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Sample records for dynamic shear stress

  1. Effects of dynamic shear and transmural pressure on wall shear stress sensitivity in collecting lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kornuta, Jeffrey A; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna; Gasheva, Olga Y; Mukherjee, Anish; Zawieja, David C; Dixon, J Brandon

    2015-11-01

    Given the known mechanosensitivity of the lymphatic vasculature, we sought to investigate the effects of dynamic wall shear stress (WSS) on collecting lymphatic vessels while controlling for transmural pressure. Using a previously developed ex vivo lymphatic perfusion system (ELPS) capable of independently controlling both transaxial pressure gradient and average transmural pressure on an isolated lymphatic vessel, we imposed a multitude of flow conditions on rat thoracic ducts, while controlling for transmural pressure and measuring diameter changes. By gradually increasing the imposed flow through a vessel, we determined the WSS at which the vessel first shows sign of contraction inhibition, defining this point as the shear stress sensitivity of the vessel. The shear stress threshold that triggered a contractile response was significantly greater at a transmural pressure of 5 cmH2O (0.97 dyne/cm(2)) than at 3 cmH2O (0.64 dyne/cm(2)). While contraction frequency was reduced when a steady WSS was applied, this inhibition was reversed when the applied WSS oscillated, even though the mean wall shear stresses between the conditions were not significantly different. When the applied oscillatory WSS was large enough, flow itself synchronized the lymphatic contractions to the exact frequency of the applied waveform. Both transmural pressure and the rate of change of WSS have significant impacts on the contractile response of lymphatic vessels to flow. Specifically, time-varying shear stress can alter the inhibition of phasic contraction frequency and even coordinate contractions, providing evidence that dynamic shear could play an important role in the contractile function of collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:26333787

  2. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, Mouhammad; Assoum, Hassan Hassan; Sobolik, Vaclav; Vétel, Jérôme; Abed-Meraim, Kamel; Garon, André; Sakout, Anas

    2012-06-01

    The wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet are investigated experimentally for Re = 1,260 and 2,450. The wall shear stress is obtained at different radial locations from the stagnation point using the polarographic method. The velocity field is given from the time resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) technique in both the free jet region and near the wall in the impinging region. The distribution of the momentum thickness is also inspected from the jet exit toward the impinged wall. It is found that the wall shear stress is correlated with the large-scale vortex passing. Both the primary vortices and the secondary structures strongly affect the variation of the wall shear stress. The maximum mean wall shear stress is obtained just upstream from the secondary vortex generation where the primary structures impinge the wall. Spectral analysis and cross-correlations between the wall shear stress fluctuations show that the vortex passing influences the wall shear stress at different locations simultaneously. Analysis of cross-correlations between temporal fluctuations of the wall shear stress and the transverse vorticity brings out the role of different vortical structures on the wall shear stress distribution for the two Reynolds numbers.

  3. Evaluation of Shear-Induced Platelet Activation Models Under Constant and Dynamic Shear Stress Loading Conditions Relevant to Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Soares, João Silva; Xenos, Michalis; Jesty, Jolyon; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The advent of implantable blood-recirculating devices such as left ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves provides a viable therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure and valvular disease. However, device-generated pathological flow patterns result in thromboembolic complications that require complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy, which entails hemorrhagic risks and is not appropriate for certain patients. Optimizing the thrombogenic performance of such devices utilizing numerical simulations requires the development of predictive platelet activation models that account for variations in shear-loading rates characterizing blood flow through such devices. Platelets were exposed in vitro to both dynamic and constant shear stress conditions emulating those found in blood-recirculating devices in order to determine their shear-induced activation and sensitization response. Both these behaviors were found to be dependent on the shear loading rates, in addition to shear stress magnitude and exposure time. We then critically examined several current models and evaluated their predictive capabilities using these results. Shear loading rate terms were then included to account for dynamic aspects that are either ignored or partially considered by these models, and model parameters were optimized. Independent optimization for each of the two types of shear stress exposure conditions tested resulted in different sets of best-fit constants, indicating that universal optimization may not be possible. Inherent limitations of the current models require a paradigm shift from these integral-based discretized power law models to better address the dynamic conditions encountered in blood-recirculating devices. PMID:23400312

  4. Stress dynamics of a 2D dense granular system near shear jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie; Dijksman, Joshua; Behringer, Robert

    2013-03-01

    We study the dynamics of pressure and shear stress in a frictional 2D dense granular system using a novel apparatus that can provide fixed-volume shear without generating inhomogeneities. Under increasing shear strain, the system's pressure shows a strong increase with strain, characterized by a ``Reynolds coefficient,'' R =d2 P / dγ2 . R depends only on packing fraction ϕ, and shows a strong increase as ϕ approaches ϕJ from below. In the meantime, the system's shear stress shows a non-monotonic behavior with increasing strain. It first increases with strain as the system is in ``fragile'' states and builds up long force chains along the compression direction. After a certain amount of strain, force chains along the dilation direction starts to build up, and the system transfers into a ``shear-jammed'' state and the shear stress starts to decrease with strain. Under oscillatory shear, both pressure and shear stress show limit-cycle behavior and reach steady states after many cycles. However, the limit cycles of pressure and shear stress are very different: the pressure exhibits a hysteresis-free parabolic curve, while the shear stress exhibits a strongly hysteretic loop. This work is funded by NSF grants: DMR0906908, DMS0835571, NASA grant NNX10AU01G and ARO grant W911NF-11-1-0110.

  5. Working Principle Simulations of a Dynamic Resonant Wall Shear Stress Sensor Concept

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Naughton, Jonathan W.; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses a novel dynamic resonant wall shear stress sensor concept based on an oscillating sensor operating near resonance. The interaction between the oscillating sensor surface and the fluid above it is modelled using the unsteady laminar boundary layer equations. The numerical experiment shows that the effect of the oscillating shear stress is well correlated by the Hummer number, the ratio of the steady shear force caused by the outside flow to the oscillating viscous force created by the sensor motion. The oscillating shear stress predicted by the fluid model is used in a mechanical model of the sensor to predict the sensor's dynamic motion. Static calibration curves for amplitude and frequency influences are predicted. These results agree with experimental results on some extent, and shows some expectation for further development of the dynamic resonant sensor concept.

  6. Dynamic response of micro-pillar sensors measuring fluctuating wall-shear-stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücker, Ch.; Bauer, D.; Chaves, H.

    2007-05-01

    We present in this paper test results of flexible micro-pillars and pillar arrays for wall shear stress measurements in flows with fluctuating wall shear stress such as unsteady separated flows or turbulent flows. Previous papers reported on the sensing principle and fabrication process. Static calibrations have shown this sensor to have a maximum nonlinearity of 1% over two orders of wall-shear-stress. For measurements in flows with fluctuating wall shear stress the dynamic response has been experimentally verified in an oscillating pipe flow and compared to a calculated response based on Stokes’ and Oseen’s solution for unsteady flow around a cylinder. The results demonstrate good agreement under the given boundary conditions of cylindrical micro-pillars and the limit of viscous Stokes-flow around the pillar. Depending on the fluid and pillar geometry, different response curves result ranging from a flat low-pass filtered response to a strong resonant behavior. Two different methods are developed to detect the frequency content and the directional wall shear stress information from image processing of large sensor films with arrays of micro-pillars of different geometry. Design rules are given to achieve the optimal conditions with respect to signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity and bandwidth for measurements in turbulent flows.

  7. Normal and shear impact of layered composite with a crack - Dynamic stress intensification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Chen, E. P.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic response of a layered composite under normal and shear impact is analyzed by assuming that the composite contains an initial flaw in the matrix material. One of the objectives was to develop an analytical method for determining dynamic stress solutions which should lead to a numerical method which utilizes Fourier transform for the space variable and Laplace transform for the time variable. The time-dependent angle loading is separated into two parts: a symmetric and a skew-symmetric with reference to the crack plane. By superposition, the transient boundary conditions consist of applying normal and shear tractions to a crack embedded in a layered composite; one phase of the composite could represent the fiber while the other could be the matrix. Mathematically, these conditions reduce the problem to a system of dual integral equations solved in the transform plane for the transform of the dynamic stress-intensity factor.

  8. Dynamic Deformation and Recovery Response of Red Blood Cells to a Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow: Effects of Frequency of Cyclically Reversing Shear Flow and Shear Stress Level

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Toshitaka; Takatani, Setsuo

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic deformation and recovery responses of red blood cells (RBCs) to a cyclically reversing shear flow generated in a 30-μm clearance, with the peak shear stress of 53, 108, 161, and 274 Pa at the frequency of 1, 2, 3, and 5 Hz, respectively, were studied. The RBCs' time-varying velocity varied after the glass plate velocity without any time lag, whereas the L/W change, where L and W were the major and minor axes of RBCs' ellipsoidal shape, exhibited a rapid increase and gradual decay during the deformation and recovery phase. The time of minimum L/W occurrence lagged behind the zero-velocity time of the glass plate (zero stress), and the delay time normalized to the one-cycle duration remained constant at 8.0%. The elongation of RBCs at zero stress time became larger with the reversing frequency. A simple mechanical model consisting of an elastic linear element during a rapid elongation period and a parallel combination of elements such as a spring and dashpot during the nonlinear recovery phase was suggested. The dynamic response behavior of RBCs under a cyclically reversing shear flow was different from the conventional shape change where a steplike force was applied to and completely released from the RBCs. PMID:16766612

  9. Yield shear stress and disaggregating shear stress of human blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinmu; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2014-05-01

    This review presents two distinct rheological parameters of blood that have the potential to indicate blood circulation adequacy: yield shear stress (YSS) and disaggregating shear stress (DSS). YSS and DSS reflect the strength of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation in suspension under static and dynamic conditions, respectively. YSS, defined as the critical stress to disperse RBC aggregates under static conditions, was found to be dependent upon hematocrit, fibrinogen, and red cell deformability, but not temperature. DSS, defined as the minimum shear stress to disperse RBC aggregates under dynamic conditions, is dependent upon fibrinogen, red cell deformability, and temperature but not hematocrit. Owing to recent advances in measurement technology, these two parameters can be easily measured, and thus, their clinical significance in blood circulation can be verified.

  10. Measurement of shear stress-mediated intracellular calcium dynamics in human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarnejad, M.; Cromer, W. E.; Kaunas, R. R.; Zhang, S. L.; Zawieja, D. C.

    2015-01-01

    The shear stress applied to lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) by lymph flow changes dramatically under normal conditions as well as in response to disease conditions and immune reactions. In general, LEC are known to regulate the contraction frequency and strength of lymphatic pumping in response to shear stress. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is an important factor that regulates lymphatic contraction characteristics. In this study, we measured changes in the [Ca2+]i under different shear stress levels and determined the source of this calcium signal. Briefly, human dermal LEC were cultured in custom-made microchannels for 3 days before loading with 2 µM fura-2 AM, a ratiometric calcium dye to measure [Ca2+]i. Step changes in shear stress resulted in a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i followed by a gradual return to the basal level and sometimes below the initial baseline (45.2 ± 2.2 nM). The [Ca2+]i reached a peak at 126.2 ± 5.6 nM for 10 dyn/cm2 stimulus, whereas the peak was only 71.8 ± 5.4 nM for 1 dyn/cm2 stimulus, indicating that the calcium signal depends on the magnitude of shear stress. Removal of the extracellular calcium from the buffer or pharmocological blockade of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels significantly reduced the peak [Ca2+]i, demonstrating a role of extracellular calcium entry. Inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pumps showed the importance of intracellular calcium stores in the initiation of this signal. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the shear-mediated calcium signal is dependent on the magnitude of the shear and involves ER store calcium release and extracellular calcium entry. PMID:25617358

  11. Dynamic deformation capability of a red blood cell under a cyclically reciprocating shear stress.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, N; Yasuda, T; Kataoka, H; Takatani, S

    2004-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) in the cardiovascular devices are exposed to varying degree of the shear stress from all the directions. However the RBCs' deformability or the deformation capability under such a shear stress is not well understood. In this study, we designed and built a system that can induce a cyclically reciprocating shear stress to a RBC suspension. The arm of the cyclically reciprocating shear stress device was attached to the upper piece of the parallel glass plates between which a suspension of human RBCs (1% hematocrit whole blood diluted in a 32 weight% dextran phosphate buffer solution) was contained. The cyclic reciprocating motion of the upper glass plate of 3.0 mm stroke length was produced using a slider-crank shaft mechanism that was linked to an eccentric cam-motor system. Each rotation of the motor produced a 3.0 mm stroke each in the forward and backward direction of the slider block. The clearance between the two glass plates was adjusted to 30 micrometer. The cyclic reciprocating glass plate apparatus was attached to a light microscope stage (IX71 Olympus with x40 objective lens) for illumination with a 350 watt metal halide light source. A high speed camera (MEMREMCAM fx-K3 Nac, 5000 frames per second with shutter kept open) was attached to the microscope to capture the deformation process of the RBCs under cyclic shear stress. The preliminary result indicated that the correlation between the amplitude of the maximum shear stress and the RBCs' deformability. This indicates a potential application of the cyclic reciprocating device to evaluate the temporal response of the RBCs deformability prior to its destruction. The future study will focus on the study of the relative velocity of the erythrocytes with respect to the velocity of the reciprocating plate. PMID:17271457

  12. Dynamic shear-stress-enhanced rates of nutrient consumption in gas-liquid semi-continuous-flow suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfiore, Laurence A.; Volpato, Fabio Z.; Paulino, Alexandre T.; Belfiore, Carol J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to establish guidelines for generating significant mammalian cell density in suspension bioreactors when stress-sensitive kinetics enhance the rate of nutrient consumption. Ultra-low-frequency dynamic modulations of the impeller (i.e., 35104 Hz) introduce time-dependent oscillatory shear into this transient analysis of cell proliferation under semi-continuous creeping flow conditions. Greater nutrient consumption is predicted when the amplitude A of modulated impeller rotation increases, and stress-kinetic contributions to nutrient consumption rates increase linearly at higher modulation frequency via an application of fluctuation-dissipation response. Interphase mass transfer is required to replace dissolved oxygen as it is consumed by aerobic nutrient consumption in the liquid phase. The theory and predictions described herein could be important at small length scales in the creeping flow regime where viscous shear is significant at the interface between the nutrient medium and isolated cells in suspension. Two-dimensional flow around spherically shaped mammalian cells, suspended in a Newtonian culture medium, is analyzed to calculate the surface-averaged magnitude of the velocity gradient tensor and modify homogeneous rates of nutrient consumption that are stimulated by viscous shear, via the formalism of stress-kinetic reciprocal relations that obey Curie's theorem in non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Time constants for stress-free free and stress-sensitive stress nutrient consumption are defined and quantified to identify the threshold (i.e., stress,threshold) below which the effect of stress cannot be neglected in accurate predictions of bioreactor performance. Parametric studies reveal that the threshold time constant for stress-sensitive nutrient consumption stress,threshold decreases when the time constant for stress

  13. A Piezoelectric Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress suppressing effects of normal stress generated from the vortex lift-up by applying opposite poling vectors to the: piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces and it showed high sensitivity to shear stress (=91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of PMN-33%PT (d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also showed almost no sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is 0-800 Hz. Keywords: Piezoelectric sensor, shear stress, floating element, electromechanical symmetry

  14. A piezoelectric shear stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyang; Saini, Aditya; Kim, Jinwook; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Zhu, Yong; Palmieri, Frank L.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric sensor with a floating element was developed for shear stress measurement. The piezoelectric sensor was designed to detect the pure shear stress, suppressing effects of normal stress components, by applying opposite poling vectors to the piezoelectric elements. The sensor was first calibrated in the lab by applying shear forces where it demonstrated high sensitivity to shear stress (91.3 +/- 2.1 pC/Pa) due to the high piezoelectric coefficients of 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3 (PMN-33%PT, d31=-1330 pC/N). The sensor also exhibited negligible sensitivity to normal stress (less than 1.2 pC/Pa) because of the electromechanical symmetry of the device. The usable frequency range of the sensor is up to 800 Hz.

  15. Dynamic blood flow and wall shear stress in pulmonary hypertensive disease.

    PubMed

    Postles, Arthur; Clark, Alys R; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2014-01-01

    This study provides new model of pulsatile flow in the pulmonary circulation in health and pulmonary hypertensive disease. Structural vascular remodeling typical of pulmonary hypertensive disease was implemented in the model by progressively altering the mechanical properties of the arterial geometry and progressively increasing the inlet pulse pressure (PP). The transmission of PP throughout the tree was shown to increase in advanced stages of disease, creating the potential for a `vicious-cycle' of damage to vasculature. Wall shear stress (WSS) was shown to be highest in the terminal arteries of the model and increased significantly with disease. A further trend observed in WSS results was that high WSS values began to `climb' the arterial tree towards the proximal vessels as disease progressed. This suggests a link between WSS and distal remodeling in pulmonary hypertensive disease, which initiates in the small muscular arteries and arterioles and spreads into larger arteries as the disease progresses. PMID:25571282

  16. Analysis of structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers in solution subject to a dynamic shear stress

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.; Baker, S.; Toprakcioglu, C.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Polymer-based separation techniques rely on the ability of a binding portion of the polymer to interact with a specific molecule in a solution flowing past the polymer. The location of the binding site within or out of the entangled polymer chains is thus crucial to the effectiveness of these methods. For this reason, the details of flow induced deformation of the polymer chains is important in such applications as exclusion chromatography, waste water treatment, ultrafiltration, enhanced oil recovery and microbial adhesion. Few techniques exist to examine the structure and orientation of polymeric materials, and even fewer to examine systems in a dynamic fluid flow. The goal of this project was to understand the molecular structure and orientation of adsorbed polymers with and without active binding ligands as a function of solvent shear rate, solvent power, polymer molecular weight, surface polymer coverage and heterogeneity of the surface polymer chains by neutron reflectometry in a newly designed shear cell. Geometrical effects on binding of molecules in the flow was also studied subject to the same parameters.

  17. Dynamics of a one-dimensional model for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer with momentum-conserving Reynolds stress

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, I.; Carreras, B. A.

    2007-10-15

    A one-dimensional version of the second-order transition model based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing is presented. The model discussed in this paper includes a form of the Reynolds stress which explicitly conserves momentum. A linear stability analysis of the critical point is performed. Then, it is shown that the dynamics of weakly unstable states is determined by a reduced equation for the shear flow. In the case in which the flow damping term is diffusive, the stationary solutions are those of the real Ginzburg-Landau equation.

  18. Observations of dynamic stall phenomena on an oscillating airfoil with shear-stress-sensitive liquid crystal coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillating airfoil experiments were conducted using shear-stress- sensitive/temperature-insensitive liquid crystal coatings in order to investigate unsteady fluid physics associated with the dynamic-stall process. Laser-light-sheet/smoke-particle flow visualization and surface-mounted micro-tufts were also employed to complement the liquid crystal technique. Experiments were conducted under incompressible flow conditions at a freestream Reynolds number (based on chord) of {approximately}10{sup 6}. Angle-of-attack oscillations of {plus minus}19{degree} about 0{degree}, at several discrete frequencies, were used to induce the unsteady flows. Boundary layer transition and turbulent separation locations were seen to undergo extensive and rapid movements with changing angle of attack, particularly on the airfoil lee surface. Progression of turbulent separation to the immediate vicinity of the leading edge was observed (via the liquid crystal technique) to result in large-scale, high-frequency fluctuations in the surface shear stress distribution. Comparisons of transition and turbulent separation measurements with Eppler code predictions indicated that the empirically-based viscous flow modeling used in this design tool requires updates. 19 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  19. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model of shear stress distribution during neotissue growth in a perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Y; Luyten, F P; Schrooten, J; Papantoniou, I; Geris, L

    2015-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies use flow through perfusion bioreactors to apply mechanical stimuli to cells seeded on porous scaffolds. Cells grow on the scaffold surface but also by bridging the scaffold pores leading a fully filled scaffold following the scaffold's geometric characteristics. Current computational fluid dynamic approaches for tissue engineering bioreactor systems have been mostly carried out for empty scaffolds. The effect of 3D cell growth and extracellular matrix formation (termed in this study as neotissue growth), on its surrounding fluid flow field is a challenge yet to be tackled. In this work a combined approach was followed linking curvature driven cell growth to fluid dynamics modeling. The level-set method (LSM) was employed to capture neotissue growth driven by curvature, while the Stokes and Darcy equations, combined in the Brinkman equation, provided information regarding the distribution of the shear stress profile at the neotissue/medium interface and within the neotissue itself during growth. The neotissue was assumed to be micro-porous allowing flow through its structure while at the same time allowing the simulation of complete scaffold filling without numerical convergence issues. The results show a significant difference in the amplitude of shear stress for cells located within the micro-porous neo-tissue or at the neotissue/medium interface, demonstrating the importance of taking along the neotissue in the calculation of the mechanical stimulation of cells during culture.The presented computational framework is used on different scaffold pore geometries demonstrating its potential to be used a design as tool for scaffold architecture taking into account the growing neotissue. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2591-2600. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26059101

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis to Determine Shear Stresses and Rates in a Centrifugal Left Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Selgrade, Brian Paul; Truskey, George A.

    2014-01-01

    Axial flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are a significant improvement in mechanical circulatory support. However, patients with these devices experience degradation of large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers, which is associated with bleeding and may be caused by high shear stresses within the LVAD. In this study, we used computational fluid mechanics to determine the wall shear stresses, shear rates, and residence times in a centrifugal LVAD and assess the impact on these variables caused by changing impeller speed and changing from a shrouded to a semi-open impeller. In both LVAD types, shear rates were well over 10 000/s in several regions. This is high enough to degrade vWF, but it is unclear if residence times, which were below 5 ms in high-shear regions, are long enough to allow vWF cleavage. Additionally, wall shear stresses were below the threshold stress of 10 Pa only in the outlet tube so it is feasible to endothelialize this region to enhance its biocompatibility. PMID:22360826

  1. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to

  2. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-11-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to

  3. Flow fields, bed shear stresses, and suspended bed sediment dynamics in bifurcations of a large river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szupiany, R. N.; Amsler, M. L.; Hernandez, J.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Fornari, E.; Trento, A.

    2012-11-01

    Channel bifurcations associated with bars and islands are important nodes in braided rivers and may control flow partitioning and thus affect downstream confluences, as well as the formation and dynamics of bars. However, the morphodynamic processes associated with bar formation are poorly understood, and previous studies have largely concerned laboratory experiments, small natural streams, or numerical analyses with large Froude numbers, high slopes, and low Shields stresses. In these cases, the morphologic changes at bifurcations are relatively rapid, with predominant bed load transport and the suspended load playing a minor role. In this paper, the evolution of the flow structure and suspended bed sediment transport along four expansion-diffluence units in the Rio Paraná, Argentina, are described. The Rio Paraná is a large multichannel river with a bed composed of medium and fine sands and possesses low Froude numbers and high suspended bed material transport. Primary and secondary flow velocity components were measured with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) along the expansion-diffluence units, and the backscatter signal of the ADCP was calibrated to allow simultaneous measurements of suspended bed sediment concentrations. The interactions between these variables show that the cores of primary flow velocity and suspended bed sediment concentration do not necessarily follow the thalweg at the bifurcation and that inertial effects on the suspended bed sediment may influence the morphodynamics of bar formation. It is suggested that changes in flow stage, as well as the presence of vegetation, may further increase the deposition of suspended bed sediment at the bar head. This study suggests that the ratio of suspended bed material to bed load is an important factor controlling the morphodynamics of bifurcations in large sand bed braided rivers.

  4. Dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations in rapidly shearing granular materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; LaHusen, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    Results from two types of experiments show that intergranular pore pressures fluctuated dynamically during rapid, steady shear deformation of water-saturated granular materials. During some fluctuations, the pore water locally supported all normal and shear stresses, while grain-contact stresses transiently fell to zero. Fluctuations also propagated outward from the shear zone; this process modifies grain-contact stresses in adjacent areas and potentially instigates shear-zone growth.

  5. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  6. A dynamic jamming point for shear thickening suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Densely packed suspensions can shear thicken, in which the viscosity increases with shear rate. We performed rheometry measurements on two model systems: corn starch in water and glass spheres in oils. In both systems we observed shear thickening up to a critical packing fraction φc (=0.55 for spherical grains) above which the flow abruptly transitions to shear thinning. The viscosity and yield stress diverge as power laws at φc. Extrapolating the dynamic ranges of shear rate and stress in the shear thickening regime up to φc suggests a finite change in shear stress with zero change in shear rate. This is a dynamic analog to the jamming point with a yield stress at zero shear rate.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of Maternal Circulation: Wall Shear Stress in the Human Placenta and Its Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lecarpentier, E.; Bhatt, M.; Bertin, G. I.; Deloison, B.; Salomon, L. J.; Deloron, P.; Fournier, T.; Barakat, A. I.; Tsatsaris, V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the human placenta the maternal blood circulates in the intervillous space (IVS). The syncytiotrophoblast (STB) is in direct contact with maternal blood. The wall shear stress (WSS) exerted by the maternal blood flow on the STB has not been evaluated. Our objective was to determine the physiological WSS exerted on the surface of the STB during the third trimester of pregnancy. Material and Methods To gain insight into the shear stress levels that the STB is expected to experience in vivo, we have formulated three different computational models of varying levels of complexity that reflect different physical representations of the IVS. Computations of the flow fields in all models were performed using the CFD module of the finite element code COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4. The mean velocity of maternal blood in the IVS during the third trimester was measured in vivo with dynamic MRI (0.94±0.14 mm.s-1). To investigate if the in silico results are consistent with physiological observations, we studied the cytoadhesion of human parasitized (Plasmodium falciparum) erythrocytes to primary human STB cultures, in flow conditions with different WSS values. Results The WSS applied to the STB is highly heterogeneous in the IVS. The estimated average values are relatively low (0.5±0.2 to 2.3±1.1 dyn.cm-2). The increase of WSS from 0.15 to 5 dyn.cm-2 was associated with a significant decrease of infected erythrocyte cytoadhesion. No cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes was observed above 5 dyn.cm-2 applied for one hour. Conclusion Our study provides for the first time a WSS estimation in the maternal placental circulation. In spite of high maternal blood flow rates, the average WSS applied at the surface of the chorionic villi is low (<5 dyn.cm-2). These results provide the basis for future physiologically-relevant in vitro studies of the biological effects of WSS on the STB. PMID:26815115

  8. Study of flow behaviors on single-cell manipulation and shear stress reduction in microfluidic chips using computational fluid dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Feng; Li, XiuJun; Li, Paul C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Various single-cell retention structures (SCRSs) were reported for analysis of single cells within microfluidic devices. Undesirable flow behaviors within micro-environments not only influence single-cell manipulation and retention significantly but also lead to cell damage, biochemical heterogeneity among different individual cells (e.g., different cell signaling pathways induced by shear stress). However, the fundamentals in flow behaviors for single-cell manipulation and shear stress reduction, especially comparison of these behaviors in different microstructures, were not fully investigated in previous reports. Herein, flow distribution and induced shear stress in two different single-cell retention structures (SCRS I and SCRS II) were investigated in detail to study their effects on single-cell trapping using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The results were successfully verified by experimental results. Comparison between these two SCRS shows that the wasp-waisted configuration of SCRS II has a better performance in trapping and manipulating long cylinder-shaped cardiac myocytes and provides a safer “harbor” for fragile cells to prevent cell damage due to the shear stress induced from strong flows. The simulation results have not only explained flow phenomena observed in experiments but also predict new flow phenomena, providing guidelines for new chip design and optimization, and a better understanding of the cell micro-environment and fundamentals of microfluidic flows in single-cell manipulation and analysis. PMID:24753729

  9. Micro-computed tomography based computational fluid dynamics for the determination of shear stresses in scaffolds within a perfusion bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zermatten, Emilie; Vetsch, Jolanda Rita; Ruffoni, Davide; Hofmann, Sandra; Müller, Ralph; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-05-01

    Perfusion bioreactors are known to exert shear stresses on cultured cells, leading to cell differentiation and enhanced extracellular matrix deposition on scaffolds. The influence of the scaffold's porous microstructure is investigated for a polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold with a regular microarchitecture and a silk fibroin (SF) scaffold with an irregular network of interconnected pores. Their complex 3D geometries are imaged by micro-computed tomography and used in direct pore-level simulations of the entire scaffold-bioreactor system to numerically solve the governing mass and momentum conservation equations for fluid flow through porous media. The velocity field and wall shear stress distribution are determined for both scaffolds. The PCL scaffold exhibited an asymmetric distribution with peak and plateau, while the SF scaffold exhibited a homogenous distribution and conditioned the flow more efficiently than the PCL scaffold. The methodology guides the design and optimization of the scaffold geometry. PMID:24492950

  10. Flexible Micropost Arrays for Shear Stress Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Hopkins, John W.; Jackson, Allen M.; Connell, John W.; Lin, Yi; Cisotto, Alexxandra A.

