and bending moment without fracture. Learning from antler may shed a new light on traumatic bone fracture prevention and development of novel fracture-resistant, impact-absorbent materials. Antlers have a similar microstructure as bones, composed mainly of type-I collagen fibrils and carbonated apatite crystals, arranged in osteons in the compact bone and trabeculae in the cancellous bone. However, antlers have lower mineral content and consist mainly of primary osteons. The structure of antler at various hierarchical levels was thoroughly characterized and examined using various techniques and compared with bovine femur. Quasi-static mechanical tests (three-point bending, compression, and nanoindentation) were conducted on elk antlers and the results were compared to reported data. The flexural strength and elastic modulus are similar to other antlers but lower than bovine femur. However, the antler has much higher work of fracture and fracture toughness compared with bone. Dynamic behavior of antler was investigated using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar system. Results showed that antler can sustain large amount of deformation without catastrophic fracture. In situ mechanical testing under ESEM was performed to examine crack propagation in the longitudinal and transverse orientations in compact antler. Nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics were applied to determine R-curves. The fracture toughness in the transverse orientation is much higher than that in the longitudinal orientation due to crack deflections/twists at the hypermineralized interface and the rising R-curve behavior was observed. Synchrotron X-ray computed tomography and SEM images showed toughening mechanisms, including crack deflections/twists, uncracked ligament and collagen fiber bridging. The structure and compressive mechanical properties of the mineral and protein constituents in cancellous antler and

  18. Face on Barred and Ringed Spiral Galaxy NGC 3351

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet image (left) and visual image (right) of the face on barred and ringed spiral galaxy NGC 3351 (M95). The morphological appearance of a galaxy can change dramatically between visual and ultraviolet wavelengths. In the case of M95, the nucleus and bar dominate the visual image. In the ultraviolet, the bar is not even visible and the ring and spiral arms dominate.

  19. Uncertainties in the deprojection of the observed bar properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yanfei; Shen, Juntai; Li, Zhao-Yu

    2014-08-10

    In observations, it is important to deproject the two fundamental quantities characterizing a bar, i.e., its length (a) and ellipticity (e), to face-on values before any careful analyses. However, systematic estimation on the uncertainties of the commonly used deprojection methods is still lacking. Simulated galaxies are well suited in this study. We project two simulated barred galaxies onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane with different bar orientations and disk inclination angles (i). Bar properties are measured and deprojected with the popular deprojection methods in the literature. Generally speaking, deprojection uncertainties increase with increasing i. All of the deprojection methods behave badly when i is larger than 60°, due to the vertical thickness of the bar. Thus, future statistical studies of barred galaxies should exclude galaxies more inclined than 60°. At moderate inclination angles (i ≤ 60°), 2D deprojection methods (analytical and image stretching), and Fourier-based methods (Fourier decomposition and bar-interbar contrast) perform reasonably well with uncertainties ∼10% in both the bar length and ellipticity, whereas the uncertainties of the one-dimensional (1D) analytical deprojection can be as high as 100% in certain extreme cases. We find that different bar measurement methods show systematic differences in the deprojection uncertainties. We further discuss the deprojection uncertainty factors with the emphasis on the most important one, i.e., the three-dimensional structure of the bar itself. We construct two triaxial toy bar models that can qualitatively reproduce the results of the 1D and 2D analytical deprojections; they confirm that the vertical thickness of the bar is the main source of uncertainties.

  20. Magnetic Fields in Barred Spiral Galaxies: NGC 2442 & NGC 7552

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehle, M.; Harnett, J. I.; Beck, R.; Haynes, R. F.; Gray, A.

    2002-12-01

    We report on the total and polarised radio continuum emission of the southern barred galaxies NGC 2442 and NGC 7552 observed with the ATCA at λ6 cm (cf. Harnett et al. 2002). These galaxies form part of a sample of 20 barred galaxies mapped at several wavelengths with the ATCA and VLA (Beck et al. 2002) to study the role of magnetic fields in the bar with respect to the gas flow and star formation.

  1. Record-brightness laser-diode bars for fiber coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, M.; Pathak, R.; Ellison, S.; Eppich, H.; Campbell, G.; Vignati, J.; Jacob, J. H.; Lang, K. D.; Chin, R. H.; Knapczyk, M. T.; Sun, W.; Fulghum, S. F.; Chin, A. K.

