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Sample records for dynamic interfacial properties

  1. Green-Kubo relations for dynamic interfacial excess properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, Leonard M. C.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we analyze the fluctuations of the in-plane interfacial excess fluxes in multiphase systems, in the context of the extended irreversible thermodynamics formalism. We derive expressions for the time correlation functions of the surface extra stress tensor, the surface mass flux vector, and the surface energy flux vector, and use these expressions to derive Green-Kubo relations for the surface shear viscosity, the surface dilatational viscosity, the surface diffusion coefficient, and the surface thermal conductivity. These Green-Kubo relations can be used to compute these excess transport coefficients using for example molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Influences of thermal annealing on P3HT/PCBM interfacial properties and charge dynamics in polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng-En; Dinelli, Franco; Yu, Chen-Te; Shih, Hwa-Wei; Pei, Zingway; Chang, Chen-Shiung; Shih-Sen Chien, Forest

    2015-12-01

    The effects of thermal annealing on the interfacial properties of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and on the charge dynamics in P3HT:PCBM polymer solar cells (PSCs) are investigated. This study determines that an effective phase separation of the P3HT and PCBM caused by thermal annealing achieves a larger interfacial area for efficient exciton dissociation and a well-defined pn junction with few defect levels at the P3HT/PCBM interface. Additionally, thermal annealing creates a compositional gradient across the P3HT:PCBM films, which enhances the charge transit ability significantly. These improved interfacial properties and efficiency in charge transit ability account for the better power conversion efficiency of P3HT:PCBM PSCs treated with thermal annealing.

  3. Effect of Interfacial Bonding on Interphase Properties in SiO2/Epoxy Nanocomposite: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhikun; Lv, Qiang; Chen, Shenghui; Li, Chunling; Sun, Shuangqing; Hu, Songqing

    2016-03-23

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to explore the effect of interfacial bonding on the interphase properties of a nanocomposite system that consists of a silica nanoparticle and the highly cross-linked epoxy matrix. For the structural properties, results show that interfacial covalent bonding can broaden the interphase region by increasing the radial effect range of fluctuated mass density and oriented chains, as well as strengthen the interphase region by improving the thermal stability of interfacial van der Waals excluded volume and reducing the proportion of cis conformers of epoxy segments. The improved thermal stability of the interphase region in the covalently bonded model results in an increase of ∼21 K in the glass transition temperature (Tg) compared to that of the pure epoxy. It is also found that interfacial covalent bonding mainly restricts the volume thermal expansion of the model at temperatures near or larger than Tg. Furthermore, investigations from mean-square displacement and fraction of immobile atoms point out that interfacial covalent and noncovalent bonding induces lower and higher mobility of interphase atoms than that of the pure epoxy, respectively. The obtained critical interfacial bonding ratio when the interphase and matrix atoms have the same mobility is 5.8%. These results demonstrate that the glass transitions of the interphase and matrix will be asynchronous when the interfacial bonding ratio is not 5.8%. Specifically, the interphase region will trigger the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is larger than 5.8%, whereas it restrains the glass transition of the matrix when the ratio is smaller than 5.8%. PMID:26927032

  4. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, J. M.; Algaba, J.; Míguez, J. M.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Piñeiro, M. M.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  5. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J M; Algaba, J; Míguez, J M; Mendiboure, B; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Piñeiro, M M; Blas, F J

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  6. Dynamic interfacial properties of human tear-lipid films and their interactions with model-tear proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Svitova, Tatyana F; Lin, Meng C

    2016-07-01

    This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding interfacial properties of very complex biological colloids, specifically, human meibum and tear lipids, and their interactions with proteins similar to the proteins found in aqueous part of human tears. Tear lipids spread as thin films over the surface of tear-film aqueous and play crucial roles in tear-film stability and overall ocular-surface health. The vast majority of papers published to date report interfacial properties of meibum-lipid monolayers spread on various aqueous sub-phases, often containing model proteins, in Langmuir trough. However, it is well established that natural human ocular tear lipids exist as multilayered films with a thickness between 30 and 100nm, that is very much disparate from 1 to 2nm thick meibum monolayers. We employed sessile-bubble tensiometry to study the dynamic interfacial and rheological properties of reconstituted multilayered human tear-lipid films. Small amounts (0.5-1μg) of human tear lipids were deposited on an air-bubble surface to produce tear-lipid films in thickness range 30-100nm corresponding to ocular lipid films. Thus, we were able to overcome major Langmuir-trough method limitations because ocular tear lipids can be safely harvested only in minute, sub-milligram quantities, insufficient for Langmuir through studies. Sessile-bubble method is demonstrated to be a versatile tool for assessing conventional synthetic surfactants adsorption/desorption dynamics at an air-aqueous solution interface. (Svitova T., Weatherbee M., Radke C.J. Dynamics of surfactant sorption at the air/water interface: continuous-flow tensiometry. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 2003;261:1170-179). The augmented flow-sessile-bubble setup, with step-strain relaxation module for dynamic interfacial rheological properties and high-precision syringe pump to generate larger and slow interfacial area expansions-contractions, was developed and employed in our studies. We established that

  7. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  8. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  9. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of CO2/Water/Quartz Interfacial Properties: Impact of CO2 Dissolution in Water.

    PubMed

    Javanbakht, Gina; Sedghi, Mohammad; Welch, William; Goual, Lamia

    2015-06-01

    The safe trapping of carbon dioxide (CO2) in deep saline aquifers is one of the major concerns of CO2 sequestration. The amount of capillary trapping is dominated by the capillary pressure of water and CO2 inside the reservoir, which in turn is controlled by the interfacial tension (IFT) and the contact angle (CA) of CO2/water/rock systems. The measurement of IFT and CA could be very challenging at reservoir conditions, especially in the presence of toxic cocontaminants. Thus, the ability to accurately predict these interfacial properties at reservoir conditions is very advantageous. Although the majority of existing molecular dynamics (MD) studies of CO2/water/mineral systems were able to capture the trends in IFT and CA variations with pressure and temperature, their predictions often deviated from experimental data, possibly due to erroneous models and/or overlooked chemical reactions. The objective of this study was to improve the MD predictions of IFT and CA of CO2/water/quartz systems at various pressure and temperature conditions by (i) considering the chemical reactions between CO2 and water and (ii) using a new molecular model for α-quartz surface. The results showed that the presence of carbonic acid at the CO2/water interface improved the predictions of IFT, especially at low temperature and high pressure where more CO2 dissolution occurs. On the other hand, the effect on CA was minor. The slight decrease in CA observed across the pressure range investigated could be attributed to an increase in the total number of H-bonds between fluid molecules and quartz surface. PMID:25965772

  11. Alkane-Metal Interfacial Structure and Elastic Properties by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sebeck, Katherine; Shao, Chen; Kieffer, John

    2016-07-01

    The structure of amorphous materials near the interface with an ordered substrate can be affected by various characteristics of the adjoining phases, such as the lattice spacing of the adherent surface, polymer chain length, and adhesive strength. To discern the influence of each of these factors, four FCC metal lattices are examined for three chain lengths of n-alkane and van der Waals interfacial interactions are controlled by adjusting the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential parameters. The role of interaction strength is investigated for a single chain length and substrate combination. Four nanoconfined systems are also analyzed in terms of their mechanical strength. A strong layering effect is observed near the interface for all systems. The distinctiveness of polymer layering, i.e., the maximum density and spatial extent, exhibits a logarithmic dependence on the interaction strength between polymer and substrate. Congruency with the substrate lattice parameter further enhances this effect. Moreover, the elastic modulus of the alkane phase as a function of layer thickness indicates that the effects of ordering within the structure extend beyond the immediately obvious interfacial region. PMID:27282363

  12. Microstructural Evolution Based on Fundamental Interfacial Properties

    SciTech Connect

    A. D. Rollett; D. J. Srolovitz; A. Karma

    2003-07-11

    This first CMSN project has been operating since the summer of 1999. The main achievement of the project was to bring together a community of materials scientists, physicists and mathematicians who share a common interest in the properties of interfaces and the impact of those properties on microstructural evolution. Six full workshops were held at Carnegie Mellon (CMU), Northwestern (NWU), Santa Fe, Northeastern University (NEU), National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), Ames Laboratory, and at the University of California in San Diego (UCSD) respectively. Substantial scientific results were obtained through the sustained contact between the members of the project. A recent issue of Interface Science (volume 10, issue 2/3, July 2002) was dedicated to the output of the project. The results include: the development of methods for extracting anisotropic boundary energy and mobility from molecular dynamics simulations of solid/liquid interfaces in nickel; the extraction of anisotropic energies and mobilities in aluminum from similar MD simulations; the application of parallel computation to the calculation of interfacial properties; the development of a method to extract interfacial properties from the fluctuations in interface position through consideration of interfacial stiffness; the use of anisotropic interface properties in studies of abnormal grain growth; the discovery of abnormal grain growth from random distributions of orientation in subgrain networks; the direct comparison at the scale of individual grains between experimentally observed grain growth and simulations, which confirmed the importance of including anisotropic interfacial properties in the simulations; the classification of a rich variety of dendritic morphologies based on slight variations in the anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface; development of phase field methods that permit both solidification and grain growth to be simulated within the same framework.

  13. Interfacial welding of dynamic covalent network polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kai; Shi, Qian; Li, Hao; Jabour, John; Yang, Hua; Dunn, Martin L.; Wang, Tiejun; Qi, H. Jerry

    2016-09-01

    Dynamic covalent network (or covalent adaptable network) polymers can rearrange their macromolecular chain network by bond exchange reactions (BERs) where an active unit replaces a unit in an existing bond to form a new bond. Such macromolecular events, when they occur in large amounts, can attribute to unusual properties that are not seen in conventional covalent network polymers, such as shape reforming and surface welding; the latter further enables the important attributes of material malleability and powder-based reprocessing. In this paper, a multiscale modeling framework is developed to study the surface welding of thermally induced dynamic covalent network polymers. At the macromolecular network level, a lattice model is developed to describe the chain density evolution across the interface and its connection to bulk stress relaxation due to BERs. The chain density evolution rule is then fed into a continuum level interfacial model that takes into account surface roughness and applied pressure to predict the effective elastic modulus and interfacial fracture energy of welded polymers. The model yields particularly accessible results where the moduli and interfacial strength of the welded samples as a function of temperature and pressure can be predicted with four parameters, three of which can be measured directly. The model identifies the dependency of surface welding efficiency on the applied thermal and mechanical fields: the pressure will affect the real contact area under the consideration of surface roughness of dynamic covalent network polymers; the chain density increment on the real contact area of interface is only dependent on the welding time and temperature. The modeling approach shows good agreement with experiments and can be extended to other types of dynamic covalent network polymers using different stimuli for BERs, such as light and moisture etc.

  14. The stability and interfacial properties of functionalized silica nanoparticles dispersed in brine studied by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lara, Lucas S.; Rigo, Vagner A.; Miranda, Caetano R.

    2015-10-01

    The charge accumulation and surface tension of overall neutral functionalized silica nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed in brine (NaCl and CaCl2) were studied using large scale fully atomistic molecular dynamics. Sulphonic (SA) and ethylene-glycol (EG) functional groups have been incorporated in the NP surface respectively, covering both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic characters. For the latter, groups with one (EG) and two (PEG2) monomers were considered. The ion distribution in electrolyte aqueous solution and its accumulation around NPs were monitored for different salt concentrations (from 0.05 up to 1 wt%), and temperature (300 and 350 K) at 1 atm. At certain conditions, the ion accumulation surrounding the overall neutral NPs leads to a formation of electrical double layers (EDL). Compared with the monovalent ions (NaCl), the accumulation of divalent ions (CaCl2) was found to be more pronounced and the thickness of the EDL around the NPs is more compact. According to the functional group attached, the EDL width also reduces going from EG, to PEG2, to SA. Our simulations suggest that the EDL formation, its narrowing, the large variation of the interface tension, followed by a steep increase in ion mobility are conditions which may precede instability of functionalized NPs dispersion in brine.

  15. Studies of structural, dynamical, and interfacial properties of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide ionic liquids by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatee, Mohammad Hadi; Zolghadr, Amin Reza; Moosavi, Fatemeh; Ansari, Younes

    2012-03-01

    Bulk and surface properties of the ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methyl-imidazolium iodides ([Cnmim]I) were simulated by classical molecular dynamics using all atom non-polarizable force field (n = 4, butyl; 6, hexyl; 8, octyl). The structure of ionic liquids were initially optimized by density functional theory and atomic charges obtained by CHELPG method. Reduction of partial atomic charges (by 20% for simulation of density and surface tension, and by 10% for viscosity) found to improve the accuracy, while a non-polarizable force field was applied. Additionally, the simulation ensembles approach the equilibrium faster when the charge reduction is applied. By these refined force field parameters, simulated surface tensions in the range of 323-393 k are quite in agreement with the experiments. Simulation of temperature dependent surface tension of [C4mim]I well beyond room temperature (up to 700 K) permits prediction of the critical temperature in agreement with that predicted from experimental surface tension data. Simulated densities in the range of 298-450 K for the three ionic liquids are within 0.8% of the experimental data. Structural properties for [C4mim]I were found to be in agreement with the results of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation we performed, which indicates a rather well-structured cation-anion interaction and occurs essentially through the imidazolium ring cation. Diffusion coefficient changes with alkyl chain length in the order of [C8mim]I > [C6mim]I > [C4mim]I for the cation and the anion. Formation of a dense domain in subsurface region is quite evident, and progressively becomes denser as the alkyl chain length increases. Bivariate orientational analysis was used to determine the average orientation of molecule in ionic liquids surface, subsurface, and bulk regions. Dynamic bisector-wise and side-wise movement of the imodazolium ring cation in the surface region can be deduced from the bivariate maps. Atom-atom density profile and

  16. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  17. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  18. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena. PMID:27386567

  19. Investigating the interfacial dynamics of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Aaron W.

    This thesis probes the interfacial dynamics and associated phenomena of thin films. Surface specific tools were used to study the self-assembly of alkanethiols, the mono- and bilayer dynamics of SF6, and the surface motion of poly(methyl methacrylate). Non-pertubative helium atom scattering was the principal technique used to investigate these systems. A variety of other complementary tools, including scanning tunneling microscopy, electron diffraction, Auger spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and ellipsometry were used in tandem with the neutral atom scattering studies. Controlling the spontaneous assembly of alkanethiols on Au(111) requires a better fundamental understanding of the adsorbate-adsorbate and substrate-adsorbate interactions. Our characterization focused on two key components, the surface structure and adsorbate vibrations. The study indicates that the Au(111) reconstruction plays a larger role than anticipated in the low-density phase of alkanethiol monolayers. A new structure is proposed for the 1-decanethiol monolayer that impacts the low-energy vibrational mode. Varying the alkane chain lengths imparts insight into the assembly process via characterization of a dispersionless phonon mode. Studies of SF6 physisorbed on Au(111) bridge surface research on rare gas adsorbates with complicated dynamical organic thin films. Mono- and bilayer coverages of SF6/Au(111) were studied at cryogenic temperatures. Our experiments probed the surface properties of SF6 yielding insights into substrate and coverage effects. The study discovered a dispersionless Einstein oscillation with multiple harmonic overtones. A second layer of SF6 softened the mode, but did not show any indications of bulk or cooperative interactions. The vibrational properties of SF 6 showed both striking similarities and differences when compared with physisorbed rare gases. Lastly, this thesis will discuss studies of thin film poly(methyl methacrylate) on Si. The non-pertubative and

  20. The effect of chain rigidity on the interfacial layer thickness and dynamics of polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shiwang; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Carroll, Bobby; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    There are growing experimental evidences showing the existence of an interfacial layer that has a finite thickness with slowing down dynamics in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). Moreover, it is believed that the interfacial layer plays a significant role on various macroscopic properties of PNCs. A thicker interfacial layer is found to have more pronounced effect on the macroscopic properties such as the mechanical enhancement. However, it is not clear what molecular parameter controls the interfacial layer thickness. Inspired by our recent computer simulations that showed the chain rigidity correlated well with the interfacial layer thickness, we performed systematic experimental studies on different polymer nanocomposites by varying the chain stiffness. Combining small-angle X-ray scattering, broadband dielectric spectroscopy and temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry, we find a good correlation between the polymer Kuhn length and the thickness of the interfacial layer, confirming the earlier computer simulations results. Our findings provide a direct guidance for the design of new PNCs with desired properties.

  1. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  2. Direct, Dynamic Measurement of Interfacial Area within Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H.; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    Standard models of two-phase flow in porous media have been shown to exhibit several shortcomings that might be partially overcome with a recently developed model based on thermodynamic principles (Hassanizadeh and Gray, 1990). This alternative two-phase flow model contains a set of new and non-standard parameters, including specific interfacial area. By incorporating interfacial area production, destruction, and propagation into functional relationships that describe the capillary pressure and saturation, a more physical model has been developed. Niessner and Hassanizadeh (2008) have examined this model numerically and have shown that the model captures saturation hysteresis with drainage/imbibition cycles. Several static experimental studies have been performed to examine the validity of this new thermodynamically based approach; these allow the determination of static parameters of the model. To date, no experimental studies have obtained information about the dynamic parameters required for the model. A new experimental porous flow cell has been constructed using stereolithography to study two-phase flow phenomena (Crandall et al. 2008). A novel image analysis tool was developed for an examination of the evolution of flow patterns during displacement experiments (Crandall et al. 2009). This analysis tool enables the direct quantification of interfacial area between fluids by matching known geometrical properties of the constructed flow cell with locations identified as interfaces from images of flowing fluids. Numerous images were obtained from two-phase experiments within the flow cell. The dynamic evolution of the fluid distribution and the fluid-fluid interface locations were determined by analyzing these images. In this paper, we give a brief introduction to the thermodynamically based two-phase flow model, review the properties of the stereolithography flow cell, and show how the image analysis procedure has been used to obtain dynamic parameters for the

  3. Understanding the interfacial layer dynamics of polymer nanocomposites from broadband dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Robert; Cheng, Shiwang; Sokolov, Alexei

    Polymer nanocomposites show many advanced mechanical, thermal, optical, and transport properties mainly due to the vast interfacial area between the polymer matrix and nanoparticles. Recent studies show that there is an interfacial polymer layer with structure and dynamics that are different from the bulk polymer, and that contributes to the advanced macroscopic properties. It has been shown that broadband dielectric spectroscopy provides good method to study the interfacial dynamics in nanocomposites. However, current dielectric spectroscopy studies ignore the heterogeneous nature of polymer nanocomposites. Models based on a simple superposition of bulk polymer and interfacial layer spectra, or those that assume the interfacial layer is dynamically ``dead'' are inaccurate. In this talk, the prevailing methods in the literature will be compared with an accurate method accounting for the heterogeneity of the nanocomposites. Different nanocomposites with well-dispersed nanoparticles will be used as examples. The analysis clearly shows that the width and the amplitude of the relaxation peaks are affected by the data analysis. Thus accurate quantitative conclusions on properties and thickness of the interfacial layer can be achieved only using heterogeneous models.

  4. Mass transfer and interfacial properties in two-phase microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jeffrey D.; Hudson, Steven D.

    2009-11-01

    Drop-based microfluidic devices are becoming more common, and molecular mass transfer and drop circulation are issues that often affect the performance of such devices. Moreover, interfacial properties and surfactant mass transfer rates govern emulsion behavior. Since these phenomena depend strongly on drop size, measurement methods using small drops and flow typical of applications are desired. Using mineral oil as a continuous phase, water droplets and an alcohol surfactant, we demonstrate here a microfluidic approach to measure the interrelated phenomena of dynamic interfacial tension, surfactant mass transfer and interfacial retardation that employs droplet flows in a microchannel with constrictions/expansions. Interfacial flow is influenced markedly by adsorption of surfactant: severe interfacial retardation (by a factor of 30) is observed at low surfactant concentrations and interface remobilization is observed at higher surfactant concentrations. The interfacial tension is described by Langmuir kinetics and the parameters for interfaces with mineral oil (studied here) compare closely with those previously found at air interfaces. For the conditions explored, the surfactant mass transfer is described well by a mixed kinetic-diffusion limited model, and the desorption rate coefficients are measured to be both approximately 70 s-1. The transition from a diffusion-controlled to mixed diffusion-kinetic mass transfer mechanism predicted with reducing drop size is verified. This experimental approach (i.e. adjustable geometry and drop size and height) can therefore probe interfacial dynamics in simple and complex flow.

  5. Mesoscale Interfacial Dynamics in Magnetoelectric Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Shashank, Priya

    2009-12-14

    Biphasic composites are the key towards achieving enhanced magnetoelectric response. In order understand the control behavior of the composites and resultant symmetry of the multifunctional product tensors, we need to synthesized model material systems with the following features (i) interface formation through either deposition control or natural decomposition; (ii) a very high interphase-interfacial area, to maximize the ME coupling; and (iii) an equilibrium phase distribution and morphology, resulting in preferred crystallographic orientation relations between phases across the interphase-interfacial boundaries. This thought process guided the experimental evolution in this program. We initiated the research with the co-fired composites approach and then moved on to the thin film laminates deposited through the rf-magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition process

  6. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  7. How does interfacial rheology govern soap bubble cluster dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Addad, Sylvie; Biance, Anne-Laure; Hohler, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    Aqueous foams are concentrated dispersions of gas bubbles in a soapy solution. These complex fluids exhibit solid-like or liquid-like mechanical behaviors, depending on the applied shear. When it is increased beyond a yield strain, neighbor switching bubble rearrangements called T1 events are triggered and plastic flow sets in. We study experimentally the dynamics of such strain induced T1s in 3D bubble clusters that we consider as model systems of 3D foams. To determine the hydrodynamics and physico-chemistry that set the duration of T1s, we use foaming solutions of a wide range of well characterized bulk and interfacial rheological properties. At low shear rates, the T1 duration is set by a balance between surface tension and surface viscous forces in qualitative agreement with previous studies of T1s in 2D foams [1] and we present a simple physical model that explains our 3D findings. Moreover, above a characteristic shear rate, rearrangement dynamics are driven by the applied strain. By combining all our results, we link the transition from intermittent to continous flow dynamics in foams to the rheology of the gas-liquid interfaces. [4pt] [1] M. Durand, H. A. Stone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 2226101 (2006).

  8. Atomistic simulation of surface functionalization on the interfacial properties of graphene-polymer nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. C.; Lai, Z. B.; Galpaya, D.; Yan, C.; Hu, N.; Zhou, L. M.

    2014-03-28

    Graphene has been increasingly used as nano sized fillers to create a broad range of nanocomposites with exceptional properties. The interfaces between fillers and matrix play a critical role in dictating the overall performance of a composite. However, the load transfer mechanism along graphene-polymer interface has not been well understood. In this study, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of surface functionalization and layer length on the interfacial load transfer in graphene-polymer nanocomposites. The simulation results show that oxygen-functionalized graphene leads to larger interfacial shear force than hydrogen-functionalized and pristine ones during pull-out process. The increase of oxygen coverage and layer length enhances interfacial shear force. Further increase of oxygen coverage to about 7% leads to a saturated interfacial shear force. A model was also established to demonstrate that the mechanism of interfacial load transfer consists of two contributing parts, including the formation of new surface and relative sliding along the interface. These results are believed to be useful in development of new graphene-based nanocomposites with better interfacial properties.

  9. An aggregation-induced-emission platform for direct visualization of interfacial dynamic self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Junwei; Li, Yuan; Chan, Carrie Y K; Kwok, Ryan T K; Li, Hongkun; Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu; Sun, Jing Zhi; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2014-12-01

    An in-depth understanding of dynamic interfacial self-assembly processes is essential for a wide range of topics in theoretical physics, materials design, and biomedical research. However, direct monitoring of such processes is hampered by the poor imaging contrast of a thin interfacial layer. We report in situ imaging technology capable of selectively highlighting self-assembly at the phase boundary in real time by employing the unique photophysical properties of aggregation-induced emission. Its application to the study of breath-figure formation, an immensely useful yet poorly understood phenomenon, provided a mechanistic model supported by direct visualization of all main steps and fully corroborated by simulation and theoretical analysis. This platform is expected to advance the understanding of the dynamic phase-transition phenomena, offer insights into interfacial biological processes, and guide development of novel self-assembly technologies. PMID:25363745

  10. An Aggregation-Induced-Emission Platform for Direct Visualization of Interfacial Dynamic Self-Assembly**

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Carrie Y.K.; Kwok, Ryan T.K.; Li, Hongkun; Zrazhevskiy, Pavel; Gao, Xiaohu; Sun, Jing Zhi; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2015-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of dynamic interfacial self-assembly processes is essential for a wide range of topics in theoretical physics, materials design, and biomedical research. However, direct monitoring of such processes is hampered by the poor imaging contrast of a thin interfacial layer. We report in situ imaging technology capable of selectively highlighting self-assembly at the phase boundary in real time by employing the unique photophysical properties of aggregation-induced emission. Its application to the study of breath-figure formation, an immensely useful yet poorly understood phenomenon, provided a mechanistic model supported by direct visualization of all main steps and fully corroborated by simulation and theoretical analysis. This platform is expected to advance the understanding of the dynamic phase-transition phenomena, offer insights into interfacial biological processes, and guide development of novel self-assembly technologies. PMID:25363745

  11. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface. The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical strength.

  12. Healing of polymer interfaces: Interfacial dynamics, entanglements, and strength

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ge, Ting; Robbins, Mark O.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2014-07-25

    Self-healing of polymer films often takes place as the molecules diffuse across a damaged region, above their melting temperature. Using molecular dynamics simulations we probe the healing of polymer films and compare the results with those obtained for thermal welding of homopolymer slabs. These two processes differ from each other in their interfacial structure since damage leads to increased polydispersity and more short chains. A polymer sample was cut into two separate films that were then held together in the melt state. The recovery of the damaged film was followed as time elapsed and polymer molecules diffused across the interface.more » The mass uptake and formation of entanglements, as obtained from primitive path analysis, are extracted and correlated with the interfacial strength obtained from shear simulations. We find that the diffusion across the interface is signifcantly faster in the damaged film compared to welding because of the presence of short chains. Though interfacial entanglements increase more rapidly for the damaged films, a large fraction of these entanglements are near chain ends. As a result, the interfacial strength of the healing film increases more slowly than for welding. For both healing and welding, the interfacial strength saturates as the bulk entanglement density is recovered across the interface. However, the saturation strength of the damaged film is below the bulk strength for the polymer sample. At saturation, cut chains remain near the healing interface. They are less entangled and as a result they mechanically weaken the interface. When the strength of the interface saturates, the number of interfacial entanglements scales with the corresponding bulk entanglement density. Chain stiffness increases the density of entanglements, which increases the strength of the interface. Our results show that a few entanglements across the interface are sufficient to resist interfacial chain pullout and enhance the mechanical

  13. A novel pyrene-based fluorescing amphiphile with unusual bulk and interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Anniina; Knyazev, Anton; von Bandel, Nicolas; Degrouard, Jéril; Langevin, Dominique; Drenckhan, Wiebke

    2011-01-17

    We have synthesised a new, pyrene-based, low-molecular-mass, amphiphilic molecule that displays a wealth of properties of potential interest for aggregation and interfacial applications. In order to elucidate some of the key properties of this molecule, which consists of a pyrene-containing hydrophobic head and a short PEG-based hydrophilic tail, we investigate herein some aspects of its concentration-dependent behaviour in aqueous solutions. We show that the inclusion of the hydrophobic pyrene group not only provides the molecule with intriguing bulk and interfacial properties down to low concentrations, but also with various means of assessing its aggregation behaviour by means of its well-characterised fluorescence properties. Combining a range of fluorescence techniques with microscopic imaging (optical and Cryo-TEM), interfacial tension measurements and foaming studies, we have been able to identify and characterise three concentration-dependant regimes. At low concentrations, the molecule is dissolved in monomeric form. At intermediate concentrations, labile aggregates are formed, which, at higher concentrations, give way to aggregates containing pre-associated pyrenes. Our measurements strongly imply that the latter aggregates are hexagonally close-packed tubular micelles. In this latter regime we also find a range of micron-sized precipitates. Additionally, the molecule displays strong interfacial activity, yet a surprisingly slow dynamics of interfacial adsorption. Finally, we demonstrate the possibility of using it to visualize interfaces and also create reasonably stable (1 hour) and fluorescing foams. PMID:21226196

  14. Dynamic film and interfacial tensions in emulsion and foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.H.; Koczo, K.; Wasan, D.T.

    1997-03-01

    In concentrated fluid dispersions the liquid films are under dynamic conditions during film rupture or drainage. Aqueous foam films stabilized with sodium decylsulfonate and aqueous emulsion films stabilized with the nonionic Brij 58 surfactant were formed at the tip of a capillary and the film tension was measured under static and dynamic conditions. In the stress relaxation experiments the response of the film tension to a sudden film area expansion was studied. These experiments also allowed the direct measurement of the Gibbs film elasticity. In the dynamic film tension experiments, the film area was continuously increased by a constant rate and the dynamic film tension was monitored. The measured film tensions were compared with the interfacial tensions of the respective single air/water and oil/water interfaces, which were measured using the same radius of curvature, relative expansion, and expansion rate as in the film studies. It was found that under dynamic conditions the film tension is higher than twice the single interfacial tension (IFT) and a mechanism was suggested to explain the difference. When the film, initially at equilibrium, is expanded and the interfacial area increases, a substantial surfactant depletion occurs inside the film. As a result, the surfactant can be supplied only from the adjoining meniscus (Plateau border) by surface diffusion, and the film tension is controlled by the diffusion and adsorption of surfactant in the meniscus. The results have important implications for the stability and rheology of foams and emulsions with high dispersed phase ratios (polyhedral structure).

  15. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  16. A growing-drop technique for measuring dynamic interfacial tension

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C.A.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    A novel, growing-drop technique is described for measuring dynamic interfacial tension due to sorption of surface-active solutes. The proposed method relates the instantaneous pressure and size of expanding liquid drops to interfacial tension and is useful for measuring both liquid/gas and liquid/liquid tensions over a wide range of time scales, currently from 10 ms to several hours. Growing-drop measurements on surfactant-free water/air and water/octanol interfaces yield constant tensions equal to their known literature values. For surfactant-laden, liquid drops, the growing-drop technique captures the actual transient tension evolution of a single interface, rather than interval times as with the classic maximum-drop-pressure and drop.-volume tension measurements. Dynamic tensions measured for 0.25 mM aqueous 1-decanol solution/air and 0.02 kg/m{sup 3} aqueous Triton X-100 solution/dodecane interfaces show nonmonotonic behavior, indicating slow surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of interfacial dilatation. The dynamic tension of a purified and fresh 6 mM aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution/air interface shows only a monotonic decrease, indicating rapid surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of dilatation. ConverselY, an aged SDS solution, naturally containing trace dodecanol impurities, exhibits dynamic tensions which reflect a superposition of the rapidly equilibrating SDS and the slowly adsorbing dodecanol.

  17. Monitoring interfacial dynamics by pulsed laser techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Goal is to develop new optical methods for the study of dynamic processes at the electrode/electrolyte interface. In the past year, optical second harmonic generation was used for time resolved measurements of thallium electrodeposition on Cu(111). Other studies included the study of the photochemistry involved in a GaAs surface treatment known as photowashing, and the study of picosecond time resolved luminescence decays from GaAs in electrochemical environments (power dependent effects). 4 figs. (DLC)

  18. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-02-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets (that is, droplets with faces of differing chemistries) and multiple emulsions, are of increasing importance in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules for food, in chemical separations, in cosmetics, and in dynamic optics. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets' physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have great utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of multiphase emulsions with

  19. Dynamically reconfigurable complex emulsions via tunable interfacial tensions

    PubMed Central

    Zarzar, Lauren D.; Sresht, Vishnu; Sletten, Ellen M.; Kalow, Julia A.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Swager, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Emulsification is a powerful, well-known technique for mixing and dispersing immiscible components within a continuous liquid phase. Consequently, emulsions are central components of medicine, food and performance materials. Complex emulsions, including multiple emulsions and Janus droplets which contain hemispheres of differing material, are of increasing importance1 in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics2, in the fabrication of microparticles and capsules3–5 for food6, in chemical separations7, in cosmetics8, and in dynamic optics9. Because complex emulsion properties and functions are related to the droplet geometry and composition, the development of rapid, simple fabrication approaches allowing precise control over the droplets’ physical and chemical characteristics is critical. Significant advances in the fabrication of complex emulsions have been made using a number of procedures, ranging from large-scale, less precise techniques that give compositional heterogeneity using high-shear mixers and membranes10, to small-volume but more precise microfluidic methods11,12. However, such approaches have yet to create droplet morphologies that can be controllably altered after emulsification. Reconfigurable complex liquids potentially have greatly increased utility as dynamically tunable materials. Here we describe an approach to the one-step fabrication of three- and four-phase complex emulsions with highly controllable and reconfigurable morphologies. The fabrication makes use of the temperature-sensitive miscibility of hydrocarbon, silicone and fluorocarbon liquids, and is applied to both the microfluidic and the scalable batch production of complex droplets. We demonstrate that droplet geometries can be alternated between encapsulated and Janus configurations by varying the interfacial tensions using hydrocarbon and fluorinated surfactants including stimuli-responsive and cleavable surfactants. This yields a generalizable strategy for the fabrication of

  20. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  1. Shape Oscillations of Gas Bubbles With Newtonian Interfacial Rheological Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadim, Ali

    1996-01-01

    The oscillation frequency and damping rate for small-amplitude axisymmetric shape modes of a gas bubble in an ideal liquid are obtained, in the limit when the bubble interface possesses Newtonian interfacial rheology with constant surface shear and dilatational viscosities. Such results permit the latter surface properties to be measured by analyzing experimental data on frequency shift and damping rate of specific shape modes of suspended bubbles in the presence of surfactants.

