Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic stability enhancement

  1. Protein stabilizer, NDSB-195, enhances the dynamics of the β4 -α2 loop of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haimei; Hosoda, Kazuo; Ishii, Takeshi; Arai, Ryo; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Terawaki, Shin-Ichi; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2016-03-01

    Non-detergent sulfobetaines (NDSBs) are a new group of small, synthetic protein stabilizers, which have advantages over classical compatible osmolytes, such as polyol, amines, and amino acids: they do not increase solution viscosity, unlike polyols, and they are zwitterionic at all pH ranges, unlike amines and amino acids. NDSBs also facilitate the crystallization and refolding of proteins. The mechanism whereby NDSBs exhibit such activities, however, remains elusive. To gain insight into this mechanism, we studied, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the effects of dimethylethylammonium propane sulfonate (NDSB-195) on the dynamics of ubiquitin, on which a wealth of information has been accumulated. By analyzing the line width of amide proton resonances and the transverse relaxation rates of nitrogen atoms, we found that NDSB-195 enhances the microsecond-millisecond dynamics of a β4 -α2 loop of ubiquitin. Although those compounds that enhance protein dynamics are generally considered to destabilize protein molecules, NDSB-195 enhanced the stability of ubiquitin against guanidium chloride denaturation. Thus, the simultaneous enhancement of stability and flexibility by a single compound can be attained. PMID:26856691

  2. Enhancement of amorphous celecoxib stability by mixing it with octaacetylmaltose: the molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Grzybowska, K; Paluch, M; Wlodarczyk, P; Grzybowski, A; Kaminski, K; Hawelek, L; Zakowiecki, D; Kasprzycka, A; Jankowska-Sumara, I

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel way of stabilization of amorphous celecoxib (CEL) against recrystallization by preparing binary amorphous celecoxib-octaacetylmaltose (CEL-acMAL) systems by quench-cooling of the molten phase. As far as we know this is the first application of carbohydrate derivatives with acetate groups to enhance the stability of an amorphous drug. We found that CEL in the amorphous mixture with acMAL is characterized by a much better solubility than pure CEL. We report very promising results of the long-term measurements of stability of the CEL-acMAL binary amorphous system with small amount of stabilizer during its storage at room temperature. Moreover, we examined the effect of adding acMAL on molecular dynamics of CEL in the wide temperature range in both the supercooled liquid and glassy states. We found that the molecular mobility of the mixture of CEL with 10 wt % acMAL in the glassy state is much more limited than that in the case of pure CEL, which correlates with the better stability of the amorphous binary system. By dielectric measurements and theoretical calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT), we studied the role of acMAL in enhancing the stability of amorphous CEL in mixtures and postulated which interactions between CEL and acMAL molecules can be responsible for preventing devitrification. PMID:22384922

  3. Delay and noise induced regime shift and enhanced stability in gene expression dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Chunhua; Zhou, Guoqiong; Han, Qinglin; Tian, Dong; Zhang, Huili

    2014-12-01

    A quantitative model of autoregulatory gene expression involving a single gene with time delays and cross-correlated noise sources is investigated. The probability density and mean first passage time (MFPT) of the protein concentration are obtained. The impacts of multiplicative (σM) and additive (σA) noise intensities, cross-correlation intensity λ between two noises, time delays τ in the degradation process and θ in the synthesis process and time delay β in both processes on the probability density and MFPT of the regime shifts between high and low protein concentration states are discussed, respectively. These results indicate that (i) the regime shifts from a high (or low) protein concentration state to a low (or high) one can be induced by σM, λ and θ (or σA and β) (ii) the MFPT as a function of the noise intensity σM or σA exhibits one maximum value in the case of λ > 0 or θ > 0, this maximum is a signature of the noise's enhanced stability phenomenon for high protein concentration state; and (iii) τ and β can weaken the stability of high protein concentration state but, in contrast, λ and θ can enhance it in the gene expression dynamics.

  4. Silver-mediated base pairings: towards dynamic DNA nanostructures with enhanced chemical and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal and chemical fragility of DNA nanomaterials assembled by Watson–Crick (WC) pairing constrain the settings in which these materials can be used and how they can be functionalized. Here we investigate use of the silver cation, Ag+, as an agent for more robust, metal-mediated self-assembly, focusing on the simplest duplex building blocks that would be required for more elaborate Ag+–DNA nanostructures. Our studies of Ag+-induced assembly of non-complementary DNA oligomers employ strands of 2–24 bases, with varied base compositions, and use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to determine product compositions. High yields of duplex products containing narrowly distributed numbers of Ag+ can be achieved by optimizing solution conditions. These Ag+-mediated duplexes are stable to at least 60 mM Mg2+, higher than is necessary for WC nanotechnology schemes such as tile assemblies and DNA origami, indicating that sequential stages of Ag+-mediated and WC-mediated assembly may be feasible. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests simple helical structures for Ag+-mediated duplexes with lengths to at least 20 base pairs, and further indicates that the structure of cytosine-rich duplexes is preserved at high urea concentrations. We therefore propose an approach towards dynamic DNA nanomaterials with enhanced thermal and chemical stability through designs that combine sturdy silver-mediated ‘frames’ with WC paired ‘pictures’.

  5. Noises- and delay-enhanced stability in a bistable dynamical system describing chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chun; Han, Qinglin; Zeng, Chun-Hua; Wang, Hua; Tian, Dong; Long, Fei

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the Schlögl model with time-delayed feedback to study the switching behavior of a bistable chemical reaction system in the presence of cross-correlated multiplicative and additive noise sources. Our results show that (i) the multiplicative noise (or additive noise) can induce the switch from high (or low) concentration state to low (or high) concentration one; (ii) the mean first passage time (MFPT) of switch from high concentration state to the low concentration one as functions of the noise strengths exhibits a maximum, which is the signature of the noise enhanced stability (NES) phenomenon for the high concentration state; and (iii) as the value of cross-correlation strength λ, time delay τ, or strength K of the feedback loop increases, the maximum in the MFPT increases, i.e., λ, τ, or K can enhance stability of the high concentration state.

  6. End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Winiarski, D.W.; Donnelly, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.

  7. Dynamic stabilization of a bistable suspension system attached to a flexible host structure for operational safety enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Harne, R. L.; Wang, K. W.; Huang, Hai

    2014-12-01

    In engineering applications, a suspension system may be attached to a flexible host structure, e.g. spacecraft truss, to provide vibration isolation for sensitive instrumentation, where the suspension and host structure dynamics are strongly coupled. For linear suspensions, a resonance normally occurs adjacent to the roll-off frequency band, which significantly and detrimentally amplifies vibration transmission. To avoid the adverse resonance for operational safety enhancement, this research proposes a nonlinear bistable suspension and evaluates its performance when attached to a flexible host structure. Dynamic models of the bistable and comparable linear suspensions attached to the host structure are formulated, and steady-state responses are predicted using analytical and numerical methods. Results show that the bistable suspension can eliminate the harmful resonance via a dynamic stabilization phenomenon, and simultaneously retains the favorable isolation performance in the roll-off bandwidth as compared to the linear suspension. Series of experimental investigations support the analytical and numerical findings and help define design guidelines for operational safety improvement.

  8. Enhanced rotor modeling tailored for rub dynamic stability analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    New methods are presented that allow straightforward application of complex nonlinearities to finite element based rotor dynamic analyses. The key features are: (1) the methods can be implemented with existing finite element or dynamic simulation programs, (2) formulation is general for simple application to a wide range of problems, and (3) implementation is simplified because nonlinear aspects are separated from the linear part of the model. The new techniques are illustrated with examples of inertial nonlinearity and torquewhirl which can be important in rubbing turbomachinery. The sample analyses provide new understanding of these nonlinearities which are discussed.

  9. Dynamically stabilized magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Iacocca, E.; Awad, A. A.; Dumas, R. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Braun, H. B.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically non-trivial spin textures that manifest themselves as quasiparticles in ferromagnetic thin films or noncentrosymmetric bulk materials. So far attention has focused on skyrmions stabilized either by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) or by dipolar interaction, where in the latter case the excitations are known as bubble skyrmions. Here we demonstrate the existence of a dynamically stabilized skyrmion, which exists even when dipolar interactions and DMI are absent. We establish how such dynamic skyrmions can be nucleated, sustained and manipulated in an effectively lossless medium under a nanocontact. As quasiparticles, they can be transported between two nanocontacts in a nanowire, even in complete absence of DMI. Conversely, in the presence of DMI, we observe that the dynamical skyrmion experiences strong breathing. All of this points towards a wide range of skyrmion manipulation, which can be studied in a much wider class of materials than considered so far. PMID:26351104

  10. Enhancement of Transient Stability Limit and Voltage Regulation with Dynamic Loads Using Robust Excitation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Jahangir; Mahmud, Apel; Roy, Naruttam K.; Pota, Hemanshu R.

    2013-10-01

    In stressed power systems with large induction machine component, there exist undamped electromechanical modes and unstable monotonic voltage modes. This article proposes a sequential design of an excitation controller and a power system stabiliser (PSS) to stabilise the system. The operating region, with induction machines in stressed power systems, is often not captured using a linearisation around an operating point, and to alleviate this situation a robust controller is designed which guarantees stable operation in a large region of operation. A minimax linear quadratic Gaussian design is used for the design of the supplementary control to automatic voltage regulators, and a classical PSS structure is used to damp electromechanical oscillations. The novelty of this work is in proposing a method to capture the unmodelled nonlinear dynamics as uncertainty in the design of the robust controller. Tight bounds on the uncertainty are obtained using this method which enables high-performance controllers. An IEEE benchmark test system has been used to demonstrate the performance of the designed controller.

  11. Dynamics simulation of soybean agglutinin (SBA) dimer reveals the impact of glycosylation on its enhanced structural stability.

    PubMed

    Halder, Swagata; Surolia, Avadhesha; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2016-06-16

    The legume lectins are widely used as a model system for studying protein-carbohydrate and protein-protein interactions. They exhibit a fascinating quaternary structure variation. Recently, it has become clear that lectins exist as oligomers. Soybean agglutinin is a tetrameric legume lectin, each of whose subunits are glycosylated. In the present study we explore the main origin for the stability of soybean agglutinin dimer. In order to understand the role of glycosylation on the dimeric interface, we have carried out normal (298K), high temperatures (380K, 500K) long explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and compared the structural and conformational changes between the glycosylated and non-glycosylated dimers. The study reveals that the high degree of stability at normal temperature is mostly contributed by interfacial ionic interactions (~200 kcal/mol) between polar residues like Lys, Arg, Asp, Thr, Ser, Asn and Gln (62%). It maintains its overall folded conformation due to high subunit interactions at the non-canonical interface. Mainly five important hydrogen bonds between CO of one β sheet of one subunit with the N-H of other β strand of the other subunit help to maintain the structural integrity. Ten inter subunit salt-bridge interactions between Arg 185-Asṕ192, Lys 163-Asṕ169, Asp 169-Lyś 163 and Asp 192-Arǵ 185 at non-canonical interface appear to be important to maintain the three dimensional structure of SBA dimer. Moreover, our simulation results revealed that increase in vibrational entropy could decrease the free energy and contribute to the glycan-induced stabilization by ~45 kcal/mol at normal temperature. PMID:27108103

  12. DYNAMIC NEUROMUSCULAR STABILIZATION & SPORTS REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    Kobesova, Alena; Kolar, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic neuromuscular (core) stability is necessary for optimal athletic performance and is not achieved purely by adequate strength of abdominals, spinal extensors, gluteals or any other musculature; rather, core stabilization is accomplished through precise coordination of these muscles and intra‐abdominal pressure regulation by the central nervous system. Understanding developmental kinesiology provides a framework to appreciate the regional interdependence and the inter‐linking of the skeleton, joints, musculature during movement and the importance of training both the dynamic and stabilizing function of muscles in the kinetic chain. The Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) approach provides functional tools to assess and activate the intrinsic spinal stabilizers in order to optimize the movement system for both pre‐habilitation and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and performance. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23439921

  13. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  14. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  15. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  16. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  17. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics. PMID:26907568

  18. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics.

  19. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study identifies basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  20. The condition for dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Hof, A L; Gazendam, M G J; Sinke, W E

    2005-01-01

    The well-known condition for standing stability in static situations is that the vertical projection of the centre of mass (CoM) should be within the base of support (BoS). On the basis of a simple inverted pendulum model, an extension of this rule is proposed for dynamical situations: the position of (the vertical projection of) the CoM plus its velocity times a factor (square root l/g) should be within the BoS, l being leg length and g the acceleration of gravity. It is proposed to name this vector quantity 'extrapolated centre of mass position' (XcoM). The definition suggests as a measure of stability the 'margin of stability' b, the minimum distance from XcoM to the boundaries of the BoS. An alternative measure is the temporal stability margin tau, the time in which the boundary of the BoS would be reached without intervention. Some experimental data of subjects standing on one or two feet, flatfoot and tiptoe, are presented to give an idea of the usual ranges of these margins of stability. Example data on walking are also presented. PMID:15519333

  1. Stabilization Strategies for Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Devjani J.; Morasso, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Background When humans are faced with an unstable task, two different stabilization mechanisms are possible: a high-stiffness strategy, based on the inherent elastic properties of muscles/tools/manipulated objects, or a low-stiffness strategy, based on an explicit positional feedback mechanism. Specific constraints related to the dynamics of the task and/or the neuromuscular system often force people to adopt one of these two strategies. Methodology/Findings This experiment was designed such that subjects could achieve stability using either strategy, with a marked difference in terms of effort and control requirements between the two strategies. The task was to balance a virtual mass in an unstable environment via two elastic linkages that connected the mass to each hand. The dynamics of the mass under the influence of the unstable force field and the forces applied through the linkages were simulated using a bimanual, planar robot. The two linkages were non-linear, with a stiffness that increased with the amount of stretch. The mass could be stabilized by stretching the linkages to achieve a stiffness that was greater than the instability coefficient of the unstable field (high-stiffness), or by balancing the mass with sequences of small force impulses (low-stiffness). The results showed that 62% of the subjects quickly adopted the high-stiffness strategy, with stiffness ellipses that were aligned along the direction of instability. The remaining subjects applied the low-stiffness strategy, with no clear preference for the orientation of the stiffness ellipse. Conclusions The choice of a strategy was based on the bimanual coordination of the hands: high-stiffness subjects achieved stability quickly by separating the hands to stretch the linkages, while the low-stiffness subjects kept the hands close together and took longer to achieve stability but with lower effort. We suggest that the existence of multiple solutions leads to different types of skilled behavior

  2. Stabilization strategies for unstable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; De Santis, Dalia; Nomura, Taishin; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2014-12-01

    The stabilization of the human standing posture was originally attributed to the stiffness of the ankle muscles but direct measurements of the ankle stiffness ruled out this hypothesis, leaving open the possibility for a feedback stabilization strategy driven by proprioceptive signals. This solution, however, could be implemented with two different kinds of control mechanisms, namely continuous or intermittent feedback. The debate is now settled and the latter solution seems to be the most plausible one. Moreover, stabilization of unstable dynamics is not limited to bipedal standing. Indeed many manipulation tasks can be described in the same framework and thus a very general protocol for addressing this kind of problems is the use of haptic virtual reality where instability is generated by some kind of divergent or saddle-like force field. Several studies demonstrated that human subjects can choose to adopt a stiffness or feedback strategy as a combination of biomechanical and task constraints and can learn to switch from one strategy to the other if it is feasible or to use one or the other is infeasible. Understanding such mechanisms is relevant, for example, for the design of novel ergonomic man-machine interfaces in difficult, unstable tasks. PMID:25453479

  3. Enhancement of calcium signalling dynamics and stability by delayed modulation of the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Diana M; Hoth, Markus; Lewis, Richard S

    2002-01-01

    In addition to its homeostatic role of maintaining low resting levels of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase (PMCA) may actively contribute to the generation of complex Ca2+ signals. We have investigated the role of the PMCA in shaping Ca2+ signals in Jurkat human leukaemic T cells using single-cell voltage-clamp and calcium-imaging techniques. Crosslinking the T-cell receptor with the monoclonal antibody OKT3 induces a biphasic elevation in [Ca2+]i consisting of a rapid overshoot to a level > 1 μM, followed by a slow decay to a plateau of ≈0.5 μM. A similar overshoot was triggered by a constant level of Ca2+ influx through calcium-release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in thapsigargin-treated cells, due to a delayed increase in the rate of Ca2+ clearance by the PMCA. Following a rise in [Ca2+]i, PMCA activity increased in two phases: a rapid increase followed by a further calcium-dependent increase of up to approximately fivefold over 10-60 s, termed modulation. After the return of [Ca2+]i to baseline levels, the PMCA recovered slowly from modulation (τ ≈4 min), effectively retaining a ‘memory’ of the previous [Ca2+]i elevation. Using a Michaelis-Menten model with appropriate corrections for cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering, we found that modulation extended the dynamic range of PMCA activity by increasing both the maximal pump rate and Ca2+ sensitivity (reduction of KM). A simple flux model shows how pump modulation and its reversal produce the initial overshoot of the biphasic [Ca2+]i response. The modulation of PMCA activity enhanced the stability of Ca2+ signalling by adjusting the efflux rate to match influx through CRAC channels, even at high [Ca2+]i levels that saturate the transport sites and would otherwise render the cell defenceless against additional Ca2+ influx. At the same time, the delay in modulation enables small Ca2+ fluxes to transiently elevate [Ca2+]i, thus enhancing Ca2+ signalling dynamics. PMID:12068047

  4. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  5. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  6. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  7. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  8. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  9. Stability in dynamical systems I

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.; Weng, W.T.

    1984-08-01

    We have reviewed some of the basic techniques which can be used to analyze stability in nonlinear dynamical systems, particularly in circular particle accelerators. We have concentrated on one-dimensional systems in the examples in order to simply illustrate the general techniques. We began with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. We then reviewed linear equations with periodic coefficients using the basic techniques from accelerator theory. To handle nonlinear terms we developed a canonical perturbation theory. From this we calculated invariants and the amplitude dependence of the frequency. This led us to resonances. We studied the cubic resonance in detail by using a rotating coordinate system in phase space. We then considered a general isolated nonlinear resonance. In this case we calculated the width of the resonance and estimated the spacing of resonances in order to use the Chirikov criterion to restrict the validity of the analysis. Finally the resonance equation was reduced to the pendulum equation, and we examined the motion on a separatrix. This brought us to the beginnings of stochastic behavior in the neighborhood of the separatrix. It is this complex behavior in the neighborhood of the separatrix which causes the perturbation theory used here to diverge in many cases. In spite of this the methods developed here have been and are used quite successfully to study nonlinear effects in nearly integrable systems. When used with caution and in conjunction with numerical work they give tremendous insight into the nature of the phase space structure and the stability of nonlinear differential equations. 14 references.

  10. On the dynamic stability of grasping

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, C.H.; Li, Y.F.; Ding, H.; Xiong, Y.L.

    1999-09-01

    Stability is one of the important properties that a robot hand grasp must possess to be able to perform tasks similar to those performed by human hands. This paper discusses the dynamic stability of a grasped object. To analyze the stability of grasps, the authors build the model of the dynamics of the grasped object in response to the small perturbances. Furthermore, they determine the conditions associated with the dynamic stability and discuss the effects of various factors on the grasp stability. A quantitative measure for evaluating grasps is then presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed theory is verified via examples.

  11. Hydrophilic Domains Enhance Nanobubble Stability.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Koji; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yutaka; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-05-18

    Highly stable nanoscale gas states at solid/liquid interfaces, referred to as nanobubbles, have been widely studied for over a decade. In this study, nanobubbles generated on a hydrophobic Teflon amorphous fluoroplastic thin film in the presence and absence of hydrophilic carbon domains are investigated by peak force quantitative nanomechanics. On the hydrophobic surface without hydrophilic domains, a small number of nanobubbles are generated and then rapidly decrease in size. On the hydrophobic surface with hydrophilic domains, the hydrophilic domains have a significant effect on the generation and stability of nanobubbles, with bubbles remaining on the surface for up to three days. PMID:26864857

  12. Langevin stabilization of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Jesús A.; Catarello, Daniel P.; Wozniak, Justin M.; Skeel, Robert D.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper we show the possibility of using very mild stochastic damping to stabilize long time step integrators for Newtonian molecular dynamics. More specifically, stable and accurate integrations are obtained for damping coefficients that are only a few percent of the natural decay rate of processes of interest, such as the velocity autocorrelation function. Two new multiple time stepping integrators, Langevin Molly (LM) and Brünger-Brooks-Karplus-Molly (BBK-M), are introduced in this paper. Both use the mollified impulse method for the Newtonian term. LM uses a discretization of the Langevin equation that is exact for the constant force, and BBK-M uses the popular Brünger-Brooks-Karplus integrator (BBK). These integrators, along with an extrapolative method called LN, are evaluated across a wide range of damping coefficient values. When large damping coefficients are used, as one would for the implicit modeling of solvent molecules, the method LN is superior, with LM closely following. However, with mild damping of 0.2 ps-1, LM produces the best results, allowing long time steps of 14 fs in simulations containing explicitly modeled flexible water. With BBK-M and the same damping coefficient, time steps of 12 fs are possible for the same system. Similar results are obtained for a solvated protein-DNA simulation of estrogen receptor ER with estrogen response element ERE. A parallel version of BBK-M runs nearly three times faster than the Verlet-I/r-RESPA (reversible reference system propagator algorithm) when using the largest stable time step on each one, and it also parallelizes well. The computation of diffusion coefficients for flexible water and ER/ERE shows that when mild damping of up to 0.2 ps-1 is used the dynamics are not significantly distorted.

  13. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181 Dynamic.... 31, 2012. For the convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 23.181...

  14. The dynamical stability of reverberatory neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Tegnér, Jesper; Compte, Albert; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2002-12-01

    The concept of reverberation proposed by Lorente de Nó and Hebb is key to understanding strongly recurrent cortical networks. In particular, synaptic reverberation is now viewed as a likely mechanism for the active maintenance of working memory in the prefrontal cortex. Theoretically, this has spurred a debate as to how such a potentially explosive mechanism can provide stable working-memory function given the synaptic and cellular mechanisms at play in the cerebral cortex. We present here new evidence for the participation of NMDA receptors in the stabilization of persistent delay activity in a biophysical network model of conductance-based neurons. We show that the stability of working-memory function, and the required NMDA/AMPA ratio at recurrent excitatory synapses, depend on physiological properties of neurons and synaptic interactions, such as the time constants of excitation and inhibition, mutual inhibition between interneurons, differential NMDA receptor participation at excitatory projections to pyramidal neurons and interneurons, or the presence of slow intrinsic ion currents in pyramidal neurons. We review other mechanisms proposed to enhance the dynamical stability of synaptically generated attractor states of a reverberatory circuit. This recent work represents a necessary and significant step towards testing attractor network models by cortical electrophysiology. PMID:12461636

  15. Rational Design of Biobetters with Enhanced Stability.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Fabienne; Schneider, Curtiss P; Agrawal, Neeraj J; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2015-08-01

    Biotherapeutics are the fastest growing class of pharmaceutical with a rapidly evolving market facing the rise of biosimilar and biobetter products. In contrast to a biosimilar, which is derived from the same gene sequence as the innovator product, a biobetter has enhanced properties, such as enhanced efficacy or reduced immunogenicity. Little work has been carried out so far to increase the intrinsic stability of biotherapeutics via sequence changes, even though, aggregation, the primary degradation pathway of proteins, leads to issues ranging from manufacturing failure to immunological response and to loss of therapeutic activity. Using our spatial aggregation propensity tool as a first step to a rational design approach to identify aggregation-prone regions, biobetters of rituximab have been produced with enhanced stability by introducing site-specific mutations. Significant stabilization against aggregation was achieved for rituximab with no decrease in its binding affinity to the antigen. PMID:26096711

  16. Hybrid Control of Electric Vehicle Lateral Dynamics Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabti, Khatir; Bourahla, Mohamend; Mostefai, Lotfi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for motion control applied to driver stability system of an electric vehicle with independently driven wheels. By formulating the vehicle dynamics using an approximating the tire-force characteristics into piecewise affine functions, the vehicle dynamics cen be described as a linear hybrid dynamical system to design a hybrid model predictive controller. This controller is expected to make the yaw rate follow the reference ensuring the safety of the car passengers. The vehicle speed is estimated using a multi-sensor data fusion method. Simulation results in Matlab/Simulink have shown that the proposed control scheme takes advantages of electric vehicle and enhances the vehicle stability.

  17. A discussion of dynamic stability measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the measurement of the dynamic stability of linear systems are discussed. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the errors in the procedures, and to methods for calculating the system damping from the data. The techniques discussed include: transient decay, moving block analysis, spectral analysis, random decrement signatures, transfer function analysis, and parameter identification methods. The special problems of rotorcraft dynamic stability testing are discussed.

  18. Compressor Stability Enhancement Using Discrete Tip Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Thorp, Scott A.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Bright, Michelle B.

    2001-01-01

    Mass injection upstream of the tip of a high-speed axial compressor rotor is a stability enhancement approach known to be effective in suppressing small in tip-critical rotors. This process is examined in a transonic axial compressor rotor through experiments and time-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations. Measurements and simulations for discrete injection are presented for a range of injection rates and distributions of injectors around the annulus. The simulations indicate that tip injection increases stability by unloading the rotor tip and that increasing injection velocity improves the effectiveness of tip injection. For the tested rotor, experimental results demonstrate that at 70 percent speed the stalling flow coefficient can be reduced by 30 percent using an injected mass- flow equivalent to 1 percent of the annulus flow. At design speed, the stalling flow coefficient was reduced by 6 percent using an injected mass-fiow equivalent to 2 percent of the annulus flow. The experiments show that stability enhancement is related to the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip. For a given injected mass-flow, the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip is increased by injecting flow over discrete portions of the circumference as opposed to full-annular injection. The implications of these results on the design of recirculating casing treatments and other methods to enhance stability will be discussed.

  19. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  20. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  1. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  2. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  3. Enhanced stability of a naringenin/2,6-dimethyl β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: molecular dynamics and free energy calculations based on MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA.

    PubMed

    Sangpheak, Waratchada; Khuntawee, Wasinee; Wolschann, Peter; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada

    2014-05-01

    The structure, dynamic behavior and binding affinity of the inclusion complexes between naringenin and the two cyclodextrins (CDs), β-CD and its 2,6-dimethyl derivative (DM-β-CD), were theoretically studied by multiple molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Naringenin most likely prefers to bind with CDs through the phenyl ring. Although a lower hydrogen bond formation of naringenin with the 3-hydroxyl group of DM-β-CD (relative to β-CD) was observed, the higher cavity could encapsulate almost the whole naringenin molecule. In contrast for the naringenin/β-CD complex, the phenyl ring feasibly passed through the primary rim resulting in the chromone ring binding inside instead. MM-PBSA/GBSA and QM-PBSA/GBSA binding free energies strongly suggested a greater stability of the naringenin/DM-β-CD inclusion complex. Van der Waals force played an important role as the key guest-host interaction for the complexation between naringenin and each cyclodextrin. PMID:24681901

  4. Stability of Dynamical Systems with Discontinuous Motions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Anthony N.; Hou, Ling

    In this paper we present a stability theory for discontinuous dynamical systems (DDS): continuous-time systems whose motions are not necessarily continuous with respect to time. We show that this theory is not only applicable in the analysis of DDS, but also in the analysis of continuous dynamical systems (continuous-time systems whose motions are continuous with respect to time), discrete-time dynamical systems (systems whose motions are defined at discrete points in time) and hybrid dynamical systems (HDS) (systems whose descriptions involve simultaneously continuous-time and discrete-time). We show that the stability results for DDS are in general less conservative than the corresponding well-known classical Lyapunov results for continuous dynamical systems and discrete-time dynamical systems. Although the DDS stability results are applicable to general dynamical systems defined on metric spaces (divorced from any kind of description by differential equations, or any other kinds of equations), we confine ourselves to finite-dimensional dynamical systems defined by ordinary differential equations and difference equations, to make this paper as widely accessible as possible. We present only sample results, namely, results for uniform asymptotic stability in the large.

  5. Dynamic stability experiment of Maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on Maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents magnetic-force data obtained from both measurements and calculations. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial Maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all Maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on Maglev systems and compares their numerical simulation with predictions calculated by a nonlinear dynamic computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic system (EDS)-type vehicle model were obtained from both experimental observations and computer simulations for a five-degree-of-freedom Maglev vehicle moving on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of Maglev systems.

  6. Enhancement of stability in systems with metastable states

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, B.; Augello, G.; Pizzolato, N.; Valenti, D.; Fiasconaro, A.

    2007-12-06

    The investigation of noise-induced phenomena in far from equilibrium systems is one of the approach used to understand the behaviour of physical and biological complex systems. Metastability is a generic feature of many nonlinear systems, and the problem of the lifetime of metastable states involves fundamental aspects of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The enhancement of the life-time of metastable states through the noise enhanced stability effect and the role played by the resonant activation phenomenon will be discussed in models of interdisciplinary physics: (i) Ising model (ii) Josephson junction; (iii) stochastic FitzHugh-Nagumo model; (iv) a population dynamics model, and (v) a market model with stochastic volatility.

  7. Enhanced Product Stability in the Hammerhead Ribozyme†

    PubMed Central

    Shepotinovskaya, Irina; Uhlenbeck, Olke C.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of dissociation of P1, the 5′ product of hammerhead cleavage, is 100–300-fold slower in full-length hammerheads than in hammerheads that either lack or have disrupting mutations in the loop-loop tertiary interaction. The added stability requires the presence of residue 17 at the 3′ terminus of P1 but not the 2′, 3′ terminal phosphate. Since residue 17 is buried within the catalytic core of the hammerhead in the x-ray structure, we propose that the enhanced P1 stability is the result of the cooperative folding of the hammerhead around this residue. However, since the P1 is fully stabilized above 2.5 mM MgCl2 while hammerhead activity continues to increase with increasing MgCl2, it is clear that the hammerhead structure in the transition state must differ from that of the product complex. The product stabilization assay is used to test our earlier proposal that different tertiary interactions modulate the cleavage rate by differentially stabilizing the core. PMID:20423112

  8. U31: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Electronic Stability Control

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Delorenzis, Damon; LaClair, Tim J; Lim, Alvin; Pape, Doug

    2011-01-01

    A team led by NTRCI is working to improve the roll and yaw stability of heavy duty combination trucks through developing stability algorithms, assembling demonstration hardware, and investigating robust wireless communication. Modern electronic stability control (ESC) products automatically slow a vehicle rounding a corner too quickly or apply individual brakes when necessary to improve the steering characteristics of a vehicle. Air brake systems in North America provide no electronic communication between a tractor and semitrailer, limiting the degree to which control systems can be optimized. Prior research has demonstrated stability improvements where dynamic measurements and control commands are communicated between units of a vehicle. Three related activities were undertaken: (1) Develop an algorithm for the optimum yaw and roll control of a combination vehicle. Vehicle state parameters needed to control the vehicle and the proper brake response were determined. An integrated stability control for the tractor and semitrailer requires communication between the two units. Dynamic models were used to assess the algorithm. (2) Implement the ESC algorithm in the laboratory. Hardware components suitable for the harsh environment for measurement, sensor-to-controller communication, and semitrailer-to-tractor communication and brake actuation were specified and assembled as a working system. The goal was to collect the needed vehicle state information, transmit the information to the ESC system, and then actuate the brakes in response to controller commands. (3) Develop a wireless network with the data rate and reliability necessary to communicate dynamic signals for a vehicle stability control system. Adaptive connectivity-aware, multi-hop routing was selected because it can perform in the harsh environment where packet collisions and fading often will exist. The protocol is to give high priority to urgent messages.

  9. Convection, stability, and low dimensional dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, C.R.

    1997-05-01

    Recent developments concerning the connection between notions of hydrodynamic stability{emdash}usually associated with stationary laminar flows{emdash}and dynamics, most notably turbulent fluid flows, are reviewed. Based on a technical device originally introduced by Hopf in 1941, a rigorous mathematical relationship between criteria for nonlinear energy stability and bounds on global transport by steady, unsteady, or even turbulent flows, has been established. The optimal {open_quotes}marginal stability{close_quotes} criteria for the best bound leads to a novel variational problem, and the differential operator associated with the stability condition generates an adapted basis in which turbulent flow fields may naturally be decomposed. The application and implications of Galerkin truncations in these bases to produce low dimensional dynamical systems models is discussed in the context of thermal convection in a saturated porous layer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-06-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale.

  11. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A.S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-01-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale. PMID:26083864

  12. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:24468046

  13. Dynamic stabilization of an optomechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, H.; Wright, E. M.; Meystre, P.

    2014-10-01

    Quantum optomechanics offers the potential to investigate quantum effects in macroscopic quantum systems in extremely well-controlled experiments. In this paper we discuss one such situation, the dynamic stabilization of a mechanical system such as an inverted pendulum. The specific example that we study is a "membrane-in-the-middle" mechanical oscillator coupled to a cavity field via a quadratic optomechanical interaction, with cavity damping the dominant source of dissipation. We show that the mechanical oscillator can be dynamically stabilized by a temporal modulation of the radiation pressure force. We investigate the system both in the classical and quantum regimes highlighting similarities and differences.

  14. Dynamic stability of electrodynamic maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on mathematical models and experimental data. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis for motion-dependent magnetic-force-induced instability developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  15. Dynamic stability experiment of Maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Rote, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares with predictions calculated by a nonlinear dynamic computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic system (EDS)-type vehicle model were obtained from both experimental observations and computer simulations for a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  16. Ceramic membranes with enhanced thermal stability

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin; Bischoff, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    A method of creating a ceramic membrane with enhanced thermal stability is disclosed. The method involves combining quantities of a first metal alkoxide with a second metal, the quantities selected to give a preselected metal ratio in the resultant membrane. A limited amount of water and acid is added to the combination and stirred until a colloidal suspension is formed. The colloid is dried to a gel, and the gel is fired at a temperature greater than approximately 400.degree. C. The porosity and surface area of ceramic membranes formed by this method are not adversely affected by this high temperature firing.

  17. On dynamic stability boundaries for binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, M. I.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic stability boundaries are developed for linear two-degree-of-freedom systems with damping and elastic couplings. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of natural frequency proximity and those instabilities which stem from skew-symmetric stiffness properties. These arise in aeroelasticity and flight dynamics systems. Insight is provided into the destabilizing effects of the 'dreaded modal resonance' which results when the two natural frequencies in the modal natural frequency ratio match or nearly match.

  18. DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES, STABILITY AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The image of a ball rolling along a series of hills and valleys is an effective heuristic by which to communicate stability concepts in ecology. However, the dynamics of this landscape model have little to do with ecological systems. Other landscape representations, however, are ...

  19. Estimating Gait Stability: Asymmetrical Loading Effects Measured Using Margin of Stability and Local Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Worden, Timothy A; Beaudette, Shawn M; Brown, Stephen H M; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    Changes to intersegmental locomotor control patterns may affect body stability. Our study aimed to (a) characterize upper body dynamic stability in response to the unilateral addition of mass to the lower extremity and (b) evaluate the efficacy of 2 different stability measures commonly used in the literature to detect resulting symmetrical step pattern modifications across the weighted segments (spatial) and between epochs of the gait cycle (temporal). Young adults walked on a treadmill while unloaded or with weights applied unilaterally to their foot, shank, or thigh. Both margin of stability and local dynamic stability (LDS) estimates detected similar trends of distal segment weighting resulting in more unstable upper body movement compared to proximal weighting; however only LDS detected anteroposterior changes in upper body stability over time. PMID:27253774

  20. Dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic response of maglev systems is important in several respects: Safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. The dynamic response of vehicles is the key element in the determination of ride quality, and vehicle stability is one of the important elements relative to safety. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, the vehicle dynamics must be understood. The trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. This paper is a summary of our previous work on dynamics, stability and control of maglev systems. First of all, the importance of dynamics of vehicle/guideway of maglev systems is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the modeling vehicle/guideway interactions of maglev systems with a multicar, or multiload vehicle traversing on a single or double-span flexible guideway. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions in wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters for maglev systems are investigated. Secondly, the alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems are investigated in this study to achieve safe, stable operation and acceptable ride comfort requires some form of vehicle motion control. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. Finally, this paper discusses the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  1. Dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-06-01

    The dynamic response of maglev systems is important in several respects: Safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. The dynamic response of vehicles is the key element in the determination of ride quality, and vehicle stability is one of the important elements relative to safety. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, the vehicle dynamics must be understood. The trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. This paper is a summary of our previous work on dynamics, stability and control of maglev systems. First of all, the importance of dynamics of vehicle/guideway of maglev systems is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the modeling vehicle/guideway interactions of maglev systems with a multicar, or multiload vehicle traversing on a single or double-span flexible guideway. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions in wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters for maglev systems are investigated. Secondly, the alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems are investigated in this study to achieve safe, stable operation and acceptable ride comfort requires some form of vehicle motion control. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. Finally, this paper discusses the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  2. Photovoltaic panel having enhanced conversion efficiency stability

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, V. D.

    1985-10-01

    A photovoltaic panel for converting light into electrical energy has enhanced energy conversion efficiency stability. The panel includes a photovoltaic device having an active region formed from a semiconductor material which exhibits an energy conversion efficiency stability directly related to the operating temperature of the device. The panel also includes means for maintaining the operating temperature of the device upon exposure to light at an elevated temperature above the ambient temperature external to the device. The active region semiconductor material is preferably an amorphous semiconductor alloy such as, for example, an amorphous silicon alloy. The operating temperature elevating means can include a thermal insulating material such as glass wool, styrofoam, or cork applied to the back side of the device to minimize heat conduction from the device. The panel can also include an enclosure for enclosing the device having a transparent cover overlying the device to seal the enclosure and provide a still air space adjacent the device. The panel is thereby arranged to maintain the operating temperature of the device at a temperature which is from about twenty degrees Centigrade to about one hundred and fifty degrees Centigrade above the ambient temperature external to the device.

  3. Stability, complexity and robustness in population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Demongeot, J; Hazgui, H; Ben Amor, H; Waku, J

    2014-09-01

    The problem of stability in population dynamics concerns many domains of application in demography, biology, mechanics and mathematics. The problem is highly generic and independent of the population considered (human, animals, molecules,…). We give in this paper some examples of population dynamics concerning nucleic acids interacting through direct nucleic binding with small or cyclic RNAs acting on mRNAs or tRNAs as translation factors or through protein complexes expressed by genes and linked to DNA as transcription factors. The networks made of these interactions between nucleic acids (considered respectively as edges and nodes of their interaction graph) are complex, but exhibit simple emergent asymptotic behaviours, when time tends to infinity, called attractors. We show that the quantity called attractor entropy plays a crucial role in the study of the stability and robustness of such genetic networks. PMID:25107273

  4. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the 'thinnest site' of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most 'dangerous' direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  5. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the ‘thinnest site’ of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most ‘dangerous’ direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  6. Parachute Dynamic Stability Variations Due to Atmospheric Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, J. M.; Braun, R. D.; Clark, I. G.

    2014-06-01

    Apparent inertia effects on parachute dynamics are investigated. Both static and dynamic stability are examined as a function of apparent inertia parameters. Conclusions are drawn describing changes in stability based on atmospheric density.

  7. Dynamics and stability of pipes conveying fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.O. . Inst. of Applied Mechanics); Chen, K.C. )

    1994-02-01

    This paper deals with the dynamics and stability of simply supported pipes conveying fluid, where the fluid has a small harmonic component of flow velocity superposed on a constant mean value. The perturbation techniques and the method of averaging are used to convert the nonautonomous system into an autonomous one and determine the stability boundaries. Post-bifurcation analysis is performed for the parametric points in the resonant regions where the axial force, which is induced by the transverse motion of the pipe due to the fixed-span ends and contributes nonlinearities to the equations of motion, is included. For the undamped system, linear analysis is inconclusive about stability and there does not exist nontrivial solution in the resonant regions. For the damped system, it is found that the original stable system remains stable when the pulsating frequency increased cross the stability boundary and becomes unstable when the pulsating frequency decreases across the stability boundary. Practical applications of such a problem are vibrations of heat exchangers, liquid-fuel rocket piping, and nuclear reactor coolant channels.

  8. Dynamic flight stability of a model dronefly in vertical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chong; Sun, Mao

    2014-12-01

    The dynamic flight stability of a model dronefly in hovering and upward flight is studied. The method of computational fluid dynamics is used to compute the stability derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector used to solve the equations of motion. The major finding is as following. Hovering flight of the model dronefly is unstable because of the existence of an unstable longitudinal and an unstable lateral natural mode of motion. Upward flight of the insect is also unstable, and the instability increases as the upward flight speed increases. Inertial force generated by the upward flight velocity coupled with the disturbance in pitching angular velocity is responsible for the enhancement of the instability.

  9. Dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuk Tung

    This thesis presents a study of the dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars resulting from the accretion induced collapse of rapidly rotating white dwarfs. Chapter 2 and part of Chapter 3 study the equilibrium models for these neutron stars. They are constructed by assuming that the neutron stars have the same masses, angular momenta, and specific angular momentum distributions as the pre-collapse white dwarfs. If the pre-collapse white dwarf is rapidly rotating, the collapsed object will contain a high density central core of size about 20 km, surrounded by a massive accretion torus extending to hundreds of kilometers from the rotation axis. The ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to gravitational binding energy, β, of these neutron stars is all found to be less than 0.27. Chapter 3 studies the dynamical stability of these neutron stars by numerically evolving the linearized hydrodynamical equations. A dynamical bar-mode instability is observed when the β of the star is greater than the critical value β d ≈ 0.25. It is expected that the unstable mode will persist until a substantial amount of angular momentum is carried away by gravitational radiation. The detectability of these sources is studied and it is estimated that LIGO II is unlikely to detect them unless the event rate is greater than 10-6/year/galaxy. All the calculations on the structure and stability of the neutron stars in Chapters 2 and 3 are carried out using Newtonian hydrodynamics and gravity. Chapter 4 studies the relativistic effects on the structure of these neutron stars. New techniques are developed and used to construct neutron star models to the first post- Newtonian (1PN) order. The structures of the ON models are qualitatively similar to the corresponding Newtonian models, but the values of β are somewhat smaller. The maximum β for these ON neutron stars is found to be 0.24, which is 8% smaller than the Newtonian result (0.26). However, relativistic effects will also change

  10. Stability studies of Solar Optical Telescope dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullapalli, Sarma N.; Pal, Parimal K.; Ruthven, Gregory P.

    1987-01-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) is designed to operate as an attached payload mounted on the Instrument Pointing System (IPS) in the cargo bay of the Shuttle Orbiter. Pointing and control of SOT is accomplished by an active Articulated Primary Mirror (APM), an active Tertiary Mirror (TM), an elaborate set of optical sensors, electromechanical actuators and programmable controllers. The structural interactions of this complex control system are significant factors in the stability of the SOT. The preliminary stability study results of the SOT dynamical system are presented. Structural transfer functions obtained from the NASTRAN model of the structure were used. These studies apply to a single degree of freedom (elevation). Fully integrated model studies will be conducted in the future.

  11. Beam stability & nonlinear dynamics. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    his Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Beam Stability and Nonlinear Dynamics, December 3-5, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  12. Dynamical Stability of Slip-stacking Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-04

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  13. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  14. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J. N.; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  15. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J N; Fiebach, Christian J

    2015-06-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  16. Dynamic and galvanic stability of stretchable supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Gu, Taoli; Wei, Bingqing

    2012-12-12

    Stretchable electronics are emerging as a new technological advancement, since they can be reversibly stretched while maintaining functionality. To power stretchable electronics, rechargeable and stretchable energy storage devices become a necessity. Here, we demonstrate a facile and scalable fabrication of full stretchable supercapacitor, using buckled single-walled carbon nanotube macrofilms as the electrodes, an electrospun membrane of elastomeric polyurethane as the separator, and an organic electrolyte. We examine the electrochemical performance of the fully stretchable supercapacitors under dynamic stretching/releasing modes in different stretching strain rates, which reveal the true performance of the stretchable cells, compared to the conventional method of testing the cells under a statically stretched state. In addition, the self-discharge of the supercapacitor and the electrochemical behavior under bending mode are also examined. The stretchable supercapacitors show excellent cyclic stability under electrochemical charge/discharge during in situ dynamic stretching/releasing. PMID:23167804

  17. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  18. High gain 1.3-μm GaInNAs SOA with fast gain dynamics and enhanced temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Iliadis, N.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Viheriälä, J.; Laakso, A.; Dris, S.; Spyropoulou, M.; Avramopoulos, H.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.; Guina, M.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are a well-established solution of optical access networks. They could prove an enabling technology for DataCom by offering extended range of active optical functionalities. However, in such costand energy-critical applications, high-integration densities increase the operational temperatures and require powerhungry external cooling. Taking a step further towards improving the cost and energy effectiveness of active optical components, we report on the development of a GaInNAs/GaAs (dilute nitride) SOA operating at 1.3μm that exhibits a gain value of 28 dB and combined with excellent temperature stability owing to the large conduction band offset between GaInNAs quantum well and GaAs barrier. Moreover, the characterization results reveal almost no gain variation around the 1320 nm region for a temperature range from 20° to 50° C. The gain recovery time attained values as short as 100 ps, allowing implementation of various signal processing functionalities at 10 Gb/s. The combined parameters are very attractive for application in photonic integrated circuits requiring uncooled operation and thus minimizing power consumption. Moreover, as a result of the insensitivity to heating issues, a higher number of active elements can be integrated on chip-scale circuitry, allowing for higher integration densities and more complex optical on-chip functions. Such component could prove essential for next generation DataCom networks.