    2015-01-01

    Increased fuel costs, heightened environmental protection requirements, and noise abatement continue to place drag reduction at the forefront of aerospace research priorities. Unfortunately, shortfalls still exist in the fundamental understanding of boundary-layer airflow over aerodynamic surfaces, especially regarding drag arising from skin friction. For example, there is insufficient availability of instrumentation to adequately characterize complex flows with strong pressure gradients, heat transfer, wall mass flux, three-dimensionality, separation, shock waves, and transient phenomena. One example is the acoustic liner efficacy on aircraft engine nacelle walls. Active measurement of shear stress in boundary layer airflow would enable a better understanding of how aircraft structure and flight dynamics affect skin friction. Current shear stress measurement techniques suffer from reliability, complexity, and airflow disruption, thereby compromising resultant shear stress data. The state-of-the-art for shear stress sensing uses indirect or direct measurement techniques. Indirect measurements (e.g., hot-wire, heat flux gages, oil interferometry, laser Doppler anemometry, small scale pressure drag surfaces, i.e., fences) require intricate knowledge of the studied flow, restrictive instrument arrangements, large surface areas, flow disruption, or seeding material; with smaller, higher bandwidth probes under development. Direct measurements involve strain displacement of a sensor element and require no prior knowledge of the flow. Unfortunately, conventional "floating" recessed components for direct measurements are mm to cm in size. Whispering gallery mode devices and Fiber Bragg Gratings are examples of recent additions to this type of sensor with much smaller (?m) sensor components. Direct detection techniques are often single point measurements and difficult to calibrate and implement in wind tunnel experiments. In addition, the wiring, packaging, and installation

  11. Determining Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2010-01-01

    A "simplified shear solution" method approximates the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on an extension of laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather, it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply-level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply-by-ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. The method has been incorporated within the HyperSizer commercial structural sizing software to improve its predictive capability for designing composite structures. The HyperSizer structural sizing software is used extensively by NASA to design composite structures. In the case of through-thickness shear loading on panels, HyperSizer previously included a basic, industry-standard, method for approximating the resulting shear stress distribution in sandwich panels. However, no such method was employed for solid laminate panels. The purpose of the innovation is to provide an approximation of the through-thickness shear stresses in a solid laminate given the through-thickness shear loads (Qx and Qy) on the panel. The method was needed for implementation within the HyperSizer structural sizing software so that the approximated ply-level shear stresses could be utilized in a failure theory to assess the adequacy of a panel design. The simplified shear solution method was developed based on extending and generalizing bi-material beam theory to plate-like structures. It is assumed that the through-thickness shear stresses arise due to local bending of the laminate induced by the through-thickness shear load, and by imposing

  12. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  13. Coupling curvature-dependent and shear stress-stimulated neotissue growth in dynamic bioreactor cultures: a 3D computational model of a complete scaffold.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Y; Papantoniou, I; Luyten, F P; Geris, L

    2016-02-01

    The main challenge in tissue engineering consists in understanding and controlling the growth process of in vitro cultured neotissues toward obtaining functional tissues. Computational models can provide crucial information on appropriate bioreactor and scaffold design but also on the bioprocess environment and culture conditions. In this study, the development of a 3D model using the level set method to capture the growth of a microporous neotissue domain in a dynamic culture environment (perfusion bioreactor) was pursued. In our model, neotissue growth velocity was influenced by scaffold geometry as well as by flow- induced shear stresses. The neotissue was modeled as a homogenous porous medium with a given permeability, and the Brinkman equation was used to calculate the flow profile in both neotissue and void space. Neotissue growth was modeled until the scaffold void volume was filled, thus capturing already established experimental observations, in particular the differences between scaffold filling under different flow regimes. This tool is envisaged as a scaffold shape and bioprocess optimization tool with predictive capacities. It will allow controlling fluid flow during long-term culture, whereby neotissue growth alters flow patterns, in order to provide shear stress profiles and magnitudes across the whole scaffold volume influencing, in turn, the neotissue growth. PMID:26758425

  14. Stress diffusion in models for shear banding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnada, Elian; Olmsted, Peter

    Understanding shear banding is of utmost importance from both theoretical and experimental point of view and consequently it has been studied for several decades. Despite this study numerous aspects of shear banding remains poorly understood. Because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity in the shear banded state, applicable constitutive models must be include spatial inhomogeneities, leading to a so-called 'diffusive' term in the equation of motion for the slow variables that carry stress. Such terms are also vital in describing the interaction of bulk shear banding flows with walls and incorporation of wall slip. In this work, we consider different sources of 'diffusion' in polymer models in which concentration degrees of freedom are negligible. The simplest models used are consistent with diffusive terms whose origin is intrinsically dissipative, such as due to hydrodynamic interactions. By contrast, models in which elastic effects such as finite chain stiffness contribute to stress diffusion are inconsistent with simple diffusive models, and we propose alternative consistent models

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of shear induced bands en route to rheochaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathy, R.; Majumdar, S.; Sood, A. K.

    2008-08-01

    We show experimentally that the route to rheochaos in shear rate relaxation measurements is via Type-III intermittency and mixed mode oscillations in the shear-thinning wormlike micellar system of cetyltrimethylammonium tosylate in the presence of salt sodium chloride. Depolarised small angle light scattering measurements performed during flow show that scattered intensity temporally follows the shear rate/stress dynamics and portrays the crucial role played by nematic ordering. Direct visualization of the gap of the Couette cell, illuminated by an unpolarised laser sheet, in the (vorticity, velocity gradient) plane shows that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the shear induced structures is closely related to the temporal behaviour of shear rate/stress fluctuations.

  16. Stress enhanced shear yielding in aging polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottler, Joerg; Liu, Amy Y.-H.

    2010-03-01

    The plastic response of polymer glasses is strongly dependent on the thermomechanical history of the material. We determine the molecular level origin of the enhancement of the shear yield stress reported in experiments of polymer glasses that undergo physical aging in the presence of a pre-stress. Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to show that the applied stress does not alter the physical aging rate, but instead induces a highly orientation-dependent mechanical response of the polymer glass. The change in yield stress with respect to polymers that have aged without pre-stress is directly proportional to the orientation of covalent bonds, which is proportional to strain and logarithmic aging time. We observe a pronounced Bauschinger effect, which amplifies or reduces the pressure dependence of shear yielding. Control simulations with a monovalent Lennard-Jones glass offer further evidence that these effects are distinct from other rejuvenation and overaging behavior reported for a broad class of amorphous solids.

  17. A multi-shear perfusion bioreactor for investigating shear stress effects in endothelial cell constructs.

    PubMed

    Rotenberg, Menahem Y; Ruvinov, Emil; Armoza, Anna; Cohen, Smadar

    2012-08-01

    Tissue engineering research is increasingly relying on the use of advanced cultivation technologies that provide rigorously-controlled cell microenvironments. Herein, we describe the features of a micro-fabricated Multi-Shear Perfusion Bioreactor (MSPB) designed to deliver up to six different levels of physiologically-relevant shear stresses (1-13 dyne cm(-2)) to six cell constructs simultaneously, during a single run. To attain a homogeneous fluid flow within each construct, flow-distributing nets photo-etched with a set of openings for fluid flow were placed up- and down-stream from each construct. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) seeded in alginate scaffolds within the MSPB and subjected to three different levels of shear stress for 24 h, responded accordingly by expressing three different levels of the membranal marker Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and the phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS). A longer period of cultivation, 17 d, under two different levels of shear stress resulted in different lengths of cell sprouts within the constructs. Collectively, the HUVEC behaviour within the different constructs confirms the feasibility of using the MSPB system for simultaneously imposing different shear stress levels, and for validating the flow regime in the bioreactor vessel as assessed by the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model. PMID:22622237

  18. A Shearing-Stretching Device That Can Apply Physiological Fluid Shear Stress and Cyclic Stretch Concurrently to Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Meza, Daphne; Abejar, Louie; Rubenstein, David A; Yin, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) morphology and functions can be highly impacted by the mechanical stresses that the cells experience in vivo. In most areas in the vasculature, ECs are continuously exposed to unsteady blood flow-induced shear stress and vasodilation-contraction-induced tensile stress/strain simultaneously. Investigations on how ECs respond to combined shear stress and tensile strain will help us to better understand how an altered mechanical environment affects EC mechanotransduction, dysfunction, and associated cardiovascular disease development. In the present study, a programmable shearing and stretching device that can apply dynamic fluid shear stress and cyclic tensile strain simultaneously to cultured ECs was developed. Flow and stress/strain conditions in the device were simulated using a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model. To characterize the performance of this device and the effect of combined shear stress-tensile strain on EC morphology, human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs) were exposed to concurrent shear stress and cyclic tensile strain in the device. Changes in EC morphology were evaluated through cell elongation, cell alignment, and cell junctional actin accumulation. Results obtained from the numerical simulation indicated that in the "in-plane" area of the device, both fluid shear stress and biaxial tensile strain were uniform. Results obtained from the in vitro experiments demonstrated that shear stress, alone or combined with cyclic tensile strain, induced significant cell elongation. While biaxial tensile strain alone did not induce any appreciable change in EC elongation. Fluid shear stress and cyclic tensile strain had different effects on EC actin filament alignment and accumulation. By combining various fluid shear stress and cyclic tensile strain conditions, this device can provide a physiologically relevant mechanical environment to study EC responses to physiological and pathological mechanical stimulation. PMID:26810848

  19. Shear Stress in Magnetorheological FInishing for Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Mici, J.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2009-04-28

    We report in situ, simultaneous measurements of both drag and normal forces in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) for what is believed to be the first time, using a spot taking machine (STM) as a test bed to take MRF spots on stationary parts. The measurements are carried out over the entire area where material is being removed, i.e., the projected area of the MRF removal function/spot on the part surface, using a dual force sensor. This approach experimentally addresses the mechanisms governing material removal in MRF for optical glasses in terms of the hydrodynamic pressure and shear stress, applied by the hydrodynamic flow of magnetorheological fluid at the gap between the part surface and the STM wheel. This work demonstrates that the volumetric removal rate shows a positive linear dependence on shear stress. Shear stress exhibits a positive linear dependence on a material figure of merit that depends upon Young’s modulus, fracture toughness, and hardness. A modified Preston’s equation is proposed that better estimates MRF material removal rate for optical glasses by incorporating mechanical properties, shear stress, and velocity.

  20. Shear stress in magnetorheological finishing for glasses.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chunlin; Shafrir, Shai N; Lambropoulos, John C; Mici, Joni; Jacobs, Stephen D

    2009-05-01

    We report in situ, simultaneous measurements of both drag and normal forces in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) for what is believed to be the first time, using a spot taking machine (STM) as a test bed to take MRF spots on stationary parts. The measurements are carried out over the entire area where material is being removed, i.e., the projected area of the MRF removal function/spot on the part surface, using a dual force sensor. This approach experimentally addresses the mechanisms governing material removal in MRF for optical glasses in terms of the hydrodynamic pressure and shear stress, applied by the hydrodynamic flow of magnetorheological fluid at the gap between the part surface and the STM wheel. This work demonstrates that the volumetric removal rate shows a positive linear dependence on shear stress. Shear stress exhibits a positive linear dependence on a material figure of merit that depends upon Young's modulus, fracture toughness, and hardness. A modified Preston's equation is proposed that better estimates MRF material removal rate for optical glasses by incorporating mechanical properties, shear stress, and velocity. PMID:19412219

  1. BOUNDARY SHEAR STRESS ALONG VEGETATED STREAMBANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is intended to improve our understanding of the role of riparian vegetation in stream morphology by evaluating the effects of vegetation on boundary shear stress, providing insight to the type and density of vegetation required for streambank stability. The resu...

  2. Integrated Shear Stress/Temperature Micromachined Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N., III; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2002-01-01

    During this project we were able to design and initiate the fabrication of an integrated Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS)-based shear stress/temperature sensor for flow control applications. A brief summary of the completed activities during this project is presented.

  3. Dynamic Shear Modulus of Polymers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byutner, Oleksiy; Smith, Grant

    2001-03-01

    In this work we describe the methodology for using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) simulations to obtain the viscoelastic properties of polymers in the glassy regime. Specifically we show how the time dependent shear stress modulus and frequency dependent complex shear modulus in the high-frequency regime can be determined from the off-diagonal terms of the stress-tensor autocorrelation function obtained from MD trajectories using the Green-Kubo method and appropriate Fourier transforms. In order to test the methodology we have performed MD simulations of a low-molecular-weight polybutadiene system using quantum chemistry based potential functions. Values of the glassy modulus and the maximum loss frequency were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for polybutadiene at 298 K.

  4. ISIS: An Instrument for Measuring Erosion Shear Stress In Situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Helen; Ockenden, Mary

    1996-01-01

    An instrument for measuring shear stress for erosion in situ(ISIS) has been developed to measure the erosion shear stress of muddy sediments on intertidal mud flats. Erosion shear stress is defined in this paper as the minimum applied bed shear stress required to initiate erosion and remove sediment from the bed surface. An applied shear stress is generated by the flow through and around a specially shaped bell head, which draws water radially across the bed into the centre of the bell head. The applied shear stress is a function of the distance from the bell head to the bed surface and the discharge through the system. The design of ISIS was assisted by the use of a computational numerical flow modelling package. The operating conditions giving the most even shear stress across the whole test section were discharges of 0·01-0·6 ls -1, and bell-to-bed distance of 4-8 mm giving a shear stress of 0·02-5 Nm -2. The ISIS system was calibrated using hot film shear stress probes. The calibration data gave a 92% fit to the calibration function for shear stress. Laboratory measurements with ISIS of the erosion shear stress of mud beds consolidated for c. 1·5 days, showed surface shear stresses of 0·11-0·24 Nm -2. These were very similar to values of surface erosion shear stress measured for the same mud in an annular flume. The ISIS system was used to measure surface erosion shear stresses on the mud flats at Portishead and Blue Anchor Bay in the Severn Estuary, U.K. Surface erosion shear stresses at Portishead were generally in the range 0·2-0·5 Nm -2. The surface erosion shear stresses measured at Blue Anchor Bay, which included mud and sand, ranged between 0·1-1·9 Nm -2.

  5. Stent implantation influence wall shear stress evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A. F.; Bosioc, A. I.; Petre, I.; Bernad, E. S.

    2016-06-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. The impact of flow alterations around struts vary as the strut geometrical parameters change. Our results provide data regarding the hemodynamic parameters for the blood flow in both stenosed and stented coronary artery under physiological conditions, namely wall shear stress and pressure drop.

  6. Shear Stress Sensing using Elastomer Micropillar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Palmieri, Frank L.; Lin, Yi; Jackson, Allen M.; Cissoto, Alexxandra; Sheplak, Mark; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement of shear stress developed as a fluid moves around a solid body is difficult to measure. Stresses at the fluid-solid interface are very small and the nature of the fluid flow is easily disturbed by introducing sensor components to the interface. To address these challenges, an array of direct and indirect techniques have been investigated with various advantages and challenges. Hot wire sensors and other indirect sensors all protrude significantly into the fluid flow. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices, although facilitating very accurate measurements, are not durable, are prone to contamination, and are difficult to implement into existing model geometries. One promising approach is the use of engineered surfaces that interact with fluid flow in a detectable manner. To this end, standard lithographic techniques have been utilized to generate elastomeric micropillar arrays of various lengths and diameters. Micropillars of controlled length and width were generated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer using a soft-lithography technique. The 3D mold for micropillar replication was fabricated using laser ablative micromachining and contact lithography. Micropillar dimensions and mechanical properties were characterized and compared to shear sensing requirements. The results of this characterization as well as shear stress detection techniques will be discussed.

  7. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  8. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari, S. H.; Brinkmann, M.; Vollmer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation, etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state which corresponds to dynamic yield stress of the system. Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, ν , follows a nontrivial dependence on the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . Most noticeably, we show that ν is a generic and universal quantity which does not depend on the driving protocol. Using this universal quantity, we calculate the arrest stress, σa, analytically based on a balance of the energy injection rate due to the external force driving the flow and the dissipation rate accounting for the rupture of capillary bridges. The resulting prediction of σa is a nonlinear function of the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . This formula provides an excellent, parameter-free prediction of the numerical data. Corrections to the theory for small and large packing fractions are connected to the emergence of shear bands and of contributions to the stress from repulsive particle interactions, respectively.

  9. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ivo R; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-04-14

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process. PMID:27042934

  10. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process.

  11. Dilation dynamics of granular suspensions during the shear thickening transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-03-01

    We experimentally investigate the dilation dynamics of dense granular (non-Brownian) suspensions under shear. We focus on the scenario where the packing fraction is close to the dynamic jamming point and combine oscillatory rheological measurements with in situ high-speed imaging to study the particle dynamics throughout the shear-thickening (ST) transition. By visualizing the shear profile at different strain amplitudes, we show that, although frustrated dilation is the dominant factor for ST in granular suspensions, viscous hydrodynamic stress τμ still plays an important role in determining the velocity profile and shear localization during the dilation process. Moreover, when the suspending liquid becomes highly viscous, τμ affects the magnitude of the stress increment. By imaging the air-suspension boundary during shear, we demonstrate that the upper stress limit of the observable ST regime in suspensions of hard particles corresponds to the point where the confining pressure due to capillary forces is exceeded, as signaled by movement of the contact line between suspension and substrate.

  12. Wrinkling of reinforced plates subjected to shear stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seydel, Edgar

    1931-01-01

    An analysis is made here of the problem of long plates with transverse stiffeners subject to shear. A typical example would be a long Wagner beam. The shear stress is calculated at which the web wrinkles and shear stress becomes a maximum. The equation is solved for both a condition of free support and rigidity of support on the edges.

  13. Dynamic shear deformation in high purity Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Bingert, John F; Trujillo, Carl P; Lopez, Mike F; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The forced shear test specimen, first developed by Meyer et al. [Meyer L. et al., Critical Adiabatic Shear Strength of Low Alloyed Steel Under Compressive Loading, Metallurgical Applications of Shock Wave and High Strain Rate Phenomena (Marcel Decker, 1986), 657; Hartmann K. et al., Metallurgical Effects on Impact Loaded Materials, Shock Waves and High Strain rate Phenomena in Metals (Plenum, 1981), 325-337.], has been utilized in a number of studies. While the geometry of this specimen does not allow for the microstructure to exactly define the location of shear band formation and the overall mechanical response of a specimen is highly sensitive to the geometry utilized, the forced shear specimen is useful for characterizing the influence of parameters such as strain rate, temperature, strain, and load on the microstructural evolution within a shear band. Additionally, many studies have utilized this geometry to advance the understanding of shear band development. In this study, by varying the geometry, specifically the ratio of the inner hole to the outer hat diameter, the dynamic shear localization response of high purity Fe was examined. Post mortem characterization was performed to quantify the width of the localizations and examine the microstructural and textural evolution of shear deformation in a bcc metal. Increased instability in mechanical response is strongly linked with development of enhanced intergranular misorientations, high angle boundaries, and classical shear textures characterized through orientation distribution functions.

  14. Liquid crystals for unsteady surface shear stress visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Oscillating airfoil experiments were conducted to test the frequency response of thermochromic liquid crystal coatings to unsteady surface shear stresses under isothermal-flow conditions. The model was an NACA-0015 airfoil, exposed to an incompressible flow at a freestream Reynolds number (based on chord) of 1.14 x 10/sup 6/. Angle-of-attack forcing functions were sine waves of amplitude +- 10/degree/ about each of three mean angles of attack: 0/degree/, 10/degree/, and 20/degree/. Frequencies of oscillation were 0.2, 0.6 and 1.2 hertz, corresponding to reduced frequencies of 0.0055, 0.0164 and 0.0328. Data acquisition was accomplished by video recording. Observations showed the liquid crystal technique capable of visualizing high surface shear stress zones over the stated dynamic range in a continuous and reversible manner. 11 refs.

  15. Liquid crystals for unsteady surface shear stress visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, D. C.

    1988-04-01

    Oscillating airfoil experiments were conducted to test the frequency response of thermochromic liquid crystal coatings to unsteady surface shear stresses under isothermal-flow conditions. The model was an NACA-0015 airfoil, exposed to an incompressible flow at a freestream Reynolds number (based on chord) of 1.14 x 1000000. Angle-of-attack forcing functions were sine waves of amplitude + or - 10 deg about each of three mean angles of attack: 0 deg 10 deg, and 20 deg. Frequencies of oscillation were 0.2, 0.6 and 1.2 hertz, corresponding to reduced frequencies of 0.0055, 0.0164 and 0.0328. Data acquisition was accomplished by video recording. Observations showed the liquid crystal technique capable of visualizing high surface shear stress zones over the stated dynamic range in a continuous and reversible manner.

  16. Shear stress cleaning for surface departiculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musselman, R. P.; Yarbrough, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    A cleaning technique widely used by the nuclear utility industry for removal of radioactive surface contamination has proven effective at removing non-hazardous contaminant particles as small as 0.1 micrometer. The process employs a controlled high velocity liquid spray inside a vapor containment enclosure to remove particles from a surface. The viscous drag force generated by the cleaning fluid applies a shear stress greater than the adhesion force that holds small particles to a substrate. Fluid mechanics and field tests indicate general cleaning parameters.

  17. Shear-stress relaxation and ensemble transformation of shear-stress autocorrelation functions.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the relation between the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t), computed at finite shear strain 0<γ≪1, and the shear-stress autocorrelation functions C(t)|(γ) and C(t)|(τ) computed, respectively, at imposed strain γ and mean stress τ. Focusing on permanent isotropic spring networks it is shown theoretically and computationally that in general G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ)+G(eq) for t>0 with G(eq) being the static equilibrium shear modulus. G(t) and C(t)|(γ) thus must become different for solids and it is impossible to obtain G(eq) alone from C(t)|(γ) as often assumed. We comment briefly on self-assembled transient networks where G(eq)(f) must vanish for a finite scission-recombination frequency f. We argue that G(t)=C(t)|(τ)=C(t)|(γ) should reveal an intermediate plateau set by the shear modulus G(eq)(f=0) of the quenched network. PMID:25768458

  18. Predicting bed shear stress and its role in sediment dynamics and restoration potential of the Everglades and other vegetated flow systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, L.G.; Harvey, J.W.; Crimaldi, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Entrainment of sediment by flowing water affects topography, habitat suitability, and nutrient cycling in vegetated floodplains and wetlands, impacting ecosystem evolution and the success of restoration projects. Nonetheless, restoration managers lack simple decision-support tools for predicting shear stresses and sediment redistribution potential in different vegetation communities. Using a field-validated numerical model, we developed state-space diagrams that provide these predictions over a range of water-surface slopes, depths, and associated velocities in Everglades ridge and slough vegetation communities. Diminished bed shear stresses and a consequent decrease in bed sediment redistribution are hypothesized causes of a recent reduction in the topographic and vegetation heterogeneity of this ecosystem. Results confirmed the inability of present-day flows to entrain bed sediment. Further, our diagrams showed bed shear stresses to be highly sensitive to emergent vegetation density and water-surface slope but less sensitive to water depth and periphyton or floating vegetation abundance. These findings suggested that instituting a pulsing flow regime could be the most effective means to restore sediment redistribution to the Everglades. However, pulsing flows will not be sufficient to erode sediment from sloughs with abundant spikerush, unless spikerush density first decreases by natural or managed processes. Our methods provide a novel tool for identifying restoration parameters and performance measures in many types of vegetated aquatic environments where sediment erosion and deposition are involved.

  19. Dynamic Rock Fragmentation in Grain Flow: Application to Geophysical Shearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, T. R.; McSaveney, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    Mechanical explanations for large-scale, hypermobile, geophysical phenomena (long-runout debris avalanches, low-angle blockslides, faulting) have had limited success. These phenomena all involve shearing of comminuted grain strata, but grain-flow mechanics provides no mechanism for reducing frictional resistance to grain shearing. We outline a mechanical explanation for increased debris mobility, based on the shearing grain strata in these situations being intensely comminuted by dynamic rock fragmentation, and fragmentation taking place throughout the motion. The work done in fragmentation is not lost to "fracture-surface energy": much of it is recycled to the motion of the grain mass as local isotropic dispersive pressure, which can be in the GPa range. We identify two classes of geological mass movement, in which grain fragmentation has different roles. In confined shear the fragmenting grain layer is thin and bounded by non-fragmenting material (fault motion, blocksliding, basal shear of volcanic debris avalanches, some laboratory experiments). Under high ambient stresses and strain rates, shear concentrates in thin "shear bands"; fragmentation reduces the confining stress in a band, and so reduces its effective intergranular direct stress and ability to resist boundary shear with a conventional friction coefficient. Thus we quantitatively explain the motion of the Waikaremoana blockslide and the Socompa volcanic debris avalanche; rupture stresses reported from the San Andreas fault; and data from laboratory rock friction experiments. In less confined shear (dry debris avalanches) the fragmenting layer is initially thin, but thickens in runout until it extends through the whole mass except for a ~ 10-m thick unfragmented surface carapace. The shear rate is lower and shear banding is less dominant than in confined shearing; motion is affected by reduced internal friction due to local, transient shear bands and by the isotropic dispersive pressure from

  20. Shear stress induced stimulation of mammalian cell metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Frangos, J. A.; Eskin, S. G.

    1988-01-01

    A flow apparatus was developed for the study of the metabolic response of anchorage dependent cells to a wide range of steady and pulsatile shear stresses under well controlled conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers were subjected to steady shear stresses of up to 24 dynes/sq cm, and the production of prostacyclin was determined. The onset of flow led to a burst in prostacyclin production which decayed to a long term steady state rate (SSR). The SSR of cells exposed to flow was greater than the basal release level, and increased linearly with increasing shear stress. It is demonstrated that shear stresses in certain ranges may not be detrimental to mammalian cell metabolism. In fact, throughout the range of shear stresses studied, metabolite production is maximized by maximizing shear stress.

  1. Colors Of Liquid Crystals Used To Measure Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, D. C.; Muratore, J. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Developmental method of mapping shear stresses on aerodynamic surfaces involves observation, at multiple viewing angles, of colors of liquid-crystal surface coats illuminated by white light. Report describing method referenced in "Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses" (ARC-13379). Resulting maps of surface shear stresses contain valuable data on magnitudes and directions of skin friction forces associated with surface flows; data used to refine mathematical models of aerodynamics for research and design purposes.

  2. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  3. Temporal oscillations of the shear stress and scattered light in a shear-banding--shear-thickening micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Azzouzi, H; Decruppe, J P; Lerouge, S; Greffier, O

    2005-08-01

    The results of optical and rheological experiments performed on a viscoelastic solution (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide + sodium salicylate in water) are reported. The flow curve has a horizontal plateau extending between two critical shear rates characteristic of heterogeneous flows formed by two layers of fluid with different viscosities. These two bands which also have different optical anisotropy are clearly seen by direct observation in polarized light. At the end of the plateau, apparent shear thickening is observed in a narrow range of shear rates; in phase oscillations of the shear stress and of the first normal stress difference are recorded in a shearing device operating under controlled strain. The direct observation of the annular gap of a Couette cell in a direction perpendicular to a plane containing the vorticity shows that the turbidity of the whole sample also undergoes time dependent variations with the same period as the shear stress. However no banding is observed during the oscillations and the flow remains homogeneous. PMID:16132153

  4. Adjustable shear stress erosion and transport flume

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jepsen, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the total erosion rate and downstream transport of suspended and bedload sediments using an adjustable shear stress erosion and transport (ASSET) flume with a variable-depth sediment core sample. Water is forced past a variable-depth sediment core sample in a closed channel, eroding sediments, and introducing suspended and bedload sediments into the flow stream. The core sample is continuously pushed into the flow stream, while keeping the surface level with the bottom of the channel. Eroded bedload sediments are transported downstream and then gravitationally separated from the flow stream into one or more quiescent traps. The captured bedload sediments (particles and aggregates) are weighed and compared to the total mass of sediment eroded, and also to the concentration of sediments suspended in the flow stream.

  5. High-Shear Stress Sensitizes Platelets to Subsequent Low-Shear Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Bluestein, Danny; Girdhar, Gaurav; Jesty, Jolyon

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with mechanical heart valve implants are plagued by flow-induced thromboembolic complications, which are undoubtedly caused by platelet activation. Flow fields in or around the affected regions involve brief exposure to pathologically high-shear stresses on the order of 100 to 1000 dyne/cm2. Although high shear is known to activate platelets directly, their subsequent behavior is not known. We hypothesize that the post-high-shear activation behavior of platelets is particularly relevant in understanding the increased thrombotic risk associated with blood-recirculating prosthetic cardiovascular devices. Purified platelets were exposed to brief (5–40 s) periods of high-shear stress, and then exposed to longer periods (15–60 min) of low shear. Their activation state was measured using a prothrombinase-based assay. Platelets briefly exposed to an initial high-shear stress (e.g., 60 dyne/cm2 for 40 s) activate a little, but this study shows that they are now sensitized, and when exposed to subsequent low shear stress, they activate at least 20-fold faster than platelets not initially exposed to high shear. The results show that platelets in vitro exposed beyond a threshold of high-shear stress are primed for subsequent activation under normal cardiovascular circulation conditions, and they do not recover from the initial high-shear insult. PMID:20135353

  6. Research on measurement of bed shear stress under wave-current interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Xia, Yun-feng; Ma, Bing-he; Hao, Si-yu; Zhang, Shi-zhao; Du, De-jun

    2015-06-01

    The movement of sediment in estuary and on coast is directly restricted by the bed shear stress. Therefore, the research on the basic problem of sediment movement by the bed shear stress is an important way to research the theory of sediment movement. However, there is not a measuring and computing method to measure the bed shear stress under a complicated dynamic effect like wave and current. This paper describes the measurement and test research on the bed shear stress in a long launder of direct current by the new instrument named thermal shearometer based on micro-nanotechnology. As shown by the research results, the thermal shearometer has a high response frequency and strong stability. The measured results can reflect the basic change of the bed shear stress under wave and wave-current effect, and confirm that the method of measuring bed shear stress under wave-current effect with thermal shearometer is feasible. Meanwhile, a preliminary method to compute the shear stress compounded by wave-current is put forward according to the tested and measured results, and then a reference for further study on the basic theory of sediment movement under a complicated dynamic effect is provided.