  2. Effects of wettability and interfacial nanobubbles on flow through structured nanochannels: an investigation of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Tsu-Hsu

    2015-12-01

    Solid-fluid boundary conditions are strongly influenced by a number of factors, including the intrinsic properties of the solid/fluid materials, surface roughness, wettability, and the presence of interfacial nanobubbles (INBs). The interconnected nature of these factors means that they should be considered jointly. This paper employs molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in a series of studies aimed at elucidating the influence of wettability in boundary behaviour and the accumulation of interfacial gas. Specifically, we examined the relationship between effective slip length, the morphology of nanobubbles, and wettability. Two methods were employed for the promotion of hydrophobicity between two structured substrates with similar intrinsic contact angles. We also compared anisotropic and isotropic atomic arrangements in the form of graphite and Si(100), respectively. A physical method was employed to deal with variations in surface roughness, whereas a chemical method was used to adjust the wall-fluid interaction energy (ɛwf). We first compared the characteristic properties of wettability, including contact angle and fluid density within the cavity. We then investigated the means by which variations in solid-fluid interfacial wettability affect interfacial gas molecules. Our results reveal that the morphology of INB on a patterned substrate is determined by wettability as well as the methods employed for the promotion of hydrophobicity. The present study also illustrates the means by which the multiple effects of the atomic arrangement of solids, surface roughness, wettability and INB influence effective slip length.

  3. Interfacial structure and dynamics of fatty alcohols: Effects of chain branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Rachel Elana

    The interfacial and bulk dynamic properties of fatty alcohol materials are of great interest as subjects of research and for a range of practical applications. One example is the use of surfactants to stabilize systems such as emulsions and foams. Interfacial viscoelasticity impacts the transport properties of the system. This thesis describes an investigation into interfacial phenomena: straight- and branched-chain hexadecanol and eicosanol mixtures. In this study, the rheology of Langmuir films of hexadecanol and eicosanol straight and branched mixtures was examined. Surface pressure vs. area isotherms, interfacial rheology, Brewster angle microscopy, and X-ray diffraction and reflectivity were all used to elucidate the behavior and structure of the fatty alcohol systems as a function of branched concentration. It was found that for eicosanol below a surface pressure of 25 mN/m, the branched chains are in the monolayer, yet phase-separated from the straight chains. At higher surface pressures, the branched chains are expelled, and presumably form micelles in the subphase. In contrast, the hexadecanol branched chains are not in the monolayer at any surface pressure. These different behaviors are explained in terms of straight-chain flexibility. The effect of the monolayer structure on the surface shear viscosity will be discussed. These studies provide a deeper understanding of the structure and behavior of amphiphilic mixtures, and will ultimately aid in developing models for lipids, micelle formation, and other important biological functions.

  4. A perspective on the interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George

    2012-11-01

    The structural and interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops are assessed by means of mechanical, thermodynamical, and statistical mechanical approaches that are discussed in detail, including original developments at both the macroscopic level and the microscopic level of density functional theory (DFT). With a novel analysis we show that a purely macroscopic (static) mechanical treatment can lead to a qualitatively reasonable description of the surface tension and the Tolman length of a liquid drop; the latter parameter, which characterizes the curvature dependence of the tension, is found to be negative and has a magnitude of about a half of the molecular dimension. A mechanical slant cannot, however, be considered satisfactory for small finite-size systems where fluctuation effects are significant. From the opposite perspective, a curvature expansion of the macroscopic thermodynamic properties (density and chemical potential) is then used to demonstrate that a purely thermodynamic approach of this type cannot in itself correctly account for the curvature correction of the surface tension of liquid drops. We emphasize that any approach, e.g., classical nucleation theory, which is based on a purely macroscopic viewpoint, does not lead to a reliable representation when the radius of the drop becomes microscopic. The description of the enhanced inhomogeneity exhibited by small drops (particularly in the dense interior) necessitates a treatment at the molecular level to account for finite-size and surface effects correctly. The so-called mechanical route, which corresponds to a molecular-level extension of the macroscopic theory of elasticity and is particularly popular in molecular dynamics simulation, also appears to be unreliable due to the inherent ambiguity in the definition of the microscopic pressure tensor, an observation which has been known for decades but is frequently ignored. The union of the theory of capillarity (developed in the nineteenth

  5. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Holt, Adam P; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M; White, B Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J P; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E; Etampawala, Thusitha; Martin, Halie; Sikes, Nicole; Sumpter, Bobby G; Dadmun, Mark D; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2016-07-26

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer-nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as low as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching-a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density. PMID:27337392

  6. Controlling Interfacial Dynamics: Covalent Bonding versus Physical Adsorption in Polymer Nanocomposites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Holt, Adam P.; Bocharova, Vera; Cheng, Shiwang; Kisliuk, Alexander M.; White, B. Tyler; Saito, Tomonori; Uhrig, David; Mahalik, J. P.; Kumar, Rajeev; Imel, Adam E.; et al

    2016-06-23

    It is generally believed that the strength of the polymer nanoparticle interaction controls the modification of near-interface segmental mobility in polymer nanocomposites (PNCs). However, little is known about the effect of covalent bonding on the segmental dynamics and glass transition of matrix-free polymer-grafted nanoparticles (PGNs), especially when compared to PNCs. In this article, we directly compare the static and dynamic properties of poly(2-vinylpyridine)/silica-based nanocomposites with polymer chains either physically adsorbed (PNCs) or covalently bonded (PGNs) to identical silica nanoparticles (RNP = 12.5 nm) for three different molecular weight (MW) systems. Interestingly, when the MW of the matrix is as lowmore » as 6 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 5.4) or as high as 140 kg/mol (RNP/Rg= 1.13), both small-angle X-ray scattering and broadband dielectric spectroscopy show similar static and dynamic properties for PNCs and PGNs. However, for the intermediate MW of 18 kg/mol (RNP/Rg = 3.16), the difference between physical adsorption and covalent bonding can be clearly identified in the static and dynamic properties of the interfacial layer. We ascribe the differences in the interfacial properties of PNCs and PGNs to changes in chain stretching, as quantified by self-consistent field theory calculations. These results demonstrate that the dynamic suppression at the interface is affected by the chain stretching; that is, it depends on the anisotropy of the segmental conformations, more so than the strength of the interaction, which suggests that the interfacial dynamics can be effectively tuned by the degree of stretching a parameter accessible from the MW or grafting density.« less

  7. Monitoring interfacial dynamics by pulsed laser techniques: Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, G.

    1987-01-01

    Several types of materials have been surveyed including thin film and layered semiconductors as well as a metal and semimetal. Second harmonic (SH) generation measurements on these materials were made using both nanosecond (Q-switched) and picosecond (mode-locked) pulsed Nd:YAG lasers with appropriate gated or photon counting detection. Initial studies were performed under steady state conditions in order to optimize the experiments for time-resolved studies. SHG were also extended to the time domain. A means of monitoring surface structure and reconstruction phenomena in-situ was developed. This discovery now opens a broad new area of dynamic interfacial measurements to be done in-situ.

  8. Atomistic simulations of bulk, surface and interfacial polymer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Upendra

    In chapter I, quasi-static molecular mechanics based simulations are used to estimate the activation energy of phenoxy rings flips in the amorphous region of a semicrystalline polyimide. Intra and intermolecular contributions to the flip activation energy, the torsional cooperativity accompanying the flip, and the effect of the flip on the motion in the glassy bulk state, are looked at. Also, comparison of the weighted mean activation energy is made with experimental data from solid state NMR measurements; the simulated value being 17.5 kcal/mol., while the experimental value was observed to be 10.5 kcal/mol. Chapter II deals with construction of random copolymer thin films of styrene-butadiene (SB) and styrene-butadiene-acrylonitrile (SBA). The structure and properties of the free surfaces presented by these thin films are analysed by, the atom mass density profiles, backbone bond orientation function, and the spatial distribution of acrylonitrile groups and styrene rings. The surface energies of SB and SBA are calculated using an atomistic equation and are compared with experimental data in the literature. In chapter III, simulations of polymer-polymer interfaces between like and unlike polymers, specifically cis-polybutadiene (PBD) and atatic polypropylene (PP), are presented. The structure of an incompatible polymer-polymer interface, and the estimation of the thermodynamic work of adhesion and interfacial energy between different incompatible polymers, form the focus here. The work of adhesion is calculated using an atomistic equation and is further used in a macroscopic equation to estimate the interfacial energy. The interfacial energy is compared with typical values for other immiscible systems in the literature. The interfacial energy compared very well with interfacial energy values for a few other immiscible hydrocarbon pairs. In chapter IV, the study proceeds to look at the interactions between nonpolar and polar small molecules with SB and SBA thin

  9. Interfacial Properties of a Hydrophobic Dye in the Tetrachloroethylene-Water-Glass Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-02-23

    Interfacial effects play an important role in governing multiphase fluid behavior in porous media. Strongly hydrophobic organic dyes, used in many experimental studies to facilitate visual observation of the phase distributions, have generally been implicitly assumed to have no influence on the interfacial properties of the various phases in porous media. Sudan IV is the most commonly used dye for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in laboratory experiments. It has also been used in at least one field experiment. The effects of this dye on the tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-water-glass system were investigated to test the assumption that the dye does not effect the interfacial properties and therefore PCE mobility. The results indicate that the dye does indeed change the interfacial relationships.The effect of the dye on the interfacial relationships is a complex function of the dye concentration, the solid phase composition, and the dynamic rate of new interface formation. The dye caused a slight (<10 percent) increase in interfacial tension at low concentrations (<0.1 g/L) and high rates of new interface formation. The dye reduced interfacial tension between PCE and water at low rates of new interface formation for all dye concentrations tested (0.00508 to 5.08 g/L). At the highest dye concentration, the PCE-water interfacial tension was significantly reduced regardless of the rate of new interface formation. The apparent interfacial tension increase at low dye concentrations is suspected to be an artifact of a low measured IFT value for the undyed PCE caused by leaching of rubber o-rings by the PCE prior to testing in the final drop-volume configuration.In addition to reducing interfacial tension, the dye was found to significantly alter the wetting relationship between PCE and water on a glass surface at and above the range of reported dye concentrations cited in the literature (1.1 to 1.7 g/L). The wetting relationship was rendered neutral from a water-wet initial

  10. Mimicking mussel adhesion to improve interfacial properties in composites

    PubMed Central

    Hamming, L. M.; Fan, X. W.; Messersmith, P. B.; Brinson, L. C.

    2009-01-01

    The macroscale properties of polymer-matrix composites depend immensely on the quality of the interaction between the reinforcement phase and the bulk polymer. This work presents a method to improve the interfacial adhesion between metal-oxides and a polymer matrix by performing surface-initiated polymerization (SIP) by way of a biomimetic initiator. The initiator was modeled after 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa), an amino acid that is highly concentrated in mussel foot adhesive proteins. Mechanical pull out tests of NiTi and Ti-6Al-4V wires from poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were performed to directly test the interfacial adhesion. These tests demonstrated improvements in maximum interfacial shear stress of 116% for SIP-modified NiTi wires and 60% for SIP-modified Ti-6Al-4V wires over unmodified specimens. Polymer chain growth from the metal oxides was validated using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and contact angle analysis. PMID:19578545

  11. Capillary, wettability and interfacial dynamics in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Partha P

    2009-01-01

    In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for different applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance/durability limitation in the PEFC arises from liquid water transport, perceived as the Holy Grail in PEFC operation. The porous catalyst layer (CL), fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) and flow channels play a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance due to the transport limitation in the presence of liquid water and flooding phenomena. Although significant research, both theoretical and experimental, has been performed, there is serious paucity of fundamental understanding regarding the underlying structure-transport-performance interplay in the PEFC. The inherent complex morphologies, micro-scale transport physics involving coupled multiphase, multicomponent, electrochemically reactive phenomena and interfacial interactions in the constituent components pose a formidable challenge. In this paper, the impact of capillary transport, wetting characteristics and interfacial dynamics on liquid water transport is presented based on a comprehensive mesoscopic modeling framework with the objective to gain insight into the underlying electrodynamics, two-phase dynamics and the intricate structure-transport-interface interactions in the PEFC.

  12. Pore invasion dynamics during fluid front displacement - an interfacial front model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, F.; Or, D.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of fluid fronts in porous media shape subsequent phase distribution and the transport properties of the partially saturated region with implications ranging from gaseous transport to plant roots to extraction or injection of fluids to petroleum reservoirs. What macroscopically seems as a smooth and continuous motion of a displacement fluid front, involves numerous rapid pore-scale interfacial jumps often resembling avalanches of invasion events. We present a 2D model for simulating interfacial front displacement that was developed to study details of invasion dynamics at the front and to systematically study effects of boundary conditions on the resulting macroscopic properties after passage of a front. The interfacial front is represented by hydraulically connected sinusoidal capillaries allowing for redistribution and capillary pressure relaxation through exchange with neighboring interfaces. The model focuses on processes at the front and neglects interfacial redistribution left behind the front as well as saturated fluid flow below the front. The description of the dynamics of the rapid non-wetting fluid invasions induced by constant wetting fluid withdrawal includes capillary, viscous and hydrostatic component and inertia. Results show that the additional inertial force (not considered in previous studies) does significantly affect invasion pathways such as the hypothesized 'consecutive jumps'. The menisci jump velocities show a strong relation to geometrical throat dimensions that reflect local capillary gradients. The front model further enables to link boundary conditions (macroscopic Capillary number, throat size distribution) effects on pore invasion sequences and impact on residual wetting phase entrapment and front morphology. A limited comparison of model predictions with experimental results from sintered glass-beads micro-models will be presented.

  13. Dynamics of various polymer-graphene interfacial systems through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rissanou, Anastassia N; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-04-28

    The current work refers to a simulation study on hybrid polymer-graphene interfacial systems. We explore the effect of graphene on the mobility of polymers, by studying three well known and widely used polymers, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS) and poly(methyl-methacrylate) (PMMA). Qualitative and quantitative differences in the dynamical properties of the polymer chains in particular at the polymer-graphene interface are detected. Results concerning both the segmental and the terminal dynamics render PE much faster than the other two polymers; PS follows, while PMMA is the slowest one. Clear spatial dynamic heterogeneity has been observed for all model systems, with different dynamical behavior of the adsorbed polymer segments. The segmental relaxation time of the polymer (τseg) as a function of the distance from graphene shows an abrupt decrease beyond the first adsorption layer for PE, as a result of its well-ordered layered structure close to graphene, though a more gradual decay is observed for PS and PMMA. The distribution of the relaxation times of adsorbed segments was also found to be broader than those of the bulk ones for all three polymer-graphene systems. PMID:24667937

  14. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Effects of Water Speciation on Interfacial Structure and Dynamics in Silica-Filled PDMS Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Maxwell, R S; Dinh, L N; Balazs, B

    2001-11-21

    Significant changes in materials properties of siloxane based polymers can be obtained by the addition of inorganic fillers. In silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based composites the mechanism of this reinforcing behavior is presumably hydrogen bonding between surface hydroxyls and backbone siloxane species. We have chosen to investigate in detail the effect of chemisorbed and physisorbed water on the interfacial structure and dynamics in silica-filled PDMS based composites. Toward this end, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and experimental studies employing DMA and Nh4R analysis. Our results suggest that the polymer-silica contact distance and the mobility of interfacial polymer chains significantly decreased as the hydration level at the interface was reduced. The reduced mobility of the PDMS chains in the interfacial domain reduced the overall, bulk, motional properties of the polymer, thus causing an effective ''stiffening'' of the polymer matrix. The role of the long-ranged Coulombic interactions on the structural features and chain dynamics of the polymer were also examined. Both are found to be strongly influenced by the electrostatic interactions as identified by the bond orientation time correlation function and local density distribution functions. These results have important implications for the design of nanocomposite silica-siloxane materials.

  15. Exploiting interfacial water properties for desalination and purification applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu; Varma, Sameer; Nyman, May Devan; Alam, Todd Michael; Thuermer, Konrad; Holland, Gregory P.; Leung, Kevin; Liu, Nanguo; Xomeritakis, George K.; Frankamp, Benjamin L.; Siepmann, J. Ilja; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Hartl, Monika A.; Travesset, Alex; Anderson, Joshua A.; Huber, Dale L.; Kissel, David J.; Bunker, Bruce Conrad; Lorenz, Christian Douglas; Major, Ryan C.; McGrath, Matthew J.; Farrow, Darcie; Cecchi, Joseph L.; van Swol, Frank B.; Singh, Seema; Rempe, Susan B.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Clawson, Jacalyn S.; Feibelman, Peter Julian; Houston, Jack E.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Chen, Zhu; Zhu, Xiaoyang; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Pless, Jason D.; Daemen, Luke L.; Gerung, Henry; Ockwig, Nathan W.; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2008-09-01

    A molecular-scale interpretation of interfacial processes is often downplayed in the analysis of traditional water treatment methods. However, such an approach is critical for the development of enhanced performance in traditional desalination and water treatments. Water confined between surfaces, within channels, or in pores is ubiquitous in technology and nature. Its physical and chemical properties in such environments are unpredictably different from bulk water. As a result, advances in water desalination and purification methods may be accomplished through an improved analysis of water behavior in these challenging environments using state-of-the-art microscopy, spectroscopy, experimental, and computational methods.

  16. Glassy Interfacial Dynamics of Ni Nanoparticles: Part I Colored Noise, Dynamic Heterogeneity and Collective Atomic Motion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-01-28

    Most condensed materials exhibit a significant fraction of atoms, molecules or particles that are strongly interacting with each other, while being configured geometrically at any instant of time in an 'amorphous' state having a relatively uniform density. Recently, both simulations and experiments have revealed that the dynamics of diverse condensed amorphous materials is generally characterized by significant heterogeneity in the local mobility and by progressively increasing collective motion upon cooling that takes the form of string-like collective particle rearrangements. The direct experimental observation of this type of collective motion, which has been directly linked to the growing relaxation times of glass-forming materials, and its quantification under different thermodynamic conditions, has so far been restricted to colloidal and driven granular fluids. The present work addresses the fundamental problem of how to determine the scale of this type of collective motion in materials composed of molecules or atoms. The basic premise of our work is that large scale dynamic particle clustering in amorphous materials must give rise to large fluctuations in particle mobility so that transport properties, especially those related to particle mobility, should naturally exhibit noise related to the cooperative motion scale. In our initial exploratory study seeking a relationship of this kind, we find 1/f (α) or 'colored noise', in both potential energy and particle displacements fluctuations of the atoms within the glassy interfacial layer of Ni nanoparticles (NPs). A direct relation between the particle displacement (mobility) noise exponent α and the average polymerization index of the string-like collective motion L is observed for a range of NP sizes, temperatures and for surface doping of the NPs with other metal atoms (Ag, Au, Pt) to change of fragility of the glassy interfacial layer at the surface of the Ni NPs. We also introduce a successful analytic

  17. Linear interfacial polymerization: theory and simulations with dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Berezkin, Anatoly V; Kudryavtsev, Yaroslav V

    2014-11-21

    Step-growth alternating interfacial polymerization between two miscible or immiscible monomer melts is investigated theoretically and by dissipative particle dynamics simulations. In both cases the kinetics for an initially bilayer system passes from the reaction to diffusion control. The polymer composed of immiscible monomers precipitates at the interface forming a film of nearly uniform density. It is demonstrated that the reaction proceeds in a narrow zone, which expands much slower than the whole film, so that newly formed polymer is extruded from the reaction zone. This concept of "reactive extrusion" is used to analytically predict the degree of polymerization and distribution of all components (monomers, polymer, and end groups) within the film in close agreement with the simulations. Increasing the comonomer incompatibility leads to thinner and more uniform films with the higher average degree of polymerization. The final product is considerably more polydisperse than expected for the homogeneous step-growth polymerization. The results extend the previous theoretical reports on interfacial polymerization and provide new insights into the internal film structure and polymer characteristics, which are important for membrane preparation, microencapsulation, and 3D printing technologies. A systematic way of mapping the simulation data onto laboratory scales is discussed. PMID:25416911

  18. Effect of confinement and molecular architecture on interfacial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrissopoulou, K.; Androulaki, K.; Prevosto, D.; Labardi, M.; Anastasiadis, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of polyester polyols in the bulk, under confinement when the polymers are intercalated within the galleries of a hydrophilic clay and close to the inorganic surfaces is investigated utilizing Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy (DRS). A series of linear biobased polyesters with hydroxyl end groups were utilized in the bulk and in nanohybrids and the results were compared with the case of hyperbranched polymers of similar chemistry but non-linear architecture. A broad range of temperatures below and above the bulk polymer glass transition temperature, Tg, was investigated covering both the regimes of beta-like local processes and segmental (alpha-process) dynamics. The polymer dynamics observed in all the nanocomposites are quite different compared to the bulk due to the different interactions whereas differences are seen due to the architecture as well. Moreover, non-standard local dielectric spectroscopy has been used to investigate the nanocomposites dynamics at the local scale: polymer relaxation has been investigated in the same material both close and far from the MMT surfaces. The comparison of the results from the two techniques allowed the understanding, in more detail, of the influence of the complex interfacial interactions on the relaxation dynamics.

  19. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured properties is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.

  20. Interfacial properties of asphaltenes at toluene-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zarkar, Sharli; Pauchard, Vincent; Farooq, Umer; Couzis, Alexander; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2015-05-01

    Asphaltenes are "n-alkane insoluble" species in crude oil that stabilize water-in-oil emulsions. To understand asphaltene adsorption mechanisms at oil-water interfaces and coalescence blockage, we first studied the behavior in aliphatic oil-water systems in which asphaltenes are almost insoluble. They adsorbed as monomers, giving a unique master curve relating interfacial tension (IFT) to interfacial coverage through a Langmuir equation of state (EoS). The long-time surface coverage was independent of asphaltene bulk concentration and asymptotically approached the 2-D packing limit for polydisperse disks. On coalescence, the surface coverage exceeded the 2-D limit and the asphaltene film appeared to become solidlike, apparently undergoing a transition to a soft glassy material and blocking further coalescence. However, real systems consist of mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic components in which asphaltenes may be quite soluble. To understand solubility effects, we focus here on how the increased bulk solubility of asphaltenes affects their interfacial properties in comparison to aliphatic oil-water systems. Unlike the "almost irreversible" adsorption of asphaltenes where the asymptotic interfacial coverage was independent of the bulk concentration, an equilibrium surface pressure, dependent on bulk concentration, was obtained for toluene-water systems because of adsorption being balanced by desorption. The equilibrium surface coverage could be obtained from the short- and long-term Ward-Tordai approximations. The behavior of the equilibrium surface pressure with the equilibrium surface coverage was then derived. These data for various asphaltene concentrations were used to determine the EoS, which for toluene-water could also be fitted by the Langmuir EoS with Γ∞ = 3.3 molecule/nm(2), the same value as that found for these asphaltenes in aliphatic media. Asphaltene solubility in the bulk phase only appears to affect the adsorption isotherm but not the Eo

  1. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured propertiesmore » is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.« less

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Analysis of Interfacial Water at Selected Sulfide Mineral Surfaces under Anaerobic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2014-04-10

    In this paper, we report on a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) study of the behavior of interfacial water at selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions. The study revealed the interfacial water structure and wetting characteristics of the pyrite (100) surface, galena (100) surface, chalcopyrite (012) surface, sphalerite (110) surface, and molybdenite surfaces (i.e., the face, armchair-edge, and zigzag-edge surfaces), including simulated contact angles, relative number density profiles, water dipole orientations, hydrogen-bonding, and residence times. For force fields of the metal and sulfur atoms in selected sulfide minerals used in the MDS, we used the universal force field (UFF) and another set of force fields optimized by quantum chemical calculations for interactions with interfacial water molecules at selected sulfide mineral surfaces. Simulation results for the structural and dynamic properties of interfacial water molecules indicate the natural hydrophobic character for the selected sulfide mineral surfaces under anaerobic conditions as well as the relatively weak hydrophobicity for the sphalerite (110) surface and two molybdenite edge surfaces. Part of the financial support for this study was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Basic Science Grant No. DE-FG-03-93ER14315. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE, funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES. The authors are grateful to Professor Tsun-Mei Chang for valuable discussions.

  3. The effects of a soluble surfactant on the interfacial dynamics of stationary bubbles in inclined tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, Daniel P.; Eckmann, David M.

    2002-10-01

    We have experimentally examined the effects of a common soluble surfactant on gas bubbles in liquid flows in inclined tubes. Air bubbles of known size ([lambda] = 0.8, 1.0, 1.5) are held stationary under minimum flow conditions in tubes inclined at fixed angles ([omega] = 25°, 45°, 65°, 90°). Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) is infused into the bulk flow at two bulk concentrations (C = 10% or 100% critical micelle concentration (CMC)). In addition to recording pressure and flow waveforms, we capture video images of bubbles before and during exposure to the surfactant. Modification of the interfacial properties by the surfactant results in extremely dynamic bubble behaviour including interfacial deformation, deformation plus axial translation, and bubble detachment from the wall plus translation. We measure the corresponding time-dependent pressure gradient within the tube. The surfactant mediated responses observed are dependent upon the interrelated effects of C, [lambda] and [omega]. A high bulk concentration of surfactant may produce more rapid modification of bubble shape and influence wetting, thus increasing the potential for bubble detachment. The likelihood that detachment will occur increases further as bubble volume in increased. In both vertical tubes in which contact forces are absent and in non-vertical tubes, the infusion of surfactant may result in axial translation either in the direction of, or opposite to, the direction of the bulk flow. Critical to the translation and/or detachment of the bubble is the surfactant-mediated modification of contact line mechanics. Contact line velocities corresponding to rates of shrinkage of dewetted surface area are extracted from experimental data. We also explore the potential effects of surfactants on interfacial remobilization. This investigation demonstrates the potential use of surfactants to be used for dislodging dewetted gas bubbles by the intentional manipulation of interfacial properties.

  4. Interfacial electrical properties of ion-beam sputter deposited amorphous carbon on silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Chung, Y.; Banks, B.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous, 'diamond-like' carbon films have been deposited on Si substrates, using ion-beam sputtering. The interfacial properties are studied using capacitance and conductance measurements. Data are analyzed using existing theories for interfacial electrical properties. The density of electronic states at the interface, along with corresponding time constants are determined.

  5. Interfacial ionic ‘liquids’: connecting static and dynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Uysal, Ahmet; Zhou, Hua; Feng, Guang; Lee, Sang Soo; Li, Song; Cummings, Peter T.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Dai, Sheng; McDonough, John K.; Gogotsi, Yury; Fenter, Paul

    2014-12-05

    It is well known that room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) often adopt a charge-separated layered structure, i.e. with alternating cation- and anion-rich layers, at electrified interfaces. However, the dynamic response of the layered structure to temporal variations in applied potential is not well understood. In this study, we used in situ, real-time x-ray reflectivity to study the potential-dependent electric double layer (EDL) structure of an imidazolium-based RTIL on charged epitaxial graphene during potential cycling as a function of temperature. The results suggest that the graphene–RTIL interfacial structure is bistable in which the EDL structure at any intermediate potential can be described by the combination of two extreme-potential structures whose proportions vary depending on the polarity and magnitude of the applied potential. This picture is supported by the EDL structures obtained by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at various static potentials. The potential-driven transition between the two structures is characterized by an increasing width but with an approximately fixed hysteresis magnitude as a function of temperature. Finally, the results are consistent with the coexistence of distinct anion- and cation-adsorbed structures separated by an energy barrier (~0.15 eV).

  6. Interfacial ionic ‘liquids’: connecting static and dynamic structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Uysal, Ahmet; Zhou, Hua; Feng, Guang; Lee, Sang Soo; Li, Song; Cummings, Peter T.; Fulvio, Pasquale F.; Dai, Sheng; McDonough, John K.; Gogotsi, Yury; et al

    2014-12-05

    It is well known that room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) often adopt a charge-separated layered structure, i.e. with alternating cation- and anion-rich layers, at electrified interfaces. However, the dynamic response of the layered structure to temporal variations in applied potential is not well understood. In this study, we used in situ, real-time x-ray reflectivity to study the potential-dependent electric double layer (EDL) structure of an imidazolium-based RTIL on charged epitaxial graphene during potential cycling as a function of temperature. The results suggest that the graphene–RTIL interfacial structure is bistable in which the EDL structure at any intermediate potential can bemore » described by the combination of two extreme-potential structures whose proportions vary depending on the polarity and magnitude of the applied potential. This picture is supported by the EDL structures obtained by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at various static potentials. The potential-driven transition between the two structures is characterized by an increasing width but with an approximately fixed hysteresis magnitude as a function of temperature. Finally, the results are consistent with the coexistence of distinct anion- and cation-adsorbed structures separated by an energy barrier (~0.15 eV).« less

  7. Effect of pendent chains on the interfacial properties of thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) networks.

    PubMed

    Landherr, Lucas J T; Cohen, Claude; Archer, Lynden A

    2011-05-17

    The interfacial properties of end-linked polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films on silicon are examined. Thin cross-linked PDMS films (∼10 μm thick) were synthesized over a self-assembled monolayer supported on a silicon wafer. By systematically varying the concentration of monofunctional PDMS in a mixture with telechelic precursor molecules, structures ranging from near-ideal elastic networks to poorly cross-linked networks composed of a preponderance of dangling/pendent chains were synthesized. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) employing bead probes was used to quantify the effect of network structure on the interfacial friction coefficient and residual force. Indentation measurements employing an AFM in force mode were used to characterize the elastic modulus and the pull-off force for the films as a function of pendent chain content. These measurements were complemented with conventional mechanical rheometry measurements on similar thick network films to determine their bulk rheological properties. All networks studied manifested interfacial friction coefficients substantially lower than that of bare silicon. PDMS networks with the lowest pendent chain content displayed friction coefficients close to 1 order of magnitude lower than that of bare silicon, whereas networks with the highest pendent chain content manifested friction coefficients about 3 times lower than that of bare silicon. At intermediate sliding velocities, a crossover in the interfacial friction coefficient was observed, wherein cross-linked PDMS films with the least amount of pendent chains exhibit the highest friction coefficient. These observations are discussed in terms of the structure of the films and relaxation dynamics of elastic strands and dangling chains in tethered network films. PMID:21495649

  8. Molecular level computational studies of polyethylene and polyacrylonitrile composites containing single walled carbon nanotubes: effect of carboxylic acid functionalization on nanotube-polymer interfacial properties

    PubMed Central

    Haghighatpanah, Shayesteh; Bohlén, Martin; Bolton, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular mechanics (MM) methods have been used to investigate additive-polymer interfacial properties in single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)—polyethylene and SWNT—polyacrylonitrile composites. Properties such as the interfacial shear stress and bonding energy are similar for the two composites. In contrast, functionalizing the SWNT with carboxylic acid groups leads to an increase in these properties, with a larger increase for the polar polyacrylonitrile composite. Increasing the percentage of carbon atoms that were functionalized from 1 to 5% also leads to an increase in the interfacial properties. In addition, the interfacial properties depend on the location of the functional groups on the SWNT wall. PMID:25229056

  9. Correlating interfacial properties with stress transfer in SMA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, G.E.; Jonnalagadda, K.; Sottos, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) wires have been proposed as large strain actuators for use in smart structures. SMA wires can be embedded in a host material to alter the stiffness or modal response and provide vibration control. The interaction between the embedded SMA and the host material is critical to applications requiring transfer of loads or strain from the wire to the host. Paine, Jones and Rogers have asserted the importance of interfacial adhesion between embedded SMA wires and the host material. When the SMA wires are actuated, large shear strains are generated at the SMA/host interface. The stronger the interface, the greater the transfer of strain from the actuator to the host material. Although there has been a significant amount of research dedicated to characterizing and modeling the response of SMA alone, little work has been done to understand the behavior of embedded SMA wires. Maximum displacement, load transfer and repeatability of actuation of the embedded wire are particularly critical in assessing the effects of the host material. This work continues to investigate the interaction between SMA wires and a host polymer matrix. High resolution photoelasticity was utilized to study the internal stresses induced during actuation of an embedded shape memory alloy wire in a polymer matrix. The influence of several wire surface treatments on the resulting stresses and load transfer was investigated. Four different surface treatments were considered: untreated, acid etched, hand sanded and sandblasted. Pull-out data indicated that sandblasting of wires increased the SMA/polymer interfacial bond strength while hand sanding and acid cleaning actually decreased the bond strength. Wires with greater adhesion (sandblasted) resulted in higher stresses induced in the polymer while those with lower adhesion transferred less load. Overall, properties of the SMA/polymer interface were shown to significantly affect the performance of the embedded SMA actuator.