  19. Calculation of the lateral-dynamic stability of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raikh, A

    1952-01-01

    Graphs and formulas are given with the aid of which all the aerodynamic coefficients required for computing the lateral dynamic stability can be determined. A number of numerical examples are given for obtaining the stability derivatives and solving the characteristic-stability equation. Approximate formulas are derived with the aid of which rapid preliminary computations may be made and the stability coefficients corrected for certain modifications of the airplane. A derivation of the lateral-dynamic-stability equations is included.

  20. Stability precision dynamic testing system on artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Li, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic feature of Weapon equipments is one of important performance index for evaluating the performance of the whole weapon system. The construction of target range in our country in fire control dynamic testing is relatively backward; therefore, it has greatly influenced the evaluation on the fire control system. In order to solve this problem, it's urgent to develop a new testing instrument so as to adjust to the armament research process and promote weapon system working more efficiently and thereby meeting the needs of modernization in national defense. This paper proposes a new measure which is used to test the stability precision of the fire control system, and it is installed on the moving base. Using the method, we develop a testing system which can test the stability precision of the fire control system and achieve a high precision results after testing. The innovation of the system is we can receive the image not only by CCD, but our eyes. It also adopts digital image-forming and image processing technique for real-time measurement and storing of the target information; it simultaneously adopts the method adjusting the platform and the corresponding fixture mounted on a sample to measure the stable precision and the precision of corner of stabilizator. In this paper, we make a description on the construction of the system and the idea of the designing of the optical system. Finally, we introduce the actual application of the system and testing results.

  1. Dynamic stability of an aerodynamically efficient motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amrit; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycles exhibit two potentially dangerous oscillatory modes known as 'wobble' and 'weave'. The former is reminiscent of supermarket castor shimmy, while the latter is a low frequency 'fish-tailing' motion that involves a combination of rolling, yawing, steering and side-slipping motions. These unwanted dynamic features, which can occur when two-wheeled vehicles are operated at speed, have been studied extensively. The aim of this paper is to use mathematical analysis to identify important stability trends in the on-going design of a novel aerodynamically efficient motorcycle known as the ECOSSE Spirit ES1. A mathematical model of the ES1 is developed using a multi-body dynamics software package called VehicleSim [Anon, VehicleSim Lisp Reference Manual Version 1.0, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, 2008. Available at http://www.carsim.com]. This high-fidelity motorcycle model includes realistic tyre-road contact geometry, a comprehensive tyre model, tyre relaxation and a flexible frame. A parameter set representative of a modern high-performance machine and rider is used. Local stability is investigated via the eigenvalues of the linearised models that are associated with equilibrium points of interest. A comprehensive study of the effects of frame flexibilities, acceleration, aerodynamics and tyre variations is presented, and an optimal passive steering compensator is derived. It is shown that the traditional steering damper cannot be used to stabilise the ES1 over its entire operating speed range. A simple passive compensator, involving an inerter is proposed. Flexibility can be introduced deliberately into various chassis components to change the stability characteristics of the vehicle; the implications of this idea are studied.

  2. Stability at systems of usual differential equations in virus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    In this paper we discuss different models of differential equations systems, that describe virus dynamics in different situations (HIV-virus and Hepatitis B-virus). We inquire the stability of differential equations. We use theorems of the stability theory.

  3. Flux-line-lattice stability and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyde, H. R.; Moleko, L. K.; Findeisen, P.

    1992-02-01

    The mechanical stability of a flux-line lattice (FLL) having parameters appropriate for the high-Tc superconductors is determined using the self-consistent phonon theory of lattice dynamics. Nearly parallel flux lines (FL's) are assumed and FL pinning is neglected. The FLL becomes unstable when a phonon frequency goes to zero. At instability the rms vibrational amplitude diverges and the FL's can no longer be localized. In Bi2Sr2CaCuO2O8, the instability line as a function of temperature and magnetic field lies below but in reasonable agreement with the observed irreversibility line. In YBa2Cu3O7, it lies significantly below. The present instability line is a reliable upper bound to the FLL melting line. Identifying instability with melting, we find the Lindemann criterion of melting does not hold. However, the present instability lines and the melting lines obtained by Houghton et al. are found to have similar shape.

  4. Group formation stabilizes predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, John M; Mosser, Anna; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Packer, Craig

    2007-10-25

    Theoretical ecology is largely founded on the principle of mass action, in which uncoordinated populations of predators and prey move in a random and well-mixed fashion across a featureless landscape. The conceptual core of this body of theory is the functional response, predicting the rate of prey consumption by individual predators as a function of predator and/or prey densities. This assumption is seriously violated in many ecosystems in which predators and/or prey form social groups. Here we develop a new set of group-dependent functional responses to consider the ecological implications of sociality and apply the model to the Serengeti ecosystem. All of the prey species typically captured by Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) are gregarious, exhibiting nonlinear relationships between prey-group density and population density. The observed patterns of group formation profoundly reduce food intake rates below the levels expected under random mixing, having as strong an impact on intake rates as the seasonal migratory behaviour of the herbivores. A dynamical system model parameterized for the Serengeti ecosystem (using wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) as a well-studied example) shows that grouping strongly stabilizes interactions between lions and wildebeest. Our results suggest that social groups rather than individuals are the basic building blocks around which predator-prey interactions should be modelled and that group formation may provide the underlying stability of many ecosystems. PMID:17960242

  5. Enhancing probiotic stability in industrial processes

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Background Manufacture of probiotic products involves industrial processes that reduce the viability of the strains. This lost of viability constitutes an economic burden for manufacturers, compromising the efficacy of the product and preventing the inclusion of probiotics in many product categories. Different strategies have been used to improve probiotic stability during industrial processes. These include technological approaches, such as the modification of production parameters or the reformulation of products, as well as microbiological approaches focused on the strain intrinsic resistance. Among the later, both selection of natural strains with the desired properties and stress-adaptation of strains have been widely used. Conclusion During recent years, the knowledge acquired on the molecular basis of stress-tolerance of probiotics has increased our understanding on their responses to industrial stresses. This knowledge on stress-response may nowadays be used for the selection of the best strains and industrial conditions in terms of probiotic stability in the final product. PMID:23990824

  6. Lift enhancement by bats' dynamically changing wingspan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the aerodynamic role of the dynamically changing wingspan in bat flight. Based on direct numerical simulations of the flow over a slow-flying bat, it is found that the dynamically changing wingspan can significantly enhance the lift. Further, an analysis of flow structures and lift decomposition reveal that the elevated vortex lift associated with the leading-edge vortices intensified by the dynamically changing wingspan considerably contributed to enhancement of the time-averaged lift. The nonlinear interaction between the dynamically changing wing and the vortical structures plays an important role in the lift enhancement of a flying bat in addition to the geometrical effect of changing the lifting-surface area in a flapping cycle. In addition, the dynamically changing wingspan leads to the higher efficiency in terms of generating lift for a given amount of the mechanical energy consumed in flight. PMID:26701882

  7. Dynamic flight stability of hovering insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mao; Wang, Jikang; Xiong, Yan

    2007-06-01

    The equations of motion of an insect with flapping wings are derived and then simplified to that of a flying body using the “rigid body” assumption. On the basis of the simplified equations of motion, the longitudinal dynamic flight stability of four insects (hoverfly, cranefly, dronefly and hawkmoth) in hovering flight is studied (the mass of the insects ranging from 11 to 1,648 mg and wingbeat frequency from 26 to 157 Hz). The method of computational fluid dynamics is used to compute the aerodynamic derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis are used to solve the equations of motion. The validity of the “rigid body” assumption is tested and how differences in size and wing kinematics influence the applicability of the “rigid body” assumption is investigated. The primary findings are: (1) For insects considered in the present study and those with relatively high wingbeat frequency (hoverfly, drone fly and bumblebee), the “rigid body” assumption is reasonable, and for those with relatively low wingbeat frequency (cranefly and howkmoth), the applicability of the “rigid body” assumption is questionable. (2) The same three natural modes of motion as those reported recently for a bumblebee are identified, i.e., one unstable oscillatory mode, one stable fast subsidence mode and one stable slow subsidence mode. (3) Approximate analytical expressions of the eigenvalues, which give physical insight into the genesis of the natural modes of motion, are derived. The expressions identify the speed derivative M u (pitching moment produced by unit horizontal speed) as the primary source of the unstable oscillatory mode and the stable fast subsidence mode and Z w (vertical force produced by unit vertical speed) as the primary source of the stable slow subsidence mode.

  8. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  9. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  10. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  11. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  12. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  13. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; Li, Jack; Reed, Sean A; Xiao, Han; Young, Travis S; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-05-24

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. Here we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a library of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ∼9 °C was identified. This result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes. PMID:27162342

  14. Dynamic Stabilization of a Quantum Many-Body Spin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, T. M.; Gerving, C. S.; Land, B. J.; Anquez, M.; Hamley, C. D.; Chapman, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting quantum spin system realized in a spin-1 atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. The spinor Bose-Einstein condensate is initialized to an unstable fixed point of the spin-nematic phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to squeezing and quantum spin mixing. To stabilize the system, periodic microwave pulses are applied that rotate the spin-nematic many-body fluctuations and limit their growth. The stability diagram for the range of pulse periods and phase shifts that stabilize the dynamics is measured and compares well with a stability analysis.

  15. Dynamic stabilization of a quantum many-body spin system.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T M; Gerving, C S; Land, B J; Anquez, M; Hamley, C D; Chapman, M S

    2013-08-30

    We demonstrate dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting quantum spin system realized in a spin-1 atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. The spinor Bose-Einstein condensate is initialized to an unstable fixed point of the spin-nematic phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to squeezing and quantum spin mixing. To stabilize the system, periodic microwave pulses are applied that rotate the spin-nematic many-body fluctuations and limit their growth. The stability diagram for the range of pulse periods and phase shifts that stabilize the dynamics is measured and compares well with a stability analysis. PMID:24033006

  16. Temporal stability in forest productivity increases with tree diversity due to asynchrony in species dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morin, Xavier; Fahse, Lorenz; de Mazancourt, Claire; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Bugmann, Harald

    2014-12-01

    Theory predicts a positive relationship between biodiversity and stability in ecosystem properties, while diversity is expected to have a negative impact on stability at the species level. We used virtual experiments based on a dynamic simulation model to test for the diversity-stability relationship and its underlying mechanisms in Central European forests. First our results show that variability in productivity between stands differing in species composition decreases as species richness and functional diversity increase. Second we show temporal stability increases with increasing diversity due to compensatory dynamics across species, supporting the biodiversity insurance hypothesis. We demonstrate that this pattern is mainly driven by the asynchrony of species responses to small disturbances rather than to environmental fluctuations, and is only weakly affected by the net biodiversity effect on productivity. Furthermore, our results suggest that compensatory dynamics between species may enhance ecosystem stability through an optimisation of canopy occupancy by coexisting species. PMID:25212251

  17. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  18. Double polymer sheathed carbon nanotube supercapacitors show enhanced cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenqi; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Ouyang, An; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Yibin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices.Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05978j

  19. Enhanced stabilization of vesicles by compressed CO2.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jianling; Cheng, Siqing; Han, Buxing; Zhang, Chaoxing; Feng, Xiaoying; Zhao, Yueju

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of compressed CO2 on the stability of vesicles formed in a dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixed surfactant system by combination of phase behavior and turbidity study, and UV-vis and fluorescence techniques. It was discovered that compressed CO2 could enhance the stability of vesicles significantly. This new and effective method to stabilize vesicles has some unique advantages over conventional methods. For example, the size and stability of the vesicles can be easily controlled by CO2 pressure; the method is greener because CO2 is a green reagent and it can be released completely after depressurization, which simplifies postseparation processes in applications. The main reason for CO2 to stabilize the vesicles is that CO2 molecules can insert into the hydrophobic bilayer region to enhance the rigidity of the vesicle film and reduce the size of the vesicles, which is different from that of conventional cosolvents (e.g., alcohols) used to stabilize vesicles. On the basis of this discovery, we developed a method to prepare hollow silica spheres using tetraethoxysilane as the precursor and CO2-stabilized vesicles as the template, in which CO2 acts as both the stabilizer of the vesicular template and the catalyst for the hydrolysis reaction of the precursor, and other cosolvents and catalysts are not required. Besides, the size of the silica hollow spheres prepared can be controlled by the pressure of CO2. PMID:19049396

  20. Dynamic stabilization in the double-well duffing oscillator

    PubMed

    Kim; Kim

    2000-06-01

    Bifurcations associated with stability of the saddle fixed point of the Poincare map, arising from the unstable equilibrium point of the potential, are investigated in a forced Duffing oscillator with a double-well potential. One interesting behavior is the dynamic stabilization of the saddle fixed point. When the driving amplitude is increased through a threshold value, the saddle fixed point becomes stabilized via a pitchfork bifurcation. We note that this dynamic stabilization is similar to that of the inverted pendulum with a vertically oscillating suspension point. After the dynamic stabilization, the double-well Duffing oscillator behaves as the single-well Duffing oscillator, because the effect of the central potential barrier on the dynamics of the system becomes negligible. PMID:11088331

  1. Enhanced thermal stability of Ag nanorods through capping

    SciTech Connect

    Bachenheimer, Lou; Elliott, Paul; Stagon, Stephen; Huang, Hanchen

    2014-11-24

    Ag nanorods may serve as sensors in the detection of trace amounts of chemical agents, even single molecules, through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). However, thermal coarsening of Ag nanorods near room temperature limits their applications. This letter proposes the use of a thin oxide capping layer to enhance the thermal stability of Ag nanorods beyond 100 °C. Using electron microscopy characterization and SERS tests, the authors show that the proposed method is effective in stabilizing both morphology and sensitivity of Ag nanorods. The results of this work extend the applicability of Ag nanorods as chemical sensors to higher temperatures.

  2. A Quasi-Steady Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady CFD with Unsteady Aerodynamic Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin is caused by an undamping of the aerodynamics in one of the lower frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic lineloads derived from steady rigid computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic (CAE) analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping. This paper will present a method of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics. The enhanced formulation uses unsteady CFD to compute the response of selected lower frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle lineloads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic lineload response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping and mass matrices. The results of the enhanced quasi-static aeroelastic stability analysis are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady CAE analysis and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady CAE analysis.

  3. A paradigm shift from stationary stability to dynamically evolving stability required from experimental fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi

    2009-05-15

    A paradigm shift from the traditional concept of stationary stability to the new one of dynamically evolving stability is proposed in order to correctly deal with dynamically evolving experimental plasmas. A new process to derive generalized simultaneous eigenvalue equations is presented by the use of a generalized theory of self-organization. The final simultaneous eigenvalue equations are shown to be a good candidate for the proposed paradigm shift because their mathematical forms exactly describe the self-similarly evolving and dynamically stable states available to various dynamic systems. Typical numerical configurations of mutually dependent, dynamically stable, and self-similarly evolving physical quantities are presented for the reversed-field pinch plasmas in cylindrical geometry by solving a set of simultaneous eigenvalue equations for the two-fluid model. A new algorithm is presented to find the dynamically stable, self-similarly evolving and self-organized configurations and to investigate quantitatively the robust dynamical stability of these configurations.

  4. Enhancing Biopolymer Dynamics through Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal filaments that organize intracellular space structurally and through active transport along their lengths. They need to be organized and remodeled quickly during development of differentiated cells or in mitosis. Much work has focused on remodeling from the ends because these long polymers can stochastically disassemble through dynamic instability or be actively disassembled. Microtubule-severing enzymes are a novel class of microtubule regulators that create new ends by cutting the filament. Thus, these proteins add a new dimension to microtubule regulation by their ability to create new microtubule ends. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We are interested in the inherent biophysical activities of these proteins and their ability to remodel cellular microtubule networks. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We use two-color single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence imaging to visualize purified severing enzymes and microtubules in vitro. We have examined two families of severing enzymes to find that their biophysical activities are distinct giving them different network-regulating abilities.

  5. Stability analysis of dynamic thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Crawford, Paulo

    2005-11-01

    We analyse the stability of generic spherically symmetric thin shells to linearized perturbations around static solutions. We include the momentum flux term in the conservation identity, deduced from the 'ADM' constraint and the Lanczos equations. Following the Ishak Lake analysis, we deduce a master equation which dictates the stable equilibrium configurations. Considering the transparency condition, we study the stability of thin shells around black holes, showing that our analysis is in agreement with previous results. Applying the analysis to traversable wormhole geometries, by considering specific choices for the form function, we deduce stability regions and find that the latter may be significantly increased by considering appropriate choices for the redshift function.

  6. On the dynamic stability of multilayer sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.; Chen, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the dynamic stability of plates which are constructed of several alternating soft and hard layers and are subjected to time-dependent periodic in-plane loads. A theory that accounts for all of these effects is presented for multilayer sandwich plates. The plate thickness consists of (k - 1) orthotropic soft core layers sandwiched between k hard isotropic membrane layers, each of which may have a different thickness and elastic properties. It is assumed that the core layers carry only the transverse shear stresses, while the hard membrane layers carry the in-plane normal and shear stresses. The complementary variational principle for dynamics is used to derive the governing differential equations and the necessary boundary conditions for the dynamic stability of the sandwich plate. The equations governing the vibration of the plate and those governing its static stability are deduced from the more general equations for dynamic stability.

  7. Marginal Stability Dynamics for Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Herbert

    2009-11-01

    Marginal stability in plasmas characteristically sets a stiff limit to the range of that can be achieved. Below this limit, the system is governed by classical. Near marginal stability, however, plasmas may be subject to rapid processes, resulting in a system that hovers near marginality. This scenario emerged from nonlinear studies of energetic particle relaxation and may be to more general plasma transport. We describe results from several such which include. [1] Avalanches---Near marginal stability, an important point is whether an instability driven by resonant particles where the distribution function has ``free energy'' will cause global radial diffusion. For that,modes need to overlap. This process can be continuous or bursty, the latter having been recently observed in NSTX and DIII-D. [2] Frequency chirping---Recent simulations by Vann showed that marginal stability can be sustained when there is only one unstable linear mode, due to the mechanism of spontaneous frequency sweeping. Although a single mode near stability should not cause dramatic relaxation, nevertheless in the Vann simulations, the achievement of marginal stability induced a continual chirping of that had removed energy from the bulk of the region where the external beam to deposit free energy. The distribution was then found to hover near stability. This mechanism may apply to the n=0 GAM where frequency sweeping might be a mechanism for extracting energy from alpha particles in a burning plasma, thereby reducing the stored alpha particle pressure. One way to implement this is to have the n=0 geodesic acoustic modes (GAM) be preferentially excited, since energy rather than momentum (leading to spatial diffusion) is then primarily extracted from alpha particles.

  8. Dynamical stability of extended teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, Petr V.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss modified teleparallel gravity with function f(T,TG) in the action, where the function depends on two arguments: torsion scalar T and analogue of Gauss-Bonnet invariant TG. In contradistinction to usual teleparallel gravity f(T), this theory contains higher derivative terms, which may produce different instabilities. We discuss Minkowski stability problem in such kind of theories and explicitly demonstrate that for stability it must be fT(0, 0) < 0, fTGTG > 0. We apply these restrictions for the few types of functions discussed by the early authors.

  9. Dynamics and stability of wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.; Nolan, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous and induction generators are considered. A comparison is made between wind turbines, steam, and hydro units. The unusual phenomena associated with wind turbines are emphasized. The general control requirements are discussed, as well as various schemes for torsional damping such as speed sensitive stabilizer and blade pitch control. Integration between adjacent wind turbines in a wind farm is also considered.

  10. New Insight into Cataract Formation: Enhanced Stability through Mutual Attraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stradner, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Foffi, G.; Dorsaz, N.; Thurston, G.

    2007-11-09

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations combined with an application of concepts from soft matter physics to complex protein mixtures provide new insight into the stability of eye lens protein mixtures. Exploring this colloid-protein analogy we demonstrate that weak attractions between unlike proteins help to maintain lens transparency in an extremely sensitive and nonmonotonic manner. These results not only represent an important step towards a better understanding of protein condensation diseases such as cataract formation, but provide general guidelines for tuning the stability of colloid mixtures, a topic relevant for soft matter physics and industrial applications.

  11. Attraction-induced dynamical stability of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a nonlinear lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Raka; Venkatesh, B. Prasanna; Watanabe, Gentaro

    2016-06-01

    We study multiple-period Bloch states of a Bose-Einstein condensate with spatially periodic interatomic interaction. Solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the continuum model, and also using a simplified discrete version of it, we investigate the energy-band structures and the corresponding stability properties. We observe an "attraction-induced dynamical stability" mechanism caused by the localization of the density distribution in the attractive domains of the system and the isolation of these higher-density regions. This makes the superfluid stable near the zone boundary and also enhances the stability of higher-periodic states if the nonlinear interaction strength is sufficiently high.

  12. Dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Wang, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents both measured and calculated magnetic-force data. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares the results with predictions calculated by a nonlinear-dynamics computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic-suspension system type vehicle model were obtained by experimental observation and computer simulation of a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway that consists of a pair of L-shaped aluminum conductors attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  13. Constrained basin stability for studying transient phenomena in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kan, Adrian; Jegminat, Jannes; Donges, Jonathan F.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Transient dynamics are of large interest in many areas of science. Here, a generalization of basin stability (BS) is presented: constrained basin stability (CBS) that is sensitive to various different types of transients arising from finite size perturbations. CBS is applied to the paradigmatic Lorenz system for uncovering nonlinear precursory phenomena of a boundary crisis bifurcation. Further, CBS is used in a model of the Earth's carbon cycle as a return time-dependent stability measure of the system's global attractor. Both case studies illustrate how CBS's sensitivity to transients complements BS in its function as an early warning signal and as a stability measure. CBS is broadly applicable in systems where transients matter, from physics and engineering to sustainability science. Thus CBS complements stability analysis with BS as well as classical linear stability analysis and will be a useful tool for many applications.

  14. Summary of methods for calculating dynamic lateral stability and response and for estimating aerodynamic stability derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1952-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Detailed estimation methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic and supersonic speed conditions.

  15. Effect of stabilizer on dynamic thermal transport property of ZnO nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of adding a stabilizer on the dynamic thermal properties of ZnO nanofluid (containing 5 to 10 nm diameter of ZnO nanocrystals) measured using a 3ω method. Addition of the stabilizer leads to the stabilization of the nanofluid and also substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport compared to that seen in the bare ZnO nanofluid. This also alters the frequency dependence of the thermal transport and the characteristic time scale associated with it. It is suggested that the addition of the stabilizer inhibits the thermodiffusion-assisted local aggregation thus leading to substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport properties of the bare nanofluid as proposed in some recent models, and this also alters the characteristic time scales by altering the scale of aggregation. PMID:23497347

  16. Dynamic regulation of Schwann cell enhancers after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hung, Holly A; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Svaren, John

    2015-03-13

    Myelination of the peripheral nervous system is required for axonal function and long term stability. After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells transition from axon myelination to a demyelinated state that supports neuronal survival and ultimately remyelination of axons. Reprogramming of gene expression patterns during development and injury responses is shaped by the actions of distal regulatory elements that integrate the actions of multiple transcription factors. We used ChIP-seq to measure changes in histone H3K27 acetylation, a mark of active enhancers, to identify enhancers in myelinating rat peripheral nerve and their dynamics after demyelinating nerve injury. Analysis of injury-induced enhancers identified enriched motifs for c-Jun, a transcription factor required for Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. We identify a c-Jun-bound enhancer in the gene for Runx2, a transcription factor induced after nerve injury, and we show that Runx2 is required for activation of other induced genes. In contrast, enhancers that lose H3K27ac after nerve injury are enriched for binding sites of the Sox10 and early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factors, which are critical determinants of Schwann cell differentiation. Egr2 expression is lost after nerve injury, and many Egr2-binding sites lose H3K27ac after nerve injury. However, the majority of Egr2-bound enhancers retain H3K27ac, indicating that other transcription factors maintain active enhancer status after nerve injury. The global epigenomic changes in H3K27ac deposition pinpoint dynamic changes in enhancers that mediate the effects of transcription factors that control Schwann cell myelination and peripheral nervous system responses to nerve injury. PMID:25614629

  17. Enhanced Enzyme Kinetic Stability by Increasing Rigidity within the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; An, Jiao; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Li; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important issue for protein engineers. Understanding how rigidity in the active site affects protein kinetic stability will provide new insight into enzyme stabilization. In this study, we demonstrated enhanced kinetic stability of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) by mutating the structurally flexible residues within the active site. Six residues within 10 Å of the catalytic Ser105 residue with a high B factor were selected for iterative saturation mutagenesis. After screening 2200 colonies, we obtained the D223G/L278M mutant, which exhibited a 13-fold increase in half-life at 48 °C and a 12 °C higher T5015, the temperature at which enzyme activity is reduced to 50% after a 15-min heat treatment. Further characterization showed that global unfolding resistance against both thermal and chemical denaturation also improved. Analysis of the crystal structures of wild-type CalB and the D223G/L278M mutant revealed that the latter formed an extra main chain hydrogen bond network with seven structurally coupled residues within the flexible α10 helix that are primarily involved in forming the active site. Further investigation of the relative B factor profile and molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the enhanced rigidity decreased fluctuation of the active site residues at high temperature. These results indicate that enhancing the rigidity of the flexible segment within the active site may provide an efficient method for improving enzyme kinetic stability. PMID:24448805

  18. Enhanced catalyst stability for cyclic co methanation operations

    DOEpatents

    Risch, Alan P.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is thereafter reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Enhanced catalyst stability for long term, cyclic operation is obtained by the incorporation of an alkali or alkaline earth dopant in a silica binding agent added to the catalyst-support additive composition.

  19. Stability of focal adhesion enhanced by its inner force fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhi-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Cells actively sense and respond to mechanical signals from the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. By representing a single focal adhesion as a cluster of slip bonds, it has been demonstrated that the cluster often became unstable under fluctuated forces. However, an unusual case was also reported, where the stability of the cluster might be substantially enhanced by a fluctuated force with a relatively low fluctuation frequency and high fluctuation amplitude. Such an observation cannot be explained by the conventional fracture theory of fatigue. Here, we intensively investigate this intriguing observation by carrying out systematic parametric studies. Our intensive simulation results indicate that stability enhancement of this kind is in fact quite robust, which can be affected by the stochastic features of a single bond and the profile of the fluctuated forces such as the average value of bond force. We then suggest that the fluctuation of traction force within a focal adhesion might enhance its stability in a certain way. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.*11372279).

  20. Dispersive Elements for Enhanced Laser Gyroscopy and Cavity Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Diels, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the modulation to determine the conditions for cavity self-stabilization and enhanced gyroscopic sensitivity. We find an enhancement in the sensitivity of a laser gyroscope to rotation for normal dispersion, while anomalous dispersion can be used to self-stabilize an optical cavity. Our results indicate that atomic media, even coherent superpositions in multilevel atoms, are of limited use for these applications, because the amplitude and phase filters work against one another, i.e., decreasing the modulation frequency increases its amplitude and vice-versa. On the other hand, for optical resonators the dispersion reversal associated with critical coupling enables the amplitude and phase filters to work together. We find that for over-coupled resonators, the absorption and normal dispersion on-resonance increase the contrast and frequency of the beat-note, respectively, resulting in a substantial enhancement of the gyroscopic response. Under-coupled resonators can be used to stabilize the frequency of a laser cavity, but result in a concomitant increase in amplitude fluctuations. As a more ideal solution we propose the use of a variety of coupled-resonator-induced transparency that is accompanied by anomalous dispersion.

  1. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  2. Dynamic Stabilization of Expressed Proteins in Engineered Diatom Biosilica Matrices.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yijia; Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Roesijadi, Guritno; Squier, Thomas C

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembly of recombinant proteins within the biosilica of living diatoms represents a means to construct functional materials in a reproducible and scalable manner that will enable applications that harness the inherent specificities of proteins to sense and respond to environmental cues. Here we describe the use of a silaffin-derived lysine-rich 39-amino-acid targeting sequence (Sil3T8) that directs a single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody or an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to assemble within the biosilica frustule, resulting in abundance of >200 000 proteins per frustule. Using either a fluorescent ligand bound to the scFv or the intrinsic fluorescence of EGFP, we monitored protein conformational dynamics, accessibility to external quenchers, binding affinity, and conformational stability. Like proteins in solution, proteins within isolated frustules undergo isotropic rotational motion, but with 2-fold increases in rotational correlation times that are indicative of weak macromolecular associations within the biosilica. Solvent accessibilities and high-affinity (pM) binding are comparable to those in solution. In contrast to solution conditions, scFv antibodies within the biosilica matrix retain their binding affinity in the presence of chaotropic agents (i.e., 8 M urea). Together, these results argue that dramatic increases in protein conformational stability within the biosilica matrices arise through molecular crowding, acting to retain native protein folds and associated functionality with the potential to allow the utility of engineered proteins under a range of harsh environmental conditions associated with environmental sensing and industrial catalytic transformations. PMID:27139003

  3. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results.

  4. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results. PMID:26764672

  5. Effects of asymmetry on the dynamic stability of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantino, R. E.; Parsons, E. K.; Powell, J. D.; Shevell, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The oblique wing concept for transonic aircraft was proposed to reduce drag. The dynamic stability of the aircraft was investigated by analytically determining the stability derivatives at angles of skew ranging from 0 and 45 deg and using these stability derivatives in a linear analysis of the coupled aircraft behavior. The stability derivatives were obtained using a lifting line aerodynamic theory and found to give reasonable agreement with derivatives developed in a previous study for the same aircraft. In the dynamic analysis, no instability or large changes occurred in the root locations for skew angles varying from 0 to 45 deg with the exception of roll convergence. The damping in roll, however, decreased by an order of magnitude. Rolling was a prominent feature of all the oscillatory mode shapes at high skew angles.

  6. Dynamical stability of global vortex strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Nguyen Vien; Ha, To Ba

    2011-10-01

    The time-dependent field equations of the nonlinear field systems, whose static soliton solutions are (global) vortex strings, are studied by a numerical approach. They concern (i) the theory of a single complex scalar field with a spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry, and (ii) the system of a complex scalar field doublet with an approximate U(2) symmetry. The obtained numerical solutions allow to clarify the dynamical behaviors of the systems under fluctuations. The systems are shown to have order-chaos phase transitions, but, despite phase transitions and deformations in field profiles by fluctuations, the shapes of the total field energy density distributions are rather stable.

  7. Enhanced bioavailability of atorvastatin calcium from stabilized gastric resident formulation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Furquan Nazimuddin; Dehghan, Mohamed Hassan G

    2011-12-01

    Oral bioavailability of atorvastatin calcium (ATC) is very low (only 14%) due to instability and incomplete intestinal absorption and/or extensive gut wall extraction. When ATC is packed in the form of tablets, powders, etc., it gets destabilized as it is exposed to the oxidative environment, which is usually present during the production process, the storage of the substance, and the pharmaceutical formulation. Therefore, stabilized gastro-retentive floating tablets of ATC were prepared to enhance bioavailability. Water sorption and viscosity measurement studies are performed to get the best polymer matrix for gastro-retention. A 3(2) factorial design used to prepare optimized formulation of ATC. The selected excipients such as docusate sodium enhanced the stability and solubility of ATC in gastric media and tablet dosage form. The best formulation (F4) consisting of hypromellose, sodium bicarbonate, polyethylene oxide, docusate sodium, mannitol, crosscarmellose sodium, and magnesium stearate, gave floating lag time of 56 ± 4.16 s and good matrix integrity with in vitro dissolution of 98.2% in 12 h. After stability studies, no significant change was observed in stability, solubility, floating lag time, total floating duration, matrix integrity, and sustained drug release rates, as confirmed by DSC and powder X-ray diffraction studies. In vivo pharmacokinetic study performed in rabbits revealed enhanced bioavailability of F4 floating tablets, about 1.6 times compared with that of the conventional tablet (Storvas® 80 mg tablet). These results suggest that the gastric resident formulation is a promising approach for the oral delivery of ATC for improving bioavailability. PMID:21879394

  8. Enhanced structural stability of nanoporous zirconia under irradiation of He

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tengfei; Huang, Xuejun; Wang, Chenxu; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    This work reports a greatly enhanced tolerance for He irradiation-induced swelling in nanocrystalline zirconia film with interconnected nanoporous structure (hereinafter referred as to NC-C). Compared to bulk yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and another nanocrystalline zirconia film only with discrete nano voids (hereinafter referred as to NC-V), the NC-C film reveals good tolerance for irradiation of high-fluence He. No appreciable surface blistering can be found even at the highest fluence of 6 1017 cm2 in NCC film. From TEM analysis of as-irradiated samples, the enhanced tolerance for volume swelling in NCC film is attributed to the enhanced diffusion mechanism of deposited He via widely distributed nano channels. Furthermore, the growth of grain size is quite small for both nanocrystalline zirconia films after irradiation, which is ascribed to the decreasing of area of grain boundary due to loose structure and low energy of primary knock-on atoms for He ions.

  9. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  10. Stability limits and dynamics of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Resnik, Andy; Kaukler, William F.

    1993-01-01

    This program of theoretical and experimental ground-based and low gravity research is focussed on the understanding of the dynamics and stability limits of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges. There are three basic objectives to the proposed work: (1) to determine the stability limits of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges held between non-coaxially aligned disks; (2) to examine the dynamics of nonaxisymmetric bridges and nonaxisymmetric oscillations of initially axisymmetric bridges (some of these experiments require a low gravity environment and the ground-based research will culminate in a definitive flight experiment); and (3) to experimentally investigate the vibration sensitivity of liquid bridges under terrestrial and low gravity conditions.

  11. Control augmented structural synthesis with dynamic stability constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Dynamic stability constraints are included in a computer program that simultaneously synthesizes a structure and its control system. Two measures of stability, the real part of the system complex eigenvalues and the damping ratio, are examined. The procedure for calculating the sensitivities of the two measures of stability to changes in the structure and its control system is explained. The sensitivities are used to formulate an approximate problem that is solved at each design iteration. The effects of structural damping and noncollated controllers on the synthesis process are discussed.

  12. Structural Dynamics, Stability, and Control of Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Hale, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamic synthesis of gyroscopic structures consisting of point-connected substructures is investigated. The objective is to develop a mathematical model capable of an adequate simulation of the modal characteristics of a helicopter using a minimum number of degrees of freedom. The basic approach is to regard the helicopter structure as an assemblage of flexible substructures. The variational equations for the perturbed motion about certain equilibrium solutions are derived. The discretized variational equations can be conveniently exhibited in matrix form, and a great deal of information about the system modal characteristics can be extracted from the coefficient matrices. The derivation of the variational equations requires a monumental amount of algebraic operations. To automate this task a symbolic manipulation program on a digital computer is developed.

  13. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2003-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  14. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2004-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  15. Enhancing protein stability by adsorption onto raftlike lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Litt, Jeffrey; Padala, Chakradhar; Asuri, Prashanth; Vutukuru, Srinavya; Athmakuri, Krishna; Kumar, Sanat; Dordick, Jonathan; Kane, Ravi S

    2009-05-27

    We demonstrate that the stability of adsorbed proteins can be enhanced by controlling the heterogeneity of the surfaceby creating raftlike domains in a soft liposomal membrane. Recent work has shown that enzymes adsorbed onto highly curved nanoscale supports can be more stable than those adsorbed on flat surfaces with nominally the same chemical structure. This effect has been attributed to a decrease in lateral interenzyme interactions on a curved surface. Exploiting this idea, we asked if adsorbing enzymes onto "patchy" surfaces composed of adsorbing and nonadsorbing regions can be used to reduce lateral interactions even on relatively flat surfaces. We demonstrate that creating domains on which an enzyme can adsorb enhances the stability of that enzyme under denaturing conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the size of these domains has a considerable effect on the degree of stability imparted by adsorption. Such biomimetic raft-inspired systems may find use in applications ranging from biorecognition to the design of novel strategies for the separation of biomolecules and controlling the interaction of multicomponent membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:19385631

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  17. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-14

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  18. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min). PMID:23827593

  19. Constraints on dynamic stability during forward, backward and lateral locomotion in skilled football players.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of speed and plane of motion on stability during locomotion in skilled football players. Ten male national-level football players participated in this study to run forward, backward and in lateral directions on a treadmill at 80%, 100% and 120% of their preferred running speeds. The coordinate data of passive reflective markers attached to body segments were recorded using motion capture systems. Time series data obtained from the ankle marker were used for further analyses. The largest finite-time Lyapunov exponent and maximum Floquet multiplier were adopted to quantify local and orbital dynamic stabilities, respectively. Results showed that speed did not significantly change local and orbital dynamic stabilities in any of running patterns. However, both local and orbital dynamic stability were significantly higher in the secondary plane of progression. Data revealed that in running, unlike walking, stability in the direction perpendicular to the direction of running is significantly higher, implying that less active control is required in the secondary plane of progression. The results of this study could be useful in sports training and rehabilitation programmes where development of fundamental exercise programmes that challenge both speed and the ability to maintain stability might produce a tangible enhancement of athletic skill level. PMID:25553807

  20. Vesicle Stability and Dynamics: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Bianco, Cristina; Torino, Domenica; Mansy, Sheref S.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory exercise is described that helps students learn about lipid self-assembly by making vesicles under different solution conditions. Concepts covering the chemical properties of different lipids, the dynamics of lipids, and vesicle stability are explored. Further, the described protocol is easy and cheap to implement. One to two…

  1. Morphological stability and fluid dynamics of vapor crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research on morphological stability and fluid dynamics of crystal growth is discussed. Interfacial heat and mass transfer research is discussed. The finding of surface roughening is a precursor to a solid-solid phase transition was further quantified. Progress was obtained with the mass spectroscopic characterization of GeSe-Ge I sub 4.

  2. Enhancement of charge ordering by dynamic electron-phonon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Andrej; Fullerton, Eric; Shpyrko, Oleg

    Symmetry breaking and emergence of order is one of the most fascinating phenomena in condensed matter physics and leads to a plethora of intriguing ground states such as in antiferromagnets, Mott insulators, superconductors, and density-wave systems. Exploiting non-equilibrium dynamics of matter following ultrafast external excitation can provide even more striking routes to symmetry-lowered, ordered states, for instance, by accessing hidden equilibrium states in the free-energy landscape or dynamic stabilization of non-equilibrium states. This is remarkable because ultrafast excitation typically creates disorder, reduces the order parameter, and raises the symmetry. Here, we demonstrate for the case of antiferromagnetic chromium that moderate photo-excitation can transiently enhance the charge-density-wave (CDW) order by up to 30% above its equilibrium value, while strong excitation leads to an oscillating, large-amplitude CDW state that persists above the equilibrium transition temperature. Both effects result from dynamic electron-phonon interaction, which provides an efficient mechanism to selectively transform a broad excitation of the electronic order into a well defined, long-lived coherent lattice vibration. This mechanism may be exploited to transiently enhance the order parameter in other systems with coupled electronic and lattice orders. The data was collected at the x-ray free electron laser LCLS at SLAC.

  3. Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System (DSIS). Volume 3; User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Boyden, Richmond P.; Dress, David A.; Jordan, Thomas L.

    1996-01-01

    The paper is an operating manual for the Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System in specific NASA Langley wind tunnels. The instrumentation system performs either a synchronous demodulation or a Fast Fourier Transform on dynamic balance strain gage signals, and ultimately computes aerodynamic coefficients. The dynamic balance converts sting motor rotation into pitch or yaw plane or roll axis oscillation, with timing information provided by a shaft encoder. Additional instruments control model attitude and balance temperature and monitor sting vibrations. Other instruments perform self-calibration and diagnostics. Procedures for conducting calibrations and wind-off and wind-on tests are listed.

  4. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. PMID:22766281

  5. Does a crouched leg posture enhance running stability and robustness?

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra; Daley, Monica A; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-07-21

    Humans and birds both walk and run bipedally on compliant legs. However, differences in leg architecture may result in species-specific leg control strategies as indicated by the observed gait patterns. In this work, control strategies for stable running are derived based on a conceptual model and compared with experimental data on running humans and pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). From a model perspective, running with compliant legs can be represented by the planar spring mass model and stabilized by applying swing leg control. Here, linear adaptations of the three leg parameters, leg angle, leg length and leg stiffness during late swing phase are assumed. Experimentally observed kinematic control parameters (leg rotation and leg length change) of human and avian running are compared, and interpreted within the context of this model, with specific focus on stability and robustness characteristics. The results suggest differences in stability characteristics and applied control strategies of human and avian running, which may relate to differences in leg posture (straight leg posture in humans, and crouched leg posture in birds). It has been suggested that crouched leg postures may improve stability. However, as the system of control strategies is overdetermined, our model findings suggest that a crouched leg posture does not necessarily enhance running stability. The model also predicts different leg stiffness adaptation rates for human and avian running, and suggests that a crouched avian leg posture, which is capable of both leg shortening and lengthening, allows for stable running without adjusting leg stiffness. In contrast, in straight-legged human running, the preparation of the ground contact seems to be more critical, requiring leg stiffness adjustment to remain stable. Finally, analysis of a simple robustness measure, the normalized maximum drop, suggests that the crouched leg posture may provide greater robustness to changes in terrain height. PMID

  6. Posterior dynamic stabilization: The interspinous spacer from treatment to prevention

    PubMed Central

    Nachanakian, Antoine; El Helou, Antonios; Alaywan, Moussa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Managements of lumbar stenosis evoluted over the time from decompression to dynamic stabilization preserving the motion segment passing by the rigid fixation. After long years of rigid fusion, adjacent segment disease became more and more frequent and the concept of dynamic stabilization emerged. Materials and Methods: We report our experience with posterior dynamic stabilization using an interspinous distracter (ISD). One hundred and eight patients were operated between September 2008 and January 2012 with different lumbar spine pathologies. The ages of our patients were between 45 years and 70 years, with a mean age of 55 years. With our growing experience, indication of ISD became narrowed and the interspinous spacer became an absolute tool for adjacent segment disease as a treatment as well as prophylactic with rigid stabilization. Results and Discussion: Overall clinical improvement was noted in ISD-treated patients, with considerable satisfaction in 77% of patients on average. The patient at first reported an improvement of their radicular pain with a mean reduction of 3.6/10 on visual analog scale. Post-operative walking distance progressively increased during the next 3 months. Whereas, a radiological evaluation at 3 months showed a mean of 42% improvement of the disc height. On the other hand, all patients operated with posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) at the time of rigid stabilization showed no adjacent segment disease compared to those operated with posterior arthrodesis (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Interspinous spacer after surgical decompression for spinal stenosis by excision of Ligamentum flavum demonstrates excellent short-term and long-term results for improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, and patient satisfaction. It provides restoration of disc height, reduction of vertebral slip and it's a necessary tool in the management and the prevention of adjacent segment disease. PMID:27057211

  7. Dynamic Stability of Uncertain Laminated Beams Under Subtangential Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vijay K.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Adelman, Howard (Technical Monitor); Horta, Lucas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the inherent complexity of fiber-reinforced laminated composites, it can be challenging to manufacture composite structures according to their exact design specifications, resulting in unwanted material and geometric uncertainties. In this research, we focus on the deterministic and probabilistic stability analysis of laminated structures subject to subtangential loading, a combination of conservative and nonconservative tangential loads, using the dynamic criterion. Thus a shear-deformable laminated beam element, including warping effects, is derived to study the deterministic and probabilistic response of laminated beams. This twenty-one degrees of freedom element can be used for solving both static and dynamic problems. In the first-order shear deformable model used here we have employed a more accurate method to obtain the transverse shear correction factor. The dynamic version of the principle of virtual work for laminated composites is expressed in its nondimensional form and the element tangent stiffness and mass matrices are obtained using analytical integration The stability is studied by giving the structure a small disturbance about an equilibrium configuration, and observing if the resulting response remains small. In order to study the dynamic behavior by including uncertainties into the problem, three models were developed: Exact Monte Carlo Simulation, Sensitivity Based Monte Carlo Simulation, and Probabilistic FEA. These methods were integrated into the developed finite element analysis. Also, perturbation and sensitivity analysis have been used to study nonconservative problems, as well as to study the stability analysis, using the dynamic criterion.

  8. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket.

  9. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability.

    PubMed

    Levatić, I; Popčević, P; Šurija, V; Kruchkov, A; Berger, H; Magrez, A; White, J S; Rønnow, H M; Živković, I

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  10. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    PubMed Central

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  11. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  12. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of mathbb {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius mathcal {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  13. Summary of Methods for Calculating Dynamic Lateral Stability and Response and for Estimating Lateral Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1951-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Reference is also made to reports presenting experimental data that should be useful in making estimates of the derivatives. Detailed estimating methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic- and supersonic-speed conditions.

  14. On the dynamics of turbulent transport near marginal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H. |; Hahm, T.S.

    1995-03-01

    A general methodology for describing the dynamics of transport near marginal stability is formulated. Marginal stability is a special case of the more general phenomenon of self-organized criticality. Simple, one field models of the dynamics of tokamak plasma self-organized criticality have been constructed, and include relevant features such as sheared mean flow and transport bifurcations. In such models, slow mode (i.e. large scale, low frequency transport events) correlation times determine the behavior of transport dynamics near marginal stability. To illustrate this, impulse response scaling exponents (z) and turbulent diffusivities (D) have been calculated for the minimal (Burgers) and sheared flow models. For the minimal model, z = 1 (indicating ballastic propagation) and D {approximately}(S{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}, where S{sub 0}{sup 2} is the noise strength. With an identically structured noise spectrum and flow with shearing rate exceeding the ambient decorrelation rate for the largest scale transport events, diffusion is recovered with z = 2 and D {approximately} (S{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 3/5}. This indicates a qualitative change in the dynamics, as well as a reduction in losses. These results are consistent with recent findings from {rho} scaling scans. Several tokamak transport experiments are suggested.