    2012-03-01

    High brightness, laser-diode bars are required for efficient coupling into small-core optical-fibers. Record power and brightness results were achieved using 20% fill-factor, 980nm, 1cm-wide, 4mm cavity-length bars. Lifetimes of single bars, operated CW at 200W and 20°C, exceed 1000hr. Due to superb thermal management, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) exceeds 60% at 200W output power. Similar lifetime and PCE were obtained for a 3-bar stack emitting 600W output power.

  2. Bars in Field and Cluster Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazza, F. D.; Jablonka, P.; Ediscs Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    We present the first study of large-scale bars in clusters at intermediate redshifts (z=0.4-0.8). We compare the properties of the bars and their host galaxies in the clusters with those of a field sample in the same redshift range. We use a sample of 945 moderately inclined disk galaxies drawn from the EDisCS project. The morphological classification of the galaxies and the detection of bars are based on deep HST/ACS F814W images. The total optical bar fraction in the redshift range z=0.4-0.8, averaged over the entire sample, is 25%. This is lower than found locally, but in good agreement with studies of bars in field environments at intermediate redshifts. For the cluster and field subsamples, we measure bar fractions of 24% and 29%, respectively. In agreement with local studies, we find that disk-dominated galaxies have a higher bar fraction than bulge-dominated galaxies. We also find, based on a small subsample, that bars in clusters are on average longer than in the field and preferentially found close to the cluster center, where the bar fraction is somewhat higher than at larger distances.

  3. Measurement of the B0-bar Lifetime and the B0B0-bar Oscillation Frequency Using Partially Reconstructed B0-bar to D*+ l- nu-bar Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-07-27

    The authors present a simultaneous measurement of the {bar B}{sup 0} lifetime {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub d}. We use a sample of about 50,000 partially reconstructed {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays identified with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at SLAC. The flavor of the other B meson in the event is determined from the charge of another high-momentum lepton.

  4. An exploratory study of drug use in bar environments

    PubMed Central

    Trocki, Karen; Michalak, Laurence; McDaniel, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of bars where drug use was observed compared to those where no drug use was observed. The study was done through a combination of qualitative and quantitative techniques gleaned through observations and interviews. Among the most important of indicators were the type of activity (particularly dancing) and the level of rowdiness evident in the bars. In addition drug use bars had higher levels of other types of rule-breaking. Patron characteristics (more men) and behavioral patterns (more sexual risk-taking) also distinguished these bars. PMID:25221431

  5. Multipacting Analysis of the Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is being considered for a number of applications. Multipacting can be a limiting factor to the performance of in any superconducting structure. In the parallel-bar cavity the main contribution to the deflection is due to the transverse deflecting voltage, between the parallel bars, making the design potentially prone to multipacting. This paper presents the results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of multipacting in the parallel-bar cavity with resonant voltage, impact energies and corresponding particle trajectories.

  6. Exotic mesons in /bar N/N annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    We investigate the utility of the antinucleon-nucleon (/bar N/N) annihilation process as a means of producing exotic (non /bar Q/Q) mesons. Several examples are considered of J/sup ..pi..//sup C/ exotic formation in the /bar p/p ..-->.. ..pi..X reaction. We emphasize the usefulness of quantum number filtration, achieved by preparing the initial /bar p/p atom in tagged L = 0,1 states and focusing on selected exclusive final states. 36 refs., 4 tabs.

  7. Mechanical Engineering Safety Note PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.

    2001-08-26

    The PEPC Spreader Bar Assembly consists of a spreader bar that will be attached to the PEPC Cell Housing or the Midplane Transportation Fixture during operation. While in use in the OAB (Optics Assembly Building), the Spreader Bar Assembly will be manipulated by the NOID (New Optics Insertion Device). The other critical components of the assembly are the three angular contact bearing swivels that attach the spreader bar to the lifting mechanism and the corner clamps which are used to capture the Cell Housing.

  8. Interaction of Bar Morphology and Riparian Vegetation in Gravel-Bed Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francalanci, S.; Bertoldi, W.; Siviglia, A.; Solari, L.; Toffolon, M.; Vetsch, D.

