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Sample records for dynamic i-v measurements

  1. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, B.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V{close_quote}s do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element

    SciTech Connect

    Wernsman, Bernard

    1997-01-10

    A comparison between steady-state and dynamic I-V measurements from a single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) is made. The single-cell TFE used in this study is the prototype for the 40 kW{sub e} space nuclear power system that is similar to the 6 kW{sub e} TOPAZ-II. The steady-state I-V measurements influence the emitter temperature due to electron cooling. Therefore, to eliminate the steady-state I-V measurement influence on the TFE and provide a better understanding of the behavior of the thermionic energy converter and TFE characteristics, dynamic I-V measurements are made. The dynamic I-V measurements are made at various input power levels, cesium pressures, collector temperatures, and steady-state current levels. From these measurements, it is shown that the dynamic I-V's do not change the TFE characteristics at a given operating point. Also, the evaluation of the collector work function from the dynamic I-V measurements shows that the collector optimization is not due to a minimum in the collector work function but due to an emission optimization. Since the dynamic I-V measurements do not influence the TFE characteristics, it is believed that these measurements can be done at a system level to understand the influence of TFE placement in the reactor as a function of the core thermal distribution.

  3. Research Level I-V and QE Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Keith

    2013-08-12

    A summary of key points related to research-level measurements of current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) for various types of photovoltaic cells include the following: (1) Compare measurements with another trusted laboratory often enough to see the random error; (2) Have a calibration lab calibrate your research cell; (3) Document potential metastabilities and sensitivity to premeasurement conditions; (4) Measure the 1-sun spectral responsivity with a bias light level of 0.37 times the expected 1-sun short-current current; and (5) Be aware of bias rate artifacts in I-V and QE.

  4. The I-V Measurement System for Solar Cells Based on MCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengxiang, Chen; Yu, Ai; Jiafu, Wang; Lisheng, Wang

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, an I-V measurement system for solar cells based on Single-chip Microcomputer (MCU) is presented. According to the test principles of solar cells, this measurement system mainly comprises of two parts—data collecting, data processing and displaying. The MCU mainly used as to acquire data, then the collecting results is sent to the computer by serial port. The I-V measurement results of our test system are shown in the human-computer interaction interface based on our hardware circuit. By comparing the test results of our I-V tester and the results of other commercial I-V tester, we found errors for most parameters are less than 5%, which shows our I-V test result is reliable. Because the MCU can be applied in many fields, this I-V measurement system offers a simple prototype for portable I-V tester for solar cells.

  5. Direct I-V measurement of polypyrrole nanotube using conductive scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Gyu; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Bio; Park, Yung Woo

    2003-03-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanotubes were synthesized using the pores of track-etched polycarbonate membrane as a template. Its size depends on the pore diameter of template, range from 50 to 200 nm. Direct I-V measurements of PPy nanotube (diameter of 120 nm) deposited on Au were done using a metal-coated tapping-mode atomic force microscope tip. Linear I-V characteristics are observed and the resistance decreased as the contact force is increased. Using the Hertz model, the elastic modulus E and electrical resistivity ρ are estimated to be E ˜ 1 GPa and ρ ˜ 1 Ωcm. These values are consistent with those obtained in bulk PPy film.

  6. Photovoltaic performance parameters at the nanoscale from in situ I-V curve measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, Sadia; Tennyson, Elizabeth; Leite, Marina

    Monocrystalline photovoltaic (PV) devices exhibit higher efficiencies than polycrystalline devices, but the high manufacturing costs associated with single crystal solar cells pose a hindrance to their wide implementation. Polycrystalline CuInxGa(1 - x)Se2 (CIGS) material with high optical absorbance and low cost/Watt, is a promising alternative. Yet, the efficiency of this low-cost technology is still substantially lower than the theoretical values estimated by the Shockley-Queisser limit. This is likely due to microstructural non-uniformities, which cannot be accessed by macroscopic light I-V measurements. Therefore, we spatially resolve the electrical response of these devices by `local' I-Vs. For that, we utilize a 100x objective as a local excitation source and LabVIEW to map the PV performance with sub-micronscale resolution through extrapolation of key parameters from pixel by pixel I-V curves. Extraction of performance parameters such as short-circuit current, opencircuit voltage fill factor, and maximum power point can provide useful information regarding optimal microstructural characteristics. This information is not only valuable for CIGS-based devices, but also will be an essential tool for maximizing performance across all PV technologies.

  7. First works by K. E. Tsiolkovsky and I. V. Meshchersky on rocket dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmodemiansky, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    A study of rocket dynamics done by K. E. Tsiolkovsky in 1896 is reported. Problems in rectilinear movement of rockets were studied. Calculations were done on velocity efficiency, motion in free space, motion in a homogeneous gravitational field and motion with constant acceleration.

  8. Interface studies of ZnO nanowire transistors using low-frequency noise and temperature-dependent I-V measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Sanghyun; Kim, Sunkook; Mohammadi, Saeed; Janes, David B.; Ha, Young-Geun; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J.

    2008-01-01

    Single ZnO nanowire (NW) transistors fabricated with self-assembled nanodielectric (SAND) and SiO2 gate insulators were characterized by low-frequency noise and variable temperature current-voltage (I-V ) measurements. According to the gate dependence of the noise amplitude, the extracted Hooge's constants (αH) are ˜3.3×10-2 for SAND-based devices and ˜3.5×10-1 for SiO2-based devices. Temperature-dependent I-V studies show that the hysteresis of the transfer curves and the threshold voltage shifts of SAND-based devices are significantly smaller than those of SiO2-based devices. These results demonstrate the improved SAND/ZnO NW interface quality (lower interface-trap states and defects) in comparison to those fabricated with SiO2.

  9. Elimination of the gate and drain bias stresses in I-V characteristics of WSe2 FETs by using dual channel pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Mo; Cho, In-Tak; Kang, Won-Mook; Park, Byung-Gook; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Intrinsic transfer and output characteristics of WSe2 field effect transistors are obtained by adopting the dual channel pulsed I-V measurement. Due to the DC gate bias stress during the measurement, a large hysteresis is observed and increased with increasing the sweeping range of the gate bias in the transfer curves. In addition, as a drain bias increases, the drain bias stress during the measurement induces the threshold voltage shift. The output curves measured by a DC method are significantly affected by the drain bias sweeping direction and the previous measurement, which leads to a large error in the analysis. By using the dual channel pulsed I-V measurement with a short turn-on time (10-4 s), a long turn-off time (1 s), and a base voltage (gate and drain bias during turn-off time) of 0 V, hysteretic behaviors caused by the gate bias stress and threshold voltage shift due to the drain bias stress in transfer curves are eliminated. The effect of the drain bias sweeping direction and the previous measurement in output curves are also eliminated, and the output curves show a typical field effect behavior. The intrinsic characteristics of WSe2 field effect transistors show negligible hysteresis and remarkably enhanced mobility (˜200 cm2/V s), and higher current drive capability compared to those of DC measurements.

  10. Defect Measurements of CdZnTe Detectors Using I-DLTS, TCT, I-V and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gul,R.

    2008-08-11

    In this work we measured the crystal defect levels and tested the performance of CdZnTe detectors by diverse methodologies, viz., Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Current Technique (TCT), Current and Capacitance versus Voltage measurements (I-V and C-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Two important characteristics of I-DLTS technique for advancing this research are (1) it is applicable for high-resistivity materials (>10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm), and, (2) the minimum temperature for measurements can be as low as 10 K. Such low-temperature capability is excellent for obtaining measurements at shallow levels. We acquired CdZnTe crystals grown by different techniques from two different vendors and characterized them for point defects and their response to photons. I-DLTS studies encompassed measuring the parameters of the defects, such as the energy levels in the band gap, the carrier capture cross-sections and their densities. The current induced by the laser-generated carriers and the charge collected (or number of electrons collected) were obtained using TCT that also provides the transport properties, such as the carrier life time and mobility of the detectors under study. The detector's electrical characteristics were explored, and its performance tested using I-V, C-V and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  11. Accurate extraction of mobility in carbon nanotube network transistors using C-V and I-V measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jinsu; Lee, Dongil; Kim, Chaewon; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Bongsik; Kim, Dong Myong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Mijung; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2014-11-01

    The mobility of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network thin-film transistors (TFTs) is an essential parameter. Previous extraction methods for mobility encountered problems in extracting accurate intrinsic mobility due to the uncertainty of the SWNT density in the network channel and the existence of contact resistance at the source/drain electrodes. As a result, efficient and accurate extraction of the mobility in SWNT TFTs is challenging using previous methods. We propose a direct method of extracting accurate intrinsic mobility in SWNT TFTs by employing capacitance-voltage and current-voltage measurements. Consequently, we simply obtain accurate intrinsic mobility within the ink-jet printed SWNT TFTs without any complicated calculations.

  12. Quantitative measurements and modeling of electronic and atomic surface structure in epitaxial LaNiO3 thin films by ARPES, LEED-I(V), and DFT +DMFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruf, Jacob; Nowadnick, Elizabeth; Park, Hyowon; King, Philip; Millis, Andrew; Schlom, Darrell; Shen, Kyle

    Careful exploration of the phase space available for artificially engineering emergent electronic properties in epitaxial thin films and superlattices of transition-metal oxides requires close feedback between materials synthesis, experimental characterization of both electronic and atomic structures, and modeling based on advanced computational methods. Here we apply this general strategy to the perovskite rare-earth nickelate LaNiO3, using molecular-beam epitaxy to synthesize thin films, performing in situangle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements, and comparing our results with the predictions of density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT +DMFT). Our study establishes LaNiO3 as a moderately correlated metal in which the quasiparticle mass enhancement can be modeled with quantitative accuracy by DFT +DMFT. Finally, in view of efforts to produce eg orbital polarization in nickelate heterostructures as a means of mimicking single-band cuprate-like physics, we discuss the extent to which our ARPES and LEED results suggest that such effects are intrinsically present at film surfaces due to the existence of polar distortions, as reported by coherent Bragg rod analysis of surface x-ray diffraction.

  13. Electrometric direct current I/V converter with wide bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Holt, S; Skyba, P

    2012-06-01

    A principle of operation and electrical characteristics of a high frequency current-to-voltage (I/V) converter are presented. The I/V converter measures the electric current with selectable gains of 10(5), 10(4), and 10(3) V/A in the frequency range from DC to 500 kHz, 1.2 MHz, and 2.4 MHz, respectively. These properties make this I/V converter suitable for wide range of applications such as tuning forks, torsion oscillators, ultrasound transducers measurements, detection of the piezoelectric transducers used in STM techniques, etc., in low temperature physics. The influence of the input impedance of a I/V converter on the precision of alternating current measurements is also discussed. PMID:22755647

  14. Teaching solar cell I-V characteristics using SPICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devasia, Archana; Kurinec, Santosh K.

    2011-12-01

    The basic equivalent circuit of a p-n junction solar cell is most commonly represented as consisting of a current source in parallel with two diodes and two parasitic resistances. The output of a solar cell is measured by obtaining the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics for different illumination intensities, and various parameters are extracted from these characteristics. Because the nature of the information derived from these characteristics is not obvious to the beginning students in photovoltaics, a simulation using SPICE was utilized to explain three solar cell I-V characteristics—dark I-V, illuminated I-V, and open circuit voltage versus the short circuit current (illumination intensity). Students can construct a solar cell and study the effect of the diode and parasitic parameters on the three output I-V characteristics. Series and parallel combinations of solar cells for arrays and modules using bypass diodes are demonstrated using SPICE as educational tools for understanding the role of bypass diodes.

  15. Evaluation of Thermoelectric Generators by I-V Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gao; Singh, Tanuj; Garcia-Canadas, Jorge; Ellor, Robert

    2016-03-01

    A recent theoretical study proposes a new way to evaluate thermoelectric devices by measuring two I-V curves—one obtained under a constant temperature difference and the other obtained for a constant thermal input. We report an experimental demonstration of the feasibility of this novel technique. A measurement system was designed and constructed, which enables both types of I-V curves to be obtained automatically. The effective ZT values of a thermoelectric module were determined using this system and compared with those measured by an impedance spectroscopy technique. The results confirm the validity of the proposed technique. In addition, the capability of measuring ZT under a large temperature difference was also investigated. The results show that the ZTs obtained for a large temperature difference are significantly smaller than those for a small temperature difference, providing insights into the design and operation of thermoelectric modules in realistic applications.

  16. Nonlinear I-V Curve at a Quantum Impurity Quantum Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranger, Harold; Chung, Chung-Hou; Lin, Chao-Yun; Zhang, Gu; Ke, Chung-Ting; Finkelstein, Gleb

    The nonlinear I-V curve at an interacting quantum critical point (QCP) is typically out of reach theoretically. Here, however, we provide a striking example of an analytical calculation of the full nonlinear I-V curve at the QCP. The system that we consider is a quantum dot coupled to resistive leads - a spinless resonant level interacting with an ohmic EM environment in which a QCP similar to the two-channel Kondo QCP occurs. Recent experiments studied this criticality via transport measurements: the transmission approaches unity at low temperature and applied bias when tuned exactly to the QCP (on resonance and symmetric tunnel barriers) and approaches zero in all other cases. To obtain the current at finite temperature and arbitrary bias, we write the problem as a one-dimensional field theory and transform from electrons in the left/right leads to right-going and left-going channels between which there is weak two-body backscattering. Drawing on dynamical Coulomb blockade theory, we thus obtain an analytical expression for the full I-V curve. The agreement with the experimental result is remarkable.

  17. Dynamic aperture measurement on Aladdin

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, J.; Cho, Y.; Chou, W.; Crosbie, E.; Kramer, S.; Kustom, R.; Voss, D.; Teng, L.; Kleman, K.; Otte, R.; Trzeciak, W.; Symon, K.; Wisconsin Univ., Stoughton, WI . Synchrotron Radiation Center; Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    The sextupole-induced non-linear transverse beam dynamics in the synchrotron radiation storage ring Aladdin is studied. Specifically, the dynamic aperture is measured as function of the sextupole strength. The results agree reasonably well with computer simulations. 1 ref., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  19. Instrument measures dynamic pressure fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, J. W.; Penko, P. E.; Reshotko, M.

    1977-01-01

    Pressure probe instrument, incorporating "infinite line" principle, can be used to remotely measure dynamic pressure fluctuations in hot high-pressure environemnts too severe for sensors. System is designed and can be utilized for measurements in core of operating turbofan engine.

  20. Investigation of abnormal negative threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress in input/output n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with TiN/HfO{sub 2} structure using fast I-V measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen; Chang, Ting-Chang Lu, Ying-Hsin; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen

    2014-03-17

    This letter investigates abnormal negative threshold voltage shifts under positive bias stress in input/output (I/O) TiN/HfO{sub 2} n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using fast I-V measurement. This phenomenon is attributed to a reversible charge/discharge effect in pre-existing bulk traps. Moreover, in standard performance devices, threshold-voltage (V{sub t}) shifts positively during fast I-V double sweep measurement. However, in I/O devices, V{sub t} shifts negatively since electrons escape from bulk traps to metal gate rather than channel electrons injecting to bulk traps. Consequently, decreasing pre-existing bulk traps in I/O devices, which can be achieved by adopting Hf{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}O{sub 2} as gate oxide, can reduce the charge/discharge effect.

  1. Pulse I-V characterization of a nano-crystalline oxide device with sub-gap density of states.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeho; Hur, Ji-Hyun; Jeon, Sanghun

    2016-05-27

    Understanding the charge trapping nature of nano-crystalline oxide semiconductor thin film transistors (TFTs) is one of the most important requirements for their successful application. In our investigation, we employed a fast-pulsed I-V technique for understanding the charge trapping phenomenon and for characterizing the intrinsic device performance of an amorphous/nano-crystalline indium-hafnium-zinc-oxide semiconductor TFT with varying density of states in the bulk. Because of the negligible transient charging effect with a very short pulse, the source-to-drain current obtained with the fast-pulsed I-V measurement was higher than that measured by the direct-current characterization method. This is because the fast-pulsed I-V technique provides a charge-trap free environment, suggesting that it is a representative device characterization methodology of TFTs. In addition, a pulsed source-to-drain current versus time plot was used to quantify the dynamic trapping behavior. We found that the charge trapping phenomenon in amorphous/nano-crystalline indium-hafnium-zinc-oxide TFTs is attributable to the charging/discharging of sub-gap density of states in the bulk and is dictated by multiple trap-to-trap processes. PMID:27094772

  2. Dynamic indocyanine green angiography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Timothy; Invernizzi, Alessandro; Larkin, Sean; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic indocyanine green imaging uses a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and a fluorescent dye to produce movies of the dye-filling pattern in the retina and choroid of the eye. It is used for evaluating choroidal neovascularization. Movies are examined to identify the anatomy of the pathology for planning treatment and to evaluate progression or response to treatment. The popularity of this approach is affected by the complexity and difficulty in interpreting the movies. Software algorithms were developed to produce images from the movies that are easy to interpret. A mathematical model is formulated of the flow dynamics, and a fitting algorithm is designed that solves for the flow parameters. The images provide information about flow and perfusion, including regions of change between examinations. Imaged measures include the dye fill-time, temporal dispersion, and magnitude of the dye dilution temporal curves associated with image pixels. Cases show how the software can help to identify clinically relevant anatomy such as feeder vessels, drain vessels, capillary networks, and normal choroidal draining vessels. As a potential tool for research into the character of neovascular conditions and treatments, it reveals the flow dynamics and character of the lesion. Future varieties of this methodology may be used for evaluating the success of engineered tissue transplants, surgical flaps, reconstructive surgery, breast surgery, and many other surgical applications where flow, perfusion, and vascularity of tissue are important.

  3. Electrical I-V Probes Calibration And Reactor Plasma Chamber Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Tadjine, R.; Lahmar, H.

    2008-09-23

    We have constructed a high resolution I-V Probes including a high voltage and current probes to measure the current and the tension at the entry of the electrode excitation in reactor plasma RF argon. The I-V Probes is no intrusive, therefore it can be transposable in another surface treatment reactor, and it is what is required in the industrial applications. Because of capacitive aspect of the coupling and the presence of parasitic electrical elements in the chamber plasma reactor and the connection circuits, the measured signals are largely different from the signals at the RF electrode in contact with plasma. A phase angle error of 1 deg. between i(t) and v(t) introduce a large error in the calculated parameters. The objective of this work is the calibration of the I-V Probes and the whole system of measurement, and the characterization of the parasitic elements of the reactor. The characterization of the I-V Probes required the realization of several reactive loads (capacitive) measured with a network analyzer HP8753ES. The signals Vi(t) and Vv(t), resulting from the I-V Probes and collected by a DPO (TDS4054 numerical oscilloscope of very high performance), are transferred towards the computer for a digital processing. The elimination of the offsets voltage present at the entries of the DPO and the smoothing by a powerful method of least squares, make it possible to increase precision.

  4. How to measure microtubule dynamics?

    PubMed

    Straube, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules are one of the most spectacular features in the cell: long, fairly rigid tubules that provide physical strength while at the same time serving as tracks of the intracellular transport network. In addition, they are the main constituents of the cell division machinery, and guide axonal growth and the direction of cell migration. To be able to fulfil such diverse functions, microtubules have to be arranged into suitable patterns and remodelled according to extra- and intracellular cues. Moreover, the delicate regulation of microtubule dynamics and the dynamic interactions with subcellular structures, such as kinetochores or cell adhesion sites, appear to be of crucial importance to microtubule functions. It is, therefore, important to understand microtubule dynamics and its spatiotemporal regulation at the molecular level. In this chapter, I introduce the concept of microtubule dynamics and discuss the techniques that can be employed to study microtubule dynamics in vitro and in cells, for many of which detailed protocols can be found in this volume. Microtubule dynamics is traditionally assessed by the four parameters of dynamic instability: growth and shrinkage rates, rescue and catastrophe frequencies, sometimes supplemented by pause duration. I discuss emerging issues with and alternatives to this parameter description of microtubule dynamics. PMID:21773917

  5. Mass calibration and cosmological analysis of the SPT-SZ galaxy cluster sample using velocity dispersion σ <i>v and x-ray Y X measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bautz, M.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Chiu, I.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Desai, S.; de Haan, T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Dobbs, M. A.; Foley, R. J.; Forman, W. R.; Gangkofner, D.; George, E. M.; Gladders, M. D.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Halverson, N. W.; Hennig, C.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Holder, G. P.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hrubes, J. D.; Jones, C.; Keisler, R.; Knox, L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Liu, J.; Lueker, M.; Luong-Van, D.; Marrone, D. P.; McDonald, M.; McMahon, J. J.; Meyer, S. S.; Mocanu, L.; Murray, S. S.; Padin, S.; Pryke, C.; Reichardt, C. L.; Rest, A.; Ruel, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sayre, J. T.; Schaffer, K. K.; Shirokoff, E.; Spieler, H. G.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A. A.; Story, K.; Stubbs, C. W.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Vikhlinin, A.; Williamson, R.; Zahn, O.; Zenteno, A.

    2015-01-30

    Here, we present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg2 of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (σv) and 16 X-ray YX measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using σv and YX are consistent at the 0.6σ level, with the σ v calibration preferring ~16% higher masses. We use the full SPTCL data set (SZ clusters+σv+YX) to measure σ8(Ωm/0.27)0.3 = 0.809 ± 0.036 within a flat ΛCDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is mν = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0σ level for WMAP9 and 1.5σ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger Σmν further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPTCL and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and Type Ia supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9σ higher than the YX calibration and 0.8σ higher than the σ v calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (~44% and ~23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure Ωm = 0.299 ± 0.009 and σ8 = 0.829 ± 0.011. Within a νCDM model we find Σmν = 0.148 ± 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index γ and the

  6. BICEP2 / Keck Arrayi> V: Measurements of B-mode polarization at degree angular scales and 150 GHz by the Keck Array

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.; Barkats, D.; Benton, S. J.; Bischoff, C. A.; Bock, J. J.; Brevik, J. A.; Buder, I.; Bullock, E.; Buza, V.; Connors, J.; Crill, B. P.; Dowell, C. D.; Dvorkin, C.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Harrison, S.; Hasselfield, M.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hilton, G. C.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K. D.; Karkare, K. S.; Kaufman, J. P.; Keating, B. G.; Kefeli, S.; Kernasovskiy, S. A.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E. M.; Lueker, M.; Mason, P.; Megerian, K. G.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; O’Brient, R.; Ogburn IV, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Pryke, C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Richter, S.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z. K.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Teply, G. P.; Thompson, K. L.; Tolan, J. E.; Turner, A. D.; Vieregg, A. G.; Weber, A. C.; Willmert, J.; Wong, C. L.; Yoon, K. W.

    2015-09-29

    Here, the Keck Array is a system of cosmic microwave background polarimeters, each similar to the Bicep2 experiment. In this paper we report results from the 2012 to 2013 observing seasons, during which the Keck Array consisted of five receivers all operating in the same (150 GHz) frequency band and observing field as Bicep2. We again find an excess of B-mode power over the lensed-ΛCDM expectation of >5σ in the range 30 < ℓ < 150 and confirm that this is not due to systematics using jackknife tests and simulations based on detailed calibration measurements. In map difference and spectral difference tests these new data are shown to be consistent with Bicep2. Finally, we combine the maps from the two experiments to produce final Q and U maps which have a depth of 57 nK deg (3.4 μK arcmin) over an effective area of 400 deg2 for an equivalent survey weight of 250,000 μK–2. The final BB band powers have noise uncertainty a factor of 2.3 times better than the previous results, and a significance of detection of excess power of >6σ.

  7. New Analysis Method for I-V and Complex Impedance Data of Transition-edge Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Maasilta, I. J.; Kinnunen, K. M.

    2009-12-16

    Measurement of the complex impedance of a bolometric detector has become a standard technique to determine the important thermal and electrical parameters of the device. We present here a new way to analyze the complex impedance data of a TES detector, in combination with the DC I-V measurements. We show that the most important electrical parameters can be inferred from the low-frequency data only, without the need to rely on less reliable high-frequency measurements.

  8. Dynamic measurement of bulk modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; Strand, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Technique based on measuring phase difference between microwave reference and test signals and has been used to determine change in bulk modulus of solid-fuel rocket propellants should be useful in studying other dielectric materials.

  9. Dynamic measurements of beam-pump parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.; Bowen, J.F. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of nine electrical and mechanical parameters were made on conventional and special-geometry units during operation of beam-pump/sucker rod systems in oil and natural gas wells. All quantities were measured simultaneously and computer-recorded for a variety of pumping conditions. In this paper, using this data, the authors compared measured dynamic gearbox torques with calculated values, illustrating how calculation techniques model dynamically measured data. Calculated efficiencies indicating losses through the units from polished rod to the gearbox are shown to be necessary for adjusting gearbox torque calculations to measured values. Also, torque/speed curves are shown at the motor sheave. These data are corrected for inertial effects and plotted vs. motor manufacturers' published curves. Possibilities for future work incorporating these measurement techniques while the unit is in operation were discussed. In general, the data show how dynamically measured beam-pump data compare with conventional calculation techniques.

  10. Measurements of glottal structure dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzrichter, John F.; Ng, Lawrence C.; Burke, Gerry J.; Champagne, Nathan J.; Kallman, Jeffrey S.; Sharpe, Robert M.; Kobler, James B.; Hillman, Robert E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2005-03-01

    Low power, radarlike electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors, operating in a homodyne interferometric mode, are being used to measure tissue motions in the human vocal tract during speech. However, when these and similar sensors are used in front of the laryngeal region during voiced speech, there remains an uncertainty regarding the contributions to the sensor signal from vocal fold movements versus those from pressure induced trachea-wall movements. Several signal-source hypotheses are tested by performing experiments with a subject who had undergone tracheostomy, and who still was able to phonate when her stoma was covered (e.g., with a plastic plate). Laser-doppler motion-measurements of the subject's posterior trachea show small tissue movements, about 15 microns, that do not contribute significantly to signals from presently used EM sensors. However, signals from the anterior wall do contribute. EM sensor and air-pressure measurements, together with 3-D EM wave simulations, show that EM sensors measure movements of the vocal folds very well. The simulations show a surprisingly effective guiding of EM waves across the vocal fold membrane, which, upon glottal opening, are interrupted and reflected. These measurements are important for EM sensor applications to speech signal de-noising, vocoding, speech recognition, and diagnostics. .

  11. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  12. Mass properties measurement system: Dynamics and statics measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents and interprets experimental data obtained from the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS). Statics measurements yield the center-of-gravity of an unknown mass and dynamics measurements yield its inertia matrix. Observations of the MPMS performance has lead us to specific design criteria and an understanding of MPMS limitations.

  13. Driver for solar cell I-V characteristic plots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, G. B. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A bipolar voltage ramp generator which applies a linear voltage through a resistor to a solar cell for plotting its current versus voltage (I-V) characteristic between short circuit and open circuit conditions is disclosed. The generator has automatic stops at the end points. The resistor serves the multiple purpose of providing a current sensing resistor, setting the full-scale current value, and providing a load line with a slope approximately equal to one, such that it will pass through the origin and the approximate center of the I-V curve with about equal distance from that center to each of the end points.