  15. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  16. Dynamics and stability of parametrically excited gyroscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Narayana L.

    We study the reduction, dynamics and stability of two-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. We are particularly interested in understanding energy transfer between modes in such systems. The first part of this research is concerned with the stochastic stability of a two-degree-of-freedom linear system: (a) with one asymptotically stable and one critical mode, (b) with both modes critical and one of the modes corresponding to a nilpotent structure. We obtain asymptotic expansions for the moment and maximal Lyapunov exponents which characterize the exponential growth rate of the amplitude. The results from (a) indicate that the presence of noise may have a stabilizing effect and are applied to explain experimental observations on fluid flow over tube bundles. The results from (b) are applied to show that the effects of noise on a pipe conveying fluid close to divergence are always destabilising in nature. The second part of this research involves the reduction of two-degree-of-freedom randomly perturbed nonlinear gyroscopic systems close to a double zero resonance. It is shown that the long term behaviour of the original four-dimensional system can be approximated by a one dimensional Markov process which take values on a line or a graph. These results are applied to study the dynamics and stability of a rotating shaft subjected to fluctuating axial load. In the final part of this research, we study the dynamics and stability of nonlinear delay gyroscopic systems with periodically varying delay. The center manifold and normal form methods are used to obtain an approximate and simpler two dimensional system. Analysis of this simpler system shows that periodic variations in the delay may lead to larger stability boundaries. These results are applied to demonstrate that greater depths of cut may be achieved in a boring process when the speed of the spindle is modulated sinusoidally instead of being kept constant. A detailed knowledge of the machine-tool structure

  17. Dynamic stabilization of classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Piriz, S. A.; Tahir, N. A.

    2011-09-15

    Dynamic stabilization of classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied by modeling the interface vibration with the simplest possible wave form, namely, a sequence of Dirac deltas. As expected, stabilization results to be impossible. However, in contradiction to previously reported results obtained with a sinusoidal driving, it is found that in general the perturbation amplitude is larger than in the classical case. Therefore, no beneficial effect can be obtained from the vertical vibration of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between two ideal fluids.

  18. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigation of the stability of nonaxisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric bridges contained between equal and unequal radii disks as a function of Bond and Weber number with emphasis on the transition from unstable axisymmetric to stable nonaxisymmetric shapes. Numerical analysis of the stability of nonaxisymmetric bridges for various orientations of the gravity vector for equal and unequal disks. Experimental and theoretical investigation of large (nonaxisymmetric) oscillations and breaking of liquid bridges. This project involves both experimental and theoretical work. Static and dynamic experiments are conducted in a Plateau tank which makes a range of static Bond numbers accessible.

  19. Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

  20. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  1. Lipid Cross-Linking of Nanolipoprotein Particles Substantially Enhances Serum Stability and Cellular Uptake.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Sean F; Blanchette, Craig D; Scharadin, Tiffany M; Hura, Greg L; Rasley, Amy; Corzett, Michele; Pan, Chong-Xian; Fischer, Nicholas O; Henderson, Paul T

    2016-08-17

    Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) consist of a discoidal phospholipid lipid bilayer confined by an apolipoprotein belt. NLPs are a promising platform for a variety of biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, size, definable composition, and amphipathic characteristics. However, poor serum stability hampers the use of NLPs for in vivo applications such as drug formulation. In this study, NLP stability was enhanced upon the incorporation and subsequent UV-mediated intermolecular cross-linking of photoactive DiynePC phospholipids in the lipid bilayer, forming cross-linked nanoparticles (X-NLPs). Both the concentration of DiynePC in the bilayer and UV exposure time significantly affected the resulting X-NLP stability in 100% serum, as assessed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of fluorescently labeled particles. Cross-linking did not significantly impact the size of X-NLPs as determined by dynamic light scattering and SEC. X-NLPs had essentially no degradation over 48 h in 100% serum, which is a drastic improvement compared to non-cross-linked NLPs (50% degradation by ∼10 min). X-NLPs had greater uptake into the human ATCC 5637 bladder cancer cell line compared to non-cross-linked particles, indicating their potential utility for targeted drug delivery. X-NLPs also exhibited enhanced stability following intravenous administration in mice. These results collectively support the potential utility of X-NLPs for a variety of in vivo applications. PMID:27411034

  2. Distributed Multi-Agent-Based Protection Scheme for Transient Stability Enhancement in Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. S.; Mahmud, M. A.; Pota, H. R.; Hossain, M. J.; Orchi, T. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new distributed agent-based scheme to enhance the transient stability of power systems by maintaining phase angle cohesiveness of interconnected generators through proper relay coordination with critical clearing time (CCT) information. In this distributed multi-agent infrastructure, intelligent agents represent various physical device models to provide dynamic information and energy flow among different physical processes of power systems. The agents can communicate with each other in a distributed manner with a final aim to control circuit breakers (CBs) with CCT information as this is the key issue for maintaining and enhancing the transient stability of power systems. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated on a standard IEEE 39-bus New England benchmark system under different large disturbances such as three-phase short-circuit faults and changes in loads within the systems. From the simulation results, it is found that the proposed scheme significantly enhances the transient stability of power systems as compared to a conventional scheme of static CB operation.

  3. Numerical stability in multifluid gas dynamics with implicit drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, J. D.; Chang, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    The numerical stability of a conventional explicit numerical scheme for solving the inviscid multifluid dynamical equations describing a multicomponent gas mixture is investigated both analytically and computationally. Although these equations do not explicitly contain diffusion terms, it is well known that they reduce to a single-fluid diffusional description when the drag coefficients in the species momentum equations are large. The question then arises as to whether their numerical solution is subject to a diffusional stability restriction on the time step in addition to the usual Courant sound-speed stability condition. An analytical stability analysis is performed for the special case of a quiescent binary gas mixture with equal sound speeds and temperatures. It is found that the Courant condition is always sufficient to ensure stability, so that no additional diffusional stability restriction arises for any value of the drag coefficient, however large. This result is confirmed by one-dimensional computational results for binary and ternary mixtures with unequal sound speeds, which remain stable even when the time step exceeds the usual diffusional limit by factors of order 100.

  4. Stability Enhancement of Polymeric Sensing Films Using Fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Brian; Shevade, Abhijit; Ryan, Margaret Amy; Kisor, Adam; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Manatt, Kenneth; Homer, Margie; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown the stability enhancement of polymeric sensing films on mixing the polymer with colloidal filler particles (submicron-sized) of carbon black, silver, titanium dioxide, and fumed silicon dioxide. The polymer films are candidates for potential use as sensing media in micro/nano chemical sensor devices. The need for stability enhancement of polymer sensing films arises because such films have been found to exhibit unpredictable changes in sensing activity over time, which could result in a possible failure of the sensor device. The changes in the physical properties of a polymer sensing film caused by the sorption of a target molecule can be measured by any of several established transduction techniques: electrochemical, optical, calorimetric, or piezoelectric, for example. The transduction technique used in the current polymer stability experiments is based on piezoelectric principles using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The surface of the QCM is coated with the polymer, and the mass uptake by the polymer film causes a change in the oscillating frequency of the quartz crystal. The polymer used for the current study is ethyl cellulose. The polymer/ polymer composite solutions were prepared in 1,3 dioxolane solvent. The filler concentration was fixed at 10 weight percent for the composites. The polymer or polymer composite solutions were cast on the quartz crystal having a fundamental frequency of about 6 MHz. The coated crystal was subjected to a multistage drying process to remove all measurable traces of the solvent. In each experiment, the frequency of oscillation was measured while the QCM was exposed to clean, dry, flowing air for about 30 minutes, then to air containing a known concentration of isopropanol for about 30 minutes, then again to clean dry air for about 30 minutes, and so forth. This cycle of measurements for varying isopropanol concentrations was repeated at intervals for several months. The figure depicts some of the

  5. Dynamical systems techniques for enhancing microfluidic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    Achieving rapid mixing is often desirable in microfluidic devices, for example in improving reation rates in biotechnological assays. Enhancing mixing within a particular context is often achieved by introducing problem-specific strategies such as grooved or twisted channels, ac electromagnetic fields or oscillatory microsyringe flows. Evaluating the efficiency of these methods is challenging since either experimental fabrication and sensing, or computationally expensive direct numerical simulations with complicated boundary conditions, are required. A review of how mixing can be quantified when velocity fields have been obtained from such situations is presented. A less-known alternative to these methods is offered by dynamical systems, which characterizes the motion of collective fluid parcel trajectories by studying crucial interior flow barriers which move unsteadily, but nevertheless strongly govern mixing possibilities. The methodology behind defining these barriers and quantifying the fluid transport influenced by them is explained. Their application towards several microfluidic situations (e.g. best cross-flow positioning in cross-channel micromixers, usage of channel curvature to enhance mixing within microdroplets traveling in a channel, optimum frequencies of velocity agitations to use) is discussed.

  6. Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System (DSIS). Volume 1: Hardware description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. L.; Daniels, T. S.; Hare, D. A.; Boyden, R. P.; Dress, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a hardware description manual for the Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System that is used in specific NASA Langley wind tunnels. The instrumentation system performs either a synchronous demodulation or a fast Fourier transform on dynamic balance strain gage signals, and ultimately computes aerodynamic coefficients. The DSIS consists of a double rack of instruments, a remote motor-generator set, two special stings each with motor driven shafts, and specially designed balances. The major components in the instrumentation rack include a personal computer, digital signal processor microcomputers, computer-controlled signal conditioners, function generator, digital multimeter, and an optional fast Fourier transform analyzer.

  7. Stability of interconnected dynamical systems described on Banach spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. D.; Michel, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    New stability results for a large class of interconnected dynamical systems (also called composite systems or large scale systems) described on Banach spaces are established. In the present approach, the objective is always the same: to analyze large scale systems in terms of their lower order and simpler subsystems and in terms of their interconnecting structure. The present results provide a systematic procedure of analyzing hybrid dynamical systems (i.e., systems that are described by a mixture of different types of equations). To demonstrate the method of analysis advanced, two specific examples are considered.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation on Stability of Insulin on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Li-jun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Shen, Jia-wei; Kang, Yu

    2009-12-01

    The adsorption dynamics of a model protein (the human insulin) onto graphene surfaces with different sizes was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. During the adsorption, it has different effect on the stability of the model protein in the fixed and non-fixed graphene systems. The tertiary structure of the protein was destroyed or partially destroyed, and graphene surfaces shows the selective protection for some α-helices in non-fixed systems but not in fixed systems by reason of the flexibility of graphene. As indicated by the interaction energy curve and trajectory animation, the conformation and orientation selection of the protein were induced by the properties and the texture of graphene surfaces. The knowledge of protein adsorption on graphene surfaces would be helpful to better understand stability of protein on graphene surfaces and facilitate potential applications of graphene in biotechnology.

  9. Dynamic stability testing of aircraft - Needs versus capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlik-Rueckemann, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    Highlights of a recent survey of the future needs for dynamic stability information for such aerospace vehicles as the Space Shuttle and advanced high-performance military aircraft, indicating the importance of obtaining this information for high-angle-of-attack high-Reynolds-number conditions. A review of the wind-tunnel capabilities in North America for measuring dynamic stability derivatives reveals an almost total lack of such capabilities for Mach numbers above 0.1 at angles of attack higher than 25 deg. In addition, capabilities to obtain certain new cross-coupling derivatives and information on effects of the coning motion are almost completely lacking. Recommendations are made regarding equipment that should be constructed to remedy this situation.

  10. Development of a transfer function method for dynamic stability measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    Flutter testing method based on transfer function measurements is developed. The error statistics of several dynamic stability measurement methods are reviewed. It is shown that the transfer function measurement controls the error level by averaging the data and correlating the input and output. The method also gives a direct estimate of the error in the response measurement. An algorithm is developed for obtaining the natural frequency and damping ratio of low damped modes of the system, using integrals of the transfer function in the vicinity of a resonant peak. Guidelines are given for selecting the parameters in the transfer function measurement. Finally, the dynamic stability measurement technique is applied to data from a wind tunnel test of a proprotor and wing model.

  11. Conditional random matrix ensembles and the stability of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Paul; Rolando, Delphine M. Y.; MacLean, Adam L.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-08-01

    Random matrix theory (RMT) has found applications throughout physics and applied mathematics, in subject areas as diverse as communications networks, population dynamics, neuroscience, and models of the banking system. Many of these analyses exploit elegant analytical results, particularly the circular law and its extensions. In order to apply these results, assumptions must be made about the distribution of matrix elements. Here we demonstrate that the choice of matrix distribution is crucial. In particular, adopting an unrealistic matrix distribution for the sake of analytical tractability is liable to lead to misleading conclusions. We focus on the application of RMT to the long-standing, and at times fractious, ‘diversity-stability debate’, which is concerned with establishing whether large complex systems are likely to be stable. Early work (and subsequent elaborations) brought RMT to bear on the debate by modelling the entries of a system’s Jacobian matrix as independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. These analyses were successful in yielding general results that were not tied to any specific system, but relied upon a restrictive i.i.d. assumption. Other studies took an opposing approach, seeking to elucidate general principles of stability through the analysis of specific systems. Here we develop a statistical framework that reconciles these two contrasting approaches. We use a range of illustrative dynamical systems examples to demonstrate that: (i) stability probability cannot be summarily deduced from any single property of the system (e.g. its diversity); and (ii) our assessment of stability depends on adequately capturing the details of the systems analysed. Failing to condition on the structure of dynamical systems will skew our analysis and can, even for very small systems, result in an unnecessarily pessimistic diagnosis of their stability.

  12. Issues on stability of ADP feedback controllers for dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S N; Ding, Jie; Lewis, Frank L

    2008-08-01

    This paper traces the development of neural-network (NN)-based feedback controllers that are derived from the principle of adaptive/approximate dynamic programming (ADP) and discusses their closed-loop stability. Different versions of NN structures in the literature, which embed mathematical mappings related to solutions of the ADP-formulated problems called "adaptive critics" or "action-critic" networks, are discussed. Distinction between the two classes of ADP applications is pointed out. Furthermore, papers in "model-free" development and model-based neurocontrollers are reviewed in terms of their contributions to stability issues. Recent literature suggests that work in ADP-based feedback controllers with assured stability is growing in diverse forms. PMID:18632377

  13. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  14. Dynamic remedial action scheme using online transient stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Arun

    Economic pressure and environmental factors have forced the modern power systems to operate closer to their stability limits. However, maintaining transient stability is a fundamental requirement for the operation of interconnected power systems. In North America, power systems are planned and operated to withstand the loss of any single or multiple elements without violating North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) system performance criteria. For a contingency resulting in the loss of multiple elements (Category C), emergency transient stability controls may be necessary to stabilize the power system. Emergency control is designed to sense abnormal conditions and subsequently take pre-determined remedial actions to prevent instability. Commonly known as either Remedial Action Schemes (RAS) or as Special/System Protection Schemes (SPS), these emergency control approaches have been extensively adopted by utilities. RAS are designed to address specific problems, e.g. to increase power transfer, to provide reactive support, to address generator instability, to limit thermal overloads, etc. Possible remedial actions include generator tripping, load shedding, capacitor and reactor switching, static VAR control, etc. Among various RAS types, generation shedding is the most effective and widely used emergency control means for maintaining system stability. In this dissertation, an optimal power flow (OPF)-based generation-shedding RAS is proposed. This scheme uses online transient stability calculation and generator cost function to determine appropriate remedial actions. For transient stability calculation, SIngle Machine Equivalent (SIME) technique is used, which reduces the multimachine power system model to a One-Machine Infinite Bus (OMIB) equivalent and identifies critical machines. Unlike conventional RAS, which are designed using offline simulations, online stability calculations make the proposed RAS dynamic and adapting to any power system

  15. Enhanced structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures by graphene encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Vasić, Borislav; Pešić, Jelena; Prinz, Julia; Bald, Ilko; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Gajić, Radoš

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that a single-layer graphene replicates the shape of DNA origami nanostructures very well. It can be employed as a protective layer for the enhancement of structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures. Using the AFM based manipulation, we show that the normal force required to damage graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures is over an order of magnitude greater than for the unprotected ones. In addition, we show that graphene encapsulation offers protection to the DNA origami nanostructures against prolonged exposure to deionized water, and multiple immersions. Through these results we demonstrate that graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures are strong enough to sustain various solution phase processing, lithography and transfer steps, thus extending the limits of DNA-mediated bottom-up fabrication.

  16. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed.

  17. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed. PMID:19566263

  18. Low dose tunicamycin enhances atherosclerotic plaque stability by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meijuan; Song, Liqiang; Yan, Hao; Liu, Min; Zhang, Le; Ma, Ying; Yuan, Jian; Hu, Jianhua; Ji, Zhaole; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Congye; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Yingmei; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    After decades of indolent progression, atherosclerosis may cause unheralded events, such as myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and stroke due to sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaques, and pharmacologically modulating plaque stability would reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is responsible for the vulnerability of plaques. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this work, ApoE(-/-) mice underwent perivascular carotid collar placement surgeries or sham operations were given higher (3.0mg/kg) and lower (0.3mg/kg) doses of tunicamycin (TM), and plaque stability was evaluated. It was shown that lower TM-treated animals exhibited reduced plaque areas and necrotic cores as well as fibrous cap thickness accompanied by a lower percentage of infiltrates and foam cells than the sham-operated and higher TM treated animals. Lower TM had a profound inhibitory effect on plasma inflammatory response and lipid profile in atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mice. In addition, we found that the ApoE(-/-) mice presented higher autophagy activity in response to lower TM administration while apoptosis was reduced. An in vitro study in murine macrophages revealed that lower TM could markedly reduce lipid uptake and accumulation and cell apoptosis while significantly upregulated the expression of Atg7. However, higher TM had adverse effects. Finally, mild induction of ERS by lower TM inhibits AKT-TSC-mTOR cascades to increase cellular autophagy. However, high TM failed to enhance autophagy and equilibrate elevated CHOP-mediated cell death in spite of the inhibition of AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling. In conclusion, lower TM stabilized plaques by activating autophagy through AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling. PMID:26616221

  19. Dynamics, stability, and statistics on lattices and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Roberto

    2014-07-15

    These lectures aim at surveying some dynamical models that have been widely explored in the recent scientific literature as case studies of complex dynamical evolution, emerging from the spatio-temporal organization of several coupled dynamical variables. The first message is that a suitable mathematical description of such models needs tools and concepts borrowed from the general theory of dynamical systems and from out-of-equilibrium statistical mechanics. The second message is that the overall scenario is definitely reacher than the standard problems in these fields. For instance, systems exhibiting complex unpredictable evolution do not necessarily exhibit deterministic chaotic behavior (i.e., Lyapunov chaos) as it happens for dynamical models made of a few degrees of freedom. In fact, a very large number of spatially organized dynamical variables may yield unpredictable evolution even in the absence of Lyapunov instability. Such a mechanism may emerge from the combination of spatial extension and nonlinearity. Moreover, spatial extension allows one to introduce naturally disorder, or heterogeneity of the interactions as important ingredients for complex evolution. It is worth to point out that the models discussed in these lectures share such features, despite they have been inspired by quite different physical and biological problems. Along these lectures we describe also some of the technical tools employed for the study of such models, e.g., Lyapunov stability analysis, unpredictability indicators for “stable chaos,” hydrodynamic description of transport in low spatial dimension, spectral decomposition of stochastic dynamics on directed networks, etc.

  20. Metaconcrete: Engineered aggregates for enhanced dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.

    This work presents the development and investigation of a new type of concrete for the attenuation of waves induced by dynamic excitation. Recent progress in the field of metamaterials science has led to a range of novel composites which display unusual properties when interacting with electromagnetic, acoustic, and elastic waves. A new structural metamaterial with enhanced properties for dynamic loading applications is presented, which is named metaconcrete. In this new composite material the standard stone and gravel aggregates of regular concrete are replaced with spherical engineered inclusions. Each metaconcrete aggregate has a layered structure, consisting of a heavy core and a thin compliant outer coating. This structure allows for resonance at or near the eigenfrequencies of the inclusions, and the aggregates can be tuned so that resonant oscillations will be activated by particular frequencies of an applied dynamic loading. The activation of resonance within the aggregates causes the overall system to exhibit negative effective mass, which leads to attenuation of the applied wave motion. To investigate the behavior of metaconcrete slabs under a variety of different loading conditions a finite element slab model containing a periodic array of aggregates is utilized. The frequency dependent nature of metaconcrete is investigated by considering the transmission of wave energy through a slab, which indicates the presence of large attenuation bands near the resonant frequencies of the aggregates. Applying a blast wave loading to both an elastic slab and a slab model that incorporates the fracture characteristics of the mortar matrix reveals that a significant portion of the supplied energy can be absorbed by aggregates which are activated by the chosen blast wave profile. The transfer of energy from the mortar matrix to the metaconcrete aggregates leads to a significant reduction in the maximum longitudinal stress, greatly improving the ability of the material

  1. Lower Protein Stability Does Not Necessarily Increase Local Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Levi J; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-17

    Overall protein stability is thought to have an important impact on the millisecond time scale dynamics modulating enzyme function. In order to better understand the effects of overall stability on the substructure dynamics of mitochondrial cytochrome c, we test the effect of a destabilizing L85A mutation on the kinetics and equilibrium thermodynamics of the alkaline conformational transition. The alkaline conformational transition replaces the Met80 ligand of the heme with a lysine residue from Ω-loop D, the heme crevice loop, consisting of residues 70-85. Residues 67-87 are the most conserved portion of the sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c, suggesting that this region is of prime importance for function. Mutations to Ω-loop D affect the stability of the heme crevice directly, modulating the pKapp of the alkaline transition. Two variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c, WT*/L85A and WT*/K73H/L85A, were prepared for these studies. Guanidine-HCl unfolding monitored by circular dichroism and pH titrations at 695 nm, respectively, were used to study the thermodynamics of global and local unfolding of these variants. The kinetics of the alkaline transition were measured by pH-jump stopped-flow methods. Gated electron transfer techniques using bis(2,2',2″-terpyridine)cobalt(II) as a reducing reagent were implemented to measure the heme crevice dynamics for the WT*/K73H/L85A variant. Contrary to the expectation that dynamics around the heme crevice would be faster for the less stable WT*/K73H/L85A variant, based on the behavior of psychrophilic versus mesophilic enzymes, they were similar to those for a variant without the L85A mutation. In fact, below pH 7, the dynamics of the WT*/K73H/L85A variant were slower. PMID:27104373

  2. Dynamic Stability Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroenenberger, Mark; Yates, Leslie; Hathaway, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Results from a 26 shot ballistic range test of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule are presented. The supersonic pitch damping properties of the MSL capsule were characterized between Mach 1.35 and Mach 3.5 and total angles-of-attack from 0 to 30 degrees. In flight, the MSL entry capsule will utilize a radial center-of-gravity offset to produce a non-zero trim angle-of-attack. This offset trim angle will produce lift, enabling the capsule to fly a guided entry and reducing the landing footprint dimensions to within 10 km of the desired landing site. A lifting configuration could not be tested at the ballistic range used for this test as the models would swerve into the range walls, possibly damaging cameras, the coordinate reference system or other facility assets. Ballistic (non-lifting) data was extracted and will be implemented in a conservative fashion to ensure that the dynamic stability characteristics of the flight vehicle are bounded. A comparison between the MSL pitch damping results and the dynamic model of the Mars Exploration Rover capsule shows generally close agreement with no significant differences in damping characteristics due to the change in backshell geometry. Dynamic moments are also compared to the MSL reaction control system (RCS) control authority to show the controller has sufficient margin to easily damp any dynamic stability effects.

  3. Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.

  4. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  5. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  6. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  7. Enhanced stability and activity of an antimicrobial peptide in conjugation with silver nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Pal, Indrani; Brahmkhatri, Varsha P; Bera, Swapna; Bhattacharyya, Dipita; Quirishi, Yasrib; Bhunia, Anirban; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2016-12-01

    The conjugation of nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides (AMP) is emerging as a promising route to achieve superior antimicrobial activity. However, the nature of peptide-nanoparticle interactions in these systems remains unclear. This study describes a system consisting of a cysteine containing antimicrobial peptide conjugated with silver nanoparticles, in which the two components exhibit a dynamic interaction resulting in a significantly enhanced stability and biological activity compared to that of the individual components. This was investigated using NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other biophysical techniques. Using fluorescence assisted cell sorting and membrane mimics we carried out a quantitative comparison of the activity of the AMP-nanoparticle system and the free peptide. Taken together, the study provides new insights into nanoparticle-AMP interactions at a molecular level and brings out the factors that will be useful for consideration while designing new conjugates with enhanced functionality. PMID:27585423

  8. Symmetry-enhanced performance of dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasini, S.; Uhrig, G. S.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a system with general decoherence and a quadratic dynamical decoupling sequence (QDD) for the coherence control of a qubit coupled to a bath of spins. We investigate the influence of the geometry and of the initial conditions of the bath on the performance of the sequence. The overall performance is quantified by a distance norm d. It is expected that d scales with {tau}, the total duration of the sequence, as {tau}{sup min{l_brace}N{sub x},N{sub z}{r_brace}+1}, where N{sub x} and N{sub z} are the number of pulses of the outer and of the inner sequence, respectively. We show both numerically and analytically that the state of the bath can boost the performance of QDD under certain conditions: The scaling of QDD for a given number of pulses can be enhanced by a factor of 2 if the bath is prepared in a highly symmetric state and if the system Hamiltonian is SU(2) invariant.

  9. Reexamination of dynamical stabilization of matter-wave solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Itin, Alexander; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2006-09-15

    We consider dynamical stabilization of Bose-Einstein condensates by time-dependent modulation of the scattering length. The problem has been studied before by several methods: Gaussian variational approximation, the method of moments, the method of modulated Townes soliton, and the direct averaging of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We summarize these methods and find that the numerically obtained stabilized solution has a different configuration than that assumed by the theoretical methods (in particular a phase of the wave function is not quadratic with r). We show that there is presently no clear evidence for stabilization in a strict sense, because in the numerical experiments only metastable (slowly decaying) solutions have been obtained. In other words, neither numerical nor mathematical evidence for a new kind of soliton solutions has been revealed so far. The existence of the metastable solutions is nevertheless an interesting and complicated phenomenon on its own. We try some non-Gaussian variational trial functions to obtain better predictions for the critical nonlinearity g{sub cr} for metastabilization but other dynamical properties of the solutions remain difficult to predict.

  10. Strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zenzeri, Jacopo; De Santis, Dalia; Morasso, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms of strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics, this work investigates how human subjects learn to become skilled users of an underactuated bimanual tool in an unstable environment. The tool, which consists of a mass and two hand-held non-linear springs, is affected by a saddle-like force-field. The non-linearity of the springs allows the users to determine size and orientation of the tool stiffness ellipse, by using different patterns of bimanual coordination: minimal stiffness occurs when the two spring terminals are aligned and stiffness size grows by stretching them apart. Tool parameters were set such that minimal stiffness is insufficient to provide stable equilibrium whereas asymptotic stability can be achieved with sufficient stretching, although at the expense of greater effort. As a consequence, tool users have two possible strategies for stabilizing the mass in different regions of the workspace: 1) high stiffness feedforward strategy, aiming at asymptotic stability and 2) low stiffness positional feedback strategy aiming at bounded stability. The tool was simulated by a bimanual haptic robot with direct torque control of the motors. In a previous study we analyzed the behavior of naïve users and we found that they spontaneously clustered into two groups of approximately equal size. In this study we trained subjects to become expert users of both strategies in a discrete reaching task. Then we tested generalization capabilities and mechanism of strategy-switching by means of stabilization tasks which consist of tracking moving targets in the workspace. The uniqueness of the experimental setup is that it addresses the general problem of strategy-switching in an unstable environment, suggesting that complex behaviors cannot be explained in terms of a global optimization criterion but rather require the ability to switch between different sub-optimal mechanisms. PMID:24921254

  11. Strategy Switching in the Stabilization of Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zenzeri, Jacopo; De Santis, Dalia; Morasso, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms of strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics, this work investigates how human subjects learn to become skilled users of an underactuated bimanual tool in an unstable environment. The tool, which consists of a mass and two hand-held non-linear springs, is affected by a saddle-like force-field. The non-linearity of the springs allows the users to determine size and orientation of the tool stiffness ellipse, by using different patterns of bimanual coordination: minimal stiffness occurs when the two spring terminals are aligned and stiffness size grows by stretching them apart. Tool parameters were set such that minimal stiffness is insufficient to provide stable equilibrium whereas asymptotic stability can be achieved with sufficient stretching, although at the expense of greater effort. As a consequence, tool users have two possible strategies for stabilizing the mass in different regions of the workspace: 1) high stiffness feedforward strategy, aiming at asymptotic stability and 2) low stiffness positional feedback strategy aiming at bounded stability. The tool was simulated by a bimanual haptic robot with direct torque control of the motors. In a previous study we analyzed the behavior of naïve users and we found that they spontaneously clustered into two groups of approximately equal size. In this study we trained subjects to become expert users of both strategies in a discrete reaching task. Then we tested generalization capabilities and mechanism of strategy-switching by means of stabilization tasks which consist of tracking moving targets in the workspace. The uniqueness of the experimental setup is that it addresses the general problem of strategy-switching in an unstable environment, suggesting that complex behaviors cannot be explained in terms of a global optimization criterion but rather require the ability to switch between different sub-optimal mechanisms. PMID:24921254

  12. A study of helicopter stability and control including blade dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xin; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A linearized model of rotorcraft dynamics has been developed through the use of symbolic automatic equation generating techniques. The dynamic model has been formulated in a unique way such that it can be used to analyze a variety of rotor/body coupling problems including a rotor mounted on a flexible shaft with a number of modes as well as free-flight stability and control characteristics. Direct comparison of the time response to longitudinal, lateral and directional control inputs at various trim conditions shows that the linear model yields good to very good correlation with flight test. In particular it is shown that a dynamic inflow model is essential to obtain good time response correlation, especially for the hover trim condition. It also is shown that the main rotor wake interaction with the tail rotor and fixed tail surfaces is a significant contributor to the response at translational flight trim conditions. A relatively simple model for the downwash and sidewash at the tail surfaces based on flat vortex wake theory is shown to produce good agreement. Then, the influence of rotor flap and lag dynamics on automatic control systems feedback gain limitations is investigated with the model. It is shown that the blade dynamics, especially lagging dynamics, can severly limit the useable values of the feedback gain for simple feedback control and that multivariable optimal control theory is a powerful tool to design high gain augmentation control system. The frequency-shaped optimal control design can offer much better flight dynamic characteristics and a stable margin for the feedback system without need to model the lagging dynamics.

  13. Calmodulin enhances the stability of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Joyal, J L; Sacks, D B

    2001-05-18

    The estrogen receptor mediates breast cell proliferation and is the principal target for chemotherapy of breast carcinoma. Previous studies have demonstrated that the estrogen receptor binds to calmodulin-Sepharose in vitro. However, the association of endogenous calmodulin with endogenous estrogen receptors in intact cells has not been reported, and the function of the interaction is obscure. Here we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation from MCF-7 human breast epithelial cells that endogenous estrogen receptors bind to endogenous calmodulin. Estradiol treatment of the cells had no significant effect on the interaction. However, incubation of the cells with tamoxifen enhanced by 5-10-fold the association of calmodulin with the estrogen receptor and increased the total cellular content of estrogen receptors by 1.5-2-fold. In contrast, the structurally distinct calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine and CGS9343B attenuated the interaction between calmodulin and the estrogen receptor and dramatically reduced the number of estrogen receptors in the cell. Neither of these agents altered the amount of estrogen receptor mRNA, suggesting that calmodulin stabilizes the protein. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that, in the presence of Ca2+, calmodulin protected estrogen receptors from in vitro proteolysis by trypsin. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type calmodulin, but not a mutant calmodulin incapable of binding Ca2+, increased the concentration of estrogen receptors in MCF-7 cells, whereas transient expression of a calmodulin inhibitor peptide reduced the estrogen receptor concentration. These data demonstrate that calmodulin binds to the estrogen receptor in intact cells in a Ca2+-dependent, but estradiol-independent, manner, thereby modulating the stability and the steady state level of estrogen receptors. PMID:11278648

  14. Non-linear dynamics of human locomotion: effects of rhythmic auditory cueing on local dynamic stability

    PubMed Central

    Terrier, Philippe; Dériaz, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    It has been observed that times series of gait parameters [stride length (SL), stride time (ST), and stride speed (SS)], exhibit long-term persistence and fractal-like properties. Synchronizing steps with rhythmic auditory stimuli modifies the persistent fluctuation pattern to anti-persistence. Another non-linear method estimates the degree of resilience of gait control to small perturbations, i.e., the local dynamic stability (LDS). The method makes use of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, which estimates how fast a non-linear system embedded in a reconstructed state space (attractor) diverges after an infinitesimal perturbation. We propose to use an instrumented treadmill to simultaneously measure basic gait parameters (time series of SL, ST, and SS from which the statistical persistence among consecutive strides can be assessed), and the trajectory of the center of pressure (from which the LDS can be estimated). In 20 healthy participants, the response to rhythmic auditory cueing (RAC) of LDS and of statistical persistence [assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)] was compared. By analyzing the divergence curves, we observed that long-term LDS (computed as the reverse of the average logarithmic rate of divergence between the 4th and the 10th strides downstream from nearest neighbors in the reconstructed attractor) was strongly enhanced (relative change +73%). That is likely the indication of a more dampened dynamics. The change in short-term LDS (divergence over one step) was smaller (+3%). DFA results (scaling exponents) confirmed an anti-persistent pattern in ST, SL, and SS. Long-term LDS (but not short-term LDS) and scaling exponents exhibited a significant correlation between them (r = 0.7). Both phenomena probably result from the more conscious/voluntary gait control that is required by RAC. We suggest that LDS and statistical persistence should be used to evaluate the efficiency of cueing therapy in patients with neurological gait disorders. PMID

  15. Enhancement of stability of aqueous suspension of alumina nanoparticles by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngsang; Ha, Jeonghong; Kim, Dongsik; Choi, Tae-Youl; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Lee, Seung Yong

    2015-09-21

    In this work, we report substantially enhanced colloidal stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser (wavelength: 800 nm; pulse duration: 50 fs at full width at half maximum) was used to modify the electrochemical properties of nanoparticle suspensions at laser fluences below the particle ablation threshold. The colloidal stability of the suspension was evaluated by zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The DLS results along with the images from transmission electron microscopy revealed that the laser irradiation caused no distinct morphological change to the individual alumina particles, but a substantial portion of the clustered particles was fragmented by the laser pulses, decreasing the apparent size of the suspended particles. Also, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicates that the laser irradiation modified the surface chemistry of the alumina particles. The stabilizing capability of the proposed technique was turned out to be better than that of conventional ultrasonic treatments. The stability of the laser-treated sample with no added surfactant was maintained for up to 30 days, without requiring an additional homogenizing process such as magnetic stirring.

  16. Enhancement of stability of aqueous suspension of alumina nanoparticles by femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngsang; Choi, Tae-Youl; Ha, Jeonghong; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Lee, Seung Yong; Kim, Dongsik

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we report substantially enhanced colloidal stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser (wavelength: 800 nm; pulse duration: 50 fs at full width at half maximum) was used to modify the electrochemical properties of nanoparticle suspensions at laser fluences below the particle ablation threshold. The colloidal stability of the suspension was evaluated by zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The DLS results along with the images from transmission electron microscopy revealed that the laser irradiation caused no distinct morphological change to the individual alumina particles, but a substantial portion of the clustered particles was fragmented by the laser pulses, decreasing the apparent size of the suspended particles. Also, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicates that the laser irradiation modified the surface chemistry of the alumina particles. The stabilizing capability of the proposed technique was turned out to be better than that of conventional ultrasonic treatments. The stability of the laser-treated sample with no added surfactant was maintained for up to 30 days, without requiring an additional homogenizing process such as magnetic stirring.

  17. Kinematic variability, fractal dynamics and local dynamic stability of treadmill walking

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Motorized treadmills are widely used in research or in clinical therapy. Small kinematics, kinetics and energetics changes induced by Treadmill Walking (TW) as compared to Overground Walking (OW) have been reported in literature. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the differences between OW and TW in terms of stride-to-stride variability. Classical (Standard Deviation, SD) and non-linear (fractal dynamics, local dynamic stability) methods were used. In addition, the correlations between the different variability indexes were analyzed. Methods Twenty healthy subjects performed 10 min TW and OW in a random sequence. A triaxial accelerometer recorded trunk accelerations. Kinematic variability was computed as the average SD (MeanSD) of acceleration patterns among standardized strides. Fractal dynamics (scaling exponent α) was assessed by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) of stride intervals. Short-term and long-term dynamic stability were estimated by computing the maximal Lyapunov exponents of acceleration signals. Results TW did not modify kinematic gait variability as compared to OW (multivariate T2, p = 0.87). Conversely, TW significantly modified fractal dynamics (t-test, p = 0.01), and both short and long term local dynamic stability (T2 p = 0.0002). No relationship was observed between variability indexes with the exception of significant negative correlation between MeanSD and dynamic stability in TW (3 × 6 canonical correlation, r = 0.94). Conclusions Treadmill induced a less correlated pattern in the stride intervals and increased gait stability, but did not modify kinematic variability in healthy subjects. This could be due to changes in perceptual information induced by treadmill walking that would affect locomotor control of the gait and hence specifically alter non-linear dependencies among consecutive strides. Consequently, the type of walking (i.e. treadmill or overground) is important to consider in each protocol

  18. Dynamic and thermodynamic stability of relativistic, perfect fluid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Schiffrin, Joshua S.; Wald, Robert M.

    2014-02-01

    We consider perfect fluid bodies (‘stars’) in general relativity, with the local state of the fluid specified by its 4-velocity, ua, its ‘particle number density’, n, and its ‘entropy per particle’, s. A star is said to be in dynamic equilibrium if it is a stationary, axisymmetric solution to the Einstein-fluid equations with circular flow. A star is said to be in thermodynamic equilibrium if it is in dynamic equilibrium and its total entropy, S, is an extremum for all variations of initial data that satisfy the Einstein constraint equations and have fixed total mass, M, particle number, N, and angular momentum, J. We prove that for a star in dynamic equilibrium, the necessary and sufficient condition for thermodynamic equilibrium is constancy of angular velocity, Ω, redshifted temperature, \\widetilde{T}, and redshifted chemical potential, \\widetilde{\\mu }. A star in dynamic equilibrium is said to be linearly dynamically stable if all physical, gauge invariant quantities associated with linear perturbations of the star remain bounded in time; it is said to be mode stable if there are no exponentially growing solutions that are not pure gauge. A star in thermodynamic equilibrium is said to be linearly thermodynamically stable if δ2S < 0 for all variations at fixed M, N, and J; equivalently, a star in thermodynamic equilibrium is linearly thermodynamically stable if \\delta ^2 M - \\widetilde{T} \\delta ^2 S -\\widetilde{\\mu } \\delta ^2 N - \\Omega \\delta ^2 J > 0 for all variations that, to first order, satisfy δM = δN = δJ = 0 (and, hence, δS = 0). Friedman previously identified positivity of canonical energy, {E}, as a criterion for dynamic stability and argued that all rotating stars are dynamically unstable to sufficiently non-axisymmetric perturbations (the CFS instability), so our main focus is on axisymmetric stability (although we develop our formalism and prove many results for non-axisymmetric perturbations as well). We show that

  19. Lagrangian, Eulerian, and Dynamically Accessible Stability of MHD flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Tommaso; Morrison, Philip; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Stability conditions of magnetized plasma flows are obtained by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations and, in particular, by using three kinds of energy principles. First, the Lagrangian energy principle of Ref. [1] is introduced and sufficient stability conditions are presented. Next, plasma flows are described in terms of Eulerian variables and the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of MHD [2] is exploited. For symmetric equilibria, the energy-Casimir principle of Ref. [3] is expanded to second order and sufficient conditions for stability to symmetric perturbation are obtained. Then, dynamically accessible variations, i.e. variations that explicitly preserve the invariants of the system, are introduced and the respective energy principle is considered. As in Ref. [4], general criteria for stability are obtained. A comparison between the three different approaches is finally presented. [4pt] [1] E.A. Frieman and M. Rotenberg, Rev. Mod. Phys., 32 898 (1960).[0pt] [2] P.J. Morrison, J.M. Greene, Phys. Rev. Lett., 45 790 (1980).[0pt] [3] T. Andreussi, P.J. Morrison, F. Pegoraro, Phys. Plasmas, 19 052102 (2012).[0pt] [4] E. Hameiri, Phys. Plasmas, 10 2643 (2003).

  20. Algorithm for Stabilizing a POD-Based Dynamical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia L.

    2010-01-01

    This algorithm provides a new way to improve the accuracy and asymptotic behavior of a low-dimensional system based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Given a data set representing the evolution of a system of partial differential equations (PDEs), such as the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow, one may obtain a low-dimensional model in the form of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that should model the dynamics of the flow. Temporal sampling of the direct numerical simulation of the PDEs produces a spatial time series. The POD extracts the temporal and spatial eigenfunctions of this data set. Truncated to retain only the most energetic modes followed by Galerkin projection of these modes onto the PDEs obtains a dynamical system of ordinary differential equations for the time-dependent behavior of the flow. In practice, the steps leading to this system of ODEs entail numerically computing first-order derivatives of the mean data field and the eigenfunctions, and the computation of many inner products. This is far from a perfect process, and often results in the lack of long-term stability of the system and incorrect asymptotic behavior of the model. This algorithm describes a new stabilization method that utilizes the temporal eigenfunctions to derive correction terms for the coefficients of the dynamical system to significantly reduce these errors.

  1. A Simple Model of Stability in Critical Mass Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centola, Damon

    2013-04-01

    Collective behaviors often spread via the self-reinforcing dynamics of critical mass. In collective behaviors with strongly self-reinforcing dynamics, incentives to participate increase with the number of participants, such that incentives are highest when the full population has adopted the behavior. By contrast, when collective behaviors have weakly self-reinforcing dynamics, incentives to participate "peak out" early, leaving a residual fraction of non-participants. In systems of collective action, this residual fraction constitutes free riders, who enjoy the collective good without contributing anything themselves. This "free rider problem" has given rise to a research tradition in collective action that shows how free riding can be eliminated by increasing the incentives for participation, and thereby making cooperation strongly self-reinforcing. However, we show that when the incentives to participate have weakly self-reinforcing dynamics, which allow free riders, collective behaviors will have significantly greater long term stability than when the incentives have strongly self-reinforcing dynamics leading to full participation.

  2. Dynamic stability of periodic shells with moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, M.; Baz, A.

    2006-10-01

    A moving load causes the radial displacements of an axi-symmetric shell to be several times higher than that produced by the static application of the same load. The travel velocity of the moving load affects the amplitude of the radial response and a critical velocity above which the shell response becomes unstable can be identified. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to analyze the dynamic response of axi-symmetric shells subjected to axially moving loads. The model accounts for the effect of periodically placing stiffening rings along the shell, on the dynamic response and stability characteristics of the shell. Shape functions obtained from the steady-state solution of the equation of motion for a uniform shell are utilized in the development of the FEM. The model is formulated in a reference frame moving with the load in order to enable study of the shell stability using wave propagation and attenuation criteria. Hence, the critical velocity can be identified as the minimum velocity allowing the propagation of applied perturbations. Such stability boundaries are conveniently identified through a transfer matrix formulation. The model is used to determine the critical velocities of the moving load for various arrangements and geometry of the stiffening rings. The obtained results indicate that stiffening the shell generally increases the critical velocity and generates a pattern of alternating stable and unstable regions. The presented analysis provides a viable means for designing a wide variety of stable dynamic systems operating with fast moving loads such as crane booms, robotic arms and gun barrels.

  3. Dynamic stability of periodic shells with moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, Massimo; Baz, Amr M.

    2001-08-01

    A moving load causes the radial displacements of an axi- symmetric shell to be several times higher than that produced by the static application of the same load. The travel velocity of the moving load affects the amplitude of the radial response and a critical velocity above which the shell response becomes unstable can be identified. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to analyze the dynamic response of axi-symmetric shells subjected to axially moving loads. The model accounts for the effect of periodically placing stiffening rings along the shell, on the dynamic response and stability characteristics of the shell. Shape functions obtained from the steady-state solution of the equation of motion for a uniform shell are utilized in the development of the FEM. The model is formulated in a reference frame moving with the load in order to enable studying the shell stability using wave propagation and attenuation criteria. Hence, the critical velocity can be identified as the minimum velocity allowing the propagation of applied perturbations. Such stability boundaries are conveniently identified through a transfer mis formulation. The model is used to determine the critical velocities of the moving load for various arrangements and geometry of the stiffening rings. The obtained results indicate that stiffening the shell generally increases the critical velocity and generates a pattern of alternating stable and unstable regions. The presented analysis provides a viable means for designing a wide variety of stable dynamic systems operating with fast moving loads such as crane booms, robotic arms and gun barrels.

  4. On the dynamical stability of the space 'monorail'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, S.; Manni, D.

    The dynamical stability of 'monorail' tethered-satellite/elevator configurations being studied for the Space Station is investigated analytically, treating the end platforms and elevator as point masses, neglecting tether elasticity, and taking the Coriolis force and the complex gravitational field into account in analyzing the orbital-plane motion of the system. A mathematical model is constructed; the equations of motion are derived; and results obtained by numerical integration for platform masses 100,000 and 10,000 kg, elevator mass 5000 kg, and a 10-km-long 6-mm-diameter 4070-kg-mass tether are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  5. Nonequilibrium dynamics in lattice ecosystems: Chaotic stability and dissipative structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, Ricard V.; Bascompte, Jordi; Valls, Joaquim

    1992-07-01

    A generalized coupled map lattice (CML) model of ecosystem dynamics is presented. We consider the spatiotemporal behavior of a prey-predator map, a model of host-parasitoid interactions, and two-species competition. The latter model can show phase separation of domains (Turing-like structures) even when chaos is present. We also use this CML model to explore the time evolution and structural properties of ecological networks built with a set of N competing species. The May-Wigner criterion is applied as a measure of stability, and some regularities in the stable networks observed are discussed.