  7. Granular dynamics under shear with deformable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Drew; Backhaus, Scott; Ecke, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Granular materials under shear develop complex patterns of stress as the result of granular positional rearrangements under an applied load. We consider the simple planar shear of a quasi two-dimensional granular material consisting of bi-dispersed nylon cylinders confined between deformable boundaries. The aspect ratio of the gap width to total system length is 50, and the ratio of particle diameter to gap width is about 10. This system, designed to model a long earthquake fault with long range elastic coupling through the plates, is an interesting model system for understanding effective granular friction because it essentially self tunes to the jamming condition owing to the hardness of the grains relative to that of the boundary material, a ratio of more than 1000 in elastic moduli. We measure the differential strain displacements of the plates, the inhomogeneous stress distribution in the plates, the positions and angular orientations of the individual grains, and the shear force, all as functions of the applied normal stress. There is significant stick-slip motion in this system that we quantify through our quantitative measurements of both the boundary and the grain motion, resulting in a good characterization of this sheared 2D hard sphere system.

  8. 4D shear stress maps of the developing heart using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lindsy M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Gu, Shi; Barwick, Lee; Watanabe, Michiko; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate imaging and measurement of hemodynamic forces is vital for investigating how physical forces acting on the embryonic heart are transduced and influence developmental pathways. Of particular importance is blood flow-induced shear stress, which influences gene expression by endothelial cells and potentially leads to congenital heart defects through abnormal heart looping, septation, and valvulogenesis. However no imaging tool has been available to measure shear stress on the endocardium volumetrically and dynamically. Using 4D structural and Doppler OCT imaging, we are able to accurately measure the blood flow in the heart tube in vivo and to map endocardial shear stress throughout the heart cycle under physiological conditions for the first time. These measurements of the shear stress patterns will enable precise titration of experimental perturbations and accurate correlation of shear with the expression of molecules critical to heart development. PMID:23162737

  9. Stress Heterogeneities in Sheared Type-I Collagen Networks Revealed by Boundary Stress Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo, Richard C.; Kumar, Pramukta; Urbach, Jeffrey S.; Blair, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    Disordered fiber networks provide structural support to a wide range of important materials, and the combination of spatial and dynamic complexity may produce large inhomogeneities in mechanical properties, an effect that is largely unexplored experimentally. In this work, we introduce Boundary Stress Microscopy to quantify the non-uniform surface stresses in sheared collagen gels. We find local stresses exceeding average stresses by an order of magnitude, with variations over length scales much larger than the network mesh size. The strain stiffening behavior observed over a wide range of network mesh sizes can be parameterized by a single characteristic strain and associated stress, which describes both the strain stiffening regime and network yielding. The characteristic stress is approximately proportional to network density, but the peak boundary stress at both the characteristic strain and at yielding are remarkably insensitive to concentration. PMID:25734484

  10. Two-axis direct fluid shear stress sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajikar, Sateesh (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor); Adcock, Edward E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A micro sized multi-axis semiconductor skin friction/wall shear stress induced by fluid flow. The sensor design includes a shear/strain transduction gimble connected to a force collecting plate located at the flow boundary surface. The shear force collecting plate is interconnected by an arm to offset the tortional hinges from the fluid flow. The arm is connected to the shear force collecting plate through dual axis torsional hinges with piezoresistive torsional strain gauges. These gauges are disposed on the tortional hinges and provide a voltage output indicative of applied shear stress acting on the force collection plate proximate the flow boundary surface. Offsetting the torsional hinges creates a force concentration and resolution structure that enables the generation of a large stress on the strain gauge from small shear stress, or small displacement of the collecting plate. The design also isolates the torsional sensors from exposure to the fluid flow.

  11. Shear thinning behavior of linear polymer melts under shear flow via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Chen, Jizhong; An, Lijia

    2014-05-01

    The properties of both untangled and entangled linear polymer melts under shear flow are studied by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results reveal that the dependence of shear viscosity η on shear rate dot{γ }, expressed by η ˜ dot{γ }^{-n}, exhibits three distinct regimes. The first is the well-known Newtonian regime, namely, η independent of shear rate at small shear rates dot{γ }<τ 0^{-1} (where τ0 is the longest polymer relaxation time at equilibrium). In the non-Newtonian regime (dot{γ }>τ 0^{-1}), the shear dependence of viscosity exhibits a crossover at a critical shear rate dot{γ }c dividing this regime into two different regimes, shear thinning regime I (ST-I) and II (ST-II), respectively. In the ST-I regime (τ ^{-1}_0dot{γ }c) a universal power law η ˜ dot{γ }^{-0.37} is found for considered chain lengths. Furthermore, the longer the polymer chain is, the smaller the shear viscosity for a given shear rate in the ST-II regime. The simulation also shows that a characteristic chain length, below which dot{γ }c will be equal to τ 0^{-1}, lies in the interval 30 < N < 50. For all considered chain lengths in the ST-II regime, we also find that the first and second normal stress differences N1 and N2 follow power laws of N1 ˜ dot{γ }^{2/3} and N2 ˜ dot{γ }^{0.82}, respectively; the orientation resistance parameter mG follows the relation mG ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75} and the tumbling frequency ftb follows f_{tb} ˜ dot{γ }^{0.75}. These results imply that the effects of entanglement on the shear dependences of these properties may be negligible in the ST-II regime. These findings may shed some light on the nature of shear thinning in flexible linear polymer melts.

  12. Shear-Panel Test Fixture Eliminates Corner Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J. J.; Farley, G. L.; Baker, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    New design eliminates corner stresses while maintaining uniform stress across panel. Shear panel test fixture includes eight frames and eight corner pins. Fixture assembled in two halves with shear panel sandwiched in between. Results generated from this fixture will result in good data base for design of efficient aircraft structures and other applications.

  13. Regulation of Vascular Endothelium Inflammatory Signalling by Shear Stress.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Angelini, Gianni D; Emanueli, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    The vascular endothelium plays a pivotal role in regulating vascular homeostasis. Blood flow exerts several mechanical forces on the luminal surface of the Endothelial Cell (EC) including pressure, circumferential stretch, and shear stress. It is widely believed that shear stress plays a central role in regulating EC inflammatory responses and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. High shear stress can induce an antiinflammatory status in EC, which is partially mediated by the production of proteins and transcription factors able to suppress different proinflammatory signalling pathways. In this review, we summarise the available evidence regarding the effect of shear stress on vascular EC and smooth muscle cells, the regulation of MAPK and NF-κB including the production of different negative regulators of inflammation such as MKP-1 and NRF2, and the production of microRNAs. We also discuss the possible links between shear stress and the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:26638798

  14. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes. PMID:15688141

  15. The shear-stress intensity factor for a centrally cracked stiff-flanged shear web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    By use of the principle of superposition the stiff-flanged shear web is modeled mathematically by an infinite elastic strip with fixed longitudinal edges. The shear-stress intensity factor for a central longitudinal crack is calculated for various values of the ratio of strip width to crack length, h/a, in the range 0.1-10. The interaction of the crack with the boundaries is illustrated by boundary shear-stress distributions for three values of h/a. Some implications of the results for the design of damage-tolerant shear webs are discussed briefly.

  16. A technique for combined dynamic compression-shear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.; Chen, R.; Lin, Y. L.; Li, J. L.; Lu, L.; Sun, G. L.

    2011-03-01

    It is critically important to study the dynamic response of materials under a combined compression-shear loading for developing constitutive laws more accurately and fully. We present a novel technique to achieve the combined compression and shear loadings at high strain rates. The main apparatus consists of a strike bar, an incident bar, and two transmission bars. The close-to-specimen end of the incident bar is wedge-shaped with 90°. In each experiment, there are two identical specimens, respectively, agglutinated between one side of the wedge and one of transmission bars. When a loading impulse travels to specimens along the incident bar, because of the special geometrical shape, the specimen-incident bar interface gets an axial and a transverse velocity. Specimens endure a combined compression-shear loading at high strain rates. The compression stress and strain of the specimens are deduced from signals recorded by strain gages mounted on the bars. The shear stress is measured by two piezoelectric transducers of quartz (Y-cut with rotation angle 17.7°) embedded at the close-to-specimen end of transmission bars; the shear strain is measured with a novel optical technique, which is based on the luminous flux method. An analytic model was proposed and validated by the numerical simulations. The simulation results yield good agreement with the analytic results. The proposed technique was then validated through experiments carried out on lead specimens, by comparing experimental results with that of the split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments.

  17. Measurement of turbulent wall shear stress in air using micro-pillars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Kevin, Kevin; Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nicholas

    2013-11-01

    The measurement of unsteady wall shear stress in a turbulent boundary layer, especially when the working medium is air, has been a historically challenging problem in experimental fluid mechanics. Recently the micro-pillar shear stress sensor (MPS3) has shown promise in this regard. The MPS3 is an array of micro-pillar mounted on the wall of a model. These micro-pillars deflect an amount proportional to the drag force it experiences. This drag force is proportional to the wall shear stress. The micro-pillar tip deflection is thus tracked using high-speed imaging to yield the unsteady wall shear stress. Here, the MPS3 is used to carry out unsteady wall shear stress measurements in a fully developed channel flow. Both static and dynamic calibrations of the sensor are presented. The wall shear stress statistics obtained in the fully developed channel flow are compared with those obtained from Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) to provide an assessment of the sensor capabilities. Exemplary measurements such as two-dimensional temporal distribution of the wall shear stress are presented to highlight the capabilities of the sensor.

  18. Dynamic response of block copolymer wormlike micelles to shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonetti, B.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Willner, L.; Dhont, J. K. G.; Lettinga, M. P.

    2008-10-01

    The linear and nonlinear dynamic response to an oscillatory shear flow of giant wormlike micelles consisting of Pb-Peo block copolymers is studied by means of Fourier transform rheology. Experiments are performed in the vicinity of the isotropic-nematic phase transition concentration, where the location of isotropic-nematic phase transition lines is determined independently. Strong shear-thinning behaviour is observed due to critical slowing down of orientational diffusion as a result of the vicinity of the isotropic-nematic spinodal. This severe shear-thinning behaviour is shown to result in gradient shear banding. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering experiments are used to obtain an insight into the microscopic phenomena that underlie the observed rheological response. An equation of motion for the order parameter tensor and an expression of the stress tensor in terms of the order parameter tensor are used to interpret the experimental data, both in the linear and nonlinear regimes. Scaling of the dynamic behaviour of the orientational order parameter and the stress is found when critical slowing down due to the vicinity of the isotropic-nematic spinodal is accounted for.

  19. Dynamic shear jamming in granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-11-01

    Jamming by shear allows a frictional granular packing to transition from an unjammed state into a jammed state while keeping the system volume and average packing fraction constant. Shear jamming of dry granular media can occur quasi-statically, but boundaries are crucial to confine the material. We perform experiments in aqueous starch suspension where we apply shear using a rheometer with a large volume (400 ml) cylindrical Couette cell. In our suspensions the packing fraction is sufficiently low that quasi-static deformation does not induce a shear jammed state. Applying a shock-like deformation however, will turn the suspension into a jammed solid. A fully jammed state is reached within tens of microseconds, and can be sustained for at least several seconds. High speed imaging of the initial process reveals a jamming front propagating radially outward through the suspension, while the suspension near the outer boundary remains quiescent. This indicates that granular suspensions can be shear jammed without the need of confining solid boundaries. Instead, confinement is most likely provided by the dynamics in the front region.

  20. Edge Sheared Flows and Blob Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.

    2012-10-01

    The dynamics of blob-filaments [S. I. Krasheninnikov, et al. J. Plasma Phys. 74, 679 (2008); D. A. D'Ippolito, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 060501 (2011)] in the strongly radially inhomogeneous edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a tokamak plasma is considered, with emphasis on sheared flow generation and interaction. The work is motivated by the potential importance of edge sheared flows for turbulence regulation, (e.g. the L-H transition), and the influence of flows on the character of emitted blob-filament structures which ultimately contact plasma-facing components. To study the dynamics of blobs and sheared flows, we employ both numerical simulations and experimental data analysis. The simulations use the fluid-based 2D curvature-interchange model embedded in the SOLT (SOL turbulence) code [D. A. Russell, et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 122304 (2009)]. A blob-tracking algorithm has also been developed and applied to NSTX and Alcator C-Mod data. The algorithm is based on 2D time-resolved images from the gas puff imaging (GPI) diagnostic [S. J. Zweben, et al. Phys. Plasmas 9, 1981 (2002)]. The algorithm is able to track the blob motion and changes in blob structure, such as elliptical deformations, that can be affected by sheared flows. Results of seeded blob simulations are compared with the experimental data to determine the role of plasma parameters on the blob tracks and to evaluate the exchange of momentum between the blobs and flows. Seeded blob simulations are shown to reproduce many qualitative and quantitative features of the data including size, scale and direction of perpendicular (approximately poloidal) flows and the inferred Reynolds forces, poloidal reversal of blob tracks, and blob trapping and/or ejection. Simulation and experimental data comparisons permit the inference of dynamical mechanisms associated with blob motion and sheared flow generation in these shots, and their relation to previous theoretical work.

  1. The origin of persistent shear stress in supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Sneha; Harrowell, Peter

    2012-07-01

    The persistence of shear stress fluctuations in viscous liquids is a direct consequence of the non-zero shear stress of the local potential minima which couples stress relaxation to transitions between inherent structures. In simulations of 2D and 3D glass forming mixtures, we calculate the distribution of this inherent shear stress and demonstrate that the variance is independent of temperature and obeys a power law in density. The inherent stress is shown to involve only long wavelength fluctuations, evidence of the central role of the static boundary conditions in determining the residual stress left after the minimization of the potential energy. A temperature Tη is defined to characterise the crossover from stress relaxation governed by binary collisions at high temperatures to low temperature relaxation dominated by the relaxation of the inherent stress. Tη is found to coincide with the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein scaling of diffusion and viscosity.

  2. Application and improvement of Raupach's shear stress partitioning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, B. A.; Lehning, M.; Gromke, C.

    2012-12-01

    .27. It was also found that the model parameter m, which relates τS'' with τS' and which is needed to determine the peak surface shear stress τS'', is rather impractically defined in the original model formulation, because m is identified to be a function of the wind velocity, the roughness element shape and the roughness density. We propose an alternative, more universal definition of an a-parameter as a substitute for the m-parameter simply linearly relating τS'' with τS'. This strong linear relation is supported by the measurements and can be made plausible with simple fluid dynamical arguments. The advantage of a over m is that a is solely a function of the roughness element shape. Finally, a method is presented to determine the new a-parameter for different kinds of roughness elements with relatively simple experimental methods.

  3. The stress profile in a sheared granular column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, Prabhu; Mehandia, Vishwajeet; Jyotsna Gutam, Kamala

    2011-11-01

    It has been known for several centuries that the normal stress at the base of a column of granular material deviates from the value dictated by the hydrostatic balance. This was explained by Janssen (1895) as being due to the shear stress imposed by the confining walls on the granular column, as a result of grain-wall friction. The question we address in this presentation is, what is the stress field when the column is sheared? Depending on the assumptions on the kinematics, plasticity theories predict that the stress profile is similar either to that in a static column, or to that in a sheared fluid column. Here, we report the results of our experimental study of slow shear of a granular material in a cylindrical Couette cell, in which all components of the stress were measured at the stationary outer cylinder. The stress was measured as a function of distance from the free surface. The results of our experiments are intriguing: the radial normal stress deviates strongly from the predictions of all available theories and previous experimental measurements. The axial shear stress changes sign when a static column is sheared. We describe these results, and speculate as to which type of theory might explain the observations. Support from the DST, India is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-JeŻewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  5. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos. PMID:26429038

  6. Dynamics of flexible fibers in shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Słowicka, Agnieszka M.; Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Ekiel-Jeżewska, Maria L.

    2015-09-28

    Dynamics of flexible non-Brownian fibers in shear flow at low-Reynolds-number are analyzed numerically for a wide range of the ratios A of the fiber bending force to the viscous drag force. Initially, the fibers are aligned with the flow, and later they move in the plane perpendicular to the flow vorticity. A surprisingly rich spectrum of different modes is observed when the value of A is systematically changed, with sharp transitions between coiled and straightening out modes, period-doubling bifurcations from periodic to migrating solutions, irregular dynamics, and chaos.

  7. Endovascular Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Dissection: Hemodynamic Shear Stress Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik Sau; Lai, Siu Kai; Cheng, Stephen Wing Keung; Chow, Kwok Wing

    2012-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD), a life threatening cardiovascular disease, occurs when blood intrudes into the layers of the aortic wall, creating a new artificial channel (the false lumen) beside the original true lumen. The weakened false lumen wall may expand, enhancing the risk of rupture and resulting in high mortality. Endovascular treatment involves the deployment of a stent graft into the aorta, thus blocking blood from entering the false lumen. Due to the irregular geometry of the aorta, the stent graft, however, may fail to conform to the vessel curvature, and would create a ``bird-beak'' configuration, a wedge-shaped domain between the graft and the vessel wall. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is employed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. With the `beaking' configuration, the local hemodynamic shear stress will drop below the threshold of safety reported earlier in the literature. The oscillating behavior of the shear stress might lead to local inflammation, atherosclerosis and other undesirable consequences. Supported by the Innovation and Technology Fund of the Hong Kong Government.

  8. Cake properties in ultrafiltration of TiO2 fine particles combined with HA: in situ measurement of cake thickness by fluid dynamic gauging and CFD calculation of imposed shear stress for cake controlling.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Qu, Fangshu; Liang, Heng; Li, Kai; Chang, Haiqing; Li, Guibai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the cake buildup of TiO2 fine particles in the presence of humid acid (HA) and cake layer controlling during ultrafiltration (UF) were investigated. Specifically, we measured the cake thickness using fluid dynamic gauging (FDG) method under various solution conditions, including TiO2 concentration (0.1-0.5 g/L), HA concentration (0-5 mg/L, total organic carbon (TOC)), and pH values (e.g., 4, 6 and 10), and calculated the shear stress distribution induced by stirring using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to analyze the cake layer controlling conditions, including the operation flux (50-200 L m(-2) h(-1)) and TiO2 concentration (0.1-0.5 g/L). It was found that lower TiO2/HA concentration ratio could lead to exceedingly severe membrane fouling because of the formation of a relatively denser cake layer by filling the voids of cake layer with HA, and pH was essential for cake layer formation owing to the net repulsion between particles. Additionally, it was observed that shear stress was rewarding for mitigating cake growth under lower operation flux as a result of sufficient back-transport forces, and exhibited an excellent performance on cake layer controlling in lower TiO2 concentrations due to slight interaction forces on the vicinity of membrane. PMID:26810663

  9. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  10. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-a-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  11. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for the production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional culturing process responsive to shear stress uses a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-.alpha.-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D.sub.3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating an in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  12. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Holme, Margaret N; Fedotenko, Illya A; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress. PMID:22683843

  13. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Fedotenko, Illya A.; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  14. Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Laminate from the Applied Shear Resultant--A Simplified Shear Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem, rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  15. Simplified Shear Solution for Determination of the Shear Stress Distribution in a Composite Panel from the Applied Shear Resultant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Yarrington, Phillip W.; Collier, Craig S.

    2008-01-01

    The simplified shear solution method is presented for approximating the through-thickness shear stress distribution within a composite laminate or panel based on laminated beam theory. The method does not consider the solution of a particular boundary value problem; rather it requires only knowledge of the global shear loading, geometry, and material properties of the laminate or panel. It is thus analogous to lamination theory in that ply level stresses can be efficiently determined from global load resultants (as determined, for instance, by finite element analysis) at a given location in a structure and used to evaluate the margin of safety on a ply by ply basis. The simplified shear solution stress distribution is zero at free surfaces, continuous at ply boundaries, and integrates to the applied shear load. Comparisons to existing theories are made for a variety of laminates, and design examples are provided illustrating the use of the method for determining through-thickness shear stress margins in several types of composite panels and in the context of a finite element structural analysis.

  16. Impaired endothelial shear stress induces podosome assembly via VEGF up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Fey, Theres; Schubert, Kai Michael; Schneider, Holger; Fein, Evelyn; Kleinert, Eike; Pohl, Ulrich; Dendorfer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Podosomes are dynamic cytoskeletal membrane structures with local adhesive and proteolytic activity. They are critically involved in angiogenesis and vascular adaptive growth. Here, we studied in HUVECs and murine small vessels whether shear stress controls podosome assembly and local proteolytic activity. Podosomes were characterized by immunohistochemistry, and their proteolytic activity was assessed as degradation imprints in fluorescent gelatin that was used as growth substrate. Compared with controls (10 dyn/cm(2)), the number of podosomes formed per time was doubled when cells were exposed to low shear stress (0.3 dyn/cm(2)) or even increased 5-fold under static conditions. This was a result of an enhanced expression of VEGF after reduction of shear stress. Consequently, enhanced podosome formation could be prevented by a VEGF receptor antagonist as well by interruption of VEGF signaling via inhibition of PI3K, Src, or p38. Increase of podosome assembly went along with significantly augmented cell motility. In vivo experiments in mouse arteries confirmed increased endothelial podosome numbers when shear stress was abolished by vessel occlusion. We conclude that shear stress, by reducing VEGF release, inhibits podosome assembly. Hence, endothelial cell-mediated matrix proteolysis and migratory activity are inhibited, thereby stabilizing the structure of the vessel wall.-Fey, T., Schubert, K. M., Schneider, H., Fein, E., Kleinert, E., Pohl, U., Dendorfer, A. Impaired endothelial shear stress induces podosome assembly via VEGF up-regulation. PMID:27103579

  17. Wall shear stress distributions in a model of normal and constricted small airways.

    PubMed

    Evans, David J; Green, Anthony S; Thomas, Nicholas K

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have highlighted flow shear stress as a possible damage mechanism for small airways, in particular those liable to constriction through disease or injury due to mechanical ventilation. Flow experiments in vitro have implicated shear stress as a relevant factor for mechanotransduction pathways with respect to airway epithelial cell function. Using computational fluid dynamics analysis, this study reports velocity profiles and calculations for wall shear stress distributions in a three-generation, asymmetric section of the small airways subjected to a steady, inspiratory flow. The results show distal variation of wall shear stress distributions due to velocity gradients on the carina side of each daughter airway branch. The maximum wall shear stresses in both normal and constricted small airways are shown to exceed those calculated using data from previous simpler one-dimensional experimental analyses. These findings have implications for lung cell flow experiments involving shear stress in the consideration of both normal airway function and pathology due to mechanotransduction mechanisms. PMID:24618983

  18. ESTIMATION OF SHEAR STRESS WORKING ON SUBMERGED HOLLOW FIBRE MEMBRANE BY CFD METHOD IN MBRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaw, Hlwan Moe; Li, Tairi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi

    This study was conducted to evaluate shear stress working on submerged hollow fibre membrane by CFD (Computation Fluid Dynamics) method in MBRs. Shear stress on hollow fibre membrane caused by aeration was measured directly using a two-direction load sensor. The measurement of water-phase flow velocity was done also by using laser doppler velocimeter. It was confirmed that the shear stress was possible to be evaluated from the water-phase flow velocityby the result of comparison of time average shear stress actually measured with one hollow fibre membrane and the one calculated by the water-phase flow velocity. In the estimation of the water-phase flow velocity using the CFD method, time average water-phase flow velocity estimated by consideration of the fluid resistance of the membrane module nearly coincided with the measured values, and it was shown that it was possible to be estimated also within the membrane module. Moreover, the measured shear stress and drag force well coincided with the values calculated from the estimated water-phase flow velocity outside of membrane module and in the center of membrane module, and it was suggested that the shear stress on the hollow fibre membrane could be estimated by the CFD method in MBRs.

  19. Dimensionless critical shear stress in gravel-bed rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, François; Houbrechts, Geoffrey; Peeters, Alexandre; Hallot, Eric; Van Campenhout, Jean; Denis, Anne-Cécile

    2015-12-01

    This paper first compiles critical shear stress values from 26 studies of gravel-bed rivers (GBRs) worldwide. The most frequently proposed value of the Shields criterion (θc) is 0.045, but three major groups with θc values ranging from < 0.030 to > 0.100 were identified. Second, dimensionless critical shear stresses (the Shields criterion) were evaluated for 14 GBRs (18 sites) with watershed areas ranging from 12 to 3000 km2. Different approaches were used to identify the initial movement of the bed material: painted and PIT-tag pebbles, sediment traps, and bedload samplers. The Shields criterion (θc) was estimated using the total shear stress (τ) and the grain shear stress (τ‧). Several shear stresses were also estimated using shear velocities. For bedload transport, we obtained an average Shields criterion (θc) of 0.040. The values were higher in small rivers (> 0.050) than larger rivers (< 0.030) because of more significant bedform shear stresses. The Shields criterion (θ‧c) was lower when the grain shear stress (τ‧) was used and only reached 0.019. Different values are also proposed in relation to the type of mobilization: the θc value for partial transport was ~ 0.025 and exceeded 0.040 for full transport (usually reached in association with discharges with a 10-year return period). The values based on the results of sediment traps and a bedload sampler were greater than those obtained using tracers, but these differences are smaller than those usually reported in the literature.

  20. Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Cancer Stem Cell Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunday, Brittney; Triantafillu, Ursula; Domier, Ria; Kim, Yonghyun

    2014-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are believed to be the source of tumor formation, are exposed to fluid shear stress as a result of blood flow within the blood vessels. It was theorized that CSCs would be less susceptible to cell death than non-CSCs after both types of cell were exposed to a fluid shear stress, and that higher levels of fluid shear stress would result in lower levels of cell viability for both cell types. To test this hypothesis, U87 glioblastoma cells were cultured adherently (containing smaller populations of CSCs) and spherically (containing larger populations of CSCs). They were exposed to fluid shear stress in a simulated blood flow through a 125-micrometer diameter polyetheretherketone (PEEK) tubing using a syringe pump. After exposure, cell viability data was collected using a BioRad TC20 Automated Cell Counter. Each cell type was tested at three physiological shear stress values: 5, 20, and 60 dynes per centimeter squared. In general, it was found that the CSC-enriched U87 sphere cells had higher cell viability than the CSC-depleted U87 adherent cancer cells. Interestingly, it was also observed that the cell viability was not negatively affected by the higher fluid shear stress values in the tested range. In future follow-up studies, higher shear stresses will be tested. Furthermore, CSCs from different tumor origins (e.g. breast tumor, prostate tumor) will be tested to determine cell-specific shear sensitivity. National Science Foundation Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  1. Simple average expression for shear-stress relaxation modulus.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, J P; Xu, H; Baschnagel, J

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on isotropic elastic networks we propose a simple-average expression G(t)=μ_{A}-h(t) for the computational determination of the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t) of a classical elastic solid or fluid. Here, μ_{A}=G(0) characterizes the shear transformation of the system at t=0 and h(t) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress τ[over ̂](t) as a function of time t. We discuss sampling time and ensemble effects and emphasize possible pitfalls of alternative expressions using the shear-stress autocorrelation function. We argue finally that our key relation may be readily adapted for more general linear response functions. PMID:26871020

  2. Simple average expression for shear-stress relaxation modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J. P.; Xu, H.; Baschnagel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on isotropic elastic networks we propose a simple-average expression G (t ) =μA-h (t ) for the computational determination of the shear-stress relaxation modulus G (t ) of a classical elastic solid or fluid. Here, μA=G (0 ) characterizes the shear transformation of the system at t =0 and h (t ) the (rescaled) mean-square displacement of the instantaneous shear stress τ ̂(t ) as a function of time t . We discuss sampling time and ensemble effects and emphasize possible pitfalls of alternative expressions using the shear-stress autocorrelation function. We argue finally that our key relation may be readily adapted for more general linear response functions.

  3. Characterization of fractures subjected to normal and shear stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Min-Kwang

    Results from a series of laboratory experiments to determine fracture specific stiffness, for a fracture subjected to shear and normal stress, are presented and analyzed. The experimental work focuses on the determination of relations between normal and shear fracture specific stiffness and between spatial distribution of fracture specific stiffness and fluid flow through the fracture The ratio of shear to normal fracture specific stiffness is experimentally investigated on a fracture subjected to shear as well as normal stress. Synthetic fractures made of gypsum and lucite were prepared with different fracture surface conditions: either well-mated or non-mated. For well-mated fracture surfaces, asperities were created by casting gypsum against sandpaper. A block of gypsum was cast against the sandpaper and then a second block was cast against the first block such that the two contact surfaces were well-mated. The surface roughness was controlled by using the sandpapers with different average grit size. Non-mated fracture surfaces were fabricated with two lucite blocks that were polished (lucite PL) or sand-blasted (lucite SB) along their contact surface. In the experiments, each specimen was subjected to normal and shear loading while the fracture was probed with transmitted and reflected compressional and shear waves. Shear and normal fracture specific stiffnesses were calculated using the displacement discontinuity theory. For non-mated fractures, the stiffness ratio was not sensitive to the application of shear stress and, as normal stress increased, approached a theoretical ratio which was determined assuming that the transmission of compressional and shear waves was equal. The stiffness ratio obtained from well-mated fractures ranged from 0.5 to 1.4, which deviated from the conventional assumption that shear and normal fracture specific stiffness are equal. The stiffness ratio increased with increasing surface roughness and with increasing shear stress. For

  4. Dynamics of Concentrated Silica Suspension under Oscillatory Shear Studied by SAXS and XPCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jonghun; Lin, Xiao-Min; Sandy, Alec; Narayanan, Suresh; X-ray Science Division Team; CenterNanomaterials Team

    2015-03-01

    The viscoelastic properties of complex fluids are often obtained by applying small amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS). In this regime, their microstructure does not change by shear, and the shear stress linearly responds to the applied strain. However, in the real application, high shear strain or rate is applied, where the viscoelastic properties are affected by the microstructural deformation by this high shear. The rheological behavior of complex fluids under large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) has been widely studied, but there is a lack of studies in microscopic dynamics of complex fluids under LAOS. X-ray scattering is a suitable method to understand microscopic perspective of rheology because of its proper length scales of tens to hundreds nm and time scales of millisecond to thousands second. Here, we studied the dynamics of the concentrated silica nanoparticle suspensions in PEG under different shear strain regimes using small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS). With strain increasing, these suspensions showed shear thinning and shear thickening behavior, and their microstructural change was observed by SAXS. In oscillatory shear, as the original scattering volume periodically comes back to the original position, we could better study the changes in autocorrelation function by shear and diffusion than steady shear study where correlation decays by transit.