  14. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  15. High dynamic range charge measurements

    DOEpatents

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2012-09-04

    A charge amplifier for use in radiation sensing includes an amplifier, at least one switch, and at least one capacitor. The switch selectively couples the input of the switch to one of at least two voltages. The capacitor is electrically coupled in series between the input of the amplifier and the input of the switch. The capacitor is electrically coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. A method of measuring charge in radiation sensing includes selectively diverting charge from an input of an amplifier to an input of at least one capacitor by selectively coupling an output of the at least one capacitor to one of at least two voltages. The input of the at least one capacitor is operatively coupled to the input of the amplifier without a switch coupled therebetween. The method also includes calculating a total charge based on a sum of the amplified charge and the diverted charge.

  16. The NO<i>vA simulation chain

    SciTech Connect

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Hatcher, R.; Mayer, N.; Musser, J.; Patterson, R.; Schroeter, R.; Sousa, A.

    2015-12-23

    The NO<i>vA experiment is a two-detector, long-baseline neutrino experiment operating in the recently upgraded NuMI muon neutrino beam. Simulating neutrino interactions and backgrounds requires many steps including: the simulation of the neutrino beam flux using FLUKA and the FLUGG interface, cosmic ray generation using CRY, neutrino interaction modeling using GENIE, and a simulation of the energy deposited in the detector using GEANT4. To shorten generation time, the modeling of detector-specific aspects, such as photon transport, detector and electronics noise, and readout electronics, employs custom, parameterized simulation applications. We will describe the NO<i>vA simulation chain, and present details on the techniques used in modeling photon transport near the ends of cells, and in developing a novel data-driven noise simulation. Due to the high intensity of the NuMI beam, the Near Detector samples a high rate of muons originating in the surrounding rock. In addition, due to its location on the surface at Ash River, MN, the Far Detector collects a large rate ((˜) 140 kHz) of cosmic muons. Furthermore, we will discuss the methods used in NO<i>vA for overlaying rock muons and cosmic ray muons with simulated neutrino interactions and show how realistically the final simulation reproduces the preliminary NO<i>vA data.

  17. Parameter extraction from I-V characteristics of PV devices

    SciTech Connect

    Macabebe, Erees Queen B.; Sheppard, Charles J.; Dyk, E. Ernest van

    2011-01-15

    Device parameters such as series and shunt resistances, saturation current and diode ideality factor influence the behaviour of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of solar cells and photovoltaic modules. It is necessary to determine these parameters since performance parameters are derived from the I-V curve and information provided by the device parameters are useful in analyzing performance losses. This contribution presents device parameters of CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells, as well as, CuInSe{sub 2}, mono- and multicrystalline silicon modules determined using a parameter extraction routine that employs Particle Swarm Optimization. The device parameters of the CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells show that the contribution of recombination mechanisms exhibited by high saturation current when coupled with the effects of parasitic resistances result in lower maximum power and conversion efficiency. Device parameters of photovoltaic modules extracted from I-V characteristics obtained at higher temperature show increased saturation current. The extracted values also reflect the adverse effect of temperature on parasitic resistances. The parameters extracted from I-V curves offer an understanding of the different mechanisms involved in the operation of the devices. The parameter extraction routine utilized in this study is a useful tool in determining the device parameters which reveal the mechanisms affecting device performance. (author)

  18. DUVFEL PHOTOINJECTOR DYNAMICS: MEASUREMENT AND SIMULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    GRAVES, W.S.; DIMAURO, L.F.; HEESE, R.; JOHNSON, E.D.; ROSE, J.; RUDATI, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; SHEEHY, B.; YU, L.H.; DOWELL, D.H.

    2001-06-18

    The DUVFEL photoinjector consists of a 1.6 cell BNL gun IV with copper cathode, variable pulse length Ti:Sapp and solenoid magnet. The beam dynamics and the electromagnetic fields in the photoinjector have been characterized by producing a short electron beam with very low charge that is used as a field probe. Transverse beam size and divergence are measured as a function of initial RF phase and initial spot size and compared with simulations using the code HOMDYN. The electromagnetic fields used in the simulations are produced by SUPERFISH, and have been verified with RF measurements. The simulations and measurements of beam dynamics are presented.

  19. A discussion of dynamic stability measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the measurement of the dynamic stability of linear systems are discussed. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the errors in the procedures, and to methods for calculating the system damping from the data. The techniques discussed include: transient decay, moving block analysis, spectral analysis, random decrement signatures, transfer function analysis, and parameter identification methods. The special problems of rotorcraft dynamic stability testing are discussed.

  20. Optimization of Dynamical Decoupling Using Measurement Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uys, Hermann; Biercuk, Michael; Vandevender, Aaron; Shiga, Nobuyasu; Itano, Wayne; Bollinger, John

    2009-05-01

    We study the optimization of dynamical decoupling sequences using ^9Be^+ ions in a Penning ion trap. We artificially synthesize the noise environment the ions see to emulate a variety of physical systems. By incorporating measurement feedback with a Nelder-Mead search algorithm, our locally optimized dynamical decoupling sequences (LODD) attain an order of magnitude improved error suppression compared to known sequences in noise environments with power spectra that have sharp, high-frequency cutoffs. The technique requires no prior knowledge of the noise spectrum. This work shows that optimized dynamical decoupling will be a useful tool in suppressing qubit errors below the fault-tolerant threshold for quantum computation.

  1. Bioinspired dynamic inclination measurement using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Vikas, Vishesh; Crane, Carl

    2015-06-01

    Biologically, the vestibular feedback is critical to the ability of human body to balance in different conditions. This balancing ability inspires analysis of the reference equilibrium position in dynamic environments. The research proposes and experimentally validates the concept of equilibrium for the human body modeled as an inverted pendulum, which is instrumental in explaining why we align the body along the surface normal when standing on a surface but not on an incline, and tend to lean backward or forward on non-static surfaces e.g. accelerating or decelerating bus. This equilibrium position--the dynamic equilibrium axis--is dependent only on the acceleration of surface of contact (e.g. gravity) and acts as the reference to the orientation measurements. The research also draws design inspiration from the two human ears--symmetry and plurality of inertial sensors. The vestibular dynamic inclinometer and planar vestibular dynamic inclinometer consist of multiple (two or four) symmetrically placed accelerometers and a gyroscope. The sensors measure the angular acceleration and absolute orientation, not the change in orientation, from the reference equilibrium position and are successful in separating gravity from motion for objects moving on ground. The measurement algorithm is an analytical solution that is not time-recursive, independent of body dynamics and devoid of integration errors. The experimental results for the two sensor combinations validate the theoretically (kinematics) derived analytical solution of the measurement algorithm. PMID:25879912

  2. Total i.v. anaesthesia with propofol and alfentanil for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Manara, A R; Monk, C R; Bolsin, S N; Prys-Roberts, C

    1991-06-01

    The haemodynamic effects of total i.v. anaesthesia with a combination of propofol and alfentanil infusions were studied in eight patients with good left ventricular function undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Haemodynamic indices were measured before anaesthesia and at specified intervals before cardiopulmonary bypass. The technique resulted in haemodynamic changes comparable to those reported with opioid-based anaesthesia for coronary artery surgery, and has potential advantages. PMID:2064887

  3. Measuring Dynamic Transfer Functions of Cavitating Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baun, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A water-flow test facility has been built to enable measurement of dynamic transfer functions (DTFs) of cavitating pumps and of inducers in such pumps. Originally, the facility was intended for use in an investigation of the effects of cavitation in a rocket-engine low-pressure oxygen turbopump. The facility can also be used to measure DTFs of cavitating pumps in general

  4. I.v. lidocaine worsens histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hirota, K; Hashimoto, Y; Sato, T; Yoshioka, H; Kudo, T; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A

    1999-01-01

    We have assessed the effect of lidocaine (lignocaine) on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by direct visualization with a superfine fibreoptic bronchoscope. Seven mongrel dogs were anaesthetized with pentobarbital (pentobarbitone) 30 mg kg-1 followed by 2 mg kg-1 h-1 and pancuronium 200 micrograms kg-1 h-1. The trachea was intubated with a tracheal tube containing a second lumen for insertion of a 2.2-mm fibreoptic bronchoscope. This allowed estimation of the bronchial cross-sectional area (BCA) of the third bronchial bifurcation of the right lung. We used NIH image, a public domain image processing and analysis program. Bronchoconstriction was produced with a bolus dose of histamine 10 micrograms kg-1 i.v. followed by continuous infusion of 500 micrograms kg-1 h-1. After 30 min the following i.v. doses of lidocaine were given: lidocaine 0 (saline), 0.01, 0.1, 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 at 10-min intervals. BCA was assessed 90 s after each dose. Arterial blood sampling was performed for measurement of plasma catecholamines. Lidocaine 1.0 and 10 mg kg-1 significantly reduced histamine-decreased BCA from 69.7 (SEM 4.1)% to 59.8 (7.3)% and 34.3 (6.8)%, respectively. Plasma concentrations of catecholamines decreased significantly after lidocaine 10 mg kg-1 i.v. In addition, there was a significant correlation between percentage decreases in plasma concentrations of epinephrine (adrenaline) and norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and reduction in %BCA (epinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.674; norepinephrine-BCA, P < 0.01, r = 0.510). This study suggests that i.v. lidocaine may exacerbate histamine-induced bronchoconstriction by a sympatholytic effect. This may have therapeutic implications for patients with acute asthma or anaphylactic shock who may become dependent on circulating catecholamines. PMID:10325842

  5. Robotic system for i.v. antineoplastic drug preparation: description and preliminary evaluation under simulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Cote, D D; Torchia, M G

    1989-11-01

    A robotic system for preparing doses of i.v. antineoplastic drugs is described, and measurements made with the system are compared for accuracy and reproducibility with those made by pharmacists and technicians. System hardware consists of a robotic arm, a 16-bit microcomputer, a bar-code reader, a voice synthesizer, and an electronic balance. The software includes a menu-driven main program, executable files for each robotic activity, and an interface to allow control to pass between the program and the files. The program has routines for matching the software to the hardware; for entering information about the patient, the name of the drug ordered, and the dose; for checking the dose; for selecting the number and size of the vials to be used; for specifying the manipulations of the robotic arm; for printing labels; and for maintaining records. The robot fills an order by getting and placing a vial, inserting a needle into it and withdrawing the drug, weighing the vial, agitating the container to dissolve its contents, reading a bar code, placing a syringe in a syringe manipulator, and getting an i.v. container and injecting the drug into it. Detection of any errors by a series of self-checks arrests execution of an order. No significant differences in accuracy and precision were found between the robotic system and humans performing the same tasks under simulated conditions. The robotic system required less time than humans and eliminated the possibility of direct human contact with the i.v. admixture. Under simulated conditions, a robotic system developed to assist in the preparation of i.v. antineoplastic drugs was as accurate as a manual system and was more time efficient. PMID:2589345

  6. Solar cell dark I-V characteristics and their applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Brandtzaeg, P.; Miller, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of studies conducted to evaluate the feasibility of and to generate techniques for the use of dark forward current-voltage characteristics in the checkout of the Apollo Telescope Mount Solar Array. Methods for the determination of lumped series resistance and prediction of the illuminated I-V curve using the dark characteristics are also presented. The paper addresses itself primarily to the generation of a valid performance testing and flight readiness checkout technique using the forward characteristics of the solar cell.

  7. The importance of measuring dynamic visual acuity.

    PubMed

    Muzdalo, Natasa Vujko

    2013-04-01

    In their everyday life, people interact with different objects, static as well as those in motion. However, dynamic acuity is rarely checked in medical examinations, even those preceding the issue of driving license. In order for driving to be safe, good eyesight or good correction with visual aids is imperative. Beside good eyesight, drivers also have to have good reflexes and short reaction span. The aim of this study was to compare dynamic and static visual acuity in order to observe how they vary among individuals. Twenty female and male participants, 65 years of age, took part in the study and the comparison was made with the results provided by 20 20-year old participants. Dynamic acuity was tested using the Landolt-ring optotype which was simulating movement velocity of 72 km/h. T-test demonstrated the presence of a statistically significant difference between dynamic and static acuity among the participants from 62 to 68 years of age (t = 15.852; df = 39; p < 0.01). Within the same group, dynamic acuity (mean = 0.887; std. deviation = 0.297) proved to be significantly worse than static acuity (mean = 1.40; std. deviation = 0.317). By comparing the results measured within the older group of participants with those measured in the younger group, it was shown that there exists a statistically significant difference (t = 0.275; df = 58; p < 0,05) between the older and younger group in their dynamic binocular acuity with correction. Younger participants had better dynamic binocular acuity with correction (mean = 1.063; std. deviation = 0.259) than the older participants (mean = 0.884; std. deviation = 0.298). The differences between dynamic and static acuity and its degradation in the older age groups have to be taken into account when issuing driving licenses. The future of research lies within the study of correlation between the age and acuity in order that the results can be applied in practice. PMID:23837257

  8. Dynamically defined measures and equilibrium states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Ivan

    2011-12-01

    A technique of dynamically defined measures is developed and its relation to the theory of equilibrium states is shown. The technique uses Carathéodory's method and the outer measure introduced in a previous work by I. Werner [Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 140(2), 333-347 (2006), 10.1017/S0305004105009072]. As an application, equilibrium states for contractive Markov systems [I. Werner, J. London Math. Soc. 71(1), 236-258 (2005), 10.1112/S0024610704006088] are obtained.

  9. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  10. Dynamic heart rate measurements from video sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong-Poh; Raveendran, P.; Lim, Chern-Loon

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows how dynamic heart rate measurements that are typically obtained from sensors mounted near to the heart can also be obtained from video sequences. In this study, two experiments are carried out where a video camera captures the facial images of the seven subjects. The first experiment involves the measurement of subjects’ increasing heart rates (79 to 150 beats per minute (BPM)) while cycling whereas the second involves falling heart beats (153 to 88 BPM). In this study, independent component analysis (ICA) is combined with mutual information to ensure accuracy is not compromised in the use of short video duration. While both experiments are going on measures of heartbeat using the Polar heart rate monitor is also taken to compare with the findings of the proposed method. Overall experimental results show the proposed method can be used to measure dynamic heart rates where the root mean square error (RMSE) and the correlation coefficient are 1.88 BPM and 0.99 respectively. PMID:26203374

  11. Measurement of Gear Tooth Dynamic Friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of dynamic friction forces at the gear tooth contact were undertaken using strain gages at the root fillets of two successive teeth. Results are presented from two gear sets over a range of speeds and loads. The results demonstrate that the friction coefficient does not appear to be significantly influenced by the sliding reversal at the pitch point, and that the friction coefficient values found are in accord with those in general use. The friction coefficient was found to increase at low sliding speeds. This agrees with the results of disc machine testing.

  12. Approximate Single-Diode Photovoltaic Model for Efficient I-V Characteristics Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Ting, T. O.; Zhang, Nan; Guan, Sheng-Uei; Wong, Prudence W. H.

    2013-01-01

    Precise photovoltaic (PV) behavior models are normally described by nonlinear analytical equations. To solve such equations, it is necessary to use iterative procedures. Aiming to make the computation easier, this paper proposes an approximate single-diode PV model that enables high-speed predictions for the electrical characteristics of commercial PV modules. Based on the experimental data, statistical analysis is conducted to validate the approximate model. Simulation results show that the calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics fit the measured data with high accuracy. Furthermore, compared with the existing modeling methods, the proposed model reduces the simulation time by approximately 30% in this work. PMID:24298205

  13. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling.

    PubMed

    Shaniv, R; Akerman, N; Ozeri, R

    2016-04-01

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on m_{j}^{2}, where m_{j}^{2} is the angular momentum of level |j⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in m_{j}, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4D_{5/2} level in ^{88}Sr^{+} to be 2.973_{-0.033}^{+0.026}ea_{0}^{2}. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in ^{88}Sr^{+} based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations. PMID:27104691

  14. Atomic Quadrupole Moment Measurement Using Dynamic Decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaniv, R.; Akerman, N.; Ozeri, R.

    2016-04-01

    We present a method that uses dynamic decoupling of a multilevel quantum probe to distinguish small frequency shifts that depend on mj2, where mj2 is the angular momentum of level |j ⟩ along the quantization axis, from large noisy shifts that are linear in mj, such as those due to magnetic field noise. Using this method we measured the electric-quadrupole moment of the 4 D5 /2 level in 88Sr+ to be 2.97 3-0.033+0.026e a02 . Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in 88Sr+ based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  15. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  16. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  17. Dynamic plasmapause model based on THEMIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Liu, W.; Cao, J. B.; Fu, H. S.; Yu, J.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a dynamic plasmapause location model established based on 5 years of Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) measurements from 2009 to 2013. In total, 5878 plasmapause crossing events are identified, sufficiently covering all 24 magnetic local time (MLT) sectors. Based on this plasmapause crossing database, we investigate the correlations between plasmapause locations with solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. Input parameters for the best fits are obtained for different MLT sectors, and finally, we choose five input parameters to build a plasmapause location model, including 5 min-averaged SYM-H, AL, and AU indices as well as hourly-averaged AE and Kp indices. two out-of-sample comparisons on the evolution of the plasmapause is shown during two magnetic storms, demonstrating good agreement between model results and observations. Two major advantages are achieved by this model. First, this model provides plasmapause locations at 24 MLT sectors, still providing good consistency with observations. Second, this model is able to reproduce dynamic variations of the plasmapause on timescales as short as 5 min.

  18. Measuring Visual Expertise in Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Jean; Curran, Tim; Goodman, Katherine

    2014-11-01

    What role does visual expertise play in the learning of abstract physics? In surveys for the Flow Visualization course at the University of Colorado, Boulder, students often commented positively about a new awareness of fluid dynamics in everyday life. Could this new awareness, termed visual expertise, be measured in some way? Working with research psychologists at CU Boulder, who had already been working in this area on projects such as face recognition, a study was developed. This study had subjects with no prior fluid dynamics expertise classify flow images as either turbulent or laminar. The first group was given error-driven learning; that is, they had to guess the correct category for each image, were given feedback as to whether they had guessed correctly, and after a period of training, were tested on both the training images and a set of similar but new images. A second group was given simple instruction for the training images; that is, they were shown the image along with the name of the correct category, before being tested on both training images and new images. Preliminary results of the pilot study are presented, along with next steps. This work is supported by NSF Grant Number 1240294.

  19. Measuring multipartite entanglement through dynamic susceptibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauke, Philipp; Heyl, Markus; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Zoller, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Entanglement is considered an essential resource in quantum technologies, and central to the understanding of quantum many-body physics. Developing protocols to detect and quantify the entanglement of many-particle quantum states is thus a key challenge for present experiments. Here, we show that the quantum Fisher information, a witness for genuinely multipartite entanglement, becomes measurable for thermal ensembles by means of the dynamic susceptibility--that is, with resources readily available in present cold atomic-gas and condensed-matter experiments. This establishes a connection between multipartite entanglement and many-body correlations contained in response functions, with immediate implications close to quantum phase transitions, where the quantum Fisher information becomes universal, allowing us to identify strongly entangled phase transitions with a divergent multipartite entanglement. We illustrate our framework using paradigmatic quantum Ising models, and point out potential signatures in optical-lattice experiments and strongly correlated materials.

  20. Measuring Atmospheric Dynamics on Titan with AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamkovics, Mate; de Pater, I.; Hartung, M.

    2009-05-01

    The cycling of fluid methane between Titan's atmosphere and surface, via seemingly familiar meteorological phenomena, is often compared to Earth's hydrology. Near-IR observations with AO resolve the moon's 1" disk, measure spatial variation in both the surface reflectivity and scattering in the atmosphere, and constrain the methane cycle. Forward models of the atmosphere are compared to observations and used to identify and quantify sources and altitudes of atmospheric opacity; including aerosols, clouds, and precipitation. The ubiquitous submicron aerosol hazes are tracers of global stratospheric dynamics over yearly timescales. Cloud properties may constrain the tropospheric circulation and are observed to change on hourly, daily, and seasonal timescales. Here we present observations of the daily life-cycle of a cloud system, a signature of tropospheric precipitation, seasonal changes in aerosol, and discuss the models that are used to quantify the observed meteorology.

  1. Fluid dynamic factors in tracheal pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Chang, H K; Mortola, J P

    1981-07-01

    Because tracheal pressure measurement generally involves the use of a cannula or an endotracheal tube, fluid dynamic factors may cause a considerable artifact. We present a theoretical explanation of the observed apparent paradox in which the resistance of a tracheal cannula or an endotracheal tube is isolation was found to exceed the resistance of the airways plus the cannula or the tube in situ. By estimating the viscous dissipation and the kinetic energy change in a conduit with sudden variation of cross-sectional area, a predictive model is derived. The predictions are verified by a series of in vitro experiments with both steady and oscillatory flows. The experiments showed that the pressure recorded from the sidearm of a tracheal cannula or endotracheal tube contains an error which, in general, increased with the mean Reynolds' number of the through flow and also depends on the diameter ratio between the trachea and the tube or cannula, the position of the pressure tap, and the frequency of ventilation. When feasible, direct measurement with a needle in the trachea is suggested as a way to avoid the possible artifacts arising from the use fo a side tap of the cannula. Theoretical considerations, as well as in vitro and animal experiments, indicate that adding a properly chosen expansion to the tracheal cannula makes it possible to alter inspiratory and expiratory pressures selectively. This device may prove useful in control of breathing studies. PMID:7263418

  2. I-V Characteristic for ZnO MSM Photodetector with Pd Contact Electrodes on PPC Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Jandow, N. N.; Ibrahim, K.; Hassan, H. Abu

    2010-07-07

    ZnO thin film was deposited on polypropylene carbonate (PPC) plastic substrate by direct current (DC) sputtering. The measurements of the absorption spectrum and the photoluminescence of the film were carried out. ZnO Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) photodetector with palladium (Pd) contact electrodes was then fabricated. The structural and electrical properties of the detector were investigated using the current-voltage (I-V) measurements.

  3. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K+ channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification. PMID:27167118

  4. Origin of the Shape of Current-Voltage Curve through Nanopores: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Sumikama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ion transports through ion channels, biological nanopores, are essential for life: Living cells generate electrical signals by utilizing ion permeation through channels. The measured current-voltage (i-V) relations through most ion channels are sublinear, however, its physical meaning is still elusive. Here we calculated the i-V curves through anion-doped carbon nanotubes, a model of an ion channel, using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found the i-V curve reflects the physical origin of the rate-determining step: the i-V curve is sublinear when the permeation is entropy bottlenecked, while it is superlinear in the case of the energy bottlenecked permeation. Based on this finding, we discuss the relation between the molecular mechanism of ion permeation through the biological K(+) channels and the shape of the i-V curves through them. This work also provides a clue for a novel design of nanopores that show current rectification. PMID:27167118

  5. Statistics of dynamic speckles in application to distance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Miridonov, Serguei V.; Sidorov, Igor S.; Semenov, Dmitry V.; Nippolainen, Ervin

    2009-03-01

    We present an analysis of statistical properties of dynamic speckles to estimate the limiting accuracy of measurements achievable in a distance sensor using spatially filtered dynamic speckles. The main reason for inaccurate measurements using dynamic speckles is their stochastic nature. It is shown that the average lifetime of dynamic speckles is the key factor defining the measurement accuracy. Main conclusions of the theoretical analysis were confirmed in an experiment carried out with a fast moving rough surface. Special attention is paid to a recently proposed range sensor using dynamic speckles generated by a fast-deflecting laser beam. It is shown that this sensor possesses the best combination of accuracy and response time.

  6. Thomson Scattering Measurements of Plasma Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Forster, E; Cao, L; Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P

    2006-03-29

    The authors propose to investigate the dynamics of plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime on ultra-short time scales. Accessible plasma conditions are in the density range of n = 10{sup 20} - 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and at moderate temperatures of T = 1 - 20 eV. These plasmas are of importance for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. They are characterized by a coupling parameter of {Lambda} {approx}> 1, where electromagnetic interactions are of the same order as the kinetic energy. The high density of the plasma makes it opaque to radiation in the visible range and, as a consequence, UV up to x-ray radiation can be used to probe such systems. Therefore a wide range in the temperature-density plane of WDM is presently unexplored and only the VUV-FEL opens for the first time the opportunity for its detailed investigation. In equilibrium, the macroscopic state of the plasma is completely characterized by its density and temperature. In pump-probe experiments however, the plasma is initially in a nonequilibrium state and relaxes towards equilibrium within the relaxation time {tau}{sub R}. For t > {tau}{sub R}, the plasma is in an equilibrium state and expands hydrodynamically on a time scale {tau}{sub H}. The proposed experiment measures the time-resolved Thomson scattering signal with the VUV-FEL radiation characterizing the plasma in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states. Both regimes are extremely interesting and will provide new insight into the following phenomena: (1) details of nonequilibrium correlations, (2) relaxation phenomena, (3) hydrodynamic expansion, (4) recombination kinetics. The time-resolved Thomson scattering signal is obtained in a pump-probe experiment by varying the delay between pump and probe. The final stage of the relaxation process (t {approx} {tau}{sub R}) is of special interest since the plasma components (electrons and ion species) can be assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium. This

  7. Measuring Word Learning: Dynamic versus Static Assessment of Kindergarten Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Vera Joanna; Watkins, Ruth V.

    2007-01-01

    This preliminary study investigated the potential of using a dynamic approach to assessing expressive word mapping. Because measuring word mapping with productive language responses is much more difficult than measuring receptive word mapping, incorporating a dynamic measure allowed us to tap partial mapping and provided useful information on word…

  8. USTUR WHOLE BODY CASE 0269: DEMONSTRATING EFFECTIVENESS OF I.V. CA-DTPA FOR PU

    SciTech Connect

    James, Anthony C.; Sasser , Lyle B.; Stuit, Dorothy B.; Glover, Samuel E.; Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2008-01-28

    This whole body donation case (USTUR Registrant) involved a single acute inhalation of an acidic Pu(NO3)4 solution in the form of an aerosol ‘mist.’ Chelation treatment with i.v. Ca-EDTA was initiated on the day of the intake, and continued intermittently over 6 months. After 2½ years with no further treatment, a course of i.v. Ca-DTPA was administered. A total of 400 measurements of 239+240Pu excreted in urine were recorded; starting on the first day (both before and during the initial Ca-EDTA chelation), and continuing for 37 years. This sampling included all intervals of chelation. In addition, 91 measurements of 239+240Pu-in-feces were recorded over this whole period. The Registrant died about 38 years after the intake, at age 79 y, with extensive carcinomatosis secondary to adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. At autopsy, all major soft tissue organs were harvested for radiochemical analyses of their 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am content. Also, all types of bone (comprising about half the skeleton) were harvested for radiochemical analyses, as well as samples of skin, subcutaneous fat and muscle. This comprehensive dataset has been applied to derive ‘chelation-enhanced’ transfer rates in the ICRP Publication 67 plutonium biokinetic model, representing the behaviour of blood-borne and tissue-incorporated plutonium during intervals of therapy. The resulting model of the separate effects of i.v. Ca-EDTA and Ca-DTPA chelation shows that the therapy administered in this case succeeded in reducing substantially the long-term burden of plutonium in all body organs, except for the lungs. The calculated reductions in organ content at the time of death are approximately 40% for the liver, 60% for other soft tissues (muscle, skin, glands, etc.), 50% for the kidneys, and 50% for the skeleton. Essentially all of the substantial reduction in skeletal burden occurred in trabecular bone. This modeling exercise demonstrated that 3-y-delayed Ca-DTPA therapy was as

  9. Rotor/bearing system dynamic stiffness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, A.

    1985-01-01

    Sweep perturbation testing as used in Modal Analysis when applied to a rotating machine has to take into consideration the machine dynamic state of equilibrium at its operational rotative speed. This stands in contrasts to a static equilibrium of nonrotating structures. The rotational energy has a significant influence on rotor dynamic characteristics. The best perturbing input for rotating machines is a forward or reverse rotating, circular force applied directly to the shaft. Determination of Dynamic Stiffness Characteristics of the rotor bearing system by nonsynchronous perturbation of a symmetric rotating shaft supported in one relatively rigid and one oil lubricated bearing.