  6. Solar enhanced wastewater treatment in waste stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Agunwamba, J C; Utsev, J T; Okonkwo, W I

    2009-05-01

    One of the most popular off-site wastewater treatment plants used in the tropics is the waste stabilization pond (WSP). Although it has several advantages, its use in urban areas is limited because of its large land area requirement. Hence, this research is aimed at investigating if a solar-enhanced WSP (SEWSP) can increase treatment efficiency and consequently reduce the land area requirement. The SEWSPs of varying sizes, made of a metallic tank with inlet and outlet valves and a solar reflector, were constructed to increase the incident sunlight intensity. Wastewater samples collected from the inlet and outlet of the SEWSPs were examined for physio-chemical and biological characteristics for a period of 2 months. The parameters examined were total suspended solids, dissolved oxygen, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD), coliform, and Escherichia coli. The efficiencies of the SEWSPs, with respect to these parameters, fluctuated with temperature variation, with the shallowest SEWSP giving the highest treatment efficiency. The research revealed that the cost of treating wastewater using SEWSPs was approximately 2 times lower than the conventional WSP for the same treatment efficiencies. PMID:19472946

  7. Birefringence and Enhanced Stability in Stable Organic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyi; Exarhos, Annemarie; Cheng, Kevin; Jia, Tiezheng; Walsh, Patrick; Kikkawa, Jay; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Stable glasses can be prepared by physical vapor depositing organic molecules onto a cold substrate at slow rates. These glasses have many exceptional properties such as high thermal stability, high density, and birefringence. Regardless of the molecular shape or intermolecular interactions, birefringence has been observed in various stable glasses produced at low temperatures (below 80% of the molecule's glass transition temperature, Tg) . Here we prepare stable glasses of an organic molecule, 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene, that possesses a nearly isotropic shape and intrinsic fluorescence. Ellipsometry is used to show that all stable glasses prepared in the temperature range from 73% Tg to 97% Tgshow positive birefringence. Angle- and polarization- dependent photoluminescence measurements show isotropic molecular orientation in these optically birefringent glasses. Furthermore, the values of birefringence are strongly correlated with the enhanced density, implying a general origin of the observed anisotropy in stable glasses. This correlation can elucidate the role of packing in the formation of such high-density glasses. The authors would like to acknowledge Ethan Alguire and Joe Subotnik for simulation. Z.F. acknowledges funding from NSF CAREER (DMR-1350044). P.J.W. acknowledges funding from NSF (CHE-1152488). J.M.K acknowledges funding from NSF (DMR-1206270).

  8. Peptide lipidation stabilizes structure to enhance biological function★

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Brian P.; Ottaway, Nickki L.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Ma, Dejian; Gelfanov, Vasily M.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; DiMarchi, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Medicines that decrease body weight and restore nutrient tolerance could improve human diabetes and obesity treatment outcomes. We developed lipid–acylated glucagon analogs that are co-agonists for the glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors, and stimulate weight loss and plasma glucose lowering in pre-diabetic obese mice. Our studies identified lipid acylation (lipidation) can increase and balance in vitro potencies of select glucagon analogs for the two aforementioned receptors in a lipidation site-dependent manner. A general capacity for lipidation to enhance the secondary structure of glucagon analogs was recognized, and the energetics of this effect quantified. The molecular structure of a lipid–acylated glucagon analog in water was also characterized. These results support that lipidation can modify biological activity through thermodynamically-favorable intramolecular interactions which stabilize structure. This establishes use of lipidation to achieve specific pharmacology and implicates similar endogenous post-translational modifications as physiological tools capable of refining biological action in means previously underappreciated. PMID:24327962

  9. Observation of enhanced nuclear stability near the 162 neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Lougheed, R.W.; Moody, K.J.; Wild, J.F.; Hulet, E.K.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lazarev, Yu.A.; Lobanov, Yu.V.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Utyonkov, V.K.; Abdullin, F.Sh.; Buklanov, G.V.; Gikal, B.N.; Iliev, S.; Mezentsev, A.N.; Polyakov, A.N.; Sedykh, I.M.; Shirokovsky, I.V.; Subbotin, V.G.; Sukhov, A.M.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.; Zhuchko, V.E.

    1993-09-22

    In bombardments of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 22}Ne the authors discovered two new isotopes, {sup 265}106 and {sup 266}106, by establishing genetic links between {alpha} decays of the 106 nuclides and SF or {alpha} decays of the daughter (grand-daughter) nuclides. For {sup 266}106 they measured E{sub {alpha}}=8.62{+-}0.06 MeV followed by the SF decay of {sup 262}104 for which they measured a half-life value of 1.2{sup +1.0}{sub {minus}0.5} s. For {sup 265}106 they measured E{sub {alpha}}=8.82{+-}0.06 MeV. They estimated {alpha} half-lives of 10-30 s for {sup 266}106 and 2-30 s for {sup 265}106 with SF branches of {approximately}50% or less. The decay properties of {sup 266}106 indicate a large enhancement in the SF stability of this N=160 nuclide and confirm the existence of the predicted neutron-deformed shell N=162.

  10. Enhanced photoacoustic stability of gold nanorods by silica matrix confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Wei, Chen-Wei; Souris, Jeffrey S.; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Chen, Chin-Tu; Yang, Chung-Shi; Li, Pai-Chi; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has garnered much attention for its high contrast and excellent spatial resolution of perfused tissues. Gold nanorods (GNRs) have been employed to further enhance the imaging contrast of PAT. However, the photon fluences typically needed for PA wave induction often also result in GNR shape changes that significantly reduce the efficiency of acoustic wave generation. In this work, we propose, synthesize, and evaluate amorphous silica-coated gold nanorods (GNR-Si) in an effort to improve contrast agent stability and ameliorate efficiency loss during photoacoustic (PA) wave induction. TEM and optical absorption spectra measurements of GNR and GNR-Si show that encasing GNRs within amorphous silica provides substantial protection of nanorod conformation from thermal deformation. PA signals generated by GNR-Si demonstrate considerably greater resistance to degradation of signal intensity with repetitive pulsing than do uncoated GNRs, thereby enabling much longer, high-contrast imaging sessions than previously possible. The prolongation of high-contrast imaging, and biocompatibility and easy surface functionalization for targeting ligands afforded by amorphous silica, suggest GNR-Si to be potentially significant for the clinical translation of PAT.

  11. Dynamic pressure approach to analysis of reactor fuel plate stability

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Yahr, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic pressure model can conveniently be used to evaluate the critical stress regions as a function of flow velocity. For some of the preliminary advanced neutron source reactor plate designs this could be very significant since the flow velocity could be limited by peak stresses in the plates more than by deflection or stability. The dynamic pressure results predicts the differential pressure across a plate as a function of flow velocity. The pressure differential can then be used to find the deflection and/or stress of the plate using traditional plate analyses. Instability would occur when plates are touching at mid-channel such that rapid oscillations of pressure can occur. The technique is conservative and gives a design limit for the plate. This model is one of several methods being used in the design of the ANS fuel elements. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Nonlinear flight dynamics and stability of hovering model insects

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Sun, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Current analyses on insect dynamic flight stability are based on linear theory and limited to small disturbance motions. However, insects' aerial environment is filled with swirling eddies and wind gusts, and large disturbances are common. Here, we numerically solve the equations of motion coupled with the Navier–Stokes equations to simulate the large disturbance motions and analyse the nonlinear flight dynamics of hovering model insects. We consider two representative model insects, a model hawkmoth (large size, low wingbeat frequency) and a model dronefly (small size, high wingbeat frequency). For small and large initial disturbances, the disturbance motion grows with time, and the insects tumble and never return to the equilibrium state; the hovering flight is inherently (passively) unstable. The instability is caused by a pitch moment produced by forward/backward motion and/or a roll moment produced by side motion of the insect. PMID:23697714

  13. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part i: Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    1999-08-01

    The study presented is an investigation of the non-linear dynamics and stability of simply supported, circular cylindrical shells containing inviscid incompressible fluid flow. Non-linearities due to large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using the non-linear Donnell's shallow shell theory, with account taken of the effect of viscous structural damping. Linear potential flow theory is applied to describe the fluid-structure interaction. The system is discretiszd by Galerkin's method, and is investigated by using a model involving seven degrees of freedom, allowing for travelling wave response of the shell and shell axisymmetric contraction. Two different boundary conditions are applied to the fluid flow beyond the shell, corresponding to: (i) infinite baffles (rigid extensions of the shell), and (ii) connection with a flexible wall of infinite extent in the longitudinal direction, permitting solution by separation of variables; they give two different kinds of dynamical behaviour of the system, as a consequence of the fact that axisymmetric contraction, responsible for the softening non-linear dynamical behaviour of shells, is not allowed if the fluid flow beyond the shell is constrained by rigid baffles. Results show that the system loses stability by divergence.

  14. Dynamic Stability Testing of the Genesis Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Winchenbach, Gerald L.; Hathaway, Wayne; Chapman, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents a series of free flight tests of a scale model of the Genesis Sample Return Capsule. These tests were conducted in the Aeroballistic Research Facility (ARF), located at Eglin AFB, FL, during April 1999 and were sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center. Because these blunt atmospheric entry shapes tend to experience small angle of attack dynamic instabilities (frequently leading to limit cycle motions), the primary purpose of the present tests was to determine the dynamic stability characteristics of the Genesis configuration. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range of 1.0 to 4.5. The results for this configuration indicate that the models were dynamically unstable at low angles of attack for all Mach numbers tested. At Mach numbers below 2.5, the models were also unstable at the higher angles of attack (above 15 deg), and motion amplitudes of up to 40 deg were experienced. Above Mach 2.5, the models were dynamically stable at the higher angles of attack.

  15. Fast Dynamic Simulation-Based Small Signal Stability Assessment and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Naresh; Baone, Chaitanya; Veda, Santosh; Dai, Jing; Chaudhuri, Nilanjan; Leonardi, Bruno; Sanches-Gasca, Juan; Diao, Ruisheng; Wu, Di; Huang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yousu

    2014-12-31

    Power grid planning and operation decisions are made based on simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system. Enabling substantial energy savings while increasing the reliability of the aging North American power grid through improved utilization of existing transmission assets hinges on the adoption of wide-area measurement systems (WAMS) for power system stabilization. However, adoption of WAMS alone will not suffice if the power system is to reach its full entitlement in stability and reliability. It is necessary to enhance predictability with "faster than real-time" dynamic simulations that will enable the dynamic stability margins, proactive real-time control, and improve grid resiliency to fast time-scale phenomena such as cascading network failures. Present-day dynamic simulations are performed only during offline planning studies, considering only worst case conditions such as summer peak, winter peak days, etc. With widespread deployment of renewable generation, controllable loads, energy storage devices and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles expected in the near future and greater integration of cyber infrastructure (communications, computation and control), monitoring and controlling the dynamic performance of the grid in real-time would become increasingly important. The state-of-the-art dynamic simulation tools have limited computational speed and are not suitable for real-time applications, given the large set of contingency conditions to be evaluated. These tools are optimized for best performance of single-processor computers, but the simulation is still several times slower than real-time due to its computational complexity. With recent significant advances in numerical methods and computational hardware, the expectations have been rising towards more efficient and faster techniques to be implemented in power system simulators. This is a natural expectation, given that the core solution algorithms of most commercial simulators were developed

  16. Magnetic vortex state stability, reversal and dynamics in restricted geometries.

    PubMed

    Guslienko, K Yu

    2008-06-01

    Magnetic vortices are typically the ground states in geometrically confined ferromagnets with small magnetocrystalline anisotropy. In this article I review static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex state in small particles with nanoscale thickness and sub-micron and micron lateral sizes (magnetic dots). Magnetic dots made of soft magnetic material shaped as flat circular and elliptic cylinders are considered. Such mesoscopic dots undergo magnetization reversal through successive nucleation, displacement and annihilation of magnetic vortices. The reversal process depends on the stability of different possible zero-field magnetization configurations with respect to the dot geometrical parameters and application of an external magnetic field. The interdot magnetostatic interaction plays an important role in magnetization reversal for dot arrays with a small dot-to-dot distance, leading to decreases in the vortex nucleation and annihilation fields. Magnetic vortices reveal rich, non-trivial dynamical properties due to existance of the vortex core bearing topological charges. The vortex ground state magnetization distribution leads to a considerable modification of the nature of spin excitations in comparison to those in the uniformly magnetized state. A magnetic vortex confined in a magnetically soft ferromagnet with micron-sized lateral dimensions possesses a characteristic dynamic excitation known as a translational mode that corresponds to spiral-like precession of the vortex core around its equilibrium position. The translation motions of coupled vortices are considered. There are, above the vortex translation mode eigenfrequencies, several dynamic magnetization eigenmodes localized outside the vortex core whose frequencies are determined principally by dynamic demagnetizing fields appearing due to restricted dot geometry. The vortex excitation modes are classified as translation modes and radially or azimuthally symmetric spin waves over the vortex

  17. Enhancing enzyme stability by construction of polymer-enzyme conjugate micelles for decontamination of organophosphate agents.

    PubMed

    Suthiwangcharoen, Nisaraporn; Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2014-04-14

    Enhancing the stability of enzymes under different working environments is essential if the potential of enzyme-based applications is to be realized for nanomedicine, sensing and molecular diagnostics, and chemical and biological decontamination. In this study, we focus on the enzyme, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH), which has shown great promise for the nontoxic and noncorrosive decontamination of organophosphate agents (OPs) as well as for therapeutics as a catalytic bioscavanger against nerve gas poisoning. We describe a facile approach to stabilize OPH using covalent conjugation with the amphiphilic block copolymer, Pluronic F127, leading to the formation of F127-OPH conjugate micelles, with the OPH on the micelle corona. SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF confirmed the successful conjugation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed ∼100 nm size micelles. The conjugates showed significantly enhanced stability and higher activity compared to the unconjugated OPH when tested (i) in aqueous solutions at room temperature, (ii) in aqueous solutions at higher temperatures, (iii) after multiple freeze/thaw treatments, (iv) after lyophilization, and (v) in the presence of organic solvents. The F127-OPH conjugates also decontaminated paraoxon (introduced as a chemical agent simulant) on a polystyrene film surface and on a CARC (Chemical Agent Resistant Coating) test panel more rapidly and to a larger extent compared to free OPH. We speculate that, in the F127-OPH conjugates (both in the micellar form as well as in the unaggregated conjugate), the polypropylene oxide block of the copolymer interacts with the surface of the OPH and this confinement of the OPH reduces the potential for enzyme denaturation and provides robustness to OPH at different working environments. The use of such polymer-enzyme conjugate micelles with improved enzyme stability opens up new opportunities for numerous civilian and Warfighter applications. PMID

  18. Global asymptotic stability of dynamic dissipative compensators for multibody flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Joshi, Suresh M.; Alberts, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    The stability characteristics of dynamic dissipative compensators are investigated for multibody flexible space structures having nonlinear dynamics. The problem addressed is that of proving asymptotic stability of dynamic dissipative compensators. The stability proof uses the Liapunov approach and exploits the inherent passivity of such systems. For such systems these compensators are shown to be robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics. The results are applicable to a large class of structures such as flexible space structures with articulated flexible appendages.

  19. Transient dynamics and nonlinear stability of spatially extended systems.

    PubMed

    Handel, Andreas; Grigoriev, Roman O

    2006-09-01

    As studies of various systems have shown, the sole focus on the eigenvalues in a linear stability analysis can be misleading, especially when the dynamics of disturbances is characterized by strong transient growth. The aim of this paper is to extend the generalized stability analysis, in the context of spatially extended systems, by examining the role of the nonlinear terms in the destabilization process. The critical noise level leading to destabilization is often found to scale as a power of the magnitude of transient amplification. In what follows we show that the power law exponent sensitively depends on the type of nonlinear terms and their potential for generating self-sustaining noise amplification cycles (bootstrapping). We find, however, that the exponents are not universal and also depend on the more subtle details of the transient dynamics. We also show that the basin of attraction of a spatially uniform state is bounded by the stable manifold(s) of nearby saddle(s) which play a major role in the transition. PMID:17025738

  20. Dynamic blade row compression component model for stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, W. A.; Steenken, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a generalized dynamic model which has been developed for use in compression component aerodynamic stability studies. The model is a one-dimensional, pitch-line, blade row, lumped volume system. Arbitrary placement of blade free volumes upstream, within, and downstream of the compression component as well as the removal of bleed flow from the exit of any rotor or stator are model options. The model has been applied to a two-stage fan and an eight-stage compressor. The clean inlet pressure ratio/flow maps and the surge line have been reproduced, thereby validating the capability of the dynamic model to reproduce the steady-flow characteristics of the compression component. A method for determining the onset of an aerodynamic instability which is associated with surge is described. Sinusoidally time-varying inlet and exit boundary conditions have been applied to the eight stage compressor as examples of the manner in which this model may be used for stability studies.

  1. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Slobozhanin, Lev A.; Resnick, Andrew H.; Ramus, Jean-Francois; Delafontaine, Sylvie

    1999-01-01

    Liquid bridges have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental investigations since the early work by Plateau more than a century ago. More recently, motivated by interest in their physical behavior and their occurrence in a variety of technological situations, there has been a resurgence of interest in the static and dynamic behavior of liquid bridges. Furthermore, opportunities to carry out experiments in the near weightless environment of a low-Earth-orbit spacecraft have also led to a number of low-gravity experiments involving large liquid bridges. In this paper, we present selected results from our work concerning the stability of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges, the bifurcation of weightless bridges in the neighborhood of the maximum volume stability limit, isorotating axisymmetric bridges contained between equidimensional disks, and bridges contained between unequal disks. For the latter, we discuss both theoretical and experimental results. Finally, we present results concerning the stability of axisymmetric equilibrium configurations for a capillary liquid partly contained in a closed circular cylinder.

  2. Chemical lake restoration products: sediment stability and phosphorus dynamics.

    PubMed

    Egemose, Sara; Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Ø; Flindt, Mogens R

    2010-02-01

    Laboratory experiments with sediments from three shallow Danish lakes were conducted to evaluate the effects of chemical lake restoration products during resuspension. Phosphorus (P) removal, sediment stability, sediment consolidation and color reduction were studied over time. The investigated products were aluminum (Al), Phoslock (a commercial bentonite product coated with lanthanum) and a combination of Al covered with bentonite (Al/Ben). All treatments effectively reduced the P concentration in the water. However, the treatments containing Al reduced the P concentration immediately after resuspension, whereas Phoslock required several days after resuspension to reduce the P concentration. Especially Phoslock, but also Al/Ben, increased the sediment stability threshold by 265% and 101%, respectively, whereas Al had no stabilizing effect. The fresh Al floc was resuspended 5x easier than untreated sediment. The largest consolidation of the sediment occurred with addition of Phoslock, followed by Al/Ben, while Al alone had no effect. Enhanced consolidation may be of importance for macrophyte colonisation of organic sediment. Phoslock improved the light climate moderately by removing color, whereas Al was very effective in removing color. Ben/Al showed intermediate effects on color reduction. These findings are important when decisions are made on restoration method for a specific lake, which may be more or less wind exposed. PMID:20055487

  3. Enhanced stability and antibacterial efficacy of a traditional Chinese medicine-mediated silver nanoparticle delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjie; Qu, Ding; Ma, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Congyan; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used as antibacterial products in various fields. Recent studies have suggested that AgNPs need an appropriate stabilizer to improve their stability. Some antibacterial traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) contain various reductive components, which can not only stabilize AgNPs but also enhance their antimicrobial activity. In this study, we developed a series of novel AgNPs using a TCM extract as a stabilizer, reducing agent, and antimicrobial agent (TCM-AgNPs). A storage stability investigation of the TCM-AgNPs suggested a significant improvement when compared with bare AgNPs. Further, conjugation of TCMs onto the AgNP surface resulted in stronger antimicrobial potency on antibacterial evaluation using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration 50% (MIC50) ratios (and minimum bactericidal concentration 90% [MBC90] ratios) of AgNPs to respective TCM-AgNPs as assessment indices. Among these, P. cuspidatum Sieb. et-conjugated AgNPs (P.C.-AgNPs) had the advantage of a combination of TCMs and AgNPs and was studied in detail with regard to its synthesis and characterization. The extraction time, reaction temperature, and concentrations of AgNO3 and Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et extract were critical factors in the preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. Further, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated successful preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. In representative studies, P.C.-AgNPs showed a well-defined spherical shape, a homogeneous small particle size (36.78 nm), a narrow polydispersity index (0.105), and a highly negative zeta potential (−23.6 mV) on transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. These results indicate that TCM-AgNPs have a potential role as antibacterial agents in the clinic setting. PMID:25473286

  4. Enhanced stability and antibacterial efficacy of a traditional Chinese medicine-mediated silver nanoparticle delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Qu, Ding; Ma, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Congyan; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used as antibacterial products in various fields. Recent studies have suggested that AgNPs need an appropriate stabilizer to improve their stability. Some antibacterial traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) contain various reductive components, which can not only stabilize AgNPs but also enhance their antimicrobial activity. In this study, we developed a series of novel AgNPs using a TCM extract as a stabilizer, reducing agent, and antimicrobial agent (TCM-AgNPs). A storage stability investigation of the TCM-AgNPs suggested a significant improvement when compared with bare AgNPs. Further, conjugation of TCMs onto the AgNP surface resulted in stronger antimicrobial potency on antibacterial evaluation using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration 50% (MIC50) ratios (and minimum bactericidal concentration 90% [MBC90] ratios) of AgNPs to respective TCM-AgNPs as assessment indices. Among these, P. cuspidatum Sieb. et-conjugated AgNPs (P.C.-AgNPs) had the advantage of a combination of TCMs and AgNPs and was studied in detail with regard to its synthesis and characterization. The extraction time, reaction temperature, and concentrations of AgNO3 and Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et extract were critical factors in the preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. Further, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated successful preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. In representative studies, P.C.-AgNPs showed a well-defined spherical shape, a homogeneous small particle size (36.78 nm), a narrow polydispersity index (0.105), and a highly negative zeta potential (-23.6 mV) on transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. These results indicate that TCM-AgNPs have a potential role as antibacterial agents in the clinic setting. PMID:25473286

  5. Stabilization and dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Joanna A.

    The dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels is studied, first within the context of a reactive diffusive (or constant density) model and then in a variable density model which allows for the consideration of thermal expansion effects. Fuel and oxidizer, separated upstream by a thin plate of finite length, flow into a channel with a prescribed upstream velocity. At the end of the plate, the fuel and oxidizer mix and, when ignited, an edge flame is sustained at some distance from the tip of the plate. Typically, the flame, which is stabilized by heat conduction back to the cold plate, has a tribrachial structure. It consists of a leading edge, made up of lean and rich premixed segments, and an attached diffusion flame trailing behind. The flame can also have a hook-like shape, when one of the premixed branches is missing. This often happens for conditions away from stoichiometry and when the mass diffusivities of the fuel and oxidizer are unequal. Earlier work has determined the behavior of an edge flame in a mixing layer that develops downstream of a splitter plate with no boundaries in the lateral direction. This is relevant to the stabilization and liftoff of jet diffusion flames. The confined case has other possible applications, such as flames in mini-combustor systems, that have been recently tested experimentally. The objective in this work is to determine the effect that confinement has on the edge standoff distance, on the flame shape and on the flame stability. In particular, we examine the influence of channel width, wall temperature, and the effects of differential diffusion. We determine conditions under which the edge flame is stabilized near the tip of the splitter plate, is held near the tip but oscillates back and forth, or is blown-off. We consider a wide range of channel widths and boundary conditions at the walls.

  6. Stability and Load Sharing Characteristics of a Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Device

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Yeager, Matthew S.; Thampi, Shankar S.; Whiting, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion is a common treatment for a variety of spinal pathologies. It has been hypothesized that insufficient mechanical loading of the interbody graft can prevent proper fusion of the joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical stability and anterior column loading sharing characteristics of a posterior dynamic system compared to titanium rods in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model. Methods Range of motion, interpedicular kinematics and interbody graft loading were measured in human cadaveric lumbar segments tested under a pure moment flexibility testing protocol. Results Both systems provided significant fixation compared to the intact condition and to an interbody spacer alone in flexion extension and lateral bending. No significant differences in fixation were detected between the devices. A significant decrease in graft loading was detected in flexion for the titanium rod treatment compared to spacer alone. No significant differences in graft loading were detected between the spacer alone and posterior dynamic system or between the posterior dynamic system and the titanium rod. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the posterior dynamic system provides similar fixation compared to that of a titanium rod, however, studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of fixation in a cadaver model may not be sufficiently powered to establish differences in load sharing using the techniques described here. PMID:26131403

  7. Dynamics and stability of divacancy defects in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngkuk; Ihm, Jisoon; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do

    2011-08-01

    A divacancy (DV) is one of the most abundant and most important defects in irradiated graphene, which modifies electronic and chemical properties of graphene. In this paper, we present ab initio calculations to study the dynamics and stability of DVs in graphene. Divacancies in graphene have various reconstructed structures, such as triple pentagon-triple heptagon (555-777) and pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) patterns. A direct observation of the structural transformations between these reconstructions was recorded in transmission electron microscope images reported by Girit in ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1166999 323, 1705 (2009). We clarify the atomic structures of DVs observed in the experiment and investigate the atomic processes and energetics for the observed dynamical motions in great detail. It is found that a series of Stone-Wales-type transformations are responsible for the migration and structural transformations of DVs and that a pentagon-heptagon-heptagon-pentagon (5-7-7-5) defect appearing as an intermediate structure during the dynamical process plays an important role in the transformations of DVs.

  8. Portal Stability Controls Dynamics of DNA Ejection from Phage.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Krista G; Behrens, Manja A; Streletzky, Kiril A; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Through a unique combination of time-resolved single-molecule (cryo-TEM) and bulk measurements (light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering), we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of stochastic DNA ejection events from phage λ. We reveal that both binding with the specific phage receptor, LamB, and thermo-mechanical destabilization of the portal vertex on the capsid are required for initiation of ejection of the pressurized λ-DNA from the phage. Specifically, we found that a measurable activation energy barrier for initiation of DNA ejection with LamB present, Ea = (1.2 ± 0.1) × 10(-19) J/phage (corresponding to ∼28 kTbody/phage at Tbody = 37 °C), results in 15 times increased rate of ejection event dynamics when the temperature is raised from 15 to 45 °C (7.5 min versus 30 s average lag time for initiation of ejection). This suggests that phages have a double fail-safe mechanism for ejection-in addition to receptor binding, phage must also overcome (through thermal energy and internal DNA pressure) an energy barrier for DNA ejection. This energy barrier ensures that viral genome ejection into cells occurs with high efficiency only when the temperature conditions are favorable for genome replication. At lower suboptimal temperatures, the infectious phage titer is preserved over much longer times, since DNA ejection dynamics is strongly inhibited even in the presence of solubilized receptor or susceptible cells. This work also establishes a light scattering based approach to investigate the influence of external solution conditions, mimicking those of the bacterial cytoplasm, on the stability of the viral capsid portal, which is directly linked to dynamics of virion deactivation. PMID:27176921

  9. Carotenoid incorporation into microsomes: yields, stability and membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Jessel, Robert; Diehl, Horst A.

    2000-12-01

    The carotenoids β-carotene (BC), lycopene (LYC), lutein (LUT), zeaxanthin (ZEA), canthaxanthin (CTX) and astaxanthin (ASTA) have been incorporated into pig liver microsomes. Effective incorporation concentrations in the range of about 1-6 nmol/mg microsomal protein were obtained. A stability test at room temperature revealed that after 3 h BC and LYC had decayed totally whereas, gradually, CTX (46%), LUT (21%), ASTA (17%) and ZEA (5%) decayed. Biophysical parameters of the microsomal membrane were changed hardly by the incorporation of carotenoids. A small rigidification may occur. Membrane anisotropy seems to offer only a small tolerance for incorporation of carotenoids and seems to limit the achievable incorporation concentrations of the carotenoids into microsomes. Microsomes instead of liposomes should be preferred as a membrane model to study mutual effects of carotenoids and membrane dynamics.

  10. Dynamical stability of a many-body Kapitza pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Citro, Roberta; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.; D’Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Babadi, Mehrtash; Oka, Takashi; Demler, Eugene

    2015-09-15

    We consider a many-body generalization of the Kapitza pendulum: the periodically-driven sine–Gordon model. We show that this interacting system is dynamically stable to periodic drives with finite frequency and amplitude. This finding is in contrast to the common belief that periodically-driven unbounded interacting systems should always tend to an absorbing infinite-temperature state. The transition to an unstable absorbing state is described by a change in the sign of the kinetic term in the Floquet Hamiltonian and controlled by the short-wavelength degrees of freedom. We investigate the stability phase diagram through an analytic high-frequency expansion, a self-consistent variational approach, and a numeric semiclassical calculation. Classical and quantum experiments are proposed to verify the validity of our results.

  11. Chemical stabilization of porous silicon for enhanced biofunctionalization with immunoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveas, Nelson; Torres Costa, Vicente; Gallach, Dario; Hernandez-Montelongo, Jacobo; Martín Palma, Raul Jose; Predenstinacion Garcia-Ruiz, Josefa; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2012-08-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) is widely used in biological experiments, owing to its biocompatibility and well-established fabrication methods that allow tailoring its surface. Nevertheless, there are some unresolved issues such as deciding whether the stabilization of PSi is necessary for its biological applications and evaluating the effects of PSi stabilization on the surface biofunctionalization with proteins. In this work we demonstrate that non-stabilized PSi is prone to detachment owing to the stress induced upon biomolecular adsorption. Biofunctionalized non-stabilized PSi loses the interference properties characteristic of a thin film, and groove-like structures resulting from a final layer collapse were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Likewise, direct PSi derivatization with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTS) does not stabilize PSi against immunoglobulin biofunctionalization. To overcome this problem, we developed a simple chemical process of stabilizing PSi (CoxPSi) for biological applications, which has several advantages over thermal stabilization (ToxPSi). The process consists of chemical oxidation in H2O2, surface derivatization with APTS and a curing step at 120 °C. This process offers integral homogeneous PSi morphology, hydrophilic surface termination (contact angle θ = 26°) and highly efficient derivatized and biofunctionalized PSi surfaces (six times more efficient than ToxPSi). All these features are highly desirable for biological applications, such as biosensing, where our results can be used for the design and optimization of the biomolecular immobilization cascade on PSi surfaces.

  12. The dynamics of CRM attitude change: Attitude stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorich, Steven E.

    1993-01-01

    Special training seminars in cockpit resource management (CRM) are designed to enhance crew effectiveness in multicrew air-transport cockpits. In terms of CRM, crew effectiveness is defined by teamwork rather than technical proficiency. These seminars are designed to promote factual learning, alter aviator attitudes, and motivate aviators to make use of what they have learned. However, measures of attitude change resulting from CRM seminars have been the most common seminar evaluation technique. The current investigation explores a broader range of attitude change parameters with specific emphasis on the stability of change between recurrent visits to the training center. This allows for a comparison of training program strengths in terms of seminar ability to effect lasting change.

  13. Mechanism study on stability enhancement of adefovir dipivoxil by cocrystallization: Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rui-Zhen; Sun, Peng-Jie; Tao, Qian; Yao, Jia; Chen, Jia-Mei; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2016-03-31

    The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which cocrystallization can enhance the stability of adefovir dipivoxil (AD), a diester prodrug of adefovir with known chemical stability problem. Three multi-component crystals of AD with biologically safe coformers, including gallic acid cocrystal hydrate (1:1:1), salicylate salt (1:1), and maleate salt (1:1) were prepared and characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. DVS measurements and stability tests were applied to evaluate the stability. The new crystalline phases exhibit improved stability compared to pure drug in the order AD gallic acid cocrystal>AD maleate>AD salicylate>AD form I. Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation studies demonstrate that the stability enhancement mechanism by cocrystallization involves (1) inhibition of hydrolysis of AD by replacement of drug-drug homosynthons by stronger drug-coformer heterosynthons at adenine fragments; (2) suppression of dimerization of AD by separation of adenine fragments by inserting coformers in crystal lattices; (3) further reducing rates of hydrolysis by forming hydrogen bonds with hydrate water at phosphoryl fragments. This study has important implications for use of cocrystallization approach to some easily degradable drugs in pharmaceutical. PMID:26462447

  14. Subsonic and Transonic Dynamic Stability Characteristics of the X-33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomek, D.; Boyden, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic stability testing was conducted on a 2.5% scale model of the X-33 technology demonstrator sub-orbital flight-test vehicle. This testing was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) l6-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel with the LaRC High-speed Dynamic Stability system. Forced oscillation data were acquired for various configurations over a Mach number range of 0.3 to 1.15 measuring pitch, roll and yaw damping, as well as the normal force due to pitch rate and the cross derivatives. The test angle of attack range was from -2 to 24 degrees, except for those cases where load constraints limited the higher angles of attack at the higher Mach numbers. A variety of model configurations with and without control surfaces were employed, including a body alone configuration. Stable pitch damping is exhibited for the baseline configuration throughout the angle of attack range for Mach numbers 0.3, 0.8, and 1.15. Stable pitch damping is present for Mach numbers 0.9 and 0.6 with the exception of angles 2 and 16 degrees, respectively. Constant and stable roll damping were present for the baseline configuration over the range of Mach numbers up to an angle of attack of 16 degrees. The yaw damping for the baseline is somewhat stable and constant for the angle of attack range from -2 to 8 degrees, with the exception of Mach numbers 0.6 and 0.8. Yaw damping becomes highly unstable for all Mach numbers at angles of attack greater than 8 degrees.

  15. Statistical precision and sensitivity of measures of dynamic gait stability.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H; Meijer, Onno G; Beek, Peter J

    2009-04-15

    Recently, two methods for quantifying a system's dynamic stability have been applied to human locomotion: local stability (quantified by finite time maximum Lyapunov exponents, lambda(S-stride) and lambda(L-stride)) and orbital stability (quantified as maximum Floquet multipliers, MaxFm). Thus far, however, it has remained unclear how many data points are required to obtain precise estimates of these measures during walking, and to what extent these estimates are sensitive to changes in walking behaviour. To resolve these issues, we collected long data series of healthy subjects (n=9) walking on a treadmill in three conditions (normal walking at 0.83 m/s (3 km/h) and 1.38 m/s (5 km/h), and walking at 1.38 m/s (5 km/h) while performing a Stroop dual task). Data series from 0.83 and 1.38 m/s trials were submitted to a bootstrap procedure and paired t-tests for samples of different data series lengths were performed between 0.83 and 1.38 m/s and between 1.38 m/s with and without Stroop task. Longer data series led to more precise estimates for lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm. All variables showed an effect of data series length. Thus, when estimating and comparing these variables across conditions, data series covering an equal number of strides should be analysed. lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm were sensitive to the change in walking speed while only lambda(S-stride) and MaxFm were sensitive enough to capture the modulations of walking induced by the Stroop task. Still, these modulations could only be detected when using a substantial number of strides (>150). PMID:19135478

  16. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  17. Enrichment Ratio and Aggregate Stability Dynamics in Intensely Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Filley, T. R.; Hou, T.; Abban, B. K.; Wilson, C. G.; Boys, J.

    2015-12-01

    Challenges in understanding the soil carbon dynamics within intensely managed landscapes (IMLs), found throughout much the US Midwest, is highly complex due to the presence of heterogeneous landscape features and properties, as well as a mosaic of physical and biogeochemical processes occurring at different time scales. In addition, rainfall events exacerbate the effects of tillage by the impact of raindrops, which break down aggregates that encase carbon and dislodge and entrain soil particles and aggregates along the downslope. The redistribution of soil and carbon can have huge implications on biogeochemical cycling and overall carbon budgeting. In this study, we provide some rare field data on the mechanisms impacting aggregate stability, enrichment ratio values to estimate fluxes of carbon, as well as lignin chemistry to see influences on oxidation/mineralization rates. Rainfall simulation experiments were conducted within agricultural fields. Experiments were performed on the midslope (eroding) and toeslope (depositional) sections of representative hillslopes, under a variety of land managements, including row crop (conventional and conservation) and restored grasslands. Sensors were utilized to capture the evolution of soil moisture, temperature, microbial respiration pulses, and discharge rates to identify pseudo-steady state conditions. Samples collected at the weir outlet were tested for sediment concentrations and size fractions, as well as carbon and lignin fluxes. Preliminary findings show that conservation management practices have higher aggregate stability and decreased mass fluxes of carbon in the downslope than conventional tillage techniques.

  18. Dynamic enhancement in adhesion forces of microparticles on substrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan; Li, Mingtao; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2013-11-12

    We report a dynamically induced enhancement in interfacial adhesion between microsized particles and substrates under dry and humid conditions. The adhesion force of soft (polystyrene) and hard (SiO2 and Al2O3) microparticles on soft (polystyrene) and hard (fused silica and sapphire) substrates was measured by using an atomic force microscope with retraction (z-piezo) speed ranging over 4 orders of magnitude. The adhesion is strongly enhanced by the dynamic effect. When the retraction speed varies from 0.02 to 156 μm/s, the adhesion force increases by 10% to 50% in dry nitrogen while it increases by 15% to 70% in humid air. Among the material systems tested, the soft-soft contact systems exhibit the smallest dynamic effect while the hard-hard contacts show the largest enhancement. A dynamic model was developed to predict this dynamic effect, which agrees well with the experimental results. The influence of dynamic factors related to the adhesion enhancement, such as particle inertia, viscoelastic deformations, and crack propagation, was discussed to understand the dynamic enhancement mechanisms. PMID:24117392

  19. Structural dynamic modeling and stability of a rotating blade under gravitational force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seungmin; Chung, Jintai; Hee Yoo, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Turbine blade lengths have been increasing in recent wind energy system designs in order to enhance power generation capacity. A longer blade length makes the structural system more flexible and often results in an undesirable, large dynamic response, which should be avoided in the design of the system. In the present study, the equations of motion of a rotating wind turbine blade undergoing gravitational force are derived, while considering tilt and pitch angles. Since the gravitational force acting on the rotating blade creates an oscillating axial force, this results in oscillating stiffness terms in the governing equations. The validity of the derived rotating blade model is evaluated by comparing its transient responses to those obtained by using a commercial finite element code. Effects of rotating speed, tilt angle, and pitch angle of the wind turbine blade on its dynamic stability characteristics are investigated.

  20. Enhancing the stability of the synchronization of multivariable coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Gutiérrez, R.; Huerta-Cuellar, G.; Boccaletti, S.; Gómez-Gardeñes, J.; Arenas, A.; Buldú, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Synchronization processes in populations of identical networked oscillators are the focus of intense studies in physical, biological, technological, and social systems. Here we analyze the stability of the synchronization of a network of oscillators coupled through different variables. Under the assumption of an equal topology of connections for all variables, the master stability function formalism allows assessing and quantifying the stability properties of the synchronization manifold when the coupling is transferred from one variable to another. We report on the existence of an optimal coupling transference that maximizes the stability of the synchronous state in a network of Rössler-like oscillators. Finally, we design an experimental implementation (using nonlinear electronic circuits) which grounds the robustness of the theoretical predictions against parameter mismatches, as well as against intrinsic noise of the system.

  1. Ethanol enhances collective dynamics of lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, Martin D.; Schmalzl, Karin; Conti Nibali, Valeria; Tarek, Mounir; Rheinstaedter, Maikel C.

    2011-05-15

    From inelastic neutron-scattering experiments and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we present evidence for a low-energy dynamical mode in the fluid phase of a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phoshatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer immersed in a 5% water/ethanol solution. In addition to the well-known phonon that shows a liquidlike dispersion with energies up to 4.5 meV, we observe an additional mode at smaller energies of 0.8 meV, which shows little or no dispersion. Both modes show transverse properties and might be related to molecular motion perpendicular to the bilayer.

  2. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems. PMID:27225708

  3. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems.

  4. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems. PMID:27225708

  5. Applications of Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.

    2004-01-01

    Initial steps in the application o f a low-order panel method computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code to the calculation of aircraft dynamic stability and control (S&C) derivatives are documented. Several capabilities, unique to CFD but not unique to this particular demonstration, are identified and demonstrated in this paper. These unique capabilities complement conventional S&C techniques and they include the ability to: 1) perform maneuvers without the flow-kinematic restrictions and support interference commonly associated with experimental S&C facilities, 2) easily simulate advanced S&C testing techniques, 3) compute exact S&C derivatives with uncertainty propagation bounds, and 4) alter the flow physics associated with a particular testing technique from those observed in a wind or water tunnel test in order to isolate effects. Also presented are discussions about some computational issues associated with the simulation of S&C tests and selected results from numerous surface grid resolution studies performed during the course of the study.

  6. Dynamics of microresonator frequency comb generation: models and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Microresonator frequency combs hold promise for enabling a new class of light sources that are simultaneously both broadband and coherent, and that could allow for a profusion of potential applications. In this article, we review various theoretical models for describing the temporal dynamics and formation of optical frequency combs. These models form the basis for performing numerical simulations that can be used in order to better understand the comb generation process, for example helping to identify the universal combcharacteristics and their different associated physical phenomena. Moreover, models allow for the study, design and optimization of comb properties prior to the fabrication of actual devices. We consider and derive theoretical formalisms based on the Ikeda map, the modal expansion approach, and the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We further discuss the generation of frequency combs in silicon resonators featuring multiphoton absorption and free-carrier effects. Additionally, we review comb stability properties and consider the role of modulational instability as well as of parametric instabilities due to the boundary conditions of the cavity. These instability mechanisms are the basis for comprehending the process of frequency comb formation, for identifying the different dynamical regimes and the associated dependence on the comb parameters. Finally, we also discuss the phenomena of continuous wave bi- and multistability and its relation to the observation of mode-locked cavity solitons.

  7. Dynamic Growth and Shrinkage Govern the pH Dependence of RecA Filament Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Park, Jeehae; Joo, Chirlmin; Kim, Doseok; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    RecA proteins form a long stable filament on a single-stranded DNA and catalyze strand exchange reaction. The stability of RecA filament changes dramatically with pH, yet its detailed mechanism is not known. Here, using a single molecule assay, we determined the binding and dissociation rates of RecA monomers at the filament ends at various pH. The pH-induced rate changes were moderate but occurred in opposite directions for binding and dissociation, resulting in a substantial increase in filament stability in lower pH. The highly charged residues in C-terminal domain do not contribute to the pH dependent stability. The stability enhancement of RecA filament in low pH may help the cell to cope with acidic stress by fine-tuning of the binding and dissociation rates without losing the highly dynamic nature of the filament required for strand exchange. PMID:25608006

  8. Understanding ethylammonium nitrate stabilized cytochrome c - Molecular dynamics and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaganathan, Maheshkumar; Ramakrishnan, C.; Velmurugan, D.; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2015-02-01

    For a conceptual understanding of how an ionic liquid stabilizes a solvated protein, in this study, using new force field parameters, a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) of the loop and helical regions of hydrated Cytochrome c (cyt c) and its interaction with the ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) have been studied. For a simulation trajectory of 100 ns, the changes in network of water around the protein due to EAN and subsequent reorganization of the protein have been analyzed. The radii of gyration of solvated cyt c (13.7 Å) and cyt c + EAN (13.4 Å) at the end of the trajectory are higher than the protein in its crystalline state (12.64 Å) suggesting enhanced stability of the protein due to tightly organized assembly of EAN near the solvated cyt c. This increase in stability of the protein has been verified experimentally using fluorescence, circular dichroic spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing EAN in cyt c + EAN, protein conformation shows unusually high β strand population. To check whether the beta strand is an intermediate or a local minimum state, denaturation of cyt c with urea in the presence of EAN has been undertaken. Results show that EAN helps in renaturation of the protein by forming a tightly organized assembly around the protein with the beta strand state appearing as a local minimum energy state. Thus the feasibility of using ionic liquids to form networks around the protein and their possible applications in stabilization of the proteins has been demonstrated.

  9. Alterations of Nonconserved Residues Affect Protein Stability and Folding Dynamics through Charge-Charge Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Garcìa, Angel E; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-10-15

    Charge-charge interactions play an important role in thermal stability of proteins. We employed an all-atom, native-topology-based model with non-native electrostatics to explore the interplay between folding dynamics and stability of TNfn3 (the third fibronectin type III domain from tenascin-C). Our study elucidates the role of charge-charge interactions in modulating the folding energy landscape. In particular, we found that incorporation of explicit charge-charge interactions in the WT TNfn3 induces energetic frustration due to the presence of residual structure in the unfolded state. Moreover, optimization of the surface charge-charge interactions by altering the evolutionarily nonconserved residues not only increases the thermal stability (in agreement with previous experimental study) but also reduces the formation of residual structure and hence minimizes the energetic frustration along the folding route. We concluded that charge-charge interaction in the rationally designed TNfn3 plays an important role not only in enhancing the stability but also in assisting folding. PMID:26413861

  10. Robust transmission stabilization and dynamic switching in broadband hybrid waveguide systems with nonlinear gain and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quan M.; Peleg, Avner; Tran, Thinh P.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a method for transmission stabilization and robust dynamic switching for colliding optical soliton sequences in broadband waveguide systems with nonlinear gain and loss. The method is based on employing hybrid waveguides, consisting of spans with linear gain and cubic loss, and spans with linear loss, cubic gain, and quintic loss. We show that the amplitude dynamics is described by a hybrid Lotka-Volterra (LV) model, and use the model to determine the physical parameter values required for enhanced transmission stabilization and switching. Numerical simulations with coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations confirm the predictions of the LV model, and show complete suppression of radiative instability and pulse distortion. This enables stable transmission over distances larger by an order of magnitude compared with uniform waveguides with linear gain and cubic loss. Moreover, multiple on-off and off-on dynamic switching events are demonstrated over a wide range of soliton amplitudes, showing the superiority of hybrid waveguides compared with static switching in uniform waveguides.