    2013-12-01

    Gravel-bed rivers are often characterized by complex bed topography, including single- and multiple-row alternate bars, bed undulations associated with channel curvature, riffle and pool sequences, presence of riparian vegetation in the floodplain, etc. The interaction of these features results in different morphologies with complex patterns and dynamics. The present work investigates the effect of the riparian vegetation on the bar dynamics, in particular it is investigated how the vegetation, which grows during the dry season on the bars, can alter the topographic patterns evolution during flood conditions. Performing two-dimensional numerical simulations we try to answer to the following research questions: which is the interaction of vegetation with bar morphology? which are the changes in sediment discharge and flow resistance, at cross-sectional and reach scale? Which are the changes in distribution of emerged and submerged areas, and potential feedbacks for vegetation growth? Which is the effect of vegetation on bar wave-length? The code BASEMENT (Faeh et al., 2010) has been used for performing the numerical runs. It has been properly modified in order to deal with the numerical description of the vegetation. The vegetation was allowed to grow during the dry season on the top of dry emergent areas, and the vertical distribution of vegetation in equilibrium condition was modeled as a function of the bed elevation using a simple analytical formulation, following Marani et al (2013). Then, during the flood events we assume that the vegetation distribution does not change, and that it can only be uprooted if the bed is eroded.The flow resistance was divided into a resistance exerted by the soil and a resistance exerted by the plants (Crosato and Saleh, 2010; Li and Millar, 2011); in this way it was possible to reproduce both the decrease in bed shear stress, reducing the sediment transport capacity of the flow within the plants, and the increase in hydraulic

  9. MAPPING THE ASYMMETRIC THICK DISK. III. THE KINEMATICS AND INTERACTION WITH THE GALACTIC BAR

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, Roberta M.; Grammer, Skyler; Davidson, Kris; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun; Cabanela, Juan E.; Larsen, Jeffrey A. E-mail: grammer@astro.umn.edu E-mail: beers@pa.msu.edu E-mail: cabanela@mnstate.edu

    2011-04-15

    In the first two papers of this series, Larsen et al. describe our faint CCD survey in the inner Galaxy and map the overdensity of thick disk stars in Quadrant 1 (Q1) to 5 kpc or more along the line of sight. The regions showing the strongest excess are above the density contours of the bar in the Galactic disk. In this third paper on the asymmetric thick disk, we report on radial velocities and derived metallicity parameters for over 4000 stars in Q1, above and below the plane, and in Quadrant 4 (Q4) above the plane. We confirm the corresponding kinematic asymmetry first reported by Parker et al., extended to greater distances and with more spatial coverage. The thick disk stars in Q1 have a rotational lag of 60-70 km s{sup -1} relative to circular rotation, and the metal-weak thick disk stars have an even greater lag of 100 km s{sup -1}. Both lag their corresponding populations in Q4 by {approx}30 km s{sup -1}. Interestingly, the disk stars in Q1 also appear to participate in the rotational lag by about 30 km s{sup -1}. The enhanced rotational lag for the thick disk in Q1 extends to 4 kpc or more from the Sun. At 3-4 kpc, our sight lines extend above the density contours on the near side of the bar, and as our lines of sight pass directly over the bar the rotational lag appears to decrease. This is consistent with a 'gravitational wake' induced by the rotating bar in the disk which would trap and pile up stars behind it. We conclude that a dynamical interaction with the stellar bar is the most probable explanation for the observed kinematic and spatial asymmetries.

  10. Restoring Alternate Bar Sequences in Large Rivers: Flow, Sediment, and Elbow Room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trush, W. J.; McBain, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Large river management must rely on crucial premises that the river channel is a product of its watershed's hydrology and the space within which it moves, and that native plant and animal species have evolved with, and still depend on, the natural annual hydrograph. While interesting academically, these premises may appear to offer very limited utility as management tools, given few large rivers in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere have escaped major hydrologic and geomorphic change. The opposite, however, is likely true. Without reconstructing and incorporating an historical perspective, large river restoration will fail. Healthy river ecosystems can be achieved without completely restoring the natural unregulated hydrology, sediment supply regime, and original migration corridor. Usually there is little choice. An historical perspective identifies crucial threshold streamflow, sediment, and corridor processes driving a healthy river ecosystem. Alternating point bar sequences are the building blocks of alluvial rivers that also function as the physical template for creating abundant, high quality habitat for fish, amphibians, and riparian plant. While alternating bars can be created with bulldozers, their evolution, longevity, and quality will endure only if key geomorphic and biological threshold processes are provided by naturally variable annual hydrographs. An historical perspective therefore must identify how unregulated annual hydrographs once created and fostered dynamic alternating bar sequences. Restoration practitioners must then devise ways to restore these processes while purposefully cheating Mother Nature of some of her flow, sediment, and corridor width (elbow room). Two commonly prescribed high flow releases, flushing flows and the bankfull discharge, address several geomorphic requirements yet neither, or the two combined, can restore and maintain alternating bar sequences. Higher flood peak magnitudes from winter floods and spring snowmelt

  11. Symmetrical Taylor impact of glass bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, N. H.; Bourne, N. K.; Field, J. E.; Rosenberg, Z.