  5. Significance of extensional stresses to red blood cell lysis in a shearing flow.

    PubMed

    Down, Linden A; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V; O'Rear, Edgar A

    2011-06-01

    Traditionally, an empirical power-law model relating hemolysis to shear stress and exposure time has been used to estimate hemolysis related to flow--however, this basis alone has been insufficient in attempts to predict hemolysis through computational fluid dynamics. Because of this deficiency, we sought to re-examine flow features related to hemolysis in a shearing flow by computationally modeling a set of classic experiments performed in a capillary tube. Simulating 21 different flows of varying entrance contraction ratio, flowrate and viscosity, we identified hemolysis threshold streamlines and analyzed the stresses present. Constant damage thresholds for radial and axial extensional stresses of approximately 3000 Pa for exposure times on the order of microseconds were observed, while no such threshold was found for the maximum shear stress or gradient of the shear stress. The extensional flow seen at the entrance of the capillary appears to be most consistently related to hemolysis. An account of how extensional stresses can lead to lysis of a red cell undergoing tank-tread motion in a shearing flow is provided. This work shows that extensional components of the stress tensor are integral in causing hemolysis for some flows, and should be considered when attempting to predict hemolysis computationally. PMID:21298343

  6. Elevated Shear Stress in Arteriovenous Fistulae: Is There Mechanical Homeostasis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide access for dialysis in patients with renal failure. The current hypothesis is that the rapid remodeling occurring after the fistula creation is in part a process to restore the mechanical stresses to some preferred level (i.e. mechanical homeostasis). Given that nearly 50% of fistulae require an intervention after one year, understanding the altered hemodynamic stress is important in improving clinical outcomes. We perform numerical simulations of four patient-specific models of functioning fistulae reconstructed from 3D Doppler ultrasound scans. Our results show that the vessels are subjected to `normal' shear stresses away from the anastomosis; about 1 Pa in the veins and about 2.5 Pa in the arteries. However, simulations show that part of the anastomoses are consistently subjected to very high shear stress (>10Pa) over the cardiac cycle. These elevated values shear stresses are caused by the transitional flows at the anastomoses including flow separation and quasiperiodic vortex shedding. This suggests that the remodeling process lowers shear stress in the fistula but that it is limited as evidenced by the elevated shear at the anastomoses. This constant insult on the arterialized venous wall may explain the process of late fistula failure in which the dialysis access become occluded after years of use. Supported by an R21 Grant from NIDDK (DK081823).

  7. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, M.; Assoum, H. H.; Martinuzzi, R.; Sobolik, V.; Abed-Meraim, K.; Sakout, A.

    2013-07-01

    The influence of the large-scale vortical structures on the wall shear stress in a circular impinging jet is investigated experimentally for a Reynolds number of 1260. Time-resolved particle image velocimetry and polarographic measurements are performed simultaneously. It is found that the instantaneous wall shear stress is strongly dependent on the vortex dynamics, particularly for different parts of the transverse vortex. The influence of the vortex ring, the secondary and tertiary vortices on the ejection/sweep process near the wall is the main mechanism involved in the wall shear stress variation. In the region of the boundary layer separation, the wall shear stress amplitude increases just upstream of the separation and dramatically decreases in the recirculation zone downstream from the separation. The interaction between primary and secondary structures and their pairing process with the tertiary structure affects the sweep/ejection process near the wall and subsequently the wall shear stress variation. A comparison between the Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) method and the phase average technique is performed. It is shown that both methods describe the flow dynamics in the impinging region of the vortex ring. However, the FTLE method is more suitable for describing the unsteady separation of the boundary layer.

  8. Shear Stress Sensing with Elastic Microfence Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisotto, Alexxandra; Palmieri, Frank L.; Saini, Aditya; Lin, Yi; Thurman, Christopher S; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Taeyang; Connell, John W.; Zhu, Yong; Gopalarathnam, Ashok; Jiang, Xiaoning; Wohl, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, elastic microfences were generated for the purpose of measuring shear forces acting on a wind tunnel model. The microfences were fabricated in a two part process involving laser ablation patterning to generate a template in a polymer film followed by soft lithography with a two-part silicone. Incorporation of a fluorescent dye was demonstrated as a method to enhance contrast between the sensing elements and the substrate. Sensing elements consisted of multiple microfences prepared at different orientations to enable determination of both shear force and directionality. Microfence arrays were integrated into an optical microscope with sub-micrometer resolution. Initial experiments were conducted on a flat plate wind tunnel model. Both image stabilization algorithms and digital image correlation were utilized to determine the amount of fence deflection as a result of airflow. Initial free jet experiments indicated that the microfences could be readily displaced and this displacement was recorded through the microscope.

  9. Shear Load Transfer in High and Low Stress Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon is an integral part of joint movement and stability, as it functions to transmit load from muscle to bone. It has an anisotropic, fibrous hierarchical structure that is generally loaded in the direction of its fibers/fascicles. Internal load distributions are altered when joint motion rotates an insertion site or when local damage disrupts fibers/fascicles, potentially causing inter-fiber (or inter-fascicular) shear. Tendons with different microstructure (helical versus linear) may redistribute loads differently. Method of Approach This study explored how shear redistributes axial loads in rat tail tendon (low stress tendons with linear microstructure) and porcine flexor tendon (high stress with helical microstructure) by creating lacerations on opposite sides of the tendon, ranging from about 20-60% of the tendon width, to create various magnitudes of shear. Differences in fascicular orientation were quantified using polarized light microscopy. Results and Conclusions Unexpectedly, both tendon types maintained about 20% of pre-laceration stress values after overlapping cuts of 60% of tendon width (no intact fibers end to end) suggesting that shear stress transfer can contribute more to overall tendon strength and stiffness than previously reported. All structural parameters for both tendon types decreased linearly with increasing laceration depth. The tail tendon had a more rapid decline in post-laceration elastic stress and modulus parameters as well as a more linear and less tightly packed fascicular structure, suggesting that positional tendons may be less well suited to redistribute loads via a shear mechanism. PMID:25700261

  10. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Residual Stress from Diamagnetic Velocity Shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2010-11-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the parallel velocity (and parallel velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [1] we demonstrated with gyrokinetic (GYRO) simulations that TAM pinching from the diamagnetic level shear in the ExB velocity could provide the residual stress needed for spontaneous toroidal rotation. Here we show that the shear in the diamagnetic velocities themselves provide comparable residual stress (and level of stabilization). The sign of the residual stress, quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion power flow (M/P), depends on the signs of the various velocity shears as well as ion (ITG) versus electron (TEM) mode directed turbulence. The residual stress from these temperature and density gradient diamagnetic velocity shears is demonstrated in global gyrokinetic simulation of ``null'' rotation DIIID discharges by matching M/P profiles within experimental error. 8pt [1] R.E. Waltz, G.M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F.L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009).

  11. Effects of shear stress on endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Obi, Syotaro; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are adult stem cells that play a central role in neovascularization. EPCs are mobilized from bone marrow into peripheral blood, attach to existing endothelial cells, and then transmigrate across the endothelium into tissues, where they proliferate, differentiate, and form new blood vessels. In the process, EPCs are exposed to shear stress, a biomechanical force generated by flowing blood and tissue fluid flow. When cultured EPCs are exposed to controlled levels of shear stress in a flow-loading device, their bioactivities in terms of proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration, production of bioactive substances, anti-thrombosis, and tube formation increase markedly. Expression of endothelial marker genes and proteins by EPCs also increases in response to shear stress, and they differentiate into mature endothelial cells. Great advances have been made in elucidating the mechanisms by which mature endothelial cells sense and respond to shear stress, but not in EPCs. Further study of EPC responses to shear stress will be necessary to better understand the physiological and pathophysiological roles of EPCs and to apply EPCs to new therapies in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:25992410

  12. The Role of Shear Stress in Arteriovenous Fistula Maturation and Failure: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Leonard D.; Bashar, Khalid; Griffin, Philip; Kavanagh, Eamon G.; Walsh, Stewart R.; Walsh, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-maturation and post-maturation venous stenosis are the primary causes of failure within arteriovenous fistulae (AVFs). Although the exact mechanisms triggering failure remain unclear, abnormal hemodynamic profiles are thought to mediate vascular remodelling and can adversely impact on fistula patency. Aim The review aims to clarify the role of shear stress on outward remodelling during maturation and evaluate the evidence supporting theories related to the localisation and development of intimal hyperplasia within AVFs. Methods A systematic review of studies comparing remodelling data with hemodynamic data obtained from computational fluid dynamics of AVFs during and after maturation was conducted. Results Outward remodelling occurred to reduce or normalise the level of shear stress over time in fistulae with a large radius of curvature (curved) whereas shear stress was found to augment over time in fistulae with a small radius of curvature (straight) coinciding with minimal to no increases in lumen area. Although this review highlighted that there is a growing body of evidence suggesting low and oscillating shear stress may stimulate the initiation and development of intimal medial thickening within AVFs. Further lines of evidence are needed to support the disturbed flow theory and outward remodelling findings before surgical configurations and treatment strategies are optimised to conform to them. This review highlighted that variation between the time of analysis, classification of IH, resolution of simulations, data processing techniques and omission of various shear stress metrics prevented forming pooling of data amongst studies. Conclusion Standardised measurements and data processing techniques are needed to comprehensively evaluate the relationship between shear stress and intimal medial thickening. Advances in image acquisition and flow quantifications coupled with the increasing prevalence of longitudinal studies commencing from fistula

  13. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  14. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-12-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  15. Bed Shear Stress in Channels with Emergent Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Kerger, F.; Nepf, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    The shear stress at the bed of a channel influences important benthic processes such as sediment transport. Several methods exist to estimate the bed shear stress in open channel flow, but most of these are not appropriate for vegetated channels due to the impact of vegetation on the velocity profile and turbulence production. This study proposes a new model to estimate the bed shear stress in both vegetated and bare channels. The model is based on the observation that, for both bare and vegetated channels, within a viscous sub-layer at the bed, the viscous stress decreases linearly with increasing distance from the bed, resulting in a parabolic velocity profile at the bed. For emergent canopies of sufficient density, the thickness of this linear-stress layer is set by the stem diameter, leading to a simple estimate for bed shear stress. For bare channels, the model describes the velocity profile in the overlap region of the Law of the Wall. The model is supported by high-resolution experiments. Furthermore, the changes in turbulence isotropy and integral length across a range of vegetation density, from bare bed to dense canopy, have been explored.

  16. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  17. Discontinuous shear thickening in Brownian suspensions by dynamic simulation

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Romain; Seto, Ryohei; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Denn, Morton M.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic particle-scale numerical simulations are used to show that the shear thickening observed in dense colloidal, or Brownian, suspensions is of a similar nature to that observed in noncolloidal suspensions, i.e., a stress-induced transition from a flow of lubricated near-contacting particles to a flow of a frictionally contacting network of particles. Abrupt (or discontinuous) shear thickening is found to be a geometric rather than hydrodynamic phenomenon; it stems from the strong sensitivity of the jamming volume fraction to the nature of contact forces between suspended particles. The thickening obtained in a colloidal suspension of purely hard frictional spheres is qualitatively similar to experimental observations. However, the agreement cannot be made quantitative with only hydrodynamics, frictional contacts, and Brownian forces. Therefore, the role of a short-range repulsive potential mimicking the stabilization of actual suspensions on the thickening is studied. The effects of Brownian and repulsive forces on the onset stress can be combined in an additive manner. The simulations including Brownian and stabilizing forces show excellent agreement with experimental data for the viscosity η and the second normal stress difference N2. PMID:26621744

  18. Nonlinear Reynolds stress model for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, J. Michael; Rubinstein, R.; Kirtley, K. R.

    1991-01-01

    A nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model, derived using the renormalization group, is applied to equilibrium homogeneous shear flow and fully developed flow in a square duct. The model, which is quadratically nonlinear in the velocity gradients, successfully captures the large-scale inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the flows studied. The ratios of normal stresses, as well as the actual magnitudes of the stresses are correctly predicted for equilibrium homogeneous shear flow. Reynolds normal stress anisotropy and attendant turbulence driven secondary flow are predicted for a square duct. Profiles of mean velocity and normal stresses are in good agreement with measurements. Very close to walls, agreement with measurements diminishes. The model has the benefit of containing no arbitrary constants; all values are determined directly from the theory. It seems that near wall behavior is influenced by more than the large scale anisotropy accommodated in the current model. More accurate near wall calculations may well require a model for anisotropic dissipation.

  19. Buried wire gage for wall shear stress measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, V. S.; Rose, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A buried wire gage for measuring wall shear stress in fluid flow was studied and further developed. Several methods of making this relatively new type of gage were examined to arrive at a successful technique that is well-suited for wind-tunnel testing. A series of measurements was made to demonstrate the adequacy of a two-point calibration procedure for these gages. The buried wire gage is also demonstrated to be ideally suited for quantitative measurement of wall shear stress in wind-tunnel testing.

  20. Shear Stress Partitioning in Airflow over Rough Surfaces: Roughness Form Effects and Influence on the Distribution of Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nickling, W. G.; King, J.

    2004-12-01

    Roughness elements distributed across a surface can significantly decrease the entrainment and transport of underlying fine-grained sediments by wind. The parameterization of roughness effects on wind erosion thresholds and sediment transport is critical to the development of models that can provide realistic predictions of sediment thresholds and fluxes due to wind erosion. Raupach et al. (1993) present a model for predicting the protective role of roughness elements in terms of a threshold friction velocity ratio as a function of the roughness geometry and the aerodynamic properties of the surface and roughness elements. The predictive capacity of this model remains uncertain and the work presented here represents part of an on-going effort of our group to improve the parameterization of the Raupach et al. (1993) model. To gain additional understanding of how roughness elements influence the magnitude and nature of the shear stress acting on the surface among the elements and evaluate strength and weaknesses of the roughness density parameter to characterize these effects, a wind tunnel study using model roughness arrays of similar roughness density composed of cube-shaped elements of different length dimensions was undertaken. Roughness density is defined as the total frontal area of all the elements to the total surface area that they occupy. Shear stress in the above element air flow was determined from vertical wind speed profile measurements. Point measurements of near surface shear stresses within the roughness array were made with simple omni-directional skin friction meters in order to investigate the partitioning of shear stress to the intervening surface. The results suggest that the roughness density parameter has severe limitations in describing the shear stress partitioning for these regularly arrayed rough surfaces. For surfaces with identical roughness densities, the surface composed of more and smaller elements was observed to have average and

  1. Modelling of peak-flow wall shear stress in major airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Green, A S

    2004-05-01

    Some respiratory diseases result in the inflammation of the lung airway epithelium. An associated chronic cough, as found in many cases of asthma and in long-term smokers, can exacerbate damage to the epithelial layer. It has been proposed that wall shear stresses, created by peak expiratory flow-rates during a coughing episode, are responsible. The work here uses a computational fluid dynamics technique to model peak expiratory flow in the trachea and major lung bronchi. Calculated wall shear stress values are compared to a limited set of published measurements taken from a physical model. The measurements are discussed in the context of a flow study of a complex bronchial network. A more complete picture is achieved by the calculation method, indicating, in some cases, higher maximum wall shear stresses than measured, confirming the original findings of the experimental work. Recommendations are made as to where further work would be beneficial to medical applications. PMID:15046995

  2. Stress impacts telomere dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kotrschal, Alexander; Ilmonen, Petteri; Penn, Dustin J

    2007-04-22

    Telomeres are DNA-protein complexes at the ends of chromosomes that control genomic integrity but appear to become shorter with age and stress. To test whether stress causes telomere attrition, we exposed the offspring of wild-caught house mice (Mus musculus) to stressful conditions and examined the changes in telomere length over six months. We found that females exposed to males and reproductive stress (either with or without crowding) had significantly shorter telomeres than controls, and males exposed to crowding stress had shorter telomeres than males that were not crowded. Our results indicate that stress alters telomere dynamics, causing attrition and hindering restoration, and these effects are sex dependent. Telomeres may thus provide a biomarker for assessing an individual's cumulative exposure or ability to cope with stressful conditions. PMID:17264051

  3. Rheological properties of polymer melts in confined shear flow from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, John

    2007-03-01

    The viscoelastic properties of dense polymer melts in shear flow are examined using dynamic Monte Carlo simulation for plate spacings less than 10 times the molecular radius of gyration. The coarse graining methodology employed consists of the cooperative motion algorithm of Pakula and a derived biasing technique based on previous studies of Binder and Baushnagel. For relatively large plate spacings and slow flows, a uniform linear velocity profile is obtainable. Use of the Kramers form for entropic springs allows the calculation of stress in the simulation providing a means for exploring rheological properties including viscosity and normal stress differences. Results are in excellent agreement with well-established experimental facts; a shear thinning viscosity is obtained, the first normal stress difference increases with shear rate, and the first normal stress coefficient decreases with shear rate. Evidence of entanglements are present for longer chain lengths. For fast flows, the linear velocity profile is lost and shear banding is observed. A non-monotonic stress with shear rate is found in conjunction with the shear banding and mechanistically this is attributable to a cohesive failure with an excess of chain ends being found at the slip plane. Results for variable plate spacings shed some insight into novel confinement effects that are being exploited in emerging areas of nanotechnology.

  4. Controlling Shear Stress in 3D Bioprinting is a Key Factor to Balance Printing Resolution and Stem Cell Integrity.

    PubMed

    Blaeser, Andreas; Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Puster, Uta; Richtering, Walter; Stevens, Molly M; Fischer, Horst

    2016-02-01

    A microvalve-based bioprinting system for the manufacturing of high-resolution, multimaterial 3D-structures is reported. Applying a straightforward fluid-dynamics model, the shear stress at the nozzle site can precisely be controlled. Using this system, a broad study on how cell viability and proliferation potential are affected by different levels of shear stress is conducted. Complex, multimaterial 3D structures are printed with high resolution. This work pioneers the investigation of shear stress-induced cell damage in 3D bioprinting and might help to comprehend and improve the outcome of cell-printing studies in the future. PMID:26626828

  5. A Two-Axis Direct Fluid Shear Stress Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adcock, Edward E.; Scott, Michael A.; Bajikar, Sateesh S.

    2010-01-01

    This innovation is a miniature or micro sized semiconductor sensor design that provides two axis direct non-intrusive measurement of skin friction or wall shear stress in fluid flow. The sensor is fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, enabling small size and low cost reproductions. The sensors have been fabricated by utilizing MEMS fabrication processes to bond a sensing element wafer to a fluid coupling wafer. This layering technique provides for an out of plane dimension that is on the same order of length as the inplane dimensions. The sensor design has the following characteristics: a shear force collecting plate with dimensions that can be tailored to various application specific requirements such as spatial resolution, temporal resolution and shear force range and resolution. This plate is located coplanar to both the sensor body and flow boundary, and is connected to a dual axis gimbal structure by a connecting column or lever arm. The dual axis gimbal structure has torsional hinges with embedded piezoresistive torsional strain gauges which provide a voltage output that is correlated to the applied shear stress (and excitation current) on force collection plate that is located on the flow boundary surface (hence the transduction method). This combination of design elements create a force concentration and resolution structure that enables the generation of a large stress on the strain gauge from the small shear stress on the flow boundary wall. This design as well as the use of back side electrical contacts establishes a non-intrusive method to quantitatively measure the shear force vector on aerodynamic bodies.

  6. A fluidized bed technique for estimating soil critical shear stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion models, depending on how they are formulated, always have erodibilitiy parameters in the erosion equations. For a process-based model like the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model, the erodibility parameters include rill and interrill erodibility and critical shear stress. Thes...

  7. Production of Functional Proteins: Balance of Shear Stress and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Haysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides for a method of culturing cells and inducing the expression of at least one gene in the cell culture. The method provides for contacting the cell with a transcription factor decoy oligonucleotide sequence directed against a nucleotide sequence encoding a shear stress response element.

  8. Fluid shear stress modulation of hepatocyte-like cell function.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Hassan; Alhaque, Sharmin; Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Flint, Oliver; Hay, David C

    2016-07-01

    Freshly isolated human adult hepatocytes are considered to be the gold standard tool for in vitro studies. However, primary hepatocyte scarcity, cell cycle arrest and the rapid loss of cell phenotype limit their widespread deployment. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells provide renewable sources of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). Despite the use of various differentiation methodologies, HLCs like primary human hepatocytes exhibit unstable phenotype in culture. It has been shown that the functional capacity can be improved by adding back elements of human physiology, such as cell co-culture or through the use of natural and/or synthetic surfaces. In this study, the effect of fluid shear stress on HLC performance was investigated. We studied two important liver functions, cytochrome P450 drug metabolism and serum protein secretion, in static cultures and those exposed to fluid shear stress. Our study demonstrates that fluid shear stress improved Cyp1A2 activity by approximately fivefold. This was paralleled by an approximate ninefold increase in sensitivity to a drug, primarily metabolised by Cyp2D6. In addition to metabolic capacity, fluid shear stress also improved hepatocyte phenotype with an approximate fourfold reduction in the secretion of a foetal marker, alpha-fetoprotein. We believe these studies highlight the importance of introducing physiologic cues in cell-based models to improve somatic cell phenotype. PMID:26979076

  9. Liquid Crystals Indicate Directions Of Surface Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.

    1996-01-01

    Report consisting of main text of U.S. Patent 5,394,752 presents detailed information on one aspect of method of using changes in colors of liquid-crystal coatings to indicate instantaneous directions of flow-induced shear stresses (skin friction) on aerodynamic surfaces.

  10. WAVE ACTION AND BOTTOM SHEAR STRESSES IN LAKE ERIE

    EPA Science Inventory

    For Lake Erie, the amplitudes and periods of wind-driven, surface gravity waves were calculated by means of the SMB hindcasting method. Bottom orbital velocities and bottom shear stresses were then calculated using linear wave theory and Kajiura's (1968) turbulent oscillating bou...

  11. Calculation of Near-Bank Velocity and Boundary Shear Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detailed knowledge of the flow and boundary shear stress fields near the banks of natural channels is essential for making accurate calculations of rates of near-bank sediment transport and geomorphic adjustment. This paper presents a test of a relatively simple, fully predictive, numerical method f...

  12. An interlaminar shear stress continuity theory for both thin and thick composite laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xianqiang; Liu, Dahsin

    1992-09-01

    The interlaminar shear stress plays a very important role in the damage of composite laminates. With higher interlaminar shear stress, delamination can easily occur on the composite interface. In order to calculate the interlaminar shear stress, a laminate theory, which accounts for both the interlaminar shear stress continuity and the transverse shear deformation, was presented in this study. Verification of the theory was performed by comparing the present theory with Pagano's elasticity analysis. It was found that the present theory was able to give excellent results for both stresses and displacements. More importantly, the interlaminar shear stress can be presented directly from the constitutive equations instead of being recovered from the equilibrium equations.

  13. A Multi-Phase Based Fluid-Structure-Microfluidic interaction sensor for Aerodynamic Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Christopher; Dutta, Diganta; Bashirzadeh, Yashar; Ahmed, Kareem; Qian, Shizhi

    2014-11-01

    A novel innovative microfluidic shear stress sensor is developed for measuring shear stress through multi-phase fluid-structure-microfluidic interaction. The device is composed of a microfluidic cavity filled with an electrolyte liquid. Inside the cavity, two electrodes make electrochemical velocimetry measurements of the induced convection. The cavity is sealed with a flexible superhydrophobic membrane. The membrane will dynamically stretch and flex as a result of direct shear cross-flow interaction with the seal structure, forming instability wave modes and inducing fluid motion within the microfluidic cavity. The shear stress on the membrane is measured by sensing the induced convection generated by membrane deflections. The advantages of the sensor over current MEMS based shear stress sensor technology are: a simplified design with no moving parts, optimum relationship between size and sensitivity, no gaps such as those created by micromachining sensors in MEMS processes. We present the findings of a feasibility study of the proposed sensor including wind-tunnel tests, microPIV measurements, electrochemical velocimetry, and simulation data results. The study investigates the sensor in the supersonic and subsonic flow regimes. Supported by a NASA SBIR phase 1 contract.

  14. The Need for a Shear Stress Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    By surveying current research of various micro-electro mechanical systems (MEMS) shear stress sensor development efforts we illustrate the wide variety of methods used to test and characterize these sensors. The different methods of testing these sensors make comparison of results difficult in some cases, and also this comparison is further complicated by the different formats used in reporting the results of these tests. The fact that making these comparisons can be so difficult at times clearly illustrates a need for standardized testing and reporting methodologies. This need indicates that the development of a national or international standard for the calibration of MEMS shear stress sensors should be undertaken. As a first step towards the development of this standard, two types of devices are compared and contrasted. The first type device is a laminar flow channel with two different versions considered: the first built with standard manufacturing techniques and the second with advanced precision manufacturing techniques. The second type of device is a new concept for creating a known shear stress consisting of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangentially to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. Additionally, issues related to the development of a standard for shear stress calibration are identified and discussed.

  15. Characterizations and Correlations of Wall Shear Stress in Aneurysmal Flow.

    PubMed

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) is one of the most studied hemodynamic parameters, used in correlating blood flow to various diseases. The pulsatile nature of blood flow, along with the complex geometries of diseased arteries, produces complicated temporal and spatial WSS patterns. Moreover, WSS is a vector, which further complicates its quantification and interpretation. The goal of this study is to investigate WSS magnitude, angle, and vector changes in space and time in complex blood flow. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was chosen as a setting to explore WSS quantification. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed in six AAAs. New WSS parameters are introduced, and the pointwise correlation among these, and more traditional WSS parameters, was explored. WSS magnitude had positive correlation with spatial/temporal gradients of WSS magnitude. This motivated the definition of relative WSS gradients. WSS vectorial gradients were highly correlated with magnitude gradients. A mix WSS spatial gradient and a mix WSS temporal gradient are proposed to equally account for variations in the WSS angle and magnitude in single measures. The important role that WSS plays in regulating near wall transport, and the high correlation among some of the WSS parameters motivates further attention in revisiting the traditional approaches used in WSS characterizations. PMID:26592536

  16. Flow instability and wall shear stress variation in intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Baek, H.; Jayaraman, M. V.; Richardson, P. D.; Karniadakis, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behaviour of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high resolution numerical simulations. We analyse three representative patient-specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics: (i) a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, (ii) a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and (iii) a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Our simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms can be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 20–50 Hz, even when the blood flow rate in the parent vessel is as low as 150 and 250 ml min−1 for cases (iii) and (i), respectively. The flow returns to its original laminar pulsatile state near the end of diastole. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate at the aforementioned high frequencies. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatio-temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude. PMID:20022896

  17. Dynamic Triggering Stress Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Velasco, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    It has been well established that static (permanent) stress changes can trigger nearby earthquakes, within a few fault lengths from the causative event, whereas triggering by dynamic (transient) stresses carried by seismic waves both nearby and at remote distances has not been as well documented nor understood. An analysis of the change in the local stress caused by the passing of surfaces waves is important for the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, we modeled the change in the stress that the passing of Rayleigh and Loves waves causes on a fault plane of arbitrary orientation, and applied a Coulomb failure criteria to calculate the potential of these stress changes to trigger reverse, normal or strike-slip failure. We preliminarily test these model results with data from dynamically triggering earthquakes in the Australian Bowen Basin. In the Bowen region, the modeling predicts a maximum triggering potential for Rayleigh waves arriving perpendicularly to the strike of the reverse faults present in the region. The modeled potentials agree with our observations, and give us an understanding of the dynamic stress orientation needed to trigger different type of earthquakes.