  10. A molecular dynamics study to determine the solid-liquid interfacial tension using test area simulation method (TASM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Anjan R.; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies on heat transfer from a heated nanoparticle into the surrounding fluid have indicated that the fluid next to a spherical nanoparticle can get heated well above its boiling point without observing a phase change, while a contradicting behavior was observed for a flat surface-fluid interface. Another interesting observation is that the critical heat flux was found to increase with increase in the wetting characteristics of solid. Thus, the interfacial tension or free energy of solid-liquid interface could play a pivotal role in the mechanism of heat transfer. A recent study by Gloor et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 123, 134703 (2005)], 10.1063/1.2038827 has proposed test area simulation method (TASM) for the determination of interfacial tension. The present study involves the determination and the comparison of solid-liquid interfacial tension for planar and spherical interfaces using MD based on TASM and analyze the results. A higher interfacial tension value is observed for spherical nanoparticle fluid interface compared to flat surface fluid interface. The results also indicate that the solid-liquid interfacial tension is a size and temperature dependent property. The results from this study are also expected to give better insights into the possible reasons for the observed differences in the thermal transport for spherical nanoparticle-liquid interface compared to planar-liquid interface.

  11. A Thermodynamic Study of Dopant Interfacial Segregation Effect on Nanostability and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Longjia

    Nanoparticles, with great surface area and high surface to volume ratio, have been widely applied in many applications due to their unique size related effects. However, this high surface area character of nanoparticles also brings great excess energy to the whole system, making the system unstable and even causing the failure of nanoparticles, especially at higher temperatures. In order to maintain nanocrystalline structure of the materials, nanostability enhancement is of great significance in nanotechnology. It is well known that the global driving force for particles growth is to eliminate the excess energy brought by surface and grain boundary. Therefore, interfacial energetics has a great influence on the nanostability of the materials. And according to previous studies, dopant interfacial segregation could be a potential way to control the interfacial energetics of the nanoparticles and possibly lead to an improved nanostability. Furthermore, the interfacial energetics even can affect mechanical properties of nano-grain ceramic materials based on recent research. The main goals of the present work were to experimentally measure the interfacial energies of nanoparticles as well as nano-grain ceramics, modify the interfacial energetics through dopant segregation effect and engineer the nanostability and mechanical properties of the nanocrystalline materials through interfacial energetics modification. To achieve this goal, Mn cation has been chosen to introduce Mn interfacial segregation on ceria nanoparticles, and La cation has been added to 12 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (12YSZ) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MAO) two-phase nano-grain ceramics to cause La interfacial segregation. Both of the dopant segregation phenomena were directly proved by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). To quantify the dopant segregation effect on the interfacial energies, high-temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry, water adsorption calorimetry and differential

  12. Rheological and interfacial properties at the equilibrium of almond gum tree exudate (Prunus dulcis) in comparison with gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Nesrine; Sessa, Mariarenata; Ferrari, Giovanna; Hamdi, Salem; Donsi, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Almond gum contains an arabinogalactan-type polysaccharide, which plays an important role in defining its interfacial and rheological properties. In this study, rheological and interfacial properties of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions were comparatively investigated. The interfacial tension of almond gum and gum arabic aqueous dispersions was measured using the pendant drop method in hexadecane. The asymptotic interfacial tension values for almond gum were significantly lower than the corresponding values measured for gum arabic, especially at high concentration. Rheological properties were characterized by steady and oscillatory tests using a coaxial geometry. Almond gum flow curves exhibited a shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior with a tendency to a Newtonian plateau at low shear rate, while gum arabic flow curves exhibited such behavior only at high shear rate. The influence of temperature (5-50  ℃) on the flow curves was studied at 4% (m/m) gum concentration and the Newtonian viscosities at infinite and at zero shear rate, for gum arabic and almond gum, respectively, were accurately fitted by an Arrhenius-type equation. The dynamic properties of the two gum dispersions were also studied. Both gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties, with the viscous component being predominant in a wider range of concentrations for almond gum, while for gum arabic the elastic component being higher than the elastic one especially at higher concentrations.The rheological and interfacial tension properties of almond gum suggest that it may represent a possible substitute of gum arabic in different food applications. PMID:26163565

  13. Interfacial and mechanical properties of self-assembling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvajal, Daniel

    Self-assembly is a fascinating phenomena where interactions between small subunits allow them to aggregate and form complex structures that can span many length scales. These self-assembled structures are especially important in biology where they are necessary for life as we know it. This dissertation is a study of three very different self-assembling systems, all of which have important connections to biology and biological systems. Drop shape analysis was used to study the interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers at the oil/water interface. When biologically functionalyzed copolymers are used, this system can serve as a model for receptor-ligand interactions that are used by cells to perform many activities, such as interact with their surroundings. The physical properties of a self-assembling membrane system were quantified using membrane inflation and swelling experiments. These types of membranes may have important applications in medicine such as drug eluting (growth factor eluting) scaffolds to aid in wound healing. The factors affecting the properties of bis(leucine) oxalamide gels were also explored. We believe that this particular system will serve as an appropriate model for biological gels that are made up of fiber-like and/or rod-like structures. During the course of the research presented in this dissertation, many new techniques were developed specifically to allow/aid the study of these distinct self-assembling systems. For example, numerical methods were used to predict drop stability for drop shape analysis experiments and the methods used to create reproducibly create self-assembling membranes were developed specifically for this purpose. The development of these new techniques is an integral part of the thesis and should aid future students who work on these projects. A number ongoing projects and interesting research directions for each one of the projects is also presented.

  14. Interfacial microstructure and properties of carbon fiber composites modified with graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Fan, Xinyu; Yan, Chun; Li, Hongzhou; Zhu, Yingdan; Li, Xiaotuo; Yu, Liping

    2012-03-01

    The performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composites is dependent to a great extent on the properties of fiber-matrix interface. To improve the interfacial properties in carbon fiber/epoxy composites, we directly introduced graphene oxide (GO) sheets dispersed in the fiber sizing onto the surface of individual carbon fibers. The applied graphite oxide, which could be exfoliated to single-layer GO sheets, was verified by atomic force microscope (AFM). The surface topography of modified carbon fibers and the distribution of GO sheets in the interfacial region of carbon fibers were detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The interfacial properties between carbon fiber and matrix were investigated by microbond test and three-point short beam shear test. The tensile properties of unidirectional (UD) composites were investigated in accordance with ASTM standards. The results of the tests reveal an improved interfacial and tensile properties in GO-modified carbon fiber composites. Furthermore, significant enhancement of interfacial shear strength (IFSS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and tensile properties was achieved in the composites when only 5 wt % of GO sheets introduced in the fiber sizing. This means that an alternative method for improving the interfacial and tensile properties of carbon fiber composites by controlling the fiber-matrix interface was developed. Such multiscale reinforced composites show great potential with their improved mechanical performance to be likely applied in the aerospace and automotive industries. PMID:22391332

  15. Identifying Mechanisms of Interfacial Dynamics Using Single-Molecule Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    The “soft” (i.e. non-covalent) interactions between molecules and surfaces are complex and highly-varied (e.g. hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding, ionic) often leading to heterogeneous interfacial behavior. Heterogeneity can arise either from spatial variation of the surface/interface itself or from molecular configurations (i.e. conformation, orientation, aggregation state, etc.). By observing adsorption, diffusion, and desorption of individual fluorescent molecules, single-molecule tracking can characterize these types of heterogeneous interfacial behavior in ways that are inaccessible to traditional ensemble-averaged methods. Moreover, the fluorescence intensity or emission wavelength (in resonance energy transfer experiments) can be used to simultaneously track molecular configuration and directly relate this to the resulting interfacial mobility or affinity. In this feature article, we review recent advances involving the use of single-molecule tracking to characterize heterogeneous molecule-surface interactions including: multiple modes of diffusion and desorption associated with both internal and external molecular configuration, Arrhenius activated interfacial transport, spatially dependent interactions, and many more. PMID:22716995

  16. On the influence of interfacial properties to the bending rigidity of layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shenyou; Wei, Yujie

    2016-07-01

    Layered structures are ubiquitous, from one-atom thick layers in two-dimensional materials, to nanoscale lipid bi-layers, and to micro and millimeter thick layers in composites. The mechanical behavior of layered structures heavily depends on the interfacial properties and is of great interest in engineering practice. In this work, we give an analytical solution of the bending rigidity of bilayered structures as a function of the interfacial shear strength. Our results show that while the critical bending stiffness when the interface starts to slide plastically is proportional to the interfacial shear strength, there is a strong nonlinearity between the rigidity and the applied bending after interfacial plastic shearing. We further give semi-analytical solutions to the bending of bilayers when both interfacial shearing and pre-existing crack are present in the interface of rectangular and circular bilayers. The analytical solutions are validated by using finite element simulations. Our analysis suggests that interfacial shearing resistance, interfacial stiffness and preexisting cracks dramatically influence the bending rigidity of bilayers. The results can be utilized to understand the significant stiffness difference in typical biostructures and novel materials, and may also be used for non-destructive detection of interfacial crack in composites when stiffness can be probed through vibration techniques.

  17. Static interfacial properties of Bose-Einstein-condensate mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indekeu, Joseph O.; Lin, Chang-You; Van Thu, Nguyen; Van Schaeybroeck, Bert; Phat, Tran Huu

    2015-03-01

    The interfacial profiles and interfacial tensions of phase-separated binary mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates are studied theoretically. The two condensates are characterized by their respective healing lengths ξ1 and ξ2 and by the interspecies repulsive interaction K . An exact solution to the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations is obtained for the special case ξ2/ξ1=1 /2 and K =3 /2 . Furthermore, applying a double-parabola approximation (DPA) to the energy density featured in GP theory allows us to define a DPA model, which is much simpler to handle than GP theory but nevertheless still captures the main physics. In particular, a compact analytic expression for the interfacial tension is derived that is useful for all ξ1,ξ2 , and K . An application to wetting phenomena is presented for condensates adsorbed at an optical wall. The wetting phase boundary obtained within the DPA model nearly coincides with the exact one in GP theory.

  18. Interfacial properties and mechanical behavior of titanium aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Fu, C.L.

    1998-01-01

    The role of various interfaces in deformation and fracture behavior of two phase TiAl-Ti{sub 3}Al alloys is analyzed on the basis of the specific interfacial and surface energies determined from ab initio calculations. The propensity of twinning observed in these alloys is consistent with the low true twin boundary energy. The strong plastic anisotropy reported in TiAl polysynthetically twinned (PST) crystals is attributed partly to the localized slip along lamellar interfaces, thus lowering the yield stress for soft orientations. Interfacial fracture energies are estimated to be the highest for the {alpha}{sub 2}/{gamma} lamellar boundary and the lowest for the 120 {degree} rotational {gamma}/{gamma} boundary. The fracture mode mixity plays an important role in the crack-tip plasticity by ordinary slip and true twinning, leading to translamellar and interfacial fracture.

  19. Liquid-vapor equilibria and interfacial properties of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes by molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Amat, Miguel A; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2010-03-21

    A molecular dynamics study is presented to assess the performance of a united-atom model in the prediction of liquid-vapor interfacial properties for short-chain perfluoroalkanes and their alkane counterparts. In particular, the ability of this model to discriminate between the surface-energy values of these two types of compounds was investigated over a wide temperature range corresponding to the liquid-vapor region. Comparisons with available experimental data and surface-tension predictions given by other force-field parameterizations, including those based on the more computationally demanding all-atom method, were performed to gauge the viability of this model. It was found that the model used in this study captures qualitatively the expected behavior of surface energy between alkanes and perfluoroalkanes and yields values that are in excellent agreement with experimental data, especially in the high-temperature limit as the critical temperature is approached. PMID:20331313

  20. Liquid-vapor equilibria and interfacial properties of n-alkanes and perfluoroalkanes by molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat, Miguel A.; Rutledge, Gregory C.

    2010-03-01

    A molecular dynamics study is presented to assess the performance of a united-atom model in the prediction of liquid-vapor interfacial properties for short-chain perfluoroalkanes and their alkane counterparts. In particular, the ability of this model to discriminate between the surface-energy values of these two types of compounds was investigated over a wide temperature range corresponding to the liquid-vapor region. Comparisons with available experimental data and surface-tension predictions given by other force-field parameterizations, including those based on the more computationally demanding all-atom method, were performed to gauge the viability of this model. It was found that the model used in this study captures qualitatively the expected behavior of surface energy between alkanes and perfluoroalkanes and yields values that are in excellent agreement with experimental data, especially in the high-temperature limit as the critical temperature is approached.

  1. Sound-induced Interfacial Dynamics in a Microfluidic Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Sze Yi; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2014-11-01

    Retrieving sound wave by a fluidic means is challenging due to the difficulty in visualizing the very minute sound-induced fluid motion. This work studies the interfacial response of multiphase systems towards fluctuation in the flow. We demonstrate a direct visualization of music in the form of ripples at a microfluidic aqueous-aqueous interface with an ultra-low interfacial tension. The interface shows a passive response to sound of different frequencies with sufficiently precise time resolution, enabling the recording of musical notes and even subsequent reconstruction with high fidelity. This suggests that sensing and transmitting vibrations as tiny as those induced by sound could be realized in low interfacial tension systems. The robust control of the interfacial dynamics could be adopted for droplet and complex-fiber generation.

  2. Evaluation of the interfacial mechanical properties in fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Riester, L.; Lowden, R.A.; Chawla, K.K.

    1993-06-01

    The present study examined the application of a micro-indentation technique to the measurement of interfacial properties in fiber reinforced ceramic composites. Specific fiber/matrix systems included SiC/glass, SiC/macro-defect-free (MDF) cement, SiC/SiC, and mullite/glass. The effect of fiber coatings upon the interfacial properties was also investigated. These properties, which included the debond strength, interfacial shear stress, and residual axial fiber stress, were evaluated by measuring the force-displacement curves generated during load-unload cycles. Estimates of these three stress values were obtained by matching the experimental force-displacement curves with data predicted from an existing model. In general the SiC/glass composites exhibited the lowest values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses. The sliding characteristics of the SiC/MDF cement and SiC/SiC composites were strongly influenced by the residual axial stress and the nature of the fiber coating. In the case of the mullite/glass composite, the high values of the interfacial shear and debond stresses reduced the measurement sensitivity, thereby increasing the uncertainty in the estimates of the interfacial properties. 17 refs, 6 figs, 1 tab.

  3. Understanding about How Different Foaming Gases Effect the Interfacial Array Behaviors of Surfactants and the Foam Properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yange; Qi, Xiaoqing; Sun, Haoyang; Zhao, Hui; Li, Ying

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the detailed behaviors of all the molecules, especially the interfacial array behaviors of surfactants and diffusion behaviors of gas molecules, in foam systems with different gases (N2, O2, and CO2) being used as foaming agents were investigated by combining molecular dynamics simulation and experimental approaches for the purpose of interpreting how the molecular behaviors effect the properties of the foam and find out the key factors which fundamentally determine the foam stability. Sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS was used as the foam stabilizer. The foam decay and the drainage process were determined by Foamscan. A texture analyzer (TA) was utilized to measure the stiffness and viscoelasticity of the foam films. The experimental results agreed very well with the simulation results by which how the different gas components affect the interfacial behaviors of surfactant molecules and thereby bring influence on foam properties was described. PMID:27434752

  4. Ligand and interfacial dynamics in a homodimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prashant Kumar; Meuwly, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The structural dynamics of dimeric hemoglobin (HbI) from Scapharca inaequivalvis in different ligand-binding states is studied from atomistic simulations on the μs time scale. The intermediates are between the fully ligand-bound (R) and ligand-free (T) states. Tertiary structural changes, such as rotation of the side chain of Phe97, breaking of the Lys96–heme salt bridge, and the Fe–Fe separation, are characterized and the water dynamics along the R-T transition is analyzed. All these properties for the intermediates are bracketed by those determined experimentally for the fully ligand-bound and ligand-free proteins, respectively. The dynamics of the two monomers is asymmetric on the 100 ns timescale. Several spontaneous rotations of the Phe97 side chain are observed which suggest a typical time scale of 50–100 ns for this process. Ligand migration pathways include regions between the B/G and C/G helices and, if observed, take place in the 100 ns time scale. PMID:26958581

  5. Interfacial Properties of Raw and Roasted Peanut Oils as Related to Emulsification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Roasted peanut oil is a unique product that can impart a desirable roasted peanut flavor in various emulsified formulations. Emulsification properties are a function of the oil physical properties, which include interfacial tension, viscosity, and density among others. These physical properties ha...

  6. Tunable Magnetization Dynamics in Interfacially Modified Ni81Fe19/Pt Bilayer Thin Film Microstructures

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Arnab; Azzawi, Sinan; Saha, Susmita; King, J. A.; Rowan-Robinson, R. M.; Hindmarch, A. T.; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Atkinson, Del; Barman, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Interface modification for control of ultrafast magnetic properties using low-dose focused ion beam irradiation is demonstrated for bilayers of two technologically important materials: Ni81Fe19 and Pt. Magnetization dynamics were studied using an all-optical time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr microscopy method. Magnetization relaxation, precession, damping and the spatial coherence of magnetization dynamics were studied. Magnetization precession was fitted with a single-mode damped sinusoid to extract the Gilbert damping parameter. A systematic study of the damping parameter and frequency as a function of irradiation dose varying from 0 to 3.3 pC/μm2 shows a complex dependence upon ion beam dose. This is interpreted in terms of both intrinsic effects and extrinsic two-magnon scattering effects resulting from the expansion of the interfacial region and the creation of a compositionally graded alloy. The results suggest a new direction for the control of precessional magnetization dynamics, and open the opportunity to optimize high-speed magnetic devices. PMID:26621499

  7. Tunable Magnetization Dynamics in Interfacially Modified Ni81Fe19/Pt Bilayer Thin Film Microstructures.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Arnab; Azzawi, Sinan; Saha, Susmita; King, J A; Rowan-Robinson, R M; Hindmarch, A T; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Atkinson, Del; Barman, Anjan

    2015-01-01

    Interface modification for control of ultrafast magnetic properties using low-dose focused ion beam irradiation is demonstrated for bilayers of two technologically important materials: Ni81Fe19 and Pt. Magnetization dynamics were studied using an all-optical time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr microscopy method. Magnetization relaxation, precession, damping and the spatial coherence of magnetization dynamics were studied. Magnetization precession was fitted with a single-mode damped sinusoid to extract the Gilbert damping parameter. A systematic study of the damping parameter and frequency as a function of irradiation dose varying from 0 to 3.3 pC/μm(2) shows a complex dependence upon ion beam dose. This is interpreted in terms of both intrinsic effects and extrinsic two-magnon scattering effects resulting from the expansion of the interfacial region and the creation of a compositionally graded alloy. The results suggest a new direction for the control of precessional magnetization dynamics, and open the opportunity to optimize high-speed magnetic devices. PMID:26621499

  8. Molecular Dynamics Study of Freezing Point and Solid-Liquid Interfacial Free Energy of Stockmayer Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Apte, Pankaj; Morris, James R; Zeng, X.C.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing temperatures of Stockmayer fluids with different dipolar strength at zero pressure are estimated and computed using three independent molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation methods, namely, the superheating-undercooling method, the constant-pressure and constant-temperature (NPT) two phase coexistence method, and the constant-pressure and constant-enthalpy (NPH) coexistence method. The best estimate of the freezing temperature (in reduced unit) for the Stockmayer (SM) fluid with a reduced dipole moment is 0.656 0.001, 0.726 0.002 and 0.835 0.005, respectively. The freezing temperature increases with the dipolar strength. The solid-liquid interfacial free energies of the (111), (110) and (100) interface are calculated for the first time using two independent methods, namely, the cleaving-wall method and the interfacial fluctuation method. Both methods predict that the interfacial free energy increases with the dipole moment. Although the interfacial fluctuation method suggests a weaker interfacial anisotropy, particularly for strongly dipolar SM fluids, both methods predicted the same trend of interfacial anisotropy, that is, .

  9. An ab initio molecular dynamics study of the liquid-vapor interface of an aqueous NaCl solution: inhomogeneous density, polarity, hydrogen bonds, and frequency fluctuations of interfacial molecules.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Jyoti Roy; Chandra, Amalendu

    2014-11-21

    We have presented a first principles simulation study of the structural and dynamical properties of a liquid-vapor interfacial system of a concentrated (5.3 M) aqueous NaCl solution. We have used ab initio molecular dynamics to examine the structural and dynamical properties of the bulk and interfacial regions. The structural aspects of the system that have been considered here include the inhomogeneous density profiles of ions and water molecules, hydrogen bond distributions, orientational profiles, and also vibrational frequency distributions in the bulk and interfacial regions. It is found that the sodium ions are mostly located in the interior, while the chloride anions occupy a significant portion of the interface of the slab. The water dipoles at the interface prefer to orient parallel to the surface. The dynamical aspects of the interfaces are investigated in terms of diffusion, orientational relaxation, hydrogen bond dynamics, and vibrational spectral diffusion. The results of the interfacial dynamics are compared with those of the corresponding bulk region. It is observed that the interfacial molecules exhibit faster diffusion and orientational relaxation with respect to the bulk. However, the interfacial molecules are found to have longer hydrogen bond lifetimes than those of the bulk. We have also investigated the correlations of hydrogen bond relaxation with the vibrational frequency fluctuations of interfacial water molecules. PMID:25416903

  10. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  11. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  12. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-11-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials.

  13. Effects of Graphene Oxide Modified Sizing Agents on Interfacial Properties of Carbon Fibers/Epoxy Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingbo; Jiang, Dawei; Liu, Li; Huang, Yudong; Long, Jun; Wu, Guangshun; Wu, Zijian; Umar, Ahmad; Guo, Jiang; Zhang, Xi; Guo, Zhanhu

    2015-12-01

    A kind of graphene oxide (GO) modified sizing agent was used to improve the interfacial properties of carbon fibers/epoxy composites. The surface topography of carbon fibers was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface compositions of carbon fibers were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the interfacial properties of composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). The results show that the existence of GO increases the content of reactive functional groups on carbon fiber surface. Thus it enhances the interfacial properties of carbon fibers/epoxy composites. When GO loading in sizing agents is 1 wt%, the ILSS value of composite reaches to 96.2 MPa, which is increased by 27.2% while comparing with unsized carbon fiber composites. Furthermore, the ILSS of composites after aging is also increased significantly with GO modified sizing agents. PMID:26682416

  14. Tailoring Interfacial Properties by Controlling Carbon Nanotube Coating Thickness on Glass Fibers Using Electrophoretic Deposition.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Sandeep; An, Qi; Thostenson, Erik T; Rider, Andrew N; Haque, Bazle Z Gama; Gillespie, John W

    2016-01-20

    The electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method was used to deposit polyethylenimine (PEI) functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT) films onto the surface of individual S-2 glass fibers. By varying the processing parameters of EPD following Hamaker's equation, the thickness of the CNT film was controlled over a wide range from 200 nm to 2 μm. The films exhibited low electrical resistance, providing evidence of coating uniformity and consolidation. The effect of the CNT coating on fiber matrix interfacial properties was investigated through microdroplet experiments. Changes in interfacial properties due to application of CNT coatings onto the fiber surface with and without a CNT-modified matrix were studied. A glass fiber with a 2 μm thick CNT coating and the unmodified epoxy matrix showed the highest increase (58%) in interfacial shear strength (IFSS) compared to the baseline. The increase in the IFSS was proportional to CNT film thickness. Failure analysis of the microdroplet specimens indicated higher IFSS was related to fracture morphologies with higher levels of surface roughness. EPD enables the thickness of the CNT coating to be adjusted, facilitating control of fiber/matrix interfacial resistivity. The electrical sensitivity provides the opportunity to fabricate a new class of sizing with tailored interfacial properties and the ability to detect damage initiation. PMID:26699906

  15. Control of interfacial chemistry and mechanical properties in metal/ceramic composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsin-Fu

    1994-12-31

    Evaluation of the mechanical properties of metal/ceramic interfaces (Ti/AI2O3) was accomplished by using four-point bending tests, nanoindentation tests and fiber pushout tests. At first, the interfacial fracture energy of composites with different applied bonding temperatures from 700 C to 1000 C and thickness of the metal interlayers were measured by four-point bending tests. The mixed mode interfacial fracture energy of the Ti/Al2O3 interface was found to increase with increasing bonding temperatures up to 950 C. There is increasing interdiffusion of the constituent atoms across the interfaces with increasing temperature as verified by X-ray mapping. Thus, a stronger chemical bond forms between the Ti and the Al2O3. Above this temperature, the interfacial fracture energy drops due to the formation of a continuous brittle intermetallic compound (Ti3Al) at the Ti/Al2O3 interface. Modification of the interface was achieved with a diffusion barrier consisting of a refractory metal and Y2O3 duplex coating prepared by r.f. sputtering methods. The diffusion barrier significantly reduces the diffusion of the constituent atoms and prevents the formation of a continuous Ti3Al reaction layer, thus maintaining the chemical integrity and stability at the Ti/Al2O3 interface. The interfacial fracture energy can be further reduced by providing thinner Ti interlayers. The contribution of the energy dissipation process to the interfacial fracture energy is due to plastic energy absorption in the Ti interlayer during the fracture process. The interfacial shear strength, interfacial frictional stress and mode II interfacial fracture energy of the fiber composites were obtained by performing the fiber pushout tests. Using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), the surface roughness and texture of the three different Al2O3 fibers were evaluated. Incorporation of the experimental data and the theory gives the calculated frictional coefficient to be 0.35.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the microstructure of the aluminum/alumina interfacial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Hai; Liu, Qiwen; Liu, Lisheng; Lai, Xin; She, Wuchang; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    The atomic structure and charge distribution pattern of the Al/α-Al2O3 interface were studied utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. In order to accurately describe the interactions between the atoms around the interface, the charge transfer ionic and embedded atom method potential was used. Energetically preferable Al/α-Al2O3 interface systems were first determined to study the layer structures of the interface systems. Two energetically preferable Al/α-Al2O3 interface systems with a [ 1 bar 1 0 ](1 1 1) Al ∥ [ 1 0 1 bar 0 ](0 0 0 1) Al2O3 orientation relationship were obtained, corresponding to the atop-O Al-terminated and atop-O O-terminated relaxed models, respectively. Further studies revealed the presence of an interfacial layer, which is consistent with experimental results. The models predict a thickness of the interfacial layer between 12.14 Å and 16.82 Å. It is composed of aluminum suboxide (with an Al to O atomic ratio between 1:1.07 and 1:1.17). In addition, both the combination between the interfacial layer and the metallic Al layer and the interfacial layer and the ceramic α-Al2O3 were perfect. In order to further study the atomic structure of the Al/α-Al2O3 interfacial layer, it was isolated from the system and modeled separately. An analysis of the radial distribution function revealed that the interfacial layer inherits its structure from the α-Al2O3 moiety. The study of the charge distributions in the interface systems indicates that the charge of the Al atoms in the interfacial layer is mainly in the range from +2.1 e to +2.6 e while the charge of the O atoms is at the saturated state of -2e.

  17. Effects of interfacial bonding in the Si-carbon nanotube nanocomposite: A molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byung-Hyun; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Chung, Yong-Chae; Gunn Lee, June

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effects of interfacial bonding on the mechanical properties in the Si-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposite by a molecular dynamics approach. To describe the system appropriately, we used a hybrid potential that includes Tersoff, AIREBO (adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order), and Lennard-Jones potentials. With increasing bonding strength at the interface of Si matrix and CNT, toughness as well as Young's modulus and maximum strength increased steadily. CNT pull-out and load transfer on the strong CNT were identified as the main mechanisms for the enhanced properties. At optimum bonding, crack tip was deflected around CNT and the fracture proceeded in plastic mode through Si matrix owing to the strong reinforcement of CNT, and resulted in a further enhancement of toughness. At maximum bonding, however, only load transfer is operative and the fracture returned to brittle mode. We concluded that a strong interface as long as the CNT maintains its structural integrity is desirable to realize the optimum result.

  18. Buckling Morphologies and Interfacial Properties of Silicon Nitride Films Deposited on Float Glass Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ya-Dong; Chen, Qi-Xiang; Feng, Yu-Fei; Chen, Jun; Yu, Sen-Jiang

    2015-04-01

    We report on the buckling morphologies and interfacial properties of silicon nitride films deposited on float glass substrates. The coexistence of straight-sided and telephone cord buckles can be observed in the silicon nitride films after annealing at a high temperature. The straight-sided structure is metastable and can spontaneously evolve into the telephone cord structure accompanied by the increase in the buckle width and height. The geometric parameters of various buckling structures (including the straight blister, telephone cord and their transition state) have been measured by optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The internal stress and interfacial adhesion of the films are evaluated and analyzed based on the continuum elastic theory. It is valid to measure the interfacial properties of thin films by simplifying the telephone cord buckle as a straight-sided structure. This measurement technique is suitable for all the film systems provided that the buckles can form in the film.