    1998-07-01

    Brar and Bless pioneered the use of plate impact upon bars as a technique for investigating the 1D stress loading of glass but limited their studies to relatively modest stresses (1). We wish to extend this technique by applying VISAR and embedded stress gauge measurements to a symmetrical version of the test in which two rods impact one upon the other. Previous work in the laboratory has characterised the glass types (soda-lime and borosilicate)(2). These experiments identify the failure mechanisms from high-speed photography and the stress and particle velocity histories are interpreted in the light of these results. The differences in response of the glasses and the relation of the fracture to the failure wave in uniaxial strain are discussed.

  12. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  13. A Distinct Structure inside the Galactic Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Nagata, Tetsuya; Baba, Daisuke; Haba, Yasuaki; Kadowaki, Ryota; Kato, Daisuke; Kurita, Mikio; Nagashima, Chie; Nagayama, Takahiro; Murai, Yuka; Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Sugitani, Koji; Naoi, Takahiro; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Sato, Shuji

    2005-03-01

    We present the result of a near-infrared (JHKs) survey along the Galactic plane, -10.5d<=l<=10.5d and b=+1deg, with the IRSF 1.4 m telescope and the SIRIUS camera. Ks versus H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams reveal a well-defined population of red clump stars whose apparent magnitude peak changes continuously along the Galactic plane, from Ks=13.4 at l=-10deg to Ks=12.2 at l=10deg after dereddening. This variation can be explained by the barlike structure found in previous studies, but we find an additional inner structure at |l|<~4deg, where the longitude-apparent magnitude relation is distinct from the outer bar and where the apparent magnitude peak changes by only ~0.1 mag over the central 8°. The exact nature of this inner structure is as yet uncertain.

  14. /bar p/p collider physics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1989-03-01

    This note encompasses a set of six lectures given at the summer school held at Campos Do Jordao in January of 1989 near Sao Paulo, Brazil. The intent of the lectures was to describe the physics of /bar p/p at CERN and Fermilab. Particular attention has been paid to making a self contained presentation to a prospective audience of graduate students. Since large Monte Carlo codes might not be available to all members of this audience, great reliance was placed on ''back of the envelope estimates.'' Emphasis was also placed on experimental data rather than theoretical speculation, since predictions for, for example, supersymmetric particle production are easily obtained by transcription of formulae already obtained. 9 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Charm Spectroscopy at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Poireau, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-12-21

    We present a mini-review on charm spectroscopy at the BABAR experiment. We first report on the c{bar s} meson spectrum, and present precise measurements of the D{sub s1}(2536) meson as well as the properties of the many new states discovered since 2003 (D*{sub s0}(2317), D{sub s1}(2460), D*{sub sJ}(2860), and D{sub sJ}(2700) mesons). We then discuss about charmed baryons observed recently in the BABAR experiment: {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} and {Omega}*{sub c}{sup 0} css baryons, {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} udc baryon and the {Xi}{sub c} usc/dsc baryons.

  16. Nutritional Evaluation of NASA's Rodent Food Bar Diet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joyce E.; Yu, Diane S.; Dalton, Bonnie P.

    2000-01-01

    Tests are being conducted on NASA's rodent Food Bar in preparation for long-term use as the rat and mouse diet aboard the International Space Station. Nutritional analyses are performed after the bars are manufactured and then repeated periodically to determine nutritional stability. The primary factors analyzed are protein, ash, fat, fiber, moisture, amino acids, fatty acids, and minerals. Nutrient levels are compared to values published in the National Research Council's dietary requirements for rodents, and also to those contained in several commonly used commercial rodent lab diets. The Food Bar is manufactured from a powdered diet to which moisture is added as it is processed through an extruder. The bars are dipped into potassium sorbate, vacuum-sealed, and irradiated. In order to determine nutrient changes during extrusion and irradiation, the powdered diet, the non-irradiated bars, and the irradiated bars are all analyzed. We have observed lower values for some nutrients (iodine, vitamin K, and iron) in the Food Bars compared with NRC requirements. Many nutrients in the Food Bars are contained at a higher level than levels in the NRC requirements. An additional factor we are investigating is the 26% moisture level in the Food Bars, which drops to about 15% within a week, compared to a stable 10% moisture in many standard lab chow diets. In addition to the nutritional analyses, the food bar is being fed to several strains of rats and mice, and feeding study and necropsy results are being observed (Barrett et al, unpublished data). Information from the nutritional analyses and from the rodent studies will enable us to recommend the formulation that will most adequately meet the rodent Food Bar requirements for long-term use aboard the Space Station.