  18. Shear stress related blood damage in laminar couette flow.

    PubMed

    Paul, Reinhard; Apel, Jörn; Klaus, Sebastian; Schügner, Frank; Schwindke, Peter; Reul, Helmut

    2003-06-01

    Artificial organs within the blood stream are generally associated with flow-induced blood damage, particularly hemolysis of red blood cells. These damaging effects are known to be dependent on shear forces and exposure times. The determination of a correlation between these flow-dependent properties and actual hemolysis is the subject of this study. For this purpose, a Couette device has been developed. A fluid seal based on fluorocarbon is used to separate blood from secondary external damage effects. The shear rate within the gap is controlled by the rotational speed of the inner cylinder, and the exposure time by the amount of blood that is axially pumped through the device per given time. Blood damage is quantified by the index of hemolysis (IH), which is calculated from photometric plasma hemoglobin measurements. Experiments are conducted at exposure times from texp=25 - 1250 ms and shear rates ranging from tau=30 up to 450 Pa ensuring Taylor-vortex free flow characteristics. Blood damage is remarkably low over a broad range of shear rates and exposure times. However, a significant increase in blood damage can be observed for shear stresses of tau>or= 425 Pa and exposure times of texp>or= 620 ms. Maximum hemolysis within the investigated range is IH=3.5%. The results indicate generally lower blood damage than reported in earlier studies with comparable devices, and the measurements clearly indicate a rather abrupt (i.e., critical levels of shear stresses and exposure times) than gradual increase in hemolysis, at least for the investigated range of shear rates and exposure times. PMID:12780506

  19. Development of a shear stress sensor to analyse the influence of polymers on the turbulent wall shear stress.

    PubMed

    Nottebrock, Bernardo; Grosse, Sebastian; Schröder, Wolfgang

    2011-05-11

    The drag reducing effect of polymers in a channel flow is well known and it is assumed that the polymer filaments interfere with the turbulent structures in the very near-wall flow. To analyse their precise effect, a micro-pillar shear stress sensor (MPS³) measurement system is developed which allows the detection of wall shear stress at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Different manufacturing techniques for the required micro-pillars are discussed and their influence on the flow is investigated evidencing the non-intrusive character of the pillars. Subsequently, a complete calibration is presented to relate the recorded deflection to wall shear stress values and to assure the correct detection over the whole expected frequency spectrum. A feasibility study about the ability to visualize the two-dimensional wall shear stress distribution completes the discussion about the validity of MPS³. In the last step, the drag reduction of a polymer filament grafted on a micro-pillar compared to a plain pillar and the application of MPS³ in an ocean-type polymer solution are investigated. The results confirm the expected behaviour found in the literature. PMID:21508484

  20. The Role of Shear Failure on Stress Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W.; Hauser, M.; Couzens-Schultz, B. A.; Gray, G.

    2014-09-01

    Leak-off pressure and lost circulation data are generally thought to be reflective of minimum stress. We propose an alternative interpretation should be considered where the data may reflect a shear failure along zones of pre-existing weakness rather than opening of tensile fractures against the minimum stress. This mechanism has been discussed in a small number of borehole stability and hydraulic fracture papers, but has not been widely applied to leak-off test or lost circulation interpretation. In this paper, we will revisit and expand the concept introduced recently by Couzens-Schultz and Chan (J Struct Geol, doi: 10.1016/j.jsg.2010.06.013, 2010) based on abnormally low leak-off tests in an active thrust belt to the analysis of lost circulation observations in modern-day deltaic environments. In the Gulf of Mexico, lost circulations historically are interpreted as a representation of the minimum horizontal stress due to initiating or reopening of a fracture in tensile mode. However, shear failure or fault reactivation can occur at pressures well below the minimum far-field stress that is typically considered a safe upper bound for mud pressure if pre-existing planes of weakness such as faults or fracture networks exist. We demonstrated a mud loss event is shown to be inconsistent with the tensile failure mode in a normal stress environment, but in good agreement with expectations for shear failure along pre-existing faults.

  1. Dynamic stress changes during earthquake rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, S.M.; Yu, G.; Wald, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    We assess two competing dynamic interpretations that have been proposed for the short slip durations characteristic of kinematic earthquake models derived by inversion of earthquake waveform and geodetic data. The first interpretation would require a fault constitutive relationship in which rapid dynamic restrengthening of the fault surface occurs after passage of the rupture front, a hypothesized mechanical behavior that has been referred to as "self-healing." The second interpretation would require sufficient spatial heterogeneity of stress drop to permit rapid equilibration of elastic stresses with the residual dynamic friction level, a condition we refer to as "geometrical constraint." These interpretations imply contrasting predictions for the time dependence of the fault-plane shear stresses. We compare these predictions with dynamic shear stress changes for the 1992 Landers (M 7.3), 1994 Northridge (M 6.7), and 1995 Kobe (M 6.9) earthquakes. Stress changes are computed from kinematic slip models of these earthquakes, using a finite-difference method. For each event, static stress drop is highly variable spatially, with high stress-drop patches embedded in a background of low, and largely negative, stress drop. The time histories of stress change show predominantly monotonic stress change after passage of the rupture front, settling to a residual level, without significant evidence for dynamic restrengthening. The stress change at the rupture front is usually gradual rather than abrupt, probably reflecting the limited resolution inherent in the underlying kinematic inversions. On the basis of this analysis, as well as recent similar results obtained independently for the Kobe and Morgan Hill earthquakes, we conclude that, at the present time, the self-healing hypothesis is unnecessary to explain earthquake kinematics.

  2. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  3. A simple model to understand the role of membrane shear elasticity and stress-free shape on the motion of red blood cells in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viallat, Annie; Abkarian, Manouk; Dupire, Jules

    2015-11-01

    The analytical model presented by Keller and Skalak on the dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow described the cell as a fluid ellipsoid of fixed shape. It was extended to introduce shear elasticity of the cell membrane. We further extend the model when the cell discoid physiological shape is not a stress-free shape. We show that spheroid stress-free shapes enables fitting experimental data with values of shear elasticity typical to that found with micropipettes and optical tweezers. For moderate shear rates (when RBCs keep their discoid shape) this model enables to quantitatively determine an effective cell viscosity, that combines membrane and hemoglobin viscosities and an effective shear modulus of the membrane that combines shear modulus and stress-free shape. This model allows determining RBC mechanical parameters both in the tanktreading regime for cells suspended in a high viscosity medium, and in the tumbling regime for cells suspended in a low viscosity medium. In this regime,a transition is predicted between a rigid-like tumbling motion and a fluid-like tumbling motion above a critical shear rate, which is directly related to the mechanical parameters of the cell. A*MIDEX (n ANR-11-IDEX-0001-02) funded by the ''Investissements d'Avenir'', Region Languedoc-Roussillon, Labex NUMEV (ANR-10-LABX-20), BPI France project DataDiag.

  4. Inference of dynamic shear modulus from Lotung downhole data

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Tang, H.T.

    1996-08-01

    Downhole ground motions recorded at the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST) site were used in this paper to infer in-situ dynamic soil properties. The purposes were (1) to provide field evidence of nonlinear soil behavior during earthquake excitation; and (2) to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic properties obtained from geophysical measurements and laboratory tests. For each horizontal component and event analyzed, representative shear-wave velocity and effective shear strain (defined as 65% of peak strain) between consecutive recording stations were estimated. The representative shear-wave velocities were estimated from fundamental resonant frequencies identifiable from the Fourier spectral ratios. The effective shear strains were estimated by linear ground response deconvolution analyses based on the inferred shear-wave velocity profiles. The inferred reduction in shear modulus with increasing effective shear strain was compared with laboratory test data. The degree of agreement between the inferred shear modulus reduction curves and the laboratory test data varied with different testing programs. The inferred low-strain shear-wave velocity profile agreed with geophysical measurements. These observations not only provide field evidence of nonlinear dynamic soil behavior during earthquakes, but also confirm the reasonableness of data provided by geophysical measurements and laboratory tests.

  5. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  6. Fluid shear, intercellular stress, and endothelial cell alignment

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Robert; Tambe, Dhananjay; Hardin, C. Corey; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell alignment along the direction of laminar fluid flow is widely understood to be a defining morphological feature of vascular homeostasis. While the role of associated signaling and structural events have been well studied, associated intercellular stresses under laminar fluid shear have remained ill-defined and the role of these stresses in the alignment process has remained obscure. To fill this gap, we report here the tractions as well as the complete in-plane intercellular stress fields measured within the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer subjected to a steady laminar fluid shear of 1 Pa. Tractions, intercellular stresses, as well as their time course, heterogeneity, and anisotropy, were measured using monolayer traction microscopy and monolayer stress microscopy. Prior to application of laminar fluid flow, intercellular stresses were largely tensile but fluctuated dramatically in space and in time (317 ± 122 Pa). Within 12 h of the onset of laminar fluid flow, the intercellular stresses decreased substantially but continued to fluctuate dramatically (142 ± 84 Pa). Moreover, tractions and intercellular stresses aligned strongly and promptly (within 1 h) along the direction of fluid flow, whereas the endothelial cell body aligned less strongly and substantially more slowly (12 h). Taken together, these results reveal that steady laminar fluid flow induces prompt reduction in magnitude and alignment of tractions and intercellular stress tensor components followed by the retarded elongation and alignment of the endothelial cell body. Appreciably smaller intercellular stresses supported by cell-cell junctions logically favor smaller incidence of gap formation and thus improved barrier integrity. PMID:25652451

  7. Inverse method for estimating shear stress in machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, T. J.; Mates, S. P.; Rhorer, R. L.; Whitenton, E. P.; Basak, D.

    2016-01-01

    An inverse method is presented for estimating shear stress in the work material in the region of chip-tool contact along the rake face of the tool during orthogonal machining. The method is motivated by a model of heat generation in the chip, which is based on a two-zone contact model for friction along the rake face, and an estimate of the steady-state flow of heat into the cutting tool. Given an experimentally determined discrete set of steady-state temperature measurements along the rake face of the tool, it is shown how to estimate the corresponding shear stress distribution on the rake face, even when no friction model is specified.

  8. Calculation of turbulent shear stress in supersonic boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. C.; Childs, M. E.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of turbulent boundary layer flow characteristics and the computational procedure used are discussed. The integrated mass and momentum flux profiles and differentials of the integral quantities are used in the computations so that local evaluation of the streamwise velocity gradient is not necessary. The computed results are compared with measured shear stress data obtained by using hot wire anemometer and laser velocimeter techniques. The flow measurements were made upstream and downstream of an adiabatic unseparated interaction of an oblique shock wave with the turbulent boundary layer on the flat wall of a two dimensional wind tunnel. A comparison of the numerical analysis and actual measurements is made and the effects of small differences in mean flow profiles on the computed shear stress distributions are discussed.

  9. Wall shear stress measurements using a new transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vakili, A. D.; Wu, J. M.; Lawing, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    A new instrument has been developed for direct measurement of wall shear stress. This instrument is simple and symmetric in design with small moving mass and no internal friction. Features employed in the design of this instrument eliminate most of the difficulties associated with the traditional floating element balances. Vibration problems associated with the floating element skin friction balances have been found to be minimized by the design features and optional damping provided. The unique design of this instrument eliminates or reduces the errors associated with conventional floating-element devices: such as errors due to gaps, pressure gradient, acceleration, heat transfer and temperature change. The instrument is equipped with various sensing systems and the output signal is a linear function of the wall shear stress. Measurement made in three different tunnels show good agreement with theory and data obtained by the floating element devices.

  10. [Exercise-induced shear stress: Physiological basis and clinical impact].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Romero, Fernando; Saavedra, María Javiera

    2016-01-01

    The physiological regulation of vascular function is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, where an imbalance between synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is one of its main mechanisms. In this context, the shear stress is one of the most important mechanical stimuli to improve vascular function, due to endothelial mechanotransduction, triggered by stimulation of various endothelial mechanosensors, induce signaling pathways culminating in increased bioavailability of vasodilators molecules such as nitric oxide, that finally trigger the angiogenic mechanisms. These mechanisms allow providing the physiological basis for the effects of exercise on vascular health. In this review it is discussed the molecular mechanisms involved in the vascular response induced by shear stress and its impact in reversing vascular injury associated with the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in our population. PMID:27118039

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  12. Structure-Enhanced Yield Shear Stress in Electrorheological Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Lan, Y. C.; Xu, X.

    A new technology, compression-assisted aggregation, is developed to enhance the strength of electrorheological (ER) fluids. The yield shear stress of ER fluids depends on the fluid microstructure. The unassisted electric-field induced ER structure mainly consists of single chains, whose weak points are at their ends. This new technology produces a structure consisting of robust thick columns with strong ends. As the weak points of the original ER structure are greatly enforced, the new structure makes ER fluids super-strong: At a moderate electric field and moderate pressure the yield shear stress of ER fluids at 35% volume fraction exceeds 100 kPa, well above any requirement for major industrial applications.

  13. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Justin L; Vidale, John E; Gomberg, Joan; Bodin, Paul; Creager, Kenneth C; Malone, Stephen D

    2007-08-01

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude M(w) = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface-effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress. PMID:17671500

  14. Non-volcanic tremor driven by large transient shear stresses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubinstein, J.L.; Vidale, J.E.; Gomberg, J.; Bodin, P.; Creager, K.C.; Malone, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Non-impulsive seismic radiation or 'tremor' has long been observed at volcanoes and more recently around subduction zones. Although the number of observations of non-volcanic tremor is steadily increasing, the causative mechanism remains unclear. Some have attributed non-volcanic tremor to the movement of fluids, while its coincidence with geodetically observed slow-slip events at regular intervals has led others to consider slip on the plate interface as its cause. Low-frequency earthquakes in Japan, which are believed to make up at least part of non-volcanic tremor, have focal mechanisms and locations that are consistent with tremor being generated by shear slip on the subduction interface. In Cascadia, however, tremor locations appear to be more distributed in depth than in Japan, making them harder to reconcile with a plate interface shear-slip model. Here we identify bursts of tremor that radiated from the Cascadia subduction zone near Vancouver Island, Canada, during the strongest shaking from the moment magnitude Mw = 7.8, 2002 Denali, Alaska, earthquake. Tremor occurs when the Love wave displacements are to the southwest (the direction of plate convergence of the overriding plate), implying that the Love waves trigger the tremor. We show that these displacements correspond to shear stresses of approximately 40 kPa on the plate interface, which suggests that the effective stress on the plate interface is very low. These observations indicate that tremor and possibly slow slip can be instantaneously induced by shear stress increases on the subduction interface - effectively a frictional failure response to the driving stress. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. ENaC regulation by proteases and shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shujie; Carattino, Marcelo D.; Hughey, Rebecca P.; Kleyman, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) are comprised of subunits that have large extracellular regions linked to membrane spanning domains where the channel pore and gate reside. A variety of external factors modify channel activity by interacting at sites within extracellular regions that lead to conformational changes that are transmitted to the channel gate and alter channel open probability. Our review addresses two external factors that have important roles in regulating channel activity, proteases and laminar shear stress. PMID:23547932

  16. Surface shear stress fluctuations in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monty, Jason; Hutchins, Nick; Chong, Min

    2005-11-01

    A lightweight, high frequency response (25Hz), floating element sensor was used to measure wall shear stress fluctuations in the atmospheric surface layer formed over a salt flat at the SLTEST site, Utah, USA. The sensor uses a laser position measurement system to track the motion of the floating element which consisted of a 50mm diameter foam disc, as described by Heuer & Marusic (Meas. Sci. Tech., Vol. 16, 1644- -1649, 2005). The measurements were taken as part of an internationally coordinated experimental program designed to make extensive spatial and temporal measurements of velocity, temperature and wall shear stress of the surface layer. Velocity measurements were made with both a 30m high vertical array and a 100m wide horizontal array of sonic anemometers; 18 anemometers in total were employed. Cross-correlations of shear stress and streamwise velocity fluctuations were analysed in an attempt to identify structure angles in the flow. The results were also compared with experimental data from controlled, laboratory turbulent boundary layers having three orders of magnitude lower Reynolds number.

  17. Pulse shear stress for anaerobic membrane bioreactor fouling control.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jixiang; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2011-01-01

    Increase of shear stress at membrane surfaces is a generally applied strategy to minimize membrane fouling. It has been reported that a two-phase flow, better known as slug flow, is an effective way to increase shear stress. Hence, slug flow was introduced into an anaerobic membrane bioreactor for membrane fouling control. Anaerobic suspended sludge was cultured in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AMBR) operated with a side stream inside-out tubular membrane unit applying sustainable flux flow regimes. The averaged particle diameter decreased from 20 to 5 microm during operation of the AMBR. However, the COD removal efficiency did not show any significant deterioration, whereas the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) increased from 0.16 to 0.41 gCOD/g VSS/day. Nevertheless, the imposed gas slug appeared to be insufficient for adequate fouling control, resulting in rapidly increasing trans membrane pressures (TMP) operating at a flux exceeding 16 L/m2/h. Addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) enhanced the effect of slug flow on membrane fouling. However, the combined effect was still considered as not being significant. The tubular membrane was subsequently equipped with inert inserts for creating a locally increased shear stress for enhanced fouling control. Results show an increase in the membrane flux from 16 L/m2/h to 34 L/m2/h after the inserts were mounted in the membrane tube. PMID:22097007

  18. The conductivity dependence of the shear stress in electrorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yucheng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Men, Shouqiang; Lu, Kunquan

    1998-11-01

    A ferroelectric KNO3/silicone oil electrorheological (ER) fluid is introduced to investigate the conductivity dependence of the ER effect under dc electric fields where the ER effect is conductivity dominated. By measuring the temperature dependence of the shear stress across the Curie temperature of particles, the dependence of the ER effect on conductivity has been quantitatively obtained in experiments. There is a critical conductivity ratio Γc (or mismatch factor βc2): when Γ<Γc, the shear stress increases with Γ; when Γ>Γc, the shear stress decreases with Γ. An agreement is obtained between theory and experiment when Γ (or β2) is lower. In the higher Γ(or β2) range, the experimental data are not in agreement with the theoretical prediction and the interfacial effect should be taken into account. The experimental data are more reliable due to the same conditions, such as the chemical nature, the surfacial property of particles, and the interfacial property between particles and suspending liquid as well as the size and shape of the particles.

  19. Shearing of a confined granular layer: tangential stress and dilatancy.

    PubMed

    Coste, C

    2004-11-01

    We study the behavior of a confined granular layer under shearing, in an annular cell, at low velocity. We give evidence that the response of the granular layer under shearing is described by characteristic length scales. The tangential stress reaches its steady state on the same length scale as the dilatancy. Stop-and-go experiments performed at several driving velocities show a logarithmic increase of the static friction coefficient with waiting time, followed by rejuvenation on a characteristic length of the order of the magnitude of a Hertz contact between adjacent grains. The dilatancy does not evolve during the stop, neither during the elastic reloading when the driving is resumed. There is a small variation when sliding sets anew, which corresponds to the rejuvenation of the layer, and this variation is independent of the waiting time. We argue that aging is due to the behavior of individual contacts between grains, not global evolution of the piling. Under an instantaneous increase of the velocity, the tangential stress reaches a new steady state, exhibiting velocity strengthening behavior. An increase of dilatancy is also observed. It is much larger than fluctuations in the steady state, variations in a stop and-go-experiment, but much less than for shearing of freshly poured grains. The dilatancy variation during a velocity jump is not due to structural rearrangements of the piling. The evolutions of tangential stress and dilatancy are logarithmic in the ratio of upper and lower velocities. PMID:15600598

  20. Basal shear stress of debris flow in the runout phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, V.; Bettella, F.; Cesca, M.

    2013-11-01

    A laboratory device is proposed to assess the basal shear stresses generated by debris-flow mixtures during their runout phase. The device consists of an inclinable box with a gate facing a deposition plane. The box is filled with a selected debris-flow mixture, and after sudden opening of the gate, the features of the dam-break deposit can be measured. Based on some simplified assumptions of the energy balance, a methodology is proposed to assess basal shear stresses. The device has been tested using sediment samples from debris-flow deposits generated by two catchments of the Dolomites (Cortina d'Ampezzo, Belluno, Italy) by carrying out runout tests for different sediment concentrations by volume. The results show how the static Coulomb friction law is valid in the runout phase, with friction angles on the order of the angle of repose of the same material in dry conditions. The data elaboration also yields an innovative constitutive equation for shear stresses. This relation merges the Coulomb mixture approach with the concept of a one-phase flow with a certain rheology. This integration offers a useful insight into the weaknesses of the rheological approach if it is not properly scaled up to the ambient pressure of interest.

  1. FOXC2 and fluid shear stress stabilize postnatal lymphatic vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sabine, Amélie; Bovay, Esther; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Kimura, Wataru; Jaquet, Muriel; Agalarov, Yan; Zangger, Nadine; Scallan, Joshua P.; Graber, Werner; Gulpinar, Elgin; Kwak, Brenda R.; Mäkinen, Taija; Martinez-Corral, Inés; Ortega, Sagrario; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kiefer, Friedemann; Davis, Michael J.; Djonov, Valentin; Miura, Naoyuki; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    Biomechanical forces, such as fluid shear stress, govern multiple aspects of endothelial cell biology. In blood vessels, disturbed flow is associated with vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, and promotes endothelial cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identified an important role for disturbed flow in lymphatic vessels, in which it cooperates with the transcription factor FOXC2 to ensure lifelong stability of the lymphatic vasculature. In cultured lymphatic endothelial cells, FOXC2 inactivation conferred abnormal shear stress sensing, promoting junction disassembly and entry into the cell cycle. Loss of FOXC2-dependent quiescence was mediated by the Hippo pathway transcriptional coactivator TAZ and, ultimately, led to cell death. In murine models, inducible deletion of Foxc2 within the lymphatic vasculature led to cell-cell junction defects, regression of valves, and focal vascular lumen collapse, which triggered generalized lymphatic vascular dysfunction and lethality. Together, our work describes a fundamental mechanism by which FOXC2 and oscillatory shear stress maintain lymphatic endothelial cell quiescence through intercellular junction and cytoskeleton stabilization and provides an essential link between biomechanical forces and endothelial cell identity that is necessary for postnatal vessel homeostasis. As FOXC2 is mutated in lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, our data also underscore the role of impaired mechanotransduction in the pathology of this hereditary human disease. PMID:26389677

  2. Rheological investigations of ferrofluids with a shear stress controlled rheometer.

    PubMed

    Shahnazian, Hamid; Odenbach, Stefan

    2008-05-21

    The appearance of field- and shear-dependent changes of viscosity-the magnetoviscous effect-is correlated to the formation of chains and structures of magnetic nanoparticles. Moreover, the formation of these structures leads to the appearance of viscoelastic effects or other non-Newtonian features in ferrofluids in the presence of a magnetic field. In order to describe these phenomena, different theoretical approaches have been developed which explain the mechanism of these effects with different assumptions. One point in which these models differ, and which has to be clarified, is the appearance of yield stress and its dependence on magnetic field strength. With this aim, a stress controlled rheometer has been designed to prove the existence of this very small field-dependent yield stress for ferrofluids. The results presented here show a dependence of the yield stress on the magnetic field strength as well as on the interparticle interaction and particle size distribution. Finally, yield stress experiments have been performed for different geometries of the shear cell in order to get more information about the microstructure formed by the magnetic particles. PMID:21694266

  3. Dynamic shear behavior of alumina-filled epoxy

    SciTech Connect

    Costin, L.S.

    1982-03-01

    Thin-walled tubular specimens of alumina-filled epoxy were loaded in torsion at a strain rate of approximately 10/sup 3/ s/sup -1/ using a stored-torque Kolsky bar. In addition to measuring the time resolved shear stress and shear strain in the specimen, the axial stress generated by the dilation of the material during shear deformation was also obtained as a function of time. Tests were conducted at room temperature and at -60/sup 0/C. At room temperature, a moderate amount of plastic deformation occurred before failure. Material dilation was associated with the plastic flow. At -60/sup 0/C, there was a marked increase in failure stress over the failure stress at room temperature. However, little or no plastic deformation or dilation occurred before failure.

  4. Turbulent Sediment Suspension and Induced Ripple Dynamics Absent Mean Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. A.; Cowen, E.

    2014-12-01

    The uprush and backwash phases in the swash zone, the region of the beach that is alternately covered and uncovered by wave run-up, are fundamentally different events. Backwash is dominated by a growing boundary layer where the turbulence is set by the bed shear stress. In this phase traditional boundary layer turbulence models and Shields-type critical stress pickup functions work well. However, the uprush phase, while often viewed in the context of traditional boundary layer turbulence models, has little in common with the backwash phase. During uprush, the entire water column is turbulent, as it rapidly advects well-stirred highly turbulent flow generated offshore from breaking waves or collapsing bores. Turbulence levels in the uprush are several times higher than turbulent boundary layer theory would predict and hence the use of a boundary layer model to predict turbulence levels during uprush grossly under predicts the turbulence and subsequent sediment suspension in the swash zone. To study the importance of this advected turbulence to sediment suspension we conduct experiments in a water tank designed to generate horizontally homogeneous isotropic turbulence absent mean shear using randomly actuated synthetic jet arrays suspended above both a solid glass plate and a narrowly graded sediment bed. Using jet arrays with different jet spacings allows the generation of high Reynolds number turbulence with variable integral length scales, which we hypothesize control the characteristic length scales in the induced ripple field. Particle image velocimetry and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the near-bed flow and this unique turbulent boundary layer. Metrics include the mean flow and turbulence intensities and stresses, temporal and spatial spectra, dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, and integral length scales of the turbulence. We leverage our unique dataset to compare the flows over impermeable fixed and permeable mobile

  5. Aeolian Shear Stress Ratio Measurements within Mesquite-Dominated Landscapes of the Chihuahuan Desert, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James; Nickling, W. G.; Gilliles, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    A field study was conducted to ascertain the amount of protection that mesquite-dominated communities provide to the surface from wind erosion. The dynamics of the locally accelerated evolution of a mesquite/coppice dune landscape and the undetermined spatial dependence of potential erosion by wind from a shear stress partition model were investigated. Sediment transport and dust emission processes are governed by the amount of protection that can be provided by roughness elements. Although shear stress partition models exist that can describe this, their accuracy has only been tested against a limited dataset because instrumentation has previously been unable to provide the necessary measurements. This study combines the use of meteorological towers and surface shear stress measurements with Irwin sensors to measure the partition of shear stress in situ. The surface shear stress within preferentially aligned vegetation (within coppice dune development) exhibited highly skewed distributions, while a more homogenous surface stress was recorded at a site with less developed coppice dunes. Above the vegetation, the logarithmic velocity profile deduced roughness length (based on 10-min averages) exhibited a distinct correlation with compass direction for the site with vegetation preferentially aligned, while the site with more homogenously distributed vegetation showed very little variation in the roughness length. This distribution in roughness length within an area, defines a distribution of a resolved shear stress partitioning model based on these measurements, ultimately providing potential closure to a previously uncorrelated model parameter.

  6. Shear banding of colloidal glasses: observation of a dynamic first-order transition.

    PubMed

    Chikkadi, V; Miedema, D M; Dang, M T; Nienhuis, B; Schall, P

    2014-11-14

    We demonstrate that application of an increasing shear field on a glass leads to an intriguing dynamic first-order transition in analogy with equilibrium transitions. By following the particle dynamics as a function of the driving field in a colloidal glass, we identify a critical shear rate upon which the diffusion time scale of the glass exhibits a sudden discontinuity. Using a new dynamic order parameter, we show that this discontinuity is analogous to a first-order transition, in which the applied stress acts as the conjugate field on the system's dynamic evolution. These results offer new perspectives to comprehend the generic shear-banding instability of a wide range of amorphous materials. PMID:25432056

  7. Imaging shear stress distribution and evaluating the stress concentration factor of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Antony, S.

    2015-03-01

    Healthy eyes are vital for a better quality of human life. Historically, for man-made materials, scientists and engineers use stress concentration factors to characterise the effects of structural non-homogeneities on their mechanical strength. However, such information is scarce for the human eye. Here we present the shear stress distribution profiles of a healthy human cornea surface in vivo using photo-stress analysis tomography, which is a non-intrusive and non-X-ray based method. The corneal birefringent retardation measured here is comparable to that of previous studies. Using this, we derive eye stress concentration factors and the directional alignment of major principal stress on the surface of the cornea. Similar to thermometers being used for monitoring the general health in humans, this report provides a foundation to characterise the shear stress carrying capacity of the cornea, and a potential bench mark for validating theoretical modelling of stresses in the human eye in future.

  8. Imaging shear stress distribution and evaluating the stress concentration factor of the human eye

    PubMed Central

    Joseph Antony, S.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy eyes are vital for a better quality of human life. Historically, for man-made materials, scientists and engineers use stress concentration factors to characterise the effects of structural non-homogeneities on their mechanical strength. However, such information is scarce for the human eye. Here we present the shear stress distribution profiles of a healthy human cornea surface in vivo using photo-stress analysis tomography, which is a non-intrusive and non-X-ray based method. The corneal birefringent retardation measured here is comparable to that of previous studies. Using this, we derive eye stress concentration factors and the directional alignment of major principal stress on the surface of the cornea. Similar to thermometers being used for monitoring the general health in humans, this report provides a foundation to characterise the shear stress carrying capacity of the cornea, and a potential bench mark for validating theoretical modelling of stresses in the human eye in future. PMID:25754336

  9. Imaging shear stress distribution and evaluating the stress concentration factor of the human eye.

    PubMed

    Joseph Antony, S

    2015-01-01

    Healthy eyes are vital for a better quality of human life. Historically, for man-made materials, scientists and engineers use stress concentration factors to characterise the effects of structural non-homogeneities on their mechanical strength. However, such information is scarce for the human eye. Here we present the shear stress distribution profiles of a healthy human cornea surface in vivo using photo-stress analysis tomography, which is a non-intrusive and non-X-ray based method. The corneal birefringent retardation measured here is comparable to that of previous studies. Using this, we derive eye stress concentration factors and the directional alignment of major principal stress on the surface of the cornea. Similar to thermometers being used for monitoring the general health in humans, this report provides a foundation to characterise the shear stress carrying capacity of the cornea, and a potential bench mark for validating theoretical modelling of stresses in the human eye in future. PMID:25754336

  10. Molecular Origins of Higher Harmonics in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow: Shear Stress Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Peter; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey; Schmalzer, Andrew; Bird, R. B.