  19. AFM probing of polymer/nanofiller interfacial adhesion and its correlation with bulk mechanical properties in a poly(ethylene terephthalate) nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shigeru; Park, Yong Tae; Macosko, Christopher W; Ougizawa, Toshiaki; Haugstad, Greg

    2014-11-01

    The interfacial adhesion between polymer and nanofiller plays an important role in affecting the properties of nanocomposites. The detailed relationship between interfacial adhesion and bulk properties, however, is unclear. In this work, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based abrasive scanning methodology, as applied to model laminate systems, to probe the strength of interfacial adhesion relevant to poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/graphene or clay nanocomposites. Graphite and mica substrates covered with ∼2 nm thick PET films were abrasively sheared by an AFM tip as a model measurement of interfacial strength between matrix PET and dispersed graphene and clay, respectively. During several abrasive raster-scan cycles, PET was shear-displaced from the scanned region. At temperatures below the PET glass transition, PET on graphite exhibited abrupt delamination (i.e., full adhesive failure), whereas PET on mica did not; rather, it exhibited a degree of cohesive failure within the shear-displaced layer. Moreover, 100-fold higher force scanning procedures were required to abrade through an ultimate "precursor" layer of PET only ∼0.2-0.5 nm thick, which must be largely disentangled from the matrix polymer. Thus, the adhesive interface of relevance to the strength of clay-filler nanocomposites is between matrix polymer and strongly bound polymer. At 90 °C, above the bulk PET glass transition temperature, the PET film exhibited cohesive failure on both graphite and mica. Our results suggest that there is little difference in the strength of the relevant interfacial adhesion in the two nanocomposites within the rubbery dynamic regime. Further, the bulk mechanical properties of melt mixed PET/graphene and PET/clay nanocomposites were evaluated by dynamic mechanical analysis. The glassy dynamic storage modulus of the PET/clay nanocomposite was higher than that of PET/graphene, correlating with the differences in interfacial adhesion probed by AFM. PMID

  20. The role of dispersants' dynamic interfacial tension in effective crude oil spill dispersion.

    PubMed

    Riehm, David A; McCormick, Alon V

    2014-07-15

    The dispersion effectiveness of dispersants containing Tween 80, Span 80, and dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS) was characterized using a modified Swirling Flask test, and was correlated with both initial and dynamic interfacial tension produced by those dispersants at an oil-water interface. Compositional trends in effectiveness were shown to be governed by: (1) initial oil-water interfacial tension observed upon dispersant-oil-saltwater contact; (2) rate of increase (or decrease) from the initial interfacial tension as DOSS was rapidly lost to the aqueous phase; and (3) gradually slowing kinetics of dispersant adsorption to the oil-water interface as Span 80 concentration was increased, which ultimately diminished dispersion effectiveness considerably even as dynamic interfacial tension remained <10(-3) mN/m. It is proposed that this third phenomenon results not only from the hydrophobicity of Span 80, but also from the dependence of mixed Tween-Span-DOSS reverse micelles' stability in crude oil on dispersant composition. PMID:24889318

  1. Surface Restricted Grating Studies of Interfacial Charge Transfer Dynamics at N-Gallium ARSENIDE(100) Liquid Junction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangdong

    1995-01-01

    Heterogeneous electron transfer involves the coupling of a dense manifold of highly delocalized electronic levels of the solid state to a discrete molecular state as well as an abrupt change in phase in the reaction coordinate. These features make this problem unique relative to homogeneous solution phase or gas phase reaction mechanisms which involve coupling between discrete states within a uniform medium. In this work, the advances in Surface Restricted Transient Grating Spectroscopy (Surface Restricted Transient Grating) are discussed in the context of studying interfacial charge transfer processes at single crystal semiconductor surfaces as a means to probe the primary processes governing heterogeneous electron transfer. In situ grating studies of n-GaAs/(Se ^{-2/-1}) aqueous liquid junction have observed 1 ~ 2 picosecond decay components in the presence of the selenium redox couple. Bias voltage and injection intensity dependencies have shown that field focusing of the hole carrier distribution to the surface reaction plane was achieved. Based on the bias voltage and injection intensity dependence, and known hole scavenging properties of Se^{ -2}, the fast initial decay is assigned to interfacial hole transfer. This time scale is coincident with the highly damped diffusive relaxation components of water under the high ionic concentrations present in the Helmholtz double layer of the GaAs electrode surface. The similarity in time scales between charge transfer and the rate limiting nuclear motion in the barrier crossing dynamics indicates that the electronic coupling at the interface is in the strong coupling regime. This study was the first direct time-resolved measurement of interfacial electron transfer from a single crystal surface. The observation that the dynamics are essentially in the strong coupling limit is contrary to conventional treatments of interfacial transfer processes, which assume weak coupling conditions. This result is important as it

  2. Probing model tumor interfacial properties using piezoelectric cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2010-09-01

    Invasive malignant breast cancers are typically branchy and benign breast tumors are typically smooth. It is of interest to characterize tumor branchiness (roughness) to differentiate invasive malignant breast cancer from noninvasive ones. In this study, we examined the shear modulus (G) to elastic modulus (E) ratio, G/E, as a quantity to describe model tumor interfacial roughness using a piezoelectric cantilever capable of measuring both tissue elastic modulus and tissue shear modulus. The piezoelectric cantilever used had two lead zirconate titanate layers to facilitate all-electrical elastic (shear) modulus measurements using one single device. We constructed model tissues with tumors by embedding one-dimensional (1D) corrugated inclusions and three-dimensional (3D) spiky-ball inclusions made of modeling clay in gelatin. We showed that for smooth inclusions, G/E was 0.3 regardless of the shear direction. In contrast, for a 1D corrugated rough inclusion G/E was 0.3 only when the shear was parallel to corrugation and G/E increased with an increasing angle between the shear direction and the corrugation. When the shear was perpendicular to corrugation, G/E became >0.7. For 3D isotropic spiky-ball inclusions we showed that the G/E depended on the degree of the roughness. Using the ratio s/r of the spike length (s) to the overall inclusion radius (r) as a roughness parameter, we showed that for inclusions with s/r larger than or equal to 0.28, the G/E ratio over the inclusions was larger than 0.7 whereas for inclusions with s/r less than 0.28, the G/E decreased with decreasing s/r to around 0.3 at s/r=0. In addition, we showed that the depth limit of the G/E measurement is twice the width of the probe area of the piezoelectric cantilever. PMID:20887005

  3. Interfacial dynamics and adhesion behaviors of water and oil droplets in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Guo, Dan; Liu, Shuhai; Xie, Guoxin; Luo, Jianbin

    2014-07-01

    To simulate the interfacial behaviors in real heterogeneous systems, the point contact condition is constructed to study the classical immiscible displacement problem in this work. Specifically, the interfacial dynamics during the water droplet passing through the oil capillary bridge formed under the point contact condition is investigated. Emphasis is put on the influences of the wettabilities and the relative separation motion of the solid surfaces on the dynamic behavior of the droplets. The observations suggested that the capillary pressure had negligible effect on the movement of the water droplet when it was passing though the oil capillary bridge. The wettability and the relative separation of the disk and ball would influence the final adhesion behaviors of the water droplet after the droplet passed through the oil capillary bridge. Surface tension and adhesion energy were used to interpret these observations. PMID:24946005

  4. Molecular dynamics study of interfacial thermal transport between silicene and substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingchao; Hong, Yang; Tong, Zhen; Xiao, Zhihuai; Bao, Hua; Yue, Yanan

    2015-10-01

    In this work, the interfacial thermal transport across silicene and various substrates, i.e., crystalline silicon (c-Si), amorphous silicon (a-Si), crystalline silica (c-SiO2) and amorphous silica (a-SiO2) are explored by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A transient pulsed heating technique is applied in this work to characterize the interfacial thermal resistance in all hybrid systems. It is reported that the interfacial thermal resistances between silicene and all substrates decrease nearly 40% with temperature from 100 K to 400 K, which is due to the enhanced phonon couplings from the anharmonicity effect. Analysis of phonon power spectra of all systems is performed to interpret simulation results. Contradictory to the traditional thought that amorphous structures tend to have poor thermal transport capabilities due to the disordered atomic configurations, it is calculated that amorphous silicon and silica substrates facilitate the interfacial thermal transport compared with their crystalline structures. Besides, the coupling effect from substrates can improve the interface thermal transport up to 43.5% for coupling strengths χ from 1.0 to 2.0. Our results provide fundamental knowledge and rational guidelines for the design and development of the next-generation silicene-based nanoelectronics and thermal interface materials. PMID:26266456

  5. Effect of heat treatment on carbon fiber surface properties and fibers/epoxy interfacial adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Zhishuang; Zhang, Baoyan; Shi, Fenghui; Li, Min; Zhang, Zuoguang; Gu, Yizhuo

    2011-08-01

    Carbon fiber surface properties are likely to change during the molding process of carbon fiber reinforced matrix composite, and these changes could affect the infiltration and adhesion between carbon fiber and resin. T300B fiber was heat treated referring to the curing process of high-performance carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites. By means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), activated carbon atoms can be detected, which are defined as the carbon atoms conjunction with oxygen and nitrogen. Surface chemistry analysis shows that the content of activated carbon atoms on treated carbon fiber surface, especially those connect with the hydroxyl decreases with the increasing heat treatment temperature. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) analysis reveals that the dispersive surface energy γSd increases and the polar surface energy γSsp decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases to 200. Contact angle between carbon fiber and epoxy E51 resin, which is studied by dynamic contact angle test (DCAT) increases with the increasing heat treatment temperature, indicating the worse wettability comparing with the untreated fiber. Moreover, micro-droplet test shows that the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) of the treated carbon fiber/epoxy is lower than that of the untreated T300B fiber which is attributed to the decrement of the content of reactive functional groups including hydrogen group and epoxy group.

  6. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-06-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

  7. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-01-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties. PMID:27245687

  8. Novel strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheets with excellent tensile and interfacial bonding properties.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Su; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Seung-Pill; Lee, Kwang Seok; Kim, Ki Jong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Chang, Young Won; Yuh, Junhan; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-01-01

    In order to broaden industrial applications of Mg alloys, as lightest-weight metal alloys in practical uses, many efforts have been dedicated to manufacture various clad sheets which can complement inherent shortcomings of Mg alloys. Here, we present a new fabrication method of Mg/Al clad sheets by bonding thin Al alloy sheet on to Mg alloy melt during strip casting. In the as-strip-cast Mg/Al clad sheet, homogeneously distributed equi-axed dendrites existed in the Mg alloy side, and two types of thin reaction layers, i.e., γ (Mg17Al12) and β (Mg2Al3) phases, were formed along the Mg/Al interface. After post-treatments (homogenization, warm rolling, and annealing), the interfacial layers were deformed in a sawtooth shape by forming deformation bands in the Mg alloy and interfacial layers, which favorably led to dramatic improvement in tensile and interfacial bonding properties. This work presents new applications to multi-functional lightweight alloy sheets requiring excellent formability, surface quality, and corrosion resistance as well as tensile and interfacial bonding properties. PMID:27245687

  9. Fluid displacement under elastic membranes: Dynamics and interfacial instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Housseiny, Talal; Christov, Ivan; Juel, Anne; Stone, Howard

    2012-11-01

    The spreading of fluids under a flexible membrane is a feature of many systems such as the lateral intrusion of magma under a terrestrial crust, or when blood spreads underneath the skin giving the signature color of bruises. In this work, we investigate the displacement of a viscous fluid by a gas underneath an elastic membrane. We consider a radial Hele-Shaw cell where the upper plate is an elastic sheet. The dynamics of the interface between the injected gas and the displaced fluid are fundamentally modified by the presence of an elastic boundary, which leads to the suppression of viscous fingering below a critical flow rate. We demonstrate theoretically the mechanism of suppression and find the corresponding critical flow rate. In addition, we study the dynamics of a stable (circular) interface propagating underneath an elastic membrane and derive the scaling laws for both the position of the interface and the shape of the elastic membrane. Our theoretical findings agree very well with the experimental results of D. Pihler-Puzovic et al. (PRL 2012). T. T. Al-Housseiny is supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-0646086.

  10. Time-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques for real-time studies of interfacial charge transfer dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shavorskiy, Andrey; Hertlein, Marcus; Guo Jinghua; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Cordones, Amy; Vura-Weis, Josh; Siefermann, Katrin; Slaughter, Daniel; Sturm, Felix; Weise, Fabian; Khurmi, Champak; Belkacem, Ali; Weber, Thorsten; Gessner, Oliver; Bluhm, Hendrik; Strader, Matthew; Cho, Hana; Coslovich, Giacomo; Kaindl, Robert A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; and others

    2013-04-19

    X-ray based spectroscopy techniques are particularly well suited to gain access to local oxidation states and electronic dynamics in complex systems with atomic pinpoint accuracy. Traditionally, these techniques are applied in a quasi-static fashion that usually highlights the steady-state properties of a system rather than the fast dynamics that often define the system function on a molecular level. Novel x-ray spectroscopy techniques enabled by free electron lasers (FELs) and synchrotron based pump-probe schemes provide the opportunity to monitor intramolecular and interfacial charge transfer processes in real-time and with element and chemical specificity. Two complementary time-domain xray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques are presented that are applied at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to study charge transfer processes in N3 dye-sensitized ZnO semiconductor nanocrystals, which are at the heart of emerging light-harvesting technologies.

  11. Dynamically­ Reconfigurable Complex Emulsions via Tunable Interfacial Tensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swager, Timothy

    This lecture will focus on the design of systems wherein a reconfiguration of the materials can be triggered chemically of mechanically. The utility of these methods is to generate transduction mechanisms by which chemical and biological sensors can be developed. Three different types of systems will be discussed. (1) Particles wherein a protease enzyme releases strain in the particle by breaking crosslinks. (2) Assemblies of polymers at air water interfaces and the demonstration of a luminescence strain response upon compression. (3) Dynamic colloids produced from immiscible fluorocarbon/hydrocarbon mixtures and ability to convert the core and shell layers of the particles as well as the conversion to Janus particles. The latter system's morphology changes can be triggered chemically or optically.

  12. Effect of Cu2+ Activation on Interfacial Water Structure at the Sphalerite Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-12-10

    In the first part of this paper, an experimental contact angle study of the fresh and Cu2+ activated sphalerite-ZnS surface as well as the covellite-CuS (001) surface is reported describing the increased hydrophobic character of the surface during Cu2+ activation. In addition to these experimental results, the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite- CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS). Our MDS results on the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh sphalerite-ZnS (110), copper-zinc sulfide-CuZnS2 (110), villamaninite-CuS2 (100), and covellite-CuS (001) surfaces include simulated contact angles, water number density distribution, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The copper content at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface seems to account for the increased hydrophobicity as revealed by both experimental and MD simulated contact angle measurements. The relatively greater hydrophobic character developed at the Cu2+ activated sphalerite surface and at the copper-zinc sulfide surface has been described by MDS, based on the structure of interfacial water and its dynamic properties. L.X.D. acknowledges funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences.

  13. Monitoring interfacial dynamics by pulsed laser techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, G.

    1995-12-31

    The research is aimed at understanding the structural, electronic, and reactive properties of semiconductors in solutions. Focus is on Si and GaAs surfaces because they are used in photovoltaic devices, etc. The pulsed laser techniques used included surface second harmonic generation in Si and laser induced photoluminescence in GaAs. SHG can measure space charge effects in the semiconductor under various conditions, ie, immersed in electrolyte, in presence of oxide overlayers, and under UHV conditions. The Si studies demonstrated the sensitivity of the phase of the SH response to space charge effects. With GaAs, time-correlated single photon counting methods were used in the picosecond time regime to examine the recombination luminescence following above band gap excitation (surface trapping velocities).

  14. Dynamic interfacial trapping of flexural waves in structured plates

    PubMed Central

    Craster, R. V.; Movchan, A. B.; Movchan, N. V.; Jones, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents new results on the localization and transmission of flexural waves in a structured plate containing a semi-infinite two-dimensional array of rigid pins. In particular, localized waves are identified and studied at the interface boundary between the homogeneous part of the flexural plate and the part occupied by rigid pins. A formal connection has been made with the dispersion properties of flexural Bloch waves in an infinite doubly periodic array of rigid pins. Special attention is given to regimes corresponding to standing waves of different types as well as Dirac-like points that may occur on the dispersion surfaces. A single half-grating problem, hitherto unreported in the literature, is also shown to bring interesting solutions. PMID:27118892

  15. Interfacial properties of binary mixtures of square-well molecules from Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, F J; Blas, F J

    2016-04-21

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical square-well molecules from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with the same molecular size and intermolecular potential range but different dispersive energy parameter values. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of square-well molecules. In particular, we determine the pressuretensor using the mechanical (virial) route and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension evaluated using the Irving-Kirkwood method. In addition to the pressuretensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. This work can be considered as the extension of our previous work [F. J. Martínez-Ruiz and F. J. Blas, Mol. Phys. 113, 1217 (2015)] to deal with mixtures of spherical molecules that interact through a discontinuous intermolecular potential. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ϵ22/ϵ11, is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the more volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, since there are stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in comparison with the rest of intermolecular interactions. Also, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as ϵ22/ϵ11 is larger, a direct consequence of the increasing of the cohesive energy of the system. PMID:27389232

  16. Interfacial properties of binary mixtures of square-well molecules from Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of mixtures of spherical square-well molecules from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. We consider mixtures with the same molecular size and intermolecular potential range but different dispersive energy parameter values. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of mixtures of square-well molecules. In particular, we determine the pressure tensor using the mechanical (virial) route and the vapor-liquid interfacial tension evaluated using the Irving-Kirkwood method. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles, coexistence densities, and interfacial thickness as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. This work can be considered as the extension of our previous work [F. J. Martínez-Ruiz and F. J. Blas, Mol. Phys. 113, 1217 (2015)] to deal with mixtures of spherical molecules that interact through a discontinuous intermolecular potential. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the ratio between the dispersive energy parameters of the mixture, ɛ22/ɛ11, is to sharpen the vapor-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative maximum in the density profiles of the more volatile component at the interface. This maximum is related with adsorption or accumulation of these molecules at the interface, since there are stronger attractive interactions between these molecules in comparison with the rest of intermolecular interactions. Also, the interfacial thickness decreases and the surface tension increases as ɛ22/ɛ11 is larger, a direct consequence of the increasing of the cohesive energy of the system.

  17. Flax Fiber Quality and Influence on Interfacial Properties of Composites.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measured flax physical and chemical properties could potentially impact binding and thus the stress transfer between the matrix and fiber. The study included 14 linseed samples with 12 samples ranging in cleanliness and retting produced using hammer mill technology from 2000, 2006 and 2007 with 2 sa...

  18. Elucidating the role of interfacial materials properties in microfluidic packages.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Thayne L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to discover a method to investigate the properties of interfaces as described by a numerical physical model. The model used was adopted from literature and applied to a commercially available multiphysics software package. By doing this the internal properties of simple structures could be elucidated and then readily applied to more complex structures such as valves and pumps in laminate microfluidic structures. A numerical finite element multi-scale model of a cohesive interface comprised of heterogeneous material properties was used to elucidate irreversible damage from applied strain energy. An unknown internal state variable was applied to characterize the damage process. Using a constrained blister test, this unknown internal state variable could be determined for an adherend/adhesive/adherend body. This is particularly interesting for laminate systems with microfluidic and microstructures contained within the body. A laminate structure was designed and fabricated that could accommodate a variety of binary systems joined using nearly any technique such as adhesive, welding (solvent, laser, ultrasonic, RF, etc.), or thermal. The adhesive method was the most successful and easy to implement but also one of the more difficult to understand, especially over long periods of time. Welding methods are meant to achieve a bond that is similar to bulk properties and so are easier to predict. However, methods of welding often produce defects in the bonds.. Examples of the test structures used to elucidate the internal properties of the model were shown and demonstrated. The real life examples used this research to improve upon current designs and aided in creating complex structures for sensor and other applications.

  19. Anodization of carbon fibers on interfacial mechanical properties of epoxy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Chang, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Yeong-Cheol; Rhee, Kyong-Yop

    2010-01-01

    The influence of anodic oxidation on the mechanical interfacial properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced epoxy resin composites was investigated. The surface properties of the anodized carbon fibers were studied through the measurement of contact angles and through SEM, XPS, and FT-IR analyses. The mechanical interfacial properties of the composites were studied through measurements of interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and critical strain energy release rate (G(IC)). It was shown that the surface functional groups containing oxygen on the anodized carbon fibers exert great effects on the surface energetics of fibers and the mechanical interfacial properties, e.g., ILSS, of the resulting composites. Contact angle measurements based on the wicking rate of a test liquid showed that anodic oxidation lead to an increase in the surface free energy of the carbon fibers, mainly in its specific (or polar) component. In terms of surface energetics, it was found that wetting played an important role in increasing the degree of adhesion at interfaces between the fibers and the resin matrices of the composites. PMID:20352820

  20. Effects of inclination and vorticity on interfacial flow dynamics in horizontal and inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiara, Areti; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming

    2015-11-01

    The transport of oil and gas in long horizontal pipelines can be significantly affected by the development of violent roll waves and slugs, but the mechanics causing such transitions have not been well understood. To enable the improvement of the prediction of flow transition criteria in long pipelines we perform theoretical analysis and direct numerical simulations of multiphase pipe flows to quantify the roles of inclination and vorticity in the flow dynamics. We find that backflow or flooding may occur even in the absence of disturbances due to inclination effects and obtain criteria on the maximum pipe length for steady flows. We identify and compare the effects of inclination and vorticity on the stability of interfacial wave disturbances. We discuss the mechanisms of non-linear energy transfer between stable and unstable wave disturbances and present results from direct numerical simulations for the predictions of spectrum evolutions for broad-banded interfacial disturbances in inclined pipes.

  1. Subcritical Water Induced Complexation of Soy Protein and Rutin: Improved Interfacial Properties and Emulsion Stability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Qi, Jun-Ru; Hou, Jun-Jie

    2016-09-01

    Rutin is a common dietary flavonoid with important antioxidant and pharmacological activities. However, its application in the food industry is limited mainly because of its poor water solubility. The subcritical water (SW) treatment provides an efficient technique to solubilize and achieve the enrichment of rutin in soy protein isolate (SPI) by inducing their complexation. The physicochemical, interfacial, and emulsifying properties of the complex were investigated and compared to the mixtures. SW treatment had much enhanced rutin-combined capacity of SPI than that of conventional method, ascribing to the well-contacted for higher water solubility of rutin with stronger collision-induced hydrophobic interactions. Compared to the mixtures of rutin with proteins, the complex exhibited an excellent surface activity and improved the physical and oxidative stability of its stabilized emulsions. This improving effect could be attributed to the targeted accumulation of rutin at the oil-water interface accompanied by the adsorption of SPI resulting in the thicker interfacial layer, as evidenced by higher interfacial protein and rutin concentrations. This study provides a novel strategy for the design and enrichment of nanovehicle providing water-insoluble hydrophobic polyphenols for interfacial delivery in food emulsified systems. PMID:27467966

  2. Determination of the Si-conducting polymer interfacial properties using A-C impedance techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Moacanin, Jovan

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the interfacial properties of poly(pyrrole) (PP) deposited electrochemically onto single crystal p-Si surfaces. The interfacial properties are dependent upon the counterions. The formation of 'quasi-ohmic' and 'nonohmic' contacts, respectively, of PP(ClO4) and PP films doped with other counterions (BF4 and para-toluene sulfonate) with p-Si, are explained in terms of the conductivity of these films and the flat band potential, V(fb), of PP relative to that of p-Si. The PP film seems to passivate or block intrinsic surface states present on the p-Si surface. The differences in the impedance behavior of para-toluene sulfonate doped and ClO4 doped PP are compared.

  3. Electrochemical evaluation of the p-Si/conducting polymer interfacial properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Distefano, S.; Moacanin, J.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of the contact resistance and interfacial properties of a p-Si/conducting polymer interface for solar cell applications. The electronic character of the polymer/semiconductor function is determined by studying the electrochemical behavior of both poly(isothianapthene) (PITN) and polypyrrole (PP) in an acetonitrile solution on p-silicon electrodes. The results obtained indicate that while PITN is intrinsically more conductive than PP, neither passivates surface states nor forms ohmic contact.

  4. Interfacial antiwear and physicochemical properties of alkylborate-dithiophosphates.

    PubMed

    Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Höglund, Erik; Lindberg, Mats; Antzutkin, Oleg N

    2011-04-01

    Boron compounds have become of interest in tribology because of their unique tribochemical and tribological properties. At the same time, dialkyldithiophosphates (DTPs) of transition metals have been extensively used as multifunctional additives in lubricants to control friction and reduce wear in mechanical systems. Because of the environmental pollution and health hazards of these compounds, ashless compounds with reduced amounts of sulfur and phosphorus are desirable. This work reports on the synthesis, characterization, and tribological properties of a new class of compounds, alkylborate-dithiophosphates. This class combines two high-iron-affinity surface active groups, borate and dialkyldithiophosphate, into a single molecule. The final products, viscous liquids, were characterized by FT-IR, multinuclear (1)H, (13)C, (31)P, and (11)B NMR spectroscopy and thermal analyses. Residues of one representative compound from this class, DPB-EDTP, after thermal analyses were additionally characterized by multinuclear (13)C, (31)P and (11)B MAS and (31)P CP/MAS NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR data suggest that a dominant part of the solid residue of DPB-EDTP consists of borophosphates. Antiwear and friction properties of a mineral oil with these novel additives were evaluated in a four-ball tribometer in comparison with O,O'-di-n-butyl-dithiophosphato-zinc(II), Zn-BuDTP, as a reference lubricant additive. The surface morphology and the elemental composition of the tribofilms were characterized using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-rays spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The results show that alkylborate-dithiophosphates, with substantially reduced amounts of sulfur and phosphorus compared with Zn-BuDTP, have considerably better antiwear and friction performance. PMID:21381776

  5. Effects of dispersion and interfacial modification on the macroscale properties of TiO2 polymer matrix nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Hamming, Lesley M.; Qiao, Rui; Messersmith, Phillip B.; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper quantifies how the quality of dispersion and the quality of the interfacial interaction between TiO2 nanoparticles and host polymer independently affect benchmark properties such as glass transition temperature (Tg), elastic modulus and loss modulus. By examining these composites with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we were able to demonstrate changes in properties depending on the adhesive/wetting or repulsive/dewetting interactions the nanoparticles have with the bulk polymer. We further quantified the dispersion of TiO2 nanoparticles in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) matrices by a digital-optical method and correlated those values to the degree of Tg depression compared to neat PMMA. Samples with the same weight percent of nanoparticles but better dispersion showed larger shifts in Tg. PMID:20161273

  6. Density-functional study of interfacial properties of colloid-polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moncho-Jordá, A; Dzubiella, J; Hansen, J P; Louis, A A

    2005-04-14

    Interfacial properties of colloid-polymer mixtures are examined within an effective one-component representation, where the polymer degrees of freedom are traced out, leaving a fluid of colloidal particles interacting via polymer-induced depletion forces. Restriction is made to zero-, one-, and two-body effective potentials, and a free energy functional is used that treats colloid excluded volume correlations within Rosenfeld's fundamental measure theory, and depletion-induced attraction within first-order perturbation theory. This functional allows a consistent treatment of both ideal and interacting polymers. The theory is applied to surface properties near a hard wall, to the depletion interaction between two walls, and to the fluid-fluid interface of demixed colloid-polymer mixtures. The results of the present theory compare well with predictions of a fully two-component representation of mixtures of colloids and ideal polymers (the Asakura-Oosawa model) and allow a systematic investigation of the effects of polymer-polymer interactions on interfacial properties. In particular, the wall surface tension is found to be significantly larger for interacting than for ideal polymers, whereas the opposite trend is predicted for the fluid-fluid interfacial tension. PMID:16851746

  7. Interfacial properties of mixed films of long-chain organics at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Jessica B.; Tervahattu, Heikki; Vaida, Veronica

    Organic molecules residing at the air-water interface of atmospheric aerosols will have a critical and direct effect on the aerosols' chemical, physical, and optical properties. It is important to study the interfacial properties of such compounds in order to accurately assess these effects. In this study, the compositions of two organic binary films at the air-water interface were monitored as a function of exposure time to the ambient atmosphere. One film was composed of tetracosanoic acid (lignoceric acid, CH 3(CH 2) 22COOH) and nonacosane (C 29H 60), and the second film was composed of octadecanoic acid (stearic acid, CH 3(CH 2) 16COOH) and octadecane (C 18H 38). These films were used as simplified proxies for the organic coating on atmospheric aerosols. The effect of lengthening the hydrocarbon chain on the interfacial longevity of the compounds in the mixed organic film at the air-aqueous interface was determined. The results show that octadecane in a mixed film desorbs from the interface after 72 h while octadecanoic acid remains. For nonacosane, further lengthening of the carbon chain greatly increased its interfacial longevity so that it was comparable with the fatty acids, which remained stable at the interface for at least 144 h. These results are used to explain the preponderance of long-chain fatty acids on the surfaces of collected aerosols and give insight into the degree to which the presence of other long-chain organics may affect the aerosol's chemical and physical properties.

  8. Influence of compaction properties and interfacial topography on the performance of bilayer tablets.

    PubMed

    Kottala, Niranjan; Abebe, Admassu; Sprockel, Omar; Akseli, Ilgaz; Nikfar, Faranak; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2012-10-15

    Bilayer tablets are generating great interest recently as they can achieve controlled delivery of different drugs with pre-defined release profiles. However, the production of such tablets has been facing great challenges as the layered tablets are prone to delaminate or fracture in the individual layers due to insufficient bonding strength of layers and adhesion at the interfaces. This paper will provide an insight into the role of interfacial topography on the performance of the bilayer tablets. In this study, two widely used pharmaceutical excipients: microcrystalline cellulose and lactose were investigated. Bilayer tablets were manufactured with a range of first and second layer compression forces. A crack of known dimensions was introduced at the interface to investigate the crack propagation mechanisms upon axially loading the bilayer tablet, and to determine the stress intensity factor (K(I)) of the interface (will be discussed in a separate paper). The results indicated that a strong dependency of the strength of bilayer tablets and mode of crack propagation on the material and compaction properties. The results showed that the strength of bilayer tablets increased with the increase of interfacial roughness, and the first layer and second layer forces determined the magnitude of interfacial roughness for both plastic and brittle materials. Further, the results also indicated that layer sequence and compaction forces played a key role in influencing the strength of the bilayer tablets. For the same (first and second layer) force combination, interfacial strength is higher for the tablets made of brittle material in the first layer. It was observed that interfacial strength decreased with the increase of lubricant concentration. The studies showed that the effect of lubricant (i.e. reduction in compact strength with the increase of lubricant concentration) on the strength of compacts is higher for tablets made of plastic material as compared to the tablets

  9. Interfacial properties in a discrete model for tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moglia, Belén; Guisoni, Nara; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2013-03-01

    We propose and study, by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations, a minimal discrete model for avascular tumor growth, which can also be applied for the description of cell cultures in vitro. The interface of the tumor is self-affine and its width can be characterized by the following exponents: (i) the growth exponent β=0.32(2) that governs the early time regime, (ii) the roughness exponent α=0.49(2) related to the fluctuations in the stationary regime, and (iii) the dynamic exponent z=α/β≃1.49(2), which measures the propagation of correlations in the direction parallel to the interface, e.g., ξ∝t1/z, where ξ is the parallel correlation length. Therefore, the interface belongs to the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality class, in agreement with recent experiments of cell cultures in vitro. Furthermore, density profiles of the growing cells are rationalized in terms of traveling waves that are solutions of the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. In this way, we achieved excellent agreement between the simulation results of the discrete model and the continuous description of the growth front of the culture or tumor.

  10. Probing interfacial electron dynamics with time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neppl, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Time-resolved core-level spectroscopy techniques using laser pulses to initiate and short X-ray pulses to probe photo-induced processes have the potential to provide electronic state- and atomic site-specific insight into fundamental electron dynamics at complex interfaces. We describe the implementation of femto- and picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in order to follow light-driven electron dynamics at dye-semiconductor interfaces on femto- to nanosecond timescales, and from the perspective of individual atomic sites. A distinct transient binding-energy shift of the Ru3d photoemission lines originating from the metal centers of N3 dye-molecules adsorbed on nanoporous ZnO is observed 500 fs after resonant HOMO-LUMO excitation with a visible laser pulse. This dynamical chemical shift is accompanied by a characteristic surface photo-voltage response of the semiconductor substrate. The two phenomena and their correlation will be discussed in the context of electronic bottlenecks for efficient interfacial charge-transfer and possible charge recombination and relaxation pathways leading to the neutralization of the transiently oxidized dye following ultrafast electron injection. First steps towards in operando time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques to monitor interfacial chemical dynamics will be presented.

  11. Spontaneous formation of intermediate phases and dynamics of interfacial tension in water-nonionic surfactant-octane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Svitova, T.F.; Smirnova, Yu.P.; Pisarev, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    The kinetics of the spontaneous formation of intermediate phases in aqueous solutions of ethoxylated iso-nonylphenols (iso-C{sub 9}PhEO{sub n}, where n = 5-10)-octane systems was studied at 25{degree}C. The maximum rate of the formation of intermediate phases at this temperature was observed when the number of ethoxy-groups n was 6. The dynamic interfacial tension at the boundary between the aqueous solutions of the surfactants and octane were measured using drop volume and spinning drop methods. The rate of the interfacials tension decrease was maximum and the equilibrium interfacial tension was minimum also at n = 6. A correlation between the dynamics of interfacial processes and the equilibrium phase state of the water-nonionic surfactant-hydrocarbon systems was found for the first time.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of contact mechanics: contact area and interfacial separation from small to full contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chunyan; Persson, Bo

    2008-03-01

    We report a molecular dynamics study of the contact between a rigid solid with a randomly rough surface and an elastic block with a flat surface. We study the contact area and the interfacial separation from small contact (low load) to full contact (high load). For small load the contact area varies linearly with the load and the interfacial separation depends logarithmically on the load [1-4]. For high load the contact area approaches to the nominal contact area (i.e., complete contact), and the interfacial separation approaches to zero. The present results may be very important for soft solids, e.g., rubber, or for very smooth surfaces, where complete contact can be reached at moderate high loads without plastic deformation of the solids. References: [1] C. Yang and B.N.J. Persson, arXiv:0710.0276, (to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.) [2] B.N.J. Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 125502 (2007) [3] L. Pei, S. Hyun, J.F. Molinari and M.O. Robbins, J. Mech. Phys. Sol. 53, 2385 (2005) [4] M. Benz, K.J. Rosenberg, E.J. Kramer and J.N. Israelachvili, J. Phy. Chem. B.110, 11884 (2006)

  13. Interfacial Properties and Design of Functional Energy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Liang, Liangbo; Nicolai, Adrien; Meunier, V.