  17. Active chatter control system for long-overhang boring bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Douglas R.; Golioto, Igor; Thompson, Norman B.

    1997-05-01

    Some machining processes, such as boring, have been historically limited by excessive bar vibration, often resulting in poor surface finish and reduced tool life. A unique boring bar system has been developed to suppress bar vibration, or chatter, during machining using active control technology. Metal cutting test programs have shown proven, repeatable performance on hard-to-cut, aircraft industry high-temperature nickel alloys as well as more easily cut carbon steels. Critical bar length-to-diameter (L/D) ratios, depths-of-cuts, feed rates and cutting speeds far exceed those attainable from the best available passively-damped boring bars. This industry-ready system consists of three principle subsystems: active clamp, instrumented bar, and control electronics. The active clamp is a lathe-mountable body capable of supporting bars of varying sizes and articulating them in orthogonal directions from the base of the bar shank. The instrumented bar consists of a steel shank, standard insert head and imbedded accelerometers. Wire harnesses from both the bar and clamp connect to control electronics comprised of highly-efficient switched- capacitor amplifiers that drive the piezoelectric actuators, sensor signal conditioning, a PC-based program manager and two 32-bit floating-point DSPs. The program manager code runs on the host PC and distributes system identification and control functions to the two DSPs. All real-time signal processing is based on the principles of adaptive filter minimization. For the described system, cutting performance has extended existing chatter thresholds (cutting parameter combinations) for nickel alloys by as much as 400% while maintaining precision surface finish on the machined part. Bar L/D ratios as high as 11 have enabled deep boring operations on nickel workpieces that otherwise could not be performed free of chatter.

  18. New Observables In the Decay Mode \\bar B_d \\-->\\bar K^{0*} \\ell^+ \\ell^-

    SciTech Connect

    Egede, U.; Hurth, T.; Matias, J.; Ramon, M.; Reece, W.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2008-08-07

    We discuss the large set of observables available from the angular distributions of the decay {bar B}{sub d} {yields} {bar K}*{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. We present a NLO analysis of all observables based on the QCD factorization approach in the low-dilepton mass region and an estimate of {Lambda}/m{sub b} corrections. Moreover, we discuss their sensitivity to new physics. We explore the experimental sensitivities at LHCb (10 fb{sup -1}) and SuperLHCb (100 fb{sup -1}) based on a full-angular fit method and explore the sensitivity to right handed currents. We also show that the previously discussed transversity amplitude A{sub T}{sup (1)} cannot be measured at the LHCb experiment or at future B factory experiments as it requires a measurement of the spin of the final state particles.

  19. Role of the f1(1285) state in the J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* and J/ψ → ϕf1(1285) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ju-Jun; Oset, E.

    2016-02-01

    We study the role of the f1 (1285) resonance in the decays of J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* and J / ψ → ϕf1 (1285). The theoretical approach is based on the results of chiral unitary theory where the f1 (1285) resonance is dynamically generated from the K* K bar -c.c. interaction. In order to further test the dynamical nature of the f1 (1285) state, we investigate the J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* decay close to the K bar K* threshold and make predictions for the ratio of the invariant mass distributions of the J / ψ → ϕ K bar K* decay and the J / ψ → ϕf1 (1285) partial decay width with all the parameters of the mechanism fixed in previous studies. The results can be tested in future experiments and therefore offer new clues on the nature of the f1 (1285) state.

  20. Sweet! Candy Bar Activity Teaches CAD, Math, and Graphics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granlund, George

    2009-01-01

    By far, the tastiest technology learning activity that the author's students work on is the development of the design of a chocolate candy bar. This article describes how the author implemented the candy bar activity. The activity gives students an opportunity to design a product and to take it from concept through to production.