  11. Dynamic stability of sequential stimulus representations in adapting neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Renato C. F.; Morrison, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    The ability to acquire and maintain appropriate representations of time-varying, sequential stimulus events is a fundamental feature of neocortical circuits and a necessary first step toward more specialized information processing. The dynamical properties of such representations depend on the current state of the circuit, which is determined primarily by the ongoing, internally generated activity, setting the ground state from which input-specific transformations emerge. Here, we begin by demonstrating that timing-dependent synaptic plasticity mechanisms have an important role to play in the active maintenance of an ongoing dynamics characterized by asynchronous and irregular firing, closely resembling cortical activity in vivo. Incoming stimuli, acting as perturbations of the local balance of excitation and inhibition, require fast adaptive responses to prevent the development of unstable activity regimes, such as those characterized by a high degree of population-wide synchrony. We establish a link between such pathological network activity, which is circumvented by the action of plasticity, and a reduced computational capacity. Additionally, we demonstrate that the action of plasticity shapes and stabilizes the transient network states exhibited in the presence of sequentially presented stimulus events, allowing the development of adequate and discernible stimulus representations. The main feature responsible for the increased discriminability of stimulus-driven population responses in plastic networks is shown to be the decorrelating action of inhibitory plasticity and the consequent maintenance of the asynchronous irregular dynamic regime both for ongoing activity and stimulus-driven responses, whereas excitatory plasticity is shown to play only a marginal role. PMID:25374534

  12. Application of a combined superconducting fault current limiter and STATCOM to enhancement of power system transient stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdad, Belkacem; Srairi, K.

    2013-12-01

    Stable and reliable operation of the power system network is dependent on the dynamic equilibrium between energy production and power demand under large disturbance such as short circuit or important line tripping. This paper investigates the use of combined model based superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) and shunt FACTS Controller (STATCOM) for assessing the transient stability of a power system considering the automatic voltage regulator. The combined model located at a specified branch based on voltage stability index using continuation power flow. The main role of the proposed combined model is to achieve simultaneously a flexible control of reactive power using STATCOM Controller and to reduce fault current using superconducting technology based SFCL. The proposed combined model has been successfully adapted within the transient stability program and applied to enhance the transient power system stability of the WSCC9-Bus system. Critical clearing time (CCT) has been used as an index to evaluate and validate the contribution of the proposed coordinated Controller. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness and perspective of this combined Controller to enhance the dynamic power system performances.

  13. Metaconcrete: designed aggregates to enhance dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.; Pandolfi, Anna; Ortiz, Michael

    2014-04-01

    We propose a new type of concrete for the attenuation of elastic waves induced by dynamic excitation. In this metamaterial, which we call metaconcrete, the stone, sand, and gravel aggregates of standard concrete are replaced with spherical inclusions consisting of a heavy metal core coated with a soft outer layer. These engineered aggregates can be tuned so that particular frequencies of a propagating blast wave will activate resonant oscillations of the heavy mass within the inclusions. The resonant behavior causes the system to exhibit negative effective mass, and this interaction between the wave motion and the resonant aggregates results in the attenuation of the applied dynamic loading. We introduce the concept of negative mass by deriving the effective momentum mass for the system and we define the geometrical and material parameters for the design of resonant aggregates. We develop finite element models for the analysis of metaconcrete behavior, defining a section of slab containing a periodic arrangement of inclusions. By computing the energy histories for the system when subject to a blast load, we show that there is a transfer of energy between the inclusions and the surrounding mortar. The inclusions are able to absorb a significant portion of the applied energy, resulting in a reduction in the amount of stress carried by the mortar phase and greatly improving the ability of the material to resist damage under explosive dynamic loading.

  14. Enhanced stability of hillslopes and channel beds to mass failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prancevic, Jeff; Lamb, Michael; Palucis, Marisa; Venditti, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    The stability of inclined, unconsolidated sediments subjected to groundwater flow on hillslopes and steep channel beds is important for both landscape evolution and natural hazards. Force-balance models have been used for seven decades to predict the stability of slopes, but they generally underpredict the degree of saturation required to destabilize the sediment. Researchers often appeal to heightened stabilizing forces from root and mineral cohesion, and friction acting on the margins of the failure to explain this underprediction. Surprisingly, infinite-slope stability models in their simplest form have never been tested under controlled laboratory conditions. To address this gap in data, we perform a set of controlled laboratory experiments with slope-parallel seepage in the simplest possible configuration. We performed 47 experiments in a 5 m laboratory flume with 4 grain sizes (D50 = 0.7, 2, 5, and 15 mm) and a wide range in bed angles (20° to 43°), spanning both Darcian and turbulent subsurface flow regimes. Our experiments show that granular slopes were more stable than predicted by simple force balance models in experiments that lack root or mineral cohesion. Despite the smooth plastic walls and the long aspect ratio of our flume, we calculate wall and toe friction to be important. Including these additional resistance terms in the model reduces the model misfit with our experimental results. However, there is considerable remaining misfit (up to 50% underestimation of the saturation level required for failure). We investigate two explanations of this heightened stability: 1) standard frictional resistance terms are underestimated, and 2) seepage stresses are overestimated. Both explanations require that we modify the models used to predict slope stability.

  15. Determining basin geometry, stability, and flow dynamics of valley glaciers with ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Seth William

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps (GICs) currently contribute ~0% to annual sea level rise. Most are temperate, therefore having the potential for rapid retreat from rising atmospheric temperatures. This climate sensitivity makes GIC stability and their impact on sea level rise a scientific problem with societal implications. To accurately predict impacts from GIC changes, knowledge of glacier components (e.g., basin geometry, mass balance, and dynamics) is needed. The goal of my dissertation research is to determine information about glacier geometry, snow-fire, and englacial stratigraphy using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to enhance our understanding of valley glacier mass balance, dynamics, and stability. I first examine glacier basin geometry and ice volume of two temperate glaciers (Jarvis Glacier, Alaska and Nisqually Glacier, Washington) and demonstrate that significant errors (≥30-50%) can arise when using empirically-based volume estimates without geophysical constraints. I next determine spatial variability of accumulation across the temperate Juneau Icefield in Alaska usina GPR to interpolate between snowpits. To accomplish this, the dependence of radar velocity on snow density (~.3-0.7 g cm -3) and water content (0-9% by volume) needs to be addressed. Results show that on average, 2.1+/-0.5 m (water equivalent) of winter snow accumulates across the icefield with accumulation patterns depending on elevation, aspect, and proximity to moisture source. The third component of my dissertation combines locally measured accumulation rates, ice flow velocities, and englacial structures imaged with GPR to calculate that a negative mass balance (-0.25 cm a -1) has existed in valley glaciers of the Pensacola Mountains, West Antarctica over the past 1200 years. Finally, 1 use a 3-dimensional finite element non-Newtonian model to characterize the stress fields and current dynamics of a small ice divide. GPR-derived basin geometry is used for model boundary

  16. De-enhancing the dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI for robust registration.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Yu, Jingyi; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Englander, Sarah; Schnall, Mitchell D; Shen, Dinggang

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic enhancement causes serious problems for registration of contrast enhanced breast MRI, due to variable uptakes of agent on different tissues or even same tissues in the breast. We present an iterative optimization algorithm to de-enhance the dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI and then register them for avoiding the effects of enhancement on image registration. In particular, the spatially varying enhancements are modeled by a Markov Random Field, and estimated by a locally smooth function with boundaries using a graph cut algorithm. The de-enhanced images are then registered by conventional B-spline based registration algorithm. These two steps benefit from each other and are repeated until the results converge. Experimental results show that our two-step registration algorithm performs much better than conventional mutual information based registration algorithm. Also, the effects of tumor shrinking in the conventional registration algorithms can be effectively avoided by our registration algorithm. PMID:18051148

  17. α-SNAP Enhances SNARE Zippering by Stabilizing the SNARE Four-Helix Bundle.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lu; Kang, Yuhao; Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A; Cha, Hyo Keun; Xi, Zhiqun; Qu, Hong; Zhang, Yongli

    2016-04-19

    Intracellular membrane fusion is mediated by dynamic assembly and disassembly of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs). α-SNAP guides NSF to disassemble SNARE complexes after membrane fusion. Recent experiments showed that α-SNAP also dramatically enhances SNARE assembly and membrane fusion. How α-SNAP is involved in these opposing activities is not known. Here, we examine the effect of α-SNAP on the stepwise assembly of the synaptic SNARE complex using optical tweezers. We found that α-SNAP destabilized the linker domain (LD) of the SNARE complex but stabilized its C-terminal domain (CTD) through a conformational selection mechanism. In contrast, α-SNAP minimally affected assembly of the SNARE N-terminal domain (NTD), indicating that α-SNAP barely bound the partially assembled trans-SNARE complex. Thus, α-SNAP recognizes the folded CTD for SNARE disassembly with NSF and subtly modulates membrane fusion by altering the stabilities of the SNARE CTD and LD. PMID:27068468

  18. Active electrostatic control of liquid bridge dynamics and stability.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, David B; Wei, Wei; Marston, Philip L

    2004-11-01

    Stabilization of cylindrical liquid bridges beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit has been demonstrated in both Plateau-tank experiments and in short-duration low gravity on NASA KC-135 aircraft using an active electrostatic control method. The method controls the (2,0) capillary mode using an optical modal-amplitude detector and mode-coupled electrostatic feedback stress. The application of mode-coupled stresses to a liquid bridge is also a very useful way to study mode dynamics. A pure (2,0)-mode oscillation can be excited by periodic forcing and then the forcing can be turned off to allow for a free decay from which the frequency and damping of the mode is measured. This can be done in the presence or absence of feedback control. Mode-coupled feedback stress applied in proportion to modal amplitude with appropriate gain leads to stiffening of the mode allowing for stabilization beyond the Rayleigh-Plateau limit. If the opposite sign of gain is applied the mode frequency is reduced. It has also been demonstrated that, by applying feedback in proportion to the modal velocity, the damping of the mode can be increased or decreased depending on the velocity gain. Thus, both the mode frequency and damping can be independently controlled at the same time and this has been demonstrated in Plateau-tank experiments. The International Space Station (ISS) has its own modes of oscillation, some of which are in a low frequency range comparable to the (2,0)-mode frequency of typical liquid bridges. In the event that a vibration mode of the ISS were close to the frequency of a capillary mode it would be possible, with active electrostatic control, to shift the capillary-mode frequency away from that of the disturbance and simultaneously add artificial damping to further reduce the effect of the g-jitter. In principle, this method could be applied to any fluid configuration with a free surface. PMID:15644377

  19. Does visual augmented feedback reduce local dynamic stability while walking?

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Daniel; Hamacher, Dennis; Schega, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Augmented feedback is frequently used in gait training to efficiently correct specific gait patterns in patients with different disorders. The patients use this external augmented feedback to align actual movements in a way that predefined gait characteristics can be achieved. Voluntary changes of gait characteristics are reported to reduce local dynamic stability (LDS) which in turn is associated with increased risk of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of visual feedback, provided to help patients to correct frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements, on the LDS of pelvis and trunk. Kinematic gait data was captured in ten women with gait disorders. The effect of visual feedback on LDS, quantified with the largest Lyapunov exponent, of walking was examined. We found a significant decreased LDS (e.g. pelvis: p=.009) in our subjects when they were using visual augmented feedback. Our data suggest that the use of visual augmented feedback causes less stable gait patterns indicating a reduced ability to respond to small perturbations which might increase risk of falling. Therefore, researchers or clinicians who aim to correct gait patterns through real time based external augmented feedback should consider the potential negative effect on gait stability. It should be evaluated if the possible increased fall risk provoked by visual feedback exceeds possible increases in fall risk induced by conventional gait-retraining interventions. The external validity of the study is limited because of the low sample size and inhomogeneous group characteristics. Thus, further studies including homogeneous cohorts are required. PMID:26296676

  20. Stability Mechanisms of a Thermophilic Laccase Probed by Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Niels J.; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD) was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response to variable ionic strengths, temperatures, and glycosylation status. Near-physiological conditions provided excellent agreement with the crystal structure (average RMSD ∼0.92 Å) and residual agreement with experimental B-factors. The persistence of backbone hydrogen bonds was identified as a key descriptor of structural response to environment, whereas solvent-accessibility, radius of gyration, and fluctuations were only locally relevant. Backbone hydrogen bonds decreased systematically with temperature in all simulations (∼9 per 50 K), probing structural changes associated with enthalpy-entropy compensation. Approaching Topt (∼350 K) from 300 K, this change correlated with a beginning “unzipping” of critical β-sheets. 0 M ionic strength triggered partial denucleation of the C-terminal (known experimentally to be sensitive) at 400 K, suggesting a general salt stabilization effect. In contrast, F− (but not Cl−) specifically impaired secondary structure by formation of strong hydrogen bonds with backbone NH, providing a mechanism for experimentally observed small anion destabilization, potentially remedied by site-directed mutagenesis at critical intrusion sites. N-glycosylation was found to support structural integrity by increasing persistent backbone hydrogen bonds by ∼4 across simulations, mainly via prevention of F− intrusion. Hydrogen-bond loss in distinct loop regions and ends of critical β-sheets suggest potential strategies for laboratory optimization of these industrially important enzymes. PMID:23658618

  1. Effectiveness of the Bjerknes stability index in representing ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Felicity S.; Brown, Jaclyn N.; Langlais, Clothilde; Marsland, Simon J.; Wittenberg, Andrew T.; Holbrook, Neil J.

    2014-11-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a naturally occurring coupled phenomenon originating in the tropical Pacific Ocean that relies on ocean-atmosphere feedbacks. The Bjerknes stability index (BJ index), derived from the mixed-layer heat budget, aims to quantify the ENSO feedback process in order to explore the linear stability properties of ENSO. More recently, the BJ index has been used for model intercomparisons, particularly for the CMIP3 and CMIP5 models. This study investigates the effectiveness of the BJ index in representing the key ENSO ocean feedbacks—namely the thermocline, zonal advective, and Ekman feedbacks—by evaluating the amplitudes and phases of the BJ index terms against the corresponding heat budget terms from which they were derived. The output from Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator Ocean Model (a global ocean/sea ice flux-forced model) is used to calculate the heat budget in the equatorial Pacific. Through the model evaluation process, the robustness of the BJ index terms are tested. We find that the BJ index overestimates the relative importance of the thermocline feedback to the zonal advective feedback when compared with the corresponding terms from the heat budget equation. The assumption of linearity between variables in the BJ index formulation is the primary reason for these differences. Our results imply that a model intercomparison relying on the BJ index to explain ENSO behavior is not necessarily an accurate quantification of dynamical differences between models that are inherently nonlinear. For these reasons, the BJ index may not fully explain underpinning changes in ENSO under global warming scenarios.

  2. Recombination technologies for enhanced transgene stability in bioengineered insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transposon-based vectors currently provide the most suitable gene transfer systems for insect germ-line transformation and are used for molecular improvement of the Sterile Insect Technique. However, the long time stability of genome-integrated transposon constructs depends on the absence of transpo...

  3. Dynamic Stability and Gravitational Balancing of Multiple Extended Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Feasibility of a non-invasive compensation scheme was analyzed for precise positioning of a massive extended body in free fall using gravitational forces influenced by surrounding source masses in close proximity. The N-body problem of classical mechanics is a paradigm used to gain insight into the physics of the equivalent N-body problem subject to control forces. The analysis addressed how a number of control masses move around the proof mass so that the proof mass position can be accurately and remotely compensated when exogenous disturbances are acting on it, while its sensitivity to gravitational waves remains unaffected. Past methods to correct the dynamics of the proof mass have considered active electrostatic or capacitive methods, but the possibility of stray capacitances on the surfaces of the proof mass have prompted the investigation of other alternatives, such as the method presented in this paper. While more rigorous analyses of the problem should be carried out, the data show that, by means of a combined feedback and feed-forward control approach, the control masses succeeded in driving the proof mass along the specified trajectory, which implies that the proof mass can, in principle, be balanced via gravitational forces only while external perturbations are acting on it. This concept involves the dynamic stability of a group of massive objects interacting gravitationally under active control, and can apply to drag-free control of spacecraft during missions, to successor gravitational wave space borne sensors, or to any application requiring flying objects to be precisely controlled in position and attitude relative to another body via gravitational interactions only.

  4. Multidentate block-copolymer-stabilized ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with enhanced colloidal stability for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Chan, Nicky; Laprise-Pelletier, Myriam; Chevallier, Pascale; Bianchi, Andrea; Fortin, Marc-André; Oh, Jung Kwon

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) with diameters <5 nm hold great promise as T1-positive contrast agents for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging. However, control of the surface chemistry of USPIOs to ensure individual colloidal USPIOs with a ligand monolayer and to impart biocompatibility and enhanced colloidal stability is essential for successful clinical applications. Herein, an effective and versatile strategy enabling the development of aqueous colloidal USPIOs stabilized with well-defined multidentate block copolymers (MDBCs) is reported. The multifunctional MDBCs are designed to consist of an anchoring block possessing pendant carboxylates as multidentate anchoring groups strongly bound to USPIO surfaces and a hydrophilic block having pendant hydrophilic oligo(ethylene oxide) chains to confer water dispersibility and biocompatibility. The surface of USPIOs is saturated with multiple anchoring groups of MDBCs, thus exhibiting excellent long-term colloidal stability as well as enhanced colloidal stability at biologically relevant electrolyte, pH, and temperature conditions. Furthermore, relaxometric properties as well as in vitro and in vivo MR imaging results demonstrate that the MDBC-stabilized USPIO colloids hold great potential as an effective T1 contrast agent. PMID:24785001

  5. Transient Stability Enhancement of Power Systems by Lyapunov-Based Recurrent Neural Networks UPFC Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Hung-Chi; Chang, Wei-Neng

    A Lyapunov-based recurrent neural networks unified power flow controller (UPFC) is developed for improving transient stability of power systems. First, a simple UPFC dynamical model, composed of a controllable shunt susceptance on the shunt side and an ideal complex transformer on the series side, is utilized to analyze UPFC dynamical characteristics. Secondly, we study the control configuration of the UPFC with two major blocks: the primary control, and the supplementary control. The primary control is implemented by standard PI techniques when the power system is operated in a normal condition. The supplementary control will be effective only when the power system is subjected by large disturbances. We propose a new Lyapunov-based UPFC controller of the classical single-machine-infinite-bus system for damping enhancement. In order to consider more complicated detailed generator models, we also propose a Lyapunov-based adaptive recurrent neural network controller to deal with such model uncertainties. This controller can be treated as neural network approximations of Lyapunov control actions. In addition, this controller also provides online learning ability to adjust the corresponding weights with the back propagation algorithm built in the hidden layer. The proposed control scheme has been tested on two simple power systems. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy is very effective for suppressing power swing even under severe system conditions.

  6. Late-quaternary vegetational dynamics and community stability reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.

    1983-03-01

    Defining the spatial and temporal limits of vegetational processes such as migration and invasion of established communities is a prerequisite to evaluating the degree of stability in plant communities through the late Quaternary. The interpretation of changes in boundaries of major vegetation types over the past 20,000 yr offers a complementary view to that provided by migration maps for particular plant taxa. North of approximately 43°N in eastern North America, continual vegetational disequilibrium has resulted from climatic change, soil development, and species migrations during postglacial times. Between 33° and 39°N, stable full-glacial vegetation was replaced by a relatively unstable vegetation during late-glacial climatic amelioration; stable interglacial vegetation developed there after about 9000 yr B.P. Late-Quaternary vegetation has been in dynamic equilibrium, with a relatively constant flora, south of 33°N on upland interfluves along the northern Gulf Coastal Plain, peninsular Florida, and west-central Mexico.

  7. Shape optimization for maximum stability and dynamic stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szyszkowski, W.

    1990-01-01

    Any optimization of structures for maximum stability or for maximum dynamic stiffness deals with an eigenvalue problem. The goal of this optimization is to raise the lowest eigenvalue (or eigenvalues) of the problem to its highest (optimal) level at a constant volume of the structure. Likely the lowest eigenvalue may be either inherently multi-modal or it can become multi-modal as a result of the optimization process. The multimodeness introduces some ambiguity to the eigenvalue problem and make the optimization difficult to handle. Thus far, only the simplest cases of multi-modal structures have been effectively optimized using rather elaborate analytical methods. Numerous publications report design of a minimum volume structure with different eigenvalues constraints, in which, however, the modality of the problem is assumed a priori. The method presented here utilizes a multi-modal optimality criteria and allows for inclusion of an arbitrary number of buckling or vibrations modes which might influence the optimization process. The real multi-modality of the problem, that is the number of modes participating in the final optimal design is determined iteratively. Because of a natural use of the FEM technique the method is easy to program and might be helpful in design of large flexible space structures.

  8. Optimal mistuning for enhanced aeroelastic stability of transonic fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, K. C.; Crawley, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    An inverse design procedure was developed for the design of a mistuned rotor. The design requirements are that the stability margin of the eigenvalues of the aeroelastic system be greater than or equal to some minimum stability margin, and that the mass added to each blade be positive. The objective was to achieve these requirements with a minimal amount of mistuning. Hence, the problem was posed as a constrained optimization problem. The constrained minimization problem was solved by the technique of mathematical programming via augmented Lagrangians. The unconstrained minimization phase of this technique was solved by the variable metric method. The bladed disk was modelled as being composed of a rigid disk mounted on a rigid shaft. Each of the blades were modelled with a single tosional degree of freedom.

  9. Recombination technologies for enhanced transgene stability in bioengineered insects

    PubMed Central

    Schetelig, Marc F.; Götschel, Frank; Viktorinová, Ivana; Handler, Alfred M.

    2010-01-01

    Transposon-based vectors currently provide the most suitable gene transfer systems for insect germ-line transformation and are used for molecular improvement of the Sterile Insect Technique. However, the long time stability of genome-integrated transposon constructs depends on the absence of transposase activity that could remobilize the transposon-embedded transgenes. To achieve transgene stability transposon vectors are usually non-autonomous, lacking a functional transposase gene, and chosen so that endogenous or related transposon activities are not present in the host. Nevertheless, the non-autonomous transposon-embedded transgenes could become unstable by the unintended presence of a mobilizing transposase that may have been undetected or subsequently entered the host species by horizontal gene transfer. Since the field release of transgenic insects will present environmental concerns relating to large populations and high mobility, it will be important to ensure that transgene constructs are stably integrated for maintaining strain integrity and eliminating the possibility for unintentional transfer into the genome of another organism. Here we review efficient methods to delete or rearrange terminal repeat sequences of transposons necessary for their mobility, subsequent to their initial genomic integration. These procedures should prevent transposase-mediated remobilization of the transgenes, ensuring their genomic stability. PMID:20844938

  10. Method for enhancing stability of high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, and the stabilized high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Nutt, Gerald L.

    1991-01-01

    The stability of porous solid high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, is enhanced by reducing the sensitivity to shock initiation of a reaction that leads to detonation. The pores of the explosive down to a certain size are filled under pressure with a stable, low melt temperature material in liquid form, and the combined material is cooled so the pore filling material solidifies. The stability can be increased to progressively higher levels by filling smaller pores. The pore filling material can be removed, at least partially, by reheating above its melt temperature and drained off so that the explosive is once more suitable for detonation.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Processable Polyimides with Enhanced Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    1999-01-01

    The following is a summary report of the research carried out under NASA Grant NAG-1-448. The work was divided into four major areas: 1) Enhanced polyimide processing through the use of reactive plasticizers 2) Development of processable polyhenylquinoxalines 3) Synthesis and characterization of perfluorovinylether-terminated imide oligomers and 4) Fluorosilicones containing perfuorocyclobutane rings.

  12. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  13. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Fortgang, C.M.; Fazio, M.V.; Haynes, W.B.; May, L.M.; Potter, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Present-day pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that win make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling-wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons. Detailed particle-in-cell simulations are included to demonstrate the transverse wiggling of the rf mode and the axial FEL interaction.

  14. Tuneable enhancement of the salt and thermal stability of polymeric micelles by cyclized amphiphiles

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tezuka, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic molecules provide better stability for their aggregates. Typically in nature, the unique cyclic cell membrane lipids allow thermophilic archaea to inhabit extreme conditions. By mimicking the biological design, the robustness of self-assembled synthetic nanostructures is expected to be improved. Here we report topology effects by cyclized polymeric amphiphiles against their linear counterparts, demonstrating a drastic enhancement in the thermal, as well as salt stability of self-assembled micelles. Furthermore, through coassembly of the linear and cyclic amphiphiles, the stability was successfully tuned for a wide range of temperatures and salt concentrations. The enhanced thermal/salt stability was exploited in a halogen exchange reaction to stimulate the catalytic activity. The mechanism for the enhancement was also investigated. These topology effects by the cyclic amphiphiles offer unprecedented opportunities in polymer materials design unattainable by traditional means. PMID:23481382

  15. Electrified film on a porous inclined plane: Dynamics and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma, B.; Usha, R.

    2010-07-01

    The time evolution of a thin conducting liquid film flowing down a porous inclined substrate is investigated when an electric field acts normal to the substrate. It is assumed that the flow through the porous medium is governed by Darcy’s law together with Beavers-Joseph condition. Under the assumption of small permeability relative to the thickness of the overlying fluid layer, the flow is decoupled from the filtration flow through the porous medium. A slip condition at the bottom is used to incorporate the effects of the permeability of the substrate. From the set of exact averaged equations derived using integral boundary method for the film thickness and for the flow rate, a nonlinear evolution equation for the film thickness is derived through a long-wave approximation. A linear stability analysis of the base flow is performed and the critical Reynolds number is obtained. The results reveal that the substrate porosity in general destabilizes the liquid film flow and the presence of the electric field enhances this destabilizing effect. A weakly nonlinear stability analysis divulges the existence of supercritical stable and subcritical unstable zones in the wave number/Reynolds number parameter space and the results demonstrate how the neutral curves change as the intensity of the electric filed or the permeability of the porous medium is varied. The numerical solution of the nonlinear evolution equation in a periodic domain reveals that the base flow yields to surface structures that are either time independent waves of permanent form that propagate or time-dependent modes that oscillate slightly in the amplitude. Further, it is observed that the shape and amplitude of long-time waveforms are influenced by the permeability of the porous medium as well as by the applied electric field. The results reveal that the destabilization induced by the electric field in an otherwise stable film over a porous medium is exhibited in the form of traveling waves of finite

  16. Electrified film on a porous inclined plane: dynamics and stability.

    PubMed

    Uma, B; Usha, R

    2010-07-01

    The time evolution of a thin conducting liquid film flowing down a porous inclined substrate is investigated when an electric field acts normal to the substrate. It is assumed that the flow through the porous medium is governed by Darcy's law together with Beavers-Joseph condition. Under the assumption of small permeability relative to the thickness of the overlying fluid layer, the flow is decoupled from the filtration flow through the porous medium. A slip condition at the bottom is used to incorporate the effects of the permeability of the substrate. From the set of exact averaged equations derived using integral boundary method for the film thickness and for the flow rate, a nonlinear evolution equation for the film thickness is derived through a long-wave approximation. A linear stability analysis of the base flow is performed and the critical Reynolds number is obtained. The results reveal that the substrate porosity in general destabilizes the liquid film flow and the presence of the electric field enhances this destabilizing effect. A weakly nonlinear stability analysis divulges the existence of supercritical stable and subcritical unstable zones in the wave number/Reynolds number parameter space and the results demonstrate how the neutral curves change as the intensity of the electric filed or the permeability of the porous medium is varied. The numerical solution of the nonlinear evolution equation in a periodic domain reveals that the base flow yields to surface structures that are either time independent waves of permanent form that propagate or time-dependent modes that oscillate slightly in the amplitude. Further, it is observed that the shape and amplitude of long-time waveforms are influenced by the permeability of the porous medium as well as by the applied electric field. The results reveal that the destabilization induced by the electric field in an otherwise stable film over a porous medium is exhibited in the form of traveling waves of finite

  17. Dynamic Stability of Lateral and Yawing Motions in the Double Null-Flux EDS System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Toshiaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Sugino, Motohiko

    The double null-flux electro-dynamic suspension (EDS) in the superconducting maglev has the coupling lateral and yawing stiffness, which does not coincide with each other, so special attention should be paid to the dynamic stability of lateral and yawing motions. This paper describes their intrinsic dynamic stability by analyzing the lateral and yawing motions of bogie levitated by the double null-flux EDS.

  18. Enhanced Thermal Stability of Polylactide by Terminal Conjugation Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hang Thi; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Vu, Ngo Dinh

    2016-05-01

    Various acids such as aliphatic or carbocyclic fatty or aromatic acids were successfully conjugated into the ending hydroxyl group of poly( l-lactide) (PLLA). The chemical structures of various acid-PLLAs were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The crystallinity and solubility of the original PLLA were maintained after the terminal conjugation of various acids. The thermal properties were significantly improved, especially the 10% weight-loss temperature that showed an increase of over 80°C for conjugation of aliphatic or aromatic acids as compared to that of the corresponding original PLLA. In addition, more than 60 wt.% of the aliphatic acid-PLLAs was pyrolyzed, and aromatic acid-PLLAs degraded only about 10 wt.% for 150 min, although the original PLLA was pyrolyzed completely at 250°C for 7 min. The thermal stability of PLLA was controlled by the conjugation of aliphatic or aromatic acids into a chain end. These acid-PLLAs may be useful as materials with high thermal stability for various application fields.

  19. Protein dynamics, thermal stability, and free-energy landscapes: a molecular dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Cotesta, Simona; Di Iorio, Ernesto E

    2003-10-01

    Proteins have a complex free-energy landscape because of their rich topology and the nature of their nonbonded interaction potential. This has important consequences because the roughness of the landscape affects the ease with which a chain folds and also determines the dynamic behavior of the folded structure, thus influencing its functional and stability properties. A detailed description of the free-energy landscape is therefore of paramount importance for a quantitative understanding of the relationships between structure, dynamics, stability, and functional behavior of proteins. The free-energy landscape of a protein is a high-dimensional hypersurface, difficult to rationalize. Therefore, achieving its detailed graphical representation in a way that goes beyond the familiar funnel-like free-energy model is still a big challenge. We describe here an approach based on global structural parameters that allows a two-dimensional representation of the free-energy landscape from simulated atomic trajectories. As shown in this and in the accompanying article, our representation of the landscape, combined with other conformational analyses, provides valuable information on its roughness and on how atomic trajectories evolve with time. PMID:14507727

  20. Microstructure-dependent dynamic stability analysis of torsional NEMS scanner in van der Waals regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Javad; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-06-01

    The physico-mechanical behavior of nanoscale devices might be microstructure dependent. However, the classical continuum theory cannot correctly predict the microstructure dependency. In this paper, the strain gradient theory is employed to examine the instability characteristics of a nanoscanner with circular geometry. The governing equation of the scanner is derived incorporating the Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) forces. The influences of applied voltage, squeeze damping and microstructure parameters on the dynamic instability of equilibrium points are studied by plotting the phase portrait and bifurcation diagrams. In the presence of the applied voltage, the phase portrait shows the saddle-node bifurcation while for freestanding scanner a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation is observed. It is concluded that the microstructure parameter enhances the torsional stability.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of processable polyimides with enhanced thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the emerging applications of polymers on space vehicles require materials with outstanding thermal stability. These polymers must also be readily processable in order to facilitate their use. The syntheses and polymerization of a cardo dianhydride were investigated. This monomer was prepared via the reaction of N-methyl 4-nitrophthalimide with a cardo diol. Polyimides containing oxyalkylene linkages were studied. The effects of two additional structural modifications on the polymers' properties were investigated. The effects of carrying out the preparation of poly(amic acid)s under non-equilibrium conditions were examined. Approaches that were investigated included the in-situ neutralization of the generated amic acid and its in-situ esterification.

  2. Dynamics of single-species population growth: stability or chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, L.D.; Ayala, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined stability at the carrying capacity for 25 genetically different populations of Drosophila melanogaster. In spite of their genetic heterogeneity, 20 of the populations yield stable equilibria and none have eigenvalues significantly greater than one. Computer simulations demonstrate how selection at the individual level may account for population stability (and, hence, that group selection is not necessary for the evolution of stability). Recent theoretical studies on density-dependent selection in random environments provide predictions consistent with our empirical findings.

  3. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigation of the stability of nonaxisymmetric and axisymmetric bridges contained between equal and unequal radii disks as a function of Bond and Weber number with emphasis on the transition from unstable axisymmetric to stable nonaxisymmetric shapes. Numerical analysis of the stability of nonaxisymmetric bridges between unequal disks for various orientations of the gravity vector Experimental and numerical investigation of bridge stability (nonaxisymmetric and axisymmetric), large amplitude (nonaxisymmetric) oscillations and breaking.

  4. Dynamics and stability of mechanical systems with follower forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, G.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph on problems of stability of equilibrium of mechanical systems with follower forces is presented. Concepts of stability and criteria of stability are reviewed briefly, together with means of analytical specification of follower forces. Nondissipative systems with two degrees of freedom are discussed, and destabilizing effects due to various types of dissipative forces both in discrete and continuous systems, are treated. The analyses are accompanied by some quantative experiments and observations on demonstrational laboratory models.

  5. The importance of steady and dynamic inflow on the stability of rotor-body systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The induced flow field of a rotor responds in a dynamic fashion to oscillations in rotor lift. This was long known to affect the stability and control derivatives of the rotor. More recently, however, it was also shown that this dynamic inflow also affects rotor and rotor-body aeroelastic stability. Thus, both the steady and unsteady inflow have pronounced effects on air resonance. Recent theoretical developments were made in the modeling of dynamic inflow, and these were verified experimentally. Thus, there is now a simple, verified dynamic inflow model for use in dynamic analyses.

  6. Enhanced weathering strategies for stabilizing climate and averting ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m-2 yr-1) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  7. Enhanced Weathering Strategies for Stabilizing Climate and Averting Ocean Acidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m(exp -2) yr (exp -1)) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  8. Glycosylation of the enhanced aromatic sequon is similarly stabilizing in three distinct reverse turn contexts.

    PubMed

    Price, Joshua L; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2011-08-23

    Cotranslational N-glycosylation can accelerate protein folding, slow protein unfolding, and increase protein stability, but the molecular basis for these energetic effects is incompletely understood. N-glycosylation of proteins at naïve sites could be a useful strategy for stabilizing proteins in therapeutic and research applications, but without engineering guidelines, often results in unpredictable changes to protein energetics. We recently introduced the enhanced aromatic sequon as a family of portable structural motifs that are stabilized upon glycosylation in specific reverse turn contexts: a five-residue type I β-turn harboring a G1 β-bulge (using a Phe-Yyy-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) and a type II β-turn within a six-residue loop (using a Phe-Yyy-Zzz-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) [Culyba EK, et al. (2011) Science 331:571-575]. Here we show that glycosylating a new enhanced aromatic sequon, Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr, in a type I' β-turn stabilizes the Pin 1 WW domain. Comparing the energetic effects of glycosylating these three enhanced aromatic sequons in the same host WW domain revealed that the glycosylation-mediated stabilization is greatest for the enhanced aromatic sequon complementary to the type I β-turn with a G1 β-bulge. However, the portion of the stabilization from the tripartite interaction between Phe, Asn(GlcNAc), and Thr is similar for each enhanced aromatic sequon in its respective reverse turn context. Adding the Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr motif (in a type I' β-turn) to the enhanced aromatic sequon family doubles the number of proteins that can be stabilized by glycosylation without having to alter the native reverse turn type. PMID:21825145

  9. Stability of sticky particle dynamics and related scalar conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutsinga, Octave

    2009-06-01

    We show the stability of the sticky particle forward flow (x, s, t) [↦]{phi} (x, s, Pt, ut) w.r.t. perturbations of the initial mass distribution P0 and velocity function u0. Then, we deduce the stability of related scalar conservation laws and pressureless gas system.

  10. Optimal placement of unified power flow controllers to improve dynamic voltage stability using power system variable based voltage stability indices.

    PubMed

    Albatsh, Fadi M; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches. PMID:25874560

  11. Optimal Placement of Unified Power Flow Controllers to Improve Dynamic Voltage Stability Using Power System Variable Based Voltage Stability Indices

    PubMed Central

    Albatsh, Fadi M.; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches. PMID:25874560

  12. Enhanced stability of skyrmions in magnets with broken mirror symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, James; Banerjee, Sumilan; Randeria, Mohit

    Most previous work on skyrmion phases in chiral magnets with Dzyaloshinkii Moriya interactions (DMI) focuses on the case of broken bulk inversion symmetry. The skyrmion crystal is then stable only in a limited range of parameter space with easy-axis anisotropy. In this talk I will describe the effects of including broken mirror or surface inversion symmetry which leads to a Rashba DMI, in addition to the Dresselhaus DMI arising from broken bulk inversion. I will show that increasing Rashba DMI leads to a progressively larger domain of stability for skyrmions, especially in the easy-plane anisotropy regime. In the latter regime the topological charge density shows an unusual internal structure, and isolated skyrmions cannot be embedded in a ferromagnetic background. Thus the homotopy group π2 (S2) method of classifying skyrmions fails. I will discuss a Chern number classification of these non-trivial skyrmions using maps from the 2-torus (the unit cell for skyrmion crystals) to the 2-sphere in spin space. Finally, I will discuss the elliptic cone phase, a new state that emerges for easy-axis anisotropy and broken mirror symmetry. We acknowledge support by the National Science Foundation by the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program Grant No. DGE-1343012 (JR), by an NSF Grant DMR-1410364 (MR), and by the CEM, an NSF MRSEC, under Grant DMR-1420451.

  13. Zirconia coating for enhanced thermal stability of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastre, A.; Cristini-Robbe, O.; Bois, L.; Chassagneux, F.; Branzea, D.; Boé, A.; Kinowski, C.; Raulin, K.; Rolland, N.; Bernard, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, simple and one-step method for the preparation of 2-4 nm diameter zirconia-coated gold nanoparticles at room temperature. These nanoparticles were synthesized by two simultaneous processes: the chemical reduction of tetrachloroauric acid with sodium borohydride and the formation of zirconia sol-gel matrices. All the gold nanoparticle sols were characterized by UV-visible absorption and transmission electron microscopy to determine the nanoparticle size and shape. The synthesis method is a combination of a polymeric structure of the amorphous zirconia and the use of a strong reducing agent, and it yields to very small quasi-spherical gold nanoparticles at room temperature. The thermal stability up to 1200 °C of the coated nanoparticles was studied by x-ray diffraction. The metastable tetragonal phase of the zirconia coating was obtained at 400 °C, and a progressive transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic phases of the zirconia coating was observed up to 1100 °C. After the heat treatment at 400 °C, the crystallite size of the gold nanoparticles was about 29 nm, and it remained unchanged from 400 °C to 1200 °C. These results are promising for the development of such materials as doping elements for optical fiber applications.

  14. Enhancement of stability of various nZVI suspensions used in groundwater remediation with environmentally friendly organic stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Wagner, Stephan; Velimirović, Milica; Laumann, Susanne; Micić, Vesna; Hofmann, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    The use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles for in situ remediation of polluted soil and groundwater has been shown as one of the most promising techniques [1]. The success of this technology depends on the mobility, reactivity, and longevity of nZVI particles. The mobility of nZVI particles depends on the properties of the single particles, stability of the particle suspension, and the aquifer material [1,2]. In order to enhance the mobility of nZVI, the mobility-decisive properties of the nZVI particles in suspension such as concentration, size distribution, surface charge, and sedimentation rate have to be investigated and optimized. Previous studies showed that pristine nZVI particles aggregate rapidly in water, reducing the particles radius of influence after injection [3]. In order to prevent aggregation and sedimentation of the nZVI particles, and consequently improve the stability of nZVI suspension and therefore the mobility of the nZVI particles, surface stabilizers can be used to provide electrostatic repulsion and steric or electrosteric stabilization [3,4]. The objective of this lab-scale study is to investigate the potential for enhancing the stability of different nZVI suspensions by means of environmentally friendly organic stabilizers, including carboxymethyl cellulose, pectin, alginate, xanthan, and guar gum. The different nZVI particles used included pristine and polyacrylic acid-coated nZVI particles provided in suspension (Nanofer 25 and Nanofer 25S, respectively, NANOIRON s.r.o., Czech Republic), air-stable nZVI particles (Nanofer Star, (NANOIRON s.r.o., Czech Republic), and milled iron flakes (UVR-FIA, Germany). In order to study the enhancement of nZVI stability (1 g L-1 total iron) different concentrations of organic stabilizers (1-20 wt.%) were applied in these nZVI suspensions. Each nZVI suspension was freshly prepared and treated for 10 minutes with Ultra-Turrax (15 000 rpm) and 10 minutes ultrasonic bath prior to

  15. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing. PMID:25250001

  16. Signal integration enhances the dynamic range in neuronal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Mirasso, Claudio; Eguíluz, Víctor M.

    2012-04-01

    The dynamic range measures the capacity of a system to discriminate the intensity of an external stimulus. Such an ability is fundamental for living beings to survive: to leverage resources and to avoid danger. Consequently, the larger is the dynamic range, the greater is the probability of survival. We investigate how the integration of different input signals affects the dynamic range, and in general the collective behavior of a network of excitable units. By means of numerical simulations and a mean-field approach, we explore the nonequilibrium phase transition in the presence of integration. We show that the firing rate in random and scale-free networks undergoes a discontinuous phase transition depending on both the integration time and the density of integrator units. Moreover, in the presence of external stimuli, we find that a system of excitable integrator units operating in a bistable regime largely enhances its dynamic range.

  17. hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by stabilizing mRNA.

    PubMed

    Yugami, Masato; Kabe, Yasuaki; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are thought to be involved in pre-mRNA processing. hnRNP-U, also termed scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), binds to pre-mRNA and nuclear matrix/scaffold attachment region DNA elements. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression is as yet poorly understood. In the present study, we show that hnRNP-U specifically enhances the expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA by increasing its stability, possibly through binding to the 3' untranslated region. We also show that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of several other genes as well, including GADD45A, HEXIM1, HOXA2, IER3, NHLH2, and ZFY, by binding to and stabilizing these mRNAs. These results suggest that hnRNP-U enhances the expression of specific genes by regulating mRNA stability. PMID:17174306

  18. Overview of Orion Crew Module and Launch Abort Vehicle Dynamic Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Donald B.; Aibicjpm. Vamessa V.

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA is designing a new spacecraft, called Orion, to fly astronauts to low earth orbit and beyond. Characterization of the dynamic stability of the Orion spacecraft is important for the design of the spacecraft and trajectory construction. Dynamic stability affects the stability and control of the Orion Crew Module during re-entry, especially below Mach = 2.0 and including flight under the drogues. The Launch Abort Vehicle is affected by dynamic stability as well, especially during the re-orientation and heatshield forward segments of the flight. The dynamic stability was assessed using the forced oscillation technique, free-to-oscillate, ballistic range, and sub-scale free-flight tests. All of the test techniques demonstrated that in heatshield-forward flight the Crew Module and Launch Abort Vehicle are dynamically unstable in a significant portion of their flight trajectory. This paper will provide a brief overview of the Orion dynamic aero program and a high-level summary of the dynamic stability characteristics of the Orion spacecraft.