    Recent work has focused on understanding the molecular origins of higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. These higher harmonics have been explained using only the orientation distribution of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian fluid, which neglects molecular interactions and is the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity [R.B. Bird et al., J Chem Phys, 140, 074904 (2014)]. We explore these molecular interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory that accounts for restricted polymer motions arising when chains are concentrated [Fan and Bird, JNNFM, 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ =0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1 1 8 8 to rod-climbing, 1 1 2 2 >= ɛ >= 3 3 4 4 to reasonable shear-thinning predictions in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ =1 to a dilute solution of chains. We examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases, ɛ = 0 , 1 0 , 1 8 , 3 3 8 8 8 , 3 3 8 8 , 1 , of the Curtiss-Bird model, and we compare these with those

  11. ESTIMATION OF EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRESS WORKING ON FLAT SHEET MEMBRANE USING FLUIDIZED MEDIA IN MBRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaw, Hlwan Moe; Li, Tairi; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Mishima, Iori

    This study was aimed at estimating effective shear stress working on flat sheet membrane by the addition of fluidized media in MBRs. In both of laboratory-scale aeration tanks with and without fluidized media, shear stress variations on membrane surface and water phase velocity variations were measured and MBR operation was conducted. For the evaluation of the effective shear stress working on membrane surface to mitigate membrane surface, simulation of trans-membrane pressure increase was conducted. It was shown that the time-averaged absolute value of shear stress was smaller in the reactor with fluidized media than without fluidized media. However, due to strong turbulence in the reactor with fluidized media caused by interaction between water-phase and media and also due to the direct interaction between membrane surface and fluidized media, standard deviation of shear stress on membrane surface was larger in the reactor with fluidized media than without media. Histograms of shear stress variation data were fitted well to normal distribution curves and mean plus three times of standard deviation was defined to be a maximum shear stress value. By applying the defined maximum shear stress to a membrane fouling model, trans-membrane pressure curve in the MBR experiment was simulated well by the fouling model indicting that the maximum shear stress, not time-averaged shear stress, can be regarded as an effective shear stress to prevent membrane fouling in submerged flat-sheet MBRs.

  12. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  13. Effect of biomimetic shear stress on intracellular uptake and cell-killing efficiency of doxorubicin in a free and liposomal formulation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taehee; Cho, Younhee; Park, Chulhun; Kim, Soo-Dong; Oh, Euichaul; Cui, Jing-Hao; Cao, Qing-Ri; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2016-08-20

    Shear stress could be considered in the context of cellular uptake and cell-killing efficiency. Thus, mimicking the dynamic characteristics of in vivo environment is important in targeted drug delivery. We investigated the intracellular uptake and cell-killing efficiency of doxorubicin (DOX) in a free and liposomal form (Doxil(®)) under biomimetic shear stress to mimic in vivo environment. In this dynamic environment, cells demonstrated significantly higher fluorescence intensity than that of the static environment, and fluorescence microscopy images indicated increased intracellular uptake of DOX in the presence of fluidic shear stress. In cells treated with free DOX and liposomal Doxil(®), cell-killing efficiency was affected by shear stress. Taken together, shear stress, affecting drug uptake and cell-killing efficiency, is important in intracellular drug targeting. PMID:27286636

  14. Interplay between shear stress and adhesion on neutrophil locomotion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lee A; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim; Haun, Jered B; Hammer, Daniel A

    2007-01-15

    Leukocyte locomotion over the lumen of inflamed endothelial cells is a critical step, following firm adhesion, in the inflammatory response. Once firmly adherent, the cell will spread and will either undergo diapedesis through individual vascular endothelial cells or will migrate to tight junctions before extravasating to the site of injury or infection. Little is known about the mechanisms of neutrophil spreading or locomotion, or how motility is affected by the physical environment. We performed a systematic study to investigate the effect of the type of adhesive ligand and shear stress on neutrophil motility by employing a parallel-plate flow chamber with reconstituted protein surfaces of E-selectin, E-selectin/PECAM-1, and E-selectin/ICAM-1. We find that the level and type of adhesive ligand and the shear rate are intertwined in affecting several metrics of migration, such as the migration velocity, random motility, index of migration, and the percentage of cells moving in the direction of flow. On surfaces with high levels of PECAM-1, there is a near doubling in random motility at a shear rate of 180 s(-1) compared to the motility in the absence of flow. On surfaces with ICAM-1, neutrophil random motility exhibits a weaker response to shear rate, decreasing slightly when shear rate is increased from static conditions to 180 s(-1), and is only slightly higher at 1000 s(-1) than in the absence of flow. The random motility increases with increasing surface concentrations of E-selectin and PECAM-1 under static and flow conditions. Our findings illustrate that the endothelium may regulate neutrophil migration in postcapillary venules through the presentation of various adhesion ligands at sites of inflammation. PMID:17071667

  15. Effects of shear stress pattern and magnitude on mesenchymal transformation and invasion of aortic valve endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Frendl, Christopher M.; Cao, Qingfeng; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of mechanical forces on cell behavior is critical for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and disease initiation studies. Current hemodynamic bioreactors are largely limited to 2D substrates or the application of general flow conditions at a tissue level, which eliminates the investigation of some essential physiological and pathological responses. One example is the mesenchymal transformation of endothelial cells in response to shear stress. Endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) is a valve morphogenic mechanism associated with aortic valve disease initiation. The aortic valve experiences oscillatory shear on the disease-susceptible fibrosa, and the role of hemodynamics on adult EndMT is unknown. The goal of this work was to develop and characterize a microfluidic bioreactor that applies physiologically relevant laminar or oscillatory shear stresses to endothelial cells and permits the quantitative analysis of 3D cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. In this study, porcine aortic valve endothelial cells were seeded onto 3D collagen I gels and exposed to different magnitudes of steady or oscillatory shear stress for 48 hours. Cells elongated and aligned perpendicular to laminar, but not oscillatory shear. Low steady shear stress (2 dyne/cm2) and oscillatory shear stress upregulated EndMT- (ACTA2, Snail, TGFB1) and inflammation- (ICAM1, NFKB1) related gene expression, EndMT-related (αSMA) protein expression, and matrix invasion when compared with static controls or cells exposed to high steady shear (10 and 20 dyne/cm2). Our system enables direct testing of the role of shear stress on endothelial cell mesenchymal transformation in a dynamic, 3D environment and shows that hemodynamics regulate EndMT in adult valve endothelial cells. PMID:24898772

  16. Effects of shear stress pattern and magnitude on mesenchymal transformation and invasion of aortic valve endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Gretchen J; Frendl, Christopher M; Cao, Qingfeng; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the role of mechanical forces on cell behavior is critical for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and disease initiation studies. Current hemodynamic bioreactors are largely limited to 2D substrates or the application of general flow conditions at a tissue level, which eliminates the investigation of some essential physiological and pathological responses. One example is the mesenchymal transformation of endothelial cells in response to shear stress. Endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) is a valve morphogenic mechanism associated with aortic valve disease initiation. The aortic valve experiences oscillatory shear on the disease-susceptible fibrosa, and the role of hemodynamics on adult EndMT is unknown. The goal of this work was to develop and characterize a microfluidic bioreactor that applies physiologically relevant laminar or oscillatory shear stresses to endothelial cells and permits the quantitative analysis of 3D cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. In this study, porcine aortic valve endothelial cells were seeded onto 3D collagen I gels and exposed to different magnitudes of steady or oscillatory shear stress for 48 h. Cells elongated and aligned perpendicular to laminar, but not oscillatory shear. Low steady shear stress (2 dyne/cm(2) ) and oscillatory shear stress upregulated EndMT (ACTA2, Snail, TGFB1) and inflammation (ICAM1, NFKB1) related gene expression, EndMT-related (αSMA) protein expression, and matrix invasion when compared with static controls or cells exposed to high steady shear (10 and 20 dyne/cm(2) ). Our system enables direct testing of the role of shear stress on endothelial cell mesenchymal transformation in a dynamic, 3D environment and shows that hemodynamics regulate EndMT in adult valve endothelial cells. PMID:24898772

  17. Propose a Wall Shear Stress Divergence to Estimate the Risks of Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Takao, H.; Murayama, Y.; Qian, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Although wall shear stress (WSS) has long been considered a critical indicator of intracranial aneurysm rupture, there is still no definite conclusion as to whether a high or a low WSS results in aneurysm rupture. The reason may be that the effect of WSS direction has not been fully considered. The objectives of this study are to investigate the magnitude of WSS (|WSS|) and its divergence on the aneurysm surface and to test the significance of both in relation to the aneurysm rupture. Patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to compute WSS and wall shear stress divergence (WSSD) on the aneurysm surface for nineteen patients. Our results revealed that if high |WSS| is stretching aneurysm luminal surface, and the stretching region is concentrated, the aneurysm is under a high risk of rupture. It seems that, by considering both direction and magnitude of WSS, WSSD may be a better indicator for the risk estimation of aneurysm rupture (154). PMID:24191140

  18. Differential Activation and Inhibition of RhoA by Fluid Flow Induced Shear Stress in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Kim, Seung joon; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-01-01

    Physical force environment is a major factor that influences cellular homeostasis and remodeling. It is not well understood, however, as a potential role of force intensities in the induction of cellular mechanotransduction. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based approach, we asked whether activities of GTPase RhoA in chondrocytes are dependent on intensities of flow induced shear stress. We hypothesized that RhoA activities can be either elevated or reduced by selecting different levels of shear stress intensities. The result indicate that C28/I2 chondrocytes have increased RhoA activities in response to high shear stress (10 or 20 dyn/cm2), whereas a decrease in activity was seen with an intermediate shear stress of 5 dyn/cm2. No changes were seen under low shear stress (2 dyn/cm2). The observed 2-level switch of RhoA activities is closely linked to the shear stress-induced alterations in actin cytoskeleton and traction forces. In the presence of constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), intermediate shear stress suppressed RhoA activities, while high shear stress failed to activate them. In chondrocytes, expression of various metalloproteinases is, in part, regulated by shear and normal stresses through a network of GTPases. Collectively, the data suggest that intensities of shear stress are critical in differential activation and inhibition of RhoA activities in chondrocytes. PMID:23408748

  19. Modeling flow and shear stress fields over unsteady three dimensional dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Richard; Parsons, Dan; Ashworth, Phil; Reesink, Arjan; Best, Jim

    2014-05-01

    The flow field over dunes has been extensively measured in laboratory conditions and there is general understanding on the nature of the flow over dunes formed under equilibrium flow conditions. This has allowed an understanding of bed shear stress to be derived and the development of morpho-dynamic models. However, fluvial systems typically experience unsteady flow and therefore the sediment-water interface is constantly responding and reorganizing to these unsteady flows and stresses, over a range of both spatial and temporal scales. This is primarily through the adjustment of bed forms (including ripples, dunes and bar forms) which then subsequently alter the flow field. This paper investigates, through the application of a numerical model, the influence of these roughness elements on the overall flow and bed shear stress. A series of physical experiments were undertaken in a flume, 16m long and 2m wide, where a fine sand (D50 of 239µm) was water worked under a range of unsteady hydraulic conditions to generate a series of quasi-equilibrium three dimensional bed forms. During the experiments flow was measured with acoustic Doppler velocimeters, (aDv's). On four occasions the flume was drained and the bed topography measured with terrestrial LiDAR to create digital elevation models. This data provide the necessary boundary conditions and validation data for a numerical three dimensional flow model. The prediction of flow over the four static beds demonstrates the spatial distribution of shear stress and the potential sediment transport paths between the dune crests. These appear to be associated with coherent flow structures formed by localized shear flow. These flow predictions are currently being used to develop a fully three dimensional morphodynamic model to further understand dune dynamics under unsteady flow conditions.

  20. Permeability of fault gouge under confining pressure and shear stress.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Shi, L.Q.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    The permeability of both clay-rich and non-clay gouges, as well as several pure clays, was studied as a function of confining pressures from 5 to 200 MPa and shear strain to 10. Permeability ranged over 4 orders of magnitude, from around 10-22 to 10-18 m2 (1 darcy = 0.987 X 10-12 m2). Grain size was an important factor in determining permeability, particularly for the clay-rich samples. The permeabilities of the non-clay samples were not significantly different than those of the clays. Strength of the saturated samples under drained (low pore pressure) conditions did not correlate with high or low permeability. However, the low permeabilities of these gouges could be a factor in the measured low shear stresses along fault regions if excess pore pressures were created as a result of shearing or compaction, and this pressure was unable to dissipate through a thick section of the material.-from Authors

  1. Adhesive dynamics simulations of the shear threshold effect for leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Kelly E; Lee, Dooyoung; King, Michael R; Hammer, Daniel A

    2007-02-01

    Many experiments have measured the effect of force on the dissociation of single selectin bonds, but it is not yet clear how the force dependence of molecular dissociation can influence the rolling of cells expressing selectin molecules. Recent experiments using constant-force atomic force microscopy or high-resolution microscopic observations of pause-time distributions of cells in a flow chamber show that for some bonds, the dissociation rate is high at low force and initially decreases with force, indicating a catch bond. As the force continues to increase, the dissociation rate increases again, like a slip bond. It has been proposed that this catch-slip bond leads to the shear threshold effect, in which a certain level of shear rate is required to achieve rolling. We have incorporated a catch-slip dissociation rate into adhesive dynamics simulations of cell rolling. Using a relatively simple model for the shear-controlled association rate for selectin bonds, we were able to recreate characteristics of the shear threshold effect seen most prominently for rolling through L-selectin. The rolling velocity as a function of shear rate showed a minimum near 100 s-1. Furthermore, cells were observed to roll at a shear rate near the threshold, but detach and move more quickly when the shear rate was dropped below the threshold. Finally, using adhesive dynamics, we were able to determine ranges of parameters necessary to see the shear threshold effect in the rolling velocity. In summary, we found through simulation that the catch-slip behavior of selectin bonds can be responsible for the shear threshold effect. PMID:17085490

  2. Adhesive Dynamics Simulations of the Shear Threshold Effect for Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Kelly E.; Lee, Dooyoung; King, Michael R.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    Many experiments have measured the effect of force on the dissociation of single selectin bonds, but it is not yet clear how the force dependence of molecular dissociation can influence the rolling of cells expressing selectin molecules. Recent experiments using constant-force atomic force microscopy or high-resolution microscopic observations of pause-time distributions of cells in a flow chamber show that for some bonds, the dissociation rate is high at low force and initially decreases with force, indicating a catch bond. As the force continues to increase, the dissociation rate increases again, like a slip bond. It has been proposed that this catch-slip bond leads to the shear threshold effect, in which a certain level of shear rate is required to achieve rolling. We have incorporated a catch-slip dissociation rate into adhesive dynamics simulations of cell rolling. Using a relatively simple model for the shear-controlled association rate for selectin bonds, we were able to recreate characteristics of the shear threshold effect seen most prominently for rolling through L-selectin. The rolling velocity as a function of shear rate showed a minimum near 100 s−1. Furthermore, cells were observed to roll at a shear rate near the threshold, but detach and move more quickly when the shear rate was dropped below the threshold. Finally, using adhesive dynamics, we were able to determine ranges of parameters necessary to see the shear threshold effect in the rolling velocity. In summary, we found through simulation that the catch-slip behavior of selectin bonds can be responsible for the shear threshold effect. PMID:17085490

  3. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M.; Murao, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  4. A review of Reynolds stress models for turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed review of recent developments in Reynolds stress modeling for incompressible turbulent shear flows is provided. The mathematical foundations of both two-equation models and full second-order closures are explored in depth. It is shown how these models can be systematically derived for two-dimensional mean turbulent flows that are close to equilibrium. A variety of examples are provided to demonstrate how well properly calibrated versions of these models perform for such flows. However, substantial problems remain for the description of more complex turbulent flows where there are large departures from equilibrium. Recent efforts to extend Reynolds stress models to nonequilibrium turbulent flows are discussed briefly along with the major modeling issues relevant to practical naval hydrodynamics applications.

  5. Does low and oscillatory wall shear stress correlate spatially with early atherosclerosis? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, Veronique; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2013-07-15

    Low and oscillatory wall shear stress is widely assumed to play a key role in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Indeed, some studies have relied on the low shear theory when developing diagnostic and treatment strategies for cardiovascular disease. We wished to ascertain if this consensus is justified by published data. We performed a systematic review of papers that compare the localization of atherosclerotic lesions with the distribution of haemodynamic indicators calculated using computational fluid dynamics. The review showed that although many articles claim their results conform to the theory, it has been interpreted in different ways: a range of metrics has been used to characterize the distribution of disease, and they have been compared with a range of haemodynamic factors. Several studies, including all of those making systematic point-by-point comparisons of shear and disease, failed to find the expected relation. The various pre- and post-processing techniques used by different groups have reduced the range of shears over which correlations were sought, and in some cases are mutually incompatible. Finally, only a subset of the known patterns of disease has been investigated. The evidence for the low/oscillatory shear theory is less robust than commonly assumed. Longitudinal studies starting from the healthy state, or the collection of average flow metrics derived from large numbers of healthy vessels, both in conjunction with point-by-point comparisons using appropriate statistical techniques, will be necessary to improve our understanding of the relation between blood flow and atherogenesis. PMID:23459102

  6. Probing the adhesion of particles to responsive polymer coatings with hydrodynamic shear stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toomey, Ryan; Efe, Gulnur

    2015-03-01

    Lower critical solution temperature (LCST) polymers in confined geometries have found success in applications that benefit from reversible modulation of surface properties, including drug delivery, separations, tissue cultures, and chromatography. In this talk, we present the adhesion of polystyrene microspheres to cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), or poly(NIPAAm) coatings, as studied with a spinning disk method. This method applies a linear range of hydrodynamic shear forces to physically adsorbed microspheres along the radius of a coated disk. Quantification of detachment is accomplished by optical microscopy to evaluate the minimum shear stress to remove adherent particles. Experiments were performed to assess the relationship between the surface chemistry of the microsphere, the thickness and cross-link density of the poly(NIPAAm) coating, the adsorption (or incubation) time, and the temperature on the detachment profiles of the microspheres. Results show that both the shear modulus and slow dynamic processes in the poly(NIPAAm) films strongly influence the detachment shear stresses. Moreover, whether an adsorbed microsphere can be released (through a modulation in the swelling of the poly(NIPAAm) coating by temperature) depends on both the surface chemistry of the microsphere and the extent of the adsorption time. Finally, the results show that the structure of the poly(NIPAAm) coating can significantly affect performance, which may explain several of the conflicting findings that have been reported in the literature.

  7. Shear flow behavior of a dynamically symmetric polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning

    2005-03-01

    Soft materials with complex internal structure often exhibit fascinating rheological behavior. For example, under flow the poly (ethylethylene) (PEE)/poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS)/PEE-PDMS polymeric bicontinuous microemulsion (BμE) showed shear-induced macrophase separation.^ 1 This was tentatively attributed to the extreme dynamical asymmetry of the two homopolymers, i.e., their viscosities differed by three orders of magnitude. To understand the role of the dynamic symmetry of a BμE when subjected to shear flow, we have developed a new ternary polymer blend system poly(butylene oxide) (PBO)/ poly(ethylenepropylene) (PEP)/PEP-PBO, which is dynamically almost symmetric. We will report on the shear flow behavior of this new BμE. Reference: [1] Krishnan et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2001, 87, 098301

  8. Complete Release of Horizontal Shear Stresses During Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenball, M.; Gaucher, E.; Wellmann, F.; Kohl, T.

    2013-12-01

    Seismicity can be induced in previously seismically inactive regions by man-made changes of the stress field. Notable stress perturbations are created by injection or withdrawal of fluids such as wastewater, fresh water or hydrocarbons. Over the last decades our knowledge of the physical processes of induced seismicity has improved largely. However, the driving force of seismicity, i.e. the actual perturbation of the stress field in the reservoir during fluid injection, remains largely unknown up to now. Measurements of fluid pressure at the well are not enough to extrapolate the pressure change in the reservoir. Here we study the evolution of the stress field during a massive hydraulic stimulation of a 5 km deep well at the enhanced geothermal system at Soultz-sous-Forêts, France. Fresh water was pumped with rates of 30 to 50 ls-1 for 6 days. Locations of 7215 events with maximum magnitude of MW=2.5 were obtained, for 715 events with MW > 1 focal mechanism solutions were derived. At first we present observations of several peculiar phenomena of the seismicity migration, of fluid flow and earthquake mechanisms following the shut-in of the well, which indicate to yet not understood hydro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in connection with shut-in. In order to analyze the changes of the stress field during and after the stimulation we identify the fracture planes from the two nodal planes by a probability-based method where we incorporate structural geological information gained from well logs and uncertainties of the determination of focal mechanism solutions and independent estimates of the stress field. In principle, this approach is able to incorporate further uncertainties, if available. We then conduct stress inversions resolved in time and depth to study spatio-temporal changes of the stress tensor. Our results show an increasingly perturbed stress state with time with a strong reduction of the horizontal shear stresses in areas of highest seismic activity

  9. Interfacial shear-stress effects on transient capillary wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Song-Kai; Lai, Chun-Liang

    2004-06-01

    The effects on the transient capillary flow in a wedge due to the interfacial shear-stress distribution S along the flow direction z is studied theoretically. With the assumptions of a slender liquid column and negligible gravitational and inertia effects, the problem is reduced to finding the axial velocity distribution at any cross section. The propagation of the liquid column h(z,t) and the tip location l(t) are then solved with the aid of the continuity equation. When the half-wedge angle α, the contact angle θ, and the shear-stress distribution on the free surface S are constant, analytic solutions exist. Otherwise, numerical simulation has to be applied. The results indicate that when S(z) is acting in the flow direction, the flow is strengthened and the liquid column propagates faster. When S(z) is opposing the flow direction, reverse flow may exist near the free surface and the propagation speed of the liquid column is reduced. Moreover, for a capillary flow in a wedge with constant α, θ, and S, both the analytic solutions and the numerical simulation predict that l(t)∝t3/5 for the constant-flow-rate stage and l(t)∝t1/2 for the constant-height flow stage. When S is a function of the flow direction z, the above functional relationship between l and t becomes no longer valid; it varies as the liquid column propagates along the wedge.

  10. Effects of wall shear stress and its gradient on tumor cell adhesion in curved microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Yan, W. W.; Cai, B.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to vessel walls in the microcirculation is one critical step in cancer metastasis. In this paper, the hypothesis that tumor cells prefer to adhere at the microvessels with localized shear stresses and their gradients, such as in the curved microvessels, was examined both experimentally and computationally. Our in vivo experiments were performed on the microvessels (post-capillary venules, 30–50 μm diameter) of rat mesentery. A straight or curved microvessel was cannulated and perfused with tumor cells by a glass micropipette at a velocity of ~1mm/s. At less than 10 min after perfusion, there was a significant difference in cell adhesion to the straight and curved vessel walls. In 60 min, the averaged adhesion rate in the curved vessels (n = 14) was ~1.5-fold of that in the straight vessels (n = 19). In 51 curved segments, 45% of cell adhesion was initiated at the inner side, 25% at outer side, and 30% at both sides of the curved vessels. To investigate the mechanical mechanism by which tumor cells prefer adhering at curved sites, we performed a computational study, in which the fluid dynamics was carried out by the lattice Boltzmann method, and the tumor cell dynamics was governed by the Newton’s law of translation and rotation. A modified adhesive dynamics model that included the influence of wall shear stress/gradient on the association/dissociation rates of tumor celladhesion was proposed, in which the positive wall shear stress/gradient jump would enhance tumor cell adhesion while the negative wall shear stress/gradient jump would weaken tumor cell adhesion. It was found that the wall shear stress/gradient, over a threshold, had significant contribution to tumor cell adhesion by activating or inactivating cell adhesion molecules. Our results elucidated why the tumor cell adhesion prefers to occur at the positive curvature of curved microvessels with very low Reynolds number (in the order of 10−2) laminar flow. PMID:21818636

  11. Dynamic shear modulus of glycerol: Corrections due to instrument compliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, K.; Hutcheson, S. A.; Shi, X.; Mandanici, A.; McKenna, G. B.

    2006-12-01

    A recent article by Shi et al. [J. Chem. Phys.123, 174507 (2005)] reports results from mechanical measurements on three simple inorganic glass formers: glycerol, m-toluidine, and sucrose benzoate. The experiments carried out were stress relaxation, aging, and dynamic (all in shear) using a torsional rheometer, an advanced rheometric expansion system (TA Instruments). The original force rebalance transducer (2KFRT) supplied with the system was replaced with a custom-made load cell (Sensotec) that had a capacity of 20000gcm in torque and 5000g in normal force. The replacement of the load cell was done due to the belief that the main source of compliance in this instrument was from the 2KFRT. With this assumption, the authors published their results for the three materials of interest and compared their results with the techniques of Schröter and Donth [J. Chem. Phys.113, 9101 (2000)] for the measurements on glycerol and reported important differences. These differences were disputed by one of the present authors (Schröter), and the present report shows that the results from Schröter and Donth are correct. We show that the reasons have to do with the instrument compliance being greater than originally thought by Shi et al. Here we examine the effects of platen diameter/geometry on the glycerol dynamic moduli, describe a means to correct dynamic data, present a revised comparison of the corrected data with that of Schröter and Donth, and provide a discussion of future work and conclusions.

  12. Numerical Investigations of the Dynamic Shear Behavior of Rough Rock Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junyu; Xu, Songlin; Hu, Shisheng

    2014-09-01

    The dynamic shear behavior of rock joints is significant to both rock engineering and earthquake dynamics. With the discrete element method (DEM), the dynamic direct-shear tests on the rough rock joints with 3D (sinusoidal or random) surface morphologies are simulated and discussed. Evolution of the friction coefficient with the slip displacement shows that the 3D DEM joint model can accurately reproduce the initial strengthening, slip-weakening, and steady-sliding responses of real rock joints. Energy analyses show that the strengthening and weakening behavior of the rock joint are mainly attributed to the rapid accumulation and release of the elastic energy in the joint. Then, effects of the surface roughness and the normal stress on the friction coefficient and the micro shear deformation mechanisms, mainly volume change and asperity damage, of the rock joint are investigated. The results show that the peak friction coefficient increases logarithmically with the increasing surface roughness, but decreases exponentially with the increasing normal stress. In addition, the rougher rock joint exhibits both higher joint dilation and asperity degradation. However, high normal stress constrains the joint dilation, but promotes the degree of asperity degradation significantly. Lastly, the effects of the 3D surface morphology on the shear behavior of the rock joint are investigated with a directional roughness parameter. It is observed that the anisotropy of the surface roughness consequently results in the variation of the peak friction coefficient of the joint corresponding to different shearing directions as well as the micro shear deformation mechanisms, e.g., the extent of joint dilation.

  13. Mechanical characterization of brain tissue in simple shear at dynamic strain rates.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Badar; Destrade, Michel; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    During severe impact conditions, brain tissue experiences a rapid and complex deformation, which can be seen as a mixture of compression, tension and shear. Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) occurs in animals and humans when both the strains and strain rates exceed 10% and 10/s, respectively. Knowing the mechanical properties of brain tissue in shear at these strains and strain rates is thus of particular importance, as they can be used in finite element simulations to predict the occurrence of brain injuries under different impact conditions. However, very few studies in the literature provide this information. In this research, an experimental setup was developed to perform simple shear tests on porcine brain tissue at strain rates ≤120/s. The maximum measured shear stress at strain rates of 30, 60, 90 and 120/s was 1.15±0.25kPa, 1.34±0.19kPa, 2.19±0.225kPa and 2.52±0.27kPa, (mean±SD), respectively at the maximum amount of shear, K=1. Good agreement of experimental, theoretical (Ogden and Mooney-Rivlin models) and numerical shear stresses was achieved (p=0.7866-0.9935). Specimen thickness effects (2.0-10.0mm thick specimens) were also analyzed numerically and we found that there is no significant difference (p=0.9954) in the shear stress magnitudes, indicating a homogeneous deformation of the specimens during simple shear tests. Stress relaxation tests in simple shear were also conducted at different strain magnitudes (10-60% strain) with the average rise time of 14ms. This allowed us to estimate elastic and viscoelastic parameters (initial shear modulus, μ=4942.0Pa, and Prony parameters: g1=0.520, g2=0.3057, τ1=0.0264s, and τ2=0.011s) that can be used in FE software to analyze the non-linear viscoelastic behavior of brain tissue. This study provides new insight into the behavior in finite shear of brain tissue under dynamic impact conditions, which will assist in developing effective brain injury criteria and adopting efficient countermeasures against

  14. Polymer Brushes under Shear: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Compared to Experiments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjesh K; Ilg, Patrick; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M; Kröger, Martin; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2015-04-28

    Surfaces coated with polymer brushes in a good solvent are known to exhibit excellent tribological properties. We have performed coarse-grained equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate dextran polymer brushes in an aqueous environment in molecular detail. In a first step, we determined simulation parameters and units by matching experimental results for a single dextran chain. Analyzing this model when applied to a multichain system, density profiles of end-tethered polymer brushes obtained from equilibrium MD simulations compare very well with expectations based on self-consistent field theory. Simulation results were further validated against and correlated with available experimental results. The simulated compression curves (normal force as a function of surface separation) compare successfully with results obtained with a surface forces apparatus. Shear stress (friction) obtained via nonequilibrium MD is contrasted with nanoscale friction studies employing colloidal-probe lateral force microscopy. We find good agreement in the hydrodynamic regime and explain the observed leveling-off of the friction forces in the boundary regime by means of an effective polymer-wall attraction. PMID:25830715

  15. Dynamics of prolate spheroidal elastic particles in confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villone, M. M.; D'Avino, G.; Hulsen, M. A.; Maffettone, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate through numerical simulations the dynamics of a neo-Hookean elastic prolate spheroid suspended in a Newtonian fluid under shear flow. Both initial orientations of the particle within and outside the shear plane and both unbounded and confined flow geometries are considered. In unbounded flow, when the particle starts on the shear plane, two stable regimes of motion are found, i.e., trembling, where the particle shape periodically elongates and compresses in the shear plane and the angle between its major semiaxis and the flow direction oscillates around a positive mean value, and tumbling, where the particle shape periodically changes and its major axis performs complete revolutions around the vorticity axis. When the particle is initially oriented out of the shear plane, more complex dynamics arise. Geometric confinement of the particle between the moving walls also influences its deformation and regime of motion. In addition, when the particle is initially located in an asymmetric position with respect to the moving walls, particle lateral migration is detected. The effects on the particle dynamics of the geometric and physical parameters that rule the system are investigated.