    2014-01-01

    The vital importance of energy to society continues to demand a relentless pursuit of energy responsive materials that can bridge fundamental chemical structures at the molecular level and achieve improved functionality, such as efficient energy conversion/storage/transmission, over multiple length scales. This demand can potentially be realized by harnessing the power of self-assembly a spontaneous process where molecules or much larger entities form ordered aggregates as a consequence of predominately non-covalent (weak) interactions. Self-assembly is the key to bottom-up design of molecular devices, because the nearly atomic-level control is very difficult to realize in a top-down, e.g., lithographic approach. However, while function (e.g., charge mobility) in simple systems such as single crystals can often be predicted, predicting the function of the great variety of self-assembled molecular architectures is complicated by the lack of understanding and control over nanoscale interactions, mesoscale architectures, and macroscale (long-range) order. To establish a foundation toward delivering practical solutions, it is critical to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms responsible for the self-assembly of molecular and hybrid materials on various substrates. Typically molecular self-assembly involves poorly understood non-covalent intermolecular and substrate-molecule interactions compounded by local and/or collective influences from the substrate atomic lattice (symmetry and/or topological features) and electronic structure. Thus, progress towards unraveling the underlying physicochemical processes that control the structure and macroscopic physical, mechanical, electrical, and transport properties of materials increasingly requires tight integration of theory, modeling and simulation with precision synthesis, advanced experimental characterization, and device measurements. In this mode, theory and simulation can greatly accelerate the

  14. Influence of interfacial properties and inhomogeneity on formation of microdamage in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakade, Rugved

    Microdamage accumulation at the nanoscopic level of bone affects the overall mechanical behavior of the bone. This makes it necessary to study the mechanisms through which microdamage accumulation can take place at the nanoscopic level. Experiments on bone's different hierarchy are difficult because of the small sizes of these hierarchical structures. Prevention of bone fractures is greatly enhanced with the help of predictive computational tools and hence used to evaluate the effects of microdamage in bone. There are two main types of microdamage that can form in the bone; linear cracks and diffuse damage. The bone nanostructure consists of mineral platelets embedded in soft protein called collagen and can be treated as a composite material. In this study, a two-dimensional probabilistic finite element model of the bone nanostructure was developed to evaluate the likely formation of the microdamage in the nanostructure due to changes in material properties of the nanostructure. The influence of the microdamage formation due to the collagen-mineral interface strength and also the effects of inhomogeneity were studied. To study interfacial strength effects, cohesive elements using bilinear traction separation laws were used to simulate the behavior of the interface (by way of interfacial debonding) between the collegen-mineral layers. Random field theory was used to assign spatially correlated random variables in order to assign inhomogeneous material properties to the bone. Correlation lengths were used to control the level of inhomogeneity in the model. The analysis showed that the type of microdamage was significantly influenced by the strength of the mineral-collagen interface. Probabilistic failure analyses indicated that strong interfaces resulted in limited interfacial debonding and narrow stress concentrations around an initial defect in the mineral-collagen composite, thereby suggesting that the likely location of failure was in same plane of the initial

  15. Effect of chemical treatment of Kevlar fibers on mechanical interfacial properties of composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Min-Kang; Ma, Tae-Jun; Lee, Douk-Rae

    2002-08-01

    In this work, the effects of chemical treatment on Kevlar 29 fibers have been studied in a composite system. The surface characteristics of Kevlar 29 fibers were characterized by pH, acid-base value, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and FT-IR. The mechanical interfacial properties of the final composites were studied by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)), and specific fracture energy (G(IC)). Also, impact properties of the composites were investigated in the context of differentiating between initiation and propagation energies and ductile index (DI) along with maximum force and total energy. As a result, it was found that chemical treatment with phosphoric acid solution significantly affected the degree of adhesion at interfaces between fibers and resin matrix, resulting in improved mechanical interfacial strength in the composites. This was probably due to the presence of chemical polar groups on Kevlar surfaces, leading to an increment of interfacial binding force between fibers and matrix in a composite system. PMID:16290785

  16. Liquid-vapor equilibrium and interfacial properties of square wells in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; Quintana-H, Jacqueline; Chapela, Gustavo A.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid-vapor coexistence and interfacial properties of square wells in two dimensions are calculated. Orthobaric densities, vapor pressures, surface tensions, and interfacial thicknesses are reported. Results are presented for a series of potential widths λ* = 1.4, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, and 5, where λ* is given in units of the hard core diameter σ. Critical and triple points are explored. No critical point was found for λ* < 1.4. Corresponding states principle analysis is performed for the whole series. For λ* = 1.4 and 1.5 evidence is presented that at an intermediate temperature between the critical and the triple point temperatures the liquid branch becomes an amorphous solid. This point is recognized in Armas-Pérez et al. [unpublished] as a hexatic phase transition. It is located at reduced temperatures T* = 0.47 and 0.35 for λ* = 1.4 and 1.5, respectively. Properties such as the surface tension, vapor pressure, and interfacial thickness do not present any discontinuity at these points. This amorphous solid branch does not follow the corresponding state principle, which is only applied to liquids and gases.

  17. Interfacial properties and design of functional energy materials.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Liang, Liangbo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Meunier, Vincent

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The vital importance of energy to society continues to demand a relentless pursuit of energy responsive materials that can bridge fundamental chemical structures at the molecular level and achieve improved functionality and performance. This demand can potentially be realized by harnessing the power of self-assembly, a spontaneous process where molecules or much larger entities form ordered aggregates as a consequence of predominately noncovalent (weak) interactions. Self-assembly is the key to bottom-up design of molecular devices, because the nearly atomic-level control is very difficult to realize in a top-down, for example, lithographic, approach. However, while function in simple systems such as single crystals can often be evaluated a priori, predicting the function of the great variety of self-assembled molecular architectures is complicated by the lack of understanding and control over nanoscale interactions, mesoscale architectures, and macroscale order. To establish a foundation toward delivering practical solutions, it is critical to develop an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms responsible for the self-assembly of molecular and hybrid materials on various support substrates. Typical molecular self-assembly involves noncovalent intermolecular and substrate-molecule interactions. These interactions remain poorly understood, due to the combination of many-body interactions compounded by local or collective influences from the substrate atomic lattice and electronic structure. Progress toward unraveling the underlying physicochemical processes that control the structure and macroscopic physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and transport properties of materials increasingly requires tight integration of theory, modeling, and simulation with precision synthesis, advanced experimental characterization, and device measurements. Theory, modeling, and simulation can accelerate the process of materials understanding and design

  18. Evaluation of the interfacial bond properties between carbon phenolic and glass phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, K.; Clinton, R.; Jeelani, S.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of moisture and surface finish on the mechanical and physical properties of the interfacial bond between carbon/phenolic (C/P) and glass/phenolic (G/P) composite materials have been studied. Test results indicate that moisture substantially degrades the integrity of the interfacial bond between C/P and G/P materials. The apparent effect of the autoclave curing of the C/P material reduces the ultimate interlaminar shear length of the C/P material by 20 percent compared to the hydroclave curing of the C/P material. The variation in applied surface finishes is found to have no appreciable effect on the ultimate interlaminar shear strength of the interface in the wet laminate.

  19. Emulsifying and interfacial properties of vicilins: role of conformational flexibility at quaternary and/or tertiary levels.

    PubMed

    Liang, Han-Ni; Tang, Chuan-He

    2013-11-20

    Although the functionality of plant proteins (and soy proteins in particular) has been widely investigated in the last decades, the importance of conformational characteristics to their functionalities is still far away from being understood. The aim of the present work was to unravel the role of conformational flexibility at the quaternary and/or tertiary levels in the emulsifying and interfacial properties of phaseolin, an ideal vicilin (or 7S globulin) from red kidney bean. The conformational flexibility at quaternary and tertiary levels of phaseolin was modulated by urea with increasing concentrations from 0 to 8 M, as characterized by using dynamic light scattering (DLS), intrinsic fluorescence and derivative UV spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The emulsifying and interfacial properties, including emulsifying ability, flocculated state of oil droplets (in fresh emulsions), emulsion stability against creaming, and adsorption dynamics at the oil-water interface, were characterized at a specific protein concentration of 0.5% (w/v). The results indicated that increasing the urea concentration resulted in a progressive dissociation of trimeric phaseolin molecules into monomeric subunits, and even a structural unfolding of dissociated subunits; the urea-induced conformational changes at quaternary and/or tertiary levels were reversible, and the molecules at high urea concentrations shared similar structural features to the "molten globule state". On the other hand, increasing the urea concentration progressively improved the emulsifying ability of the protein, and flocculated extent of oil droplets in the fresh emulsions, but led to a progressive decrease in interfacial protein concentration. The improvement of the emulsifying ability was not related to diffusion (during initial adsorption) and penetration at the interface, but highly dependent on ease of structural rearrangement of the adsorbed proteins. These observations clearly

  20. Wetting and Interfacial Tension Dynamics of Oil-Nanofluids-Surface Minerals System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, L.; Li, C.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Korte, C.; Ladner, D.; Daigle, H.

    2015-12-01

    Among the techniques used in enhanced oil recovery (EOR), chemical injection involves the injection of surfactants to increase the oil mobility and decrease the interfacial tension (IFT). With the nanotechnology revolution, the use of nanoparticles has shown unique opportunities in petroleum engineering due to their physico-chemical properties. Our research examines the potential application of nanoparticles as a means of EOR by studying the influence of silicon oxide nanoparticles on the wettability and IFT of oil-nanofluids-surface systems. Batch studies were conducted to assess the stability of the nanoparticle suspensions of different concentrations (0, 0.001, 0.005, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.1 wt. %) in different reservoir conditions with and without the addition of surfactants (i.e. 5% brine, and Tween 20 at 0.5 and 2 cmc). Testing of oil-nanofluids and oil-nanofluids-minerals interactions was performed using crude oils from West Texas (light, API 40), Prudhoe Bay (medium, API 28), and Lloydminster (heavy, API 20). The dynamic behavior of IFT was measured using a pendant drop method. Results for 5% brine-nanoparticle systems indicated that 0.001 and 0.01 wt.% of nanoparticles contributed to a significant decrease of IFT for West Texas and Prudhoe Bay oils, while the highest decrease of IFT for Lloydminster was reported with 0.1 wt.% nanoparticles. IFT decrease was also enhanced by surfactant, and the addition of nanoparticles at 0.001 wt.% to surfactant resulted in significant decrease of IFT in most of the tested oil-nanofluid systems. The sessile drop method was used to measure the dynamic behavior of the contact angle of these oil droplets on minerals surface made of thin sections from Berea and Boise sandstone cores through a wetting test. Different nanofluid and surfactant concentrations were tested for the optimization of changes in wettability, which is a critical phase in assessing the behavior of nanofluids for optimal EOR with the selected crude oils.

  1. Velocity-strengthening friction significantly affects interfacial dynamics, strength and dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Spatschek, Robert; Brener, Efim A.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2015-01-01

    Frictional interfaces abound in natural and man-made systems, yet their dynamics are not well-understood. Recent extensive experimental data have revealed that velocity-strengthening friction, where the steady-state frictional resistance increases with sliding velocity over some range, is a generic feature of such interfaces. This physical behavior has very recently been linked to slow stick-slip motion. Here we elucidate the importance of velocity-strengthening friction by theoretically studying three variants of a realistic friction model, all featuring identical logarithmic velocity-weakening friction at small sliding velocities, but differ in their higher velocity behaviors. By quantifying energy partition (e.g. radiation and dissipation), the selection of interfacial rupture fronts and rupture arrest, we show that the presence or absence of strengthening significantly affects the global interfacial resistance and the energy release during frictional instabilities. Furthermore, we show that different forms of strengthening may result in events of similar magnitude, yet with dramatically different dissipation and radiation rates. This happens because the events are mediated by rupture fronts with vastly different propagation velocities, where stronger velocity-strengthening friction promotes slower rupture. These theoretical results may have significant implications on our understanding of frictional dynamics. PMID:25598161

  2. Insight into interfacial effect on effective physical properties of fibrous materials. I. The volume fraction of soft interfaces around anisotropic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Wang, Han; Niu, Yanze; Bai, Jingtao

    2016-01-01

    With advances in interfacial properties characterization technologies, the interfacial volume fraction is a feasible parameter for evaluating effective physical properties of materials. However, there is a need to determine the interfacial volume fraction around anisotropic fibers and a need to assess the influence of such the interfacial property on effective properties of fibrous materials. Either ways, the accurate prediction of interfacial volume fraction is required. Towards this end, we put forward both theoretical and numerical schemes to determine the interfacial volume fraction in fibrous materials, which are considered as a three-phase composite structure consisting of matrix, anisotropic hard spherocylinder fibers, and soft interfacial layers with a constant dimension coated on the surface of each fiber. The interfacial volume fraction actually represents the fraction of space not occupied by all hard fibers and matrix. The theoretical scheme that adopts statistical geometry and stereological theories is essentially an analytic continuation from spherical inclusions. By simulating such three-phase chopped fibrous materials, we numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction. The theoretical and numerical schemes provide a quantitative insight that the interfacial volume fraction depends strongly on the fiber geometries like fiber shape, geometric size factor, and fiber size distribution. As a critical interfacial property, the present contribution can be further drawn into assessing effective physical properties of fibrous materials, which will be demonstrated in another paper (Part II) of this series.

  3. Effects of pure and dyed PCE on physical and interfacial properties of remedial solutions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Woo; Wood, A Lynn; Lee, Tony R

    2002-11-11

    Hydrophobic dyes have been used to visually distinguish dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants from background aqueous phases and soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a dyed DNAPL, 0.5 g Oil-Red-O/l of PCE, on the physical properties of remedial solutions: water, co-solvents (50, 70, and 90% (v/v) ethanol), and surfactants (4% (w) sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate). This study compared the densities, viscosities, and interfacial tensions (IFTs) of the remedial solutions in contact with both dyed and undyed PCE. The presence of the dye in PCE substantially alters the IFTs of water and ethanol solutions, while there is no apparent difference in IFTs of surfactant solutions. The remedial solutions saturated with PCE showed higher viscosities and densities than pure remedial solutions. Solutions with high ethanol content exhibited the largest increases in liquid density. Because physical properties affect the flow of the remedial solutions in porous media, experiments using dyed DNAPLs should assess the influence of dyes on fluid and interfacial properties prior to remediation process analysis. PMID:12409243

  4. Comparison of the interfacial properties of Eugenia uniflora and Triticum vulgaris lectins.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Cesar A S; Oliveira, Maria D L; Santos-Magalhães, Nereide S; Correia, Maria T S; de Melo, Celso P

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the interfacial and dielectric properties of EuniSL, a recently purified lectin obtained from seeds of Eugenia uniflora (EuniSL), through surface pressure (Pi) and surface potential (DeltaV) measurements of its floating monolayers at the 2.0interfacial properties of both lectins are strongly dependent upon the pH of bulk phase, in general terms EuniSL monolayers seem to be more structured than those of WGA. At the pH range investigated, the interfacial electric double layer values (Psi(0)) calculated from the surface potential are negative, both for EuniSL and WGA. While for EuniSL definite breakpoints in an otherwise linear dependence of Psi(0) and zeta-potential as a function of pH were detected at pH 6.5, similar changes were observed for WGA at pH 8.5, a value close to the isoelectric point (pI) of this lectin. We have then used electrical impedance spectroscopy to investigate the dielectric characteristics of aqueous solutions of the two lectins, assuming a simple Debye relaxation model, and determined the pI of EuniSL as 6.5. While it is well known that the pI of a protein dispersed as a Langmuir film can be determined by surface potential measurements, our results confirm the use of impedance spectroscopy as a valuable and convenient technique that allows the identification of the pI of proteins directly dispersed in aqueous solutions. PMID:18996683

  5. Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of ru(II)-polypy6ridine sensitized TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubikova, Elena; Martin, Richard L; Batista, Enrique R; Snoeberger, Robert C; Batista, Victor S

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory calculations are applied to study interfacial electron transfer (IET) from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} into the (101) surface of anatase TiO{sub 2}. IET rate from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid attached to the nanoparticle in bidentate mode ({tau} {approx} 100 fs) is an order of magnitude faster than the IET rate of the adsorbate attached in the monodentate mode ({tau} {approx} 1 ps). Upon excitation with visible light, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} attached to TiO{sub 2} in bidentate binding mode will undergo IET with the rate of {approx} 1-10 ps, which is competitive with the excited state decay into the ground state. The probability of electron injection from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} is rather low, as the excitation with visible light localizes the excited electron in the tpy-tpy bridge, which does not have favorable coupling with the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle. The results are relevant to better understanding of the adsorbate features important for promoting efficient interfacial electron transfer into the semiconductor.

  6. Dynamic Ordering Transitions of Liquid Crystals Driven by Interfacial Complexes Formed Between Polyanions and Amphiphilic Polyamines

    PubMed Central

    Kinsinger, Michael I.; Buck, Maren E.; Campos, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    We report the design of an amphiphilic polyamine based on poly(2-alkenyl azlactone) (polymer 1) that strongly couples the formation of polyelectrolyte complexes at aqueous/liquid crystal (LC) interfaces to ordering transitions in the LC. We demonstrate that the addition of a strong anionic polyelectrolyte to aqueous solutions in contact with polymer 1-laden LC interfaces (prepared by Langmuir-Schaefer transfer of monolayers of polymer 1 onto micrometer-thick films of nematic LC) triggers ordering transitions in the LCs. We further demonstrate that changes in the ordering of the LCs (i) are driven by electrostatic interactions between the polyelectrolytes, (ii) involve multivalent interactions between the polyelectrolytes, and (iii) are triggered by reorganization of the hydrophobic side chains of amphiphilic polymer 1 upon formation of the interfacial complexes. The results presented in this paper lead us to conclude that ordering transitions in LCs can be used to provide insights into the structure and dynamics of interfacial complexes formed between polyelectrolytes. PMID:18991416

  7. Synergistic behaviour of ZnO nanoparticles and gemini surfactants on the dynamic and equilibrium oil/water interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Fereidooni Moghadam, Tahereh; Azizian, Saeid; Wettig, Shawn

    2015-03-21

    In this work the effect of ZnO nanoparticles on the interfacial behaviour of gemini surfactants (12-3-12 and 14-3-14) at the oil/water interface was investigated. Equilibrium and dynamic interfacial tension in the absence and presence of ZnO was measured and compared. The results show that the synergistic interactions between the surfactants and nanoparticles decrease the interfacial tension beyond that observed for each component, alone. Modelling of dynamic data with two different models indicates that the mechanism of surfactant migration (with and without ZnO) is mixed diffusion-kinetic-control. The Gibbs free energy of micellization and the Gibbs free energy of adsorption in the absence and presence of ZnO were calculated and compared. Finally the effect of addition of ZnO nanoparticles on emulsion stability was also examined. PMID:25687519

  8. A molecular dynamics study of local pressures and interfacial tensions of SDS micelles and dodecane droplets in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitabata, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Kazushi; Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    To obtain the radial (normal) and lateral (transverse) components of the local pressure tensor, PN(R) and PT(R), respectively, and the interfacial tension of micelles, molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed for spherical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. The local pressure tensor was calculated as a function of radial distance R using the Irving-Kirkwood formula. Similar MD calculations were also carried out for an n-dodecane droplet in water to compare the differences in the local pressure and interfacial tension values with those of the micelles. The calculated interfacial tensions were 20 ± 5 and 44 ± 10 mN/m for the SDS micelles and dodecane droplets, respectively. The excess free energies due to the interfacial tension were 340 and 1331 kJ/mol for the SDS micelle and dodecane droplet, respectively. The micelles are stabilized by 991 kJ/mol by covering their hydrophobic cores with hydrophilic groups. The dodecane droplet has a large interfacial tension caused by the zero or positive values of PN(R) - PT(R) at all values of R. In contrast, the small interfacial tension in the SDS micelles comes from the negative PN(R) - PT(R) values over a wide range of R. The pressure difference between the inside and outside of the oil droplet and its interfacial tension well satisfies the Laplace equation. However, the hydrophobic core of the SDS micelle is quite different from the liquid alkane, and the SDS micelles do not follow Laplace's picture. Decomposing the interfacial tension into contributions from various interactions, it is found that those between charged and polar groups dominate the interfacial tension of the SDS micelles. The positive electrostatic potential (1.3 V) on the micelle surface and the negative potential (-0.15 V) on the oil droplet contribute to the interfacial tensions by 19 and 0.5 mN/m, respectively. Thus, the interfacial tension of the SDS micelles is produced by electrostatic interactions, in contrast to the dodecane

  9. A molecular dynamics study of local pressures and interfacial tensions of SDS micelles and dodecane droplets in water.

    PubMed

    Kitabata, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Kazushi; Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-06-14

    To obtain the radial (normal) and lateral (transverse) components of the local pressure tensor, PN(R) and PT(R), respectively, and the interfacial tension of micelles, molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were performed for spherical sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles. The local pressure tensor was calculated as a function of radial distance R using the Irving-Kirkwood formula. Similar MD calculations were also carried out for an n-dodecane droplet in water to compare the differences in the local pressure and interfacial tension values with those of the micelles. The calculated interfacial tensions were 20 ± 5 and 44 ± 10 mN/m for the SDS micelles and dodecane droplets, respectively. The excess free energies due to the interfacial tension were 340 and 1331 kJ/mol for the SDS micelle and dodecane droplet, respectively. The micelles are stabilized by 991 kJ/mol by covering their hydrophobic cores with hydrophilic groups. The dodecane droplet has a large interfacial tension caused by the zero or positive values of PN(R) - PT(R) at all values of R. In contrast, the small interfacial tension in the SDS micelles comes from the negative PN(R) - PT(R) values over a wide range of R. The pressure difference between the inside and outside of the oil droplet and its interfacial tension well satisfies the Laplace equation. However, the hydrophobic core of the SDS micelle is quite different from the liquid alkane, and the SDS micelles do not follow Laplace's picture. Decomposing the interfacial tension into contributions from various interactions, it is found that those between charged and polar groups dominate the interfacial tension of the SDS micelles. The positive electrostatic potential (1.3 V) on the micelle surface and the negative potential (-0.15 V) on the oil droplet contribute to the interfacial tensions by 19 and 0.5 mN/m, respectively. Thus, the interfacial tension of the SDS micelles is produced by electrostatic interactions, in contrast to the dodecane

  10. Two-dimensional materials as emulsion stabilizers: interfacial thermodynamics and molecular barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Megan A; Ohata, Yuzo; Miyawaki, Jin; Bose, Arijit; Hurt, Robert H

    2014-04-01

    A new application for two-dimensional (2D) materials is emulsification, where they can serve as ultrathin platelike interfacial stabilizers in two-liquid systems. We present a first detailed thermodynamic analysis of atomically thin 2D materials at organic-aqueous liquid-liquid interfaces and derive expressions for the transfer free energies of emulsion stabilization that account for material geometry, van der Waals transparency or opacity, and variable hydrophobicity. High mass potency is shown to be an intrinsic property of the 2D geometry, which at the atomically thin limit places every atom in contact with both liquid phases, resulting in unit atom efficiency. The thermodynamic model successfully predicts that graphene oxide but not pristine graphene has a favorable hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance for oil-water emulsion stabilization. Multilayer tiling is predicted to occur by the passivation of droplet surface patches left uncovered by packing inefficiencies in the first monolayer, and complete multilayer coverage is confirmed by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy. The molecular barrier function of graphene interfacial films causes a significant suppression of dispersed-phase evaporation rates with potential applications in controlled release. Finally, these emulsions can be used as templates for creating solid graphene foams or graphene microsacks filled with lipophilic cargos. Emerging 2D materials are promising as dispersants or emulsifiers where high mass potency and multifunctional properties are desired. PMID:24625132

  11. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Blas, F. J.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.

    2015-09-14

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ{sub 11} = σ{sub 22}, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ϵ{sub 11} = ϵ{sub 22}, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janecek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances r{sub c} and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance r{sub c} is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related

  12. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Ruiz, F. J.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Blas, F. J.

    2015-09-01

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ11 = σ22, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ɛ11 = ɛ22, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janec̆ek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances rc and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance rc is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related with a desorption of the molecules

  13. Liquid-liquid interfacial properties of a symmetrical Lennard-Jones binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ruiz, F J; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Blas, F J

    2015-09-14

    We determine the interfacial properties of a symmetrical binary mixture of equal-sized spherical Lennard-Jones molecules, σ11 = σ22, with the same dispersive energy between like species, ϵ11 = ϵ22, but different dispersive energies between unlike species low enough to induce phase separation. We use the extensions of the improved version of the inhomogeneous long-range corrections of Janec̆ek [J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 6264 (2006)], presented recently by MacDowell and Blas [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 074705 (2009)] and Martínez-Ruiz et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 141, 184701 (2014)], to deal with the interaction energy and microscopic components of the pressure tensor. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in the canonical ensemble to obtain the interfacial properties of the symmetrical mixture with different cut-off distances rc and in combination with the inhomogeneous long-range corrections. The pressure tensor is obtained using the mechanical (virial) and thermodynamic route. The liquid-liquid interfacial tension is also evaluated using three different procedures, the Irving-Kirkwood method, the difference between the macroscopic components of the pressure tensor, and the test-area methodology. This allows to check the validity of the recent extensions presented to deal with the contributions due to long-range corrections for intermolecular energy and pressure tensor in the case of binary mixtures that exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility. In addition to the pressure tensor and the surface tension, we also obtain density profiles and coexistence densities and compositions as functions of pressure, at a given temperature. According to our results, the main effect of increasing the cut-off distance rc is to sharpen the liquid-liquid interface and to increase the width of the biphasic coexistence region. Particularly interesting is the presence of a relative minimum in the total density profiles of the symmetrical mixture. This minimum is related with a desorption of the molecules

  14. Interfacial dynamics of a liposome deforming in an axisymmetric extensional flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Mancera, Andres; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2007-03-01

    Liposomes are self-enclosed structures composed of curved lipid bilayer membranes which entrap part of the solvent in which they freely float. They are predominantly made from amphiphilic molecules, a special class of surface-active molecules. Liposomes have various applications in science and technology including drug delivery systems, medical diagnostics and they can also be used as simple cellular models for basic research. We simulated the deformation of a liposome in an axisymmetric extensional flow using the boundary integral method. The liposome deforms due to hydrodynamic loading on the interface. The dynamics of the system are characterized by the competition between the hydrodynamic and interfacial forces. The lipid bilayer membrane can be modeled as a hyperelastic continuous material or a liquid-liquid interface with a highly packed surfactant layer. We compare the deformation behavior of liposomes with both types of interfaces and identify similarities and differences between the two models.

  15. Structure, viscoelasticity, and interfacial dynamics of a model polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Robert J; Gillard, Timothy M; Irwin, Matthew T; Lodge, Timothy P; Bates, Frank S

    2016-01-01

    We have systematically studied the equilibrium structure and dynamics of a polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) composed of poly(cyclohexylethylene) (PCHE), poly(ethylene) (PE), and a volumetrically symmetric PCHE-PE diblock copolymer, using dynamic mechanical spectroscopy, small angle X-ray and neutron scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The BμE was investigated over an 80 °C temperature range, revealing a structural evolution and a rheological response not previously recognized in such systems. As the temperature is reduced below the point associated with the lamellar-disorder transition at compositions adjacent to the microemulsion channel, the interfacial area per chain of the BμE approaches that of the neat (undiluted) lamellar diblock copolymer. With increasing temperature, the diblock-rich interface swells through homopolymer infiltration. Time-temperature-superposed linear dynamic data obtained as a function of frequency show that the viscoelastic response of the BμE is strikingly similar to that of the fluctuating pure diblock copolymer in the disordered state, which we associate with membrane undulations and the breaking and reforming of interfaces. This work provides new insights into the structure and dynamics that characterize thermodynamically stable BμEs in the limits of relatively weak and strong segregation. PMID:26439750

  16. Growth and interfacial properties of epitaxial CaCuO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, D.; Müller, P.; Sleem, A.; Schneider, R.; Gerthsen, D.; Löhneysen, H. v.

    2012-11-01

    Epitaxial growth and interfacial properties of CaCuO2 films deposited on various perovskite related substrates by pulsed laser ablation were investigated. Highly c-axis oriented films can be stabilized on SrTiO3, LaAlO3, (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7, and NdGaO3 single crystalline substrates. However, the interface region between film and substrate is often found to be strongly defective. CaCuO2 films grown on (001)- and (110)-oriented NdGaO3 show the best crystallinity with lattice parameters nearly the same as for bulk CaCuO2 and a mosaic spread of about 0.1°. Regions where the interfacial growth is nearly perfect, dominantly show an A-site termination of NdGaO3, i.e., a layer stacking sequence of GaO2/NdO/CuO2/Ca. Resistivity measurements on the films show thermally activated behavior between 300 K and 170 K, i.e., ln R ˜ TA/T, where the activation temperature TA amounts to 116 K, and Mott variable range hopping, i.e., ln R ˜ T-1/4, below about 120 K. With decreasing film thickness, the resistivity increases remarkably, indicating that the interfacial conductivity is more insulating than metallic in character as expected from hole-doping of CaCuO2 due to apical oxygen at the NdO/CuO2 interface. Measurements of the magnetization do not show any indications for two-dimensional superconductivity at the interface. The experimental results suggest that the conductivity is rather caused by particulates of cupric oxide found in a distance of about 10 nm from the interface in the upper part of the film.

  17. Influence of interfacial properties on Ostwald ripening in crosslinked multilayered oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Fischer, Lutz; Weiss, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    The influence of interfacial crosslinking, layer thickness and layer density on the kinetics of Ostwald ripening in multilayered emulsions at different temperatures was investigated. Growth rates of droplets were measured by monitoring changes in the droplet size distributions of 0.5% (w/w) n-octane, n-decane, and n-dodecane oil-in-water emulsions using static light scattering. Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner theory was used to calculate Ostwald ripening rates. A sequential two step process, based on electrostatic deposition of sugar beet pectin onto fish gelatin or whey protein isolate (WPI) interfacial membranes, was used to manipulate the interfacial properties of the oil droplets. Laccase was added to the fish gelatin-beet pectin emulsions to promote crosslinking of adsorbed pectin molecules via ferulic acid groups, whereas heat was induced to promote crosslinking of WPI and helix coil transitions of fish gelatin. Ripening rates of single-layered, double-layered and crosslinked emulsions increased as the chain length of the n-alkanes decreased. Emulsions containing crosslinked fish gelatin-beet pectin coated droplets had lower droplet growth rates (3.1±0.3×10(-26) m(3)/s) than fish gelatin-stabilized droplets (7.3±0.2×10(-26) m(3)/s), which was attributed to the formation of a protective network. Results suggest that physical or enzymatic biopolymer-crosslinking of interfaces may reduce the molecular transport of alkanes between the droplets in the continuous phase. PMID:22958854

  18. Interfacial properties of a carbyne-rich nanostructured carbon thin film in ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Della Foglia, Flavio; Piseri, Paolo; Milani, Paolo

    2016-03-18

    Nanostructured carbon sp(2) (ns-C) thin films with up to 30% of sp-coordinated atoms (carbynes) were produced in a high vacuum by the low kinetic energy deposition of carbon clusters produced in the gas phase and accelerated by a supersonic expansion. Immediately after deposition the ns-C films were immersed in situ in an ionic liquid electrolyte. The interfacial properties of ns-C films in the ionic liquid electrolyte were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The so-prepared carbyne-rich electrodes showed superior electric double layer (EDL) capacitance and electric conductivity compared to ns-C electrodes containing only sp(2) carbon, showing the substantial influence of carbynes on the electrochemical properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes. PMID:26878188

  19. Interfacial properties of a carbyne-rich nanostructured carbon thin film in ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomo Bettini, Luca; Della Foglia, Flavio; Piseri, Paolo; Milani, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    Nanostructured carbon sp2 (ns-C) thin films with up to 30% of sp-coordinated atoms (carbynes) were produced in a high vacuum by the low kinetic energy deposition of carbon clusters produced in the gas phase and accelerated by a supersonic expansion. Immediately after deposition the ns-C films were immersed in situ in an ionic liquid electrolyte. The interfacial properties of ns-C films in the ionic liquid electrolyte were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The so-prepared carbyne-rich electrodes showed superior electric double layer (EDL) capacitance and electric conductivity compared to ns-C electrodes containing only sp2 carbon, showing the substantial influence of carbynes on the electrochemical properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes.

  20. Viscosity and interfacial properties in a mussel-inspired adhesive coacervate†

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aasheesh; Krogstad, Daniel V.; Tirrell, Matthew; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Waite, J. Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The chemistry of mussel adhesion has commanded the focus of much recent research activity on wet adhesion. By comparison, the equally critical adhesive processing by marine organisms has been little examined. Using a mussel-inspired coacervate formed by mixing a recombinant mussel adhesive protein (fp-151-RGD) with hyaluronic acid (HA), we have examined the nanostructure, viscosity, friction, and interfacial energy of fluid-fluid phase-separated coacervates using the surface forces apparatus and microscopic techniques. At mixing ratios of fp-151-RGD:HA resulting in marginal coacervation, the coacervates showed shear-thickening viscosity and no structure by cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). However, at the mixing ratio producing maximum coacervation, the coacervate showed shear-thinning viscosity and a transition to a bicontinuous phase by cryo-TEM. The shear-thinning viscosity, high friction coefficient (>1.2), and low interfacial energy (<1 mJ m−2) observed at the optimal mixing ratio for coacervation are promising delivery, spreading and adhesion properties for future wet adhesive and coating technologies. PMID:21544267

  1. Mechanical, thermal, and interfacial properties of green composites with ramie fiber and soy resins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Tae; Netravali, Anil N

    2010-05-12

    Fully biodegradable, green composites were fabricated with ramie fibers and modified soy flour (MSF) resin. Defatted soy flour (SF) was modified by a lab-scale filtration system to improve its mechanical, interfacial, and thermal properties through increasing the protein content. The protein content of SF was increased from 53.1 to 67.5% by filtering out soluble sugars using a microfiber-based filter. Tensile stress and Young's modulus of MSF resins were 35.5 and 1411.7 MPa, respectively, which were significantly higher than those (12.7 and 379.3 MPa) of SF resins. Interfacial shear strength of single ramie fibers with MSF resins ranged from 8.8 to 15.2 MPa, which were about 40-50% higher than those obtained with SF resins. Tensile stress and Young's modulus of ramie fiber-reinforced composites were 88.0 MPa and 2.94 GPa with SF resin and 103.8 MPa and 3.15 GPa with MSF resin. PMID:20405944

  2. Interfacial dynamics of two immiscible fluids in spatially periodic porous media: The role of substrate wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Pranab Kumar; DasGupta, Debabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-07-01

    We delineate the contact line dynamics of two immiscible fluids in a medium having spatially periodic porous structures. The flow is driven by an external applied pressure gradient. We bring out the combined consequences of the solid fraction distribution and the substrate wettability on the resulting dynamics of the contact line, by employing phase-field formalism. We capture the sequence of spatiotemporal events leading to formation of liquid bridges by trapping a small amount of displaced phase fluid between two consecutive porous blocks, as dictated by the combinations of substrate wettability and solid fraction. We also demonstrate the existence of a regime of complete interfacial recovery, depending on the parametric space of the governing parameters under concern. Our results essentially demonstrate the intricate mechanisms by virtue of which the wettabilities of the substrates alter the dynamical evolutions of interfaces and the subsequent shapes and sizes of the adsorbed dispersed phases, bearing far-ranging consequences in several practical applications ranging from oil recovery to groundwater flow.