  10. Evolutionary dynamics on measurable strategy spaces: Asymmetric games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Palacios, Saul; Hernández-Lerma, Onésimo

    2015-12-01

    The theory of evolutionary dynamics in asymmetric games has been mainly studied for games with a finite strategy space. In this paper we introduce an evolutionary dynamics model for asymmetric games where the strategy sets are measurable spaces (separable metric spaces). Under this hypothesis the replicator dynamics is in a Banach Space. We specify conditions under which the replicator dynamics has a solution. Furthermore, under suitable assumptions, a critical point of the system is stable. Finally, an example illustrates our results.

  11. Dynamic Forces in Spur Gears - Measurement, Prediction, and Code Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Rebbechi, Brian; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1996-01-01

    Measured and computed values for dynamic loads in spur gears were compared to validate a new version of the NASA gear dynamics code DANST-PC. Strain gage data from six gear sets with different tooth profiles were processed to determine the dynamic forces acting between the gear teeth. Results demonstrate that the analysis code successfully simulates the dynamic behavior of the gears. Differences between analysis and experiment were less than 10 percent under most conditions.

  12. Method and apparatus for I-V data acquisition from solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Cole, Steven W.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for logging current-voltage (I-V) characteristic d of a solar cell module (10) in two modes using a portable instrument. One mode controls the load current through a circuit (36) in 256 equal intervals while voltage is measured from open circuit to at least halfway into the knee of the curve and the other mode controls the load voltage through a circuit (34) in 256 equal intervals from the lowest voltage measurement possible (short circuit) to at least halfway into the knee of the curve, under control of a microcomputer (12). All measurements are packed by discarding each measurement that is within 0.5% of the value predicted from two previous measurements, except every ninth (9th) measurement which is retained. The remaining data is further packed into a memory block of a detachable storage medium (14) by recording the data points in sequence following a header containing data common to all points, with each point having the value of the controlled parameter recorded as the number of increments from the previous point recorded followed by the measured value. The detachable storage medium is preferably a solid state device for reliability, and is transferable to a playback terminal which unpacks the data for analysis and display.

  13. Lectures on Dynamical Models for Quantum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí Balian, Roger

    2015-10-01

    In textbooks, ideal quantum measurements are described in terms of the tested system only by the collapse postulate and Born's rule. This level of description offers a rather flexible position for the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Here we analyse an ideal measurement as a process of interaction between the tested system S and an apparatus A, so as to derive the properties postulated in textbooks. We thus consider within standard quantum mechanics the measurement of a quantum spin component ŝz by an apparatus A, being a magnet coupled to a bath. We first consider the evolution of the density operator of S+A describing a large set of runs of the measurement process. The approach describes the disappearance of the off-diagonal terms ("truncation") of the density matrix as a physical effect due to A, while the registration of the outcome has classical features due to the large size of the pointer variable, the magnetisation. A quantum ambiguity implies that the density matrix at the final time can be decomposed on many bases, not only the one of the measurement. This quantum oddity prevents to connect individual outcomes to measurements, a difficulty known as the "measurement problem". It is shown that it is circumvented by the apparatus as well, since the evolution in a small time interval erases all decompositions, except the one on the measurement basis. Once one can derive the outcome of individual events from quantum theory, the so-called "collapse of the wave function" or the "reduction of the state" appears as the result of a selection of runs among the original large set. Hence nothing more than standard quantum mechanics is needed to explain features of measurements. The employed statistical formulation is advocated for the teaching of quantum theory.

  14. Charge storage phenomena and I-V characteristics observed in ultrathin polyimide Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Atsushi

    1992-04-01

    Au/PI/Al junctions were fabricated and the charge storage phenomena in polyimide (PI) layers were examined. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the junctions were examined in connection with charge storage phenomena. It was found that numerous excess charges were injected into PI multilayers from electrodes by the application of biasing voltages. Therefore, the space charge field formed in as-deposited PI layers was distorted by the excess charges injected. It was also found that asymmetric I-V characteristics observed for Au/PI/Al junctions depended on the biasing voltages, because the space charge field formed in PI layers influenced the I-V characteristics.

  15. Conductance measurement circuit with wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Von Esch, Myron (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A conductance measurement circuit to measure conductance of a solution under test with an output voltage proportional to conductance over a 5-decade range, i.e., 0.01 uS to 1000 uS or from 0.1 uS to 10,000 uS. An increase in conductance indicates growth, or multiplication, of the bacteria in the test solution. Two circuits are used each for an alternate half-cycle time periods of an alternate squarewave in order to cause alternate and opposite currents to be applied to the test solution. The output of one of the two circuits may be scaled for a different range optimum switching frequency dependent upon the solution conductance and to enable uninterrupted measurement over the complete 5-decade range. This circuitry provides two overlapping ranges of conductance which can be read simultaneously without discontinuity thereby eliminating range switching within the basic circuitry. A VCO is used to automatically change the operating frequency according to the particular value of the conductance being measured, and comparators indicate which range is valid and also facilitate computer-controlled data acquisition. A multiplexer may be used to monitor any number of solutions under test continuously.

  16. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION Generation of stable multi-jets by flow-limited field-injection electrostatic spraying and their control via I-V characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, W.; Heil, P. E.; Choi, H.; Kim, K.

    2010-12-01

    The I-V characteristics of flow-limited field-injection electrostatic spraying (FFESS) were investigated, exposing a new way to predict and control the specific spraying modes from single-jet to multi-jet. Monitoring the I-V characteristics revealed characteristic drops in the current upon formation of an additional jet in the multi-jet spraying mode. For fixed jet numbers, space-charge-limited current behaviour was measured which was attributed to space charge in the dielectric liquids between the needle electrode and the nozzle opening. The present work establishes that FFESS can, in particular, generate stable multiple jets and that their control is possible through monitoring the I-V characteristics. This can allow for automatic control of the FFESS process and expedite its future scientific and industrial applications.

  17. Laser application in measuring the dynamic deformation of gear teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qi; Wu, Zhao-Tong; Li, Jianfeng; Tian, Zhiren

    1996-10-01

    The paper shows how the laser measurement method may be applied in mechanical engineering. Double-exposure speckle photography is used to measure the dynamic deformation of spur gear tooth. A series of experiments of gears with different speed, load and accuracy have been done and double-exposure speckle patterns at different meshing positions have been shot. The dynamic information of spur gear tooth during the whole meshing procedure is obtained by means of automatic image processing.

  18. HIGH DYNAMIC-RANGE HIGH SPEED LINAC CURRENT MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Deibele, Craig Edmond; Curry, Douglas E; Dickson, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    It is desired to measure the linac current of a charged particle beam with a consistent accuracy over a dynamic range of over 120 dB. Conventional current transformers suffer from droop, can be susceptible to electromagnetic interference (EMI), and can be bandwidth limited. A novel detector and electronics were designed to maximize dynamic range of about 120 dB and measure rise-times on the order of 10 nanoseconds.

  19. I-V Characteristics of a Static Random Access Memory Cell Utilizing Ferroelectric Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, Crystal; Mitchell, Cody; Hunt, Mitchell; Ho, Fat D.; MacLeod, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    I-V characteristics for FeFET different than that of MOSFET Ferroelectric layer features hysteresis trend whereas MOSFET behaves same for both increasing and decreasing VGS FeFET I-V characteristics doesn't show dependence on VDS A Transistor with different channel length and width as well as various resistance and input voltages give different results As resistance values increased, the magnitude of the drain current decreased.

  20. Incomplete fusion dynamics by spin distribution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D.; Ali, R.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Sharma, M. K.; Singh, B. P.; Babu, K. Surendra; Sinha, Rishi K.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2010-02-15

    Spin distributions for various evaporation residues populated via complete and incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O with {sup 124}Sn at 6.3 MeV/nucleon have been measured, using charged particles (Z=1,2)-{gamma} coincidence technique. Experimentally measured spin distributions of the residues produced as incomplete fusion products associated with 'fast'{alpha}- and 2{alpha}-emission channels observed in the 'forward cone' are found to be distinctly different from those of the residues produced as complete fusion products. Moreover, 'fast'{alpha}-particles that arise from larger angular momentum in the entrance channel are populated at relatively higher driving input angular momentum than those produced through complete fusion. The incomplete fusion residues are populated in a limited, higher-angular-momentum range, in contrast to the complete fusion products, which are populated over a broad spin range.

  1. Making Scents: Dynamic Olfactometry for Threshold Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Data on human odor thresholds show disparities huge enough to marginalize olfactory psychophysics and delegitimize importation of its data into other areas. Variation of orders of magnitude from study to study, much of it systematic, threatens meaningful comparisons with animal species, comparison between in vivo with in vitro studies, the search for molecular determinants of potency, and use of olfactory information for environmental or public health policy. On the premise that good experimental results will flow from use of good tools, this report describes a vapor delivery system and its peripherals that instantiate good tools. The vapor delivery device 8 (VDD8) provides flexibility in range of delivered concentrations, offers definable stability of delivery, accommodates solvent-free delivery below a part per trillion, gives a realistic interface with subjects, has accessible and replaceable components, and adapts to a variety of psychophysical methodologies. The device serves most often for measurement of absolute sensitivity, where its design encourages collection of thousands of judgments per day from subjects tested simultaneously. The results have shown humans to be more sensitive and less variable than has previous testing. The VDD8 can also serve for measurement of differential sensitivity, discrimination of quality, and perception of mixtures and masking. The exposition seeks to transmit general lessons while it proffers some specifics of design to reproduce features of the device in a new or existing system. The principles can apply to devices for animal testing. PMID:19965900

  2. I-V Characteristics of a Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen

    1999-01-01

    There are many possible uses for ferroelectric field effect transistors.To understand their application, a fundamental knowledge of their basic characteristics must first be found. In this research, the current and voltage characteristics of a field effect transistor are described. The effective gate capacitance and charge are derived from experimental data on an actual FFET. The general equation for a MOSFET is used to derive the internal characteristics of the transistor: This equation is modified slightly to describe the FFET characteristics. Experimental data derived from a Radiant Technologies FFET is used to calculate the internal transistor characteristics using fundamental MOSFET equations. The drain current was measured under several different gate and drain voltages and with different initial polarizations on the ferroelectric material in the transistor. Two different polarization conditions were used. One with the gate ferroelectric material polarized with a +9.0 volt write pulse and one with a -9.0 volt pulse.

  3. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, D. L.; Robinson, W. W.; Watkins, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    A gas temperature measurement system with compensated frequency response of 1 kHz and capability to operate in the exhaust of a gas turbine engine combustor was developed. A review of available technologies which could attain this objective was done. The most promising method was identified as a two wire thermocouple, with a compensation method based on the responses of the two different diameter thermocouples to the fluctuating gas temperature field. In a detailed design of the probe, transient conduction effects were identified as significant. A compensation scheme was derived to include the effects of gas convection and wire conduction. The two wire thermocouple concept was tested in a laboratory burner exhaust to temperatures of about 3000 F and in a gas turbine engine to combustor exhaust temperatures of about 2400 F. Uncompensated and compensated waveforms and compensation spectra are presented.

  4. Towards Measurable Types for Dynamical Process Modeling Languages

    PubMed Central

    Mjolsness, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Process modeling languages such as “Dynamical Grammars” are highly expressive in the processes they model using stochastic and deterministic dynamical systems, and can be given formal semantics in terms of an operator algebra. However such process languages may be more limited in the types of objects whose dynamics is easily expressible. For many applications in biology, the dynamics of spatial objects in particular (including combinations of discrete and continuous spatial structures) should be formalizable at a high level of abstraction. We suggest that this may be achieved by formalizing such objects within a type system endowed with type constructors suitable for complex dynamical objects. To this end we review and illustrate the operator algebraic formulation of heterogeneous process modeling and semantics, extending it to encompass partial differential equations and intrinsic graph grammar dynamics. We show that in the operator approach to heterogeneous dynamics, types require integration measures. From this starting point, “measurable” object types can be enriched with generalized metrics under which approximation can be defined. The resulting measurable and “metricated” types can be built up systematically by type constructors such as vectors, products, and labelled graphs. We find conditions under which functions and quotients can be added as constructors of measurable and metricated types. PMID:21572536

  5. Simultaneous dynamic electrical and structural measurements of functional materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vecchini, C.; Stewart, M.; Muñiz-Piniella, A.; Wooldridge, J.; Thompson, P.; McMitchell, S. R. C.; Bouchenoire, L.; Brown, S.; Wermeille, D.; Lucas, C. A.; Lepadatu, S.; Bikondoa, O.; Hase, T. P. A.; Lesourd, M.; Dontsov, D.; Cain, M. G.

    2015-10-15

    A new materials characterization system developed at the XMaS beamline, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France, is presented. We show that this new capability allows to measure the atomic structural evolution (crystallography) of piezoelectric materials whilst simultaneously measuring the overall strain characteristics and electrical response to dynamically (ac) applied external stimuli.

  6. Atom Interferometry Measurements of Static and Dynamic Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Holmgren, Will; Hromada, Ivan; Ronan, Joe; Cronin, Alex

    2011-10-01

    We report progress towards new measurements of static and dynamic polarizabilities for several atomic species. We use a nanograting Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer with an electric field gradient to observe atomic de Broglie wave phase shifts that are proportional to the electric polarizability. These measurements provide tests of atomic structure calculations that are needed to improve the precision of atomic clocks. We explain the progress and challenges of measuring the dynamic polarizability of potassium, the static polarizability of strontium and ytterbium, and several polarizability ratios (e.g. αNa/αLi) with one part per thousand accuracy.

  7. Altazimuth mount based dynamic calibration method for GNSS attitude measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; He, Tao; Sun, Shaohua; Gu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    As the key process to ensure the test accuracy and quality, the dynamic calibration of the GNSS attitude measuring instrument is often embarrassed by the lack of the rigid enough test platform and an accurate enough calibration reference. To solve the problems, a novel dynamic calibration method for GNSS attitude measurement based on altazimuth mount is put forward in this paper. The principle and implementation of this method are presented, and then the feasibility and usability of the method are analyzed in detail involving the applicability of the mount, calibrating precision, calibrating range, base line rigidity and the satellite signal involved factors. Furthermore, to verify and test the method, a confirmatory experiment is carried out with the survey ship GPS attitude measuring instrument, and the experimental results prove that it is a feasible way to the dynamic calibration for GNSS attitude measurement.

  8. Measuring the Dynamic Parameters of MCF7 Cell Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winton, Carly; Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra

    2013-03-01

    Microtubules are the key component of the cytoskeleton. They are intrinsically dynamic displaying dynamic instability in which they randomly switch between a phase of growing and shrinking, both in vitro and in vivo. This dynamic is specified by the following parameters: growing rate, shrinking rate, frequency of catastrophe, and frequency of rescue. In this work, we will present our primary results in which we measured the dynamic parameters of a single microtubule polymerized from MCF7 tubulin in vitro. The results are significant since the MCF7 microtubules are non-neural mammalian consisting of different beta tubulin isotypes in their structures as compared to neural mammalian microtubules, such as bovine brain. The unique dynamic parameters of individual MCF7 microtubules in vitro, which are reported for the first time, indicate that non-neural microtubules can be fundamentally different from neural microtubules.

  9. Phase unwrapping in the dynamic 3D measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianyu; Zhang, Qican

    2010-04-01

    In the dynamic 3D shape measurement phase distribution has 3D character, in which phase changes along x and y directions in space and also along t direction in time. 3D phase unwrapping plays a very important role in the dynamic 3D shape measurement. In the dynamic 3D shape measurement methods based on the structured illumination, Fourier transformation profilometry (FTP) is particularly fit for dynamic 3D measurement, because of only one fringe pattern needed and full field analysis. In this paper some 3D phase unwrapping techniques for dynamic 3D shape measurement mainly in our Lab. are presented and reviewed. The basic methods and algorithm design are introduced. The basic methods include direct 3D phase unwrapping, 3D diamond phase unwrapping, 3D phase unwrapping based on reliability ordering, 3D phase unwrapping based on marked fringe tracing. The advantage of the phase unwrapping based on reliability ordering is that the path of phase unwrapping is always along the direction from the pixel with higher reliability parameter value to the pixel with low reliability parameter value. Therefore, in the worse case the error is limited, if there is any, to local minimum areas.

  10. Development of a transfer function method for dynamic stability measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    Flutter testing method based on transfer function measurements is developed. The error statistics of several dynamic stability measurement methods are reviewed. It is shown that the transfer function measurement controls the error level by averaging the data and correlating the input and output. The method also gives a direct estimate of the error in the response measurement. An algorithm is developed for obtaining the natural frequency and damping ratio of low damped modes of the system, using integrals of the transfer function in the vicinity of a resonant peak. Guidelines are given for selecting the parameters in the transfer function measurement. Finally, the dynamic stability measurement technique is applied to data from a wind tunnel test of a proprotor and wing model.

  11. Cumulative Measurement Errors for Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Located at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, the Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a real-time, six degree-of-freedom, short range motion base simulator originally designed to simulate the relative dynamics of two bodies in space mating together (i.e., docking or berthing). The SDTS has the capability to test full scale docking and berthing systems utilizing a two body dynamic docking simulation for docking operations and a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) simulation for berthing operations. The SDTS can also be used for nonmating applications such as sensors and instruments evaluations requiring proximity or short range motion operations. The motion base is a hydraulic powered Stewart platform, capable of supporting a 3,500 lb payload with a positional accuracy of 0.03 inches. The SDTS is currently being used for the NASA Docking System testing and has been also used by other government agencies. The SDTS is also under consideration for use by commercial companies. Examples of tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility integrates a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or de-mating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is used for input during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents unique challenges, one particular area of interest involves the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. The measurement systems for the test facility have two separate functions. The first is to take static measurements of facility and test hardware to determine both the static and moving frames used in the simulation and control system. The test hardware must be measured after each configuration change to determine both sets of reference frames. The second function is to take dynamic

  12. Dynamic Aperture Measurements at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Decking, W.; Robin, D.

    1999-03-12

    A large dynamic aperture for a storage ring is of importance for long lifetimes and a high injection efficiency. Measurements of the dynamic aperture of the third generation synchrotron light source Advanced Light Source (ALS) using beam excitation with kicker magnets are presented. The experiments were done for various accelerator conditions, allowing us to investigate the influence of different working points, chromaticities, insertion devices, etc.. The results are compared both with tracking calculations and a simple model for the dynamic aperture yielding good agreements. This gives us confidence in the predictability of the nonlinear accelerator model. This is especially important for future ALS upgrades as well as new storage ring designs.

  13. Dual redundant arm system operational quality measures and their applications - Dynamic measures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan; Kim, Sungbok

    1990-01-01

    Dual-arm dynamic operation quality measures are presented which quantify the efficiency and capability of generating Cartesian accelerations by two cooperative arms based on the analysis of dual-arm dynamic interactions. Dual-arm dynamic manipulability is defined as the efficiency of generating Cartesian accelerations under the dynamic and kinematic interactions between individual arms and an object under manipulation. The analysis of dual-arm dynamic interactions is based on the so-called Cartesian space agent model of an arm, which represents an individual arm as a force source acting upon a point mass with the effective Cartesian space arm dynamics and an environment or an object under manipulation. The Cartesian space agent model of an arm makes it possible to derive the dynamic and kinematic constraints involved in the transport, assembly and grasping modes of dual-arm cooperation. A task-oriented operational quality measure, (TOQd) is defined by evaluating dual-arm dynamic manipulability in terms of given task requirements. TOQd is used in dual-arm joint configuration optimization. Simulation results are shown. A complete set of forward dynamic equations for a dual-arm system is derived, and dual-arm dynamic operational quality measures for various modes of dual-arm cooperation allowing sliding contacts are established.

  14. I V characteristic of electronic transport through a quantum dot chain: The role of antiresonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Zheng, Yisong; Gong, Weijiang; Lü, Tianquan

    2006-12-01

    The I V spectrum of electronic transport through a quantum dot chain is calculated by means of the nonequilibrium Green function technique. In such a system, two arbitrary quantum dots are connected with two electron reservoirs through leads. When the dot-lead coupling is very weak, a series of discrete resonant peaks in electron transmission function cause staircase-like I V characteristic. On the contrary, in the relatively strong dot-lead coupling regime, stairs in the I V spectrum due to resonance vanish. However, when there are some dangling quantum dots in the chain outside two leads, the antiresonance which corresponds to the zero points of electron transmission function brings about novel staircase characteristic in the I V spectrum. Moreover, two features in the I V spectrum arising from the antiresonance are pointed out, which are significant for possible device applications. One is the multiple negative differential conductance regions, and another is regarding to create a highly spin-polarized current through the quantum dot chain by the interplay of the resonance and antiresonance. Finally, we focus on the role that the many-body effect plays on the antiresonance. Our result is that the antiresonance remains when the electron interaction is considered to the second order approximation.

  15. Dynamic Tire Pressure Sensor for Measuring Ground Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application. PMID:23202206

  16. Dynamic tire pressure sensor for measuring ground vibration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; McDaniel, James Gregory; Wang, Ming L

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a convenient and non-contact acoustic sensing approach for measuring ground vibration. This approach, which uses an instantaneous dynamic tire pressure sensor (DTPS), possesses the capability to replace the accelerometer or directional microphone currently being used for inspecting pavement conditions. By measuring dynamic pressure changes inside the tire, ground vibration can be amplified and isolated from environmental noise. In this work, verifications of the DTPS concept of sensing inside the tire have been carried out. In addition, comparisons between a DTPS, ground-mounted accelerometer, and directional microphone are made. A data analysis algorithm has been developed and optimized to reconstruct ground acceleration from DTPS data. Numerical and experimental studies of this DTPS reveal a strong potential for measuring ground vibration caused by a moving vehicle. A calibration of transfer function between dynamic tire pressure change and ground acceleration may be needed for different tire system or for more accurate application. PMID:23202206

  17. Dynamic subcriticality measurements using the CF neutron noise method: Videotape

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Blakeman, E.D.; Ragan, G.E.; Johnson, E.B.

    1987-01-01

    The capability to measure the subcriticality for a multiplying system with k-effective values as low as 0.3 was demonstrated for measurement times of approximately 10 s; the measured k-effective values obtained do not depend on the speed with which the solution height is changed or on whether the tank is filling or draining. As in previous experiments, the low-frequency ratios of spectral densities are all that are needed to obtain the k-effective value. This method's effectiveness for systems where conditions are changing with time as demonstrated, probably exceeds the dynamic requirements for most nuclear fuel plant processing applications. The calculated k-effective values using the KENO code and Hansen-Roach cross-sections compare well with the experimental values. Before the dynamic capability of the method can be considered fully explored, additional dynamic experiments are required for other geometries and fuel concentrations.

  18. Spectroscopic, scanning laser OBIC, and I-V/QE characterizations of browned EVA solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F.J.; Eisgruber, I.L.; Micheels, R.H.

    1996-05-01

    The effects of ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) discoloration due to accelerated field or laboratory exposure on the encapsulated silicon (Si) solar cells or EVA/glass laminates were characterized quantitatively by using non-invasive, non-destructive ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, spectrocolorimetry, spectrofluorometry, scanning laser OBIC (optical beam induced current) spectroscopy, and current-voltage (I-V) and quantum efficiency (QE) measurements. The results show that the yellowness index (YI) measured directly over the AR-coated solar cells under the glass superstrate increased from the range of -80 to -90 to the range of -20 to 15 as the EVA changed from clear to brown. The ratio of two fluorescence emission peak areas generally increased from 1.45 to 5.69 as browning increased, but dropped to 4.21 on a darker EVA. For a solar cell with brown EVA in the central region, small-area grating QE measurements and scanning laser OBIC analysis between the brown and clear EVA regions showed that the quantum efficiency loss at 633 nm was 42%-48% of the loss at 488 nm, due to a reduced decrease of transmittance in browned EVA at the longer wavelengths. The portion of the solar cell under the browned EVA showed a decrease of {approximately}36% in efficiency, as compared to the cell efficiency under clear EVA. Transmittance loss at 633 nm was 38% of the loss at 488 nm for a light yellow-brown EVA/glass laminate that showed a small increase of 10 in the yellowness index.

  19. Dynamic fracture toughness evaluation by measurement of CTOD

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, W.N. Jr.; Douglas, A.S.; Shapiro, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    Quantification of the dynamic fracture toughness of structural materials is essential to a wide range of problems-from nuclear accidents to ordnance applications. However, the difficulties associated with accurate measurements of crack under dynamic loading are considerable. Thus there are no standardized procedures and few reliable results. A systematic study of the dynamic fracture toughness of SAE-01 tool steel, 4340 and HY100 steels, and a tungsten are described using the Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage (ISDG) system which has very high frequency resolution. The ISDG system is used to measure the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) 100 microns behind a fatigue crack tip in a three-point bend specimen. Static measurements on similar specimens serve to calibrate the method and ensure consistency with the accepted procedures for static fracture toughness testing. Finite element analyses are used to obtain full field information at the point of initiation and to assess the material characteristics which lead to changes in toughness with loading rate. The major advantage of the method is that information is obtained very close to the crack tip, so that stress wave loading effects are accounted for. Results show that 4340 steel, which is strain-rate insensitive, has no significant change in toughness with loading rate. Measurable toughness dependence on loading rate is found for HY-100 and tungsten, which are approximately 15 percent tougher under dynamic conditions. The SAE-01 tool steel shows a significant increase (50 percent) in fracture toughness for dynamic over static loading.

  20. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Measurement of Velocity and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Panda, J.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for measuring dynamic gas velocity and temperature is described. The technique is based on molecular Rayleigh scattering of laser light, so no seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered light is filtered with a fixed cavity, planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer. A minimum number of photodetectors were used in order to allow the high data acquisition rate needed for dynamic measurements. One photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used to measure the total Rayleigh scattering, which is proportional to the gas density. Two additional PMTs were used to detect light that passes through two apertures in a mask located in the interferometer fringe plane. An uncertainty analysis was used to select the optimum aperture parameters and to predict the measurement uncertainty due to photon shot-noise. Results of an experiment to measure the velocity of a subsonic free jet are presented.