  19. Enhanced Immunogenicity of Stabilized Trimeric Soluble Influenza Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, William C.; Wang, Bao-Zhong; Martin, Maria P.; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G.; Skountzou, Ioanna; Compans, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    Background The recent swine-origin H1N1 pandemic illustrates the need to develop improved procedures for rapid production of influenza vaccines. One alternative to the current egg-based manufacture of influenza vaccine is to produce a hemagglutinin (HA) subunit vaccine using a recombinant expression system with the potential for high protein yields, ease of cloning new antigenic variants, and an established safety record in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated a soluble HA (sHA), derived from the H3N2 virus A/Aichi/2/68, modified at the C-terminus with a GCN4pII trimerization repeat to stabilize the native trimeric structure of HA. When expressed in the baculovirus system, the modified sHA formed native trimers. In contrast, the unmodified sHA was found to present epitopes recognized by a low-pH conformation specific monoclonal antibody. We found that mice primed and boosted with 3 µg of trimeric sHA in the absence of adjuvants had significantly higher IgG and HAI titers than mice that received the unmodified sHA. This correlated with an increased survival and reduced body weight loss following lethal challenge with mouse-adapted A/Aichi/2/68 virus. In addition, mice receiving a single vaccination of the trimeric sHA in the absence of adjuvants had improved survival and body weight loss compared to mice vaccinated with the unmodified sHA. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that the recombinant trimeric sHA presents native trimeric epitopes while the unmodified sHA presents epitopes not exposed in the native HA molecule. The epitopes presented in the unmodified sHA constitute a “silent face” which may skew the antibody response to epitopes not accessible in live virus at neutral pH. The results demonstrate that the trimeric sHA is a more effective influenza vaccine candidate and emphasize the importance of structure-based antigen design in improving recombinant HA vaccines. PMID:20824188

  20. Marginally subcritical dynamics explain enhanced stimulus discriminability under attention

    PubMed Central

    Tomen, Nergis; Rotermund, David; Ernst, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work has established the hypothesis that cortical neurons operate close to a critical state which describes a phase transition from chaotic to ordered dynamics. Critical dynamics are suggested to optimize several aspects of neuronal information processing. However, although critical dynamics have been demonstrated in recordings of spontaneously active cortical neurons, little is known about how these dynamics are affected by task-dependent changes in neuronal activity when the cortex is engaged in stimulus processing. Here we explore this question in the context of cortical information processing modulated by selective visual attention. In particular, we focus on recent findings that local field potentials (LFPs) in macaque area V4 demonstrate an increase in γ-band synchrony and a simultaneous enhancement of object representation with attention. We reproduce these results using a model of integrate-and-fire neurons where attention increases synchrony by enhancing the efficacy of recurrent interactions. In the phase space spanned by excitatory and inhibitory coupling strengths, we identify critical points and regions of enhanced discriminability. Furthermore, we quantify encoding capacity using information entropy. We find a rapid enhancement of stimulus discriminability with the emergence of synchrony in the network. Strikingly, only a narrow region in the phase space, at the transition from subcritical to supercritical dynamics, supports the experimentally observed discriminability increase. At the supercritical border of this transition region, information entropy decreases drastically as synchrony sets in. At the subcritical border, entropy is maximized under the assumption of a coarse observation scale. Our results suggest that cortical networks operate at such near-critical states, allowing minimal attentional modulations of network excitability to substantially augment stimulus representation in the LFPs. PMID:25202240

  1. Enhanced Physical Stability of Amorphous Drug Formulations via Dry Polymer Coating.

    PubMed

    Capece, Maxx; Davé, Rajesh

    2015-06-01

    Although amorphous solid drug formulations may be advantageous for enhancing the bioavailability of poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients, they exhibit poor physical stability and undergo recrystallization. To address this limitation, this study investigates stability issues associated with amorphous solids through analysis of the crystallization behavior for acetaminophen (APAP), known as a fast crystallizer, using a modified form of the Avrami equation that kinetically models both surface and bulk crystallization. It is found that surface-enhanced crystallization, occurring faster at the free surface than in the bulk, is the major impediment to the stability of amorphous APAP. It is hypothesized that a novel use of a dry-polymer-coating process referred to as mechanical-dry-polymer-coating may be used to inhibit surface crystallization and enhance stability. The proposed process, which is examined, simultaneously mills and coats amorphous solids with polymer, while avoiding solvents or solutions, which may otherwise cause stability or crystallization issues during coating. It is shown that solid dispersions of APAP (64% loading) with a small particle size (28 μm) could be prepared and coated with the polymer, carnauba wax, in a vibratory ball mill. The resulting amorphous solid was found to have excellent stability as a result of inhibition of surface crystallization. PMID:25902736

  2. Improvement of bias stability for a micromachined gyroscope based on dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jianbin; Xiao, Dingbang; Wu, Xuezhong; Hou, Zhanqiang; Chen, Zhihua

    2013-07-01

    We present a dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness for improving the bias stability of micromachined gyroscopes, which embeds the coupling stiffness in a closed-loop system to make the micromachined gyroscope possess more robust bias stability by suppressing the variation of coupling stiffness. The effect of the dynamic electrical balancing control is theoretically analyzed and implemented using a silicon micromachined gyroscope as an example case. It has been experimentally shown that, comparing with open loop detection, the proposed method increased the stability of the amplitude of the mechanical quadrature signal by 38 times, and therefore improved the bias stability by 5.2 times from 89 to 17 deg/h, and the temperature stability of scale factor by 2.7 times from 622 to 231 ppm/°C. Experimental results effectively indicated the theoretical model of dynamic electrical balancing of coupling stiffness.

  3. Attitude dynamic of spin-stabilized satellites with flexible appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renard, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Equations of motion and computer programs have been developed for analyzing the motion of a spin-stabilized spacecraft having long, flexible appendages. Stability charts were derived, or can be redrawn with the desired accuracy for any particular set of design parameters. Simulation graphs of variables of interest are readily obtainable on line using program FLEXAT. Finally, applications to actual satellites, such as UK-4 and IMP-1 have been considered.

  4. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  5. Concert halls with strong lateral reflections enhance musical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Robinson, Philip W; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-03-25

    One of the most thrilling cultural experiences is to hear live symphony-orchestra music build up from a whispering passage to a monumental fortissimo. The impact of such a crescendo has been thought to depend only on the musicians' skill, but here we show that interactions between the concert-hall acoustics and listeners' hearing also play a major role in musical dynamics. These interactions contribute to the shoebox-type concert hall's established success, but little prior research has been devoted to dynamic expression in this three-part transmission chain as a complete system. More forceful orchestral playing disproportionately excites high frequency harmonics more than those near the note's fundamental. This effect results in not only more sound energy, but also a different tone color. The concert hall transmits this sound, and the room geometry defines from which directions acoustic reflections arrive at the listener. Binaural directional hearing emphasizes high frequencies more when sound arrives from the sides of the head rather than from the median plane. Simultaneously, these same frequencies are emphasized by higher orchestral-playing dynamics. When the room geometry provides reflections from these directions, the perceived dynamic range is enhanced. Current room-acoustic evaluation methods assume linear behavior and thus neglect this effect. The hypothesis presented here is that the auditory excitation by reflections is emphasized with an orchestra forte most in concert halls with strong lateral reflections. The enhanced dynamic range provides an explanation for the success of rectangularly shaped concert-hall geometry. PMID:24591584

  6. Application of microscopic image dynamic range enhancement in sputum smear tuberculosis intelligent examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ping; Luo, Nian; Song, Chen-jie

    2009-07-01

    The bacteriological microscopic examination of sputum smear for tuberculosis is the most important means of diagnosis and experiments for tuberculosis. Through micro-imaging systems, machine vision systems, digital image processing and computer pattern recognition technology, dynamic intelligent recognition and counting of TB-DNA could be realized. However, the dynamic range of CCD image sensor is limited. The information of TB-DNA could not be fully recorded on microscopic image. In this paper, an effective method to extend the image dynamic range through merging multiple exposure images is proposed. The microscopic images of the same scene with different exposure are taken by rotating the disk-shaped optical grads attenuator that installed under the objective lens of microscopic system to control the illumination. These different exposure images are processed firstly to get irradiance response function of the imaging system, and then the high dynamic range microscopic image (HDRMI) could be obtained. Through the mapping algorithm the dynamic range of HDRMI is compressed in order to been displayed on the general display devices, which not only highlight the feature information of bacillus but also maintain the overall contrast of original microscopic image. The method proposed can effectively express the image information of the bright areas and dark areas in the scenes and enhance the image details and color characteristics. The quality of micro-imaging systems is improved. It is proved that the method proposed in the paper can enhance the resolution and stability of the TB image recognition through the experiment.

  7. Utilizing resonant magnetic perturbations to enhance neoclassical tearing mode stabilization by rf current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Qingquan; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Wang, Jinfang; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xiaojing

    2015-09-01

    A new method to stabilize the rotating neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) by using both the rf current drive and the static resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) is investigated. When a non-uniform mode rotation is induced by the RMP, the stabilization of NTM by the rf current is found to be enhanced if the RMP phase has a half period difference from that of the rf wave deposition along the helical angle. The required rf current for mode stabilization is reduced by about one third if an appropriate RMP amplitude is applied.

  8. A hybrid superconducting fault current limiter for enhancing transient stability in Korean power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Sangsoo; Kim, Seog-Joo; Moon, Young-Hwan; Lee, Byongjun

    2013-11-01

    Additional power generation sites have been limited in Korea, despite the fact load demands are gradually increasing. In order to meet these increasing demands, Korea’s power system company has begun constructing new generators at existing sites. Thus, multi-unit plants can create problems in terms of transient stability when a large disturbance occurs. This paper proposes a hybrid superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) application to enhance the transient stability of multi-unit power plants. SFCLs reduce fault currents, and limitation currents decrease the imbalance of the mechanical and electrical torque of the generators, resulting in an improvement in transient stability.

  9. Theory and analysis of nonlinear dynamics and stability in storage rings: A working group summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Audy, P.; Courant, E.D.; Forest, E.; Guignard, G.; Hagel, J.; Heifets, S.; Keil, E.; Kheifets, S.; Mais, H.; Moshammer, H.; Pellegrini, C.; Pilat, F.; Suzuki, T.; Turchetti, G.; Warnock, R.L.

    1988-07-01

    A summary and commentary of the available theoretical and analytical tools and recent advances in the nonlinear dynamics, stability and aperture issues in storage rings are presented. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Dynamic hydroxymethylation of deoxyribonucleic acid marks differentiation-associated enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Sérandour, Aurélien A.; Avner, Stéphane; Oger, Frédérik; Bizot, Maud; Percevault, Frédéric; Lucchetti-Miganeh, Céline; Palierne, Gaëlle; Gheeraert, Céline; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Péron, Christine Le; Madigou, Thierry; Durand, Emmanuelle; Froguel, Philippe; Staels, Bart; Lefebvre, Philippe; Métivier, Raphaël; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Salbert, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Enhancers are developmentally controlled transcriptional regulatory regions whose activities are modulated through histone modifications or histone variant deposition. In this study, we show by genome-wide mapping that the newly discovered deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) modification 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is dynamically associated with transcription factor binding to distal regulatory sites during neural differentiation of mouse P19 cells and during adipocyte differentiation of mouse 3T3-L1 cells. Functional annotation reveals that regions gaining 5hmC are associated with genes expressed either in neural tissues when P19 cells undergo neural differentiation or in adipose tissue when 3T3-L1 cells undergo adipocyte differentiation. Furthermore, distal regions gaining 5hmC together with H3K4me2 and H3K27ac in P19 cells behave as differentiation-dependent transcriptional enhancers. Identified regions are enriched in motifs for transcription factors regulating specific cell fates such as Meis1 in P19 cells and PPARγ in 3T3-L1 cells. Accordingly, a fraction of hydroxymethylated Meis1 sites were associated with a dynamic engagement of the 5-methylcytosine hydroxylase Tet1. In addition, kinetic studies of cytosine hydroxymethylation of selected enhancers indicated that DNA hydroxymethylation is an early event of enhancer activation. Hence, acquisition of 5hmC in cell-specific distal regulatory regions may represent a major event of enhancer progression toward an active state and participate in selective activation of tissue-specific genes. PMID:22730288

  11. An Action Dependent Heuristic Dynamic Programming-controlled Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage for Transient Stability Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinpu; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaopeng

    To enhance the stability of power system, the active power and reactive power can be absorbed from or released to Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit according to system power requirements. This paper proposes a control strategy based on action dependent heuristic dynamic programing (ADHDP) which can control SMES to improve the stability of electric power system with on-line learning ability. Based on back propagation (BP) neural network, ADHDP approximates the optimal control solution of nonlinear system through iteration step by step. This on-line learning ability improves its performance by learning from its own mistakes through reinforcement signal from external environment, so that it can adjust the neural network weights according to the back propagation error to achieve optimal control performance. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, simulation tests are carried out in Matlab/Simulink. And a conventional Proportional-Integral (PI) controlled method is used to compare the performance of ADHDP. Simulation results show that the proposed controller demonstrates superior damping performance on power system oscillation caused by three-phase fault and wind power fluctuation over the PI controller.

  12. [MRI with dynamic contrast enhancement in brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Panfilenko, A F; Iakovlev, S A; Pozdniakov, A V; Tiumin, L A; Shcherbuk, A Iu

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the leading method of radiation diagnosis of brain tumors. In conditions of the artificial contrast enhancement there are more clearly differentiated the boundaries of the tumor node on the back of peritumorous edema and identified structural features of the tumor. The purpose of this study was to examine indicators of the dynamics of accumulation and removal of contrast agents by brain tumors in MRI technique with dynamic contrast and identify opportunities of this method in the differential diagnosis of various types of tumors. PMID:23814831

  13. Enhancing synchronizability of weighted dynamical networks using betweenness centrality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalili, Mahdi; Rad, Ali Ajdari; Hasler, Martin

    2008-07-01

    By considering the eigenratio of the Laplacian of the connection graph as a synchronizability measure, we propose a procedure for weighting dynamical networks to enhance their synchronizability. The method is based on node and edge betweenness centrality measures and is tested on artificially constructed scale-free, Watts-Strogatz, and random networks as well as on some real-world graphs. It is also numerically shown that the same procedure could be used to enhance the phase synchronizability of networks of nonidentical oscillators.

  14. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  15. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  16. Dynamic characteristics of noncontacting seal and evaluation of its effect on stability of rotor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwatsubo, Takuzo

    Recent investigations on dynamic characteristics of the labyrinth seal and the pump seal are reviewed, and contributions of each element to stability of the rotor are illustrated for both seals. A method to evaluate the contribution of each element to the stability of a machine is presented. It is shown how to synthesize the rotor system by using the contribution of each element to stability.

  17. Dynamic Stability Optimization of Laminated Composite Plates under Combined Boundary Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafei, Erfan; Kabir, Mohammad Zaman

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stability and design optimization of laminated simply supported plates under planar conservative boundary loads are investigated in current study. Examples can be found in internal connecting elements of spacecraft and aerospace structures subjected to edge axial and shear loads. Designation of such elements is function of layup configuration, plate aspect ratio, loading combinations, and layup thickness. An optimum design aims maximum stability load satisfying a predefined stable vibration frequency. The interaction between compound loading and layup angle parameter affects the order of merging vibration modes and may stabilize the dynamic response. Laminated plates are assumed to be angle-plies symmetric to mid-plane surface. Dynamic equilibrium PDE has been solved using kernel integral transformation for modal frequency values and eigenvalue-based orthogonal functions for critical stability loads. The dictating dynamic stability mode is shown to be controlled by geometric stiffness distributions of composite plates. Solution of presented design optimization problem has been done using analytical approach combined with interior penalty multiplier algorithm. The results are verified by FEA approach and stability zones of original and optimized plates are stated as final data. Presented method can help designers to stabilize the dynamic response of composite plates by selecting an optimized layup orientation and thickness for prescribed design circumstances.

  18. Dynamic postural control but not mechanical stability differs among those with and without chronic ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Wikstrom, E A; Tillman, M D; Chmielewski, T L; Cauraugh, J H; Naugle, K E; Borsa, P A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare dynamic postural control and mechanical ankle stability among patients with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI) and controls. Seventy-two subjects were divided equally into three groups: uninjured controls, people with previous ankle injury but without CAI, and people with CAI. Subjects completed a single-leg hop-stabilization task, and then had an anterior drawer test and lateral ankle radiograph performed bilaterally. The dynamic postural stability index was calculated from the ground reaction forces of the single-leg hop-stabilization task. Ankle joint stiffness (N/m) was measured with an instrumented arthrometer during the anterior drawer test, and fibula position was assessed from the radiographic image. Patients with previous ankle injuries but without CAI demonstrated higher frontal plane dynamic postural stability scores than both the uninjured control and CAI groups (P<0.01). Patients with and without CAI had significantly higher sagittal plane dynamic postural stability scores (P<0.01) and increased ankle joint stiffness (P=0.045) relative to the control group. The increased frontal plane dynamic postural control may represent a component of a coping mechanism that limits recurrent sprains and the development of CAI. Mechanical stability alterations are speculated to result from the initial ankle trauma. PMID:19422654

  19. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Dynamic knee stability estimated by finite helical axis methods during functional performance approximately twenty years after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Grip, Helena; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2015-07-16

    Finite helical axis (FHA) measures of the knee joint during weight-bearing tasks may capture dynamic knee stability following Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury. The aim was to investigate dynamic knee stability during two-leg squat (TLS) and one-leg side hop (SH) in a long-term follow-up of ACL injury, and to examine correlations with knee laxity (KT-1000), osteoarthritis (OA, Kellgren-Lawrence) and knee function (Lysholm score). Participants were injured 17-28 years ago and then treated with surgery (n=33, ACLR) or physiotherapy only (n=37, ACLPT) and healthy-knee controls (n=33) were tested. Movements were registered with an optical motion capture system. We computed three FHA inclination angles, its' Anterior-Posterior (A-P) position, and an index quantifying directional changes (DI), during stepwise knee flexion intervals of ∼15°. Injured knees were less stable compared to healthy controls' and to contralateral non-injured knees, regardless of treatment: the A-P intersection was more anterior (indicating a more anterior positioning of tibia relative to femur) positively correlating with high laxity/low knee function, and during SH, the FHA was more inclined relative to the flexion-extension axis, possibly due to reduced rotational stability. During the TLS, A-P intersection was more anterior in the non-injured knee than the injured, and DI was higher, probably related to higher load on the non-injured knee. ACLR had less anterior A-P intersection than ACLPT, suggesting that surgery enhanced stability, although rotational stability may remain reduced. More anterior A-P intersection and greater inclination between the FHA and the knee flexion-extension axis best revealed reduced dynamic stability ∼23 years post-injury. PMID:25935685

  1. Motivational Dynamics in Language Learning: Change, Stability, and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waninge, Freerkien; Dörnyei, Zoltán; De Bot, Kees

    2014-01-01

    Motivation as a variable in L2 development is no longer seen as the stable individual difference factor it was once believed to be: Influenced by process-oriented models and principles, and especially by the growing understanding of how complex dynamic systems work, researchers have been focusing increasingly on the dynamic and changeable nature…

  2. Morphological Stability and Fluid Dynamics of Vapor Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F.

    1985-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the conditions under which crystals can retain morphological stability, i.e., shape stability of the advancing interface, during growth from vapors was studied. Morphological stability (MS) is a necessary condition for the growth of homogeneous single crystals required for numerous device applications. For crystallization from melts, the MS concepts are well developed and are essentially based on heat and mass transfer conditions about the advancing interface. For crystallization from vapors, the MS requirements are more complex and not well understood. The added complexity arises from the fact that anisotropies in interfacial kinetics are typically stronger in crystallization from vapors than from melts. These pronounced anisotropies root in the distinctly lower atomic roughness of most vapor-solid interfaces.

  3. Stability and dynamical properties of Cooper-Shepard-Sodano compactons

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Cardenas, Andres; Cooper, Fred; Saxena, Avadh

    2010-12-15

    Extending a Pade approximant method used for studying compactons in the Rosenau-Hyman (RH) equation, we study the numerical stability of single compactons of the Cooper-Shepard-Sodano (CSS) equation and their pairwise interactions. The CSS equation has a conserved Hamiltonian which has allowed various approaches for studying analytically the nonlinear stability of the solutions. We study three different compacton solutions and find they are numerically stable. Similar to the collisions between RH compactons, the CSS compactons re-emerge with same coherent shape when scattered. The time evolution of the small-amplitude ripple resulting after scattering depends on the values of the parameters l and p characterizing the corresponding CSS equation. The simulation of the CSS compacton scattering requires a much smaller artificial viscosity to obtain numerical stability than in the case of RH compacton propagation.

  4. Walking in simulated Martian gravity: influence of the portable life support system's design on dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M; O'Connor, Daniel P; Layne, Charles S; Josić, Kresimir; Kurz, Max J

    2009-09-01

    With human exploration of the moon and Mars on the horizon, research considerations for space suit redesign have surfaced. The portable life support system (PLSS) used in conjunction with the space suit during the Apollo missions may have influenced the dynamic balance of the gait pattern. This investigation explored potential issues with the PLSS design that may arise during the Mars exploration. A better understanding of how the location of the PLSS load influences the dynamic stability of the gait pattern may provide insight, such that space missions may have more productive missions with a smaller risk of injury and damaging equipment while falling. We explored the influence the PLSS load position had on the dynamic stability of the walking pattern. While walking, participants wore a device built to simulate possible PLSS load configurations. Floquet and Lyapunov analysis techniques were used to quantify the dynamic stability of the gait pattern. The dynamic stability of the gait pattern was influenced by the position of load. PLSS loads that are placed high and forward on the torso resulted in less dynamically stable walking patterns than loads placed evenly and low on the torso. Furthermore, the kinematic results demonstrated that all joints of the lower extremity may be important for adjusting to different load placements and maintaining dynamic stability. Space scientists and engineers may want to consider PLSS designs that distribute loads evenly and low, and space suit designs that will not limit the sagittal plane range of motion at the lower extremity joints. PMID:19725694

  5. Studies of the Stability and Dynamics of Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikumar, A.; Lee, Chun Ping; Wang, T. G.

    1996-01-01

    This is a review of our experimental and theoretical studies relating to equilibrium and stability of liquid drops, typically of low viscosity, levitated in air by a sound field. The major emphasis here is on the physical principles and understanding behind the stability of levitated drops. A comparison with experimental data is also given, along with some fascinating pictures from high-speed photography. One of the aspects we shall deal with is how a drop can suddenly burst in an intense sound field; a phenomenon which can find applications in atomization technology. Also, we are currently investigating the phenomenon of suppression of coalescence between drops levitated in intense acoustic fields.

  6. Enhanced dynamic threshold voltage UTBB SOI nMOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, K. R. A.; Manini, M. B.; Simoen, E.; Claeys, C.; Martino, J. A.

    2015-10-01

    This work aims to analyze the impact of the Ground Plane (GP) on a new generation of the dynamic threshold (DT2) operation in Ultra-thin Body and Buried Oxide (UTBB) SOI nMOSFETs. The DT2, using a short-circuit between the gate and the substrate contact, the enhanced dynamic threshold (eDT), where the substrate bias is a multiple value of the gate bias (VB = k × VG,k = 1,2,…,5), and the inverse eDT (with VG = k × VB) were compared to the conventional mode with grounded substrate. Although the improvement of the DT2 mode observed for devices with GP is lower, they presented lower short channel effects, mainly for shorter channel lengths. Regarding the direct and inverse eDT modes, a stronger dynamic threshold (DT) effect on devices with GP also results in better DC parameters such as lower subthreshold swing and higher maximum transconductance.

  7. Experimental Observations of Permeability Enhancements by Dynamic Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Niemeijer, A.; Brodsky, E. E.; Marone, C.

    2008-12-01

    Shaking produced by seismic faulting often triggers distant and nearby earthquakes. Seismic waves are also known to increase stream flow and spring discharge and enhance oil production; in some cases tripling the effective permeability of the natural system. These observations have been attributed to shaking-induced increases in permeability. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Here we present experimental evidence of permeability enhancement in fractured rock samples subject to dynamic stresses. We use Berea sandstone samples under triaxial stresses with confining pressure of 9 MPa and 20 MPa of normal stress. We flow deionized water through a fracture produced in-situ and find that oscillations in pore pressure, of 20 second period and 120 second duration, induce transient increases in permeability. Permeability increases scale with the amplitude of pore pressure oscillations. The maximum value of the permeability enhancement is 5x10-16 m2 over a background permeability of 1x10-15 m2. After the oscillations, permeability recovers as the inverse square root of time. The recovery indicates a reversible mechanism, such as clogging/unclogging of fractures, as opposed to an irreversible one, like micro-fracturing. Our result has clear consequences for earthquake triggering mediated by permeability enhancement. Moreover, our data point at the feasibility of dynamically controlling permeability of fractured systems with applications to hydrology and oil reservoir engineering.

  8. The shape, stability and dynamics of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.

    2008-03-01

    Bending a thin sheet is easier than stretching it, an observation which has its roots in geometry. We will use this fact to explain some unusual problems in biology, physics and geology. At the everyday scale, I will discuss the morphology of avascular algal blades, the dynamics of defects in an elastic ribbon, and the dynamics of prey capture by certain carnivorous plants. At the geological scale, I will try to explain the shape of island arcs on our planet. Finally, time permitting, I will discuss how we might extend these ideas to the macromolecular scale, to derive a mechanical model for the dynamic instability of a growing microtubule.

  9. Modular organization enhances the robustness of attractor network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Neeraj; Dasgupta, Subinay; Sinha, Sitabhra

    2011-05-01

    Modular organization characterizes many complex networks occurring in nature, including the brain. In this paper we show that modular structure may be responsible for increasing the robustness of certain dynamical states of such systems. In a network of threshold-activated binary elements, we observe that the basins of attractors, corresponding to patterns that have been embedded using a learning rule, occupy maximum volume in phase space at an optimal modularity. Simultaneously, the convergence time to these attractors decreases as a result of cooperative dynamics between the modules. The role of modularity in increasing global stability of certain desirable attractors of a system may provide a clue to its evolution and ubiquity in natural systems.

  10. Enhancing Economic Stability Utilizing the High Technologies in Community Colleges: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehnert, Barbara H.; Kurki, Allan W.

    Strategies to enhance the economic stability of community colleges through high technology approaches are discussed in this paper. First, general economic problems facing higher education are identified, and the ways in which they influence community colleges are described. Next, 10 strategies to aid in the economic recovery of community colleges…

  11. Molecular Lock: A Versatile Key to Enhance Efficiency and Stability of Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pei; Yan, Cenqi; Lau, Tsz-Ki; Mai, Jiangquan; Lu, Xinhui; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-07-01

    4,4'-Biphenol (BPO), a common, cheap chemical, is employed as a "molecular lock" in blends of fluorine-containing polymer or small molecule donors and fullerene acceptors to lock donors via hydrogen bond formed between the donor and BPO. The molecular lock is a versatile key to enhance the efficiency and stability of organic solar cells simultaneously. PMID:27158774

  12. Successful Stabilization of Graphene Oxide in Electrolyte Solutions: Enhancement of Bio-functionalization and Cellular Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bong Jin; Compton, Owen C.; An, Zhi; Eryzazici, Ibrahim; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide are inherently unstable in the presence of electrolytes, which screen the electrostatic surface charge on these nanosheets and induce irreversible aggregation. Two complementary strategies, utilizing either electrostatic or steric stabilization, have been developed to enhance the stability of graphene oxide in electrolyte solutions, allowing it to stay dispersed in cell culture media and serum. The electrostatic stabilization approach entails further oxidation of graphene oxide to low C/O ratio (~1.03) and increases ionic tolerance of these nanosheets. The steric stabilization technique employs an amphiphilic block copolymer that serves as a non-covalently bound surfactant to minimize the aggregate-induced nanosheets-nanosheet interactions. Both strategies can stabilize graphene oxide nanosheets with large dimensions (>300 nm) in biological media, allowing for an enhancement of >250% in the bioconjugation efficiency of streptavidin in comparison to untreated nanosheets. Notably, both strategies allow the stabilized nanosheets to be readily uptake by cells, demonstrating their excellent performance as potential drug delivery vehicles. PMID:22017285

  13. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide binding enhances virion stability and promotes environmental fitness of an enteric virus

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Christopher M.; Jesudhasan, Palmy R.; Pfeiffer, Julie K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Enteric viruses, including poliovirus and reovirus, encounter a vast microbial community in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, which has been shown to promote virus replication and pathogenesis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we find that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, which enhances virion stability and cell attachment by increasing binding to the viral receptor. Additionally, we identified a poliovirus mutant, VP1-T99K, with reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding. Although T99K and WT poliovirus cell attachment, replication and pathogenesis in mice are equivalent, following peroral inoculation of mice, VP1-T99K poliovirus was unstable in feces. Consequently, the ratio of mutant virus in feces is reduced following additional cycles of infection in mice. Thus, the mutant virus incurs a fitness cost when environmental stability is a factor. These data suggest that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, enhancing cell attachment and environmental stability, potentially promoting transmission to a new host. PMID:24439896

  14. Robust adaptive dynamic programming and feedback stabilization of nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the robust optimal control design for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems from a perspective of robust adaptive dynamic programming (RADP). The objective is to fill up a gap in the past literature of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) where dynamic uncertainties or unmodeled dynamics are not addressed. A key strategy is to integrate tools from modern nonlinear control theory, such as the robust redesign and the backstepping techniques as well as the nonlinear small-gain theorem, with the theory of ADP. The proposed RADP methodology can be viewed as an extension of ADP to uncertain nonlinear systems. Practical learning algorithms are developed in this paper, and have been applied to the controller design problems for a jet engine and a one-machine power system. PMID:24808035

  15. Dynamic Stability of a #D Tensegrity Structure Carrying a Top Mass: Simulations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, Joris; Fey, Rob H. B.; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-07-01

    The static and dynamic stability of a 3D tensegrity structure carrying a top mass is investigated both theoretically and experimentally by studying static and linear dynamic responses, (nonlinear) frequency-amplitude plots, and Poincaré maps. A good correspondence between numerical and experimental results is obtained for the eigenfrequencies, FRFs, and frequency-amplitude plots.

  16. Dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in persons with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rijken, N H M; van Engelen, B G M; Geurts, A C H; Weerdesteyn, V

    2015-09-01

    Patients with FSHD suffer from progressive skeletal muscle weakness, which is associated with an elevated fall risk. To obtain insight into fall mechanisms in this patient group, we aimed to assess dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in patients at different disease stages. Ten patients with at least some lower extremity weakness were included, of whom six were classified as moderately affected and four as mildly affected. Ten healthy controls were also included. Level walking at comfortable speed was assessed, as well as crossing a 10 cm high wooden obstacle. We assessed forward and lateral dynamic stability, as well as spatiotemporal and kinematics variables. During level walking, the moderately affected group demonstrated a lower walking speed, which was accompanied by longer step times and smaller step lengths, yet dynamic stability was unaffected. When crossing the obstacle, however, the moderately affected patients demonstrated reduced forward stability margins during the trailing step, which was accompanied by an increased toe clearance and greater trunk and hip flexion. This suggests that during level walking, the patients effectively utilized compensatory strategies for maintaining dynamic stability, but that the moderately affected group lacked the capacity to fully compensate for the greater stability demands imposed by obstacle crossing, rendering them unable to maintain optimal stability levels. The present results highlight the difficulties that FSHD patients experience in performing this common activity of daily living and may help explain their propensity to fall in the forward direction. PMID:26130572

  17. A review of dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.

    1998-07-01

    Vehicle dynamics and the need to satisfy ride quality requirements have long been recognized as crucial to the commercial success of passenger-carrying transportation systems. Design concepts for maglev systems are no exception. Early maglev investigators and designers were well aware of the importance of ride quality and took care to ensure that their designs would meet acceptable ride quality standards. In contrast, the dynamic stability of electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems, which has obvious implications for system safety and cost as well as for ride quality, has not received nearly as much attention. Because of the well-known under-damped nature of EDS suspension systems and the observation of instabilities in laboratory-scale model systems, it is prudent to develop a better understanding of vehicle stability characteristics. The work reported in this was undertaken with the intention of summarizing information that has been accumulated worldwide and that is relevant to dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems, assimilating that information, and gaining an understanding of the factors that influence that stability. Included in the paper is a discussion and comparison of results acquired from some representative tests of large-scale vehicles on linear test tracks, together with analytical and laboratory-scale investigations of stability and dynamics of EDS systems. This paper will also summarize the R and D activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) since 1991 to study the nature of the forces that are operative in an EDS system and the dynamic stability of such systems.

  18. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  19. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  20. Enhancing the stability and antibiofilm activity of DspB by immobilization on carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yulong; Ma, Su; Liu, Chenguang; Yu, Wengong; Han, Feng

    2015-09-01

    A β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (DspB) from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans CU1000 has been proved to inhibit and detach the biofilms formed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and A. actinomycetemcomitans. However, the application of this enzyme is limited by its poor stability. In the present study, a β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase encoding gene, dspB, was cloned from A. actinomycetemcomitans HK1651 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant DspB was loaded on hydrogel nanoparticles, which was prepared by using linoleic acid (LA) modified carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) after sonication. The nanoparticles were almost saturated by DspB at 0.3 mg/ml, which gave a loading capacity of 76.7%. The immobilization enhanced thermal stability, storage stability and reusability of DspB significantly. Moreover, it also increased antibiofilm activity due to the dual mechanism, including the improvement of the enzyme stability and the antibiofilm activity of CMCS nanoparticles. PMID:26302845

  1. A Nonlinear Excitation Controller Design Method for Terminal Voltage Regulation and Transient Stability Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chongxin; Zhang, Kaifeng; Dai, Xianzhong; Zang, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a cascade control method to design a nonlinear excitation controller to guarantee the terminal voltage regulation and the transient stability. Firstly, a nonlinear automatic voltage regulator (NAVR) in the inner loop is designed to control the terminal voltage exactly. Secondly, the generator model including the NAVR is transformed to be a reduced one. Subsequently, based on the reduced generator model, the nonlinear power system stabilizer in the external loop is designed to enhance the transient stability of the power systems. Furthermore, a coordination strategy is presented to improve the performances of the terminal voltage regulation in the steady state and the stability in the transient state. Finally, the proposed method is verified by numerous simulation results.

  2. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure. PMID:18434422

  3. Experimental results on the enhanced backscatter phenomenon and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chensheng; Nelson, William; Ko, Jonathan; Davis, Christopher C.

    2014-10-01

    Enhanced backscatter effects have long been predicted theoretically and experimentally demonstrated. The reciprocity of a turbulent channel generates a group of paired rays with identical trajectory and phase information that leads to a region in phase space with double intensity and scintillation index. Though simulation work based on phase screen models has demonstrated the existence of the phenomenon, few experimental results have been published describing its characteristics, and possible applications of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon are still unclear. With the development of commercially available high powered lasers and advanced cameras with high frame rates, we have successfully captured the enhanced backscatter effects from different reflection surfaces. In addition to static observations, we have also tilted and pre-distorted the transmitted beam at various frequencies to track the dynamic properties of the enhanced backscatter phenomenon to verify its possible application in guidance and beam and image correction through atmospheric turbulence. In this paper, experimental results will be described, and discussions on the principle and applications of the phenomenon will be included. Enhanced backscatter effects are best observed in certain levels of turbulence (Cn 2≍10-13 m-2/3), and show significant potential for providing self-guidance in beam correction that doesn't introduce additional costs (unlike providing a beacon laser). Possible applications of this phenomenon include tracking fast moving object with lasers, long distance (>1km) alignment, and focusing a high-power corrected laser beam over long distances.

  4. Stability and dynamics of crystals and glasses of motorized particles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tongye; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    Many of the large structures of the cell, such as the cytoskeleton, are assembled and maintained far from equilibrium. We study the stabilities of various structures for a simple model of such a far-from-equilibrium organized assembly in which spherical particles move under the influence of attached motors. From the variational solutions of the many-body master equation for Brownian motion with motorized kicking we obtain a closed equation for the order parameter of localization. Thus, we obtain the transition criterion for localization and stability limits for the crystalline phase and frozen amorphous structures of motorized particles. The theory also allows an estimate of nonequilibrium effective temperatures characterizing the response and fluctuations of motorized asemblies. PMID:15173584

  5. Toward the stabilization of extra dimensions by brane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2015-04-01

    All the models of elementary particles and their interactions derived from String Theory involve a compact six-dimensional internal space. Its volume and shape should be fixed or stabilized, since otherwise massless scalar fields (moduli) reflecting their deformations appear in our four-dimensional space-time, with sizable effects on known particles and fields. We propose a strategy toward stabilizing the compact space without fluxes of three-form fields from closed strings. Our main motivation and goal is to proceed insofar as possible within conventional string worldsheet theory. As we shall see, D-branes with magnetic flux ("magnetized D-branes") and the forces between them can be used to this end. We investigate here some necessary ingredients: open string one-loop vacuum amplitudes between magnetized D-branes, magnetized D-branes fixed at orbifold singularities, and potential energies among such D-branes in the compact space that result from tree-level closed string exchanges.

  6. Global stability and periodic solution of the viral dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinyu; Neumann, Avidan U.

    2007-05-01

    It is well known that the mathematical models provide very important information for the research of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the infection rate of almost all mathematical models is linear. The linearity shows the simple interaction between the T cells and the viral particles. In this paper, we consider the classical mathematical model with saturation response of the infection rate. By stability analysis we obtain sufficient conditions on the parameters for the global stability of the infected steady state and the infection-free steady state. We also obtain the conditions for the existence of an orbitally asymptotically stable periodic solution. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

  7. Concert halls with strong lateral reflections enhance musical dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Robinson, Philip W.; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    One of the most thrilling cultural experiences is to hear live symphony-orchestra music build up from a whispering passage to a monumental fortissimo. The impact of such a crescendo has been thought to depend only on the musicians’ skill, but here we show that interactions between the concert-hall acoustics and listeners’ hearing also play a major role in musical dynamics. These interactions contribute to the shoebox-type concert hall’s established success, but little prior research has been devoted to dynamic expression in this three-part transmission chain as a complete system. More forceful orchestral playing disproportionately excites high frequency harmonics more than those near the note’s fundamental. This effect results in not only more sound energy, but also a different tone color. The concert hall transmits this sound, and the room geometry defines from which directions acoustic reflections arrive at the listener. Binaural directional hearing emphasizes high frequencies more when sound arrives from the sides of the head rather than from the median plane. Simultaneously, these same frequencies are emphasized by higher orchestral-playing dynamics. When the room geometry provides reflections from these directions, the perceived dynamic range is enhanced. Current room-acoustic evaluation methods assume linear behavior and thus neglect this effect. The hypothesis presented here is that the auditory excitation by reflections is emphasized with an orchestra forte most in concert halls with strong lateral reflections. The enhanced dynamic range provides an explanation for the success of rectangularly shaped concert-hall geometry. PMID:24591584

  8. Dynamics of industrial waste stabilization pond treatment process.

    PubMed

    Veeresh, Mangala; Veeresh, A V; Huddar, Basvaraj D; Hosetti, Basaling B

    2010-10-01

    Waste stabilization pond is an artificial ecosystem; its performance is governed by the nature of the biological communities it supports. These are primarily used as secondary effluent treatment plants to polish the effluents. However, they are also used to treat the raw sewage and industrial effluents. In the present study, the functioning of a waste stabilization pond system from an industrial complex located in Goa was taken up. The raw waste released by the industrial complex and the final effluent released from the stabilization ponds were analyzed for pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), biological oxygen demand, phosphate content, chlorophyll content, and algal diversity and density. Also, the activities of the enzymes catalase and phosphatase were measured. The study was carried out for a period of 1 year and the data covering pre-monsoon, monsoon, and post-monsoon seasons are tabulated. The study revealed that DO, chlorophyll content, and algal count were maximum during pre-monsoon when compared to monsoon and post-monsoon. Similarly, maximum enzymatic activity was recorded during pre-monsoon and also maximum removal of biological oxygen demand and phosphate was recorded during this period than in monsoon and post-monsoon. PMID:19731057

  9. Phase stability and dynamics of entangled polymer–nanoparticle composites

    PubMed Central

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle–polymer composites, or polymer–nanoparticle composites (PNCs), exhibit unusual mechanical and dynamical features when the particle size approaches the random coil dimensions of the host polymer. Here, we harness favourable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered and free, host polymer chains to create model PNCs, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in high molecular weight entangled polymers. Investigation of the mechanical properties of these model PNCs reveals that the nanoparticles have profound effects on the host polymer motions on all timescales. On short timescales, nanoparticles slow-down local dynamics of the host polymer segments and lower the glass transition temperature. On intermediate timescales, where polymer chain motion is typically constrained by entanglements with surrounding molecules, nanoparticles provide additional constraints, which lead to an early onset of entangled polymer dynamics. Finally, on long timescales, nanoparticles produce an apparent speeding up of relaxation of their polymer host. PMID:26044723

  10. Phase stability and dynamics of entangled polymer-nanoparticle composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-06-10

    Nanoparticle–polymer composites, or polymer–nanoparticle composites (PNCs), exhibit unusual mechanical and dynamical features when the particle size approaches the random coil dimensions of the host polymer. Here, we harness favourable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered and free, host polymer chains to create model PNCs, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in high molecular weight entangled polymers. Investigation of the mechanical properties of these model PNCs reveals that the nanoparticles have profound effects on the host polymer motions on all timescales. On short timescales, nanoparticles slow-down local dynamics of the host polymer segments and lower the glass transition temperature. On intermediate timescales, where polymer chain motion is typically constrained by entanglements with surrounding molecules, nanoparticles provide additional constraints, which lead to an early onset of entangled polymer dynamics. Finally, on long timescales, nanoparticles produce an apparent speeding up of relaxation of their polymer host.

  11. Enhanced Interatomic Potential for Skutterudite CoSb3 in Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xuqiu; Zhou, An; Liu, Lisheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2010-09-01

    To find a suitable potential for the interatomic interactions in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the study of the mechanical properties of the nanostructured thermoelectric material CoSb3, the advantages and disadvantages of existing potentials for the material are first reviewed and discussed, and then an enhanced potential is proposed in which both bond-stretching and bond-angle distortions are considered. The structural stability and elastic properties of the crystalline CoSb3 model within the developed potential are validated at finite temperature using classic MD tests. Comparison of the mechanical behavior of bulk single-crystal CoSb3, including the stress-strain curve and configuration evolution under tension, shows that the enhanced potential exhibits better reliability than the other potentials. Finally, the significance of the potential and its possible further improvement for broader application are briefly discussed.

  12. Surface effects on dynamic stability and loading during outdoor running using wireless trunk accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Kurt H; Aeles, Jeroen; De Beéck, Tim Op; van der Zwaard, Babette C; Venter, Rachel; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-07-01

    Despite frequently declared benefits of using wireless accelerometers to assess running gait in real-world settings, available research is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate outdoor surface effects on dynamic stability and dynamic loading during running using tri-axial trunk accelerometry. Twenty eight runners (11 highly-trained, 17 recreational) performed outdoor running on three outdoor training surfaces (concrete road, synthetic track and woodchip trail) at self-selected comfortable running speeds. Dynamic postural stability (tri-axial acceleration root mean square (RMS) ratio, step and stride regularity, sample entropy), dynamic loading (impact and breaking peak amplitudes and median frequencies), as well as spatio-temporal running gait measures (step frequency, stance time) were derived from trunk accelerations sampled at 1024Hz. Results from generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis showed that compared to concrete road, woodchip trail had several significant effects on dynamic stability (higher AP ratio of acceleration RMS, lower ML inter-step and inter-stride regularity), on dynamic loading (downward shift in vertical and AP median frequency), and reduced step frequency (p<0.05). Surface effects were unaffected when both running level and running speed were added as potential confounders. Results suggest that woodchip trails disrupt aspects of dynamic stability and loading that are detectable using a single trunk accelerometer. These results provide further insight into how runners adapt their locomotor biomechanics on outdoor surfaces in situ. PMID:27318455

  13. Optimal contrast enhancement liquid for dynamic MRI of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, M; Higaki, T; Nishikawa, K; Otonari-Yamamoto, M; Sugiyama, T; Ishida, R; Wakoh, M

    2016-09-01

    Several dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to observe swallowing and their parameters have been reported. Although these studies used several contrast enhancement liquids, no studies were conducted to investigate the most suitable liquids. The purpose of this study was to identify the optimal contrast enhancement liquid for dynamic MRI of swallowing. MRI was performed using a new sequence consisting of true fast imaging with steady-state precession, generalised auto-calibrating partially parallel acquisition and a keyhole imaging technique. Seven liquids were studied, including pure distilled water, distilled water with thickener at 10, 20 and 30 mg mL(-1) concentrations and oral MRI contrast medium at 1, 2 or 3 mg mL(-1) . Distilled water showed the highest signal intensity. There were statistically significant differences among the following contrast media: distilled water with thickener at 20 mg mL(-1) and the oral MRI contrast medium at 2 mg mL(-1) and 1 mg mL(-1) . It can be concluded that the optimal liquid for dynamic MRI of swallowing is a water-based substance that allows variations in viscosity. PMID:27328011

  14. Enhancement of colour stability of anthocyanins in model beverages by gum arabic addition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2016-06-15

    This study investigated the potential of gum arabic to improve the stability of anthocyanins that are used in commercial beverages as natural colourants. The degradation of purple carrot anthocyanin in model beverage systems (pH 3.0) containing L-ascorbic acid proceeded with a first-order reaction rate during storage (40 °C for 5 days in light). The addition of gum arabic (0.05-5.0%) significantly enhanced the colour stability of anthocyanin, with the most stable systems observed at intermediate levels (1.5%). A further increase in concentration (>1.5%) reduced its efficacy due to a change in the conformation of the gum arabic molecules that hindered their exposure to the anthocyanins. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the anthocyanin could have interacted with the glycoprotein fractions of the gum arabic through hydrogen bonding, resulting in enhanced stability. Overall, this study provides valuable information about enhancing the stability of anthocyanins in beverage systems using natural ingredients. PMID:26868542

  15. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weidong; Zhang, Xinchang; Gong, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member’s departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs), i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs) and compensation VMs (CVMs). MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD), and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast). The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution. PMID:26562152

  16. Enhancing Intrinsic Stability of Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cell by Strong, yet Balanced, Electronic Coupling

    PubMed Central

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Bentria, El Tayeb; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the meteoric development of hybrid organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSC) astonished the community. The efficiency has already reached the level needed for commercialization; however, the instability hinders its deployment on the market. Here, we report a mechanism to chemically stabilize PSC absorbers. We propose to replace the widely used methylammonium cation (CH3NH3+) by alternative molecular cations allowing an enhanced electronic coupling between the cation and the PbI6 octahedra while maintaining the band gap energy within the suitable range for solar cells. The mechanism exploits establishing a balance between the electronegativity of the materials’ constituents and the resulting ionic electrostatic interactions. The calculations demonstrate the concept of enhancing the electronic coupling, and hence the stability, by exploring the stabilizing features of CH3PH3+, CH3SH2+, and SH3+ cations, among several other possible candidates. Chemical stability enhancement hence results from a strong, yet balanced, electronic coupling between the cation and the halides in the octahedron. This shall unlock the hindering instability problem for PSCs and allow them to hit the market as a serious low-cost competitor to silicon based solar cell technologies. PMID:27457130

  17. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weidong; Zhang, Xinchang; Gong, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member's departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs), i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs) and compensation VMs (CVMs). MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD), and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast). The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution. PMID:26562152

  18. Enhancing Intrinsic Stability of Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cell by Strong, yet Balanced, Electronic Coupling.