  3. A Quantitative Exploration of the Effect of Interfacial Phenomena on the Thermomechanical Properties of Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Bharath

    Polymer nanocomposites (PNC) are complex material systems in which the prevailing length scales, i.e., the particle size, radii of gyration of the polymer and the interparticle spacing, converge. This convergence leads to an increased dominance of the interface polymer over bulk properties, when compared to conventional "microcomposites". The development of fascinating nanoscopic filler materials (C60, nanotubes, graphene, quantum dots) along with this potential gain in interfacial area has fueled the expansion of PNCs. Nanocomposites literature has demonstrated a myriad of potential chemistries and self assembled structures that could significantly impact a diverse range of applications. However, most noteworthy results in this field are serendipitous and/or are outcomes of resource-intensive "trial and error" experiments supplemented by intuition. Intuition suggests, qualitatively, that the properties of PNCs depend on the individual properties of the participating species, the interphase and the spatial distribution of filler particles. However, the individual roles of these parameters are difficult to identify, since they are interrelated due to their co-dependence on the chemical constitution of the filler and matrix. A quantitative unifying picture is yet to emerge and the commercialization of this material class has been severely hampered by the lack of design rules and structure-property constitutive relationships that would aid in the prediction of bulk properties. In this thesis, a quantitative understanding of interfacial phenomena was sought and structure-property relationships between the filler/matrix interface chemistry and the dispersion and thermomechanical properties of PNCs were obtained by systematic experiments on 2 distinct kinds of nanocomposite systems (a) Enthalpic short silane modified fillers and (b) Entropic long polymer chain grafted filler embedded PNCs. In order to quantitatively understand the role of enthalpic compatibility, an

  4. Effect of Polymer/Solid and Polymer/Vapor Instantaneous Interfaces on the Interfacial Structure and Dynamics of Polymer Melt Systems.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    2016-07-19

    Polymers are used in a wide range of applications that involve chemical and physical processes taking place at surfaces or interfaces which influence the interaction between the polymer material and the substance that comes into contact with it. Polymer surfaces are usually modified either chemically or physically for specific applications such as facilitating wetting, reducing friction, and enhancing adhesion. The variety and complexity of surface and interfacial processes requires a molecular-level understanding of the structural and dynamical properties of the surface/interface layer to help in the design of materials with desired functional properties. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we investigate the structure and dynamics at the surface of polymer films. We find that the density profiles of the films as a function of distance relative to an instantaneous surface have a structure indicative of a layering at the polymer/vapor interface similar to the typical layered structure observed at the polymer/substrate interface. However, the interfacial molecules at the polymer/vapor interface have a higher mobility compared to that in the bulk while the mobility of the molecules is lower at the polymer/substrate interface. Time correlation of the instantaneous polymer/vapor interface shows that surface fluctuations are strongly temperature dependent and are directly related to the mobility of polymer chains near the interface. PMID:27347740

  5. Interfacial properties of Quillaja saponins and its use for micellisation of lutein esters.

    PubMed

    Tippel, Janine; Lehmann, Maren; von Klitzing, Regine; Drusch, Stephan

    2016-12-01

    Natural food colourants, colouring foods and bioactive food ingredients need to be solubilised for their incorporation in food. Aim of the present study was to investigate the micelle-forming properties of saponins from Quillaja saponaria Mollina (QS) in order to solubilise a lutein ester extract for its incorporation in food matrices. QS showed a high surface activity and functionality with respect to micellisation as derived from interfacial tension measurements and subsequent data fitting to the classical Frumkin model. The composition of the aqueous phase affected the lutein ester incorporation as revealed by particle size, zeta potential and colour measurements. In terms of morphology of lutein ester loaded saponin micelles (LMS), cryo-TEM micrographs showed depending on the composition of the medium both, spherical and elongated branched micelles. PMID:27374503

  6. Investigating the interfacial properties of electrochemically roughened platinum electrodes for neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Weremfo, Alexander; Carter, Paul; Hibbert, D Brynn; Zhao, Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Platinum electrodes have been electrochemically roughened (roughness factors up to 430) and evaluated for use as neural stimulation electrodes. The roughened electrodes show superior interfacial properties with increasing surface roughness. The roughened electrode (fR = 250) has a charge injection limit of 1.0 mC cm(-2) (400 μs pulse width), which is superior to that of titanium nitride (0.87 mC cm(-2)) but comparable to that of carbon nanotubes (1.0-1.6 mC cm(-2)). The surface roughness can also be optimized for different neural stimulation applications based on the available charge density at a particular pulse width of stimulation. The roughened platinum electrodes demonstrated good mechanical stability under harsh ultrasonication and electrochemical stability under continuous biphasic stimulation, indicating the potential of this biological interface to be safe and stable. PMID:25669232

  7. Properties of halloysite nanotube epoxy resin hybrids and the interfacial reactions in the systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingxian; Guo, Baochun; Du, Mingliang; Cai, Xiaojia; Jia, Demin

    2007-11-01

    A naturally occurred microtubullar silicate, halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), was co-cured with epoxy/cyanate ester resin to form organic-inorganic hybrids. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the hybrids with low HNT concentration was found to be substantially lower than that of the plain cured resin. The moduli of the hybrids in the glassy state and rubbery state were significantly higher than those for the plain cured resin. The dispersion of HNTs in the resin matrix was very uniform as revealed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. The interfacial reactions between the HNTs and cyanate ester (CE) were revealed by the results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The substantially increased properties of the hybrids were attributed to the covalent bonding between the nanotubes and the matrix.

  8. Removing adsorbed heavy metal ions from sand surfaces via applying interfacial properties of rhamnolipid.

    PubMed

    Haryanto, Bode; Chang, Chien-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the interfacial properties of biosurfactant rhamnolipid were investigated and were applied to remove adsorbed heavy metal ions from sand surfaces with flushing operations. The surface tension-lowering activity, micelle charge characteristic, and foaming ability of rhamnolipid were identified first. For rhamnolipid in water, the negatively charged characteristic of micelles or aggregates was confirmed and the foaming ability at concentrations higher than 40 mg/L was evaluated. By using the rhamnolipid solutions in a batch washing approach, the potential of applying the interfacial properties of rhamnolipid to remove adsorbed copper ions from sand surfaces was then demonstrated. In rhamnolipid solution flushing operations for sand-packed medium, higher efficiency was found for the removal of adsorbed copper ions with residual type than with inner-sphere interaction type, implying the important role of interaction type between the copper ion and the sand surface in the removal efficiency. In addition, the channeling effect of rhamnolipid solution flow in the sand-packed medium was clearly observed in the solution flushing operations and was responsible for the low removal efficiency with low contact areas between solution and sand. By using rhamnolipid solution with foam to flush the sand-packed medium, one could find that the channeling effect of the solution flow was reduced and became less pronounced with the increase in the rhamnolipid concentration, or with the enhanced foaming ability. With the reduced channeling effect in the flushing operations, the removal efficiency for adsorbed copper ions was significantly improved. The results suggested that the foam-enhanced rhamnolipid solution flushing operation was efficient in terms of surfactant usage and operation time. PMID:25748376

  9. Ultrafast interfacial charge transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized and quantum dot solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Hirendra N.

    2013-02-01

    Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) appeared to be one of the good discovery for the solution of energy problem. We have been involved in studying ultrafast interfacial electron transfer dynamics in DSSC using femtosecond laser spectroscopy. However it has been realized that it is very difficult to design and develop higher efficient one, due to thermodynamic limitation. Again in DSSC most of the absorbed photon energy is lost as heat within the cell, which apart from decreasing the efficiency also destabilizes the device. It has been realized that quantum dot solar cell (QDSC) are the best bet where the sensitizer dye molecules can be replaced by suitable quantum dot (QD) materials in solar cell. The quantum-confinement effect in semiconductors modifies their electronic structure, which is a very important aspect of these materials. For photovoltaic applications, a long-lived charge separation remains one of the most essential criteria. One of the problems in using QDs for photovoltaic applications is their fast charge recombination caused by nonradiative Auger processes, which occur predominantly at lower particle sizes due to an increase in the Coulomb interaction between electrons and holes. Various approaches, such as the use of metal-semiconductor composites, semiconductor-polymer composite, and semiconductor core-shell heterostructures, have been attempted to minimize the fast recombination between electrons and holes. To make higher efficient solar devices it has been realised that it is very important to understand charge carrier and electron transfer dynamics in QD and QD sensitized semiconductor nanostructured materials. In the present talk, we are going to discuss on recent works on ultrafast electron transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles/film [1-12] and charge (electron/hole) transfer dynamics in quantum dot core-shell nano-structured materials [13-17].

  10. Single-molecule resolution of protein structure and interfacial dynamics on biomaterial surfaces

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sean Yu; Kastantin, Mark; Schwartz, Daniel K.; Kaar, Joel L.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed to monitor dynamic changes in protein structure and interfacial behavior on surfaces by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer. This method entails the incorporation of unnatural amino acids to site-specifically label proteins with single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer probes for high-throughput dynamic fluorescence tracking microscopy on surfaces. Structural changes in the enzyme organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) were monitored upon adsorption to fused silica (FS) surfaces in the presence of BSA on a molecule-by-molecule basis. Analysis of >30,000 individual trajectories enabled the observation of heterogeneities in the kinetics of surface-induced OPH unfolding with unprecedented resolution. In particular, two distinct pathways were observed: a majority population (∼ 85%) unfolded with a characteristic time scale of 0.10 s, and the remainder unfolded more slowly with a time scale of 0.7 s. Importantly, even after unfolding, OPH readily desorbed from FS surfaces, challenging the common notion that surface-induced unfolding leads to irreversible protein binding. This suggests that protein fouling of surfaces is a highly dynamic process because of subtle differences in the adsorption/desorption rates of folded and unfolded species. Moreover, such observations imply that surfaces may act as a source of unfolded (i.e., aggregation-prone) protein back into solution. Continuing study of other proteins and surfaces will examine whether these conclusions are general or specific to OPH in contact with FS. Ultimately, this method, which is widely applicable to virtually any protein, provides the framework to develop surfaces and surface modifications with improved biocompatibility. PMID:24235137

  11. Improvement of interfacial property between PBO fibers and epoxy resin by surface grafting of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, B.; Meng, L. H.; Huang, Y. D.

    2012-10-01

    PBO fiber as reinforced material has been widely applied in various fields such as aerospace, automobile and sport apparatus due to excellent mechanic property during past two decades. However, poor interfacial adhesion limits the further application of PBO fiber. To solve this problem, plenty of work has been done. In the present study, the surface of PBO fibers was treated through surface grafting of polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxanes (POSS). The effect of POSS grafting on bulk mechanic property and interfacial property of PBO fiber were studied. Surface chemical composition, surface morphologies, surface free energy, single-fiber tensile strength of untreated and treated PBO fiber were characterized. The results show that POSS nanoparticles were grafted on the fiber surface successfully. The surface characteristics of treated PBO fiber were different from that of untreated one. Oxygen-containing polar functional groups, elemental ratio of oxygen to carbon, surface roughness and surface free energy increased significantly. In addition, interfacial shear strength between treated PBO fibers and epoxy resin increased to 54.9 MPa comparative with untreated one. Meanwhile tensile strength of treated PBO fibers only very little decreased. Therefore, POSS surface grafting can be utilized to enhance the interfacial adhesion between PBO fibers and epoxy resin matrix.

  12. Effect of silica nanoparticles on the interfacial properties of a canonical lipid mixture.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Ferrari, Michele; Santini, Eva; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    The incorporation of silica nanoparticles (NPs) from the subphase into Langmuir lipid monolayers formed by three components, 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and Cholesterol (Chol), modifies the thermodynamic and rheological behavior, as well as the structure of the pristine lipid film. Thus, the combination of structural characterization techniques, such as Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), with interfacial thermodynamic and dilational rheology studies has allowed us to deepen on the physico-chemical bases governing the interaction between lipid molecules and NPs. The penetration of NPs driven by the interaction (electrostatic or hydrogen bonds) with the polar groups of the lipid molecules affects the phase behaviour (surface pressure-area, П-A , isotherm) of the monolayer. This can be easily rationalized considering the modification of the packing and cohesion of the molecules at the interface as revealed BAM and AFM images. Furthermore, oscillatory barrier experiments have allowed obtaining information related to the effect of NPs on the monolayer response under dynamic conditions that presents a critical impact on the characterization of biological relevant systems because most of the processes of interest for these systems present a dynamic character. PMID:26562189

  13. In-phase and out-of-phase tensile properties of polypropylene/mica composites modified by a novel industrial waste based interfacial agent. Responses at the α and β transitions of the polymer phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Martínez, Jesús María; Collar, Emilia P.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the study of the evolution with temperature of the in-phase and the out-of-phase responses of polypropylene/mica composites with improved interfacial interactions due to the presence of an industrial waste based interfacial modifier. This one is a p-phenylen-bis-maleamic acid grafted atactic polypropylene (aPP-pPBMA) with 15% w/w grafted pPBMA (5.0.10-4 g.mol-1). This work has been two-fold planned. On one hand, we have used dynamic mechanical parameters to evidence the interfacial improve caused by the addition of the interfacial modifier (aPP-pPBMA). The other purpose has been to obtain a mathematical to predict the overall behaviour of the heterogeneous system for whatever temperature considered. In our case we have merely used the dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA) for just the α and β transition temperatures. Hence, a Box-Wilson experimental design considering the amount of mica particles and of interfacial agent as independent variables was used to obtain the mathematical model. The study has been tackled by considering the different transitions of the polypropylene matrix in the temperature interval scanned and further application of the Statistical Design of Experiments (sDOE) to each transition temperature in order to make forecasts for the property (E', E") as a function of the composite components and of the type of temperature dependent relaxation phenomena taking place.

  14. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A; Fischer, Sean A; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H G; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F; Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy. PMID:27152346

  15. Ice-nucleating bacteria control the order and dynamics of interfacial water

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Ravindra; Usui, Kota; Livingstone, Ruth A.; Fischer, Sean A.; Pfaendtner, Jim; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Nagata, Yuki; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmüser, Lars; Mauri, Sergio; Scheel, Jan F.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Ice-nucleating organisms play important roles in the environment. With their ability to induce ice formation at temperatures just below the ice melting point, bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae attack plants through frost damage using specialized ice-nucleating proteins. Besides the impact on agriculture and microbial ecology, airborne P. syringae can affect atmospheric glaciation processes, with consequences for cloud evolution, precipitation, and climate. Biogenic ice nucleation is also relevant for artificial snow production and for biomimetic materials for controlled interfacial freezing. We use interface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy to show that hydrogen bonding at the water-bacteria contact imposes structural ordering on the adjacent water network. Experimental SFG data and molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that ice-active sites within P. syringae feature unique hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns to enhance ice nucleation. The freezing transition is further facilitated by the highly effective removal of latent heat from the nucleation site, as apparent from time-resolved SFG spectroscopy. PMID:27152346

  16. All-Electrical Measurement of Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction Using Collective Spin-Wave Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Min; Jang, Chaun; Min, Byoung-Chul; Lee, Seo-Won; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Chang, Joonyeon

    2016-01-13

    Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI), which arises from the broken inversion symmetry and spin-orbit coupling, is of prime interest as it leads to a stabilization of chiral magnetic order and provides an efficient manipulation of magnetic nanostructures. Here, we report all-electrical measurement of DMI using propagating spin wave spectroscopy based on the collective spin wave with a well-defined wave vector. We observe a substantial frequency shift of spin waves depending on the spin chirality in Pt/Co/MgO structures. After subtracting the contribution from other sources to the frequency shift, it is possible to quantify the DMI energy in Pt/Co/MgO systems. The result reveals that the DMI in Pt/Co/MgO originates from the interfaces, and the sign of DMI corresponds to the inversion asymmetry of the film structures. The electrical excitation and detection of spin waves and the influence of interfacial DMI on the collective spin-wave dynamics will pave the way to the emerging field of spin-wave logic devices. PMID:26653115

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of interfacial interactions between small nanoparticles during diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jing; Liu, Dongmei; Yang, Xiaonan; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Haixing; Tang, Huan; Cui, Fuyi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the limitations of experimental methods at the atomic level, research on the aggregation of small nanoparticles (D < 5 nm) in aqueous solutions is quite rare. The aggregation of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions is very different than that of normal sized nanoparticles. The interfacial interactions play a dominant role in the aggregation of small nanoparticles. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations, which can explore the microscopic behavior of nanoparticles during the diffusion-limited aggregation at an atomic level, were employed to reveal the aggregation mechanism of small nanoparticles in aqueous solutions. First, the aggregation processes and aggregate structure were depicted. Second, the particle-particle interaction and surface diffusion of nanoparticles during aggregation were investigated. Third, the water-mediated interactions during aggregation were ascertained. The results indicate that the aggregation of nanoparticle in aqueous solutions is affected by particle size. The strong particle-particle interaction and high surface diffusion result in the formation of particle-particle bonds of 2 nm TiO2 nanoparticles, and the water-mediated interaction plays an important role in the aggregation process of 3 and 4 nm TiO2 nanoparticles.

  18. Strain-Mediated Interfacial Dynamics during Au-PbS Core-Shell Nanostructure Formation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Kai-Yang; Liu, Miao; Persson, Kristin A; Han, Yu; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-06-28

    An understanding of the hierarchical nanostructure formation is of significant importance for the design of advanced functional materials. Here, we report the in situ study of lead sulfide (PbS) growth on gold (Au) nanorod seeds using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By tracking the formation dynamics of Au-PbS core-shell nanoparticles, we found the preferential heterogeneous nucleation of PbS on the ends of a Au nanorod prior to the development of a complete PdS shell. During PbS shell growth, drastic sulfidation of Au nanorod was observed, leading to large volume shrinkage (up to 50%) of the initial Au nanorod seed. We also captured intriguing wavy interfacial behavior, which can be explained by our DFT calculation results that the local strain gradient at the core-shell interface facilitates the mass transport and mediates reversible phase transitions of Au ↔ Au2S during the PbS shell growth. PMID:27214625

  19. Dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial photoinduced electron transfer processes of third generation photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christophe; Teuscher, Joël; Brauer, Jan C; Punzi, Angela; Marchioro, Arianna; Ghadiri, Elham; De Jonghe, Jelissa; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Banerji, Natalie; Moser, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) across molecular/bulk interfaces has gained attention only recently and is still poorly understood. These interfaces offer an excellent case study, pertinent to a variety of photovoltaic systems, photo- and electrochemistry, molecular electronics, analytical detection, photography, and quantum confinement devices. They play in particular a key role in the emerging fields of third-generation photovoltaic energy converters and artificial photosynthetic systems aimed at the production of solar fuels, creating a need for a better understanding and theoretical treatment of the dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial PET processes. We aim to achieve a fundamental understanding of these phenomena by designing experiments that can be used to test and alter modern theory and computational modeling. One example illustrating recent investigations into the details of the ultrafast processes that form the basis for photoinduced charge separation at a molecular/bulk interface relevant to dye-sensitized solar cells is briefly presented here: Kinetics of interfacial PET and charge recombination processes were measured by fs and ns transient spectroscopy in a heterogeneous donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system, where D is a Ru(II)(terpyridyl-PO3)(NCS)3 complex, B an oligo-p-phenylene bridge, and A nanocrystalline TiO2. The forward ET reaction was found to be faster than vibrational relaxation of the vibronic excited state of the donor. Instead, the back ET occurred on the micros time scale and involved fully thermalized species. The D-A distance dependence of the electron transfer rate was studied by varying the number of p-phenylene units contained in the bridge moiety. The remarkably low damping factor beta = 0.16 angstroms(-1) observed for the ultrafast charge injection from the dye excited state into the conduction band of TiO2 is attributed to the coupling of electron tunneling with nonequilibrium vibrations redistributed on the bridge

  20. Investigation of the effect of coal particle sizes on the interfacial and rheological properties of coal-water slurry fuels: Final report, July 1, 1994-June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kihm, K.D.

    1996-10-01

    The scope of the project is two fold: (1) examining particle size effect on interfacial properties of CWS fuels by measuring static and dynamic surface tension properties of specially prepared CWS samples containing different ranges of coal particle sizes, and (2) studying the effect of particle size on CWS atomization characteristics by measuring mean diameters of several different CWS sprays generated by sonic air blasting. The results show that both static and dynamic surface tensions decrease with increasing coal particle size and mean droplet diameter of CW-S sprays also decreases with increasing coal particle size. Based on the experimental evidence we conjecture that three different energies are competing in slurry atomization: (1) the internal capillary holding between particles and water, (2) the interfacial surface tensile energy at the slurry surface contacting air, and (3) the external air blast shear energy acting against the former two energies. The internal capillary holding force decreases with increasing particle size. This force is believed to play a major role in determining the effect of particle size on CWS atomization.

  1. Investigation of optical and interfacial properties of Ag/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} metal dielectric multilayer structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, P. Jena, S.; Tokas, R. B.; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.; Rao, K. D.; Misal, J. S.; Prathap, C.

    2015-06-24

    One-dimensional periodic metal-dielectric multilayer thin film structures consisting of Ag and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} alternating layers are deposited on glass substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The spectral property of the multilayers has been investigated using spectrophotometry technique. The optical parameters such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, band gap etc., along with film thickness as well as the interfacial layer properties which influence these properties have been probed with spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. Atomic force microscopy has been employed to characterize morphological properties of this metal-dielectric multilayer.

  2. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.; Wise, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    Controlled impact methods have been employed to obtain dynamic response properties of armor materials. Experimental data have been obtained for high-strength ceramics. Continued analysis of time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements has produced systematic material-property data for Hugoniot and release response, initial and post-yield strength, pressure-induced phase transformation, and dynamic fracture strength. A new technique has been developed to measure hydrodynamic properties of ceramic through shock-wave experiments on metal-ceramic composites and data obtained for silicon carbide. Additional data on several titanium diboride ceramics and high-quality aluminum oxide ceramic have been acquired, and issues regarding the influence of microstructure on dynamic properties have emerged. Comparison of dynamic (Hugoniot elastic limit) strength and indentation hardness data has been performed and important correlations revealed. Innovative impact experiments on confined and unconfined alumina rods using axial and transverse VISAR diagnostics have been demonstrated which permit acquisition of multiaxial dynamic response data. Dynamic failure properties of a high-density aluminosilicate glass, similar in composition to the intergranular glassy phase of some aluminas, have been investigated with regard to yield, spall, and failure-wave propagation.

  3. An evaluation of the interfacial bond properties between carbon phenolic and glass phenolic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kelvin; Clinton, Raymond; Jeelani, Shaik

    1989-01-01

    The effects of moisture and surface finish on the mechanical and physical properties of the interfacial bond between the carbon/phenolic (C/P) and glass/phenolic (G/P) composite materials are presented. Four flat panel laminates were fabricated using the C/P and G/P materials. Of the four laminates, one panel was fabricated in which the C/P and G/P materials were cured simultaneously. It was identified as the cocure. The remaining laminates were processed with an initial simultaneous cure of the three C/P billets. Two surface finishes, one on each half, were applied to the top surface. Prior to the application and cure of the G/P material to the machined surface of the three C/P panels, each was subjected to the specific environmental conditioning. Types of conditioning included: (1) nominal fabrication environment, (2) a prescribed drying cycle, and (3) a total immersion in water at 160 F. Physical property tests were performed on specimens removed from the C/P materials of each laminate for determination of the specific gravity, residual volatiles and and resin content. Comparisons of results with shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) nozzle material specifications verified that the materials used in fabricating the laminates met acceptance criteria and were representative of SRM nozzle materials. Mechanical property tests were performed at room temperature on specimens removed from the G/P, the C/P and the interface between the two materials for each laminate. The double-notched shear strength test was used to determine the ultimate interlaminar shear strength. Results indicate no appreciable difference in the C/P material of the four laminates with the exception of the cocure laminate, where 20 percent reduction in the strength was observed. The most significant effect and the ultimate strength was significantly reduced in the wet material. No appreciable variation was noted between the surface finishes in the wet laminate.

  4. Ultrasonic Spot and Torsion Welding of Aluminum to Titanium Alloys: Process, Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Frank; Magin, Jens

    Hybrid lightweight structures shape the development of future vehicles in traffic engineering and the aerospace industry. For multi-material concepts made out of aluminum and titanium alloys, the ultrasonic welding technique is an alternative effective joining technology. The overlapped structures can be welded in the solid state, even without gas shielding. In this paper the conventional ultrasonic spot welding with longitudinal oscillation mode is compared to the recent ultrasonic torsion welding with a torsional mode at 20 kHz working frequency. For each technique the process parameters welding force, welding energy and oscillation amplitude were optimized for the hybrid joints using design of experiments. Relationships between the process parameters, mechanical properties and related welding zone should be understood. Central aspects of the research project are microscopic studies of the joining zone in cross section and extensive fracture surface analysis. Detailed electron microscopy and spectroscopy of the hybrid interface help to understand the interfacial formation during ultrasonic welding as well as to transfer the gained knowledge for further multi-metal joints.

  5. Control of interfacial properties of Pr-oxide/Ge gate stack structure by introduction of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kimihiko; Kondo, Hiroki; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2011-06-01

    We have demonstrated the control of interfacial properties of Pr-oxide/Ge gate stack structure by the introduction of nitrogen. From C- V characteristics of Al/Pr-oxide/Ge 3N 4/Ge MOS capacitors, the interface state density decreases without the change of the accumulation capacitance after annealing. The TEM and TED measurements reveal that the crystallization of Pr-oxide is enhanced with annealing and the columnar structure of cubic-Pr 2O 3 is formed after annealing. From the depth profiles measured using XPS with Ar sputtering for the Pr-oxide/Ge 3N 4/Ge stack structure, the increase in the Ge component is not observed in a Pr-oxide film and near the interface between a Pr-oxide film and a Ge substrate. In addition, the N component segregates near the interface region, amorphous Pr-oxynitride (PrON) is formed at the interface. As a result, Pr-oxide/PrON/Ge stacked structure without the Ge-oxynitride interlayer is formed.

  6. Effect of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined properties of an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Jurado, L Andres; Kim, Hojun; Rossi, Antonella; Arcifa, Andrea; Schuh, Jonathon K; Spencer, Nicholas D; Leal, Cecilia; Ewoldt, Randy H; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2016-08-10

    With reference to our previous surface-force study on 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([HMIM] EtSO4) using an extended surface forces apparatus, which showed an ordered structure within the nanoconfined dry ionic liquid (IL) between mica surfaces that extended up to ∼60 nm from the surface, this work focuses on the influence of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined structure of [HMIM] EtSO4. Infrared spectroscopy and rheometry reflect the changes in chemical and physical properties of the bulk IL due to the uptake of water when exposed to ambient humidity, while wide-angle X-ray scattering shows a mild swelling of the bulk nanostructure, and the AFM sharp tip reveals an additional surface layer at the mica-IL interface. When the water-containing [HMIM] EtSO4 is nanoconfined between two mica surfaces, no long-range order is detected, in contrast to the results obtained for the dry IL, which demonstrates that the presence of water can prevent the liquid-to-solid transformation of this IL. A combination of techniques and the calculated Bjerrum length indicate that water molecules weaken interionic electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, which lessens ion-ion correlations. Our work shows that the solid-like behavior of the nanoconfined IL strongly depends on the presence of absorbed water and hence, it has implications with regard to the correct interpretation of laboratory studies and their extension to real applications in lubrication. PMID:27430333

  7. The control of stoichiometry in Epitaxial semiconductor structures. Interfacial Chemistry: Property relations. A workshop review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, Klaus J.

    1995-01-01

    A workshop on the control of stoichiometry in epitaxial semiconductor structures was held on August 21-26, 1995 in the hotel Stutenhaus at Vesser in Germany. The secluded location of the workshop in the forest of Thuringia and its informal style stimulated extensive private discussions among the participants and promoted new contacts between young scientists from Eastern and Western Europe and the USA. Topics addressed by the presentations were interactions of precursors to heteroepitaxy and doping with the substrate surface, the control of interfacial properties under the conditions of heteroepitaxy for selected materials systems, methods of characterization of interfaces and native point defects in semiconductor heterostructures and an in depth evaluation of the present status of the control and characterization of the point defect chemistry for one specific semiconductor (ZnGeP2), including studies of both heterostructures and bulk single crystals. The selected examples of presentations and comments given here represent individual choices - made by the author to highlight major points of the discussions.

  8. Control of Interfacial Properties of Al2O3/Ge Gate Stack Structure Using Radical Nitridation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kimihiko; Kyogoku, Shinya; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Kondo, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Shotaro; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2011-10-01

    We have investigated the control of the interfacial properties of Al2O3/Ge gate stack structures by the radical nitridation technique. In the Al2O3/Ge structures formed by the atomic layer deposition method, the interface state density increases with the deposition temperature due to the decrease in the thickness of the Ge oxide interlayer. On the other hand, the hysteresis width of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics decreases with increasing deposition temperature, which indicates a decrease in the oxide trap density near the interface. We also investigated the control of the interfacial structure by the radical nitridation of Al2O3/Ge to form an interfacial structure after the deposition of a high-k dielectric layer. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal that an Al2O3/Ge3N4/GeO2/Ge stack structure is formed after the radical nitridation owing to the minimal oxygen diffusion into the Al2O3/Ge interface. Furthermore, the interfacial mixing is suppressed after radical nitridation at less than 300 °C. As a result, we can decrease the interface state density of the Al2O3/Ge sample after the radical nitridation by more than one order of magnitude compared with that without radical nitridation.

  9. Wall-liquid and wall-crystal interfacial free energies via thermodynamic integration: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Ronald; Horbach, Jürgen

    2012-07-28

    A method is proposed to compute the interfacial free energy of a Lennard-Jones system in contact with a structured wall by molecular dynamics simulation. Both the bulk liquid and bulk face-centered-cubic crystal phase along the (111) orientation are considered. Our approach is based on a thermodynamic integration scheme where first the bulk Lennard-Jones system is reversibly transformed to a state where it interacts with a structureless flat wall. In a second step, the flat structureless wall is reversibly transformed into an atomistic wall with crystalline structure. The dependence of the interfacial free energy on various parameters such as the wall potential, the density and orientation of the wall is investigated. The conditions are indicated under which a Lennard-Jones crystal partially wets a flat wall. PMID:22852644

  10. The interfacial properties of AOF/ZnS and LWIR bulk HgCdTe materials by MIS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Nili; Liu, Shijia; Lan, Tianyi; Zhao, Shuiping; Jiang, Peilu; Li, Xiangyang

    2012-10-01

    The semiconductor-passivating layer interface, as well as the dielectric properties of the passivants, plays an important role in HgCdTe based photoelectric detectors. Anodization is a commonly uses surface passivation for HgCdTe. ZnS is deposited on the AOF (anodic-oxide film) as antireflecting layer. The interfacial properties of the metal insulator semiconductor (MIS) structures were determined by capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements in the frequency range 10 KHz-10 MHz. The results showed that the MIS detector could not reach the high frequency level even at frequencies up to 10 MHz. The interfacial state densities were 3.4×1011 cm-2q-1V-1 and the fixed charges were 1.1×1012 cm-2. The surface recombination velocity was 700 cm/s.