  1. Gravimetric method for the dynamic measurement of urine flow.

    PubMed

    Steele, J E; Skarlatos, S; Brand, P H; Metting, P J; Britton, S L

    1993-10-01

    The rate of urine formation is a primary index of renal function, but no techniques are currently available to accurately measure low rates of urine flow on a continuous basis, such as are normally found in rats. We developed a gravimetric method for the dynamic measurement of urine flow in anesthetized rats. Catheters were inserted directly into the ureters close to the renal pelves, and a siphon was created to collect all of the urine formed as rapidly as it was produced. Urine flow was determined by measuring the weight of the urine using a direct-reading analytical balance interfaced to a computer. Basal urine flow was measured at 2-sec intervals for 30 to 60 min. The dynamic response of urine flow to a rapid decrease in arterial pressure produced by a bolus intravenous injection of acetylcholine (0.5 micrograms) was also measured. Intrinsic drift, evaporative losses, and the responsiveness of the system to several fixed pump flows in the low physiologic range were evaluated in vitro. The gravimetric method described was able to continuously measure basal urine flows that averaged 37.3 +/- 12.4 microliters/min. Error due to drift and evaporation was negligible, totaling less than 1% of the measured urine flow. Acetylcholine-induced declines in arterial pressure were followed within 8 sec by a decline in urine flow. These data demonstrate that this new gravimetric method provides a simple, inexpensive, dynamic measurement of urine flow in the microliter/min range. PMID:8372099

  2. A growing-drop technique for measuring dynamic interfacial tension

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C.A.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    A novel, growing-drop technique is described for measuring dynamic interfacial tension due to sorption of surface-active solutes. The proposed method relates the instantaneous pressure and size of expanding liquid drops to interfacial tension and is useful for measuring both liquid/gas and liquid/liquid tensions over a wide range of time scales, currently from 10 ms to several hours. Growing-drop measurements on surfactant-free water/air and water/octanol interfaces yield constant tensions equal to their known literature values. For surfactant-laden, liquid drops, the growing-drop technique captures the actual transient tension evolution of a single interface, rather than interval times as with the classic maximum-drop-pressure and drop.-volume tension measurements. Dynamic tensions measured for 0.25 mM aqueous 1-decanol solution/air and 0.02 kg/m{sup 3} aqueous Triton X-100 solution/dodecane interfaces show nonmonotonic behavior, indicating slow surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of interfacial dilatation. The dynamic tension of a purified and fresh 6 mM aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution/air interface shows only a monotonic decrease, indicating rapid surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of dilatation. ConverselY, an aged SDS solution, naturally containing trace dodecanol impurities, exhibits dynamic tensions which reflect a superposition of the rapidly equilibrating SDS and the slowly adsorbing dodecanol.

  3. Dynamics and constituent measurements with the Waves Michelson Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. E.; Wang, D. Y.; Kowalski, M.; Gault, W. A.; Bell, A.

    The Waves Michelson Interferometer WaMI is an imaging Michelson interferometer designed to provide altitude profiles of wind temperature ozone atomic oxygen and density from the stratopause to the lower thermosphere This is accomplished through simultaneous measurements of the Doppler shifts line widths and irradiance of emission lines in airglow emissions O2 IR atmospheric band OH and O 1S These measurements are crucial to an understanding the behaviour of the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and its role in the middle atmosphere Observations in this region are complicated by observational issues and subtleties in the dynamical forcings Amplitudes of gravity waves and tides are substantial and as a result temperatures and winds exhibit strong variability In addition vertical and horizontal displacements associated with these waves are significant so that the interpretation of constituent signatures becomes difficult By providing simultaneous profiles of a number of quantities of dynamical interest WaMI has the potential to resolve a number of these observational issues and to provide insights into the dynamics and constituent transport in this region These measurements would be most valuable if they were part of a multiple satellite mission tentatively termed the D-Train D for dynamics each satellite of which sampled a different local time In this talk the measurement and inversion approach being developed for WaMI is described The importance of these measurements for interpreting the behaviour of the atmosphere in the upper stratosphere and

  4. A theory of neural dimensionality, dynamics, and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Surya

    In many experiments, neuroscientists tightly control behavior, record many trials, and obtain trial-averaged firing rates from hundreds of neurons in circuits containing millions of behaviorally relevant neurons. Dimensionality reduction has often shown that such datasets are strikingly simple; they can be described using a much smaller number of dimensions than the number of recorded neurons, and the resulting projections onto these dimensions yield a remarkably insightful dynamical portrait of circuit computation. This ubiquitous simplicity raises several profound and timely conceptual questions. What is the origin of this simplicity and its implications for the complexity of brain dynamics? Would neuronal datasets become more complex if we recorded more neurons? How and when can we trust dynamical portraits obtained from only hundreds of neurons in circuits containing millions of neurons? We present a theory that answers these questions, and test it using neural data recorded from reaching monkeys. Overall, this theory yields a picture of the neural measurement process as a random projection of neural dynamics, conceptual insights into how we can reliably recover dynamical portraits in such under-sampled measurement regimes, and quantitative guidelines for the design of future experiments. Moreover, it reveals the existence of phase transition boundaries in our ability to successfully decode cognition and behavior as a function of the number of recorded neurons, the complexity of the task, and the smoothness of neural dynamics. membership pending.

  5. Ammonia quantitative analysis model based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rongfei

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ammonia quantitative analysis based on miniaturized Al ionization gas sensor and non-linear bistable dynamic model was proposed. Al plate anodic gas-ionization sensor was used to obtain the current-voltage (I-V) data. Measurement data was processed by non-linear bistable dynamics model. Results showed that the proposed method quantitatively determined ammonia concentrations. PMID:25975362

  6. An interpretation of the I-V phase background based on observed plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, P. F.; Cacciani, A.; Hanslmeier, A.; Messerotti, M.; Otruba, W.; Pddoto tzi, W.; Warmuth, A.

    2002-11-01

    The presence of a solar background in the phase difference between the intensity and velocity (I-V) p-mode oscillation signals recently has been interpreted in terms of downflows due to convection (Skartlien & Rast \\cite{Skartlien00}) or due to chromospheric explosive events (Moretti et al. \\cite{Moretti01}a). In support of the latter, we present I and V characteristics of impulsive brightenings observed in the NaI D lines, show that these reproduce the frequency dependence of the I-V modulation background, and show that explanations invoking more frequently occurring phenomena such as seismic events are not likely in low-l modulation data.

  7. Tunable rectification and slope reversals in the I- V characteristics of ballistic nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackens, B.; Gence, L.; Faniel, S.; Gustin, C.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.; Bayot, V.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate nonlinear effects at low temperature in the I- V characteristics of four-terminal nanojunctions fabricated from InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructures. The rectified voltage can be tuned by applying biases on side gates, as well as by changing cooldown conditions, i.e., by controlling the conductances of the junctions’ channels. In addition, we observe reversals in the slope of the I- V curves as the probe current grows. These reversals coincide with abrupt changes in the channels’ conductances. We discuss possible interpretations of these observations, and provide a comparison with previous experimental results.

  8. Effect of the mobility on (I-V) characteristics of the MOSFET

    SciTech Connect

    Benzaoui, Ouassila; Azizi, Cherifa

    2013-12-16

    MOSFET Transistor was the subject of many studies and research works (electronics, data-processing, telecommunications...) in order to exploit its interesting and promising characteristics. The aim of this contribution is devoted to the effect of the mobility on the static characteristics I-V of the MOSFET. The study enables us to calculate the drain current as function of bias in both linear and saturated modes; this effect is evaluated using a numerical simulation program. The influence of mobility was studied. Obtained results allow us to determine the mobility law in the MOSFET which gives optimal (I-V) characteristics of the component.

  9. Anisotropy of I- V characteristics in YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, T.; Iimura, H.; Kuwasawa, Y.; Nakano, S.; Yamaguchi, T.

    1994-12-01

    Current voltage ( itI- V) curves CVD-YBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ films near the glass transition temperature Tg in the mixed state are studied as a function of the angle θ between magnetic field and c axis. In the vortex-glass scaling analysis of I- V curves, it is found that the glass critical exponentsare independent of θ, and do not show a remarkable change even at θ=90°( H⊥ c). Our results indicates that periodic plane-like intrinsic pinning is not so effective near Tg and vortices are pinned at the random point-like disorder for all field directions.

  10. Scale-Independent Measures and Pathologic Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Luís A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1998-09-01

    We study several scale-independent measures of cardiac interbeat interval dynamics defined through the application of the wavelet transform. We test their performance in detecting heart disease using a database consisting of records of interbeat intervals for a group of healthy individuals and subjects with congestive heart failure. We find that scale-independent measures effectively distinguish healthy from pathologic behavior and propose a new two-variable scale-independent measure that could be clinically useful. We compare the performance of a recently proposed scale-dependent measure and find that the results depend on the database analyzed and on the analyzing wavelet.

  11. Objective and automated measurement of dynamic vision functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flom, M. C.; Adams, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    A phoria stimulus array and electro-oculographic (EOG) arrangements for measuring motor and sensory responses of subjects subjected to stress or drug conditions are described, along with experimental procedures. Heterophoria (as oculomotor function) and glare recovery time (time required for photochemical and neural recovery after exposure to a flash stimulus) are measured, in research aimed at developing automated objective measurement of dynamic vision functions. Onset of involuntary optokinetic nystagmus in subjects attempting to track moving stripes (while viewing through head-mounted binocular eyepieces) after exposure to glare serves as an objective measure of glare recovery time.

  12. Optical feedback interferometry for measuring dynamic stress deformation of beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atashkhooei, Reza; Azcona, Francisco; Royo, Santiago; Espert, Lluis Gil

    2012-06-01

    An optical feedback interferometer has been used as a sensor for measuring the deformation of the beams under dynamic loading. The compactness, non-contact nature, high accuracy (below half wavelength of the laser) and the cost-effectiveness of this sensor makes it a suitable choice for material deformation measurements. A general procedure of the measurement is described in detail, including the proposed solution to deal with the speckle effect which appears when large deformations are presented. The performance of the proposed sensor has been compared and validated with a commercial contact LVDT sensor showing measurement differences below 20μm (2.9%).

  13. A method of measuring dynamic strain under electromagnetic forming conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinling; Xi, Xuekui; Wang, Sijun; Lu, Jun; Guo, Chenglong; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Liu, Lin; Wu, Guangheng

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic strain measurement is rather important for the characterization of mechanical behaviors in electromagnetic forming process, but it has been hindered by high strain rate and serious electromagnetic interference for years. In this work, a simple and effective strain measuring technique for physical and mechanical behavior studies in the electromagnetic forming process has been developed. High resolution (∼5 ppm) of strain curves of a budging aluminum tube in pulsed electromagnetic field has been successfully measured using this technique. The measured strain rate is about 10(5) s(-1), which depends on the discharging conditions, nearly one order of magnitude of higher than that under conventional split Hopkins pressure bar loading conditions (∼10(4) s(-1)). It has been found that the dynamic fracture toughness of an aluminum alloy is significantly enhanced during the electromagnetic forming, which explains why the formability is much larger under electromagnetic forging conditions in comparison with conventional forging processes. PMID:27131683

  14. A method of measuring dynamic strain under electromagnetic forming conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinling; Xi, Xuekui; Wang, Sijun; Lu, Jun; Guo, Chenglong; Wang, Wenquan; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Liu, Lin; Wu, Guangheng

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic strain measurement is rather important for the characterization of mechanical behaviors in electromagnetic forming process, but it has been hindered by high strain rate and serious electromagnetic interference for years. In this work, a simple and effective strain measuring technique for physical and mechanical behavior studies in the electromagnetic forming process has been developed. High resolution (˜5 ppm) of strain curves of a budging aluminum tube in pulsed electromagnetic field has been successfully measured using this technique. The measured strain rate is about 105 s-1, which depends on the discharging conditions, nearly one order of magnitude of higher than that under conventional split Hopkins pressure bar loading conditions (˜104 s-1). It has been found that the dynamic fracture toughness of an aluminum alloy is significantly enhanced during the electromagnetic forming, which explains why the formability is much larger under electromagnetic forging conditions in comparison with conventional forging processes.

  15. Deciphering Jupiter's atmospheric dynamics using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Yohai; Galanti, Eli

    2016-07-01

    This summer, the Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in course for close flybys of the planet, obtaining a high precision gravity spectrum of Jupiter. This data can be used to estimate the depth of Jupiter's observed cloud-level wind, and decipher the possible internal flows, that might be decoupled from the surface wind. In this talk, we discuss the Juno gravity experiment, and the possible outcomes with regard to the flows on Jupiter. We show several ways in which the gravity spectrum might be used to study the large scale flows: 1. measurements of the high order even harmonics which beyond J10 are dominated by the dynamics; 2. measurements of odd gravity harmonics which have no contribution from a static planet, and therefore are a pure signature of dynamics; 3. upper limits on the depth of the surface flow can be obtained by comparing low order even harmonics from dynamical models to the difference between the measured low order even harmonics and the largest possible values of a static planet; 4. direct latitudinally varying measurements of the gravity field exerted on the spacecraft. We will discuss how these methods may be applied given the expected sensitivities of the Juno gravity experiment. In addition, we present an inverse adjoint model, which allows given the gravity data, to infer the flows that produce it. This will allow, hopefully, to make significant progress in one of the longest-standing question in planetary atmospheric dynamics regarding the nature of the flows on the giant planets.

  16. Dynamic measurements of gear tooth friction and load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbechi, Brian; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a program to study fundamental mechanisms of gear noise, static and dynamic gear tooth strain measurements were made on the NASA gear-noise rig. Tooth-fillet strains from low-contact ratio-spur gears were recorded for 28 operating conditions. A method is introduced whereby strain gage measurements taken from both the tension and compression sides of a gear tooth can be transformed into the normal and frictional loads on the tooth. This technique was applied to both the static and dynamic strain data. The static case results showed close agreement with expected results. For the dynamic case, the normal-force computation produced very good results, but the friction results, although promising, were not as accurate. Tooth sliding friction strongly affected the signal from the strain gage on the tensionside of the tooth. The compression gage was affected by friction to a much lesser degree. The potential of the method to measure friction force was demonstrated, but further refinement will be required before this technique can be used to measure friction forces dynamically with an acceptable degree of accuracy.

  17. Unitary dynamics and finite-time measurements: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinz-Zwick, Andreas; Ingold, Gert-Ludwig; Talkner, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The inhibition of the decay of a quantum system by frequent measurements is known as quantum Zeno effect. Beyond the limit of projective measurements, the interplay between the unitary dynamics of the system and the coupling to a measurement apparatus becomes relevant. We explore this interplay by considering a quantum particle moving on a one-dimensional chain. A local measurement by coupling to an apparatus with a two-dimensional Hilbert space detects the presence of the particle on a specific chain site. The decay of the population is studied analytically for a two-site chain and numerically for a larger system as a function of the measurement time and the time between subsequent measurements. Particular attention is given to the shift of the energy of the measured site due to the coupling to the apparatus. The decay of the initial population can be hindered or accelerated, depending on the chosen system and the coupling parameters.

  18. In-flight measurement of upwind dynamic soaring in albatrosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2016-03-01

    In-flight measurement results on upwind flight of albatrosses using dynamic soaring are presented. It is shown how the birds manage to make progress against the wind on the basis of small-scale dynamic soaring maneuvers. For this purpose, trajectory features, motion quantities and mechanical energy relationships as well as force characteristics are analyzed. The movement on a large-scale basis consists of a tacking type flight technique which is composed of dynamic soaring cycle sequences with alternating orientation to the left and right. It is shown how this is performed by the birds so that they can achieve a net upwind flight without a transversal large-scale movement and how this compares with downwind or across wind flight. Results on upwind dynamic soaring are presented for low and high wind speed cases. It is quantified how much the tacking trajectory length is increased when compared with the beeline distance. The presented results which are based on in-flight measurements of free flying albatrosses were achieved with an in-house developed GPS-signal tracking method yielding the required high precision for the small-scale dynamic soaring flight maneuvers.

  19. Analysis of in situ measurements of cirrus anvil outflow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, J. I.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The airborne campaign, EMERALD 2 (Egrett Microphysics Experiment with Radiation, Lidar, and Dynamics,) was conducted out of Darwin, Australia in 2002. Objectives included characterization of the dynamics in the cirrus anvil outflow from tropical deep convection. Two aircraft, the Egrett and King Air, were flown in tandem in the upper troposphere (7 km - 15 km) to collect in situ measurements in the anvil outflow from a storm named "Hector" that occurs on a regular basis over the Tiwi Islands north of Darwin during November and December. Turbulence probes mounted on the wings of the Egrett aircraft were used to measure the wind fluctuations across the anvil and along its length with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. The in situ measurements from the Egrett were coincident with lidar measurements of the cloud structure from the King Air aircraft flying directly below. The presentation will show results of the analysis of the measurements with an emphasis on the turbulence, gravity waves, and coherent structures that are particular to the cirrus anvil outflow environment. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics associated with the generation of mammatus formations at the base of the anvil clouds.

  20. Correlation of Spatially Filtered Dynamic Speckles in Distance Measurement Application

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Dmitry V.; Nippolainen, Ervin; Kamshilin, Alexei A.; Miridonov, Serguei V.

    2008-04-15

    In this paper statistical properties of spatially filtered dynamic speckles are considered. This phenomenon was not sufficiently studied yet while spatial filtering is an important instrument for speckles velocity measurements. In case of spatial filtering speckle velocity information is derived from the modulation frequency of filtered light power which is measured by photodetector. Typical photodetector output is represented by a narrow-band random noise signal which includes non-informative intervals. Therefore more or less precious frequency measurement requires averaging. In its turn averaging implies uncorrelated samples. However, conducting research we found that correlation is typical property not only of dynamic speckle patterns but also of spatially filtered speckles. Using spatial filtering the correlation is observed as a response of measurements provided to the same part of the object surface or in case of simultaneously using several adjacent photodetectors. Found correlations can not be explained using just properties of unfiltered dynamic speckles. As we demonstrate the subject of this paper is important not only from pure theoretical point but also from the point of applied speckle metrology. E.g. using single spatial filter and an array of photodetector can greatly improve accuracy of speckle velocity measurements.

  1. Measurements of nuclear spin dynamics by spin-noise spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, I. I.; Poltavtsev, S. V.; Kozlov, G. G.; Zapasskii, V. S.; Kavokin, K. V.; Glazov, M. M.; Vladimirova, M.; Scalbert, D.; Cronenberger, S.; Lemaître, A.; Bloch, J.

    2015-06-15

    We exploit the potential of the spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) for studies of nuclear spin dynamics in n-GaAs. The SNS experiments were performed on bulk n-type GaAs layers embedded into a high-finesse microcavity at negative detuning. In our experiments, nuclear spin polarisation initially prepared by optical pumping is monitored in real time via a shift of the peak position in the electron spin noise spectrum. We demonstrate that this shift is a direct measure of the Overhauser field acting on the electron spin. The dynamics of nuclear spin is shown to be strongly dependent on the electron concentration.

  2. Methodology of the Westinghouse dynamic rod worth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.A.; Chapman, D.M.; Easter, M.E.; Hill, D.J.; Hoerner, J.A. ); Kurtz, P.N. )

    1992-01-01

    During zero-power physics testing, plant operations personnel use one of various techniques to measure the reactivity worth of the control rods to confirm shutdown margin. A simple and fast procedure for measuring rod worths called dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) has been developed at Westinghouse. This procedure was tested at the recent startups of Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 cycle 20 and Unit 2 cycle 18. The results of these tests show that DRWM measures rod worths with accuracy comparable to that of both boron dilution and rod bank exchange measurements. The DRWM procedure is a fast process of measuring the reactivity worth of individual banks by inserting and withdrawing the bank continuously at the maximum stepping speed without changing the boron concentration and recording the signals of the ex-core detectors.

  3. Multiple Point Dynamic Gas Density Measurements Using Molecular Rayleigh Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard; Panda, Jayanta

    1999-01-01

    A nonintrusive technique for measuring dynamic gas density properties is described. Molecular Rayleigh scattering is used to measure the time-history of gas density simultaneously at eight spatial locations at a 50 kHz sampling rate. The data are analyzed using the Welch method of modified periodograms to reduce measurement uncertainty. Cross-correlations, power spectral density functions, cross-spectral density functions, and coherence functions may be obtained from the data. The technique is demonstrated using low speed co-flowing jets with a heated inner jet.

  4. Indentation Measurements to Validate Dynamic Elasticity Imaging Methods.

    PubMed

    Altahhan, Khaldoon N; Wang, Yue; Sobh, Nahil; Insana, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    We describe macro-indentation techniques for estimating the elastic modulus of soft hydrogels. Our study describes (a) conditions under which quasi-static indentation can validate dynamic shear-wave imaging estimates and (b) how each of these techniques uniquely biases modulus estimates as they couple to the sample geometry. Harmonic shear waves between 25 and 400 Hz were imaged using ultrasonic Doppler and optical coherence tomography methods to estimate shear dispersion. From the shear-wave speed of sound, average elastic moduli of homogeneous samples were estimated. These results are compared directly with macroscopic indentation measurements measured two ways. One set of measurements applied Hertzian theory to the loading phase of the force-displacement curves using samples treated to minimize surface adhesion forces. A second set of measurements applied Johnson-Kendall-Roberts theory to the unloading phase of the force-displacement curve when surface adhesions were significant. All measurements were made using gelatin hydrogel samples of different sizes and concentrations. Agreement within 5% among elastic modulus estimates was achieved for a range of experimental conditions. Consequently, a simple quasi-static indentation measurement using a common gel can provide elastic modulus measurements that help validate dynamic shear-wave imaging estimates. PMID:26376923

  5. Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System with Synchronized Phasor Measurements

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-01-01

    The Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System is designed to monitor the dynamics within the power grid and assess the system behavior during normal and disturbance conditions. The RTDMS application was built on the Grid-3P technology platform and takes real-time information collected by Synchronized Phasor Measurement Units (PMU5) or other collection devices and transmitted to a central Phasor Data Concentrator (PDC) for monitoring grid dynamics. The data is sampled 30 times per second and is time-synchronized. Thismore » data is processed to create graphical and geographical displays to provide visualization for frequency/frequency response, voltage magnitudes and angles, voltage angle differences across critical paths as well as real and reactive power-flows on a sub-second and second basis. Software allows for monitoring, tracking, historical data archiving and electric system troubleshooting for reliability management.« less

  6. Field-dependent mobility evaluation from steady-state space-charge-limited I-V curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Dario; Sampietro, Marco

    2002-02-01

    In the framework of trap-free steady-state space-charge-limited single-carrier currents, exact equations are derived for the evaluation of arbitrary field-dependent mobility. A differential method, which simply needs first and second derivatives of measured current-voltage (I-V) curves, is put forward. No a priori assumptions are required, other than those which are typical for space-charge-limited currents. An extension to the mixed case of exponentially distributed traps and field-dependent mobility is briefly outlined. The extraction of mobility from measurements can be a valuable tool for the theoretician: theoretical predictions on mobility field-dependence can be easily compared to the real field-dependence, thus permitting an improvement of the model and stimulating the development of transport theory. This method can be of particular relevance for organic semiconductors, whose field-dependent mobility has recently attracted so much theoretical and experimental work.

  7. 3D precision surface measurement by dynamic structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, Ernest A.; Magee, Michael J.; Mitchell, Joseph N.; Rigney, Michael P.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes a 3-D imaging technique developed as an internal research project at Southwest Research Institute. The technique is based on an extension of structured light methods in which a projected pattern of parallel lines is rotated over the surface to be measured. A sequence of images is captured and the surface elevation at any location can then be determined from measurements of the temporal pattern, at any point, without considering any other points on the surface. The paper describes techniques for system calibration and surface measurement based on the method of projected quadric shells. Algorithms were developed for image and signal analysis and computer programs were written to calibrate the system and to calculate 3-D coordinates of points on a measured surface. A prototype of the Dynamic Structured Light (DSL) 3-D imaging system was assembled and typical parts were measured. The design procedure was verified and used to implement several different configurations with different measurement volumes and measurement accuracy. A small-parts measurement accuracy of 32 micrometers (.0012") RMS was verified by measuring the surface of a precision-machined plane. Large aircraft control surfaces were measured with a prototype setup that provided .02" depth resolution over a 4" by 8" field of view. Measurement times are typically less than three minutes for 300,000 points. A patent application has been filed.

  8. A Dynamic Attitude Measurement System Based on LINS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  9. A dynamic attitude measurement system based on LINS.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  10. The successful introduction of a programme to reduce the use of i.v. ciprofloxacin in hospital.

    PubMed

    Weller, T M A

    2002-05-01

    The effectiveness of a programme to reduce the use of i.v. ciprofloxacin was assessed. i.v. ciprofloxacin was removed from ward stock and discussion occurred regarding appropriate use of the drug. Six months later, a factsheet containing recommendations was distributed to all medical staff and a requirement for justification before prescription was introduced. The programme reduced expenditure on i.v. ciprofloxacin to 34% of original levels. Savings of > 36,000 pounds sterling were made for two consecutive years. A sustained reduction in the use of i.v. ciprofloxacin was obtained by a combination of education and restriction. PMID:12003978

  11. Dynamic tread wear measurement method for train wheels against vibrations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Junhua; Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Guangjun

    2015-06-10

    Dynamic tread wear measurement is difficult but significant for railway transportation safety and efficiency. The accuracy of existing methods is inclined to be affected by environmental vibrations since they are highly dependent on the accurate calibration of the relative pose between vision sensors. In this paper, we present a method to obtain full wheel profiles based on automatic registration of vision sensor data instead of traditional global calibrations. We adopt two structured light vision sensors to recover the inner and outer profiles of each wheel, and register them by the iterative closest point algorithm. Computer simulations show that the proposed method is insensitive to noises and relative pose vibrations. Static experiments demonstrate that our method has high accuracy and great repeatability. Dynamic experiments show that the measurement accuracy of our method is about 0.18 mm, which is a twofold improvement over traditional methods. PMID:26192824

  12. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    PubMed

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26156231

  13. Measuring contemporary crustal motions; NASA’s Crustal Dynamics Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frey, H. V.; Bosworth, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    In this article we describe briefly the two space geodetic techniques and how they are used by the Crustal Dynamics Project, show some of the very exciting results that have emerged at the halfway point in the project's life, describe the availability and utilization of the data being collected, and consider what the future may hold when measurement accuracies eventually exceed even those now available and when other international groups become more heavily involved.   