  16. Analysis of bonded joints. [shear stress and stress-strain diagrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivas, S.

    1975-01-01

    A refined elastic analysis of bonded joints which accounts for transverse shear deformation and transverse normal stress was developed to obtain the stresses and displacements in the adherends and in the bond. The displacements were expanded in terms of polynomials in the thicknesswise coordinate; the coefficients of these polynomials were functions of the axial coordinate. The stress distribution was obtained in terms of these coefficients by using strain-displacement and stress-strain relations. The governing differential equations were obtained by integrating the equations of equilibrium, and were solved. The boundary conditions (interface or support) were satisfied to complete the analysis. Single-lap, flush, and double-lap joints were analyzed, along with the effects of adhesive properties, plate thicknesses, material properties, and plate taper on maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond. The results obtained by using the thin-beam analysis available in the literature were compared with the results obtained by using the refined analysis. In general, thin-beam analysis yielded reasonably accurate results, but in certain cases the errors were high. Numerical investigations showed that the maximum peel and shear stresses in the bond can be reduced by (1) using a combination of flexible and stiff bonds, (2) using stiffer lap plates, and (3) tapering the plates.

  17. Dynamics and rheology of concentrated, finite-Reynolds-number suspensions in a homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Kyongmin; Maxey, Martin R.

    2013-05-01

    We present the lubrication-corrected force-coupling method for the simulation of concentrated suspensions under finite inertia. Suspension dynamics are investigated as a function of the particle-scale Reynolds number Re_{dot{γ }} and the bulk volume fraction ϕ in a homogeneous linear shear flow, in which Re_{dot{γ }} is defined from the density ρf and dynamic viscosity μ of the fluid, particle radius a, and the shear rate dot{γ } as Re_{dot{γ }}= ρ _f dot{γ } a^2 / μ. It is shown that the velocity fluctuations in the velocity-gradient and vorticity directions decrease at larger Re_{dot{γ }}. However, the particle self-diffusivity is found to be an increasing function of Re_{dot{γ }} as the motion of the suspended particles develops a longer auto-correlation under finite fluid inertia. It is shown that finite-inertia suspension flows are shear-thickening and the particle stresses become highly intermittent as Re_{dot{γ }} increases. To study the detailed changes in the suspension microstructure and rheology, we introduce a particle-stress-weighted pair-distribution function. The stress-weighted pair-distribution function clearly shows that the increase of the effective viscosity at high Re_{dot{γ }} is mostly related to the strong normal lubrication interaction in the compressive principal axis of the shear flow.

  18. Imaging the cellular response to transient shear stress using time-resolved digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arita, Yoshihiko; Antkowiak, Maciej; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-02-01

    Shear stress has been recognized as one of the biophysical methods by which to permeabilize plasma membranes of cells. In particular, high pressure transient hydrodynamic flows created by laser-induced cavitation have been shown to lead to the uptake of fluorophores and plasmid DNA. While the mechanism and dynamics of cavitation have been extensively studied using a variety of time-resolved imaging techniques, the cellular response to the cavitation bubble and cavitation induced transient hydrodynamic flows has never been shown in detail. We use time-resolved quantitative phase microscopy to study cellular response to laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped polystyrene nanoparticle (500nm in diameter) irradiated with a single nanosecond laser pulse at 532nm creates transient shear stress to surrounding cells without causing cell lysis. A bi-directional transient displacement of cytoplasm is observed during expansion and collapse of the cavitation bubble. In some cases, cell deformation is only observable at the microsecond time scale without any permanent change in cell shape or optical thickness. On a time scale of seconds, the cellular response to shear stress and cytoplasm deformation typically leads to retraction of the cellular edge most exposed to the flow, rounding of the cell body and, in some cases, loss of cellular dry mass. These results give a new insight into the cellular response to laser-induced shear stress and related plasma membrane permeabilization. This study also demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown of an optically trapped nanoparticle offers localized cavitation (70 μm in diameter), which interacts with a single cell.

  19. Ageing under Shear: Effect of Stress and Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Asheesh; Joshi, Yogesh M.

    2008-07-01

    In this work we studied the effect of oscillatory stress and temperature on the ageing dynamics of aqueous suspension of laponite. At the higher magnitude of stress, elastic and viscous moduli of the system underwent a sharp rise with the ageing time. The age at the onset of rise and the sharpness of the same increased with the magnitude of stress. We propose that at the beginning of ageing, the strain associated with the oscillatory stress field affects the lower modes in the relaxation time distribution. The higher modes, which are not significantly affected by the deformation field, continue to grow increasing the viscosity of the system thereby lowering the magnitude of the deformation field. Progressive decrease in the later reduces the range of relaxation modes affected by it. This dynamics eventually leads to an auto-catalytic increase in the elastic and viscous moduli. An increase in temperature accelerates the ageing process by shifting the ageing dynamics to a lower ageing time. This is due the microscopic relaxation dynamics, which causes ageing, becomes faster with increase in the temperature.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Shear Bands and Dynamic Fracture in Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, Colin James

    Understanding the failure of metals at high strain rate is of utmost importance in the design of a broad range of engineering systems. Numerical methods offer the ability to analyze such complex physics and aid the design of structural systems. The objective of this research will be to develop reliable finite element models for high strain rate failure modelling, incorporating shear bands and fracture. Shear band modelling is explored first, and the subsequent developments are extended to incorporate fracture. Mesh sensitivity, the spurious dependence of failure on the discretization, is a well known hurdle in achieving reliable numerical results for shear bands and fracture, or any other strain softening model. Mesh sensitivity is overcome by regularization, and while details of regularization techniques may differ, all are similar in that a length scale is introduced which serves as a localization limiter. This dissertation contains two main contributions, the first of which presents several developments in shear band modeling. The importance of using a monolithic nonlinear solver in combination with a PDE model accounting for thermal diffusion is demonstrated. In contrast, excluding one or both of these components leads to unreliable numerical results. The Pian-Sumihara stress interpolants are also employed in small and finite deformation and shown to significantly improve the computational cost of shear band modelling. This is partly due to the fact that fewer unknowns than an irreducible discretization result from the same mesh, and more significantly, the fact that convergence of numerical results upon mesh refinement is improved drastically. This means coarser meshes are adequate to resolve shear bands, alleviating some of the computational cost of numerical modelling, which are notoriously significant. Since extremely large deformations are present during shear banding, a mesh to mesh transfer algorithm is presented for the Pian Sumihara element and used as

  1. Experimental and CFD simulation studies of wall shear stress for different impeller configurations and MBR activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ratkovich, N; Chan, C C V; Bentzen, T R; Rasmussen, M R

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) have been used successfully in biological wastewater treatment for effective solids-liquid separation. However, a common problem encountered with MBR systems is fouling of the membrane resulting in frequent membrane cleaning and replacement which makes the system less appealing for full-scale applications. It has been widely demonstrated that the filtration performances in MBRs can be improved by understanding the shear stress over the membrane surface. Modern tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to diagnose and understand the shear stress in an MBR. Nevertheless, proper experimental validation is required to validate CFD simulation. In this work experimental measurements of shear stress induced by impellers at a membrane surface were made with an electrochemical approach and the results were used to validate CFD simulations. As good results were obtained with the CFD model (<9% error), it was extrapolated to include the non-Newtonian behaviour of activated sludge. PMID:22592479

  2. Estimation of critical shear stress for erosion in the Changjiang Estuary: A synergy research of observation, GOCI sensing and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jianzhong; Shen, Fang; Guo, Wenyun; Chen, Changsheng; Ding, Pingxing

    2015-12-01

    Simulating the sediment transport in a high-turbidity region with spatially varying bed properties is challenging. A comprehensive strategy that integrates multiple methods is applied here to retrieve the critical shear stress for erosion, which plays a major role in suspended sediment dynamics in the Changjiang Estuary (CE). Time-series of sea surface suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were retrieved from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) satellite data at hourly intervals (for 8 h each day) and combined with hydrodynamic modeling of high-resolution CE Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (CE-FVCOM) to estimate the near-bed critical shear stress in the clay-dominated bed region (plasticity index > 7%). An experimental algorithm to determine the in situ critical shear stress via the plasticity index method was also used to verify the GOCI-derived critical shear stress. Implemented with this new critical shear stress, the sediment transport model significantly improved the simulation of the distribution and spatial variability of the SSC during the spring and neap tidal cycles in the CE. The results suggest that a significant lateral water exchange between channels and shoals occurred during the spring flood tide, which led to a broader high-SSC area in the CE throughout the water column.

  3. Shear stress reduces protease activated receptor-1 expression in human endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Shear stress has been shown to regulate several genes involved in the thrombotic and proliferative functions of endothelial cells. Thrombin receptor (protease-activated receptor-1: PAR-1) increases at sites of vascular injury, which suggests an important role for PAR-1 in vascular diseases. However, the effect of shear stress on PAR-1 expression has not been previously studied. This work investigates effects of shear stress on PAR-1 gene expression in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). Cells were exposed to different shear stresses using a parallel plate flow system. Northern blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that shear stress down-regulated PAR-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in both HUVECs and HMECs but with different thresholds. Furthermore, shear-reduced PAR-1 mRNA was due to a decrease of transcription rate, not increased mRNA degradation. Postshear stress release of endothelin-1 in response to thrombin was reduced in HUVECs and HMECs. Moreover, inhibitors of potential signaling pathways applied during shear stress indicated mediation of the shear-decreased PAR-1 expression by protein kinases. In conclusion, shear stress exposure reduces PAR-1 gene expression in HMECs and HUVECs through a mechanism dependent in part on protein kinases, leading to altered endothelial cell functional responses to thrombin.

  4. XIAP is essential for shear stress-enhanced Tyr-576 phosphorylation of FAK

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Sunyoung; Park, Heonyong

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Laminar shear stress phosphorylates Tyr-576 in FAK. {yields} XIAP is essential for shear stress-induced phosphorylation of Tyr-576. {yields} XIAP knockdown induces shear stress-triggered translocation of FAK into nucleus. {yields} XIAP regulates ERK activation by maintaining the Src-accessible location of FAK. -- Abstract: In endothelial cells, X-chromosome linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) regulates cell survival, migration and adhesion. We have recently found that XIAP recruits focal adhesion kinase (FAK) into integrin-associated focal adhesions, controlling cell migration. However, little is understood about the molecular mechanisms by which FAK modulation is controlled by XIAP. In this study, we show that XIAP modulates FAK activity through the control of FAK phosphorylation. In bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), phosphorylation of Tyr-576 in FAK is elevated by laminar shear stress. This elevated phosphorylation appears to be responsible for shear stress-stimulated ERK activation. We found that XIAP knockdown reduces shear stress-enhanced phosphorylation of Tyr-576 and induces shear stress-triggered translocation of FAK into nucleus. Nuclear translocation of FAK reduces contact between FAK and Src, a kinase which phosphorylates Tyr-576. This spatial segregation of FAK from Src decreases Tyr-576 phosphorylation and thus shear-stimulated ERK activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate that XIAP plays a key role in shear stress-stimulated ERK activation by maintaining the Src-accessible location of FAK.

  5. Interlaminar shear stress effects on the postbuckling response of graphite-epoxy panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelstad, S. P.; Knight, N. F., Jr.; Reddy, J. N.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of shear flexibility on overall postbuckling response was assessed, and transverse shear stress distributions in relation to panel failure were examined. Nonlinear postbuckling results are obtained for finite element models based on classical laminated plate theory and first-order shear deformation theory. Good correlation between test and analysis is obtained. The results presented analytically substantiate the experimentally observed failure mode.

  6. Reynolds shear stress measurements in a separated boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driver, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence measurements were obtained for two cases of boundary layer flow with an adverse pressure gradient, one attached and the other separated. A three-component laser Doppler velocimeter system was used to measure three mean velocity components, all six Reynolds stress components, and all ten velocity triple product correlations. Independent measurements of skin-friction obtained with a laser oil-flow interferometer were used to examine the law of the wall in adverse pressure gradient flows where p(+) is less than 0.05. Strong similiarities were seen between the two adverse pressure gradient flows and free shear layer type flows. Eddy viscosities, dissipation rates, and pressure-strain rates were deduced from the data and compared to various turbulence modeling assumptions.

  7. Wrinkling Phenomena of Thin Flat Plates Subjected to Shear Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenrath, F

    1931-01-01

    This report covers a series of tests on thin flat elastic strips restrained at two parallel edges and subjected to shear by conversely directed stresses. Theoretical treatments, particularly those of Lilly, Southwell and Skan, and Timoshenko are briefly outlined. The problem to be solved by these tests was to find out whether, and to what extent the conditions and assumptions upon which the calculations are based are complied with in the tests. Three materials were used: celluloid, duralumin, brass. Owing to the high elastic deformability of celluloid, it was not only possible to observe the beginning but also to ascertain the type of deflection. The test data on celluloid was affirmed by the experiments with duralumin and brass.

  8. Observations of wave shear stress on a steep beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. W.; Hay, A. E.; Bowen, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Observations are presented of the wave shear stress on a steeply sloping beach. Above the wave boundary layer (WBL), positive values of were observed and are attributed to a combination of both wave shoaling due to the large-scale bed slope, and dissipation due to wave breaking, in agreement with the wave theory of Zou et al. (2003). Within the WBL, observed vertical profiles of were also in good agreement with theory, in cases where the wave height was small. As wave heights increased, however, the WBL profile of generally did not agree with theory. Near-simultaneous rotary sonar observations of the bed suggest the disagreement with theory was due to the presence of orbital-scale ripples, which the present theory does not accommodate.

  9. On the yielding behaviour in magnetorheology using ultrasounds, shear and normal stresses, and optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Jaime; Castro Blázquez, Pedro; Elvira, Luis; Montero de Espinosa, Francisco; Ramírez, Javier; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-11-01

    The yielding behaviour of magnetorheological fluids has been investigated by videomicroscopy, ultrasonic and rheometry techniques simultaneously. Particularly, the effect of different factors such as, the magnetic field strength, particle size, surface chemistry of the particles, particle concentration and carrier fluid viscosity has been studied. Special attention has been paid to correlate the yielding information obtained by acoustical, optical and mechanical techniques. As a general trend, independently of the particular field strength and suspension formulation, the steady shear flow curve exhibits three well differentiated regions. In the first region, at small stresses, field-induced structures remain quasistatic and all magnitudes remain constant. For larger stresses the number of aggregates decreases but their size increases. This is identified with the onset of flow, and corresponds to the classical static yield stress and a decrease in time-of-flight and normal stresses. For even larger stress values, the suspensions fully flow. This stress value corresponds to the classical dynamic yield stress and is associated to a minimum in the time-of-flight and normal stresses.

  10. Mechanical interaction between cells and fluid for bone tissue engineering scaffold: modulation of the interfacial shear stress.

    PubMed

    Blecha, L D; Rakotomanana, L; Razafimahery, F; Terrier, A; Pioletti, D P

    2010-03-22

    An analytical model of the fluid/cell mechanical interaction was developed. The interfacial shear stress, due to the coupling between the fluid and the cell deformation, was characterized by a new dimensionless number N(fs). For N(fs) above a critical value, the fluid/cell interaction had a damping effect on the interfacial shear stress. Conversely, for N(fs) below this critical value, interfacial shear stress was amplified. As illustration, the role of the dynamic fluid/cell mechanical coupling was studied in a specific biological situation involving cells seeded in a bone scaffold. For the particular bone scaffold chosen, the dimensionless number N(fs) was higher than the critical value. In this case, the dynamic shear stress at the fluid/cell interface is damped for increasing excitation frequency. Interestingly, this damping effect is correlated to the pore diameter of the scaffold, furnishing thus target values in the design of the scaffold. Correspondingly, an efficient cell stimulation might be achieved with a scaffold of pore size larger than 300 microm as no dynamic damping effect is likely to take place. The analytical model proposed in this study, while being a simplification of a fluid/cell mechanical interaction, brings complementary insights to numerical studies by analyzing the effect of different physical parameters. PMID:20004397

  11. Predicting boundary shear stress and sediment transport over bed forms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, S.R.; Wolfe, S.R.; Nelson, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    To estimate bed-load sediment transport rates in flows over bed forms such as ripples and dunes, spatially averaged velocity profiles are frequently used to predict mean boundary shear stress. However, such averaging obscures the complex, nonlinear interaction of wake decay, boundary-layer development, and topographically induced acceleration downstream of flow separation and often leads to inaccurate estimates of boundary stress, particularly skin friction, which is critically important in predicting bed-load transport rates. This paper presents an alternative methodology for predicting skin friction over 2D bed forms. The approach is based on combining the equations describing the mechanics of the internal boundary layer with semiempirical structure functions to predict the velocity at the crest of a bedform, where the flow is most similar to a uniform boundary layer. Significantly, the methodology is directed toward making specific predictions only at the bed-form crest, and as a result it avoids the difficulty and questionable validity of spatial averaging. The model provides an accurate estimate of the skin friction at the crest where transport rates are highest. Simple geometric constraints can be used to derive the mean transport rates as long as bed load is dominant.To estimate bed-load sediment transport rates in flows over bed forms such as ripples and dunes, spatially averaged velocity profiles are frequently used to predict mean boundary shear stress. However, such averaging obscures the complex, nonlinear interaction of wake decay, boundary-layer development, and topographically induced acceleration downstream of flow separation and often leads to inaccurate estimates of boundary stress, particularly skin friction, which is critically important in predicting bed-load transport rates. This paper presents an alternative methodology for predicting skin friction over 2D bed forms. The approach is based on combining the equations describing the mechanics of

  12. Magnitude of shear stress on the san andreas fault: implications of a stress measurement profile at shallow depth.

    PubMed

    Zoback, M D; Roller, J C

    1979-10-26

    A profile of measurements of shear stress perpendicular to the San Andreas fault near Palmdale, California, shows a marked increase in stress with distance from the fault. The pattern suggests that shear stress on the fault increases slowly with depth and reaches a value on the order of the average stress released during earthquakes. This result has important implications for both long- and shortterm prediction of large earthquakes. PMID:17809367

  13. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  14. Inverting for Shear Stress Rate on the Northern Cascadia Megathrust Using Geodetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhat, L.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Past physics-based models of slow slip events (SSE) have shown that, when averaged over many SSE cycles, the shear stress within the SSE zone remains roughly constant. Stress accumulates between SSE, and then is released during slow slip events. However, the predicted long-term deformation rates from such models, assuming the plate boundary is locked to the top of the ETS zone, do not fit well GPS velocities and uplift rates determined from leveling and tide-gauge data. These physics-based models particularly misfit the vertical rates. At the same time, previous kinematic inversions display a gap between the down-dip limit of the locked region and the top of the ETS zone. Our inversions of geodetic data for fault slip rates exhibit a steeper slip-rate profile at the top of the ETS zone, relative to the constant shear stress model, as well as creep up dip of the ETS zone. We explore physics-based models with velocity-strengthening regions of different length up dip the ETS zone, i.e. within the "gap" identified in kinematic inversions. However, this still does not match the observations well. We therefore try a new approach: we invert for shear stress rates on the megathrust that best fit the data. We show that a small decrease in shear stress within the top of the ETS zone, reaching 5 kPa/year at a depth of ~ 30 km, is required to fit the data. Possible explanations for this include a slow decrease in normal stress with time, possibly due to an increase in pore pressure, or a reduction in fault friction. We explore these hypotheses, using 2D quasi-dynamic simulations with rate-and-state friction and isothermal v-cutoff models for generating slow slip events. The potential for creep above the top of the ETS zone has important implications for the mechanical relationship between deep slow slip and dynamic events in the locked region.

  15. Pressure and shear stress in trabecular bone marrow during whole bone loading.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Schwaner, Stephen A; LaNeve, Anthony J; Kreipke, Tyler C; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-09-18

    Skeletal adaptation to mechanical loading is controlled by mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are highly responsive to applied strains, and are the key mechanosensory cells in bone. However, many cells residing in the marrow also respond to mechanical cues such as hydrostatic pressure and shear stress, and hence could play a role in skeletal adaptation. Trabecular bone encapsulates marrow, forming a poroelastic solid. According to the mechanical theory, deformation of the pores induces motion in the fluid-like marrow, resulting in pressure and velocity gradients. The latter results in shear stress acting between the components of the marrow. To characterize the mechanical environment of trabecular bone marrow in situ, pore pressure within the trabecular compartment of whole porcine femurs was measured with miniature pressure transducers during stress-relaxation and cyclic loading. Pressure gradients ranging from 0.013 to 0.46 kPa/mm were measured during loading. This range was consistent with calculated pressure gradients from continuum scale poroelastic models with the same permeability. Micro-scale computational fluid dynamics models created from computed tomography images were used to calculate the micromechanical stress in the marrow using the measured pressure differentials as boundary conditions. The volume averaged shear stress in the marrow ranged from 1.67 to 24.55 Pa during cyclic loading, which exceeds the mechanostimulatory threshold for mesenchymal lineage cells. Thus, the loading of bone through activities of daily living may be an essential component of bone marrow health and mechanobiology. Additional studies of cell-level interactions during loading in healthy and disease conditions will provide further incite into marrow mechanobiology. PMID:26283413

  16. Adaptive response of vascular endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress magnitude.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Friedman, Morton H

    2012-02-15

    The adaptation of vascular endothelial cells to shear stress alteration induced by global hemodynamic changes, such as those accompanying exercise or digestion, is an essential component of normal endothelial physiology in vivo. An understanding of the transient regulation of endothelial phenotype during adaptation to changes in mural shear will advance our understanding of endothelial biology and may yield new insights into the mechanism of atherogenesis. In this study, we characterized the adaptive response of arterial endothelial cells to an acute increase in shear stress magnitude in well-defined in vitro settings. Porcine endothelial cells were preconditioned by a basal level shear stress of 15 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) at 1 Hz for 24 h, after which an acute increase in shear stress to 30 ± 15 dyn/cm(2) was applied. Endothelial permeability nearly doubled after 40-min exposure to the elevated shear stress and then decreased gradually. Transcriptomics studies using microarray techniques identified 86 genes that were sensitive to the elevated shear. The acute increase in shear stress promoted the expression of a group of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative genes. The adaptive response of the global gene expression profile is triphasic, consisting of an induction period, an early adaptive response (ca. 45 min) and a late remodeling response. Our results suggest that endothelial cells exhibit a specific phenotype during the adaptive response to changes in shear stress; this phenotype is different than that of fully adapted endothelial cells. PMID:22140046

  17. Surface temperatures and glassy state investigations in tribology, part 3. [limiting shear stress rheological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1980-01-01

    Research related to the development of the limiting shear stress rheological model is reported. Techniques were developed for subjecting lubricants to isothermal compression in order to obtain relevant determinations of the limiting shear stress and elastic shear modulus. The isothermal compression limiting shear stress was found to predict very well the maximum traction for a given lubricant. Small amounts of side slip and twist incorporated in the model were shown to have great influence on the rising portion of the traction curve at low slide-roll ratio. The shear rheological model was also applied to a Grubin-like elastohydrodynamic inlet analysis for predicting film thicknesses when employing the limiting shear stress model material behavior.

  18. Spatial comparison between wall shear stress measures and porcine arterial endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Himburg, Heather A; Grzybowski, Deborah M; Hazel, Andrew L; LaMack, Jeffrey A; Li, Xue-Mei; Friedman, Morton H

    2004-05-01

    A better understanding of how hemodynamic factors affect the integrity and function of the vascular endothelium is necessary to appreciate more fully how atherosclerosis is initiated and promoted. A novel technique is presented to assess the relation between fluid dynamic variables and the permeability of the endothelium to macromolecules. Fully anesthetized, domestic swine were intravenously injected with the albumin marker Evans blue dye, which was allowed to circulate for 90 min. After the animals were euthanized, silicone casts were made of the abdominal aorta and its iliac branches. Pulsatile flow calculations were subsequently made in computational regions derived from the casts. The distribution of the calculated time-dependent wall shear stress in the external iliac branches was directly compared on a point-by-point basis with the spatially varying in vivo uptake of Evans blue dye in the same arteries. The results indicate that in vivo endothelial permeability to albumin decreases with increasing time-average shear stress over the normal range. Additionally, endothelial permeability increases slightly with oscillatory shear index. PMID:14715506

  19. Steady and dynamic shear characterization of cellulase-producing Trichoderma reesei suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, M.R.; Velkovska, S.; Khan, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Suspension rheology of fungal fermentations is important in determination of mass transfer rates, as well as mixing quality. We have characterized Trichorderma reesei RUT-C30 suspension rheology during growth on xylose (soluble) and cellulose (particulate) substrates, using both steady and dynamic shear measurements. Biomass growth was monophasic on xylose and biphasic on cellulose; the latter behavior is consistent with relatively rapid, early growth on soluble sugars derived from rapidly hydrolyzed material, followed by a second, slower growth phase owing to hydrolysis of more recalcitrant cellulose by increasing cellulose concentrations. Steady shear measurements established the presence of a yield stress for fermentation broths when using a 10 (vol)% fungal inoculum. The Casson equation represented all data well. Casson parameters of viscosity and yield stress followed biomass evolution: two maxima in both parameters were observed with cellulose substrates, and a single maximum with xylose. Dynamic shear measurements on broths indicated a gel behavior at small strains and a shear thinning liquid behavior at larger displacements. These results indicate the need to include rheology and mixing considerations in the subsequent development of a full biological and physical kinetic description of T. reesei cellulose conversions.

  20. Wall Shear Stress, Wall Pressure and Near Wall Velocity Field Relationships in a Whirling Annular Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Winslow, Robert B.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1996-01-01

    The mean and phase averaged pressure and wall shear stress distributions were measured on the stator wall of a 50% eccentric annular seal which was whirling in a circular orbit at the same speed as the shaft rotation. The shear stresses were measured using flush mounted hot-film probes. Four different operating conditions were considered consisting of Reynolds numbers of 12,000 and 24,000 and Taylor numbers of 3,300 and 6,600. At each of the operating conditions the axial distribution (from Z/L = -0.2 to 1.2) of the mean pressure, shear stress magnitude, and shear stress direction on the stator wall were measured. Also measured were the phase averaged pressure and shear stress. These data were combined to calculate the force distributions along the seal length. Integration of the force distributions result in the net forces and moments generated by the pressure and shear stresses. The flow field inside the seal operating at a Reynolds number of 24,000 and a Taylor number of 6,600 has been measured using a 3-D laser Doppler anemometer system. Phase averaged wall pressure and wall shear stress are presented along with phase averaged mean velocity and turbulence kinetic energy distributions located 0.16c from the stator wall where c is the seal clearance. The relationships between the velocity, turbulence, wall pressure and wall shear stress are very complex and do not follow simple bulk flow predictions.

  1. Possible effect from shear stress on maturation of somatic embryos of Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong; Aidun, Cyrus K; Egertsdotter, Ulrika

    2011-05-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is the only method with the potential for industrial scale clonal propagation of conifers. Implementation of the method has so far been hampered by the extensive manual labor required for development of the somatic embryos into plants. The utilization of bioreactors is limited since the somatic embryos will not mature and germinate under liquid culture conditions. The negative effect on mature embryo yields from liquid culture conditions has been previously described. We have described the negative effects of shear stress on the development of early stage somatic embryos (proembryogenic masses; PEMs) at shear stresses of 0.086 and 0.14 N/m(2). In the present study, additional flow rates were studied to determine the effects of shear stress at lower rates resembling shear stress in a suspension culture flask. The results showed that shear stress at 0.009, 0.014, and 0.029 N/m(2) inhibited the PEM expansions comparing with the control group without shear stress. This study also provides validation for the cross-correlation method previously developed to show the effect of shear stress on early stage embryo suspensor cell formation and polarization. Furthermore, shear stress was shown to positively affect the uptake of water into the cells. The results indicate that the plasmolyzing effect from macromolecules added to liquid culture medium to stimulate maturation of the embryos are affected by liquid culture conditions and thus can affect the conversion of PEMs into mature somatic embryos. PMID:21449024

  2. Shear stress partitioning of overland flow on disturbed and undisturbed rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physically-based hillslope erosion models commonly estimate soil detachment and transport capacity based on overland flow shear stress applied to soil aggregates. However, vegetation and rock cover counteract the shear stress of overland flow where they occur. Accordingly, partitioning of total sh...