  11. Effect of surface stoichiometry and interfacial interactions on ultrafast carrier dynamics of crystalline CdTe (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xing; Punpongjareorn, Napat; Wu, Chengyi; Rajagopal, Karjini; Yang, Ding-Shyue

    2015-08-01

    To improve the efficiency of optoelectronic devices, it is critical to understand the carrier dynamics of photoactive materials and the mechanisms involved, including those effects caused by different surface stoichiometry and/or interfacial interactions. A good example is CdTe, which exhibits cost-effective high performance in thin-film photovoltaic cells; it is also known to show surface oxidation, which may affect device efficiency and hence limit the production methods used. In this contribution, we present ultrafast carrier dynamics of crystalline CdTe specimens with different surface conditions using transient reflectivity measurements, following a femtosecond above-gap excitation. The distinct differences observed in the dynamics and the time constants for oxidized and stoichiometrically restored specimens indicate the major role of surface tellurium oxide on the relaxation of photoinduced carriers. The much slower recovery observed on oxidized surfaces is attributed to a transfer (and trapping) of electrons to the tellurium atoms with a high oxidation state, which signifies a charge separation near the surface. To distinguish the effect caused by oxygen adsorption, we also examined the carrier dynamics of CdTe surfaces covered by a thin layer of water molecules for comparison. These results, which show clear interfacial effects, may have broader implications for the understanding of carrier dynamics in nanostructured and polycrystalline specimens under different chemical environments, as such materials exhibit a high surface-to-volume ratio.

  12. Magneto-ionic control of interfacial magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Uwe; Yao, Lide; Tan, Aik Jun; Agrawal, Parnika; Emori, Satoru; Tuller, Harry L.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Beach, Geoffrey S. D.

    2015-02-01

    In metal/oxide heterostructures, rich chemical, electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties can emerge from interfacial chemistry and structure. The possibility to dynamically control interface characteristics with an electric field paves the way towards voltage control of these properties in solid-state devices. Here, we show that electrical switching of the interfacial oxidation state allows for voltage control of magnetic properties to an extent never before achieved through conventional magneto-electric coupling mechanisms. We directly observe in situ voltage-driven O2- migration in a Co/metal-oxide bilayer, which we use to toggle the interfacial magnetic anisotropy energy by >0.75 erg cm-2 at just 2 V. We exploit the thermally activated nature of ion migration to markedly increase the switching efficiency and to demonstrate reversible patterning of magnetic properties through local activation of ionic migration. These results suggest a path towards voltage-programmable materials based on solid-state switching of interface oxygen chemistry.

  13. Production of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, using sucrose by fungal and yeast strains, and their interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Ishibashi, Yuko; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-10-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), were produced from glucose and sucrose without vegetable oils. Pseudozyma antarctica JCM 10317, Ustilago maydis NBRC 5346, U. scitaminea NBRC 32730, and P. siamensis CBS 9960 produced mainly MEL-A, MEL-A, MEL-B, and MEL-C respectively. The sucrose-derived MELs showed excellent interfacial properties: low critical micelle concentration as well as that of oil-derived MELs. PMID:19809166

  14. Interfacial stress transfer and property mismatch in discontinuous nanofiber/nanotube composite materials.

    PubMed

    Xu, L Roy; Sengupta, Sreeparna

    2005-04-01

    Novel nanotubes/nanofibers with high strength and stiffness did not lead to high failure strengths/strains of nanocomposite materials. Therefore, the interfacial stress transfer and possible stress singularities, arising at the interfacial ends of discontinuous nanofibers embedded in a matrix, subjected to tensile and shear loading, were investigated by finite element analysis. The effects of Young's moduli and volume fractions on interfacial stress distributions were studied. Round-ended nanofibers were proposed to remove the interfacial singular stresses, which were caused by high stiffness mismatch of the nanoscale reinforcement and the matrix. However, the normal stress induced in the nanofiber through interfacial stress transfer was still less than 2 times that in the matrix. This stress value is far below the high strength of the nanofiber. Therefore, the load transfer efficiency of discontinuous nanofibers or nanotube composites is very low. Hence, nanofibers or nanotubes in continuous forms, which also preclude the formation of singular interfacial stress zones, are recommended over discontinuous nanofibers to achieve high strengths in nanocomposite materials. PMID:16004129

  15. Production of a novel glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylmannitol lipid, by Pseudozyma parantarctica and its interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Konishi, Masaaki; Imura, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Kitagawa, Masaru; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-07-01

    The development of a novel glycolipid biosurfactant was undertaken using the high-level producers of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) such as Pseudozyma parantarctica, Pseudozyma antarctica, and Pseudozyma rugulosa. Besides the conventional MELs (MEL-A, MEL-B, and MEL-C), these yeasts produced an unknown glycolipid when they were cultivated in a medium containing 4% (w/v) olive oil and 4% (w/w) mannitol as the carbon source. The unknown glycolipid extracted from the culture medium of P. parantarctica JCM 11752(T) displayed the spot with lower mobility than that of known MELs on TLC and provided mainly two peaks identical to mannose and mannitol on high-performance liquid chromatography after acid hydrolysis. Based on structural analysis by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, the novel glycolipid was composed of mannose and mannitol as the hydrophilic sugar moiety and was identified as mannosylmannitol lipid (MML). Of the strains tested, P. parantarctica JCM 11752(T) gave the best yield of MML (18.2 g/L), which comprised approximately 35% of all glycolipids produced. We further investigated the interfacial properties of the MML, considering the unique hydrophilic structure. The observed critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the surface tension at CMC of the MML were 2.6 x 10(-6) M and 24.2 mN/m, respectively. In addition, on a water-penetration scan, the MML efficiently formed not only the lamella phase (Lalpha) but also the myelins at a wide range of concentrations, indicating its excellent self-assembling properties and high hydrophilicity. The present glycolipid should thus facilitate the application of biosurfactants as new functional materials. PMID:19296097

  16. Probing the nanostructure, interfacial interaction, and dynamics of chitosan-based nanoparticles by multiscale solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fenfen; Zhang, Rongchun; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Tiehong; Sun, Pingchuan; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-12-10

    Chitosan-based nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in drug and gene delivery, therapy, and medical imaging, but a molecular-level understanding of the internal morphology and nanostructure size, interface, and dynamics, which is critical for building fundamental knowledge for the precise design and efficient biological application of the NPs, remains a great challenge. Therefore, the availability of a multiscale (0.1-100 nm) and nondestructive analytical technique for examining such NPs is of great importance for nanotechnology. Herein, we present a new multiscale solid-state NMR approach to achieve this goal for the investigation of chitosan-poly(N-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) NPs. First, a recently developed (13)C multiple cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (MAS) method enabled fast quantitative determination of the NPs' composition and detection of conformational changes in chitosan. Then, using an improved (1)H spin-diffusion method with (13)C detection and theoretical simulations, the internal morphology and nanostructure size were quantitatively determined. The interfacial coordinated interaction between chitosan and phenylboronic acid was revealed by one-dimensional MAS and two-dimensional (2D) triple-quantum MAS (11)B NMR. Finally, dynamic-editing (13)C MAS and 2D (13)C-(1)H wide-line separation experiments provided details regarding the componential dynamics of the NPs in the solid and swollen states. On the basis of these NMR results, a model of the unique nanostructure, interfacial interaction, and componential dynamics of the NPs was proposed. PMID:25372426

  17. Single-fiber push-in vs. single-fiber push-out: A comparison between two test methods to determine the interfacial properties of brittle matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Lara-Curzio, E.; Russ, S.E.; Chawla, K.K.

    1995-10-01

    Interfacial properties of Nicalon{trademark}-reinforced brittle matrix composites were determined from single-fiber load-controlled push-in tests using a Mechanical Properties Microprobe (Nanoindenter) and single-fiber displacement-controlled push-out tests using the Interfacial Test System (ITS). A comparison between the results from these two tests is presented along with a discussion of data analysis techniques.

  18. Relating foam and interfacial rheological properties of β-lactoglobulin solutions.

    PubMed

    Lexis, M; Willenbacher, N

    2014-12-28

    We have determined bulk rheology of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) foams and surface viscoelasticity of corresponding protein solutions by varying pH as well as type, valency and concentration of the added salt in a wide range. Foam rheology was characterized by the storage modulus G0, the apparent yield stress τy, and the critical strain γc,foam defining the cessation of the linear viscoelastic response. These quantities were determined at gas volume fractions ϕ between 82% and 96%. Surface viscoelasticity was characterized in shear and dilation, corresponding shear and dilational moduli G, E' as well as the critical stress τc,surface and strain γc,surface marking the onset of non-linear response in oscillatory surface shear experiments were determined at fixed frequency. Beyond the widely accepted assumption that G0 and τy are solely determined by the Laplace pressure within the droplets and the gas volume fraction we have found that both quantities strongly depend on corresponding interfacial properties. G0 increases linearly with G and even stronger with E', τy varies proportional to τc,surface and γc,foam scales linearly with γc,surface. Furthermore, deviations from these simple scaling laws with significantly higher reduced G0 and τy values are observed only for foams at pH 5 and when a trivalent salt was added. Then also the dependence of these quantities on ϕ is unusually weak and we attribute these findings to protein aggregation and structure formation across the lamellae than the dominating bulk rheology. PMID:25363684

  19. Improved interfacial and electrical properties of Ge MOS capacitor by using TaON/LaON dual passivation interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Z. X.; Xu, J. P.; Liu, L.; Huang, Y.; Lai, P. T.; Tang, W. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of TaON/LaON dual passivation interlayer on the interfacial and electrical properties of Ge metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor with HfO2 gate dielectric are investigated. As compared to its counterpart with only LaON as passivation interlayer, the formation of HfGeOx and LaHfOx, which would degrade the interfacial quality, is effectively suppressed due to the strong blocking role of the TaON barrier layer against Hf diffusion. As a result, excellent interfacial and electrical properties are achieved for the Ge MOS device with the TaON/LaON dual passivation interlayer: high k value (20.9), low interface-state density (5.32 × 1011 cm-2 eV-1) and oxide-charge density (-3.90 × 1012 cm-2), low gate leakage current density (1.77 × 10-4 A/cm2 at Vg = Vfb + 1 V), and high reliability under high-field stress.

  20. Grafting Poly(3-hexylthiophene) from Silicon Nanocrystal Surfaces: Synthesis and Properties of a Functional Hybrid Material with Direct Interfacial Contact.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad Amirul; Purkait, Tapas K; Mobarok, Md Hosnay; Hoehlein, Ignaz M D; Sinelnikov, Regina; Iqbal, Muhammad; Azulay, Doron; Balberg, Isaac; Millo, Oded; Rieger, Bernhard; Veinot, Jonathan G C

    2016-06-20

    Hybrid functional materials (HFMs) comprised of semiconductor nanoparticles and conjugated polymers offer the potential of synergetic photophysical properties. We have developed HFMs based upon silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) and the conductive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (SiNC@P3HT) by applying surface-initiated Kumada catalyst transfer polycondensation (SI-KCTP). One unique characteristic of the developed SiNC@P3HT is the formation of a direct covalent bonding between SiNCs and P3HT. The presented method for obtaining direct interfacial attachment, which is not accessible using other methods, may allow for the development of materials with efficient electronic communication at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Systematic characterization provides evidence of a core-shell structure, enhanced interfacial electron and/or energy transfer between the P3HT and SiNC components, as well as formation of a type-II heterostructure. PMID:27144670

  1. Interfacial and gravitationally-related properties of liquid crystals and other fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Milind Prabhakar

    This thesis describes a series of experiments on liquid crystals and other fluids to investigate behavior related to interfacial constraints, surface tension, and gravitational acceleration. The first part of the thesis deals with liquid crystal alignment surfaces. The grooved surface topography created by a buffing cloth on spin-coated polyimide films was characterized using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The shape of grooves was correlated to the microstructure on the lateral surface of rubbing fiber. The orientation induced in the rubbed polyimide was probed using optical retardation measurements. The retardation as a function of rubbing strength was shown to exhibit threshold-like behavior that was sensitive to rubbing history. AFM probe was used to "write" alignment pattern on sub-micron length-scale pixel. Two possible device geometries were constructed and analyzed. In the second half, the thesis discusses the static and dynamic behavior of fluid zones. MnCl2·4H2O was dissolved in water and the solution was magnetically levitated to stimulate low gravity. Static stability of a "bridge" (a fluid zone supported by two equal coaxial disks) was studied as a function of effective gravity and volume of the fluid. The ability of the levitation setup to temporally control effective gravity was exploited to investigate the dynamics of bridge collapse. A sudden change of magnetic current, corresponding to a change in gravity, beyond stability limit resulted in deformation and ultimate collapse of a bridge. A scaling relationship was found for collapse time as a function of the step change in gravity. The results were compared to predictions of a 1-D slice model. The levitated bridges were subjected to axial and lateral oscillations of gravity. The first resonance frequency was found to be maximum at zero effective gravity and decreased with increasing gravity. Comparable results were obtained by numerical simulations. Low gravity experiments on liquid crystals are

  2. Mass properties measurement system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Keith L.

    1993-01-01

    The MPMS mechanism possess two revolute degrees-of-freedom and allows the user to measure the mass, center of gravity, and the inertia tensor of an unknown mass. The dynamics of the Mass Properties Measurement System (MPMS) from the Lagrangian approach to illustrate the dependency of the motion on the unknown parameters.

  3. Studies of Interfacial Layer and Its Effect on Magnetic Properties of Glass-Coated Microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Arcady; Shuvaeva, Evgenia; Kaloshkin, Sergei; Churyukanova, Margarita; Kostitsyna, Elena; Zhdanova, Margarita; Talaat, Ahmed; Ipatov, Mihail; Zhukova, Valentina

    2016-05-01

    We present studies of the interfacial layer between the metallic nucleus and glass coating in ferromagnetic Fe- and Co-rich microwires. Using a scanning electron microscope, we obtained the image of the interfacial layer and the elements distribution within the glass coating and metallic nucleus. This allowed us to estimate the thickness of the interfacial layer ( t il). For both Fe- and Co-rich microwires, t il ≈ 0.5 μm. We measured the frequency dependence of the giant magnetoimpedance ratio in Fe and Co-rich microwires, estimated the minimum penetration depth, and discussed the optimum frequency for different microwires considering the difference of the magnetic structure and the magnetic anisotropy inside the microwire and near the surface.

  4. Well-defined oxide core-polymer shell nanoparticles: interfacial interactions, peculiar dynamics, and transitions in polymer nanolayers.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, V A; Gun'ko, V M; Egorova, L M; Guzenko, N V; Pakhlov, E M; Ryzhov, V A; Zarko, V I

    2010-07-01

    Interfacial interactions, chain dynamics, and glass and melting transitions were studied in well-defined core-shell nanoparticles with amorphous silica or crystalline alumina cores and noncrystallizable poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) or crystallizable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) shells. Varying particle composition caused regular changes in the shell thickness from 1 to 2 nm (monomolecular layer) up to 90 nm. Far- and mid-IR spectroscopy allowed us to register hydrogen bonding and, tentatively, Lewis/Brønsted (LB) interfacial interactions as well as changes in the dynamics and conformational state of the polymer chains as a function of the nanoshell thickness. Their most pronounced peculiarities were found for the monomolecular polymer layers. The LB interactions were stronger with the alumina substrate than silica. DSC analysis was performed, and the data obtained were in agreement with the spectroscopic data. Unlike the bulk polymer, the PVP monolayer was characterized with an extraordinarily large dynamic heterogeneity within the glass transition while broadening the transition range and varying the activation energy by an order of magnitude. The PEG monolayer adsorbed on silica was totally amorphous, whereas a highly crystalline one with the anomalously thin lamellae, down to 3 nm thick, was adsorbed on an alumina surface, presumably as a result of the quasi-heteroepitaxial crystallization process. PMID:20415443

  5. Spin dynamics induced by ultrafast heating with ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange in perpendicularly magnetized hard/soft bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Q. L.; Iihama, S.; Zhang, X. M.; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S.

    2015-11-01

    The laser-induced spin dynamics of FeCo in perpendicularly magnetized L10-MnGa/FeCo bilayers with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling (IEC) are examined using the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. We found a precessional phase reversal of the FeCo layer as the IEC changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. Moreover, a precession-suspension window was observed when the magnetic field was applied in a certain direction for the bilayer with ferromagnetic IEC. Our observations reveal that the spin dynamics modulation is strongly dependent on the IEC type within the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert depiction. The IEC dependence of the precessional phase and amplitude suggests the interesting method for magnetization dynamics modulation.

  6. Spin dynamics induced by ultrafast heating with ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange in perpendicularly magnetized hard/soft bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Q. L. E-mail: mizukami@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Miyazaki, T.; Mizukami, S. E-mail: mizukami@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Iihama, S.; Zhang, X. M.

    2015-11-30

    The laser-induced spin dynamics of FeCo in perpendicularly magnetized L1{sub 0}-MnGa/FeCo bilayers with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interfacial exchange coupling (IEC) are examined using the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect. We found a precessional phase reversal of the FeCo layer as the IEC changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. Moreover, a precession-suspension window was observed when the magnetic field was applied in a certain direction for the bilayer with ferromagnetic IEC. Our observations reveal that the spin dynamics modulation is strongly dependent on the IEC type within the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert depiction. The IEC dependence of the precessional phase and amplitude suggests the interesting method for magnetization dynamics modulation.

  7. Interfacial effects revealed by ultrafast relaxation dynamics in BiFeO3/YBa2Cu3O7 bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, D.; Nair, Saritha K.; He, Mi; Lu, C. L.; Cheong, S. A.; Wu, T.; Panagopoulos, C.; Chia, Elbert E. M.; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2016-02-01

    The temperature dependence of the relaxation dynamics in the bilayer thin film heterostructure composed of multiferroic BiFeO3 (BFO) and superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) grown on a (001) SrTiO3 substrate is studied by a time-resolved pump-probe technique, and compared with that of pure YBCO thin film grown under the same growth conditions. The superconductivity of YBCO is found to be retained in the heterostructure. We observe a speeding up of the YBCO recombination dynamics in the superconducting state of the heterostructure, and attribute it to the presence of weak ferromagnetism at the BFO/YBCO interface as observed in magnetization data. An extension of the Rothwarf-Taylor model is used to fit the ultrafast dynamics of BFO/YBCO, that models an increased quasiparticle occupation of the ferromagnetic interfacial layer in the superconducting state of YBCO.

  8. Production of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma siamensis CBS 9960 and their interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Konishi, Masaaki; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2008-05-01

    The search for a novel producer of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), was undertaken on the basis of the analysis of ribosomal DNA sequences of yeast strains of the genus Pseudozyma. In the course of the investigation, Pseudozyma siamensis CBS 9960, which is closely related to Pseudozyma shanxiensis, a known MEL-C producer but with a different morphology, was found to accumulate a large amount of glycolipids. On thin layer chromatography, the extracellular glycolipids showed nearly the same spots as those of the MELs produced by P. shanxiensis. However, the result of high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the present strain has a much higher glycolipid production yield than P. shanxiensis. From the structural characterization by (1)H and (13)C NMR, the major glycolipid (more than 84% of the total) was identified as a mixture of 4-O-[(2',4'-di-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol and 4-O-[(4'-O-acetyl-3'-O-alka(e)noyl-2'-O-butanoyl)-beta-D-mannopyranosyl]-D-erythritol, both of which are types of MEL-C. The present MEL-C possessed a short-chain acid (C(2) or C(4)) at the C-2' position and a long-chain acid (C(16)) at the C-3' position of the mannose moiety, and thus, the hydrophobic part was considerably different from that of conventional MELs, which mainly possess two medium-chain acids (C(10)) at the C-2' and C-3' positions. Under optimal growth conditions with safflower oil in a shake culture, the total amount of MELs reached approximately 19 g/l after 9 d at 25 degrees C. We further investigated the interfacial properties of the present MEL-C, considering its unique hydrophobic structure. The observed critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the surface tension at the CMC of the MEL were 4.5 x 10(-6) M and 30.7 mN/m, respectively. In addition, on a water penetration scan, the MEL efficiently formed the liquid crystal phases such as hexagonal (H) and lamella (L(a)) at a wide range of

  9. The influence of surface properties on carbon fiber/epoxy matrix interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, H.; Wightman, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    In recent years, as composites become increasingly sophisticated to meet ever-increasing performance requirements, it has become more important to control the interaction between the reinforcing fibers and matrix materials. The major challenge here is the lack of fundamental understanding and knowledge about the reinforcement/matrix system which contribute to the establishment of the interphase. It has been recognized that the state of the fiber surface substantially effects the quality of interfacial adhesion. However, basic and specific correlation is still incomplete. The possible mechanisms by which the fiber surface parameters contribute to the constitution of the fiber/matrix interface include the interfacial chemical and physical interactions caused by fiber surface functionality and surface energy, the mechanical interlocking due to fiber surface irregularity, and, the interfacial wetting based on fiber surface energy. It was the objective of this work to explore the effects of physical and chemical aspects of fiber surfaces on the durability of interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber reinforced composites.

  10. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  11. Mechanical and interfacial properties of poly(vinyl chloride) based composites reinforced by cassava stillage residue with different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanjuan; Gan, Tao; Li, Qian; Su, Jianmei; Lin, Ye; Wei, Yongzuo; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei

    2014-09-01

    Cassava stillage residue (CSR), a kind of agro-industrial plant fiber, was modified by coupling agent (CA), mechanical activation (MA), and MA-assisted CA (MACA) surface treatments, respectively. The untreated and different surface treated CSRs were used to prepare plant fibers/polymer composites (PFPC) with poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as polymer matrix, and the properties of these CSR/PVC composites were compared. Surface treated CSR/PVC composites possessed better mechanical properties, water resistance and dimensional stability compared with the untreated CSR/PVC composite, attributing to the improvement of interfacial properties between CSR and PVC matrix. MACA-treated CSR was the best reinforcement among four types of CSRs (untreated, MA-treated, CA-treated, and MACA-treated CSRs) because MACA treatment led to the significant improvement of dispersion, interfacial adhesion and compatibility between CSR and PVC. MACA treatment could be considered as an effective and green method for enhancing reinforcement efficiency of plant fibers and the properties of PFPC.

  12. Rheology and interfacial properties of aqueous solutions of the diblock polyelectrolyte poly(styrene-block-acrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimerling, Abigail

    In aqueous solutions diblock polyelectrolytes with amphiphilic character form aggregate structures, which affect physical properties such as viscosity, elasticity, surface tension, and film hydrophilicity. Potential applications for diblock polyelectrolyte solutions include coatings, inks, oil recovery agents, personal care products, and biomaterials. By varying the diblock polyelectrolyte and solution properties, the solutions can be tuned to meet the needs of particular applications. The research objective was to identify the influences of block length, pH, and ionic strength on the rheological and interfacial properties of poly(styrene- b-acrylic acid) (PS-PAA) solutions. Six polymers with varied PS and PAA block lengths were examined, all at 1.0 wt% in aqueous solutions. The hydrophobicity of the PS block causes the formation of spherical micelles in aqueous solutions. Increasing the solution pH ionizes the PAA block, which leads to an increase in micelle corona thickness due to repulsions between chains. Major trends observed in the rheological and interfacial properties can be understood in terms of expected changes in the micelle size and interfacial self-assembly with pH, ionic strength, and block length. Addition of NaOH was found to increase the solution pH and initially led to increases in solution viscosity, elasticity, surface tension, and film hydrophilicity. This effect was attributed to creation of larger micelles and greater inter-micellar repulsions as the PAA chain became more fully charged. However, when the concentration of NaOH exceeded a critical value, the solution viscosity, elasticity, and film hydrophilicity decreased. It is believed this was due to charge shielding by excess sodium ions, leading to shrinkage of the micelle corona and smaller micelles. Increasing the PS-PAA solution ionic strength by adding NaCl also provided charge shielding, as observed by decreases in solution viscosity and elasticity. Increasing the length of either

  13. Interfacial water on crystalline silica: A comparative molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan A.; Argyris, D.; Cole, David; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the dynamics of aqueous electrolyte solutions confined in slit-shaped silica nanopores of various degrees of protonation. Five degrees of protonation were prepared by randomly removing surface hydrogen atoms from fully protonated crystalline silica surfaces. Aqueous electrolyte solutions containing NaCl or CsCl salt were simulated at ambient conditions. In all cases, the ionic concentration was 1 M. The results were quantified in terms of atomic density distributions within the pores, and the self-diffusion coefficient along the direction parallel to the pore surface. We found evidence for ion-specific properties that depend on ion surface, water ion, and only in some cases ion ion correlations. The degree of protonation strongly affects the structure, distribution, and the dynamic behavior of confined water and electrolytes. Cl ions adsorb on the surface at large degrees of protonation, and their behavior does not depend significantly on the cation type (either Na+ or Cs+ ions are present in the systems considered). The cations show significant ion-specific behavior. Na+ ions occupy different positions within the pore as the degree of protonation changes, while Cs+ ions mainly remain near the pore center at all conditions considered. For a given degree of protonation, the planar self-diffusion coefficient of Cs+ is always greater than that of Na+ ions. The results are useful for better understanding transport under confinement, including brine behavior in the subsurface, with important applications such as environmental remediation.

  14. Correlation between interfacial interactions and mechanical properties of PA-6 doped with surface-capped nano-silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deliang; Liu, Qing; Yu, Laigui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhang, Zhijun

    2009-06-01

    The polyamide-6 pellets were mixed with nano-SiO 2 particles surface-capped by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) via a melt blending route. PA-6 composites doped with surface-capped nano-SiO 2 (designated as PAMNS, where AMNS refers to APS surface-capped nano-SiO 2). AMNS and the silica samples (designated as EAMNS) extracted by acid etching from various PAMNS samples containing different concentration of amino functional groups on surface-capped nano-silica surfaces were characterized by means of Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). This aims at revealing the interfacial interaction between AMNS and PA-6 matrix and its effect on the mechanical properties of the filled PA-6 composites. The chemical features and microstructures of the PAMNS composites were analyzed by means of FTIR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively, while their mechanical properties were evaluated using standardized test rigs. Results demonstrate that the surface-modified nano-SiO 2 particles were uniformly dispersed in PA-6 matrix. The residue silica extracted from various PAMNS samples showed characteristic FTIR absorbance peak of PA-6 and had larger weight losses than AMNS, implying that the polymeric matrix was chemically bonded with the nanofiller particles. The interfacial interactions are closely related to the concentration of functional groups in AMNS, and there might exist a critical concentration at which the strongest interfacial interactions could be reached. Beyond the critical concentration of the functional groups in AMNS, the mechanical properties of the filled PA-6 composites tended to decrease to some extent.

  15. Experimental studies on the surface and interfacial properties of polysiloxanes and their interaction with blood proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, James Oliver

    1998-12-01

    The research in this thesis is concerned with the surface and interfacial properties of polysiloxanes and their interaction with blood proteins, particularly fibrinogen. Polysiloxane properties at the polymer/air interface were investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and contact angle measurements. Polysiloxane properties at the polymer/water interface were studied using a Langmuir film balance. Interaction with blood proteins was investigated by SIMS and by aggregation studies of polysiloxanes emulsified in the presence of various blood components, namely serum, plasma, and fibrinogen solution upon exposure to the enzyme thrombin. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), poly(phenylmethylsiloxane) (PPMS), and poly(trifluoropropylmethylsiloxane) (PTFPMS) homopolymers and diblock copolymers thereof were studied using SIMS and contact angle measurements. Also studied were a newly synthesized series of random copolymers of poly(methyl(methyl undecanoate)siloxane)-co-poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PMMUS). Key findings include the resolution of discrepancies in SIMS mass fragment assignments in PDMS and establishment of mass peak assignments for PPMS, PTFPMS, and PMMUS. Also, it was shown by SIMS that complete surface saturation of the siloxane components of solution casts films of PDMS/PS and PTFPMS/PS diblock copolymers and blends with PS was achieved at siloxane concentrations as low as 2.0 percent by weight. On the other hand, PPMS/PS diblock copolymers show signature peaks of both polymers at siloxane concentrations as high as 51 percent by weight. All results correspond well with contact angle measurements on the same systems. Finally, the detection of trimethylsilyl end-groups was determined through systemic variation of chain termini and polymer molecular weight. The monolayer behavior of the PMMUS copolymer series of the siloxanes containing cholesteryl ester side-groups was examined using a langmuir film balance. The isotherms of the PMMUS polymers showed

  16. Noncontact single-pulse optical method to measure interfacial properties in intact systems.

    PubMed

    Clark, David C; Kim, Myung K

    2012-12-15

    We introduce a noncontact purely optical approach to measuring the localized surface properties of an interface within a system using a single optical pressure pulse and a time-resolved digital holographic quantitative phase-imaging technique to track the propagating nanometric capillary disturbance. We demonstrate the proposed method's ability to measure the surface energy of deionized water, methanol, and chemical monolayers formed by surfactants with good agreement to published values. The development of this technique boasts immediate application to static and dynamic systems and near-future applications for living biological cell membranes. PMID:23258033

  17. Influence of interfacial oxide on the optical properties of single layer CdTe/CdS quantum dots in porous silicon scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Girija; Koktysh, Dmitry S.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Weller, Robert A.; Reed, Robert A.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2015-08-01

    Using a combination of continuous wave and time-resolved spectroscopy, we study the effects of interfacial conditions on the radiative lifetimes and photoluminescence intensities of sub-monolayer colloidal CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a three-dimensional porous silicon (PSi) scaffold. The PSi matrix was thermally oxidized under different conditions to change the interfacial oxide thickness. QDs embedded in a PSi matrix with ˜0.4 nm of interfacial oxide exhibited reduced photoluminescence intensity and nearly five times shorter radiative lifetimes (˜16 ns) compared to QDs immobilized within completely oxidized, porous silica (PSiO2) frameworks (˜78 ns). The exponential dependence of QD lifetime on interfacial oxide thickness in the PSi scaffolds suggests charge transfer plays an important role in the exciton dynamics.

  18. Influence of interfacial oxide on the optical properties of single layer CdTe/CdS quantum dots in porous silicon scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Girija; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Weller, Robert A.; Reed, Robert A.; Weiss, Sharon M.; Koktysh, Dmitry S.

    2015-08-10

    Using a combination of continuous wave and time-resolved spectroscopy, we study the effects of interfacial conditions on the radiative lifetimes and photoluminescence intensities of sub-monolayer colloidal CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs) embedded in a three-dimensional porous silicon (PSi) scaffold. The PSi matrix was thermally oxidized under different conditions to change the interfacial oxide thickness. QDs embedded in a PSi matrix with ∼0.4 nm of interfacial oxide exhibited reduced photoluminescence intensity and nearly five times shorter radiative lifetimes (∼16 ns) compared to QDs immobilized within completely oxidized, porous silica (PSiO{sub 2}) frameworks (∼78 ns). The exponential dependence of QD lifetime on interfacial oxide thickness in the PSi scaffolds suggests charge transfer plays an important role in the exciton dynamics.

  19. Unique Interfacial Properties of the Chlorinated Solvent DNAPL at Savannah River National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, S.E.; Omrane, K.; Grimberg, S.J.

    2004-03-31

    Tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene are the primary constituents in a DNAPL found in the unsaturated zone at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Following equilibration of the SRS DNAPL with deionized water, the measured interfacial tension was less than 2 dynes/cm and the pH of the aqueous phase 3.8, thus indicating the presence of constituents other than chlorinated solvents. Based on contamination history at DOE facilities, we explored the potential for co-contamination by oils, surfactants or organic acids. Non-aqueous potentiometric titration techniques revealed a high acid content (4 mg (as KOH)/g of DNAPL). Surrogate mixtures of TCE with the hydraulic oil, dibutylbutylphosphonate (DBBP) and tributylphosphate (TBP), which were used in the plutonium production process, also had low interfacial tension but not as low as the value measured for the SRS DNAPL. Research to identify the constituents and mechanisms responsible for the low interfacial tension of this DNAPL is on-going.

  20. Interfacial properties of as-received and coated SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforced reaction-formed SiC matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gaeta, P.J.; Sisson, R.D. Jr.; Singh, M.; Eldridge, J.I.

    1995-10-01

    The possibility of improving the interfacial shear strength of the SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composite system was examined. A ceramic fiber coating was chosen based on availability and chemical stability with the fiber and matrix. Fiber push-out tests conducted on as-received and coated fiber reinforced composite samples allowed characterization of the interfacial shear strength. Average debond shear and frictional sliding stresses were calculated. The effects of sample thickness and second phase addition in the matrix were also evaluated. Tested samples were examined by SEM to determine the location of the interfacial failure and to determine if any interface reactions had occurred. The coating was then evaluated based on the resulting interfacial shear strength, failure location, and integrity of the interface as compared to those properties of samples reinforced with as-received fibers.