  14. Measurements of combustion dynamics with laser-based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dal Mo

    Since the early days of gas turbine engines, combustion/flow instability inside the combustor has been an issue in many engines, but little has been understood as to how the dynamics of the system involved contribute to the instability. The primary objective of this work is to provide general experimental procedures and to validate methods for examining the dynamic behaviors of combustion systems, and to provide accurate measurements of the combustion dynamics for use as a foundation for further theoretical and numerical research. Knowledge of the fundamental dynamics of combustion systems is crucial in understanding and modeling the flame behavior and enabling the use of insights in design process and for creating robust active control of combustors. Since mixing plays significant roles in combustion processes, the dynamics of fuel/air mixing were studied. A non-premixed burner was examined with acoustic excitations at 22˜55 Hz to assess the mixing and its relation to the thermo-acoustic coupling. Phase-resolved acetone-PLIF was used to image the mixing, and from this the unmixedness was calculated, which quantifies the degree of mixing. The results show that (1) the acoustic waves induce periodicity in the degree of mixing; (2) the way the unmixedness behaves coincides well with the behavior of the Rayleigh index, implying the degree of mixing is a major factor in determining the stability of the combustion system; (3) the two-dimensional measurements of temporal unmixedness effectively visualize the shear mixing zone. A second low-swirl premixed burner was studied to examine the impact of acoustic waves on the combustion dynamics. Measurements were performed with OH-PLIF, with acoustic forcing up to 400 Hz. Swirl burners at higher pressure are industry standard, and this study examined the dynamics at elevated combustor pressure. The results show that (1) the thermo-acoustic coupling seems to be closely coupled to the vortices generated at the flame boundary

  15. Dynamic friction measurements on living HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Colbert, Marie-Josée; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2008-03-01

    The interaction of cells with various interfaces, and especially man-made surfaces, is an active field of research. In our experiment we use a micropipette to measure both the friction and normal force as a cell slides across a surface. A thin substrate, coated with Poly-L-Lysine is brought into contact with a HeLa cell. The adjustable substrate motion is used to study the response of the cell at various normal forces and speeds. Analysis of the micropipette provides dynamic measurements of both the friction and normal force. With our novel setup we are able to probe the attachment/detachment process of living cells.

  16. Considering Measurement Model Parameter Errors in Static and Dynamic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodbury, Drew P.; Majji, Manoranjan; Junkins, John L.

    2011-07-01

    In static systems, state values are estimated using traditional least squares techniques based on a redundant set of measurements. Inaccuracies in measurement model parameter estimates can lead to significant errors in the state estimates. This paper describes a technique that considers these parameters in a modified least squares framework. It is also shown that this framework leads to the minimum variance solution. Both batch and sequential (recursive) least squares methods are described. One static system and one dynamic system are used as examples to show the benefits of the consider least squares methodology.

  17. I-V and C-V characteristics of Y0.95Ca0.05MnO3/Si film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhruv, Davit; Joshi, Zalak; Ravalia, Ashish; Kansara, Sanjay; Pandya, D. D.; Solanki, P. S.; Kuberkar, D. G.; Shah, N. A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we report the results of the electrical property measurements on Ca2+- doped Y0.95Ca0.05MnO3 (YCM) manganite thin film grown on n-type Si- substrate, using chemical solution deposition (CSD) technique. I-V characteristics show that, film exhibits rectifying behavior with high electroresistance(ER) which decreases with temperature. It is shown that, charge transport follows space charge limited current (SCLC) mechanism.

  18. Generalized Dynamic Factor Models for Mixed-Measurement Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Kai; Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we propose generalized Bayesian dynamic factor models for jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The framework allows mixed-scale measurements associated with each time series, with different measurements having different distributions in the exponential family conditionally on time-varying latent factor(s). Efficient Bayesian computational algorithms are developed for posterior inference on both the latent factors and model parameters, based on a Metropolis Hastings algorithm with adaptive proposals. The algorithm relies on a Greedy Density Kernel Approximation (GDKA) and parameter expansion with latent factor normalization. We tested the framework and algorithms in simulated studies and applied them to the analysis of intertwined credit and recovery risk for Moody’s rated firms from 1982–2008, illustrating the importance of jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:24791133

  19. Generalized Dynamic Factor Models for Mixed-Measurement Time Series.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kai; Dunson, David B

    2014-02-12

    In this article, we propose generalized Bayesian dynamic factor models for jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The framework allows mixed-scale measurements associated with each time series, with different measurements having different distributions in the exponential family conditionally on time-varying latent factor(s). Efficient Bayesian computational algorithms are developed for posterior inference on both the latent factors and model parameters, based on a Metropolis Hastings algorithm with adaptive proposals. The algorithm relies on a Greedy Density Kernel Approximation (GDKA) and parameter expansion with latent factor normalization. We tested the framework and algorithms in simulated studies and applied them to the analysis of intertwined credit and recovery risk for Moody's rated firms from 1982-2008, illustrating the importance of jointly modeling mixed-measurement time series. The article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:24791133

  20. Observation of linear I-V curves on vertical GaAs nanowires with atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geydt, P.; Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskiy, M.; Lähderanta, E.; Haggrén, T.; Kakko, J.-P.; Lipsanen, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate the possibility of studying the current-voltage characteristics for single vertically standing semiconductor nanowires on standard AFM equipped by current measuring module in PeakForce Tapping mode. On the basis of research of eight different samples of p-doped GaAs nanowires grown on different GaAs substrates, peculiar electrical effects were revealed. It was found how covering of substrate surface by SiOx layer increases the current, as well as phosphorous passivation of the grown nanowires. Elimination of the Schottky barrier between golden cap and the top parts of nanowires was observed. It was additionally studied that charge accumulation on the shell of single nanowires affects its resistivity and causes the hysteresis loops on I-V curves.

  1. Total i.v. anaesthesia for transcranial magnetic evoked potential spinal cord monitoring.

    PubMed

    Watt, J W; Fraser, M H; Soni, B M; Sett, P K; Clay, R

    1996-06-01

    Continuous intraoperative monitoring of transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (TcMMEP) can warn the surgeon of motor tract damage more effectively than somatosensory evoked potentials. As a non-invasive technique it is especially useful during post-traumatic internal fixation and is applicable whatever the level of the spinal cord at risk. Inhalation and many i.v. anaesthetics block the single pulse TcMMEP but a total i.v. anaesthetic regimen based on methohexitone, alfentanil and ketamine was effective in seven patients undergoing post-traumatic internal fixation. Consistent TcMMEP of 100-1000 mcV were obtained in all patients, with a latency change of only 2 ms above preoperative values. Good cardiovascular stability was maintained during operation. PMID:8679365

  2. A I-V analysis of irradiated Gallium Arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heulenberg, A.; Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program was used to analyze the illuminated I-V characteristics of four sets of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 10-MeV protons. It was concluded that junction regions (J sub r) dominate nearly all GaAs cells tested, except for irradiated Mitsubishi cells, which appear to have a different doping profile. Irradiation maintains or increases the dominance by J sub r. Proton irradiation increases J sub r more than does electron irradiation. The U.S. cells were optimized for beginning of life (BOL) and the Japanese for end of life (EOL). I-V analysis indicates ways of improving both the BOL and EOL performance of GaAs solar cells.

  3. Nonlinear effects and Joule heating in I-V curves in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercone, Silvana; Frésard, Raymond; Caignaert, Vincent; Martin, Christine; Saurel, Damien; Simon, Charles; André, Gilles; Monod, Philippe; Fauth, François

    2005-07-01

    We study the influence of the Joule effect on the nonlinear behavior of the transport I-V curves in polycrystalline samples of the manganite Pr0.8Ca0.2MnO3 by using the crystalline unit-cell parameters as an internal thermometer in x-ray and neutron diffractions. We develop a simple analytical model to estimate the temperature profile in the samples. Under the actual experimental conditions we show that the internal temperature gradient or the difference between the temperature of the sample and that of the thermal bath is at the origin of the nonlinearity observed in the I-V curves. Consequences on other compounds with colossal magnetoresistance are also discussed.

  4. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  5. Accurate measurements of dynamics and reproducibility in small genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Dubuis, Julien O; Samanta, Reba; Gregor, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Quantification of gene expression has become a central tool for understanding genetic networks. In many systems, the only viable way to measure protein levels is by immunofluorescence, which is notorious for its limited accuracy. Using the early Drosophila embryo as an example, we show that careful identification and control of experimental error allows for highly accurate gene expression measurements. We generated antibodies in different host species, allowing for simultaneous staining of four Drosophila gap genes in individual embryos. Careful error analysis of hundreds of expression profiles reveals that less than ∼20% of the observed embryo-to-embryo fluctuations stem from experimental error. These measurements make it possible to extract not only very accurate mean gene expression profiles but also their naturally occurring fluctuations of biological origin and corresponding cross-correlations. We use this analysis to extract gap gene profile dynamics with ∼1 min accuracy. The combination of these new measurements and analysis techniques reveals a twofold increase in profile reproducibility owing to a collective network dynamics that relays positional accuracy from the maternal gradients to the pair-rule genes. PMID:23340845

  6. Airborne Measurement of Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics over Heterogeneous Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, T. J.; Hill, T. C.; Clement, R.; Moncrieff, J.; Disney, M.; Nichol, C. J.; Williams, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon sinks are currently believed to account for the removal and storage of approximately 25% of anthropogenic carbon emissions from the atmosphere. The processes involved are numerous and complex and many feedbacks are at play. The ability to study the dynamics of different ecosystems at scales meaningful to climatic forcing is essential for understanding the key processes involved and identifying crucial sensitivities and thresholds. Airborne platforms with the requisite instrumentation offer the opportunity to directly measure biological processes and atmospheric structures at scales that are not achievable by ground measurements alone. The current generation of small research aircraft such as the University of Edinburgh’s Diamond HK36TTC ECO Dimona present excellent platforms for measurement of both the atmosphere and terrestrial surface. In this study we present results from airborne CO2/H2O flux measuring campaigns in contrasting climatic systems to quantify spatial patterns in ecosystem photosynthesis. Several airborne campaigns were undertaken in Arctic Finland, as part of the Arctic Biosphere Atmosphere Coupling at Multiple Scales (ABACUS) project (2008), and mainland UK as part of the UK Population Biology Network (UKPopNet) 2009 project, to explore the variability in surface CO2 flux across spatial scales larger than captured using conventional ground based eddy covariance. We discuss the application of our aircraft platform as a tool to address the challenge of understanding carbon dynamics within landscapes of heterogeneous vegetation class, terrain and hydrology using complementary datasets acquired from airborne eddy covariance and remote sensing.

  7. Measuring and Modeling Exciton Dynamics in Multichromophore Macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weingarten, Daniel; Hu, Nan; Lacount, Michael; Ferguson, Andrew; Dessau, Daniel; Walba, David; Vandelagemaat, Jao; Lusk, Mark; Rumbles, Garry; Shaheen, Sean

    2014-03-01

    Attaining specific control over the dynamics of exciton movement in organic photovoltaics (OPV) has, thus far, been a largely unachieved goal of OPV design. Such an understanding of exciton transfer dynamics would allow for the design of macromolecules whose energetics, bandgaps, and conformational properties allow for control of exciton flow toward specific reaction site chromophores, potentially enabling non-linear improvements in energy harvesting. To better understand exciton movement we synthesized and characterized a multi-chromophoric macromolecule and measured the dynamics of exciton transfer across coupled chromophores. Our model system is a hexabenzocoronene molecule attached to six oligothiophene. We developed a kinetic model and by fitting it to the decay rates of excited states measured via time-correlated single photon counting, we were able to extract rates for exciton transfer between chromophores. Since this macromolecule exhibits liquid crystalline aggregation behavior, observing the dependence of exciton transfer rates on solution concentration yields an improved understanding of exciton movement within a single molecule as well as the dependence of that transfer process on local material structure.

  8. Comparison of i.v. and intra-tracheal administration of adrenaline.

    PubMed

    McCrirrick, A; Monk, C R

    1994-05-01

    Adrenaline is the single most important therapeutic agent used in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Ideally it should be given into a large central vein but the European Resuscitation Council, the American Heart Association and the Resuscitation Council (U.K.) advise that adrenaline may be given into the trachea if i.v. access is not available. We have studied the effects of intra-tracheal and i.v. adrenaline in 16 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Log dose-response curves were constructed for systolic arterial pressure and heart rate responses. Intra-tracheal doses of adrenaline up to 10 micrograms kg-1, approximately one-third of that recommended for resuscitation, had no effect on arterial pressure or heart rate, whereas adrenaline 0.1 microgram kg-1 i.v. produced a mean increase in systolic pressure of 24 mm Hg. The intra-tracheal doses recommended for resuscitation (2-3 mg) are likely to be ineffective and consideration should be given to abandoning the tracheal route for adrenaline in ACLS. PMID:8198902

  9. Phosphorene as a Superior Gas Sensor: Selective Adsorption and Distinct I-V Response.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Frauenheim, Thomas; Chen, Changfeng

    2014-08-01

    Recent reports on the fabrication of phosphorene, that is, mono- or few-layer black phosphorus, have raised exciting prospects of an outstanding two-dimensional (2D) material that exhibits excellent properties for nanodevice applications. Here, we study by first-principles calculations the adsorption of CO, CO2, NH3, NO, and NO2 gas molecules on a monolayer phosphorene. Our results predict superior sensing performance of phosphorene that rivals or even surpasses that of other 2D materials such as graphene and MoS2. We determine the optimal adsorption positions of these molecules on the phosphorene and identify molecular doping, that is, charge transfer between the molecules and phosphorene, as the driving mechanism for the high adsorption strength. We further calculated the current-voltage (I-V) relation using the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The transport features show large (1-2 orders of magnitude) anisotropy along different (armchair or zigzag) directions, which is consistent with the anisotropic electronic band structure of phosphorene. Remarkably, the I-V relation exhibits distinct responses with a marked change of the I-V relation along either the armchair or the zigzag directions depending on the type of molecules. Such selectivity and sensitivity to adsorption makes phosphorene a superior gas sensor that promises wide-ranging applications. PMID:26277962

  10. Distribution of nobiletin chitosan-based microemulsions in brain following i.v. injection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jian Ping; Ping, Qi Neng; Lu, Yun; Chen, Liang

    2008-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the in vitro properties of a number of chitosan-based microemulsions containing nobiletin and determine its distribution in mice brain following i.v. administration. The phase behavior and properties of chitosan-based microemulsions were investigated in a pseudo-ternary system composed of polyoxyethylene 35 castor oil/benzyl alcohol/medium-chain triglyceride/tea oil/water with the chitosan. The droplet sizes were found to be smaller than 25 nm by photo correlation spectrometer. The nobiletin-loaded hyaluronic acid chitosan-based microemulsion (HAC-ME) carried negative charge and nobiletin-loaded hydrochlorate chitosan-based microemulsion (HCC-ME) carried positive charge. The concentrations of nobiletin in tissues were determined by HPLC after i.v. administration of HAC-ME, nobiletin-loaded microemulsion (ME), HCC-ME and nobiletin solution. Based on AUC(0-t), MRT and C(max), HAC-ME delivered more nobiletin to the brain compared to nobiletin solution, ME and HCC-ME. The long-circulation effect might contribute to the higher AUC(0-t) for HAC-ME in brain. On the other hand, the AUC(0-t) in plasma and brain after i.v. administration of HCC-ME were not significantly increased relative to ME. These results indicate that HAC-ME may be presented as potential candidates for delivering more drugs into the brain. PMID:18053660

  11. Measurements of granular flow dynamics with high speed digital images

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.

    1994-12-31

    The flow of granular materials is common to many industrial processes. This dissertation suggests and validates image processing algorithms applied to high speed digital images to measure the dynamics (velocity, temperature and volume fraction) of dry granular solids flowing down an inclined chute under the action of gravity. Glass and acrylic particles have been used as granular solids in the experiment. One technique utilizes block matching for spatially averaged velocity measurements of the glass particles. This technique is compared with the velocity measurement using an optic probe which is a conventional granular flow velocity measurement device. The other technique for measuring the velocities of individual acrylic particles is developed with correspondence using a Hopfield network. This technique first locates the positions of particles with pattern recognition techniques, followed by a clustering technique, which produces point patterns. Also, several techniques are compared for particle recognition: synthetic discriminant function (SDF), minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter, modified minimum average correlation energy (MMACE) filter and variance normalized correlation. The author proposes an MMACE filter which improves generalization of the MACE filter by adjusting the amount of averaged spectrum of training images in the spectrum whitening stages of the MACE filter. Variance normalized correlation is applied to measure the velocity and temperature of flowing glass particles down the inclined chute. The measurements are taken for the steady and wavy flow and qualitatively compared with a theoretical model of granular flow.

  12. Novel dynamic fatigue-testing device: design and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foong, Chee-Hoe; Wiercigroch, Marian; Deans, William F.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of dynamics on a propagating fatigue crack has not been studied experimentally yet mainly due to quasi-static loading from traditional fatigue-testing machines. To overcome this serious drawback, a novel base-excited fatigue-testing device was designed and built to allow measurement of the dynamic responses of a single-edge-notch beam (SENB) under a growing fatigue crack. In this paper, the details of the novel test rig including initial development, modification and instrumentation are given. The experimental time histories obtained for harmonic and chaotic excitations have shown that the fatigue rig is capable of generating a wide range of loading patterns. Moreover, the experimental crack growth curves and features of the fracture surface have confirmed that the rig is capable of inducing proper fatigue cracks.

  13. Sensitivity evaluation of dynamic speckle activity measurements using clustering methods

    SciTech Connect

    Etchepareborda, Pablo; Federico, Alejandro; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2010-07-01

    We evaluate and compare the use of competitive neural networks, self-organizing maps, the expectation-maximization algorithm, K-means, and fuzzy C-means techniques as partitional clustering methods, when the sensitivity of the activity measurement of dynamic speckle images needs to be improved. The temporal history of the acquired intensity generated by each pixel is analyzed in a wavelet decomposition framework, and it is shown that the mean energy of its corresponding wavelet coefficients provides a suited feature space for clustering purposes. The sensitivity obtained by using the evaluated clustering techniques is also compared with the well-known methods of Konishi-Fujii, weighted generalized differences, and wavelet entropy. The performance of the partitional clustering approach is evaluated using simulated dynamic speckle patterns and also experimental data.

  14. Evaluation of biological cell properties using dynamic indentation measurement.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guoxin; Chandra, Namas

    2010-02-01

    Viscoelastic mechanical properties of biological cells are commonly measured using atomic force microscope (AFM) dynamic indentation with spherical tips. A semiempirical analysis based on numerical simulation is built to determine the cell mechanical properties. It is shown that the existing analysis cannot reflect the accurate values of cell elastic/dynamic modulus due to the effects of substrate, indenter tip size, and cell size. Among these factors, substrate not only increases the true contact radius but also interferes the indentation stress field, which can cause the overestimation of cell moduli. Typically, the substrate effect is much stronger than the other two influences in cell indentation; and, thus, the cell modulii are usually overestimated. It is estimated that the moduli can be overestimated by as high as over 200% using the existing analysis. In order to obtain the accurate properties of cells, correction factors that account for these effects are required in the existing analysis. PMID:20365612

  15. High spatial resolution measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkey, J. B.; Burnham, E. A.; Bruckner, A. P.

    1992-01-01

    High spatial resolution experimental tube wall pressure measurements of ram accelerator gas dynamic phenomena are presented. The projectile resembles the centerbody of a ramjet and travels supersonically through a tube filled with a combustible gaseous mixture, with the tube acting as the outer cowling. Pressure data are recorded as the projectile passes by sensors mounted in the tube wall at various locations along the tube. Data obtained by using a special highly instrumented section of tube has allowed the recording of gas dynamic phenomena with a spatial resolution on the order of one tenth the projectile length. High spatial resolution tube wall pressure data from the three regimes of propulsion studied to date (subdetonative, transdetonative, and superdetonative) are presented and reveal the 3D character of the flowfield induced by projectile fins and the canting of the projectile body relative to the tube wall. Also presented for comparison to the experimental data are calculations made with an inviscid, 3D CFD code.

  16. Blood Sugar Measurement in Zebrafish Reveals Dynamics of Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Stefani C.; Philipson, Louis H.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The adult zebrafish has the potential to become an important model for diabetes-related research. To realize this potential, small-scale methods for analyzing pancreas function are required. The measurement of blood glucose level is a commonly used method for assessing β-cell function, but the small size of the zebrafish presents challenges both for collecting blood samples and for measuring glucose. We have developed methods for collecting microsamples of whole blood and plasma for the measurement of hematocrit and blood glucose. We demonstrate that two hand-held glucose meters designed for use by human diabetics return valid results with zebrafish blood. Additionally, we present methods for fasting and for performing postprandial glucose and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests. We find that the dynamics of zebrafish blood glucose homeostasis are consistent with patterns reported for other omnivorous teleost fish. PMID:20515318

  17. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation measured with coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Coherent Hemodynamics Spectroscopy (CHS) is a novel technique for non-invasive measurements of local microcirculation quantities such as the capillary blood transit times and dynamic autoregulation. The basis of CHS is to measure, for instance with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), peripheral coherent hemodynamic changes that are induced by controlled perturbations in the systemic mean arterial pressure (MAP). In this study, the MAP perturbation was induced by the fast release of two pneumatic cuffs placed around the subject's thighs after they were kept inflated (at 200 mmHg) for two minutes. The resulting transient changes in cerebral oxy- (O) and deoxy- (D) hemoglobin concentrations measured with NIRS on the prefrontal cortex are then described by a novel hemodynamic model, from which quantifiable parameters such as the capillary blood transit time and a cutoff frequency for cerebral autoregulation are obtained. We present results on eleven healthy volunteers in a protocol involving measurements during normal breathing and during hyperventilation, which is known to cause a hypocapnia-induced increase in cerebral autoregulation. The measured capillary transit time was unaffected by hyperventilation (normal breathing: 1.1±0.1 s; hyperventilation: 1.1±0.1 s), whereas the cutoff frequency of autoregulation, which increases for higher autoregulation efficiency, was indeed found to be significantly greater during hyperventilation (normal breathing: 0.017±0.002 Hz; hyperventilation: 0.034±0.005 Hz). These results provide a validation of local cerebral autoregulation measurements with the new technique of CHS.

  18. Statistical prediction of dynamic distortion of inlet flow using minimum dynamic measurement. An application to the Melick statistical method and inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction without RMS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweikhard, W. G.; Chen, Y. S.

    1986-01-01

    The Melick method of inlet flow dynamic distortion prediction by statistical means is outlined. A hypothetic vortex model is used as the basis for the mathematical formulations. The main variables are identified by matching the theoretical total pressure rms ratio with the measured total pressure rms ratio. Data comparisons, using the HiMAT inlet test data set, indicate satisfactory prediction of the dynamic peak distortion for cases with boundary layer control device vortex generators. A method for the dynamic probe selection was developed. Validity of the probe selection criteria is demonstrated by comparing the reduced-probe predictions with the 40-probe predictions. It is indicated that the the number of dynamic probes can be reduced to as few as two and still retain good accuracy.

  19. Prediction and measurement of human pilot dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.; Reedy, James T.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study of human pilot control strategies in a manned rotorcraft simulation is described. The task simulated involves a low-speed, constant-altitude maneuvering task in which a head-down display is utilized to allow the pilot to track a moving hover point. The efficacy of the display law driving an 'acceleration symbol' is determined and the manner in which the prediction and measurement of pilot/vehicle dynamics can be made part of man/machine system evaluations is demonstrated.

  20. Measurements and analysis of end-to-end Internet dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Paxson, V

    1997-04-01

    Accurately characterizing end-to-end Internet dynamics - the performance that a user actually obtains from the lengthy series of network links that comprise a path through the Internet - is exceptionally difficult, due to the network`s immense heterogeneity. At the heart of this work is a `measurement framework` in which a number of sites around the Internet host a specialized measurement service. By coordinating `probes` between pairs of these sites one can measure end-to-end behavior along O(N{sup 2}) paths for a framework consisting of N sites. Consequently, one obtains a superlinear scaling that allows measuring a rich cross-section of Internet behavior without requiring huge numbers of observation points. 37 sites participated in this study, allowing the author to measure more than 1,000 distinct Internet paths. The first part of this work looks at the behavior of end-to-end routing: the series of routers over which a connection`s packets travel. Based on 40,000 measurements made using this framework, the author analyzes: routing `pathologies` such as loops, outages, and flutter; the stability of routes over time; and the symmetry of routing along the two directions of an end-to-end path. The author finds that pathologies increased significantly over the course of 1995 and that Internet paths are heavily dominated by a single route. The second part of this work studies end-to-end Internet packet dynamics. The author analyzes 20,000 TCP transfers of 100 Kbyte each to investigate the performance of both the TCP endpoints and the Internet paths. The measurements used for this part of the study are much richer than those for the first part, but require a great degree of attention to issues of calibration, which are addressed by applying self-consistency checks to the measurements whenever possible. The author finds that packet filters are capable of a wide range of measurement errors, some of which, if undetected, can significantly taint subsequent analysis.

  1. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of the Wind Velocity from Minisodar Measurement Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakhin, V. A.; Cherepanov, O. S.; Shamanaeva, L. G.

    2016-04-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of the three wind velocity components in the atmospheric boundary layer is analyzed on the basis of Doppler minisodar measurements. The data were processed and analyzed with the help of robust nonparametric methods based on the weighted maximum likelihood method and classical methods. Distribution laws were obtained for each wind velocity component. There are outliers in the distribution functions; both right and left asymmetry of the distributions are observed. For the x- and ycomponents, the width of the distribution increases as the observation altitude is increased, but the maximum of the distribution function decreases, which is in agreement with the data available in the literature. For the zcomponents the width of the distribution remains practically constant, but the value of the maximum also decreases with altitude. Analysis of the hourly semidiurnal dynamics showed that all three components have maxima in the morning and evening hours. For the y- and z-components the maxima in the evening hours are more strongly expressed than in the morning hours. For the x- and y-components the horizontal wind shear is closely tracked in the evening hours. It is shown that adaptive estimates on the efficiency significantly exceed the classical parametric estimates and allow one to analyze the spatiotemporal dynamics of the wind velocity, and reveal jets and detect wind shears.