    PubMed

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Bentria, El Tayeb; Rashkeev, Sergey N; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the meteoric development of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSC) astonished the community. The efficiency has already reached the level needed for commercialization; however, the instability hinders its deployment on the market. Here, we report a mechanism to chemically stabilize PSC absorbers. We propose to replace the widely used methylammonium cation (CH3NH3(+)) by alternative molecular cations allowing an enhanced electronic coupling between the cation and the PbI6 octahedra while maintaining the band gap energy within the suitable range for solar cells. The mechanism exploits establishing a balance between the electronegativity of the materials' constituents and the resulting ionic electrostatic interactions. The calculations demonstrate the concept of enhancing the electronic coupling, and hence the stability, by exploring the stabilizing features of CH3PH3(+), CH3SH2(+), and SH3(+) cations, among several other possible candidates. Chemical stability enhancement hence results from a strong, yet balanced, electronic coupling between the cation and the halides in the octahedron. This shall unlock the hindering instability problem for PSCs and allow them to hit the market as a serious low-cost competitor to silicon based solar cell technologies. PMID:27457130

  19. Enhancing Intrinsic Stability of Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cell by Strong, yet Balanced, Electronic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Bentria, El Tayeb; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, the meteoric development of hybrid organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSC) astonished the community. The efficiency has already reached the level needed for commercialization; however, the instability hinders its deployment on the market. Here, we report a mechanism to chemically stabilize PSC absorbers. We propose to replace the widely used methylammonium cation (CH3NH3+) by alternative molecular cations allowing an enhanced electronic coupling between the cation and the PbI6 octahedra while maintaining the band gap energy within the suitable range for solar cells. The mechanism exploits establishing a balance between the electronegativity of the materials’ constituents and the resulting ionic electrostatic interactions. The calculations demonstrate the concept of enhancing the electronic coupling, and hence the stability, by exploring the stabilizing features of CH3PH3+, CH3SH2+, and SH3+ cations, among several other possible candidates. Chemical stability enhancement hence results from a strong, yet balanced, electronic coupling between the cation and the halides in the octahedron. This shall unlock the hindering instability problem for PSCs and allow them to hit the market as a serious low-cost competitor to silicon based solar cell technologies.

  20. Stability analysis and controller synthesis for hybrid dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Heemels, W P M H; De Schutter, B; Lunze, J; Lazar, M

    2010-11-13

    Wherever continuous and discrete dynamics interact, hybrid systems arise. This is especially the case in many technological systems in which logic decision-making and embedded control actions are combined with continuous physical processes. Also for many mechanical, biological, electrical and economical systems the use of hybrid models is essential to adequately describe their behaviour. To capture the evolution of these systems, mathematical models are needed that combine in one way or another the dynamics of the continuous parts of the system with the dynamics of the logic and discrete parts. These mathematical models come in all kinds of variations, but basically consist of some form of differential or difference equations on the one hand and automata or other discrete-event models on the other hand. The collection of analysis and synthesis techniques based on these models forms the research area of hybrid systems theory, which plays an important role in the multi-disciplinary design of many technological systems that surround us. This paper presents an overview from the perspective of the control community on modelling, analysis and control design for hybrid dynamical systems and surveys the major research lines in this appealing and lively research area. PMID:20921005

  1. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  2. Nyquist and Bode stability criteria to assess changes in dynamic knee stability in healthy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed individuals during walking.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kristin D; Zheng, Yanbing; Bush, Heather; Noehren, Brian

    2016-06-14

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are one of the most frequently injured knee ligaments. Despite reconstruction, many individuals report difficulty returning to high level activities that require greater dynamic stability. Since few methods have been tested to assess dynamic stability post ACL reconstruction (ACLR), the purpose of this study was to evaluate between and within dynamic knee stability in control and ACLR individuals using Nyquist and Bode stability criteria. Sixteen control and sixteen post ACLR individuals performed a walking protocol. Nyquist and Bode stability criteria were implemented to classify and quantify individual step-to-step sagittal plane dynamic knee stability from the gait waveforms at initial contact, 15% and 30% of stance based on the resulting gain and phase margins. An ANOVA compared differences in phase margins between the control and ACLR limbs and found that the ACLR limbs were overall significantly more unstable than the non-reconstructed and control limbs (p=0.001). The results indicated that the ACLR individuals who exhibited stable steps adopted a more compensatory strategy aimed to stabilize the knee. These methods of evaluating dynamic knee stability may help clinicians to assess dynamic knee stability progression throughout rehabilitation and help assess return-to-sport with minimal risk to the individual. PMID:27126984

  3. The Effects of Balance Training on Static and Dynamic Postural Stability Indices After Acute ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Asghar; Ghiasi, Fateme; Mir, Mohsen; Hosseinifar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proprioception and postural stability play an important role in knee movements. However, there are controversies about the overall recovery time of proprioception following knee surgery and onset of balance and neuromuscular training after ACL reconstruction. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of balance training in early stage of knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of balance exercises on postural stability indices in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods: The study was a controlled randomized trial study. Twenty four patients who had ACL reconstructed (balance training group) and twenty four healthy adults without any knee injury (control group) were recruited in the study. The balance exercises group performed balance exercises for 2 weeks. Before and after the interventions, overall, anteroposterior, and mediolateral stability indices were measured with a Biodex Balance System in bilateral and unilateral stance positions with the eyes open and closed. T-tests were used for statistical analysis (p<0.05). Results: Results showed that amount of static stability indices did not change after training and there were not significant differences in static stability indices before and after balance training (p>0.05). Although amount of dynamic stability indices decreased, there were not significant differences in dynamic stability indices before and after balance training (p>0.05). Amount of dynamic stability indices were decreased in balance training group, however, there were not significant differences between groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: These results support that balance exercise could partially improved dynamic stability indices in early stage of ACL reconstruction rehabilitation. The results of this study suggest that balance exercises should be part of the rehabilitation program following ACL reconstruction. PMID

  4. Stability of numerical integration techniques for transient rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    A finite element model of a rotor bearing system was analyzed to determine the stability limits of the forward, backward, and centered Euler; Runge-Kutta; Milne; and Adams numerical integration techniques. The analysis concludes that the highest frequency mode determines the maximum time step for a stable solution. Thus, the number of mass elements should be minimized. Increasing the damping can sometimes cause numerical instability. For a uniform shaft, with 10 mass elements, operating at approximately the first critical speed, the maximum time step for the Runge-Kutta, Milne, and Adams methods is that which corresponds to approximately 1 degree of shaft movement. This is independent of rotor dimensions.

  5. Dynamic stabilization devices in the treatment of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, D K

    2005-12-01

    Soft stabilization has an important role in the treatment of the degenerative lumbar spine. Fusion of one or two motion segments may not make a big difference in the total range of motion of the lumbar spine, but preserving flexibility of a motion segment may prevent adjacent segment disease and may permit disc replacement, even when facet joints need to be excised. A favourable environment is created in the motion segment by unloading the disc and permitting near normal motion, the disc may be able to repair itself or may supplement reparative potential of gene therapy. PMID:16565539

  6. Enhanced stability of hydrogen atoms at the graphene/graphane interface of nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Z. M.; Hernández-Nieves, A. D.; Peeters, F. M.; Li, S.

    2010-12-01

    The thermal stability of graphene/graphane nanoribbons (GGNRs) is investigated using density functional theory. It is found that the energy barriers for the diffusion of hydrogen atoms on the zigzag and armchair interfaces of GGNRs are 2.86 and 3.17 eV, respectively, while the diffusion barrier of an isolated H atom on pristine graphene was only ˜0.3 eV. These results unambiguously demonstrate that the thermal stability of GGNRs can be enhanced significantly by increasing the hydrogen diffusion barriers through graphene/graphane interface engineering. This may provide new insights for viable applications of GGNRs.

  7. Stabilization of chaotic and non-permanent food-web dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R. J.; Martinez, N. D.

    2004-03-01

    Several decades of dynamical analyses of food-web networks[CITE] have led to important insights into the effects of complexity, omnivory and interaction strength on food-web stability[CITE]. Several recent insights[CITE] are based on nonlinear bioenergetic consumer-resource models[CITE] that display chaotic behavior in three species food chains[CITE] which can be stabilized by omnivory[CITE] and weak interaction of a fourth species[CITE]. We slightly relax feeding on low-density prey in these models by modifying standard food-web interactions known as “typeII” functional responses[CITE]. This change drastically alters the dynamics of realistic systems containing up to ten species. Our modification stabilizes chaotic dynamics in three species systems and reduces or eliminates extinctions and non-persistent chaos[CITE] in ten species systems. This increased stability allows analysis of systems with greater biodiversity than in earlier work and suggests that dynamic stability is not as severe a constraint on the structure of large food webs as previously thought. The sensitivity of dynamical models to small changes in the predator-prey functional response well within the range of what is empirically observed suggests that functional response is a crucial aspect of species interactions that must be more precisely addressed in empirical studies.

  8. Steady-State Computation of Constant Rotational Rate Dynamic Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic stability derivatives are essential to predicting the open and closed loop performance, stability, and controllability of aircraft. Computational determination of constant-rate dynamic stability derivatives (derivatives of aircraft forces and moments with respect to constant rotational rates) is currently performed indirectly with finite differencing of multiple time-accurate computational fluid dynamics solutions. Typical time-accurate solutions require excessive amounts of computational time to complete. Formulating Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in a rotating noninertial reference frame and applying an automatic differentiation tool to the modified code has the potential for directly computing these derivatives with a single, much faster steady-state calculation. The ability to rapidly determine static and dynamic stability derivatives by computational methods can benefit multidisciplinary design methodologies and reduce dependency on wind tunnel measurements. The CFL3D thin-layer N-S computational fluid dynamics code was modified for this study to allow calculations on complex three-dimensional configurations with constant rotation rate components in all three axes. These CFL3D modifications also have direct application to rotorcraft and turbomachinery analyses. The modified CFL3D steady-state calculation is a new capability that showed excellent agreement with results calculated by a similar formulation. The application of automatic differentiation to CFL3D allows the static stability and body-axis rate derivatives to be calculated quickly and exactly.

  9. Development of a Stirling System Dynamic Model With Enhanced Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    The Stirling Convertor System Dynamic Model developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is a software model developed from first principles that includes the mechanical and mounting dynamics, the thermodynamics, the linear alternator, and the controller of a free-piston Stirling power convertor, along with the end user load. As such it represents the first detailed modeling tool for fully integrated Stirling convertor-based power systems. The thermodynamics of the model were originally a form of the isothermal Stirling cycle. In some situations it may be desirable to improve the accuracy of the Stirling cycle portion of the model. An option under consideration is to enhance the SDM thermodynamics by coupling the model with Gedeon Associates Sage simulation code. The result will be a model that gives a more accurate prediction of the performance and dynamics of the free-piston Stirling convertor. A method of integrating the Sage simulation code with the System Dynamic Model is described. Results of SDM and Sage simulation are compared to test data. Model parameter estimation and model validation are discussed.

  10. Dynamics of poloidal flows in enhanced reverse shear bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, R.; Avinash, K.

    2005-07-15

    A simple reduced enhanced reverse shear (RERS) model is constructed to study the dynamics of poloidal flows during the ERS transition. This model predicts that a reversal of poloidal flow shear occurs just prior to the transition, as seen in experiment [R. E. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1429 (1998)]. This transition front propagates until the radial location where the safety factor (q) is minimum and becomes locked there due to insufficient input power to overcome the threshold requirement for the bifurcation. This study also reveals that there can be many routes to ERS transition depending upon various tunable parameters.

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (DCE-DOT): experimental validation with a dynamic phantom

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Mehmet Burcin; Lin, Yuting; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (DCE-DOT) can provide spatially resolved enhancement kinetics of an optical contrast agent. We undertook a systematic phantom study to evaluate the effects of the geometrical parameters such as the depth and size of the inclusion as well as the optical parameters of the background on the recovered enhancement kinetics of the most commonly used optical contrast agent, indocyanine green (ICG). For this purpose a computer-controlled dynamic phantom was constructed. An ICG–intralipid–water mixture was circulated through the inclusions while the DCE-DOT measurements were acquired with a temporal resolution of 16 s. The same dynamic study was repeated using inclusions of different sizes located at different depths. In addition to this, the effect of non-scattering regions was investigated by placing a second inclusion filled with water in the background. The phantom studies confirmed that although the peak enhancement varied substantially for each case, the recovered injection and dilution rates obtained from the percentage enhancement maps agreed within 15% independent of not only the depth and the size of the inclusion but also the presence of a non-scattering region in the background. Although no internal structural information was used in these phantom studies, it may be necessary to use it for small objects buried deep in tissue. However, the different contrast mechanisms of optical and other imaging modalities as well as imperfect co-registration between both modalities may lead to potential errors in the structural a priori. Therefore, the effect of erroneous selection of structural priors was investigated as the final step. Again, the injection and dilution rates obtained from the percentage enhancement maps were also immune to the systematic errors introduced by erroneous selection of the structural priors, e.g. choosing the diameter of the inclusion 20% smaller increased the peak enhancement 60% but

  12. Enhancement of the organic solvent-stability of the LST-03 lipase by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Takuya; Ogino, Hiroyasu

    2009-01-01

    LST-03 lipase from an organic solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas aeruginosa LST-03 has high stability and activity in the presence of various organic solvents. In this research, enhancement of organic solvent-stability of LST-03 lipase was attempted by directed evolution. The structural gene of the LST-03 lipase was amplified by the error prone-PCR method. Organic solvent-stability of the mutated lipases was assayed by formation of a clear zone of agar which contained dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and tri-n-butyrin and which overlaid a plate medium. And the organic solvent-stability was also confirmed by measuring the half-life of activity in the presence of DMSO. Four mutated enzymes were selected on the basis of their high organic solvent-stability in the presence of DMSO. The organic solvent-stabilities of mutated LST-03 lipase in the presence of various organic solvents were measured and their mutated amino acid residues were identified. The half-lives of the LST-03-R65 lipase in the presence of cyclohexane and n-decane were about 9 to 11-fold longer than those of the wild-type lipase, respectively. Some substituted amino acid residues of mutated LST-03 lipases have been located at the surface of the enzyme molecules, while some other amino acid residues have been changed from neutral to basic residues. PMID:19731302

  13. Combined analytical and numerical approaches in Dynamic Stability analyses of engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náprstek, Jiří

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic Stability is a widely studied area that has attracted many researchers from various disciplines. Although Dynamic Stability is usually associated with mechanics, theoretical physics or other natural and technical disciplines, it is also relevant to social, economic, and philosophical areas of our lives. Therefore, it is useful to occasionally highlight the general aspects of this amazing area, to present some relevant examples and to evaluate its position among the various branches of Rational Mechanics. From this perspective, the aim of this study is to present a brief review concerning the Dynamic Stability problem, its basic definitions and principles, important phenomena, research motivations and applications in engineering. The relationships with relevant systems that are prone to stability loss (encountered in other areas such as physics, other natural sciences and engineering) are also noted. The theoretical background, which is applicable to many disciplines, is presented. In this paper, the most frequently used Dynamic Stability analysis methods are presented in relation to individual dynamic systems that are widely discussed in various engineering branches. In particular, the Lyapunov function and exponent procedures, Routh-Hurwitz, Liénard, and other theorems are outlined together with demonstrations. The possibilities for analytical and numerical procedures are mentioned together with possible feedback from experimental research and testing. The strengths and shortcomings of these approaches are evaluated together with examples of their effective complementing of each other. The systems that are widely encountered in engineering are presented in the form of mathematical models. The analyses of their Dynamic Stability and post-critical behaviour are also presented. The stability limits, bifurcation points, quasi-periodic response processes and chaotic regimes are discussed. The limit cycle existence and stability are examined together with their

  14. Flexible body dynamic stability for high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, E. A.; Youssef, H. M.; Apelian, C. V.; Schroeder, S. C.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic equations which include the effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces and a flexible body structure were developed for a free flying high performance fighter aircraft. The linear and angular deformations are assumed to be small in the body reference frame, allowing the equations to be linearized in the deformation variables. Equations for total body dynamics and flexible body dynamics are formulated using the hybrid coordinate method and integrated in a state space format. A detailed finite element model of a generic high performance fighter aircraft is used to generate the mass and stiffness matrices. Unsteady aerodynamics are represented by a rational function approximation of the doublet lattice matrices. The equations simplify for the case of constant angular rate of the body reference frame, allowing the effect of roll rate to be studied by computing the eigenvalues of the system. It is found that the rigid body modes of the aircraft are greatly affected by introducing a constant roll rate, while the effect on the flexible modes is minimal for this configuration.

  15. Phase Stability and Dynamics of nanoparticles in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden

    In polymer nanocomposites, polymer grafted nanoparticles, where the tethered polymer chains are chemically identical to the host chains, have been reported to irreversibly aggregate if the length of host chains (P) become 5 or more times larger than the length tethered chains (N) due to the autophobic dewetting of the polymer brush. Utilizing Small Angle X-ray scattering as a tool, here we show that by choosing appropriate chemistry one can utilize the enthalpic attractions between the tethered chains and host chains to facilitate uniform nanoparticle dispersion in very large Mw hosts (P/N ~140). A generic phase diagram has also been proposed. Xray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) is employed as a sensitive probe of nanoparticle relaxation dynamics to investigate particle dynamics in these model PNCs. Remarkably, we find that for nanoparticle size D , slightly larger than the tube diameter of the host polymer (a) , particles undergo a transition from normal diffusion to hyperdiffusive relaxation dynamics,. In contrast, for unentangled hosts, diffusive particle relaxation are observed. Our experimental observations are rationalized by finding that nanoparticle motion in entangled melts only disturb sub-chain entangled segments of size comparable to the particle diameter.

  16. Effect of dual task type on gait and dynamic stability during stair negotiation at different inclinations.

    PubMed

    Madehkhaksar, Forough; Egges, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Stair gait is a common daily activity with great potential risk for falls. Stairs have varying inclinations and people may perform other tasks concurrently with stair gait. This study investigated dual-task interference in the context of complex gait tasks, such as stair gait at different inclinations, a topic about which little is understood. We examined how secondary cognitive and manual tasks interfere with stair gait when a person concurrently performed tasks at different levels of complexity. Gait kinematic data and secondary task performance measures were obtained from fifteen healthy young males while ascending and descending a four-step staircase at three inclinations (17.7°, 29.4°, and 41.5°) as well as level walking. They performed a cognitive task, 'backward digit recall', a manual task, 'carrying a cup of water' and a combination of the two tasks. Gait performance and dynamic stability were assessed by gait speed and whole body center of mass (COM) range of motion in the medial-lateral direction, respectively. No significant effect of the gait task on the cognitive task performance was observed. In contrast, stair walking adversely affected the performance of the manual task compared to level walking. Overall, more difficult postural and secondary tasks resulted in a decrease in gait speed and variation in COM displacement within normal range. Results suggest that COM displacement and gait alterations might be adopted to enhance the stability, and optimize the secondary task performance while walking under challenging circumstances. Our findings are useful for balance and gait evaluation, and for future falls prediction. PMID:26410477

  17. Enhanced dynamic electron paramagnetic resonance imaging of in vivo physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redler, Gage

    It is well established that low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) in tumors strongly affects their malignant state and resistance to therapy. The importance of tumor oxygenation status has led to increased interest in the development of robust oxygen imaging modalities. One such method is electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). EPRI has provided a non-invasive, quantitative imaging modality with sensitivity deep in tissues, capable of investigating static oxygen concentration (pO2) in vivo and has helped to corroborate the correlation between chronic states of hypoxia and tumor malignancy. However, when studying the complicated physiology of a living animal, the situation tends to be inherently dynamic. It has been found that in certain tumor regions there may exist steady states of hypoxia, or chronic hypoxia, whereas in other regions there may exist transient states of hypoxia, or acute hypoxia. It has been postulated that the negative prognostic implications associated with hypoxic tumors may be amplified for acutely hypoxic tumors. However, controversial data and a current lack in methods with the capability to noninvasively image tumor pO2 in vivo with sufficient spatial, temporal, and pO 2 resolution preclude definitive conclusions on the relationships between the different forms of hypoxia and the differences in their clinical implications. A particularly promising oxygen imaging modality that can help to study both chronic and acute hypoxia and elucidate important physiological and clinical differences is rapid Dynamic EPRI. The focus of this work is the development of methods enabling Dynamic EPRI of in vivo physiology as well as its potential applications. This work describes methods which enhance various aspects of EPRI in order to establish a more robust Dynamic EPRI capable of noninvasively studying and quantifying acute hypoxia in vivo. These enhancements are achieved through improvements that span from methods for the acquisition of individual

  18. Magnetofluid-Dynamic Spectrum and Low Shear Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Harold

    1973-01-01

    For a perfectly conducting, cylindrical plasma equilibrium (“screw-pinch”), the spectrum contains four distinct continua, three of which can extend to the origin. This implies the existence of irreversible damping and heating in the nondissipative model. The continuum becomes (Suydam) unstable by instantly shedding an infinite number of point eigenvalues. More generally, any local instability implies an infinity of unstable eigenvalues. Spectral analysis of a new class of low shear, semilocal unstable modes provides a connection between Suydam modes, found only in sheared systems, and interchanges, found only in closed line (shearless) systems, and gives rise to the concept of an effective marginal stability threshold. Study of the spectrum should also provide a unified picture of many other plasma phenomena. PMID:16592118

  19. Stability analysis of associative memory network composed of stochastic neurons and dynamic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Katori, Yuichi; Otsubo, Yosuke; Okada, Masato; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of an associative memory network consisting of stochastic neurons and dynamic synapses that show short-term depression and facilitation. In the stochastic neuron model used in this study, the efficacy of the synaptic transmission changes according to the short-term depression or facilitation mechanism. We derive a macroscopic mean field model that captures the overall dynamical properties of the stochastic model. We analyze the stability and bifurcation structure of the mean field model, and show the dependence of the memory retrieval performance on the noise intensity and parameters that determine the properties of the dynamic synapses, i.e., time constants for depressing and facilitating processes. The associative memory network exhibits a variety of dynamical states, including the memory and pseudo-memory states, as well as oscillatory states among memory patterns. This study provides comprehensive insight into the dynamical properties of the associative memory network with dynamic synapses. PMID:23440567

  20. Enhanced stability of black phosphorus field-effect transistors with SiO2 passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Bensong; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Junying; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2015-10-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has attracted much attention due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential applic5ations in optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability under ambient conditions limits its practical applications. Our investigations indicate that by passivation of the mechanically exfoliated BP flakes with a SiO2 layer, the fabricated BP field-effect transistors (FETs) exhibit greatly enhanced environmental stability. Compared to the unpassivated BP devices, which show a fast drop of on/off current ratio by a factor of 10 after one week of ambient exposure, the SiO2-passivated BP devices display a high retained on/off current ratio of over 600 after one week of exposure, just a little lower than the initial value of 810. Our investigations provide an effective route to passivate the few-layer BPs for enhancement of their environmental stability.

  1. Enhanced stability of black phosphorus field-effect transistors with SiO₂ passivation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Bensong; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Junying; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2015-10-30

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has attracted much attention due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential applic5ations in optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability under ambient conditions limits its practical applications. Our investigations indicate that by passivation of the mechanically exfoliated BP flakes with a SiO2 layer, the fabricated BP field-effect transistors (FETs) exhibit greatly enhanced environmental stability. Compared to the unpassivated BP devices, which show a fast drop of on/off current ratio by a factor of 10 after one week of ambient exposure, the SiO2-passivated BP devices display a high retained on/off current ratio of over 600 after one week of exposure, just a little lower than the initial value of 810. Our investigations provide an effective route to passivate the few-layer BPs for enhancement of their environmental stability. PMID:26436439

  2. Transient stability enhancement of electric power generating systems by 120-degree phase rotation

    DOEpatents

    Cresap, Richard L.; Taylor, Carson W.; Kreipe, Michael J.

    1982-01-01

    A method and system for enhancing the transient stability of an intertied three-phase electric power generating system. A set of power exporting generators (10) is connected to a set of power importing generators (20). When a transient cannot be controlled by conventional stability controls, and imminent loss of synchronism is detected (such as when the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets exceeds a predetermined value, such as 150 degrees), the intertie is disconnected by circuit breakers. Then a switch (30) having a 120-degree phase rotation, or a circuit breaker having a 120-degree phase rotation is placed in the intertie. The intertie is then reconnected. This results in a 120-degree reduction in the equivalent rotor angle difference between the two generator sets, making the system more stable and allowing more time for the conventional controls to stabilize the transient.

  3. On the stabilizing role of species diffusion in chemical enhanced oil recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daripa, Prabir; Gin, Craig

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, the speaker will discuss a problem on the stability analysis related to the effect of species diffusion on stabilization of fingering in a Hele-Shaw model of chemical enhanced oil recovery. The formulation of the problem is motivated by a specific design principle of the immiscible interfaces in the hope that this will lead to significant stabilization of interfacial instabilities, there by improving oil recovery in the context of porous media flow. Testing the merits of this hypothesis poses some challenges which will be discussed along with some numerical results based on current formulation of this problem. Several open problems in this context will be discussed. This work is currently under progress. Supported by the grant NPRP 08-777-1-141 from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of The Qatar Foundation).

  4. Zwitterionic gel encapsulation promotes protein stability, enhances pharmacokinetics, and reduces immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Fang; Tsao, Caroline; Liu, Sijun; Jain, Priyesh; Sinclair, Andrew; Hung, Hsiang-Chieh; Bai, Tao; Wu, Kan; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-09-29

    Advances in protein therapy are hindered by the poor stability, inadequate pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles, and immunogenicity of many therapeutic proteins. Polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) is the most successful strategy to date to overcome these shortcomings, and more than 10 PEGylated proteins have been brought to market. However, anti-PEG antibodies induced by treatment raise serious concerns about the future of PEGylated therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate a zwitterionic polymer network encapsulation technology that effectively enhances protein stability and PK while mitigating the immune response. Uricase modified with a comprehensive zwitterionic polycarboxybetaine (PCB) network exhibited exceptional stability and a greatly prolonged circulation half-life. More importantly, the PK behavior was unchanged, and neither anti-uricase nor anti-PCB antibodies were detected after three weekly injections in a rat model. This technology is applicable to a variety of proteins and unlocks the possibility of adopting highly immunogenic proteins for therapeutic or protective applications. PMID:26371311

  5. Zwitterionic gel encapsulation promotes protein stability, enhances pharmacokinetics, and reduces immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Fang; Tsao, Caroline; Liu, Sijun; Jain, Priyesh; Sinclair, Andrew; Hung, Hsiang-Chieh; Bai, Tao; Wu, Kan; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in protein therapy are hindered by the poor stability, inadequate pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles, and immunogenicity of many therapeutic proteins. Polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) is the most successful strategy to date to overcome these shortcomings, and more than 10 PEGylated proteins have been brought to market. However, anti-PEG antibodies induced by treatment raise serious concerns about the future of PEGylated therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate a zwitterionic polymer network encapsulation technology that effectively enhances protein stability and PK while mitigating the immune response. Uricase modified with a comprehensive zwitterionic polycarboxybetaine (PCB) network exhibited exceptional stability and a greatly prolonged circulation half-life. More importantly, the PK behavior was unchanged, and neither anti-uricase nor anti-PCB antibodies were detected after three weekly injections in a rat model. This technology is applicable to a variety of proteins and unlocks the possibility of adopting highly immunogenic proteins for therapeutic or protective applications. PMID:26371311

  6. Population dynamics and the ecological stability of obligate pollination mutualisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions almost always produce both costs and benefits for each of the interacting species. It is the difference between gross benefits and costs that determines the net benefit and the per-capita effect on each of the interacting populations. For example, the net benefit of obligate pollinators, such as yucca and senita moths, to plants is determined by the difference between the number of ovules fertilized from moth pollination and the number of ovules eaten by the pollinator's larvae. It is clear that if pollinator populations are large, then, because many eggs are laid, costs to plants are large, whereas, if pollinator populations are small, gross benefits are low due to lack of pollination. Even though the size and dynamics of the pollinator population are likely to be crucial, their importance has been neglected in the investigation of mechanisms, such as selective fruit abortion, that can limit costs and increase net benefits. Here, we suggest that both the population size and dynamics of pollinators are important in determining the net benefits to plants, and that fruit abortion can significantly affect these. We develop a model of mutualism between populations of plants and their pollinating seed-predators to explore the ecological consequences of fruit abortion on pollinator population dynamics and the net effect on plants. We demonstrate that the benefit to a plant population is unimodal as a function of pollinator abundance, relative to the abundance of flowers. Both selective abortion of fruit with eggs and random abortion of fruit, without reference to whether they have eggs or not, can limit pollinator population size. This can increase the net benefits to the plant population by limiting the number of eggs laid, if the pollination rate remains high. However, fruit abortion can possibly destabilize the pollinator population, with negative consequences for the plant population.

  7. Bluff-body stabilized flame dynamics of lean premixed syngas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong G.; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Bok Jik; Kaust Team

    2015-11-01

    Recently, syngas combustion has been actively investigated for the potential application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While lean premixed combustion is attractive for both reduced emission and enhanced efficiency, flame instability becomes often an issue. Bluff-bodies have been adopted as effective flame holders for practical application of premixed flames. In the present study, high-fidelity direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized on a bluff-body, in particular at the near blow-off regime of the flame. A two-dimensional domain of 4 mm height and 20 mm length with a flame holder of a 1 mm-by-1 mm square geometry is used. For a syngas mixture with the equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the CO:H2 ratio of 1, several distinct flame modes are identified as the inflow velocity approaches to the blowoff limit. The sequences of extinction pathway and combustion characteristics are discussed.

  8. Dual Transition Edge Sensor Bolometer for Enhanced Dynamic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Benford, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    Broadband surveys at the millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths will require bolometers that can reach new limits of sensitivity and also operate under high background conditions. To address this need, we present results on a dual transition edge sensor (TES) device with two operating modes: one for low background, ultrasensitive detection and one for high background, enhanced dynamic range detection. The device consists of a detector element with two transition temperatures (T(sub c)) of 0.25 and 0.51 K located on the same micromachined, thermally isolated membrane structure. It can be biased on either transition, and features phonon-limited noise performance at the lower T(sub c). We measure noise performance on the lower transition 7 x 10(exp -18) W/rt(Hz) and the bias power on the upper transition of 12.5 pW, giving a factor of 10 enhancement of the dynamic range for the device. We discuss the biasable range of this type of device and present a design concept to optimize utility of the device.

  9. Cavity Self-Stabilization and Enhancement of Laser Gyroscopes by (Coupled) Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the modulation to determine the conditions for cavity self-stabilization and enhanced gyroscopic sensitivity. Hence, we model cavity rotation or instability by an arbitrary AM/FM modulation, and the dispersive element as a phase and amplitude filter. We find that anomalous dispersion may be used to self-stabilize a laser cavity, provided the magnitude of the group index of refraction is smaller than the phase index of refraction in the cavity. The optimal stabilization is found to occur when the group index is zero. Group indices with magnitudes larger than the phase index (both normal and anomalous dispersion) are found to enhance the sensitivity of a laser gyroscope to rotation. Furthermore, our results indicate that atomic media, even coherent superpositions in multilevel atoms, are not useful for these applications, because the amplitude and phase filters work against one another, i.e., decreasing the modulation frequency increases its amplitude and vice versa, with one exception: negative group indices whose magnitudes are larger than the phase index result in negative, but enhanced, beat frequencies. On the other hand, for optical resonators the dispersion reversal associated with critical coupling enables the amplitude and phase filters to work together under a greater variety of circumstances than for atomic media. We find that for single over-coupled resonators, or in the case of under-coupled coupled-resonator-induced absorption, the absorption and normal dispersion on-resonance increase the contrast and frequency of the beat-note, respectively, resulting in a substantial enhancement of the gyroscopic response. Moreover, for cavity self-stabilization, we propose the use of a variety of coupled-resonator induced transparency that is accompanied by anomalous dispersion.

  10. Chemical derivatization to enhance chemical/oxidative stability of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    SciTech Connect

    Hubler, T.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop modified resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin with enhanced chemical/oxidative stability in conditions typically encountered in the remediation of radioactive waste tanks. R-F resin is a regenerable organic ion-exchanger developed at Savannah River Technology Center that is being considered for use in the selective removal of radioactive cesium from alkaline waste tank supernates at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites.

  11. Effect of Lumbar Stabilization and Dynamic Lumbar Strengthening Exercises in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Dae Ha; Kim, Ha Jeong; Cho, Young Ki; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Jung Hoo; Choi, Yoo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises and lumbar dynamic strengthening exercises on the maximal isometric strength of the lumbar extensors, pain severity and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods Patients suffering nonspecific LBP for more than 3 months were included prospectively and randomized into lumbar stabilization exercise group (n=11) or lumbar dynamic strengthening exercise group (n=10). Exercises were performed for 1 hour, twice weekly, for 8 weeks. The strength of the lumbar extensors was measured at various angles ranging from 0° to 72° at intervals of 12°, using a MedX. The visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) were used to measure the severity of LBP and functional disability before and after the exercise. Results Compared with the baseline, lumbar extension strength at all angles improved significantly in both groups after 8 weeks. The improvements were significantly greater in the lumbar stabilization exercise group at 0° and 12° of lumbar flexion. VAS decreased significantly after treatment; however, the changes were not significantly different between the groups. ODQ scores improved significantly in the stabilization exercise group only. Conclusion Both lumbar stabilization and dynamic strengthening exercise strengthened the lumbar extensors and reduced LBP. However, the lumbar stabilization exercise was more effective in lumbar extensor strengthening and functional improvement in patients with nonspecific chronic LBP. PMID:23525973

  12. Bifunctional peptidomimetic prodrugs of didanosine for improved intestinal permeability and enhanced acidic stability: synthesis, transepithelial transport, chemical stability and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhongtian; Sun, Jin; Chang, Yannan; Liu, Yanhua; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Youjun; Sun, Yongbing; Pu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Youxi; Jing, Yongkui; Yin, Shiliang; Zhu, Meng; Wang, Yongjun; He, Zhonggui

    2011-04-01

    Five peptidomimetic prodrugs of didanosine (DDI) were synthesized and designed to improve bioavailability of DDI following oral administration via targeting intestinal oligopeptide transporter (PepT1) and enhancing chemical stability. The permeability of prodrugs was screened in Caco-2 cells grown on permeable supports. 5'-O-L-valyl ester prodrug of DDI (compound 4a) demonstrated the highest membrane permeability and was selected as the optimal target prodrug for further studies. The uptake of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar, a typical substrate of PepT1) by Caco-2 cells could be inhibited by compound 4a in a concentration-dependent manner. The Caco-2 cells were treated with 0.2 nM leptin for enhanced PepT1 expression. The uptake of compound 4a was markedly increased in the leptin-treated Caco-2 cells compared with the control Caco-2 cells, both of which were obviously inhibited by 20 mM Gly-Sar. The K(m) and V(max) values of kinetic study of compound 4a transported by PepT1 in Caco-2 cells were 0.91 mM and 11.94 nmol/mg of protein/10 min, respectively. The chemical stability studies were performed in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), phosphate buffers under various pH conditions, rat tissue homogenates and plasma at 37 °C. The concentrations of DDI could not be detected in the two minutes in SGF. But compound 4a could significantly increase DDI acidic stability, and its t(½) was extended to as long as 36 min in SGF. Compound 4a was stable in pH 6.0 phosphate buffer but could be quickly transformed into DDI in plasma and tissue homogenates. The oral absolute bioavailability of DDI was 47.2% and 7.9% after compound 4a and DDI were orally administered to rats at a dose of 15 mg/kg, respectively. The coadministration with antiacid agent could also suggest that compound 4a was more stable under harsh acidic conditions compared with DDI. Compound 4a bioavailability in rats was reduced to 33.9% when orally co-administered with Gly-Sar (100 mg/kg). The In Vivo bioactivation

  13. Thiols as interfacial modifiers to enhance the performance and stability of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jing; Yin, Jun; Yuan, Shangfu; Zhao, Yun; Li, Jing; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-05-01

    Modifying the interfaces of CH3NH3PbI3 with TiO2 and hole transport layers using two different types of thiols leads to enhanced performance and stability of perovskite solar cells. The incorporation of HOOC-Ph-SH at the TiO2/perovskite interface facilitates electron transfer from perovskite to TiO2 and also alters the morphology of perovskite crystal growth to increase the power conversion efficiency. The modification of pentafluorobenzenethiol at the perovskite/hole transport layer interface improves the stability.Modifying the interfaces of CH3NH3PbI3 with TiO2 and hole transport layers using two different types of thiols leads to enhanced performance and stability of perovskite solar cells. The incorporation of HOOC-Ph-SH at the TiO2/perovskite interface facilitates electron transfer from perovskite to TiO2 and also alters the morphology of perovskite crystal growth to increase the power conversion efficiency. The modification of pentafluorobenzenethiol at the perovskite/hole transport layer interface improves the stability. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the XRD, UV-vis spectra, cross-sectional SEM images and the EQE spectra of the cells. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01820j

  14. The Comprehensive Biomechanics and Load-Sharing of Semirigid PEEK and Semirigid Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, D. K.; Bucklen, Brandon; McAfee, Paul C.; Nichols, Jeff; Angara, Raghavendra; Khalil, Saif

    2013-01-01

    Alternatives to conventional rigid fusion have been proposed for several conditions related to degenerative disc disease when nonoperative treatment has failed. Semirigid fixation, in the form of dynamic stabilization or PEEK rods, is expected to provide compression under loading as well as an intermediate level of stabilization. This study systematically examines both the load-sharing characteristics and kinematics of these two devices compared to the standard of internal rigid fixators. Load-sharing was studied by using digital pressure films inserted between an artificially machined disc and two loading fixtures. Rigid rods, PEEK rods, and the dynamic stabilization system were inserted posteriorly for stabilization. The kinematics were quantified on ten, human, cadaver lumbosacral spines (L3-S1) which were tested under a pure bending moment, in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The magnitude of load transmission through the anterior column was significantly greater with the dynamic device compared to PEEK rods and rigid rods. The contact pressures were distributed more uniformly, throughout the disc with the dynamic stabilization devices, and had smaller maximum point-loading (pressures) on any particular point within the disc. Kinematically, the motion was reduced by both semirigid devices similarly in all directions, with slight rigidity imparted by a lateral interbody device. PMID:23984077

  15. Jovian Dynamics. Part 1: Vortex Stability, Structure, and Genesis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. P.

    1996-09-01

    The vertical of Jupiter's atmosphere is probed and isolated by evaluating the stability characteristics of planetary vortices over a wide parameter range. The resulting structures lead to simulating the genesis of single and multiple vortex states in Part I of this paper and the genesis of an equatorial superrotation and midlatitudinal multiple jets in Part II.The stability and genesis of baroclinic Rossby vortices, the vortices associated with long solitary Rossby waves in a stratified fluid, are studied numerically using a primitive equation model with Jovian and oceanic parameters and hypo-thermal structures. Vortex stability, that is, coherence and persistence, depends primarily upon latitude location and vertical structure and is used to deduce possible stratifications for Jupiter's atmosphere. The solutions suggest that Jupiter's large-scale motions are confined to a layer of depth h and are bounded by an abyss with an impermeable interface at a depth H, such that h/H1/20. Consequently, they also extend earlier results derived with the reduced-gravity, shallow-water model, particularly the explanation for the origin, uniqueness, and longevity of the Great Red Spot (GRS).Beginning at the equator, stable anticyclones are seen to exist only when they have the Hermitian latitudinal form, the Korteweg-deVries longitudinal form, the confined exponential vertical structure exp(Nz/H), and the amplitude range as prescribed by the analytical theory of Marshall and Boyd for N=8. Soliton interactions occur between equatorial vortices of similar horizontal and vertical form.In middle and low latitudes, shallow anticyclones with an exponential structure of N=20 exist quasi-stably for a variety of sizes. Such vortices remain coherent but tend to migrate equatorward (where they disperse) at rates that depend upon their size, location, and vertical structure: large and medium anticyclones propagate primarily westward while migrating slowly, whereas small storms just migrate

  16. Bacterial dynamics in steady-state biofilters: beyond functional stability.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial community structure and function were surveyed in duplicated woodchip-biofilters operated under constant conditions for 231 days. The contaminated gaseous stream for treatment was representative of composting emissions, included ammonia, dimethyl disulfide and a mixture of five oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The community structure and diversity were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis on 16S rRNA gene fragments. During the first 42 days, microbial acclimatization revealed the influence of operating conditions and contaminant loading on the biofiltration community structure and diversity, as well as the limited impact of inoculum compared to the greater persistence of the endogenous woodchip community. During long-term operation, a high and stable removal efficiency was maintained despite a highly dynamic microbial community, suggesting the probable functional redundancy of the community. Most of the contaminant removal occurred in the first compartment, near the gas inlet, where the microbial diversity was the highest. The stratification of the microbial structures along the filter bed was statistically correlated to the longitudinal distribution of environmental conditions (selective pressure imposed by contaminant concentrations) and function (contaminant elimination capacity), highlighting the central role of the bacterial community. The reproducibility of microbial succession in replicates suggests that the community changes were presumably driven by a deterministic process. PMID:22029727

  17. Dynamic characteristics and seismic stability of expanded polystyrene geofoam embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Zahra A.

    Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) geofoam has become a preferred material in various construction applications due to its light weight. Application of EPS accelerates the projects particularly on soft soils. The focus of this research is on the application of the EPS in embankments and its behavior mainly under harmonic vibration. The goal of this study was to investigate dynamic characteristics of freestanding vertical EPS geofoam embankment and address potential seismic issues that result from the distinguished dynamic behavior of such systems due to the layered and discrete block structure. A series of experimental studies on EPS 19 and a commercially available adhesive was conducted. Two-dimensional numerical analyses were performed to replicate the response of EPS geofoam embankment to horizontal and vertical harmonic motions. The results of the analyses have shown that for some acceleration amplitude levels interlayer sliding is expected to occur in EPS geofoam embankments almost immediately after the start of the base excitation; however, as a highly efficient energy dissipation mechanism sliding ceases rapidly. Shear keys and adhesive may be used to prevent interlayer sliding if they cover the proper extent of area of the embankment. EPS blocks placed in the corners of the embankment and at the edges of the segment prohibited from sliding may experience high stress concentrations. The embankment may show horizontal sway and rocking once sliding is prevented.

  18. Anharmonic effects in atomic hydrogen: Superconductivity and lattice dynamical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinaga, Miguel; Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco; Bergara, Aitor

    2016-05-01

    We present first-principles calculations of metallic atomic hydrogen in the 400-600 GPa pressure range in a tetragonal structure with space group I 41/a m d , which is predicted to be its first atomic phase. Our calculations show a band structure close to the free-electron-like limit due to the high electronic kinetic energy induced by pressure. Bands are properly described even in the independent electron approximation fully neglecting the electron-electron interaction. Linear-response harmonic calculations show a dynamically stable phonon spectrum with marked Kohn anomalies. Even if the electron-electron interaction has a minor role in the electronic bands, the inclusion of electronic exchange and correlation in the density response is essential to obtain a dynamically stable structure. Anharmonic effects, which are calculated within the stochastic self-consistent harmonic approximation, harden high-energy optical modes and soften transverse acoustic modes up to a 20% in energy. Despite a large impact of anharmonicity has been predicted in several high-pressure hydrides, here the superconducting critical temperature is barely affected by anharmonicity, as it is lowered from its harmonic 318 K value only to 300 K at 500 GPa. We attribute the small impact of anharmonicity on superconductivity to the absence of softened optical modes and the fairly uniform distribution of the electron-phonon coupling among the vibrational modes.

  19. Scapholunate stabilization with dynamic extensor carpi radialis longus tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Steven L; Freeland, Alan E

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic extensor carpi radialis longus tendon transfer to the distal pole of the scaphoid acts synchronously and synergistically with wrist motion to restore the slider crank mechanism of the scaphoid after scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) injury. The procedure is designed to simulate a hypothetical dorsal radioscaphoid ligament that more closely approximates the normal viscoelastic forces acting on the scaphoid throughout all phases of wrist motion than does the static checkrein effect and motion limitations of capsulodesis or tenodesis. Extensor carpi radialis longus transfer may be independently sufficient to support normal or near-normal scapholunate and midcarpal kinematics and prevent further injury propagation in patients with partial SLIL tears and dynamic scapholunate instability. Extensor carpi radialis longus transfer alone may improve carpal congruity in patients with static scapholunate instability, but SLIL and dorsal lunate ligament repair or reconstruction is essential for favorable durable outcomes. Extensor carpi radialis longus transfer offers a simple and reasonable alternative to capsulodesis or tenodesis to support these ligament repairs or reconstructions, does not require intercarpal fixation, and allows rehabilitation to proceed expeditiously at approximately 1 month after surgery. PMID:21134618

  20. Enhanced stability and polyadenylation of select mRNAs support rapid thermogenesis in the brown fat of a hibernator.

    PubMed

    Grabek, Katharine R; Diniz Behn, Cecilia; Barsh, Gregory S; Hesselberth, Jay R; Martin, Sandra L

    2015-01-01

    During hibernation, animals cycle between torpor and arousal. These cycles involve dramatic but poorly understood mechanisms of dynamic physiological regulation at the level of gene expression. Each cycle, Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) drives periodic arousal from torpor by generating essential heat. We applied digital transcriptome analysis to precisely timed samples to identify molecular pathways that underlie the intense activity cycles of hibernator BAT. A cohort of transcripts increased during torpor, paradoxical because transcription effectively ceases at these low temperatures. We show that this increase occurs not by elevated transcription but rather by enhanced stabilization associated with maintenance and/or extension of long poly(A) tails. Mathematical modeling further supports a temperature-sensitive mechanism to protect a subset of transcripts from ongoing bulk degradation instead of increased transcription. This subset was enriched in a C-rich motif and genes required for BAT activation, suggesting a model and mechanism to prioritize translation of key proteins for thermogenesis. PMID:25626169

  1. Biological soil crusts exhibit a dynamic response to seasonal rain and release from grazing with implications for soil stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jimenez, Aguilar A.; Huber-Sannwald, E.; Belnap, J.; Smart, D.R.; Arredondo, Moreno J.T.