  3. Shear stress partitioning of overland flow on disturbed and undisturbed rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In physically-based hillslope erosion models, only overland flow shear stress exerted on soil aggregates (grains) is used to estimate concentrated flow soil detachment rates and sediment transport capacity. However, on vegetated hillslopes, only overland flow total shear stress can be obtained usin...

  4. Effect of cytoskeleton stress-free state on red blood cell responses in low shear rate flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Peng, Zhangli; Mashayekh, Adel

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the recent experiment on erythrocytes (red blood cells, or RBCs) in weak shear flows (Dupire et al. 2012), we conduct a numerical investigation to study the dynamics of RBCs in low shear rate flows by applying a multiscale fluid-structure interaction model. By employing a spheroidal stress-free state in the cytoskeleton we are able to numerically predict an important feature that the cell maintains its biconcave shape during tank treading motions. This has not been achieved by any existing models. Furthermore, we numerically confirm the hypothesis that as the stress-free state approaches a sphere, the threshold shear rates corresponding to the establishment of tank treading decrease. By comparing with the experimental measurements, our study suggests that the stress-free state of RBCs is a spheroid which is close to a sphere, rather than a biconcave shape applied in existing models (the implication is that the RBC skeleton is prestressed in its natural biconcave state). It also suggests that the response of RBCs in low shear rate flows may provide a measure to quantitatively determine the distribution of shear stress in RBC cytoskeleton at the natural state.

  5. Shear stress behavior in mesoscale simulations of granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Don; Lomov, Ilya; Antoun, Tarabay; Vitali, Efrem

    2012-03-01

    3D mesoscale simulations of shock propagation in porous solids and powders have been performed with the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The results indicate that voids can have a profound effect on the stress state in the material behind the shock front. The simulations can explain experimentally observed wave profiles that are difficult to interpret in the context of the classical elastic-plastic theory. In particular, a quasielastic precursor is observed in reshock simulations. This effect persists even at extremely low porosity values, down to 0.1% by volume. Stress relaxation is pronounced in simulations involving wave propagation, but is not observed in uniform ramp loading. In this sense, the relaxation phenomenon is non-local in nature and classic continuum models are inadequate for its description. Simulations show that the response of highly porous powders is dominated by deviatoric stress relaxation in the shock regime. We propose an enhancement which can be easily integrated into most existing porous material continuum models for modeling the shockinduced relaxation phenomena observed in the mesoscale simulation. The model calculates the microkinetic energy generated by dynamic loading and stores it as an internal state variable. The rate of production and dissipation of microkinetic energy and other model parameters are calibrated based on the mesoscale results. The augmented continuum model represents the deviatoric stress behavior observed under different regimes of dynamic loading.

  6. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  7. Evaluation of Stress Anisotropy and Shearing Stress Using an Eddy Current Method with a Tangential-Rectangular Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yuichi; Soyama, Hitoshi

    In establishing a system to evaluate residual stress, it is important to design the system so that it can also evaluate the stress anisotropy, since this is introduced into metallic materials by surface processes such as grinding and polishing. The shearing stress is also an important parameter when the shear strength has to be considered, since tensile stress can cause stress corrosion cracking. Thus, a method to nondestructively evaluate the stress anisotropy and shearing stress in a short time is required. In this paper, a nondestructive eddy current method using a tangential-rectangular coil was used to accomplish this. The material under test was stainless steel, Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) SUS316L, ground or polished by an angle grinder. The stress anisotropy caused by the grinding and polishing processes was evaluated by the eddy current method with the tangential-rectangular coil. To vary the stress state, some specimens were treated with cavitation peening after grinding with the angle grinder. The results demonstrate that the stress anisotropy, shearing stress and peening intensity can be evaluated by the eddy current method using the tangential-rectangular coil. From the results, it was concluded that the maximum shearing stress and the direction of the principal stress could be determined.

  8. Development of ionic polymer transducers as flow shear stress sensors: effects of electrode architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, David; Dominic, Justin; Akle, Barbar J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    Ionomeric polymer transducers (IPTs) have recently received a great deal of attention. As actuators, IPT have the ability to generate large bending strain and moderate stress at low applied voltages. Although the actuation capabilities of IPTs have been studied extensively, the sensing performance of these transducers has not received much attention. The work presented herein aims to develop a wall shear stress sensor for aero/hydrodynamic and biomedical applications. Ionic polymers are generally created by an impregnation-reduction process in an ion exchange membrane, typically Nafion, and then coated with a flexible electrode. The traditional impregnation-reduction fabrication technique of IPTs has little control on the electrode thickness. However, the new Direct Assembly Process (DAP) for fabrication of IPTs allows for experimentation with varying conducting materials and direct control of electrode architecture. The thickness of the electrode is controlled by altering the amount of the ionomer/metal mix sprayed on the membrane. Transducers with varied electrode and membrane thicknesses are fabricated. The sensitivity of the transducer is characterized using two basic experiments. First, the electric impedance of the transducer is measured and its capacitive properties are computed. Earlier studies have demonstrated that capacitance has been strongly correlated to actuation performance in IPTs. Subsequently, the sensing capability of the IPTs in bending is measured using a fixed-pined cantilever configuration. Finally the shear stress sensing performance in fluid flow is quantified through a detailed calibration procedure. This is accomplished using two dynamic shear stress calibration apparatuses. In this study we demonstrate a strong correlation between the electrode thickness and the sensing performance of an IPT.

  9. Effect of shear stress on the high-pressure behaviour of nitromethane: Raman spectroscopy in a shear diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Philippe; Isambert, Aude; Petitet, Jean-Pierre; Zerr, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    A detailed description of the reaction mechanisms occurring in shock-induced decomposition of condensed energetic materials is very important for a comprehensive understanding of detonation. Besides pressure and temperature effects, shear stress has also been proposed to play an important role in the initiation and decomposition mechanisms. In order to study this effect, a Shear Diamond Anvil Cell (SDAC) has been developed. It is actually a classical DAC with the upper diamond anvil rotating about the compression axis relative to the opposite anvil. In this paper, we present a Raman spectroscopy study of the effect of shear stress on the high-pressure behaviour of nitromethane. Two major effects of shear stress are observed in our experiments. The first one is a lowering of the pressures at which the different structural modifications that nitromethane undergoes are observed. The second effect is observed at 28 GPa where sudden decomposition of the sample occurs just after shear application. Observation of the sample after decomposition shows the presence of a black residue which is composed of carbon as indicated by the Raman spectrum. [1] Manaa, M. R., Fried, L. E., and Reed, E. J., Journal of Computer-Aided Materials Design, 10, pp 75-97, 2003.

  10. Critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress for curved rectangular panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schildcrout, Murry; Stein, Manuel

    1949-01-01

    A solution is presented for the problem of the buckling of curved rectangular panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress. Charts giving theoretical critical combinations of shear and direct axial stress are presented for panels having five different length-width ratios. Because the actual critical compressive stress of rectangular panels having substantial curvature is known to be much lower than the theoretical value, a semiempirical method of analysis of curved panels subjected to combined shear and direct axial stress is presented for use in design. (author

  11. Optimizing the rotor design for controlled-shear affinity filtration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Francis, Patrick; Martinez, D Mark; Taghipour, Fariborz; Bowen, Bruce D; Haynes, Charles A

    2006-12-20

    Controlled shear affinity filtration (CSAF) is a novel integrated processing technology that positions a rotor directly above an affinity membrane chromatography column to permit protein capture and purification directly from cell culture. The conical rotor is intended to provide a uniform and tunable shear stress at the membrane surface that inhibits membrane fouling and cell cake formation by providing a hydrodynamic force away from and a drag force parallel to the membrane surface. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to show that the rotor in the original CSAF device (Vogel et al., 2002) does not provide uniform shear stress at the membrane surface. This results in the need to operate the system at unnecessarily high rotor speeds to reach a required shear stress of at least 0.17 Pa at every radial position of the membrane surface, compromising the scale-up of the technology. Results from CFD simulations are compared with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments and a numerical solution for low Reynolds number conditions to confirm that our CFD model accurately describes the hydrodynamics in the rotor chamber of the CSAF device over a range of rotor velocities, filtrate fluxes, and (both laminar and turbulent) retentate flows. CFD simulations were then carried out in combination with a root-finding method to optimize the shape of the CSAF rotor. The optimized rotor geometry produces a nearly constant shear stress of 0.17 Pa at a rotational velocity of 250 rpm, 60% lower than the original CSAF design. This permits the optimized CSAF device to be scaled up to a maximum rotor diameter 2.5 times larger than is permissible in the original device, thereby providing more than a sixfold increase in volumetric throughput. PMID:16937405

  12. Dynamically triggered slip and sustained fault gouge instability associated with unique slip behavior under laboratory shear conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Carmeliet, J.; Savage, H. M.; Scuderi, M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate dynamic-wave triggered slip under laboratory shear conditions. The experiment is comprised of a 3-block system containing two gouge layers composed of glass beads and held in place by a fixed load in a bi-axial configuration. When the system is sheared under steady state conditions at loads from 3-8 MPa, stick-slip exhibiting a characteristic recurrence time is observed. Under these load conditions, we find that shear failure may be instantaneously triggered by a brief dynamical wave if the system is in a critical shear-stress state, near failure. Dynamic triggering is only observed when the dynamic wave amplitude exceeds strains of 10^(-7). Following triggering, the gouge material remains in an unstable state for long periods of time as manifest by unique slip characteristics not observed during spontaneous events: the measured physical characteristics—the gouge material strength recovery, the gouge layer thickness, the gouge shear modulus and the stick-slip recurrence time recover over many stick-slip cycles following triggering. This work suggests that faults must be critically stressed to trigger under dynamic conditions and that the recovery process following a dynamically triggered event differs from the recovery following a spontaneous event.

  13. Additional shear resistance from fault roughness and stress levels on geometrically complex faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zijun; Dunham, Eric M.

    2013-07-01

    The majority of crustal faults host earthquakes when the ratio of average background shear stress τb to effective normal stress σeff is τb/σeff≈0.6. In contrast, mature plate-boundary faults like the San Andreas Fault (SAF) operate at τb/σeff≈0.2. Dynamic weakening, the dramatic reduction in frictional resistance at coseismic slip velocities that is commonly observed in laboratory experiments, provides a leading explanation for low stress levels on mature faults. Strongly velocity-weakening friction laws permit rupture propagation on flat faults above a critical stress level τpulse/σeff≈0.25. Provided that dynamic weakening is not restricted to mature faults, the higher stress levels on most faults are puzzling. In this work, we present a self-consistent explanation for the relatively high stress levels on immature faults that is compatible with low coseismic frictional resistance, from dynamic weakening, for all faults. We appeal to differences in structural complexity with the premise that geometric irregularities introduce resistance to slip in addition to frictional resistance. This general idea is quantified for the special case of self-similar fractal roughness of the fault surface. Natural faults have roughness characterized by amplitude-to-wavelength ratios α between 10-3 and 10-2. Through a second-order boundary perturbation analysis of quasi-static frictionless sliding across a band-limited self-similar interface in an ideally elastic solid, we demonstrate that roughness induces an additional shear resistance to slip, or roughness drag, given by τdrag=8π3α2G∗Δ/λmin, for G∗=G/(1-ν) with shear modulus Gand Poisson's ratio ν, slip Δ, and minimum roughness wavelength λmin. The influence of roughness drag on fault mechanics is verified through an extensive set of dynamic rupture simulations of earthquakes on strongly rate-weakening fractal faults with elastic-plastic off-fault response. The simulations suggest that fault rupture, in

  14. Shear Stress Behavior in Mesoscale Simulations of Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Don; Lomov, Ilya; Vitali, Efrem; Antoun, Tarabay

    2011-06-01

    3D mesoscale simulations of shock propagation in porous solids and powder have been performed with the hydrocode GEODYN. The results indicate that voids can have a profound effect on the stress state in the material behind the shock front. The simulations can explain experimentally observed quasielastic precursors in reshock profiles that are difficult to interpret in the context of the classical elastic-plastic theory. This effect persists even at extremely low porosity values, down to 0.01% by volume. Stress relaxation is pronounced in simulations involving wave propagation, but is not observed in uniform ramp loading. Thus this relaxation mechanism is non-local in nature and continuum models may not be inadequate for its description. Simulations show that response of highly porous powders are dominated by deviatoric stress relaxation in the shock regime. We propose an enhancement which can be easily integrated into most existing porous material continuum models for modeling the shock-induced relaxation phenomena observed in the mesoscale simulation. The model calculates microkinetic energy generated by dynamic loading and store it as an internal state variable. The rate of production and dissipation of microkinetic energy is calibrated based on the mesoscale results. The augmented continuum model represent deviatoric stress behavior observed under different loading regimes.

  15. The production of turbulent stress in a shear flow by irrotational fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartshore, I. S.; Durbin, P. A.; Hunt, J. C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to the way in which external turbulence affects an initially turbulence-free region in which there is a mean velocity gradient. External turbulence induces irrotational fluctuations in the sheared region which interact with the shear to produce rotational velocity fluctuations and mean Reynolds stresses. Since the actual front between the initial external turbulence and the shear flow is a randomly contorted surface, the turbulence near the front is intermittent, and is presently included in the form of a simple statistical model. In wind tunnel tests, turbulent shear stress was found to grow from zero to significant values in the interaction region. Observed stress magnitude and extent agrees with predictions, and it is concluded that turbulent stresses can be produced by irrotational fluctuations in a region of mean shear.

  16. Sediment transport and shear stress partitioning in a vegetated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bouteiller, Caroline; Venditti, J. G.

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation is a common feature in natural coastal and riverine water ways, interacting with both the water flow and sediment transport. However, the physical processes governing these interactions are still poorly understood, which makes it difficult to predict sediment transport and morphodynamics in a vegetated environment. We performed a simple experiment to study how sediment transport responds to the presence of flexible, single-blade vegetation, and how this response is influenced by the vegetation density. We found that the skin friction and sediment transport are reduced in a plant patch, and that this effect is larger for denser vegetation. We then evaluated several methods to calculate the skin friction in a vegetated flow, which is the key to sediment transport prediction. Among these, the inversion of bed load transport formulas and the Einstein and Banks (1950) methods appeared to produce the most reasonable values of the skin friction. Finally, we suggest using the parameter α, which is the ratio of the skin friction computed by these methods to the total bed shear stress, to make more realistic sediment transport predictions in morphodynamic models.

  17. Dynamic shear-influenced collagen self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2009-12-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g. cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9s(-1)). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch (QFDE) electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (approximately 2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 micro/s) occurring at a shear rate of 9s(-1). The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s(-1). However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term "hooks" which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or "mat" and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  18. Nonlinear dynamics and anisotropic structure of rotating sheared turbulence.

    PubMed

    Salhi, A; Jacobitz, F G; Schneider, K; Cambon, C

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulence in rotating shear flows is studied by means of pseudospectral direct numerical simulation and analytical spectral linear theory (SLT). The ratio of the Coriolis parameter to shear rate is varied over a wide range by changing the rotation strength, while a constant moderate shear rate is used to enable significant contributions to the nonlinear interscale energy transfer and to the nonlinear intercomponental redistribution terms. In the destabilized and neutral cases, in the sense of kinetic energy evolution, nonlinearity cannot saturate the growth of the largest scales. It permits the smallest scale to stabilize by a scale-by-scale quasibalance between the nonlinear energy transfer and the dissipation spectrum. In the stabilized cases, the role of rotation is mainly nonlinear, and interacting inertial waves can affect almost all scales as in purely rotating flows. In order to isolate the nonlinear effect of rotation, the two-dimensional manifold with vanishing spanwise wave number is revisited and both two-component spectra and single-point two-dimensional energy components exhibit an important effect of rotation, whereas the SLT as well as the purely two-dimensional nonlinear analysis are unaffected by rotation as stated by the Proudman theorem. The other two-dimensional manifold with vanishing streamwise wave number is analyzed with similar tools because it is essential for any shear flow. Finally, the spectral approach is used to disentangle, in an analytical way, the linear and nonlinear terms in the dynamical equations. PMID:24580333

  19. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  20. Dynamics of a polyelectrolyte in simple shear flow.

    PubMed

    Jayasree, Kandiledath; Manna, Raj Kumar; Banerjee, Debapriya; Kumar, P B Sunil

    2013-12-14

    The configurational dynamics of a polyelectrolyte (PE), subjected to a simple shear flow, is studied using Brownian dynamics (BD) and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulations of a bead-spring model with explicit counterions. We explore the effect of counterion condensation on the tumbling and extension of PEs by varying the shear rates for a range of values of the electrostatic coupling parameter A (which is defined as the ratio of the Bjerrum length to the size of the monomer). In all cases, the power spectrum of Rs(t) (which characterizes the projected length of the PE in the flow direction as a function of time) exhibits a power law decay at high frequencies, similar to that for a dumbbell in shear flow. For lower values of A (A ~ 2), the tumbling of the PE is periodic and is always associated with folding and stretching, which is in contrast to the oscillatory transition between the extended and globular states seen at higher values of A (A ~ 15). We observe that for A ~ 2 the tumbling frequency decreases and the average tumbling time increases with hydrodynamic interaction (HI). For A > 15, we observe a critical shear rate γ[combining dot]c below which there is considerable counterion condensation and the PE remains in the globular state with a structure akin to that of a neutral polymer in poor solvent. The γ[combining dot]c and the behavior of the PE above the critical shear rate are dependent on the HI. For a given shear rate, when there is considerable condensed counterion fluctuation, the PE extends as a whole and then collapses by the formation of folds with no observable periodicity in tumbling. When the condensed counterion fluctuations are suppressed, the polymer exhibits periodic tumbling. Simulation artifacts resulting from the implicit nature of the solvent and that due to boundary conditions are discussed by comparing the BD results with that obtained from the DPD simulations incorporating Ewald summation for electrostatics. PMID:24329088

  1. Shear stress activation of SREBP1 in endothelial cells is mediated by integrins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Chen, Benjamin P-C; Lu, Min; Zhu, Yi; Stemerman, Michael B; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of shear stress on the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and the mechanotransduction mechanism involved. Application of a shear stress (12 dyn/cm(2)) caused the proteolytic cleavage of SREBP1 and the ensuing translocation of its transcription factor domain into the nucleus. As a result, shear stress increased the mRNAs encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), as well as the binding of (125)I-LDL. Using a step flow channel, we showed that SREBP1 activation in ECs under laminar flow is transient, but disturbed flow causes sustained activation. In studying the shear stress-elicited molecular signaling that activates SREBP1, we found that blocking the beta(1)-integrin with the AIIB2 blocking-type monoclonal antibody inhibited SREBP1 activation induced by shear stress. EC attachment to fibronectin or the activation of beta(1)-integrin in the suspended ECs by the TS2/16 monoclonal antibody was sufficient for SREBP1 activation. Furthermore, transient transfection assays showed that dominant-negative mutants of focal adhesion kinase and c-Src attenuated the shear stress-increased LDLR promoter activity. These results demonstrate that integrin signaling plays a critical role in the modulation of SREBP in ECs in response to shear stress. PMID:11788464

  2. Shear stress-induced NO production is dependent on ATP autocrine signaling and capacitative calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Allison M.; Jaron, Dov; Buerk, Donald G.; Barbee, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Flow-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial cells plays a fundamental role in vascular homeostasis. However, the mechanisms by which shear stress activates NO production remain unclear due in part to limitations in measuring NO, especially under flow conditions. Shear stress elicits the release of ATP, but the relative contribution of autocrine stimulation by ATP to flow-induced NO production has not been established. Furthermore, the importance of calcium in shear stress-induced NO production remains controversial, and in particular the role of capacitive calcium entry (CCE) has yet to be determined. We have utilized our unique NO measurement device to investigate the role of ATP autocrine signaling and CCE in shear stress-induced NO production. We found that endogenously released ATP and downstream activation of purinergic receptors and CCE plays a significant role in shear stress-induced NO production. ATP-induced eNOS phophorylation under static conditions is also dependent on CCE. Inhibition of protein kinase C significantly inhibited eNOS phosphorylation and the calcium response. To our knowledge, we are the first to report on the role of CCE in the mechanism of acute shear stress-induced NO response. In addition, our work highlights the importance of ATP autocrine signaling in shear stress-induced NO production. PMID:25386222

  3. Properties of the shear stress peak radiated ahead of rapidly accelerating rupture fronts that mediate frictional slip

    PubMed Central

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Pino Muñoz, Daniel; Radiguet, Mathilde; Kammer, David S.; Molinari, Jean-François; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    We study rapidly accelerating rupture fronts at the onset of frictional motion by performing high-temporal-resolution measurements of both the real contact area and the strain fields surrounding the propagating rupture tip. We observe large-amplitude and localized shear stress peaks that precede rupture fronts and propagate at the shear-wave speed. These localized stress waves, which retain a well-defined form, are initiated during the rapid rupture acceleration phase. They transport considerable energy and are capable of nucleating a secondary supershear rupture. The amplitude of these localized waves roughly scales with the dynamic stress drop and does not decrease as long as the rupture front driving it continues to propagate. Only upon rupture arrest does decay initiate, although the stress wave both continues to propagate and retains its characteristic form. These experimental results are qualitatively described by a self-similar model: a simplified analytical solution of a suddenly expanding shear crack. Quantitative agreement with experiment is provided by realistic finite-element simulations that demonstrate that the radiated stress waves are strongly focused in the direction of the rupture front propagation and describe both their amplitude growth and spatial scaling. Our results demonstrate the extensive applicability of brittle fracture theory to fundamental understanding of friction. Implications for earthquake dynamics are discussed. PMID:26729877

  4. Properties of the shear stress peak radiated ahead of rapidly accelerating rupture fronts that mediate frictional slip.

    PubMed

    Svetlizky, Ilya; Pino Muñoz, Daniel; Radiguet, Mathilde; Kammer, David S; Molinari, Jean-François; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-19

    We study rapidly accelerating rupture fronts at the onset of frictional motion by performing high-temporal-resolution measurements of both the real contact area and the strain fields surrounding the propagating rupture tip. We observe large-amplitude and localized shear stress peaks that precede rupture fronts and propagate at the shear-wave speed. These localized stress waves, which retain a well-defined form, are initiated during the rapid rupture acceleration phase. They transport considerable energy and are capable of nucleating a secondary supershear rupture. The amplitude of these localized waves roughly scales with the dynamic stress drop and does not decrease as long as the rupture front driving it continues to propagate. Only upon rupture arrest does decay initiate, although the stress wave both continues to propagate and retains its characteristic form. These experimental results are qualitatively described by a self-similar model: a simplified analytical solution of a suddenly expanding shear crack. Quantitative agreement with experiment is provided by realistic finite-element simulations that demonstrate that the radiated stress waves are strongly focused in the direction of the rupture front propagation and describe both their amplitude growth and spatial scaling. Our results demonstrate the extensive applicability of brittle fracture theory to fundamental understanding of friction. Implications for earthquake dynamics are discussed. PMID:26729877

  5. Flow visualization and wall shear stress of a flapping model hummingbird wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanton, Erik W. M.; Vanier, Blake A.; Mohseni, Kamran

    2010-09-01

    The unsteady low Reynolds number aerodynamics of flapping flight was investigated experimentally through flow visualization by suspended particle imagery and wall shear stress measurement from micro-array hot-film anemometry. In conjunction, a mechanism was developed to create a flapping motion with three degrees of freedom and adjustable flapping frequency. The flapping kinematics and wing shape were selected for dynamic similarity to a hummingbird during hovering flight. Flow visualization was used to validate the anemometry observations of leading edge vortex (LEV) characteristics and to investigate the necessity of spanwise flow in LEV stability. The shear sensors determined LEV characteristics throughout the translation section of the stroke period for various wing speeds. It was observed that a minimum frequency between 2 and 3.5 Hz is required for the formation and stabilization of a LEV. The vortex strength peaked around 30% of the flapping cycle (corresponding to just past the translation midpoint), which agrees with results from previous studies conducted by others. The shear sensors also indicated a mild growth in LEV size during translation sections of the wing’s motion. This growth magnitude was nearly constant through a range of operating frequencies.

  6. Shear Stress induced Stretching of Red Blood Cells by Oscillating Bubbles within a Narrow Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Claus-Dieter Ohl Team

    2013-11-01

    The flow pattern, especially the boundary layer caused by the expanding/contracting bubble in a narrow gap (15 μm) and the resultant stretching of red blood cells is investigated in this work. High speed recordings show that a red blood cell (biconcave shape, thickness of 1-2 μm) can be elongated to five times its original length by a laser-induced cavitation bubble within the narrow gap. However, flexible cancer cells in suspension (RKO, spherical shape, diameter of 10-15 μm) are hardly elongated under the same experimental condition. We hypothesize that the shear stress at the boundary layer is crucial for this elongation to occur. Therefore, in order to resolve the related fluid dynamics, we conducted numerical simulations using the finite element method (Fluent). The rapidly expanding/contracting vapor bubble is successfully modeled by employing viscosity and surface tension. The transient pressure inside the bubble and the velocity profile of the flow is obtained. We observe strong shear near the upper and lower boundary during the bubble oscillation. The flow fields are compared with analytical solutions to transient and pulsating flows in 2D. In the experiment the red blood cells sit within the lower boundary layer, thus are probably elongated by this strong shear flow. In contrast, the spherical cancer cells are of comparable size to the gap height so that they are lesser affected by this boundary layer flow.

  7. Dynamic mechanoelectrochemistry of polypyrrole membranes via shear-force tracking.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, Robert G; Heinemann, Christian; Sundaresan, Vishnu Baba

    2016-07-14

    Mechanoelectrochemistry is the study of elastic and plastic deformation of materials during reversible reduction and oxidation processes. In this article, we introduce shear-force tracking as a method to dynamically measure mechanical (strain), chemical (ion transport), and electrical (applied redox potentials) responses of the conducting polymer polypyrrole (PPy) during redox reactions. This tracking technique uses a control algorithm to maintain a set distance between a ultramicroelectrode (UME) tip and a surface via shear-force regulation. Due to the sensitivity of shear-force signals in the near field of substrate surfaces, a significantly improved signal to noise ratio (20 : 1) is possible and allows for nanoscale measurement of redox events. Chemomechanical coupling (the ratio of ion transport to resultant extensional actuation) is calculated for PPy-based membranes of various thicknesses based on a mechanistic interpretation of charge storage in redox active conducting polymers. The measured dynamic response demonstrates that chemomechanical coupling is not a constant, as assumed in literature, but is dependent on the polymers state of charge and the direction (ingress/egress) of ion transport. PMID:27263628

  8. Acute Shear Stress Direction Dictates Adherent Cell Remodeling and Verifies Shear Profile of Spinning Disc Assays

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disc chamber or “spinning disc” in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. PMID:25619322

  9. Dynamic thermal field-induced gradient soft-shear for highly oriented block copolymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Yager, Kevin G; Berry, Brian; Kim, Ho-Cheol; Karim, Alamgir

    2012-11-27

    As demand for smaller, more powerful, and energy-efficient devices continues, conventional patterning technologies are pushing up against fundamental limits. Block copolymers (BCPs) are considered prime candidates for a potential solution via directed self-assembly of nanostructures. We introduce here a facile directed self-assembly method to rapidly fabricate unidirectionally aligned BCP nanopatterns at large scale, on rigid or flexible template-free substrates via a thermally induced dynamic gradient soft-shear field. A localized differential thermal expansion at the interface between a BCP film and a confining polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer due to a dynamic thermal field imposes the gradient soft-shear field. PDMS undergoes directional expansion (along the annealing direction) in the heating zone and contracts back in the cooling zone, thus setting up a single cycle of oscillatory shear (maximum lateral shear stress ∼12 × 10(4) Pa) in the system. We successfully apply this process to create unidirectional alignment of BCP thin films over a wide range of thicknesses (nm to μm) and processing speeds (μm/s to mm/s) using both a flat and patterned PDMS layer. Grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering measurements show absolutely no sign of isotropic population and reveal ≥99% aligned orientational order with an angular spread Δθ(fwhm) ≤ 5° (full width at half-maximum). This method may pave the way to practical industrial use of hierarchically patterned BCP nanostructures. PMID:23106286

  10. Energy consumption in terms of shear stress for two types of membrane bioreactors used for municipal wastewater treatment processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas; Bentzen, Thomas R.; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2012-10-01

    Two types of submerged membrane bioreactors (MBR): hollow fiber (HF) and hollow sheet (HS), have been studied and compared in terms of energy consumption and average shear stress over the membrane wall. The analysis of energy consumption was made using the correlation to determine the blower power and the blower power demand per unit of permeate volume. Results showed that for the system geometries considered, in terms the of the blower power, the HF MBR requires less power compared to HS MBR. However, in terms of blower power per unit of permeate volume, the HS MBR requires less energy. The analysis of shear stress over the membrane surface was made using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. Experimental measurements for the HF MBR were compared with the CFD model and an error less that 8% was obtained. For the HS MBR, experimental measurements of velocity profiles were made and an error of 11% was found. This work uses an empirical relationship to determine the shear stress based on the ratio of aeration blower power to tank volume. This relationship is used in bubble column reactors and it is extrapolate to determine shear stress on MBR systems. This relationship proved to be overestimated by 28% compared to experimental measurements and CFD results. Therefore, a corrective factor is included in the relationship in order to account for the membrane placed inside the bioreactor.