  2. Quantitative fluorescent speckle microscopy (QFSM) to measure actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Michelle C; Besson, Sebastien; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2012-10-01

    Quantitative fluorescent speckle microscopy (QFSM) is a live-cell imaging method to analyze the dynamics of macromolecular assemblies with high spatial and temporal resolution. Its greatest successes were in the analysis of actin filament and adhesion dynamics in the context of cell migration and microtubule dynamics in interphase and the meiotic/mitotic spindle. Here, focus is on the former application to illustrate the procedures of FSM imaging and the computational image processing that extracts quantitative information from these experiments. QFSM is advantageous over other methods because it measures the movement and turnover kinetics of the actin filament (F-actin) network in living cells across the entire field of view. Experiments begin with the microinjection of fluorophore-labeled actin into cells, which generate a low ratio of fluorescently labeled to endogenously unlabeled actin monomers. Spinning disk confocal or wide-field imaging then visualizes fluorophore clusters (two to eight actin monomers) within the assembled F-actin network as speckles. QFSM software identifies and computationally tracks and utilizes the location, appearance, and disappearance of speckles to derive network flows and maps of the rate of filament assembly and disassembly. PMID:23042526

  3. Perfusion measures from dynamic ICG scanning laser ophthalmoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Sean; Invernizzi, Alessandro; Beecher, David; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Tim

    2010-02-01

    Movies acquired from fundus imaging using Indocyanine Green (ICG) and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope provide information for identifying vascular and other retinal abnormalities. Today, the main limitation of this modality is that it requires esoteric training for interpretation. A straightforward interpretation of these movies by objective measurements would aid in eliminating this training barrier. A software program has been developed and tested that produces and visualizes 2D maps of perfusion measures. The program corrects for frame-to-frame misalignment caused by eye motion, including rigid misalignment and warp. The alignment method uses a cross-correlation operation that automatically detects the distance due to motion between adjacent frames. The d-ICG movie is further corrected by removing flicker and vignetting artifacts. Each pixel in the corrected movie sequence is fit with a least-squares spline to yield a smooth intensity temporal profile. From the dynamics of these intensity curves, several perfusion measures are calculated. The most effective of these measures include a metric that represents the amount of time required for a vessel to fill with dye, a metric that represents the diffusion of dye, and a metric that is affected by local blood volume. These metrics are calculated from movies acquired before and after treatment for a neovascular condition. A comparison of these before and after measures may someday provide information to the clinician that helps them to evaluate disease progression and response to treatment.

  4. Laboratory measurements of static and dynamic elastic properties in carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhorji, Aiman M.

    S-wave velocities, Gassmann's model consistently over-predict the saturated at low pressure and closely fit the measured velocities at high pressure, whereas, Biot model over-predicts the saturated velocities in most of the studied samples. The strains measured from the vertical and horizontal strain gages are differing by around 27%. The strains over the horizontal axis are higher than the vertical axis suggesting that the majority of the compliant pores and crack-like pores are oriented almost in direction parallel to the length of the sample. The static bulk modulus is always lower than dynamic one for all measured samples. There is no correlation between porosity and static-dynamic ratio. The measured grain bulk modulus obtained from the unjacketed test is reasonably close to the bulk modulus of the constituent mineral phases.

  5. Measuring kinetic coefficients by molecular dynamics simulation of zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celestini, Franck; Debierre, Jean-Marc

    2002-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to measure the kinetic coefficient at the solid-liquid interface in pure gold. Results are obtained for the (111), (100), and (110) orientations. Both Au(100) and Au(110) are in reasonable agreement with the law proposed for collision-limited growth. For Au(111), stacking fault domains form, as first reported by Burke, Broughton, and Gilmer [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 1030 (1988)]. The consequence on the kinetics of this interface is dramatic: the measured kinetic coefficient is three times smaller than that predicted by collision-limited growth. Finally, crystallization and melting are found to be always asymmetrical and here again the effect is much more pronounced for the (111) orientation.

  6. Understanding quantum measurement from the solution of dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Balian, Roger; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2013-04-01

    The quantum measurement problem, to wit, understanding why a unique outcome is obtained in each individual experiment, is currently tackled by solving models. After an introduction we review the many dynamical models proposed over the years for elucidating quantum measurements. The approaches range from standard quantum theory, relying for instance on quantum statistical mechanics or on decoherence, to quantum-classical methods, to consistent histories and to modifications of the theory. Next, a flexible and rather realistic quantum model is introduced, describing the measurement of the z-component of a spin through interaction with a magnetic memory simulated by a Curie-Weiss magnet, including N≫1 spins weakly coupled to a phonon bath. Initially prepared in a metastable paramagnetic state, it may transit to its up or down ferromagnetic state, triggered by its coupling with the tested spin, so that its magnetization acts as a pointer. A detailed solution of the dynamical equations is worked out, exhibiting several time scales. Conditions on the parameters of the model are found, which ensure that the process satisfies all the features of ideal measurements. Various imperfections of the measurement are discussed, as well as attempts of incompatible measurements. The first steps consist in the solution of the Hamiltonian dynamics for the spin-apparatus density matrix Dˆ(t). Its off-diagonal blocks in a basis selected by the spin-pointer coupling, rapidly decay owing to the many degrees of freedom of the pointer. Recurrences are ruled out either by some randomness of that coupling, or by the interaction with the bath. On a longer time scale, the trend towards equilibrium of the magnet produces a final state Dˆ(t) that involves correlations between the system and the indications of the pointer, thus ensuring registration. Although Dˆ(t) has the form expected for ideal measurements, it only describes a large set of runs. Individual runs are approached by analyzing

  7. Neural measures of dynamic changes in attentive tracking load.

    PubMed

    Drew, Trafton; Horowitz, Todd S; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Vogel, Edward K

    2012-02-01

    In everyday life, we often need to track several objects simultaneously, a task modeled in the laboratory using the multiple-object tracking (MOT) task [Pylyshyn, Z., & Storm, R. W. Tracking multiple independent targets: Evidence for a parallel tracking mechanism. Spatial Vision, 3, 179-197, 1988]. Unlike MOT, however, in life, the set of relevant targets tends to be fluid and change over time. Humans are quite adept at "juggling" targets in and out of the target set [Wolfe, J. M., Place, S. S., & Horowitz, T. S. Multiple object juggling: Changing what is tracked during extended MOT. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 14, 344-349, 2007]. Here, we measured the neural underpinnings of this process using electrophysiological methods. Vogel and colleagues [McCollough, A. W., Machizawa, M. G., & Vogel, E. K. Electrophysiological measures of maintaining representations in visual working memory. Cortex, 43, 77-94, 2007; Vogel, E. K., McCollough, A. W., & Machizawa, M. G. Neural measures reveal individual differences in controlling access to working memory. Nature, 438, 500-503, 2005; Vogel, E. K., & Machizawa, M. G. Neural activity predicts individual differences in visual working memory capacity. Nature, 428, 748-751, 2004] have shown that the amplitude of a sustained lateralized negativity, contralateral delay activity (CDA) indexes the number of items held in visual working memory. Drew and Vogel [Drew, T., & Vogel, E. K. Neural measures of individual differences in selecting and tracking multiple moving objects. Journal of Neuroscience, 28, 4183-4191, 2008] showed that the CDA also indexes the number of items being tracking a standard MOT task. In the current study, we set out to determine whether the CDA is a signal that merely represents the number of objects that are attended during a trial or a dynamic signal capable of reflecting on-line changes in tracking load during a single trial. By measuring the response to add or drop cues, we were able to observe dynamic

  8. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  9. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected. PMID:25273746

  10. Dynamic Pressure Probes Developed for Supersonic Flow-Field Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow-field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at the NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow-field probes include pitot and static pressure probes that can capture fast-acting flow-field pressure transients occurring on a millisecond timescale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The flow-field pressure probe contains four major components: 1) Static pressure aerodynamic tip; 2) Pressure-sensing cartridge assembly; 3) Pitot pressure aerodynamic tip; 4) Mounting stem. This modular design allows for a variety of probe tips to be used for a specific application. Here, the focus is on flow-field pressure measurements in supersonic flows, so we developed a cone-cylinder static pressure tip and a pitot pressure tip. Alternatively, probe tips optimized for subsonic and transonic flows could be used with this design. The pressure-sensing cartridge assembly allows the simultaneous measurement of steady-state and transient pressure which allows continuous calibration of the dynamic pressure transducer.

  11. Influence of Source/Drain Residual Implant Lattice Damage Traps on Silicon Carbide Metal Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Drain I-V Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjaye, J.; Mazzola, M. S.

    4H-SiC n-channel power metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs) with nitrogen n+-implanted source/drain ohmic contact regions, with and without p-buffer layer fabricated on semi-insulating substrates exhibited hysteresis in the drain I-V characteristics of both types of devices at 300 K and 480 K due to traps. However, thermal spectroscopic measurements could detect the traps only in the devices without p-buffer. Device simulation and optical admittance spectroscopy (OAS) are used to resolve the discrepancy in the initial experimental characterization results. Device simulations and OAS suggest that, in addition to the semi-insulating (SI) substrate traps, acceptor traps due to source/drain residual implant lattice damage contribute to the hysteresis observed in the drain I-V characteristics of the devices. Simulations suggest these traps are contained in the lateral straggle of the implanted source and drain regions since the drain current largely flows between the un-gated edges of the source and drain through the volume of lateral straggle traps. Since hysteresis in I-V curves is a manifestation of the presence of defects in devices and since defects degrade carrier mobility and hence device performance, efforts should be made to minimize the source/drain lateral straggle implant damage.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in foals after i.v. and oral dose and disposition into phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L; Gardner, S Y; Jones, S L; Schwabenton, B A; Papich, M G

    2002-04-01

    The properties of azithromycin suggest that it may be an alternative to erythromycin for treatment of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals. To investigate this possibility, the disposition of azithromycin in plasma, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and alveolar cells was examined after a single administration in foals. Azithromycin suspension was administered orally (p.o.) at a dose of 10 mg/kg to five healthy 2-3-month-old foals. Two weeks later, azithromycin for injection was administered by intravenous (i.v.) infusion at a dose of 5 mg/kg to the same foals. Plasma samples were collected after p.o. and i.v. administration. Peripheral blood PMN and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and alveolar cells were collected after p.o. administration. Azithromycin concentrations were determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with coulometric electrochemical detection. Azithromycin p.o. absorption was variable with a mean systemic availability of 39% (+/-20%). The plasma half-life was 16 and 18.3 h after i.v. and p.o. administration, respectively. Azithromycin had a very large volume of distribution (V(d)) of 11.6 L/kg [V(d(ss))] and 12.4 L/kg [V(d(area))]. The large V(d) can be attributed to high tissue and intracellular concentrations, exhibited by the high concentration of azithromycin in PMN and alveolar cells. The PMN half-life was 49.2 h. Dosage of 10 mg/kg of azithromycin p.o. once daily for foals with R. equi pneumonia is recommended for further study. PMID:12000529

  13. MEASURING THE MASS OF 4UO900-40 DYNAMICALLY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Etzel, Paul B.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurements of neutron star masses are needed to constrain the equation of state of neutron star matter - of importance to both particle physics and the astrophysics of neutron stars - and to identify the evolutionary track of the progenitor stars that form neutron stars. The best measured values of the mass of 4UO900-40 (= Vela XR-l), 1.86 +/- 0.16 Msun (Barziv et al. 2001) and 1.93 +/- 0.20 Msun (Abubekerov et al. 2004), make it a leading candidate for the most massive neutron star known. The direct relationship between the maximum mass of neutron stars and the equation of state of ultra-dense matter makes 4UO900-40 an important neutron star mass to determine accurately. The confidence interval on previous mass estimates, obtained from observations that include parameters determined by non-dynamical methods, are not small enough to significantly restrict possible equations of state. We describe here a purely dynamical method for determining the mass of 4UO900-40, an X-ray pulsar, using the reprocessed UV pulses emitted by its BO.5Ib companion. One can derive the instantaneous radial velocity of each component by simultaneous X-ray and UV observations at the two quadratures of the system. The Doppler shift caused by the primary's rotational velocity and the illumination pattern of the X-rays on the primary, two of the three principal contributors to the uncertainty on the derived mass of the neutron star, almost exactly cancel by symmetry in this method. A heuristic measurement of the mass of 4UO900-40 using observations obtained previously with the High Speed Photometer on HST is given in Appendix A.

  14. Biokinetics and effects of titania nano-material after inhalation and i.v. injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsiedel, Robert; Fabian, Eric; Ma-Hock, Lan; Wiench, Karin; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2009-05-01

    Within NanoSafe2 we developed a special inhalation model to investigate deposition of inhaled particles in the lung and the further distribution in the body after. Concurrently, the effects of the inhaled materials in the lung were examined. The results for nano-Titania were compared to results from inhalation studies with micron-sized (non-nano) Titania particles and to quartz particles (DQ12, known to be potent lung toxicants). To build a PBPK model for nano-Titania the tissue distribution of the material was also examined following intravenous (i.v.) administration.

  15. Dynamics and particle image velocimetry measurements of miniaturized thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gendy, Husam El-Deen Mohamad

    This research deals with the design and characterization of the dynamics of miniaturized thermoacoustic refrigerators (in the audible frequency range ˜ 4000 Hz) using a random array of cotton wool as the stack and a commercial piezoelectric loudspeaker as the acoustic driver. Also of primary interest is the optimization of the refrigerator by investigating the factors affecting its performance such as the stack configuration, the acoustic drive ratio, the acoustic pressure and the mean pressure in the refrigerator. Experimental measurements of cooling power, and stray heat leaks were conducted. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) was used to study the acoustic flow field in the refrigerator and to correlate measurements using PIV to the characteristic acoustic measurements. A temperature difference between the refrigerator's cold and hot heat exchangers of 13°C was obtained under optimized experimental conditions. Air at atmospheric pressure was used as the working gas, and an electric power to the acoustic driver of 2 W produced 159 dB of sound, which pumped heat by the stack. Higher sound levels would raise the performance. Results showed that the cotton stack performs well at atmospheric pressure rather than higher mean pressures where nonlinear and viscous losses affect its performance. PIV measurements, such as imaged velocity fields and gas flows, showed an excellent correlation with the acoustic pressure measurements in the refrigerator. Extreme care was taken, by investigating different PIV parameters, to fulfill the conditions that distinguish between the oscillating first-order velocity field, such as the acoustic particle velocity, and the second-order nonoscillating (steady state) fields, such as acoustic streaming. Results also showed that Rayleigh streaming, produced by and superimposed on, the oscillating particle velocity, is one of the effects affecting the performance of the refrigerator, where the time it takes the streaming to be in the

  16. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface. PMID:27131706

  17. Measurement of dynamic surface tension by mechanically vibrated sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Shuichi; Yamauchi, Satoko; Yoshitake, Yumiko; Nagumo, Ryo; Mori, Hideki; Kajiya, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    We developed a novel method for measuring the dynamic surface tension of liquids using mechanically vibrated sessile droplets. Under continuous mechanical vibration, the shape of the deformed droplet was fitted by numerical analysis, taking into account the force balance at the drop surface and the momentum equation. The surface tension was determined by optimizing four parameters: the surface tension, the droplet's height, the radius of the droplet-substrate contact area, and the horizontal symmetrical position of the droplet. The accuracy and repeatability of the proposed method were confirmed using drops of distilled water as well as viscous aqueous glycerol solutions. The vibration frequency had no influence on surface tension in the case of pure liquids. However, for water-soluble surfactant solutions, the dynamic surface tension gradually increased with vibration frequency, which was particularly notable for low surfactant concentrations slightly below the critical micelle concentration. This frequency dependence resulted from the competition of two mechanisms at the drop surface: local surface deformation and surfactant transport towards the newly generated surface.

  18. Methodological aspects of EEG and body dynamics measurements during motion.

    PubMed

    Reis, Pedro M R; Hebenstreit, Felix; Gabsteiger, Florian; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Lochmann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    EEG involves the recording, analysis, and interpretation of voltages recorded on the human scalp which originate from brain gray matter. EEG is one of the most popular methods of studying and understanding the processes that underlie behavior. This is so, because EEG is relatively cheap, easy to wear, light weight and has high temporal resolution. In terms of behavior, this encompasses actions, such as movements that are performed in response to the environment. However, there are methodological difficulties which can occur when recording EEG during movement such as movement artifacts. Thus, most studies about the human brain have examined activations during static conditions. This article attempts to compile and describe relevant methodological solutions that emerged in order to measure body and brain dynamics during motion. These descriptions cover suggestions on how to avoid and reduce motion artifacts, hardware, software and techniques for synchronously recording EEG, EMG, kinematics, kinetics, and eye movements during motion. Additionally, we present various recording systems, EEG electrodes, caps and methods for determinating real/custom electrode positions. In the end we will conclude that it is possible to record and analyze synchronized brain and body dynamics related to movement or exercise tasks. PMID:24715858

  19. Methodological aspects of EEG and body dynamics measurements during motion

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Pedro M. R.; Hebenstreit, Felix; Gabsteiger, Florian; von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Lochmann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    EEG involves the recording, analysis, and interpretation of voltages recorded on the human scalp which originate from brain gray matter. EEG is one of the most popular methods of studying and understanding the processes that underlie behavior. This is so, because EEG is relatively cheap, easy to wear, light weight and has high temporal resolution. In terms of behavior, this encompasses actions, such as movements that are performed in response to the environment. However, there are methodological difficulties which can occur when recording EEG during movement such as movement artifacts. Thus, most studies about the human brain have examined activations during static conditions. This article attempts to compile and describe relevant methodological solutions that emerged in order to measure body and brain dynamics during motion. These descriptions cover suggestions on how to avoid and reduce motion artifacts, hardware, software and techniques for synchronously recording EEG, EMG, kinematics, kinetics, and eye movements during motion. Additionally, we present various recording systems, EEG electrodes, caps and methods for determinating real/custom electrode positions. In the end we will conclude that it is possible to record and analyze synchronized brain and body dynamics related to movement or exercise tasks. PMID:24715858

  20. Diagnostic techniques for measuring suprathermal electron dynamics in plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.

    2008-10-15

    Plasmas, both in the laboratory and in space, are often not in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the plasma electron distribution function is accordingly non-Maxwellian. Suprathermal electron tails can be generated by external drives, such as rf waves and electric fields, or internal ones, such as instabilities and magnetic reconnection. The variety and importance of the phenomena in which suprathermal electrons play a significant role explains an enduring interest in diagnostic techniques to investigate their properties and dynamics. X-ray bremsstrahlung emission has been studied in hot magnetized plasmas for well over two decades, flanked progressively by electron-cyclotron emission in geometries favoring the high-energy end of the distribution function (high-field-side, vertical, oblique emission), by electron-cyclotron absorption, by spectroscopic techniques, and at lower temperatures, by Langmuir probes and electrostatic analyzers. Continuous progress in detector technology and in measurement and analysis techniques, increasingly sophisticated layouts (multichannel and tomographic systems, imaging geometries), and highly controlled suprathermal generation methods (e.g., perturbative rf modulation) have all been brought to bear in recent years on an increasingly detailed, although far from complete, understanding of suprathermal electron dynamics.

  1. Coherent THz radiation from multiple I-V branching structures in intrinsic Josephson junctions of Bi-2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Manabu; Yamaki, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Minami, Hidetoshi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Kadowaki, Kazuo; Tachiki, Masashi

    2010-03-01

    Intense and coherent terahertz (THz) radiation was observed from the intrinsic Josephson junction (IJJ) system of the single crystalline high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ (Bi-2212).footnotetextL. Ozyuzer et al., Science 318, (2007) 1291.^,footnotetextK. Kadowaki et al., Physica C 468, (2008) 634. In the present work, we demonstrate the importance of the THz radiation from inner branching structures of the I-V characteristic curve of the IJJ system. The radiation frequency has previously been thought to be uniquely constrained to the mesa size, but it turns out in the inner branches that it varies very flexibly and widely perhaps according to the inductive and capacitive coupling strength existing in the mesa itself. Therefore, the radiation frequency does not follow the previously established cavity resonance condition. This new experimental feature may provide a unique opportunity to understand the dynamical nature of IJJ as well as the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity in this particular Bi-2212 compound.

  2. Assessment of dynamic balance via measurement of lower extremities tortuosity.

    PubMed

    Eltoukhy, Moataz; Kuenze, Christopher; Jun, Hyung-Pil; Asfour, Shihab; Travascio, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    Tortuosity describes how twisted or how much curvature is present in an observed movement or path. The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in segmental tortuosity between Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach directions. Fifteen healthy participants completed this study. Participants completed the modified three direction (anterior, posteromedial, posterolateral) SEBT with three-dimensional motion analysis using an 8 camera BTS Smart 7000DX motion analysis system. The tortuosity of stance limb retro-reflective markers was then calculated and compared between reach directions using a 1 × 3 ANOVA with repeated measures, while the relationship between SEBT performance and tortuosity was established using Pearson product moment correlations. Anterior superior iliac spine tortuosity was significantly greater (p < 0.001) and lateral knee tortuosity was lesser (p = 0.018) in the anterior direction compared to the posteromedial and posterolateral directions. In addition, second metatarsal tortuosity was greater in the anterior reach direction when compared to posteromedial direction (p = 0.024). Tortuosity is a novel biomechanical measurement technique that provides an assessment of segmental movement during common dynamic tasks such as the SEBT. This enhanced level of detail compared to more global measures of joint kinematic may provide insight into compensatory movement strategies adopted following lower extremity joint injury. PMID:25895607

  3. Measurement of an atomic quadrupole moment using dynamic decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Shaniv, Ravid; Ozeri, Roee

    2016-05-01

    Some of the best clocks today are ion-based optical clocks. These clocks are referenced to a narrow optical transition in a trapped ion. An example for such a narrow transition is the electric quadrupole E 2 transition between states with identical parity. An important systematic shift of such a transition is the quadrupole shift resulting from the electric field gradient inherent to the ion trap. We present a new dynamic decoupling method that rejects magnetic field noise while measuring the small quadrupole shift of the optical clock transition. Using our sequence we measured the quadrupole moment of the 4D5/2 level in a trapped 88 Sr+ ion to be 2 .973-0 . 033 + 0 . 026 ea02 , where e is the electron charge and a0 is the Bohr radius. Our measurement improves the uncertainty of this value by an order of magnitude and thus helps mitigate an important systematic uncertainty in 88 Sr+ based optical atomic clocks and verifies complicated many-body quantum calculations.

  4. Microsensor measurements of hydrogen gas dynamics in cyanobacterial microbial mats

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Michael; Revsbech, Niels P.; Kühl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel amperometric microsensor for measuring hydrogen gas production and consumption at high spatio-temporal resolution in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats dominated by non-heterocystous filamentous cyanobacteria (Microcoleus chtonoplastes and Oscillatoria sp.). The new microsensor is based on the use of an organic electrolyte and a stable internal reference system and can be equipped with a chemical sulfide trap in the measuring tip; it exhibits very stable and sulfide-insensitive measuring signals and a high sensitivity (1.5–5 pA per μmol L-1 H2). Hydrogen gas measurements were done in combination with microsensor measurements of scalar irradiance, O2, pH, and H2S and showed a pronounced H2 accumulation (of up to 8–10% H2 saturation) within the upper mm of cyanobacterial mats after onset of darkness and O2 depletion. The peak concentration of H2 increased with the irradiance level prior to darkening. After an initial build-up over the first 1–2 h in darkness, H2 was depleted over several hours due to efflux to the overlaying water, and due to biogeochemical processes in the uppermost oxic layers and the anoxic layers of the mats. Depletion could be prevented by addition of molybdate pointing to sulfate reduction as a major sink for H2. Immediately after onset of illumination, a short burst of presumably photo-produced H2 due to direct biophotolysis was observed in the illuminated but anoxic mat layers. As soon as O2 from photosynthesis started to accumulate, the H2 was consumed rapidly and production ceased. Our data give detailed insights into the microscale distribution and dynamics of H2 in cyanobacterial biofilms and mats, and further support that cyanobacterial H2 production can play a significant role in fueling anaerobic processes like e.g., sulfate reduction or anoxygenic photosynthesis in microbial mats. PMID:26257714

  5. Dynamic measurement rate allocation for distributed compressive video sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hung-Wei; Kang, Li-Wei; Lu, Chun-Shien

    2010-07-01

    We address an important issue of fully low-cost and low-complexity video encoding for use in resource limited sensors/devices. Conventional distributed video coding (DVC) does not actually meet this requirement because the acquisition of video sequences still relies on the high-cost mechanism (sampling + compression). Recently, we have proposed a distributed compressive video sensing (DCVS) framework to directly capture compressed video data called measurements, while exploiting correlations among successive frames for video reconstruction at the decoder. The core is to integrate the respective characteristics of DVC and compressive sensing (CS) to achieve CS-based single-pixel camera-compatible video encoder. At DCVS decoder, video reconstruction can be formulated as a convex unconstrained optimization problem via solving the sparse coefficients with respect to some basis functions. Nevertheless, the issue of measurement rate allocation has not been considered yet in the literature. Actually, different measurement rates should be adaptively assigned to different local regions by considering the sparsity of each region for improving reconstructed quality. This paper investigates dynamic measurement rate allocation in block-based DCVS, which can adaptively adjust measurement rates by estimating the sparsity of each block via feedback information. Simulation results have indicated the effectiveness of our scheme. It is worth noting that our goal is to develop a novel fully low-complexity video compression paradigm via the emerging compressive sensing and sparse representation technologies, and provide an alternative scheme adaptive to the environment, where raw video data is not available, instead of competing compression performances against the current compression standards (e.g., H.264/AVC) or DVC schemes which need raw data available for encoding.

  6. Dissolution dynamics of thin films measured by optical reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punckt, Christian; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2009-12-01

    Measuring the dissolution dynamics of thin films in situ both with spatial and temporal resolution can be a challenging task. Available methods such as scanning electrochemical microscopy rely on scanning the specimen and are intrinsically slow. We developed a characterization technique employing only an optical microscope, a digital charge coupled device camera, and a computer for image processing. It is capable of detecting dissolution rates of the order of nm/min and has a spatial and temporal resolution which is limited by the imaging and recording setup. We demonstrate the capabilities of our method by analyzing the electrochemical dissolution of copper thin films on gold substrates in a mild hydrochloric acid solution. Due to its simplicity, our technique can be implemented in any laboratory and can be applied to a variety of systems such as thin film sensors or passive coatings.

  7. The measurement of specific dynamic action in fishes.

    PubMed

    Chabot, D; Koenker, R; Farrell, A P

    2016-01-01

    Specific dynamic action (SDA) is the postprandial increase in oxygen uptake. Whereas it is easy to measure in fishes that remain calm and motionless during the entire digestion period, spontaneous locomotor activity is a frequent problem that leads to overestimation of SDA amplitude and magnitude (area under the curve, bound by the standard metabolic rate, SMR). Few studies have attempted to remove the effect of fish activity on SDA. A new method, non-parametric quantile regression, is described to estimate SDA even when pronounced circadian activity cycles are present. Data from juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua are used to demonstrate its use and advantages compared with traditional techniques. Software (scripts in the R language) is provided to facilitate its use. PMID:26768974

  8. A universal steady state I-V relationship for membrane current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernyak, Y. B.; Cohen, R. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A purely electrical mechanism for the gating of membrane ionic channel gives rise to a simple I-V relationship for membrane current. Our approach is based on the known presence of gating charge, which is an established property of the membrane channel gating. The gating charge is systematically treated as a polarization of the channel protein which varies with the external electric field and modifies the effective potential through which the ions migrate in the channel. Two polarization effects have been considered: 1) the up or down shift of the whole potential function, and 2) the change in the effective electric field inside the channel which is due to familiar effect of the effective reduction of the electric field inside a dielectric body because of the presence of surface charges on its surface. Both effects are linear in the channel polarization. The ionic current is described by a steady state solution of the Nernst-Planck equation with the potential directly controlled by the gating charge system. The solution describes reasonably well the steady state and peak-current I-V relationships for different channels, and when applied adiabatically, explains the time lag between the gating charge current and the rise of the ionic current. The approach developed can be useful as an effective way to model the ionic currents in axons, cardiac cells and other excitable tissues.