  1. Investigating the use of coupling agents to improve the interfacial properties between a resorbable phosphate glass and polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Muhammad Sami; Ahmed, Ifty; Parsons, Andrew J; Rudd, Chris D; Walker, Gavin S; Scotchford, Colin A

    2013-09-01

    Eight different chemicals were investigated as potential candidate coupling agents for phosphate glass fibre reinforced polylactic acid composites. Evidence of reaction of the coupling agents with phosphate glass and their effect on surface wettability and glass degradation were studied along with their principle role of improving the interface between glass reinforcement and polymer matrix. It was found that, with an optimal amount of coupling agent on the surface of the glass/polymer, interfacial shear strength improved by a factor of 5. Evidence of covalent bonding between agent and glass was found for three of the coupling agents investigated, namely: 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane; etidronic acid and hexamethylene diisocyanate. These three coupling agents also improved the interfacial shear strength and increased the hydrophobicity of the glass surface. It is expected that this would provide an improvement in the macroscopic properties of full-scale composites fabricated from the same materials which may also help to retain these properties for the desired length of time by retarding the breakdown of the fibre/matrix interface within these composites. PMID:22781920

  2. The diastereomers of mannosylerythritol lipids have different interfacial properties and aqueous phase behavior, reflecting the erythritol configuration.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Yanagihara, Takashi; Imura, Tomohiro; Morita, Tomotake; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-04-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) produced by yeasts are one of the most promising glycolipid biosurfactants. There are two MEL diastereomers, in which the configurations of the erythritol moieties are opposite. The 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2S,3R)-erythritol (S-form) or 4-O-β-D-mannopyranosyl-(2R,3S)-erythritol (R-form) is the hydrophilic domain. In this study, we prepared S- and R-form MEL homologs with similar fatty acyl groups, and compared their interfacial properties. Among the four diastereomers (S-MEL-B and -D/R-MEL-B and -D), R-form MELs showed a higher critical aggregation concentration and hydrophilicity compared to the corresponding S-form. R-form MELs also efficiently formed relatively large vesicles compared to S-form. Moreover, we estimated the binary phase diagram of the MEL-water system and compared the aqueous phase behavior among the four diastereomers. The present MELs self-assembled into a lamellar (L(α)) structure at all concentration ranges. Meanwhile, the one-phase L(α) region of R-form MELs was wider than those of S-form MELs. R-form MELs may maintain more water between the polar layers in accordance with an extension of the interlayer spacing. These results suggest that the differences in MEL carbohydrate configurations significantly affect interfacial properties, self-assembly, and hydrate ability. PMID:22341919

  3. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process.

  4. Controlled interfacial electron dynamics in highly efficient Zn2 SnO4 -based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seong Sik; Kim, Dong Wook; Hwang, Daesub; Suk, Jae Ho; Oh, Lee Seul; Han, Byung Suh; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Ju Seong; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Jin Young; Hong, Kug Sun

    2014-02-01

    Among ternary oxides, Zn2 SnO4 (ZSO) is considered for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) because of its wide bandgap, high optical transmittance, and high electrical conductivity. However, ZSO-based DSSCs have a poor performance record owing largely to the absence of systematic efforts to enhance their performance. Herein, general strategies are proposed to improve the performance of ZSO-based DSSCs involving interfacial engineering/modification of the photoanode. A conformal ZSO thin film (blocking layer) deposited at the fluorine-doped tin oxide-electrolyte interface by pulsed laser deposition suppressed the back-electron transfer effectively while maintaining a high optical transmittance, which resulted in a 22 % improvement in the short-circuit photocurrent density. Surface modification of ZSO nanoparticles (NPs) resulted in an ultrathin ZnO shell layer, a 9 % improvement in the open-circuit voltage, and a 4 % improvement in the fill factor because of the reduced electron recombination at the ZSO NPs-electrolyte interface. The ZSO-based DSSCs exhibited a faster charge injection and electron transport than their TiO2 -based counterparts, and their superior properties were not inhibited by the ZnO shell layer, which indicates their feasibility for highly efficient DSSCs. Each interfacial engineering strategy could be applied to the ZSO-based DSSC independently to lead to an improved conversion efficiency of 6 %, a very high conversion efficiency for a non-TiO2 based DSSC. PMID:24347268

  5. Estimation of the Thermodynamic Limit of Overheating for Bulk Water from Interfacial Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, A. R.; Baranyai, A.; Deiters, U. K.; Kiss, P. T.; Kraska, T.; Quiñones Cisneros, S. E.

    2013-11-01

    The limit of overheating or expanding is an important property of liquids, which is relevant for the design and safety assessment of processes involving pressurized liquids. In this work, the thermodynamic stability limit—the so-called spinodal—of water is calculated by molecular dynamics computer simulation, using the molecular potential model of Baranyai and Kiss. The spinodal pressure is obtained from the maximal tangential pressure within a liquid-vapor interface layer. The results are compared to predictions of various equations of state. Based on these comparisons, a set of equations of state is identified which gives reliable results in the metastable (overheated or expanded) liquid region of water down to MPa.

  6. SiC-Si interfacial thermal and mechanical properties of reaction bonded SiC/Si ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chun-Yen; Deng, Fei; Karandikar, Prashant; Ni, Chaoying

    Reaction bonded SiC/Si (RBSC) ceramic composites are broadly utilized in military, semiconductor and aerospace industries. RBSC affords advanced specific stiffness, hardness and thermal. Interface is a key region that has to be considered when working with any composites. Both thermal and mechanical behaviors of the RBSC are highly dependent on the SiC-Si interface. The SiC-Si interface had been found to act as a thermal barrier in restricting heat transferring at room temperature and to govern the energy absorption ability of the RBSC. However, up to present, the role of the SiC-Si interface to transport heat at higher temperatures and the interfacial properties in the nanoscale have not been established. This study focuses on these critically important subjects to explore scientific phenomena and underlying mechanisms. The RBSC thermal conductivity with volume percentages of SiC at 80 and 90 vol% was measured up to 1,200 °C, and was found to decrease for both samples with increasing environmental temperature. The RBSC with 90 vol% SiC has a higher thermal conductivity than that of the 80 vol%; however, is still significantly lower than that of the SiC. The interfacial thermal barrier effect was found to decrease at higher temperatures close 1200 °C. A custom-made in-situ tensile testing device which can be accommodated inside a ZEISS Auriga 60 FIB/SEM has been setup successfully. The SiC-Si interfacial bonding strength was measured at 98 MPa. The observation and analysis of crack propagation along the SiC-Si interface was achieved with in-situ TEM.

  7. Accelerated and Outdoor Aging Effects on Photovoltaic Module Interfacial Adhesion Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G. J.; McMahon, T. J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an apparatus that allows the measurement of applied torque as a function of angle of twist during shear removal of cored specimens. This allows us to characterize the strength and durability of various interfaces within many types of photovoltaic (PV) modules. We have used this device to evaluate several parameters in terms of their ability to quantify degradation of interfacial adhesion in weathered PV modules. The usefulness of shear modulus in this regard is marginal. However, peak torque, angle at peak torque, and toughness are very sensitive parameters.

  8. Comparison of the capillary wave method and pressure tensor route for calculation of interfacial tension in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Stella; Frost, Denzil S; Phelan, Harrison; Dai, Lenore L

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the calculation of surface and interfacial tension for a variety of liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid interfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Because of the inherently small scale of MD systems, large pressure fluctuations can cause imprecise calculations of surface tension using the pressure tensor route. The capillary wave method exhibited improved precision and stability throughout all of the simulated systems in this study. In order to implement this method, the interface was defined by fitting an error function to the density profile. However, full mapping of the interface from coordinate files produced enhanced accuracy. Upon increasing the system size, both methods exhibited higher precision, although the capillary wave method was still more reliable. PMID:24122780

  9. Measurements of interfacial dynamics of gas–liquid displacement in a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Changfei; Qiu, Huihe

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of liquid film thickness in gas–liquid plug/slug flows is a challenging task. A novel laser interference method for measuring the interfacial film thickness of gas–liquid displacement in a plug flow has been developed. This novel technique utilizes light scattering from different liquid/gas interfaces in forming interference fringes. The interference fringes are used for calculating the film thickness. A set of simultaneous equations is derived based on geometrical optics. The experiment set up is not complex and is easy to install. The fringes are recorded by a charge-coupled device high speed camera and the image data are calculated using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and a non-linear least squares Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm. The uncertainty of this measurement technique is quite small (0.3 μm) and the entire film thickness profile can be measured at the same time.

  10. Nanoscale confinement and interfacial effects on the dynamics and glass transition/crystallinity of thin adsorbed films on silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madathingal, Rajesh Raman

    The research investigated in this dissertation has focused on understanding the structure-property-function relationships of polymer nanocomposites. The properties of composite systems are dictated by the properties of their components, typically fillers in a polymer matrix. In nanocomposites, the polymer near an interface has significantly different properties compared with the bulk polymer, and the contribution of the adsorbed polymer to composite properties becomes increasingly important as the filler size decreases. Despite many reports of highly favorable properties, the behavior of polymer nanocomposites is not generally predictable, and thus requires a better understanding of the interfacial region. The ability to tailor the filler/matrix interaction and an understanding of the impact of the interface on macroscopic properties are keys in the design of nanocomposite properties. In this original work the surface of silica nanoparticles was tailored by: (a) Changing the number of sites for polymer attachment by varying the surface silanols and, (b) By varying the size/curvature of nanoparticles. The effect of surface tailoring on the dynamic properties after the adsorption of two model polymers, amorphous polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and semicrystalline polyethylene oxide (PEO) was observed. The interphase layer of polymers adsorbed to silica surfaces is affected by the surface silanol density as well as the relative size of the polymer compared with the size of the adsorbing substrate. The non-equilibrium adsorption of PMMA onto individual colloidal Stober silica (SiO2) particles, where Rparticle (100nm) > RPMMA (˜6.5nm) was compared with the adsorption onto fumed silica, where Rparticle (7nm) ˜ RPMMA (6.5nm) < Raggregate (˜1000nm), both as a function of silanol density [SiOH] and hydrophobility. In the former case, TEM images showed that the PMMA adsorbed onto individual nanoparticles, so that the number of PMMA chains/bead could be calculated, whereas

  11. Surface grafting of Kevlar fibers for improved interfacial properties of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ravichandran, Vasudha.

    1991-01-01

    Matrix-specific chemical modification of the Kevlar fiber surfaces was carried out with the aim of enhancing adhesion, through covalent bonding, to selected thermoset matrix resins such as vinyl ester, unsaturated polyester and epoxy. A two-step grafting method, involving initial metalation followed by subsequent substitution, was used to graft vinyl and epoxy terminated groups onto Kevlar fiber surfaces. The physical changes in fiber surface were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy and surface area measurement and the chemical changes due to grafting were measured by contact angle measurement and neutron activation analysis; high concentrations of double bonds and epoxy groups were measured. The change in interfacial sear strength due to the surface grafting was measured by means of a single fiber pull out test. The results show a nearly twofold increase in the interfacial shear strength due to vinyl terminated grafts in the case of Kevlar/vinyl ester and Kevlar/polyester composites. Kevlar fibers containing the epoxy functionality on the surface had enhanced adhesion to epoxy matrix resin.

  12. Temperature effects on the interfacial properties of semifluorinated diblock copolymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Umesh; Clarson, Stephen; Perahia, Dvora

    The interfacial composition and structure of polymer films influence their response to external stimuli and their wetting behavior. Here we probe temperature effects on the interfacial morphology and surface energies of polytrifluoro propyl methyl siloxane- b-polystyrene (SiF-b-PS) films with SiF volume fraction of φ = 0.03 to 0.46 using atomic force microscopy and surface tension measurement. Films were cast from toluene, selective for PS, and annealed at temperatures ranging from 75 to 210°C, below and above Tg of the PS block (~98°C). For φ = 0. 03 a network of small aggregates is formed and hardly changed over the temperature range studied. For φ = 0.16 an asymmetric diblock, spherical aggregates at room temperature transformed to elongated ones at elevated temperatures whereas in the symmetric case, spherical assemblies at room temperature merged into larger structures. Independent of SiF fraction the contact angle increased with temperature which is indicative of migration of fluorine to the interface. Surprisingly, dewetting was not observed even annealing the film at much higher temperature than Tg of PS. NSF DMR 0907390 2009.

  13. Interfacial dilational properties of tea polyphenols and milk proteins with gut epithelia and the role of mucus in nutrient adsorption.

    PubMed

    Guri, Anilda; Li, Yang; Corredig, Milena

    2015-12-01

    By interacting with nutrients, the mucus layer covering the intestinal epithelium may mediate absorption. This study aimed to determine possible interactions between epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), skim milk proteins or their complexes with human intestinal mucin films. The films were extracted from postconfluent monolayers of HT29-MTX, a human intestinal cell line, and a model system was created using drop shape tensiometry. The EGCG uptake tested in vitro on postconfluent Caco-2 cells or co-cultures of Caco-2/HT29-MTX (mucus producing) showed recovery of bioavailable EGCG only for Caco-2 cell monolayers, suggesting an effect of mucus on absorption. Interfacial dilational rheology was employed to characterize the properties of the interface mixed with mucus dispersion. Adsorption of polyphenols greatly enhanced the viscoelastic modulus of the mucus film, showing the presence of interactions between the nutrient molecules and mucus films. On the other hand, in situ digestion of milk proteins using trypsin showed higher surface activities as a result of protein unfolding and competitive adsorption of the hydrolyzed products. There was an increase of viscoelastic modulus over the drop ageing time for the mixed interfaces, indicating the formation of a stiffer interfacial network. These results bring new insights into the role of the mucus layer in nutrient absorption and the interactions of mucus and dairy products. PMID:26328543

  14. Determining interfacial properties of submicron low-k films on Si substrate by using wedge indentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, Kong Boon; Zeng, Kaiyang; Jiang, Haiyan; Shen, Lu; Chi, Dongzhi

    2007-06-01

    This article presents studies on using a wedge indentation technique to determine interfacial adhesion properties of low-k dielectric films, namely, methyl-silsesquioxane (MSQ) and black diamond (BD™)films, both on a Si substrate. Interfacial crack initiation and propagation processes in the MSQ/Si system are studied by using focused-ion-beam sectioning of the indentation impressions created by wedge tips with 90° and 120° of inclusion angles, respectively. Furthermore, the indentation induced stress is found to be proportional to the ratio of the indentation volume and the interface delamination crack volume for both plane strain and nonplane strain cases. With this analysis, the interface toughness of the MSQ/Si and BD/Si system, in terms of the strain energy release rate, is determined. The interface toughness for the MSQ/Si system is found to be a value of 1.89±0.28J/m2 for the 90° wedge tip indentation and 1.92±0.08J/m2 for the 120° wedge tip indentation. In addition, using the 120° wedge tip, the interface toughnesses of the BD films on the Si substrate with 200 and 500nm thicknesses are found to be the values of 6.62±1.52 and 6.35±2.27J/m2, respectively.

  15. Dissimilar Laser Welding/Brazing of 5754 Aluminum Alloy to DP 980 Steel: Mechanical Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yulong; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Wei; Weckman, David; Zhou, Norman

    2015-11-01

    A diode laser welding/brazing technique was used for lap joining of 5754 aluminum alloy to DP 980 steel with Al-Si filler metal. The correlation between joint interfacial microstructure, wettability of filler metal, and mechanical properties was systematically investigated. At low laser power (1.4 kW), a layer of intermetallic compounds, composed of θ-Fe(Al,Si)3 and τ 5 -Al7.2Fe1.8Si, was observed at the interface between fusion zone and steel. Because of the poor wettability of filler metal on the steel substrate, the joint strength was very low and the joint failed at the FZ/steel interface. When medium laser power (2.0 kW) was applied, the wettability of filler metal was enhanced, which improved the joint strength and led to FZ failure. With further increase of laser power to 2.6 kW, apart from θ and τ 5, a new hard and brittle η-Fe2(Al,Si)5 IMC with microcracks was generated at the FZ/steel interface. The formation of η significantly degraded the joint strength. The failure mode changed back to interfacial failure.

  16. Interfacial properties of the enhanced visible-light plasmonic Ag/Bi2WO6 (0 0 1) nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Cao, Kun; Wu, Yi; Zhang, Kun-Hao; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    First principle calculations are performed to study the interfacial photoelectric properties of Agn/Bi2WO6 (0 0 1) (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) hybrid photocatalyst. The parallel adsorption of Ag cluster leads to more energetic favorable structures due to stronger interfacial interactions. The positive charged Ag cluster may act as excited electron traps and facilitate the electron-hole separation. In particular, hybridization between Ag 5s and O 2p leads to the formation of isolated energy levels above the valence bands, and they become more dispersed with broader bandwidth with the increment of silver cluster size, which is responsible for the enhanced absorption in visible-light region. In the deep valence region, Ag 4d orbital turns more delocalized and hybrid with O 2p states as the cluster size increases, which contributes to more covalent bond feature of Ag-O. Moreover, optical spectra demonstrate obvious red-shifts of the absorption edge with the increment of silver content, which enhances efficiently the visible-light photocatalytic activities of Bi2WO6 (0 0 1). The study provides insights into the enhanced photocatalyic mechanism of Ag/Bi2WO6 (0 0 1) and aids in the design of noble metal loaded visible-light plasmonic photocatalyst.

  17. Interfacial properties and electron structure of Al/B4C interface: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yajiang; Qiu, Ruizhi; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Pengcheng

    2016-09-01

    This research aims at investigating the structural, mechanical and electronic properties of the Al (111)/B4C (0001) interface by first-principles calculations. This model geometry Al (111)/B4C (0001) is chosen because the close-packed planes of Al and B4C have the (111) and (0001) orientation, respectively, and the lattice mismatch is only ∼2.1%. Among four B4C (0001) surfaces with different terminations, our calculation of surface free energies predicted that C-terminated B4C (0001) surface is the most stable one. Relaxed atomic geometries, the work of adhesion and interfacial free energies were calculated for three C-terminated B4C (0001)/Al (111) interfaces with different stacking sequences (top-site, hollow-site, and bridge-site). Results reveal that the relaxed top-site (hollow-site-like) Al/B4C interface has the best adhesion force and also be the most stable. The interfacial electron structure including charge density difference, Bader charge and density of states (DOS) is analyzed to determine the nature of metal/carbide bonding and we find the formation of Alsbnd C bond and possibly the formation of Al4C3 in the interface.

  18. Interfacial properties of two-carbon fiber reinforced polycarbonate composites using two-synthesized graft copolymers as coupling agents

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.M.

    2000-05-15

    Two model coupling agents, water-dispersible (WDGP) and tetrahydrofuran (THF)-soluble graft copolymers (TSGP), were synthesized for carbon fiber/polycarbonate (PC) composites. WDGP contains a long polyacrylamide (PAAm) chain grafted on a PC backbone, whereas TSGP contains a short grafted PAAm Chain. Measurements of the interfacial shear strength (IFSS) and other interfacial properties were evaluated using a fragmentation test for two-fiber composites (TFC) to provide the same loading state. Optimal conditions for the treatment was established as a function of treatment time, temperature, initial concentration, and melting procedure. The amount adsorbed on the carbon fiber was higher for WDGP and TSGP were 54% and 74%, respectively. Mechanisms of energy adsorption for WDGP and intermolecular interaction for TSGP can be considered to contribute differently to IFSS improvement. The improvement in IFSS for both coupling agents may be due to chemical and hydrogen bonding in the interface between functional groups in the carbon fiber and PAAm in the coupling agents and to interdiffusion in the interface between PC in coupling agents and matrix PC.

  19. Comparison between two anionic reverse micelle interfaces: the role of water-surfactant interactions in interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Silvina S; Falcone, R Dario; Silber, Juana J; Correa, N Mariano

    2012-01-16

    The water/sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (NaDEHP) reverse micelle (RM) system is revisited by using, for the first time, molecular probes to investigate interface properties. The solvatochromic behavior of 1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinium betaine (QB) and 6-propionyl-2-(N,N-dimethyl)aminonaphthalene (PRODAN) in the water/NaDEHP/toluene system is studied, and the results are compared with those obtained in water/sodium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/toluene RM media. The results demonstrate that the micropolarity, microviscosity, interfacial water structure, molecular probe partition, and intramolecular electron-transfer processes are dramatically altered for NaDEHP RM interfaces in comparison to the AOT systems. Because of organic nonpolar solvent penetration into the interface, NaDEHP RM media offer an interface with lower micropolarity and microviscosity than AOT media. Also, the interfacial water in the NaDEHP system shows enhanced water-water hydrogen-bond interaction in comparison with bulk water. The AOT RM interface represents a unique environment for PRODAN to undergo dual emission. PMID:22135080

  20. Chemical Imaging and Dynamical Studies of Reactivity and Emergent Behavior in Complex Interfacial Systems. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sibener, Steven J.

    2014-03-11

    This research program explored the efficacy of using molecular-level manipulation, imaging and scanning tunneling spectroscopy in conjunction with supersonic molecular beam gas-surface scattering to significantly enhance our understanding of chemical processes occurring on well-characterized interfaces. One program focus was on the spatially-resolved emergent behavior of complex reaction systems as a function of the local geometry and density of adsorbate-substrate systems under reaction conditions. Another focus was on elucidating the emergent electronic and related reactivity characteristics of intentionally constructed single and multicomponent atom- and nanoparticle-based materials. We also examined emergent chirality and self-organization in adsorbed molecular systems where collective interactions between adsorbates and the supporting interface lead to spatial symmetry breaking. In many of these studies we combined the advantages of scanning tunneling (STM) and atomic force (AFM) imaging, scanning tunneling local electronic spectroscopy (STS), and reactive supersonic molecular beams to elucidate precise details of interfacial reactivity that had not been observed by more traditional surface science methods. Using these methods, it was possible to examine, for example, the differential reactivity of molecules adsorbed at different bonding sites in conjunction with how reactivity is modified by the local configuration of nearby adsorbates. At the core of this effort was the goal of significantly extending our understanding of interfacial atomic-scale interactions to create, with intent, molecular assemblies and materials with advanced chemical and physical properties. This ambitious program addressed several key topics in DOE Grand Challenge Science, including emergent chemical and physical properties in condensed phase systems, novel uses of chemical imaging, and the development of advanced reactivity concepts in combustion and catalysis including carbon

  1. All-atom force field for the prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria and interfacial properties of HFA134a.

    PubMed

    Peguin, Robson P S; Kamath, Ganesh; Potoff, Jeffrey J; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2009-01-01

    A new all-atom force field capable of accurately predicting the bulk and interfacial properties of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFA134a) is reported. Parameterization of several force fields with different initial charge configurations from ab initio calculations was performed using the histogram reweighting method and Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. The 12-6 Lennard-Jones well depth and diameter for the different HFA134a models were determined by fitting the simulation results to pure-component vapor-equilibrium data. Initial screening of the force fields was achieved by comparing the calculated and experimental bulk properties. The surface tension of pure HFA134a served as an additional screening property to help discriminate an optimum model. The proposed model reproduces the experimental saturated liquid and vapor densities, and the vapor pressure for HFA134a within average errors of 0.7%, 4.4%, and 3.1%, respectively. Critical density, temperature, vapor pressure, normal boiling point, and heat of vaporization at 298 K are also in good agreement with experimental data with errors of 0.2%, 0.1%, 6.2%, 0%, 2.2%, respectively. The calculated surface tension is found to be within the experimental range of 7.7-8.1 mN.m(-1). The dipole moment of the different models was found to significantly affect the prediction of the vapor pressure and surface tension. The ability of the HFA134a models in predicting the interfacial tension against water is also discussed. The results presented here are relevant in the development of technologies where the more environmentally friendly HFA134a is utilized as a substitute to the ozone depleting chlorofluorocarbon propellants. PMID:19086791

  2. Dynamical properties of piano soundboards.

    PubMed

    Chaigne, Antoine; Cotté, Benjamin; Viggiano, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    In pianos, the transfer of energy from strings to soundboard and the radiation of sound are highly dependent on the dynamical properties of the soundboard. In this paper, a numerical study is conducted for various rib configurations, showing that even slight irregularities in rib spacing can induce a strong localization of the soundboard velocity pattern. The effective vibrating area can be further reduced due to the spatial filtering effect of the bridge. Numerical predictions of modal shapes and operating deflection shapes are confirmed by series of measurements made on upright piano soundboards. Simulations of radiated pressure based on measured and calculated soundboard velocity fields show that localization tends to broaden the cone of directivity and to reduce the number of lobes. PMID:23556610

  3. Electronic Transport properties of SET and REST states of interfacial phase-change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hisao; Tominaga, Junji; Asai, Yoshihiro; Rungger, Ivan; Narayan, Awadhesh; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    The phase change memory (PCM) is one of most promising nonvolatile information storage technologies. Recently, the superlattice structure of GeTe/Sb2Te3 is proposed as PCM to reduce the restive switching energy. This PCM is called interfacial PCM (iPCM) and it is considered that SET and RESET states are realized only by the flip-flop transition of Ge atoms in crystal phase because of small loss of entropy. Furthermore, the GeTe is sandwiched by Sb2Te3 topological insulator. In this study, we performed the first principles electric transport calculations including spin-orbit interactions. We presents the mechanism of resistive switch by the transition of Ge atoms as well as the volume change effect and the role of spin-orbit interaction to resistance ration of SET and RESE states.

  4. Role of reactant transport in determining the properties of NIF shells made by interfacial polycondensation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, K.E.; Letts, S.A.; Buckley, S.R.; Fearon, E.M.; Wilemski, G.; Cook, R.C.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1997-03-01

    Polymer shells up to 2 mm in diameter were prepared using an interfacial polycondensation / cross-linking reaction occurring at the surface of an oil drop. The oil phase is comprised of a solution (20 wt% or less) of isophthaloyl dichloride (IPC) dissolved in an organic solvent. An interfacial reaction is initiated when the IPC-loaded oil drop is submerged in an aqueous solution of poly(p-vinylphenol) (PVP), a poly(electrolyte) at elevated pH. Composition, structure, and surface finish for fully-formed dry shells were assessed using a number of techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), pyrolysis-gas chromatography (GC) mass spectroscopy (MS), microhardness measurements, gas permeability, and solvent permeability measurements. From deposition rate data, a reaction mechanism and key reaction parameters were identified. The deposition rate of shell membrane material was found to be a diffusion limited reaction of IPC through the forming membrane to the exterior shell interface (which is believed to be the reaction front). The final thickness of the film deposited at the interface and the rate of deposition were found to be strong functions of the IPC concentration and oil phase solvent. Films made with diethyl phthalate (DEP) were thinner and harder than films made using 1,6-dichlorohexane (DCH) as a solvent. Differences in solubility of the forming membrane in DCH and DEP appear to be able to account for the differences in deposition rate and the hardness (related to cross-linking density). The deposition can be thought of as a phase separation which is affected by both the poly(electrolyte) / ionomer transition and the amount of cross-linking. Finally, it was found that the choice of oil phase solvent profoundly affects the evolution of the outer surface roughness.

  5. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  6. Shape Oscillations of Bubbles in Water Driven by Modulated Ultrasonic Radiation Pressure and Applications to Interfacial Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaki, Thomas James

    1995-01-01

    Acoustic levitation techniques were used for static and dynamic studies of single air bubbles in aqueous solutions. Bubble sizes ranged from 0.3 to 6 mm in radius. The static position of a bubble, determined by the balance between the buoyant and acoustic forces, agrees well with existing theory. Measured bubble aspect ratios are a nonmonotonic increasing function of bubble size and agree well with an improved expression based on the radiation stress tensor. Small amplitude normal mode shape oscillations were induced by modulation of the acoustic radiation pressure and were detected by optical pseudo-extinction and optical interferometry techniques. Driven oscillation frequencies for bubbles in clean water agree well with Lamb theory although significant frequency shifts occur for bubbles of large aspect ratio (_sp{~ }{>}1.3). An improved asymptotic expansion, important for bubbles in fluids and for liquid drops in air, was obtained for the complex free decay frequency. The free decay of quadrupole shape oscillations was measured for nearly spherical bubbles (aspect ratio ~ 1.01) in clean water, clean salt water, sea water, and in the presence of surfactants. Bubbles in clean solutions exhibit behavior indicative of an ideal clean interface. Frequency shifts and excess damping were observed for bubbles in sea water, in aqueous solutions of Triton X-100, and for a bubble coated with the insoluble surfactant stearic acid. The damping and frequency exhibit nonmonotonic behavior with respect to interfacial surfactant coverage; maxima occur at coverages which do not significantly affect the surface tension. At large coverages the damping is increased and the frequency is reduced relative to theoretical expectations for a clean ideal interface at constant surface tension. These results are in qualitative agreement with theories incorporating interfacial viscoelastic effects and with planar-surface capillary ripple experiments which also exhibit maxima in the damping as a

  7. Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization improves oxidative stability and interfacial properties of soy protein isolate-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Avila, C; Trujillo, A J

    2016-10-15

    Ultra-High Pressure Homogenization (100-300MPa) has great potential for technological, microbiological and nutritional aspects of fluid processing. Its effect on the oxidative stability and interfacial properties of oil-in-water emulsions prepared with 4% (w/v) of soy protein isolate and soybean oil (10 and 20%, v/v) were studied and compared to emulsions treated by conventional homogenization (15MPa). Emulsions were characterized by particle size, emulsifying activity index, surface protein concentration at the interface and by transmission electron microscopy. Primary and secondary lipid oxidation products were evaluated in emulsions upon storage. Emulsions with 20% oil treated at 100 and 200MPa exhibited the most oxidative stability due to higher amount of oil and protein surface load at the interface. This manuscript addresses the improvement in oxidative stability in emulsions treated by UHPH when compared to conventional emulsions. PMID:27173541

  8. The interfacial properties of SrRuO3/MoS2 heterojunction: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biao; Wu, Li-Juan; Zhao, Yu-Qing; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Cai, Meng-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    First-principles calculation was used to study the interfacial properties of the SrRuO3 (1 1 1)/MoS2(√3 × √3) heterojunction. It is found that the huge magnetic moments in of monolayer MoS2 largely originate from the Ru-S hybridization for the Ru-terminated interface. Moreover, for the SrO-terminated interface, we studied mainly the metal and semiconductor contact characteristic. The calculated results show that the Schottky barrier height can be significantly reduced to zero for the SrO-terminated interface. Schottky barrier heights dominate the transport behavior of the SrRuO3/MoS2 interface. Our results not only have potential applications in spintronics devices, but also are in favour of the scaling of field effect transistors.

  9. Engineering interfacial properties by anionic surfactant-chitosan complexes to improve stability of oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zinoviadou, Kyriaki G; Scholten, Elke; Moschakis, Thomas; Biliaderis, Costas G

    2012-03-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions (10% w/w n-tetradecane) were prepared at pH = 5.7 by using, as surface active agents, electrostatically formed complexes of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL) at a concentration of 0.4% (w/w) and chitosan (CH) in a concentration range between 0 and 0.48% w/w. The use of complexes in emulsions with a low concentration of CH (<0.24% w/w) resulted in highly flocculated systems; instead, with increased level of CH, the emulsions had a smaller average droplet size and exhibited greater stability during storage. Emulsions stabilised by SSL/CH complexes showed non-Newtonian flow behavior with pronounced shear thinning. Among all formulations studied none showed a gel-like behavior since in all cases the G' (storage modulus) was lower that G'' (loss modulus). Adsorption kinetics of pure SSL and SSL/CH complexes to the oil/water interfaces were evaluated using an automated drop tensiometer (ADT). Even though complexation of SSL with CH resulted in a delay of the adsorption of the surface active species at the oil/water interface, the inclusion of the polysaccharide resulted in substantially improved interfacial properties as indicated by a significant increase of the dilatational modulus. Furthermore, the enhanced interfacial properties of the emulsion droplets resulted in improved stability against freeze-thaw cycling. The results of this study may facilitate the development of frozen food products such as desserts with an ameliorated stability and favorable sensorial characteristics. PMID:22298029

  10. Comparison of hydrolytic and non-hydrolytic atomic layer deposition chemistries: Interfacial electronic properties at alumina-silicon interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marstell, Roderick J.; Strandwitz, Nicholas C.

    2015-11-01

    We report the differences in the passivation and electronic properties of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) deposited on silicon via traditional hydrolytic atomic layer deposition (ALD) and non-hydrolytic (NH) ALD chemistries. Traditional films were grown using trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water and NHALD films grown using TMA and isopropanol at 300 °C. Hydrolytically grown ALD films contain a smaller amount of fixed charge than NHALD films (oxide fixed charge Qf Traditional = -8.1 × 1011 cm-2 and Qf NHALD = -3.6 × 1012 cm-2), and a larger degree of chemical passivation than NHALD films (density of interface trap states, Dit Traditional = 5.4 × 1011 eV-1 cm-2 and Dit NHALD = 2.9 × 1012 eV-1 cm-2). Oxides grown with both chemistries were found to have a band gap of 7.1 eV. The conduction band offset was 3.21 eV for traditionally grown films and 3.38 eV for NHALD. The increased Dit for NHALD films may stem from carbon impurities in the oxide layer that are at and near the silicon surface, as evidenced by both the larger trap state time constant (τTraditional = 2.2 × 10-9 s and τNHALD = 1.7 × 10-7 s) and the larger carbon concentration. We have shown that the use of alcohol-based oxygen sources in NHALD chemistry can significantly affect the resulting interfacial electronic behavior presenting an additional parameter for understanding and controlling interfacial electronic properties at semiconductor-dielectric interfaces.