  9. Inverse I-V Injection Characteristics of ZnO Nanoparticle-Based Diodes.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Paul; Vogel, Stefan; Bonrad, Klaus; von Seggern, Heinz

    2016-08-10

    Simple Al/ZnO(NP)/Au diodes produced by spin coating of ZnO nanoparticle dispersions (ZnO(NP)) on Al/Al2O3 and Au substrates and subsequent Au deposition have been investigated to understand electron injection properties of more complex devices, incorporating ZnO(NP) as injection layer. Inverse I-V characteristics have been observed compared to conventional Al/ZnO(SP)/Au diodes produced by reactive ion sputtering of ZnO. SEM micrographs reveal that the void-containing contact of ZnO(NP) with the bottom Al electrode and the rough morphology of the top Au electrode are likely to be responsible for the observed injection and ejection probabilities of electrons. A simple tunneling model, incorporating the voids, explains the strongly reduced injection currents from Al whereas the top electrode fabricated by vapor deposition of Au onto the nanoparticle topology adopts the inverse ZnO(NP) morphology leading to enlarged injection areas combined with Au-tip landscapes. These tips in contrast to the smooth sputtered ZnO(SP) lead to electric field enhancement and strongly increased injection of electrons in reverse direction. The injected charge piles up at the barrier generated by voids between ZnO(NP) and the bottom electrode forcing a change in the barrier shape and therefore allowing for higher ejection rates. Both effects in combination explain the inverse I-V characteristic of nanoparticle based diodes. PMID:27443793

  10. The Extrapolation of High Altitude Solar Cell I(V) Characteristics to AM0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David B.; Scheiman, David A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Reinke, William; Blankenship, Kurt; Demers, James

    2007-01-01

    The high altitude aircraft method has been used at NASA GRC since the early 1960's to calibrate solar cell short circuit current, ISC, to Air Mass Zero (AMO). This method extrapolates ISC to AM0 via the Langley plot method, a logarithmic extrapolation to 0 air mass, and includes corrections for the varying Earth-Sun distance to 1.0 AU and compensating for the non-uniform ozone distribution in the atmosphere. However, other characteristics of the solar cell I(V) curve do not extrapolate in the same way. Another approach is needed to extrapolate VOC and the maximum power point (PMAX) to AM0 illumination. As part of the high altitude aircraft method, VOC and PMAX can be obtained as ISC changes during the flight. These values can then the extrapolated, sometimes interpolated, to the ISC(AM0) value. This approach should be valid as long as the shape of the solar spectra in the stratosphere does not change too much from AMO. As a feasibility check, the results are compared to AMO I(V) curves obtained using the NASA GRC X25 based multi-source simulator. This paper investigates the approach on both multi-junction solar cells and sub-cells.

  11. A programmable high voltage electrical switching analyzer for I-V characterization of phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanu Prashanth, S. B.; Asokan, S.

    2007-07-01

    Ovonic Phase-Change Materials have found a renewed interest in the recent times owing to their applications in Non-Volatile Random Access Memories. In the present work, a cost-effective high voltage electrical switching analyzer has been developed to enable investigations on the I-V characteristics and electrical switching of bulk solids, which are necessary for identifying suitable materials for memory and other applications such as power control. The developed set up mainly consists of a PC based programmable High Voltage DC Power Supply which acts as an excitation source and a high speed Digital Storage Oscilloscope. For flexible control options, a Graphical User Interface has also been developed using LabVIEW-6i to control the excitation source through the analog outputs of a data acquisition card. Options are made in the system to sweep the output voltage from 45 to 1750 V or the output current in the range 0-45 mA with resolutions of 1.5 V & 5 or 50 μA at variable rates. I-V characteristics and switching behavior of the sample material are instantaneously acquired on the storage oscilloscope and transferred to PC for post processing. The system can be used to investigate a broad range of materials and some typical results are presented to illustrate the capability of the system developed. The closed-loop stability of the system has also been confirmed by frequency response plots.

  12. Dynamic measurements and uncertainty estimation of clinical thermometers using Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorevc, Jaka; Bojkovski, Jovan; Pušnik, Igor; Drnovšek, Janko

    2016-09-01

    Clinical thermometers in intensive care units are used for the continuous measurement of body temperature. This study describes a procedure for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation in order to examine the requirements for clinical thermometer dynamic properties in standards and recommendations. In this study thermistors were used as temperature sensors, transient temperature measurements were performed in water and air and the measurement data were processed for the investigation of thermometer dynamic properties. The thermometers were mathematically modelled. A Monte Carlo method was implemented for dynamic measurement uncertainty evaluation. The measurement uncertainty was analysed for static and dynamic conditions. Results showed that dynamic uncertainty is much larger than steady-state uncertainty. The results of dynamic uncertainty analysis were applied on an example of clinical measurements and were compared to current requirements in ISO standard for clinical thermometers. It can be concluded that there was no need for dynamic evaluation of clinical thermometers for continuous measurement, while dynamic measurement uncertainty was within the demands of target uncertainty. Whereas in the case of intermittent predictive thermometers, the thermometer dynamic properties had a significant impact on the measurement result. Estimation of dynamic uncertainty is crucial for the assurance of traceable and comparable measurements.

  13. Study of the I-V characteristics of nanostructured Pd films on a Si substrate after vacuum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Tomilin, S. V. Yanovsky, A. S.; Tomilina, O. A.; Mikaelyan, G. R.

    2013-06-15

    The I-V characteristics of nanostructured Pd films on a Si substrate are investigated. The nanostructures (nanoislands) are formed by the vacuum annealing of continuous ultrathin Pd films sputtered onto a substrate. The shape of the I-V characteristics of the investigated Si substrate-Pd film system is shown to be heavily dependent on the degree of film nanostructuring. The surface morphology of the films is studied using scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Ultrafast Magnetism Dynamics Measure Using Tabletop Ultrafast EUV Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Thomas J.; Murnane, Margaret

    2013-08-21

    In our work to date, we made two significant advances. First we demonstrated element-selective demagnetization dynamics for the first time, with a record time resolution for x-ray probing of 55 fs. Second, in new work, we were able to probe the timescale of the exchange interaction in magnetic materials, also for the first time. Our measurements were made using the transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect (T-MOKE) geometry, since the reflectivity of a magnetic material changes with the direction of the magnetization vector of a surface. In our experiment, we periodically reversed the magnetization direction of a grating structure made of Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) using an external magnetic field. To achieve maximum contrast, we used HHG light spanning the M-shell (3p) absorption edges of Fe and Ni. Our characterization of the static magnetization of a Permalloy sample shows high magnetic asymmetry at photon energies just above and below the absorption edges at 55 eV and 65 eV, respectively. This result is in excellent agreement with measurements done on the same using a synchrotron source.

  15. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  16. Measurements of particle dynamics in slow, dense granular Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueth, Daniel M.

    Experimental measurements of particle dynamics on the lower surface of a 3D Couette cell containing monodisperse spheres are reported. The average radial density and velocity profiles are similar to those previously measured within the bulk and on the lower surface of the 3D cell filled with mustard seeds. Observations of the evolution of particle velocities over time reveal distinct motion events, intervals where previously stationary particles move for a short duration before jamming again. The cross-correlation between the velocities of two particles at a given distance r from the moving wall reveals a characteristic lengthscale over which the particles are correlated. The autocorrelation of a single particle's velocity reveals a characteristic timescale tau which decreases with distance from the inner moving wall. This may be attributed to the increasing rarity at which the discrete motion events occur and the reduced duration of those events at large r. The radial profile of the velocity fluctuations about their mean, deltavtheta(r), was found to be almost identical in shape to the Gaussian component of the velocity profile vtheta(r). The relationship between the RMS azimuthal velocity fluctuations, delta vtheta(r), and average shear rate, ġ (r), was found to be deltav theta ∝ ġ alpha with alpha = 0.52 +/- 0.04. These observations are compared with other recent experiments and with the modified hydrodynamic model recently introduced by Bocquet et al.

  17. Measurements of particle dynamics in slow, dense granular Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueth, Daniel M.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental measurements of particle dynamics on the lower surface of a three-dimensional (3D) Couette cell containing monodisperse spheres are reported. The average radial density and velocity profiles are similar to those previously measured within the bulk and on the lower surface of the 3D cell filled with mustard seeds. Observations of the evolution of particle velocities over time reveal distinct motion events, intervals where previously stationary particles move for a short duration before jamming again. The cross correlation between the velocities of two particles at a given distance r from the moving wall reveals a characteristic length scale over which the particles are correlated. The autocorrelation of a single particle’s velocity reveals a characteristic time scale τ, which decreases with increasing distance from the inner moving wall. This may be attributed to the increasing rarity at which the discrete motion events occur and the reduced duration of those events at large r. The relationship between the rms azimuthal velocity fluctuations, δvθ(r), and average shear rate, γ˙(r), was found to be δvθ∝γ˙α with α=0.52±0.04. These observations are compared with other recent experiments and with the modified hydrodynamic model recently introduced by Bocquet et al.

  18. Measurement realities of current collection in dynamic space plasma environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuszczewicz, Edward P.

    1990-01-01

    Theories which describe currents collected by conducting and non-conducting bodies immersed in plasmas have many of their concepts based upon the fundamentals of sheath-potential distributions and charged-particle behavior in superimposed electric and magnetic fields. Those current-collecting bodies (or electrodes) may be Langmuir probes, electric field detectors, aperture plates on ion mass spectrometers and retarding potential analyzers, or spacecraft and their rigid and tethered appendages. Often the models are incomplete in representing the conditions under which the current-voltage characteristics of the electrode and its system are to be measured. In such cases, the experimenter must carefully take into account magnetic field effects and particle anisotropies, perturbations caused by the current collection process itself and contamination on electrode surfaces, the complexities of non-Maxwellian plasma distributions, and the temporal variability of the local plasma density, temperature, composition and fields. This set of variables is by no means all-inclusive, but it represents a collection of circumstances guaranteed to accompany experiments involving energetic particle beams, plasma discharges, chemical releases, wave injection and various events of controlled and uncontrolled spacecraft charging. Here, an attempt is made to synopsize these diagnostic challenges and frame them within a perspective that focuses on the physics under investigation and the requirements on the parameters to be measured. Examples include laboratory and spaceborne applications, with specific interest in dynamic and unstable plasma environments.

  19. Demographic characteristics, drug use, and sexual behavior of i.v. drug user with AIDS in Bronx, New York.

    PubMed Central

    Schrager, L; Friedland, G; Feiner, C; Kahl, P

    1991-01-01

    Intravenous (i.v.) drug users are a key factor in the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, yet epidemiologic information about this population, especially those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, is scarce. The demographic characteristics, drug use behavior, and sexual practices of i.v. drug users who developed AIDS were prospectively studied at the Montefiore Medical Center from October 1984 to February 1988. The early wave of i.v. drug users with AIDS was characterized by poverty, minority overrepresentation (more than 80 percent were black or Hispanic), and initiation of i.v. drug use at an early age (median age 19 years). Injection of drugs and sharing of needles was frequent. Most had used so-called shooting galleries, but only for a minority of injection episodes. Heroin or cocaine use was almost universal, nearly always accompanied by abuse of another substance, usually alcohol or marijuana. Fewer than a third had ever participated in a methadone maintenance program, but more than 40 percent had been in prison since 1978. All patients had been sexually active, often with partners who were not i.v. drug users. The research suggests a complex interaction existing between high-risk demographic characteristics, drug use practice, and certain types of sexual behavior, all of which contributed to the early spread of HIV infection in this population. Efforts that are directed toward interrupting i.v. drug user-related transmission of HIV need to include consideration of these characteristics. PMID:1899944

  20. Dynamic range measurement and calibration of SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Lauscher, M.; Middendorf, L.; Niggemann, T.; Schumacher, J.; Stephan, M.; Bueno, A.; Navas, S.; Ruiz, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    Photosensors have played and will continue to play an important role in high-energy and Astroparticle cutting-edge experiments. As of today, the most common photon detection device in use is the photomultiplier tube (PMT). However, we are witnessing rapid progress in the field and new devices now show very competitive features when compared to PMTs. Among those state-of-the-art photo detectors, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are a relatively new kind of semiconductor whose potential is presently studied by many laboratories. Their characteristics make them a very attractive candidate for future Astroparticle physics experiments recording fluorescence and Cherenkov light, both in the atmosphere and on the ground. Such applications may require the measurement of the light flux on the sensor for the purpose of energy reconstruction. This is a complex task due to the limited dynamic range of SiPMs and the presence of thermal and correlated noise. In this work we study the response of three SiPM types in terms of delivered charge when exposed to light pulses in a broad range of intensities: from single photon to saturation. The influence of the pulse time duration and the SiPM over-voltage on the response are also quantified. Based on the observed behaviour, a method is presented to reconstruct the real number of photons impinging on the SiPM surface directly from the measured SiPM charge. A special emphasis is placed on the description of the methodology and experimental design used to perform the measurements.

  1. A high dynamic range current dosimeter for space ionization radiation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheng-jie; Wei, Zhi-yong; Fang, Mei-hua; Chen, Guo-yun; Zhang, Zi-xia; Huang, San-bo

    2011-08-01

    A dosimeter for space ionization radiation field is developed, energy deposited in the sensitivity volume of ionization chamber induces an output current signal as weak as 10-14A, and the dynamic range of the signal is very high. Now, an ionization chamber is designed and a variable gain current feedback preamp module is designed for the weak output current amplification is connected to output of the ionization chamber anode. The amplifier module includes I-V converter with T shaped resistance net, zero correct circuit, low pass filter, voltage linear amplifier circuit, gain control circuit and voltage output circuit. A complete analysis of this current preamp with respect to its circuit structure, dynamic properties, its equivalent input noise and the temperature effect is given. The effects of stray impedances on the behavior of the current feedback preamp are taken into account and the techniques necessary to achieve an optimum stable electrometer, with respect to noise, Dc drift, leakage currents, are applied. Experiments show that the energy of dosimeter deposited in the sensitivity volume of ionization chamber induces an output current signal as weak as 10-14A, the current preamp can detect weak current effectively with the range from 100fA to 10μA through switchable gain.

  2. An improved forward I-V method for nonideal Schottky diodes with high series resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, C.-D.; So, F. C. T.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods are described to obtain the value of the series resistance (R) of a Schottky diode from its forward I-V characteristic. The value of R is then used to plot the curve ln(I) versus V sub D (= V - IR) which becomes a straight line even if ln(I) versus V does not. The ideality factor n and the Schottky-barrier height of the diode then follow from the standard procedure. The main advantages of the methods are: (1) a linear regression can be used to calculate the value of R; (2) many data points are used over the whole data range, which raises the accuracy of the results, and (3) the validity of constant R assumption can be checked by the linearity of the ln (I) versus V sub D curve. The methods are illustrated on the experimental data of a real diode.

  3. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  4. Measurement of human pilot dynamic characteristics in flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, James T.

    1987-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Least Square Error (LSE) estimation techniques were applied to the problem of identifying pilot-vehicle dynamic characteristics in flight simulation. A brief investigation of the effects of noise, input bandwidth and system delay upon the FFT and LSE techniques was undertaken using synthetic data. Data from a piloted simulation conducted at NASA Ames Research Center was then analyzed. The simulation was performed in the NASA Ames Research Center Variable Stability CH-47B helicopter operating in fixed-basis simulator mode. The piloting task consisted of maintaining the simulated vehicle over a moving hover pad whose motion was described by a random-appearing sum of sinusoids. The two test subjects used a head-down, color cathode ray tube (CRT) display for guidance and control information. Test configurations differed in the number of axes being controlled by the pilot (longitudinal only versus longitudinal and lateral), and in the presence or absence of an important display indicator called an 'acceleration ball'. A number of different pilot-vehicle transfer functions were measured, and where appropriate, qualitatively compared with theoretical pilot- vehicle models. Some indirect evidence suggesting pursuit behavior on the part of the test subjects is discussed.

  5. Dynamic fluid-loss measurement of oil-mud additives

    SciTech Connect

    Wyant, R.E.; Reed, R.; Sifferman, T.R.; Wooten, S.O.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of this laboratory study was to correlate the dynamic fluid loss (DFL) with the static (API high-temperature/high-pressure (HTHP)) fluid loss, the sticking coefficient, and the fluid-loss-control-agent (FLCA) concentration in oil muds. This was done as a continuing effort to use oil-mud FLCA's more efficiently in the field and to reduce pipe-sticking problems associated with deviated holes. Data were obtained with 13-lbm/gal (1558-kg/m/sup 3/) inverted-emulsion muds by use of four different types of FLCA's over wide concentration ranges, but within the limits of reasonable field usage. The DFL data (at 250/sup 0/F (121/sup 0/C) and 500-psi (3447-kPa) differential pressure) were obtained with newly developed cells in which filtration occurs in an annulus around a central permeable core. An asymmetric buildup of mud solids and fluid channeling in the annulus suggest a mechanism that would greatly increase pipe-sticking tendencies in deviated wellbores. The DFL decreased with decreasing static fluid loss. The laboratory-measured sticking coefficient, which should correlate with differential-pressure sticking in the field, was reduced as fluid loss decreased. The fluid loss generally decreased with increasing FLCA concentrations, with the major reductions occurring at concentrations of about 4 lbm/bbl (11.4 kg/m/sup 3/).

  6. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander W.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Fladung, William A.; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    The Dynamic Inertia Measurement (DIM) method uses a ground vibration test setup to determine the mass properties of an object using information from frequency response functions. Most conventional mass properties testing involves using spin tables or pendulum-based swing tests, which for large aerospace vehicles becomes increasingly difficult and time-consuming, and therefore expensive, to perform. The DIM method has been validated on small test articles but has not been successfully proven on large aerospace vehicles. In response, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) conducted mass properties testing on an "iron bird" test article that is comparable in mass and scale to a fighter-type aircraft. The simple two-I-beam design of the "iron bird" was selected to ensure accurate analytical mass properties. Traditional swing testing was also performed to compare the level of effort, amount of resources, and quality of data with the DIM method. The DIM test showed favorable results for the center of gravity and moments of inertia; however, the products of inertia showed disagreement with analytical predictions.

  7. Atomic structure of "multilayer silicene" grown on Ag(111): Dynamical low energy electron diffraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Kazuaki; Shirasawa, Tetsuroh; Lin, Chun-Liang; Nagao, Ryo; Tsukahara, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Toshio; Arafune, Ryuichi; Kawai, Maki; Takagi, Noriaki

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the atomic structure of the "multilayer silicene" grown on the Ag(111) single crystal surface by using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We measured the intensity of the LEED spot as a function of the incident electron energy (I-V curve) and analyzed the I-V curve using a dynamical LEED theory. We have found that the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag model well reproduces the I-V curve whereas the models consisting of the honeycomb structure of Si do not. The bias dependence of the STM image of multilayer silicene agrees with that of the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed surface. Consequently, we have concluded that the multilayer silicene grown on Ag(111) is identical to the Si(111)(√{ 3} ×√{ 3})-Ag reconstructed structure.

  8. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Döppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Kroll, J. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J. M.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Nathan, B. R.; Nikroo, A.; Opachich, Y. P.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rygg, J. R.; Salmonson, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Simanovskaia, N.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Widmann, K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hsing, W. W.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% ± 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel ρR on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness

  9. Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Doeppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P.; and others

    2012-12-15

    Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% {+-} 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel {rho}R on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell

  10. Using satellite measurements to improve understanding of estuarine turbidity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talke, Stefan; Hudson, Austin

    2014-05-01

    In-situ measurements of estuary turbidity maxima (ETMs) often lack spatial resolution (e.g., moored measurements) or are not synoptic (e.g., estuary transects). Satellite-based estimates of turbidity can potentially address these issues, but suffer from a lack of temporal resolution. In this contribution we address the time resolution problem by constructing a 'climatology' of turbidity for several estuaries, using approximately 15 and 12 years of MODIS data from the Terra and Aqua satellites, respectively. In-situ measurements of turbidity from the Columbia River Estuary (USA) and the Ems estuary (Germany) are regressed against atmospherically-corrected estimates of reflectance at a 250m resolution. A linear calibration with R2>0.9 (p-value < 1e-7) is found for low-aerosol conditions in the Columbia River Estuary, despite the relatively low surface turbidity (< 20 NTU). We process approximately 1300 images between 1999 and 2013 and find evidence of two topographically-trapped turbidity maxima in the North and South Channels. By conditionally sampling the data, we find that the magnitudes of these two ETMs and their spatial spread increases with tidal range and river discharge. The ETMs coincide with a sharp gradient in salinity; as the salinity gradient increases with greater river discharge, the turbidity gradient sharpens. A third ETM occurs at the head of salinity intrusion during low-flow conditions far upstream of the topographically trapped ETMs. These observations are further investigated by combining a semi-analytical model of salinity intrusion (MacCready, 2007) with an idealized analytical model of ETM dynamics developed for the Ems Estuary (Talke et al., 2009). Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that bathymetric features such as holes and sills contribute to the topographic trapping of turbidity by altering the tidally averaged circulation and salinity intrusion, particularly via the depth and mixing parameters. The methodology applied in the Columbia

  11. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  12. Statistical precision and sensitivity of measures of dynamic gait stability.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H; Meijer, Onno G; Beek, Peter J

    2009-04-15

    Recently, two methods for quantifying a system's dynamic stability have been applied to human locomotion: local stability (quantified by finite time maximum Lyapunov exponents, lambda(S-stride) and lambda(L-stride)) and orbital stability (quantified as maximum Floquet multipliers, MaxFm). Thus far, however, it has remained unclear how many data points are required to obtain precise estimates of these measures during walking, and to what extent these estimates are sensitive to changes in walking behaviour. To resolve these issues, we collected long data series of healthy subjects (n=9) walking on a treadmill in three conditions (normal walking at 0.83 m/s (3 km/h) and 1.38 m/s (5 km/h), and walking at 1.38 m/s (5 km/h) while performing a Stroop dual task). Data series from 0.83 and 1.38 m/s trials were submitted to a bootstrap procedure and paired t-tests for samples of different data series lengths were performed between 0.83 and 1.38 m/s and between 1.38 m/s with and without Stroop task. Longer data series led to more precise estimates for lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm. All variables showed an effect of data series length. Thus, when estimating and comparing these variables across conditions, data series covering an equal number of strides should be analysed. lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm were sensitive to the change in walking speed while only lambda(S-stride) and MaxFm were sensitive enough to capture the modulations of walking induced by the Stroop task. Still, these modulations could only be detected when using a substantial number of strides (>150). PMID:19135478

  13. Invariant Measures for Dissipative Dynamical Systems: Abstract Results and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekroun, Mickaël D.; Glatt-Holtz, Nathan E.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we study certain invariant measures that can be associated to the time averaged observation of a broad class of dissipative semigroups via the notion of a generalized Banach limit. Consider an arbitrary complete separable metric space X which is acted on by any continuous semigroup { S( t)} t ≥ 0. Suppose that { S( t)} t ≥ 0 possesses a global attractor {{A}}. We show that, for any generalized Banach limit LIM T → ∞ and any probability distribution of initial conditions {{m}_0}, that there exists an invariant probability measure {{m}}, whose support is contained in {{A}}, such that intX \\varphi(x) d{m}(x) = \\underset{t rightarrow infty}LIM1/T int_0^T int_X \\varphi(S(t) x) d{m}_0(x) dt, for all observables φ living in a suitable function space of continuous mappings on X. This work is based on the framework of Foias et al. (Encyclopedia of mathematics and its applications, vol 83. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001); it generalizes and simplifies the proofs of more recent works (Wang in Disc Cont Dyn Syst 23(1-2):521-540, 2009; Lukaszewicz et al. in J Dyn Diff Eq 23(2):225-250, 2011). In particular our results rely on the novel use of a general but elementary topological observation, valid in any metric space, which concerns the growth of continuous functions in the neighborhood of compact sets. In the case when { S( t)} t ≥ 0 does not possess a compact absorbing set, this lemma allows us to sidestep the use of weak compactness arguments which require the imposition of cumbersome weak continuity conditions and thus restricts the phase space X to the case of a reflexive Banach space. Two examples of concrete dynamical systems where the semigroup is known to be non-compact are examined in detail. We first consider the Navier-Stokes equations with memory in the diffusion terms. This is the so called Jeffery's model which describes certain classes of viscoelastic fluids. We then consider a family of neutral delay differential

  14. Dynamic NMR microscopy measurement of the dynamics and flow partitioning of colloidal particles in a bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Seymour, Joseph D.; Cokelet, Giles R.; Codd, Sarah L.

    2011-05-01

    The flow and distribution of Newtonian, polymeric and colloid suspension fluids at low Reynolds numbers in bifurcations has importance in a wide range of disciplines, including microvascular physiology and microfluidic devices. A bifurcation consisting of circular capillaries laser etched into a hard polymer with inlet diameter 2.50 ± 0.01 mm, bifurcating to a small diameter outlet of 0.76 ± 0.01 mm and a large diameter outlet of 1.25 ± 0.01 mm is examined. Four distinct fluids (water, 0.25%wt xanthan gum, 8 and 22%vol hard-sphere colloidal suspensions) are flowed at flow rates from 10 to 30 ml/h corresponding to Reynolds numbers based on the entry flow from 0.001 to 8. PGSE NMR techniques are applied to obtain dynamic images of the fluids inside the bifurcation with spatial resolution of 59 × 59 μm/pixel in plane over a 200-μm-thick slice. Velocity in all three spatial directions is examined to determine the impact of secondary flows and characterize the transport in the bifurcation. The velocity data provide direct measurement of the volumetric distribution of the flow between the two channels as a function of flow rate. Water and the 8% colloidal suspension show a constant distribution with increasing flow rate, the xanthan gum shows an increase in fluid going into the larger outlet with higher flow rate, and the 22% colloidal suspension shows a decrease in fluid entering the larger channel with higher flow rate. For the colloidal particle flow, the distribution of colloid particles down the capillary is determined by examining the spectrally resolved propagator for the oil inside the core-shell particles in a direction perpendicular to the axial flow. Using dynamic magnetic resonance microscopy, the potential for using magnetic resonance for "particle counting" in a microscale bifurcation is thus demonstrated.

  15. Dynamic Measures of Elastic Nonlinear (Anelastic) Behavior: Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity Testing (DAET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, G.; Le Bas, P.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Ulrich, T. J.; Carey, J. W.; Han, J.; Darling, T. W.; Johnson, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Unraveling the physics of the earthquake source, reliable sequestration of CO2, predicting wellbore breakout in oil and gas reservoirs, monitoring thermal damage to rock in nuclear waste storage, and probing cement integrity require new approaches to material characterization and imaging. The elastic nonlinear material response is extremely promising in this regard. A persistent problem has been the direct relation between elastic nonlinearity and mechanical damage, because a reliable physics-based theory does not yet exist; however, recent work in medical nonlinear acoustics has led to an experimental breakthrough in measuring material nonlinear response. The breakthrough, termed Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity Testing (e.g., Renaud et al, 2008), has significant implication to development of a physics based theory, and thus ultimately to our ability to directly relate nonlinear material behavior to damage. The method provides the means to dynamically study the velocity-pressure and attenuation-pressure behaviors through the full wave cycle in contrast to most methods that measure average response (e.g., Nonlinear Resonance Ultrasound Spectroscopy [e.g., Guyer and Johnson, 2009]). The method relies on exciting a sample with a low frequency vibration in order to cycle it through stress-strain multiple times. Simultaneously, a high frequency ultrasonic source applies pulses and the change in wavespeed as a function of the low frequency stress is measured. In crystalline rock, we expect that the elastic nonlinearity arises from the microcracks and dislocations contained within individual crystals. In contrast, sandstones, limestones and other sedimentary rocks may have other origin(s) of elastic nonlinearity that are currently under debate. Thus we can use a crystalline sample as a point of reference from which to extrapolate to other sources of nonlinear mechanisms. We report results from our preliminary studies applying a number of room-dry rock samples of differing rock

  16. Measurement of the True Dynamic and Static Pressures in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiel, Georg

    1939-01-01

    In this report, two reliable methods are presented, with the aid of which the undisturbed flight dynamic pressure and the true static pressure may be determined without error. These problems were solved chiefly through practical flight tests.

  17. Dynamic Temperature and Pressure Measurements in the Core of a Propulsion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Bill; Gordon, Grant; Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic temperature and pressure measurements were made in the core of a TECH977 propulsion engine as part of a NASA funded investigation into indirect combustion noise. Dynamic temperature measurements were made in the combustor, the inter-turbine duct, and the mixer using ten two-wire thermocouple probes. Internal dynamic pressure measurements were made at the same locations using piezoresistive transducers installed in semi-infinite coils. Measurements were acquired at four steady state operating conditions covering the range of aircraft approach power settings. Fluctuating gas temperature spectra were computed from the thermocouple probe voltage measurements using a compensation procedure that was developed under previous NASA test programs. A database of simultaneously acquired dynamic temperature and dynamic pressure measurements was produced. Spectral and cross-spectral analyses were conducted to explore the characteristics of the temperature and pressure fluctuations inside the engine, with a particular focus on attempting to identify the presence of indirect combustion noise.

  18. An Alternative Empirical Formula for Positive Corona Discharge I-V Characteristics in Point-to-Plate Electrode Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. Azooz, A.; Sabah, I. Waysi

    2014-03-01

    Experimental data are presented for a study on the dependence of the I-V characteristics of the corona discharge on pressure and electrode spacing using point-to-plane electrode configuration. These experimental data are obtained by a fast, automatic computer data-acquisition system. The data are used to suggest an alternative dimensionally self-consistent empirical equation for the parameterization of the I-V curves. The formula eliminates the need for any prior assumptions concerning the inception voltage, as is customary in this type of work.

  19. Propofol and alfentanil in children: infusion technique and dose requirement for total i.v. anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Browne, B L; Prys-Roberts, C; Wolf, A R

    1992-12-01

    We estimated the dose of propofol (initial dose followed by a stepped infusion) when given with two different infusion rates of alfentanil for total i.v. anaesthesia in 59 children aged 3-12 yr. Patients in series 1 (four groups) received an alfentanil loading dose of 85 micrograms kg-1 and an infusion of 65 micrograms kg-1 h-1. Patients in series 2 (groups 5 and 6) received an alfentanil loading dose of 65 micrograms kg-1 and infusion of 50 micrograms kg-1 h-1. Parents gave their informed consent. Premedication comprised temazepam 0.3 mg kg-1. Glycopyrronium 5 micrograms kg-1 was administered and anaesthesia induced and maintained with alfentanil (loading dose and infusion) followed by propofol (loading dose and three-stage manual infusion scheme). Suxamethonium 1 mg kg-1 was used to facilitate tracheal intubation and the lungs were ventilated artificially to normocapnia with 30% oxygen in air. Probit analysis was used to determine the dose requirement of propofol. In series 1, the ED50 was 6.0 mg kg-1 h-1 (95% confidence limits 5.5-6.2 mg kg-1 h-1) and ED95 8.6 (6.8-7.8) mg kg-1 h-1. Corresponding values for series 2 were ED50 7.5 (8.0-9.8) mg kg-1 h-1 and ED95 10.5 (9.6-13.1) mg kg-1 h-1. PMID:1467099

  20. Oesophageal contractility during total i.v. anaesthesia with and without glycopyrronium.

    PubMed

    Raftery, S; Enever, G; Prys-Roberts, C

    1991-05-01

    Somatic movement and spontaneous and provoked oesophageal contractions were noted at time of incision in 51 patients receiving total i.v. anaesthesia with alfentanil and propofol. Probit analysis of the dose of propofol required to prevent spontaneous movement revealed an ED50 (95% confidence limits) of 2.5 (1.8-2.9) mg kg(-1) h(-1) and ED95 of 4.7 (4.0-7.5) mg kg(-1) h(-1). Corresponding venous blood concentrations gave an EC50 of 1.2 (0.4-1.6) micrograms ml(-1) and an EC95 of 4.0 (2.8-18.5) micrograms ml(-1). ED50 of propofol for preventing spontaneous oesophageal contraction was 3.0 (1.9-3.6) mg kg(-1) h(-1). ED95 was 6.9 (5.0-27.3) mg kg(-1) h(-1); EC50 for oesophageal contractions was 1.7 (0.7-2.3) micrograms ml(-1) and EC95 was 5.9 (3.7-70.6) micrograms ml(-1). Another group of 10 patients were given glycopyrronium 5 micrograms kg(-1) at induction; oesophageal contractility was significantly reduced in this group. PMID:2031816

  1. Actions of agonists, fipronil and ivermectin on the predominant in vivo splice and edit variant (RDLbd, I/V) of the Drosophila GABA receptor expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lees, Kristin; Musgaard, Maria; Suwanmanee, Siros; Buckingham, Steven David; Biggin, Philip; Sattelle, David

    2014-01-01

    Ionotropic GABA receptors are the targets for several classes of insecticides. One of the most widely-studied insect GABA receptors is RDL (resistance to dieldrin), originally isolated from Drosophila melanogaster. RDL undergoes alternative splicing and RNA editing, which influence the potency of GABA. Most work has focussed on minority isoforms. Here, we report the first characterisation of the predominant native splice variant and RNA edit, combining functional characterisation with molecular modelling of the agonist-binding region. The relative order of agonist potency is GABA> muscimol> TACA> β-alanine. The I/V edit does not alter the potency of GABA compared to RDLbd. Docking calculations suggest that these agonists bind and activate RDLbdI/V through a similar binding mode. TACA and β-alanine are predicted to bind with lower affinity than GABA, potentially explaining their lower potency, whereas the lower potency of muscimol and isoguvacine cannot be explained structurally from the docking calculations. The A301S (resistance to dieldrin) mutation reduced the potency of antagonists picrotoxin, fipronil and pyrafluprole but the I/V edit had no measurable effect. Ivermectin suppressed responses to GABA of RDLbdI/V, RDLbd and RDLbdI/VA301S. The dieldrin resistant variant also showed reduced sensitivity to Ivermectin. This study of a highly abundant insect GABA receptor isoform will help the design of new insecticides. PMID:24823815

  2. Fast ion dynamics measured by collective Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindslev, Henrik

    2001-10-01

    In magnetically confined fusion plasmas, fast ions, from fusion reactions and auxiliary heating, typically carry a third of the total plasma kinetic energy, and even more of the free energy. This free energy must be channelled into heating the bulk plasma, but is also available for driving waves in the plasma, affecting confinement of bulk and fast ions. We know that fast ions can drive Alfvén waves, affect sawteeth and fishbones. In turn all three can redistribute or ejects the fast ions. Wave particle interaction, also the basis of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), depends crucially on the phase space distribution of the fast ions. Conversely the effect waves and instabilities have of fast ions will manifest itself in the detail of the fast ion phase space distribution. To explore the dynamics of fast ions and their interaction with the plasma thus begs for measurements of the fast ion distribution resolved in space, time and velocity. This has long been the promise of Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) [1]. First demonstrated at JET [2]and subsequently at TEXTOR [3], CTS is living up to its promise and is now contributing to the understanding of fast ion dynamics. With the TEXTOR CTS, temporal behaviours of fast ion velocity distributions have been uncovered. The fast ion populations are produced by ICRH and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). At sawteeth, we see clear variations in the fast ion population, which depend on ion energy, pitch angle and spatial location. Investigating the region just inside the inversion radius, we find that ions with small parallel energy, and with perpendicular energies up to a soft threshold well above thermal, are lost from the high field side near the inversion radius, while more energetic ions in the same pitch angle range remain insensitive to the sawteeth. The sensitive population could include the potato and stagnation orbit particles identified theoretically as being sensitive the sawteeth [4]. Under the same conditions

  3. Consequences of nonclassical measurement for the algorithmic description of continuous dynamical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Chris

    1989-01-01

    Continuous dynamical systems intuitively seem capable of more complex behavior than discrete systems. If analyzed in the framework of the traditional theory of computation, a continuous dynamical system with countably many quasistable states has at least the computational power of a universal Turing machine. Such an analysis assumes, however, the classical notion of measurement. If measurement is viewed nonclassically, a continuous dynamical system cannot, even in principle, exhibit behavior that cannot be simulated by a universal Turing machine.

  4. Alternative non-Markovianity measure by divisibility of dynamical maps

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, S. C.; Yi, X. X.; Yu, S. X.; Oh, C. H.

    2011-06-15

    By identifying non-Markovianity with nondivisibility, we propose a measure of non-Markovianity for quantum processes. Three examples are presented, and the measure of non-Markovianity is calculated and discussed for these examples. Comparisons with other measures of non-Markovianity are made. The present non-Markovianity measure has the merit that no optimization procedure is required and it is finite for any quantum process, which greatly enhances the practical relevance of the proposed measure.

  5. Characterization of S -T+ transition dynamics via correlation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickel, Christian; Foletti, Sandra; Umansky, Vladimir; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-09-01

    Nuclear spins are an important source of dephasing for electron spin qubits in GaAs quantum dots. Most studies of their dynamics have focused on the relatively slow longitudinal polarization. We present a semiclassical model and experimental data showing that the dynamics of the transverse hyperfine field can be probed by correlating individual Landau-Zener sweeps across the S -T+ transition of a two-electron spin qubit. The relative Larmor precession of different nuclear spin species leads to oscillations in these correlations, which decay due to dephasing of the nuclei. In the presence of spin-orbit coupling, oscillations with the absolute Larmor frequencies whose amplitude depends on the spin-orbit coupling strength are expected. These oscillations reflect rapid dynamics of the transverse hyperfine field, which are relevant for several qubit control schemes.

  6. Quantum Dynamics Simulations for Modeling Experimental Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brett; Nayyar, Sahil; Liss, Kyle; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved studies of quantum dynamics have benefited greatly from developments in ultrafast table-top and free electron lasers. Advances in computer software and hardware have lowered the barrier for performing calculations such that relatively simple simulations allow for direct comparison with experimental results. We describe here a set of quantum dynamics calculations in low-dimensional molecular systems. The calculations incorporate coupled electronic-nuclear dynamics, including two interactions with an applied field and nuclear wave packet propagation. The simulations were written and carried out by undergraduates as part of a senior research project, with the specific goal of allowing for detailed interpretation of experimental pump-probe data (in additional to the pedagogical value).

  7. Neutron Reflectivity Measurement for Polymer Dynamics near Graphene Oxide Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jaseung

    We investigated the diffusion dynamics of polymer chains confined between graphene oxide layers using neutron reflectivity (NR). The bilayers of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA)/ deuterated PMMA (d-PMMA) films and polystyrene (PS)/d-PS films with various film thickness sandwiched between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared. From the NR results, we found that PMMA diffusion dynamics was reduced near the GO surface while the PS diffusion was not significantly changed. This is due to the different strength of GO-polymer interaction. In this talk, these diffusion results will be compared with dewetting dynamics of polymer thin films on the GO monolayers. This has given us the basis for development of graphene-based nanoelectronics with high efficiency, such as heterojunction devices for polymer photovoltaic (OPV) applications.

  8. An ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring dynamic liquid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpini, T. D.; Monteith, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A novel oscillating pipe system was developed to provide dynamic calibration wherein small sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 0.5 to 10% of the steady-state flow were added to the steady-state flow by oscillating the flowmeter relative to the fixed pipes in the flow system. Excellent agreement was obtained between the dynamic velocities derived from an accelerometer mounted on the oscillating pipe system and those sensed by the flowmeter at frequencies of 7, 19, and 30 Hz. Also described were the signal processing techniques used to retrieve the small sinusoidal signals which were obscured by the fluid turbulence.

  9. Dynamic-pressure measurements using an electronically scanned pressure module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    Frequency response was measured for different lengths and diameters of tubing between a sinusoidal pressure source and a pressure sensing module from an electronically scanned pressure measuring system. Measurements were made for straight runs of both steel and vinyl tubing. For steel tubing, measured results are compared with results calculated by using equations developed by Tijdeman and Bergh. Measurements were also made with a bend in the vinyl tubing at the module. In addition, measurements were made with two coils placed in the tubing near the middle of the run.

  10. Measuring Teachers' Attunement to Children's Friendships, Victimization, and Popularity Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madill, Rebecca; Zadzora, Kathleen; Gest, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Educational researchers have long recognized that teachers have an "invisible hand" with which they can subtly shape students' relationships. Through seating arrangements, instructional groups, and general classroom management strategies, teachers have many opportunities to shape friendships and status dynamics in the classroom. The…

  11. Log amplifier instrument measures physiological biopotentials over wide dynamic range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kado, R. T.

    1970-01-01

    To record biopotentials with extreme dynamic ranges, biopotential inputs are capacitatively coupled to a miniature, low power, solid-state signal conditioner consisting of a two-stage differential preamplifier that has a low noise figure. The ouput of the preamplifier uses diodes to provide an overall gain which is nearly logarithmic.

  12. DYNAMIC FLUX CHAMBER SYSTEMS FOR FUMIGANT EMISSION MEASUREMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of effective field practices on emission reductions from soil fumigation relies on continuous and reliable emission data. Dynamic (flow through) flux chambers can provide continuous sampling for fumigants volatilized from the soil surface. The objective of this project was to design and c...

  13. Dynamics of entropic measurement-induced nonlocality in structured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ming-Liang; Fan, Heng

    2012-09-15

    We propose the entropic measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN) as the maximal increment of von Neumann entropy induced by the locally non-disturbing measurement, and study its behaviors in both the independent and common structured reservoirs. We present schemes for preserving the MIN, and show that for certain initial states the MIN, including the quantum correlations, can even be enhanced by the common reservoir. Additionally, we also show that the different measures of MIN may give different qualitative characterizations of nonlocal properties, i.e., it is rather measure dependent than state dependent. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Features of the entropic measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of MIN with other quantum correlation measures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement of MIN and other quantum correlations by common reservoir. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relativity of the geometric and entropic MIN measures.

  14. Definition of a dynamic optical sensor for measuring unsteady pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chapuis, P.; Maillard, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    This study presents the authors` contribution to define an optical dynamic sensor. Given that the studies carried out are of an exploratory nature, the first task was to validate the mechanical behavior of the specimen body in the sensor and to check that the signals recorded were reproducible. To subject the sensor to deformation rates of 10 to 10{sup 2} per second, tests were carried out using the Kolsky-Hopkinson apparatus. The results show that specimen body responds in a satisfactory manner. This result leads the authors to opt for the use of a polarimetric apparatus using birefringent shaping fibers in order to limit the intrinsic sensitivity of the two-arm apparatus. The fact that the fiber is sensitive to deformation rates does not appear in the bibliographical references. They identified it on the basis of tests on the traction/compression machine by varying the load climb rate and on the basis of Hopkinson bar dynamic tests.

  15. High Dynamic Range Complex Impedance Measurement System for Petrophysical Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; He, X.; Yao, H.; Tan, S.; Shi, H.; Shen, R.; Yan, C.; Zeng, P.; He, L.; Qiao, N.; Xi, F.; Zhang, H.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization method (SIP) or complex resistivity method is increasing its application in metalliferous ore exploration, hydrocarbon exploration, underground water exploration, monitoring of environment pollution, and the evaluation of environment remediation. And the measurement of complex resistivity or complex impedance of rock/ore sample and polluted water plays a fundamental role in improving the application effect of SIP and the application scope of SIP. However, current instruments can't guaranty the accuracy of measurement when the resistance of sample is less than 10Ω or great than 100kΩ. A lot of samples, such as liquid, polluted sea water, igneous rock, limestone, and sandstone, can't be measured with reliable complex resistivity result. Therefore, this problem projects a shadow in the basic research and application research of SIP. We design a high precision measurement system from the study of measurement principle, sample holder, and measurement instrument. We design input buffers in a single board. We adopt operation amplifier AD549 in this system because of its ultra-high input impedance and ultra-low current noise. This buffer is good in acquiring potential signal across high impedance sample. By analyzing the sources of measurement error and errors generated by the measurement system, we propose a correction method to remove the error in order to achieve high quality complex impedance measurement for rock and ore samples. This measurement system can improve the measurement range of the complex impedance to 0.1 Ω ~ 10 GΩ with amplitude error less than 0.1% and phase error less than 0.1mrad when frequency ranges as 0.01 Hz ~ 1 kHz. We tested our system on resistors with resistance as 0.1Ω ~ 10 GΩ in frequency range as 1 Hz ~ 1000 Hz, and the measurement error is less than 0.1 mrad. We also compared the result with LCR bridge and SCIP, we can find that the bridge's measuring range only reaches 100 MΩ, SCIP's measuring range

  16. Novel measuring equipment for dynamic balancing of motorcycle crankshaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiwen; Zhang, Yali; Li, Tiejun; Yue, Hong; Cai, Hegao

    2006-11-01

    Motorcycle crankshaft is a special rigid rotor. It is composed of crankshaft, connecting rod and slider. It belongs to unbalanced rotor. Most of traditional methods of measuring unbalance value of crankshaft are not continuous, which need human intervention. So the measurement time is long and measurement accuracy is not high. To solve the above problem, a novel computer-based measurement is developed. The software of the measuring system is developed based on G-language, namely LabVIEW. The hardware system includes accelerate sensors, multi-function Data Acquisition (DAQ) card and industrial control computer. When the crankshaft rotates, its centrifugal forces are generated which result in the supporting structure (also called vibration table) vibrating. Data acquisition, signal processing and analysis can obtain unbalance value including amplitude and phrases. Computer-based measurement is used with software to set up automated test system that can make fast measurements without human intervention. The application of virtual instruments makes date analysis more accurate, and decreases the measuring time significantly; a complete measurement can be finished in 25s. The results show that this new measuring system has the advantages of easy-of-use, high precision, high efficiency and low costs.

  17. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Seonghwan; Scalzetti, Ernest M.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  18. The number comb for a soil physical properties dynamic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olechko, K.; Patiño, P.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    We propose the prime numbers distribution extracted from the soil digital multiscale images and some physical properties time series as the precise indicator of the spatial and temporal dynamics under soil management changes. With this new indicator the soil dynamics can be studied as a critical phenomenon where each phase transition is estimated and modeled by the graph partitioning induced phase transition. The critical point of prime numbers distribution was correlated with the beginning of Andosols, Vertisols and saline soils physical degradation under the unsustainable soil management in Michoacan, Guanajuato and Veracruz States of Mexico. The data banks corresponding to the long time periods (between 10 and 28 years) were statistically compared by RISK 5.0 software and our own algorithms. Our approach makes us able to distill free-form natural laws of soils physical properties dynamics directly from the experimental data. The Richter (1987) and Schmidt and Lipson (2009) original approaches were very useful to design the algorithms to identify Hamiltonians, Lagrangians and other laws of geometric and momentum conservation especially for erosion case.

  19. Dynamics of incompatibility of quantum measurements in open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addis, Carole; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The nonclassical nature of quantum states, often illustrated using entanglement measures or quantum discord, constitutes a resource for quantum information protocols. However, the nonclassicality of a quantum system cannot be seen as a property of the state alone, as the set of available measurements used to extract information on the system is typically restricted. In this work we study how the nonclassicality of quantum measurements, quantified via their incompatibility, is influenced by quantum noise and how a non-Markovian environment can be useful for maintaining the measurement resources.

  20. Measures of trajectory ensemble disparity in nonequilibrium statistical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, Gavin E.; Sivak, David A.

    2011-06-01

    Many interesting divergence measures between conjugate ensembles of nonequilibrium trajectories can be experimentally determined from the work distribution of the process. Herein, we review the statistical and physical significance of several of these measures, in particular the relative entropy (dissipation), Jeffreys divergence (hysteresis), Jensen-Shannon divergence (time-asymmetry), Chernoff divergence (work cumulant generating function), and Rényi divergence.

  1. Measures of trajectory ensemble disparity in nonequilibrium statistical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin; Sivak, David

    2011-06-03

    Many interesting divergence measures between conjugate ensembles of nonequilibrium trajectories can be experimentally determined from the work distribution of the process. Herein, we review the statistical and physical significance of several of these measures, in particular the relative entropy (dissipation), Jeffreys divergence (hysteresis), Jensen-Shannon divergence (time-asymmetry), Chernoff divergence (work cumulant generating function), and Renyi divergence.

  2. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Interia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander; Herrera, Claudia; Spivey, Natalie; Fladung, William; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes the DIM method and how it measures the inertia properties of an object by analyzing the frequency response functions measured during a ground vibration test (GVT). The DIM method has been in development at the University of Cincinnati and has shown success on a variety of small scale test articles. The NASA AFRC version was modified for larger applications.

  3. Companding technique for high dynamic range measurements using Gafchromic films

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, Frank; Crijns, Wouter; Defraene, Gilles

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To introduce a methodology to perform dose measurements using Gafchromic films which can span several decades of dose levels. Methods: The technique is based on a rescaling approach using different films irradiated at different dose levels. This is combined with a registration protocol correcting positioning and scaling factors for each film. The methodology is validated using TLD's for out-of-field doses. Furthermore, two examples are provided using the technique to characterize small sized radiosurgery cones and compared with measurements made with a pinpoint chamber. Results: Excellent agreement with TLD, planning systems and measurement was found. The superior resolution of the film technique was apparent. Conclusions: The authors have introduced a new technique allowing users to quantify very low doses in conjunction with commissioning measurements. The use of film also provides 2D information on beam characteristics in high resolution measurements.

  4. Measurement of nano-particle diffusion in the simulated dynamic light scattering by contrast of dynamic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaobin; Qiu, Jian; Luo, Kaiqing; Han, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic Light Scattering is used for measuring particle size distribution of nano-particle under Brownian motion. Signal is detected through a photomultiplier and processed by correlation analysis, and results are inverted at last. Method by using CCD camera can record the procedure of motion. However, there are several weaknesses such as low refresh speed and noise from CCD camera, and this method depends on particle size and detecting angle. A simulation of nano-particle under Brownian motion is proposed to record dynamic images, studies contrast of dynamic images which can represent speed of diffusion, and its characteristic under different conditions. The results show that through contrast of dynamic images diffusion coefficient can be obtained, which is independent on density of scattering volume.

  5. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  6. Multidimensional characterization of stochastic dynamical systems based on multiple perturbations and measurements.

    PubMed

    Kryvohuz, Maksym; Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-06-01

    Generalized nonlinear response theory is presented for stochastic dynamical systems. Experiments in which multiple measurements of dynamical quantities are used along with multiple perturbations of parameters of dynamical systems are described by generalized response functions (GRFs). These constitute a new type of multidimensional measures of stochastic dynamics either in the time or the frequency domains. Closed expressions for GRFs in stochastic dynamical systems are derived and compared with numerical non-equilibrium simulations. Several types of perturbations are considered: impulsive and periodic perturbations of temperature and impulsive perturbations of coordinates. The present approach can be used to study various types of stochastic processes ranging from single-molecule conformational dynamics to chemical kinetics of finite-size reactors such as biocells. PMID:26049450

  7. Multidimensional characterization of stochastic dynamical systems based on multiple perturbations and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kryvohuz, Maksym Mukamel, Shaul

    2015-06-07

    Generalized nonlinear response theory is presented for stochastic dynamical systems. Experiments in which multiple measurements of dynamical quantities are used along with multiple perturbations of parameters of dynamical systems are described by generalized response functions (GRFs). These constitute a new type of multidimensional measures of stochastic dynamics either in the time or the frequency domains. Closed expressions for GRFs in stochastic dynamical systems are derived and compared with numerical non-equilibrium simulations. Several types of perturbations are considered: impulsive and periodic perturbations of temperature and impulsive perturbations of coordinates. The present approach can be used to study various types of stochastic processes ranging from single-molecule conformational dynamics to chemical kinetics of finite-size reactors such as biocells.

  8. Dynamic and quasi-static measurements of C-4 and primasheet P1000 explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Geoffrey W; Thompson, Darla G; De Luca, Racci; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Todd, Steven N

    2010-01-01

    We have measured dynamic and quasi-static mechanical properties of C-4 and Primasheet P1000 explosive materials to provide input data for modeling efforts. Primasheet P1000 is a pentaerythritol tetranitrate-based rubberized explosive. C-4 is a RDX-based moldable explosive. Dynamic measurements included acoustic and split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests. Quasi-static testing was done in compression on load frames and on a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Split-Hopkinson and quasi-static tests were done at five temperatures from -50 C to 50 C. Acoustic velocities were measured at, above, and below room temperature.

  9. Digital system for dynamic turbine engine blade displacement measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiraly, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    An instrumentation concept for measuring blade tip displacements which employs optical probes and an array of micro-computers is presented. The system represents a hitherto unknown instrumentation capability for the acquisition and direct digitization of deflection data concurrently from all of the blade tips of an operational engine rotor undergoing flutter or forced vibration. System measurements are made using optical transducers which are fixed to the case. Measurements made in this way are the equivalent of those obtained by placing three surface-normal displacement transducers at three positions on each blade of an operational rotor.

  10. MR measurement of critical phase transition dynamics and supercritical fluid dynamics in capillary and porous media flow.

    PubMed

    Rassi, Erik M; Codd, Sarah L; Seymour, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluids (SCF) are useful solvents in green chemistry and oil recovery and are of great current interest in the context of carbon sequestration. Magnetic resonance techniques were applied to study near critical and supercritical dynamics for pump driven flow through a capillary and a packed bed porous media. Velocity maps and displacement propagators measure the dynamics of C(2)F(6) at pressures below, at, and above the critical pressure and at temperatures below and above the critical temperature. Displacement propagators were measured at various displacement observation times to quantify the time evolution of dynamics. In capillary flow, the critical phase transition fluid C(2)F(6) showed increased compressibility compared to the near critical gas and supercritical fluid. These flows exhibit large variations in buoyancy arising from large changes in density due to very small changes in temperature. PMID:22018694