    2009-01-01

    In Northern Mexico, long-term grazing has substantially degraded semiarid landscapes. In semiarid systems, ecological and hydrological processes are strongly coupled by patchy plant distribution and biological soil crust (BSC) cover in plant-free interspaces. In this study, we asked: 1) how responsive are BSC cover/composition to a drying/wetting cycle and two-year grazing removal, and 2) what are the implications for soil erosion? We characterized BSC morphotypes and their influence on soil stability under grazed/non-grazed conditions during a dry and wet season. Light- and dark-colored cyanobacteria were dominant at the plant tussock and community level. Cover changes in these two groups differed after a rainy season and in response to grazing removal. Lichens with continuous thalli were more vulnerable to grazing than those with semi-continuous/discontinuous thalli after the dry season. Microsites around tussocks facilitated BSC colonization compared to interspaces. Lichen and cyanobacteria morphotypes differentially enhanced resistance to soil erosion; consequently, surface soil stability depends on the spatial distribution of BSC morphotypes, suggesting soil stability may be as dynamic as changes in the type of BSC cover. Longer-term spatially detailed studies are necessary to elicit spatiotemporal dynamics of BSC communities and their functional role in biotically and abiotically variable environments. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Dynamical stabilization by phonon-phonon interaction exemplified in cubic zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Souvatsos,; Rudin, Sven P

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconia exhibits a soft phonon mode (X{sup -}{sub 2}), which becomes dynamically unstable at low temperatures. Previous ab initio invest.igations into the temperature-induced stabilization of the soft mode treated it as an independent anharmonic oscillator. Calculations presented here, using the self consistent ab initio lattice dynamical (SCAILD) method to evaluate the phonons at 2570 K, show that the soft mode should not be treated independently of other phonon modes. Phonon-phonon interactions stabilize the X{sup -}{sub 2} mode. Furthermore, the effective potential experienced by the mode takes on a quadratic form.

  3. Guidelines for Computing Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics of a Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Joseph R.; Frank, Neal T.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study is presented to guide the selection of a numerical solution strategy for URANS computation of a subsonic transport configuration undergoing simulated forced oscillation about its pitch axis. Forced oscillation is central to the prevalent wind tunnel methodology for quantifying aircraft dynamic stability derivatives from force and moment coefficients, which is the ultimate goal for the computational simulations. Extensive computations are performed that lead in key insights of the critical numerical parameters affecting solution convergence. A preliminary linear harmonic analysis is included to demonstrate the potential of extracting dynamic stability derivatives from computational solutions.

  4. Protection Enhances Community and Habitat Stability: Evidence from a Mediterranean Marine Protected Area

    PubMed Central

    Fraschetti, Simonetta; Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Bevilacqua, Stanislao; Terlizzi, Antonio; Boero, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    Rare evidences support that Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) enhance the stability of marine habitats and assemblages. Based on nine years of observation (2001–2009) inside and outside a well managed MPA, we assessed the potential of conservation and management actions to modify patterns of spatial and/or temporal variability of Posidonia oceanica meadows, the lower midlittoral and the shallow infralittoral rock assemblages. Significant differences in both temporal variations and spatial patterns were observed between protected and unprotected locations. A lower temporal variability in the protected vs. unprotected assemblages was found in the shallow infralittoral, demonstrating that, at least at local scale, protection can enhance community stability. Macrobenthos with long-lived and relatively slow-growing invertebrates and structurally complex algal forms were homogeneously distributed in space and went through little fluctuations in time. In contrast, a mosaic of disturbed patches featured unprotected locations, with small-scale shifts from macroalgal stands to barrens, and harsh temporal variations between the two states. Opposite patterns of spatial and temporal variability were found for the midlittoral assemblages. Despite an overall clear pattern of seagrass regression through time, protected meadows showed a significantly higher shoot density than unprotected ones, suggesting a higher resistance to local human activities. Our results support the assumption that the exclusion/management of human activities within MPAs enhance the stability of the structural components of protected marine systems, reverting or arresting threat-induced trajectories of change. PMID:24349135

  5. Navier-Stokes Simulation of the Canard-Wing-Body Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Many modern aircraft are canard-configured for aircraft control and improved aerodynamic performance. Canards can often enhance aircraft cruise performance, maneuverability and agility. For close-coupled canard configurations, the aerodynamic interaction between the canard and wing significantly changes the flow characteristics of the wing. In unsteady flow, such changes in the flow structure and performance of wings can be quite pronounced. Accurate modeling of the unsteady aerodynamics is essential for potential CFD design and analysis of such configurations. A time-accurate numerical simulation is performed to study the unsteady aerodynamic interaction between a canard and wing with emphasis on the effects of the canard on the configuration's dynamic response characteristics. The thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Equations with various turbulence models are used in this study. Computations are made on a generic, analytically-defined, close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration which has been the subject of numerous previously published experimental studies during the 1970's to mid-80's. More recently, a series of steady-flow simulations has been performed and published by the author. In the current study, the configuration is given prescribed ramp and oscillatory motions in order to predict characteristics such as the damping-in-pitch and oscillatory longitudinal stability parameters. The current computations are made at high-subsonic and transonic Mach numbers, moderate angles-of- attack from -4 to 20 degrees, and at various pitch rates and reduced frequencies. Comparisons of pressures and integrated force quantities (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment and selected dynamic parameters) are made with other published computational results and available experimental data. Results showing the unsteady effects of the canard on surface pressures, integrated forces, canard-wing vortex interaction and vortex breakdown will be presented.

  6. Dynamics of dc bus networks and their stabilization by decentralized delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Keiji; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Hara, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The present paper deals with the dynamics of bus networks, which consist of several identical dc bus systems connected by resistors. It is analytically guaranteed that the stability of a stand-alone dc bus system is equivalent to that of the networks, independent of the number of bus systems and the network topology. In addition, we show that a decentralized delayed-feedback control can stabilize an unstable operating point embedded within the networks. Moreover, this stabilization does not depend on the number of bus systems or the network topology. A systematic procedure for designing the controller is presented. Finally, the validity of the analytical results is confirmed through numerical examples.

  7. Enhanced stability of Cu-BTC MOF via perfluorohexane plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Decoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W; Smith, Martin W; Stone, Corinne A; Willis, Colin R

    2012-01-25

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are a leading class of porous materials for a wide variety of applications, but many of them have been shown to be unstable toward water. Cu-BTC (1,3,5 benzenetricarboxylic acid, BTC) was treated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of perfluorohexane creating a hydrophobic form of Cu-BTC. It was found that the treated Cu-BTC could withstand high humidity and even submersion in water much better than unperturbed Cu-BTC. Through Monte Carlo simulations it was found that perfluorohexane sites itself in such a way within Cu-BTC as to prevent the formation of water clusters, hence preventing the decomposition of Cu-BTC by water. This PECVD of perfluorohexane could be exploited to widen the scope of practical applications of Cu-BTC and other MOFs. PMID:22239201

  8. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties. PMID:27444879

  9. Mercury's Plasma Mantle during Solar Wind Dynamical Pressure Enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, D.; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Because of the weak planetary magnetic field as well as proximity to the Sun, the magnetosphere of Mercury is very dynamical and at times subjected to prominent compression. Recent observations from MESSENGER reveal that during events of enhanced solar wind dynamical pressure, the subsolar magnetopause may actually be pushed until the immediate vicinity of the planet surface. Using three-dimensional single-particle simulations, we examine the dynamics of solar wind originating protons during such events. We show that these impulsive events can lead to substantial (several hundreds of eVs or a few keVs) H+ energization in the plasma mantle. Unlike ions with large mass-to-charge ratios (e.g., Na+ of planetary origin), H+ are transported adiabatically during these events, their energization being due to the ExB convection surge. MESSENGER observations of the plasma mantle show repeated evidences of such a transient H+ energization which may follow from the variable character of Mercury's magnetosphere.

  10. Recent Advances in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics, Stability, and Control Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, W. Keats; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Lyle, Karen H.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, S. Chad; Dowell, Earl H.; Guerrant, Daniel V.; Lawrence, Dale

    2015-01-01

    Results from recent NASA sponsored research on the structural dynamics, stability, and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, and solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment. Recent results from terrestrial 1-g blade dynamics and control experiments on "rope ladder" membrane blade analogs, and small-scale in vacuo system identification experiments with hanging and spinning high-aspect ratio membranes will also be presented. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept is used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, and is also described. Blade torsional dynamic response and control are also shown to be significantly improved through the use of edge stiffening structural features or inclusion of modest tip masses to increase centrifugal stiffening of the blade structure. An output-only system identification procedure suitable for on-orbit blade dynamics investigations is also developed and validated using ground tests of spinning sub-scale heliogyro blade models. Overall, analytical and experimental investigations to date indicate no intractable stability or control issues for the heliogyro solar sail concept.

  11. Effect of midsole thickness of dance shoes on dynamic postural stability.

    PubMed

    Wyon, Matthew A; Cloak, Ross; Lucas, Josephine; Clarke, Frances

    2013-12-01

    Landing from jumps is one of the main causes of injury within dance. A number of studies have reported a negative effect of shoe midsole thickness on lower limb kinematics during running due to the reduction in afferent sensory outputs from the foot's epithelium. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of varying midsole thicknesses in dance shoes on dynamic postural stability during a single-leg landing. Twenty-eight female undergraduate dance participants volunteered for the study. They carried out three trials under four conditions: barefoot and in ballet flats (2 mm midsole thickness), jazz shoes (7 mm), and dance sneakers (30 mm). The task consisted of a single-leg forward jump over a hurdle at 50% of their maximal vertical jump height, landing on a force platform, and balancing for 3 seconds. The stability indices for vertical stability (VSI), anterior-posterior stability (APSI), medial-lateral stability (MLSI), and dynamic postural stability (DPSI) were calculated using Wikstrom's revised method. Significant differences were reported between the midsole thicknesses for both DPSI and VSI (p<0.01). No statistical differences were noted for the indices SPSI or MLSI. The present data agree with the running studies in that increased midsole thickness has a negative influence on landing stability. PMID:24337030

  12. STABILITY AND DYNAMICS OF SPATIO-TEMPORAL STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann Riecke

    2005-10-21

    This document constitutes the final report for the grant. It provides a complete list of publications and presentations that arose from the project as well as a brief description of the highlights of the research results. The research funded by this grant has provided insights into the spontaneous formation of structures of increasing complexity in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium. A classic example of such a system is thermally driven convection in a horizontal fluid layer. Highlights of the research are: (1) explanation of the localized traveling wave pulses observed in binary-mixture convection, (2) explanation of the localized waves in electroconvection, (3) introduction of a new diagnostics for spatially and temporally chaotic states, which is based on the statistics of defect trajectories, (4) prediction of complex states in thermally driven convection in rotating systems. Additional contributions provided insight into the localization mechanism for oscillons, the prediction of a new localization mechanism for traveling waves based on a resonant periodic forcing, and an analysis of the stability of quasi-periodic patterns.

  13. Verifying Stability of Dynamic Soft-Computing Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Wu; Napolitano, Marcello; Callahan, John

    1997-01-01

    Soft computing is a general term for algorithms that learn from human knowledge and mimic human skills. Example of such algorithms are fuzzy inference systems and neural networks. Many applications, especially in control engineering, have demonstrated their appropriateness in building intelligent systems that are flexible and robust. Although recent research have shown that certain class of neuro-fuzzy controllers can be proven bounded and stable, they are implementation dependent and difficult to apply to the design and validation process. Many practitioners adopt the trial and error approach for system validation or resort to exhaustive testing using prototypes. In this paper, we describe our on-going research towards establishing necessary theoretic foundation as well as building practical tools for the verification and validation of soft-computing systems. A unified model for general neuro-fuzzy system is adopted. Classic non-linear system control theory and recent results of its applications to neuro-fuzzy systems are incorporated and applied to the unified model. It is hoped that general tools can be developed to help the designer to visualize and manipulate the regions of stability and boundedness, much the same way Bode plots and Root locus plots have helped conventional control design and validation.

  14. Linear Stability and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fishbone in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Fu, Guoyong; Breslau, J. A.; Liu, Jinyuan; Liu, Deyong

    2013-10-01

    Plasms in spherical tokamaks such as NSTX, with a safety factor above unity and weakly reversed magnetic shear may be unstable to an ideal, non-resonant internal kink mode. This mode, termed the LLM in MAST, can saturate and persist. This indicates strong interaction of energetic beam ions with LLM. In this work, we perform linear and nonlinear simulations to investigate energetic particle effects on the non-resonant kink mode and excitation of fishbone for NSTX-like parameters and profiles. The global kinetic-MHD hybrid code M3D-K is used. Numerical results show that beam ions have a strong stabilizing effect on the kink mode at low values of qmin and beam beta. However, at higher beam ion pressure, a fishbone-like mode is excited. The results show that the fishbone is preferentially excited at higher qmin values, consistent with the observed appearance of fishbone before ``long-lived mode'' in NSTX and MAST experiments. Nonlinear simulations show that the fishbone saturates nonlinearly with strong downward frequency chirping, and beam distribution flattened. An m/n = 2/1 magnetic island is induced nonlinearly, which could provide a trigger for the 2/1 NTM sometime observed after fishbone instability in NSTX. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy under DE-AC02-76CH03073, and National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (NMCSFP) under contract No. 2013GB107003, 2013GB111001.

  15. Fluid dynamics at transition regions of enhanced heat transfer channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Jennifer C.; Pohlman, Nicholas A.

    2012-11-01

    Helical wire coil inserts are used to enhance heat transfer in high heat flux cooling channels. Past research using temperature probes has sufficiently proven that wire coils increase heat transfer by factors of three to five through the disruption of the boundary layer in the channels. The coils are passive devices that are inexpensive to manufacture and easily integrate into existing heat exchangers given the limited pressure drop they produce. Most of the fluid mechanics research in flow over helical coils has focused on the dynamics and vortex structure in fully developed regions rather than the short transition region where the enhanced heat transfer is often expected. Understanding how the development of the flow occurs over the axial length of the cooling channel will determine minimum dimensions necessary for enhanced heat transfer. Results of particle-shadow velocimetry (PSV) measurements report on the flow velocities and turbulence that occurs in the transition regions at the beginning of wire coil inserts. The ability to relate parameters such as flow rate, wire diameter, coil pitch, and the total tube length will increase fundamental knowledge and will allow for more efficient heat exchanger designs. Funding provided by NIU's Undergraduate Special Opportunities in Artistry & Research grant program.

  16. Encapsulation of biophenolic phytochemical EGCG within lipid nanoparticles enhances its stability and cytotoxicity against cancer.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Rasika; Kulhari, Hitesh; Pooja, Deep; Gudem, Sagarika; Bhargava, Suresh; Shukla, Ravi; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-06-01

    Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea polyphenolic catechin, has been known to possess a variety of beneficial biological activities. The in-vitro anti-cancer activity of EGCG is well documented. However, the use of EGCG in modern therapeutics is limited due to its poor bioavailability and limited stability at physiological pH. In this study, we have investigated the stability profiles of EGCG in aqueous solutions using UV-vis spectroscopy. Stability results showed very low stability profile of EGCG at physiological pH with rapid degradation under alkaline conditions. Therefore, we have encapsulated EGCG in solid lipid nanoparticles to increase its stability and evaluated for anticancer activity. The lipid core of nanoparticles not only provides an additional structural reinforcement to the nanoparticle assembly, but also makes it biologically compatible, thereby enabling a stealth vehicle for efficient drug delivery. EGCG loaded nanoparticles (EGCG-SLN) were characterized using dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. EGCG and EGCG-SLN were evaluated for their anticancer activities by cellular proliferation. The cytotoxicity of EGCG-SLN was found to be 8.1 times higher against MDA-MB 231 human breast cancer cells and 3.8 times higher against DU-145 human prostate cancer cells than that of the pure EGCG. PMID:27234272

  17. Protein Stability and Dynamics Modulation: The Case of Human Frataxin

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Mariana; Salvay, Andres G.; Ferreiro, Diego U.; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is an α/β protein that plays an essential role in iron homeostasis. Apparently, the function of human FXN (hFXN) depends on the cooperative formation of crucial interactions between helix α1, helix α2, and the C-terminal region (CTR) of the protein. In this work we quantitatively explore these relationships using a purified recombinant fragment hFXN90–195. This variant shows the hydrodynamic behavior expected for a monomeric globular domain. Circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies show that hFXN90–195 presents native-like secondary and tertiary structure. However, chemical and temperature induced denaturation show that CTR truncation significantly destabilizes the overall hFXN fold. Accordingly, limited proteolysis experiments suggest that the native-state dynamics of hFXN90–195 and hFXN90–210 are indeed different, being the former form much more sensitive to the protease at specific sites. The overall folding dynamics of hFXN fold was further explored with structure-based protein folding simulations. These suggest that the native ensemble of hFXN can be decomposed in at least two substates, one with consolidation of the CTR and the other without consolidation of the CTR. Explicit-solvent all atom simulations identify some of the proteolytic target sites as flexible regions of the protein. We propose that the local unfolding of CTR may be a critical step for the global unfolding of hFXN, and that modulation of the CTR interactions may strongly affect hFXN physiological function. PMID:23049850

  18. Use of computational fluid dynamics in the design of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging phantoms.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Freed, Melanie; Myers, Matthew R

    2013-09-21

    Phantoms for dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging modalities such as DCE computed tomography (DCE-CT) and DCE magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) are valuable tools for evaluating and comparing imaging systems. It is important for the contrast-agent distribution within the phantom to possess a time dependence that replicates a curve observed clinically, known as the 'tumor-enhancement curve'. It is also important for the concentration field within the lesion to be as uniform as possible. This study demonstrates how computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be applied to achieve these goals within design constraints. The distribution of the contrast agent within the simulated phantoms was investigated in relation to the influence of three factors of the phantom design. First, the interaction between the inlets and the uniformity of the contrast agent within the phantom was modeled. Second, pumps were programmed using a variety of schemes and the resultant dynamic uptake curves were compared to tumor-enhancement curves obtained from clinical data. Third, the effectiveness of pulsing the inlet flow rate to produce faster equilibration of the contrast-agent distribution was quantified. The models employed a spherical lesion and design constraints (lesion diameter, inlet-tube size and orientation, contrast-agent flow rates and fluid properties) taken from a recently published DCE-MRI phantom study. For DCE-MRI in breast cancer detection, where the target tumor-enhancement curve varies on the scale of hundreds of seconds, optimizing the number of inlet tubes and their orientation was found to be adequate for attaining concentration uniformity and reproducing the target tumor-enhancement curve. For DCE-CT in liver tumor detection, where the tumor-enhancement curve varies on a scale of tens of seconds, the use of an iterated inlet condition (programmed into the pump) enabled the phantom to reproduce the target tumor-enhancement curve within a few per cent beyond about 6

  19. Use of computational fluid dynamics in the design of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; Freed, Melanie; Myers, Matthew R.

    2013-09-01

    Phantoms for dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging modalities such as DCE computed tomography (DCE-CT) and DCE magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) are valuable tools for evaluating and comparing imaging systems. It is important for the contrast-agent distribution within the phantom to possess a time dependence that replicates a curve observed clinically, known as the ‘tumor-enhancement curve’. It is also important for the concentration field within the lesion to be as uniform as possible. This study demonstrates how computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be applied to achieve these goals within design constraints. The distribution of the contrast agent within the simulated phantoms was investigated in relation to the influence of three factors of the phantom design. First, the interaction between the inlets and the uniformity of the contrast agent within the phantom was modeled. Second, pumps were programmed using a variety of schemes and the resultant dynamic uptake curves were compared to tumor-enhancement curves obtained from clinical data. Third, the effectiveness of pulsing the inlet flow rate to produce faster equilibration of the contrast-agent distribution was quantified. The models employed a spherical lesion and design constraints (lesion diameter, inlet-tube size and orientation, contrast-agent flow rates and fluid properties) taken from a recently published DCE-MRI phantom study. For DCE-MRI in breast cancer detection, where the target tumor-enhancement curve varies on the scale of hundreds of seconds, optimizing the number of inlet tubes and their orientation was found to be adequate for attaining concentration uniformity and reproducing the target tumor-enhancement curve. For DCE-CT in liver tumor detection, where the tumor-enhancement curve varies on a scale of tens of seconds, the use of an iterated inlet condition (programmed into the pump) enabled the phantom to reproduce the target tumor-enhancement curve within a few per cent beyond about

  20. Facile Synthesis of Phosphatidyl Saccharides for Preparation of Anionic Nanoliposomes with Enhanced Stability

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shuang; Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Falkeborg, Mia; Liu, Lei; Dong, Mingdong; Jensen, Henrik Max; Bertelsen, Kresten; Thorsen, Michael; Tan, Tianwei; Xu, Xuebing; Guo, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Physical stability during storage and against processing such as dehyration/rehydration are the cornerstone in designing delivery vehicles. In this work, mono-, di- and tri-saccharides were enzymatically conjugated to phosphatidyl group through a facile approach namely phospholipase D (PLD) mediated transphosphatidylation in a biphasic reaction system. The purified products were structurally identified and the connectivities of carbohydrate to phosphatidyl moiety precisely mapped by 1H, 31P, 13C NMR pulse sequences and LC-ESI-FTMS. The synthetic phosphatidyl saccharides were employed as the sole biomimetic component for preparation of nanoliposomes. It was found that the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of phosphatidyl saccharides increases as more bulky sugar moiety (mono- to tri-) is introduced. Phosphatidyl di-saccharide had the largest membrane curvature. In comparison to the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine liposome, all phosphatidyl saccharides liposomes are anionic and demonstrated significantly enhanced stability during storage. According to the confocal laser scan microscopy (CLSM) and atom force microscopy (AFM) analyses, the nanoliposomes formed by the synthetic phosphatidyl saccharides also show excellent stability against dehydration/rehydration process in which most of the liposomal structures remained intact. The abundance hydroxyl groups in the saccharide moieties might provide sufficient H-bondings for stabilization. This work demonstrated the synthesized phosphatidyl saccharides are capable of functioning as enzymatically liable materials which can form stable nanoliposomes without addition of stabilizing excipients. PMID:24069243

  1. Enhancement of the Stability of a Prolipase from Rhizopus oryzae toward Aldehydes by Saturation Mutagenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Mirella; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Molina, Rafael; Hermoso, Juan A.; Pirozzi, Domenico; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.

    2007-01-01

    A prolipase from Rhizopus oryzae (proROL) was engineered in order to increase its stability toward lipid oxidation products such as aldehydes with the aim of improving its performance in oleochemical industries. Out of 22 amino acid residues (15 Lys and 7 His) prone to react with aldehydes, 6 Lys and all His residues (except for the catalytic histidine) were chosen and subjected to saturation mutagenesis. In order to quickly and reliably identify stability mutants within the resulting libraries, active variants were prescreened by an activity staining method on agar plates. Active mutants were expressed in Escherichia coli Origami in a 96-well microtiterplate format, and a stability test using octanal as a model deactivating agent was performed. The most stable histidine mutant (H201S) conferred a stability increase of 60%, which was further enhanced to 100% by combination with a lysine mutant (H201S/K168I). This increase in stability was also confirmed for other aldehydes. Interestingly, the mutations did not affect specific activity, as this was still similar to the wild-type enzyme. PMID:17890336

  2. Co-composting solid biowastes with alkaline materials to enhance carbon stabilization and revegetation potential.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saikat; Bolan, Nanthi S; Seshadri, Balaji; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Wijesekara, Hasintha; Xu, Yilu; Yang, Jianjun; Kim, Geon-Ha; Sparks, Donald; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2016-04-01

    Co-composting biowastes such as manures and biosolids can be used to stabilize carbon (C) without impacting the quality of these biowastes. This study investigated the effect of co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials on C stabilization and monitored the fertilization and revegetation values of these co-composts. The stabilization of C in biowastes (poultry manure and biosolids) was examined by their composting in the presence of various alkaline amendments (lime, fluidized bed boiler ash, flue gas desulphurization gypsum, and red mud) for 6 months in a controlled environment. The effects of co-composting on the biowastes' properties were assessed for different physical C fractions, microbial biomass C, priming effect, potentially mineralizable nitrogen, bioavailable phosphorus, and revegetation of an urban landfill soil. Co-composting biowastes with alkaline materials increased C stabilization, attributed to interaction with alkaline materials, thereby protecting it from microbial decomposition. The co-composted biowastes also increased the fertility of the landfill soil, thereby enhancing its revegetation potential. Stabilization of biowastes using alkaline materials through co-composting maintains their fertilization value in terms of improving plant growth. The co-composted biowastes also contribute to long-term soil C sequestration and reduction of bioavailability of heavy metals. PMID:26381784

  3. Cross-linkable liposomes stabilize a magnetic resonance contrast-enhancing polymeric fastener.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cartney E; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-04-01

    Liposomes are commonly used to deliver drugs and contrast agents to their target site in a controlled manner. One of the greatest obstacles in the performance of such delivery vehicles is their stability in the presence of serum. Here, we demonstrate a method to stabilize a class of liposomes that load gadolinium, a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent, as a model cargo on their surfaces. We hypothesized that the sequential adsorption of a gadolinium-binding chitosan fastener on the liposome surface followed by covalent cross-linking of the lipid bilayer would provide enhanced stability and improved MR signal in the presence of human serum. To investigate this hypothesis, liposomes composed of diyne-containing lipids were assembled and functionalized via chitosan conjugated with a hydrophobic anchor and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This postadsorption cross-linking strategy served to stabilize the thermodynamically favorable association between liposome and polymeric fastener. Furthermore, the chitosan-coated, cross-linked liposomes proved more effective as delivery vehicles of gadolinium than uncross-linked liposomes due to the reduced liposome degradation and chitosan desorption. Overall, this study demonstrates a useful method to stabilize a broad class of particles used for systemic delivery of various molecular payloads. PMID:24635565

  4. Decreased aperture surface energy enhances electrical, mechanical, and temporal stability of suspended lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bright, Leonard K; Baker, Christopher A; Agasid, Mark T; Ma, Lin; Aspinwall, Craig A

    2013-11-27

    The development of next-generation transmembrane protein-based biosensors relies heavily on the use of black lipid membranes (BLMs); however, electrical, mechanical, and temporal instability of BLMs poses a limiting challenge to biosensor development. In this work, micrometer-sized glass apertures were modified with silanes of different chain length and fluorine composition, including 3-cyanopropyldimethychlorosilane (CPDCS), ethyldimethylchlorosilane (EDCS), n-octyldimethylchlorosilane (ODCS), (tridecafluoro-1, 1, 2, 2-tetrahydrooctyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDCS), or (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDDCS), to explore the effect of substrate surface energy on BLM stability. Low energy silane-modified surfaces promoted enhanced lipid-substrate interactions that facilitate the formation of low-leakage, stable BLMs. The surface energies of silane-modified substrates were 30 ± 3, 16 ± 1, 14 ± 2, 11 ± 1, and 7.1 ± 2 mJ m(-2) for CDCS, EDCS, ODCS, PFDCS, and PFDDCS, respectively. Decreased surface energy directly correlated to improved electrical, mechanical, and temporal BLM stability. Amphiphobic perfluorinated surface modifiers yielded superior performance compared to traditional hydrocarbon modifiers in terms of stability and BLM formation, with only marginal effects on BLM membrane permeability. Leakage currents obtained for PFDCS and PFDDCS BLMs were elevated only 10-30%, though PFDDCS modification yielded >5-fold increase in electrical stability as indicated by breakdown voltage (> 2000 mV vs 418 ± 73 mV), and >25-fold increase in mechanical stability as indicated by air-water transfers (> 50 vs 2 ± 0.2) when compared to previously reported CPDCS modification. Importantly, the dramatically improved membrane stabilities were achieved with no deleterious effects on reconstituted ion channel function, as evidenced by α-hemolysin activity. Thus, this approach provides a simple, low cost, and broadly applicable alternative for

  5. Flash nanoprecipitation: prediction and enhancement of particle stability via drug structure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhengxi

    2014-03-01

    Flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) can generate hydrophobic drug nanoparticles in ∼ 100 nm with a much higher drug loading (e.g., > 40 wt %) than traditional nanocarriers (e.g., < 20 wt %). This paper studies the effects of drug molecules on nanoparticle stability made via FNP and demonstrates that chemically bonding a drug compound (e.g., paclitaxel) with a cleavable hydrophobic moiety of organosilicate (e.g., triethoxysilicate) is able to enhance the particle size stability. A nonionic amphiphilic diblock copolymer, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG), is used as a model surfactant to provide steric stabilization. The experiments here show that the lower the drug solubility in the aqueous medium, the more stable the particles in terms of Ostwald ripening, which are consistent with the prediction by the LSW theory. The initial particle size distribution is sufficiently narrow and of insignificance to Ostwald ripening. To correlate the particle stability with hydrophobicity, this study introduces the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (LogP), a hydrophobicity indication, into the FNP technique. A comparison of various drugs and their analogues shows that LogP of a drug is a better hydrophobicity indication than the solubility parameter (δ) and correlates well with the particle stability. Empirically, with ACDLogP > ∼ 12, nanoparticles have good stability; with ∼ 2 < ACDLogP < ∼ 9, nanoparticles show fast Ostwald ripening and interparticle recrystallization; with ACDLogP < ∼ 2, the drug is very likely difficult to form nanoparticles. This rule creates a quick way to predict particle stability for a randomly selected drug structure and helps to enable a fast preclinical drug screen. PMID:24484077

  6. Flash Nanoprecipitation: Prediction and Enhancement of Particle Stability via Drug Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) can generate hydrophobic drug nanoparticles in ∼100 nm with a much higher drug loading (e.g., > 40 wt %) than traditional nanocarriers (e.g., < 20 wt %). This paper studies the effects of drug molecules on nanoparticle stability made via FNP and demonstrates that chemically bonding a drug compound (e.g., paclitaxel) with a cleavable hydrophobic moiety of organosilicate (e.g., triethoxysilicate) is able to enhance the particle size stability. A nonionic amphiphilic diblock copolymer, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG), is used as a model surfactant to provide steric stabilization. The experiments here show that the lower the drug solubility in the aqueous medium, the more stable the particles in terms of Ostwald ripening, which are consistent with the prediction by the LSW theory. The initial particle size distribution is sufficiently narrow and of insignificance to Ostwald ripening. To correlate the particle stability with hydrophobicity, this study introduces the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (LogP), a hydrophobicity indication, into the FNP technique. A comparison of various drugs and their analogues shows that LogP of a drug is a better hydrophobicity indication than the solubility parameter (δ) and correlates well with the particle stability. Empirically, with ACDLogP > ∼12, nanoparticles have good stability; with ∼2 < ACDLogP < ∼9, nanoparticles show fast Ostwald ripening and interparticle recrystallization; with ACDLogP < ∼2, the drug is very likely difficult to form nanoparticles. This rule creates a quick way to predict particle stability for a randomly selected drug structure and helps to enable a fast preclinical drug screen. PMID:24484077

  7. Certain Actions from the Functional Movement Screen Do Not Provide an Indication of Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jordan, Corrin A; Luczo, Tawni M; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Jalilvand, Farzad; Schultz, Adrian B

    2015-09-29

    Dynamic stability is an essential physical component for team sport athletes. Certain Functional Movement Screen (FMS) exercises (deep squat; left- and right-leg hurdle step; left- and right-leg in-line lunge [ILL]; left- and right-leg active straight-leg raise; and trunk stability push-up [TSPU]) have been suggested as providing an indication of dynamic stability. No research has investigated relationships between these screens and an established test of dynamic stability such as the modified Star Excursion Balance Test (mSEBT), which measures lower-limb reach distance in posteromedial, medial, and anteromedial directions, in team sport athletes. Forty-one male and female team sport athletes completed the screens and the mSEBT. Participants were split into high-, intermediate-, and low-performing groups according to the mean of the excursions when both the left and right legs were used for the mSEBT stance. Any between-group differences in the screens and mSEBT were determined via a one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc adjustment (p < 0.05). Data was pooled for a correlation analysis (p < 0.05). There were no between-group differences in any of the screens, and only two positive correlations between the screens and the mSEBT (TSPU and right stance leg posteromedial excursion, r = 0.37; left-leg ILL and left stance leg posteromedial excursion, r = 0.46). The mSEBT clearly indicated participants with different dynamic stability capabilities. In contrast to the mSEBT, the selected FMS exercises investigated in this study have a limited capacity to identify dynamic stability in team sport athletes. PMID:26557187

  8. Certain Actions from the Functional Movement Screen Do Not Provide an Indication of Dynamic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lockie, Robert G.; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Jordan, Corrin A.; Luczo, Tawni M.; Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Jalilvand, Farzad; Schultz, Adrian B.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stability is an essential physical component for team sport athletes. Certain Functional Movement Screen (FMS) exercises (deep squat; left- and right-leg hurdle step; left- and right-leg in-line lunge [ILL]; left- and right-leg active straight-leg raise; and trunk stability push-up [TSPU]) have been suggested as providing an indication of dynamic stability. No research has investigated relationships between these screens and an established test of dynamic stability such as the modified Star Excursion Balance Test (mSEBT), which measures lower-limb reach distance in posteromedial, medial, and anteromedial directions, in team sport athletes. Forty-one male and female team sport athletes completed the screens and the mSEBT. Participants were split into high-, intermediate-, and low-performing groups according to the mean of the excursions when both the left and right legs were used for the mSEBT stance. Any between-group differences in the screens and mSEBT were determined via a one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc adjustment (p < 0.05). Data was pooled for a correlation analysis (p < 0.05). There were no between-group differences in any of the screens, and only two positive correlations between the screens and the mSEBT (TSPU and right stance leg posteromedial excursion, r = 0.37; left-leg ILL and left stance leg posteromedial excursion, r = 0.46). The mSEBT clearly indicated participants with different dynamic stability capabilities. In contrast to the mSEBT, the selected FMS exercises investigated in this study have a limited capacity to identify dynamic stability in team sport athletes. PMID:26557187

  9. Dynamics and Kinetics Study of "In-Water" Chemical Reactions by Enhanced Sampling of Reactive Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Yang, Y Isaac; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin

    2015-11-12

    High potential energy barriers and engagement of solvent coordinates set challenges for in silico studies of chemical reactions, and one is quite commonly limited to study reactions along predefined reaction coordinate(s). A systematic protocol, QM/MM MD simulations using enhanced sampling of reactive trajectories (ESoRT), is established to quantitatively study chemical transitions in complex systems. A number of trajectories for Claisen rearrangement in water and toluene were collected and analyzed, respectively. Evidence was found that the bond making and breaking during this reaction are concerted processes in solutions, preferentially through a chairlike configuration. Water plays an important dynamic role that helps stabilize the transition sate, and the dipole-dipole interaction between water and the solute also lowers the transition barrier. The calculated rate coefficient is consistent with the experimental measurement. Compared with water, the reaction pathway in toluene is "narrower" and the reaction rate is slower by almost three orders of magnitude due to the absence of proper interactions to stabilize the transition state. This study suggests that the "in-water" nature of the Claisen rearrangement in aqueous solution influences its thermodynamics, kinetics, as well as dynamics. PMID:26485567

  10. Network Firewall Dynamics and the Subsaturation Stabilization of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bilal; Dombrowski, Kirk; Saad, Mohamed; McLean, Katherine; Friedman, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    In 2001, Friedman et al. conjectured the existence of a “firewall effect” in which individuals who are infected with HIV, but remain in a state of low infectiousness, serve to prevent the virus from spreading. To evaluate this historical conjecture, we develop a new graph-theoretic measure that quantifies the extent to which Friedman's firewall hypothesis(FH)holds in a risk network. We compute this new measure across simulated trajectories of a stochastic discrete dynamical system that models a social network of 25,000 individuals engaging in risk acts over a period of 15 years. The model's parameters are based on analyses of data collected in prior studies of the real-world risk networks of people who inject drugs (PWID) in New York City. Analysis of system trajectories reveals the structural mechanisms by which individuals with mature HIV infections tend to partition the network into homogeneous clusters (with respect to infection status) and how uninfected clusters remain relatively stable (with respect to infection status) over long stretches of time. We confirm the spontaneous emergence of network firewalls in the system and reveal their structural role in the nonspreading of HIV. PMID:25083120

  11. Effect of active arm swing to local dynamic stability during walking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Li, Yue; Liu, An-Min; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Yin-Zhi; Hu, Fei; Chen, Jin-Ling; Dai, Ke-Rong; Gu, Dong-Yun

    2016-02-01

    Arm swing is an essential component in regulating dynamic stability of the whole body during walking, while the contribution of active arm swing to local dynamic stability of different motion segments remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of arm swing under natural arm swing condition and active arm swing condition on local dynamic stability and gait variability of the trunk segments (C7 and T10 joint) and lower extremity joints (hip, knee and ankle joint). The local divergence exponents (λs) and mean standard deviation over strides (MeanSD) of 24 young healthy adults were calculated while they were walking on treadmill with two arm swing conditions at their preferred walking speed (PWS). We found that in medial-lateral direction, both λs and MeanSD values of the trunk segments (C7 and T10 joint) in active arm swing condition were significantly lower than those in natural arm swing condition (p<0.05), while no significant difference of λs or MeanSD in lower extremity joints (hip, knee and ankle joint) was found between two arm swing conditions (p>0.05, respectively). In anterior-posterior and vertical direction, neither λs nor MeanSD values of all body segments showed significant difference between two arm swing conditions (p>0.05, respectively). These findings indicate that active arm swing may help to improve the local dynamic stability of the trunk segments in medial-lateral direction. PMID:26615477

  12. Aggregate structure and stability linked to carbon dynamics in a south Chilean Andisol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huygens, D.; Boeckx, P.; van Cleemput, O.; Godoy, R.; Oyarzún, C.

    2005-02-01

    The extreme vulnerability of soil organic carbon to climate and land use change emphasizes the need for further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. We have studied the aggregate stability and carbon dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses in a south Chilean Andisols: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR), a grassland (GRASS) and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Al as soil organic matter stabilizing agent in this Andisol. In a case study, we linked differences in carbon dynamics between the three land use treatments to physical protection and recalcitrance of the soil organic matter (SOM). In this study, C aggregate stability and dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOM, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOM fractions, and mineralization measurements. The results showed that electrostatic attractions between and among Al-oxides and clay minerals are mainly responsible for the stabilization of soil aggregates and the physical protection of the enclosed soil organic carbon. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS. In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions showed that the recalcitrance of the SOM decreased in another order: PINUS > SGFOR > GRASS. We concluded that physical protection of soil aggregates was the main process determining whole soil C mineralization. Land use changes affected soil organic carbon dynamics in this south Chilean Andisol by altering soil pH and consequently available Al.

  13. Stability and dynamical properties of material flow systems on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, K.; Galla, T.

    2009-04-01

    The theory of complex networks and of disordered systems is used to study the stability and dynamical properties of a simple model of material flow networks defined on random graphs. In particular we address instabilities that are characteristic of flow networks in economic, ecological and biological systems. Based on results from random matrix theory, we work out the phase diagram of such systems defined on extensively connected random graphs, and study in detail how the choice of control policies and the network structure affects stability. We also present results for more complex topologies of the underlying graph, focussing on finitely connected Erdös-Réyni graphs, Small-World Networks and Barabási-Albert scale-free networks. Results indicate that variability of input-output matrix elements, and random structures of the underlying graph tend to make the system less stable, while fast price dynamics or strong responsiveness to stock accumulation promote stability.

  14. Dynamic Response and Stability Analysis of AN Automatic Ball Balancer for a Flexible Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, J.; Jang, I.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic stability and time responses are studied for an automatic ball balancer of a rotor with a flexible shaft. The Stodola-Green rotor model, of which the shaft is flexible, is selected for analysis. This rotor model is able to include the influence of rigid-body rotations due to the shaft flexibility on dynamic responses. Applying Lagrange's equation to the rotor with the ball balancer, the non-linear equations of motion are derived. Based on the linearized equations, the stability of the ball balancer around the balanced equilibrium position is analyzed. On the other hand, the time responses computed from the non-linear equations are investigated. This study shows that the automatic ball balancer can achieve the balancing of a rotor with a flexible shaft if the system parameters of the balancer satisfy the stability conditions for the balanced equilibrium position.

  15. The dynamics of spin stabilized spacecraft with movable appendages, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bainum, P. M.

    1976-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of a spin stabilized spacecraft with a hinged appendage system are treated analytically and numerically. The hinged system consists of a central hub with masses attached to (assumed) massless booms of fixed length whose orientation relative to the main part can change. The general three dimensional deployment dynamics of such a hinged system is considered without any restriction on the location of the hinge points. The equations of motion for the hinged system, with viscous damping at both hinge points, are linearized about the nominal equilibrium position where the booms are orthogonal to the nominal spin axis for the case of two dimensional and three dimensional motion. Analytic stability criteria are obtained from the necessary condition on the sign of all the coefficients in the system characteristic equation.

  16. Stability and dynamics of serpentinite layer in subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilairet, Nadege; Reynard, Bruno

    2009-02-01

    The hydrous phyllosilicate serpentines have a strong influence on subduction zone dynamics because of their high water content and low strength at shallow and intermediate depths. In the absence of data, Newtonian rheology of serpentinites has been assumed in numerical models yet experimental data show that serpentine rheology is best described by a power law rheology recently determined in subduction zone conditions [Hilairet, N., et al., 2007. High-pressure creep of serpentine, interseismic deformation, and initiation of subduction. Science, 318(5858): 1910-1913]. Using a simple 1D model of a serpentinized channel and - as opposed to previous models - in this power law rheology, we examine the influence of channel thickness, temperature and subduction angle on serpentine flow driven by density contrast (serpentinization degree) with the surroundings. At temperatures of 200-500 °C relevant to intermediate depths a fully serpentinized channel is unlikely to be thicker than 2-3 km. For channel thicknesses of 2 km upward velocities are comparable to those using a constant viscosity of 10 18 Pa s. The velocity profile using power law rheology shows shear zones at the edges of the channel and a low strain rate region at its centre consistent with the frequent observation of weakly deformed HP-rocks. Upward velocities estimated for channels 1 to 3 km thick are comparable to the serpentinization rates for maximum estimates of fluid velocities within shear zones in the literature. Competition between the upward flow and serpentinization may lead to intermittent behavior with alternating growth periods and thinning by exhumation. At shallower levels the thickness allowed for a channel may be up to ~ 8-10 km if the rheology has a higher dependence on stress. We therefore propose that the exhumation of HP oceanic units in serpentinite channels is organized in two levels, the deepest and fastest motion being driven by density contrast with the surrounding mantle and the

  17. Impact of high-alpha aerodynamics on dynamic stability parameters of aircraft and missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, G. N.

    1981-01-01

    The aerodynamic phenomena associated with high angles of attack and their effects on the dynamic stability characteristics of airplane and missile configurations are examined. Information on dynamic effects is limited. Steady flow phenomena and their effects on the forces and moments are reviewed. The effects of asymmetric vortices and of vortex bursting on the dynamic response of flight vehicles are reviewed with respect to their influence on: (1) nonlinearity of aerodynamic coefficients with attitude, rates, and accelerations; (2) cross coupling between longitudinal and lateral directional models of motion; (3) time dependence and hysteresis effects; (4) configuration dependencey; and (5) mathematical modeling of the aerodynamics.

  18. Validation of enhanced stabilization of municipal solid waste under controlled leachate recirculation using FTIR and XRD.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sapna; Kothiyal, N C; Nema, Arvind K

    2012-07-01

    Leachate recirculation at neutral PH accompanied with buffer/nutrients addition has been used successfully in earlier stabilization of municipal solid waste in bioreactor landfills. In the present study, efforts were made to enhance the stabilization rate of municipal solid waste (MSW) and organic solid waste (OSW) in simulated landfill bioreactors by controlling the pH of recirculated leachate towards slightly alkaline side in absence of additional buffer and nutrients addition. Enhanced stabilization in waste samples was monitored with the help of analytical tools like Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Predominance of bands assigned to inorganic compounds and comparatively lower intensities of bands for organic compounds in the FTIR spectra of waste samples degraded with leachate recirculation under controlled pH confirmed higher rate of biodegradation and mineralization of waste than the samples degraded without controlled leachate recirculation. XRD spectra also confirmed to a greater extent of mineralization in the waste samples degraded under leachate recirculation with controlled pH. Comparison of XRD spectra of two types of wastes pointed out higher degree of mineralization in organic solid waste as compared to municipal solid waste. PMID:24749191

  19. The role of sleep in motor sequence consolidation: stabilization rather than enhancement.

    PubMed

    Nettersheim, Almut; Hallschmid, Manfred; Born, Jan; Diekelmann, Susanne

    2015-04-29

    Sleep supports the consolidation of motor sequence memories, yet it remains unclear whether sleep stabilizes or actually enhances motor sequence performance. Here we assessed the time course of motor memory consolidation in humans, taking early boosts in performance into account and varying the time between training and sleep. Two groups of subjects, each participating in a short wake condition and a longer sleep condition, were trained on the sequential finger-tapping task in the evening and were tested (1) after wake intervals of either 30 min or 4 h and (2) after a night of sleep that ensued either 30 min or 4 h after training. The results show an early boost in performance 30 min after training and a subsequent decay across the 4 h wake interval. When sleep followed 30 min after training, post-sleep performance was stabilized at the early boost level. Sleep at 4 h after training restored performance to the early boost level, such that, 12 h after training, performance was comparable regardless of whether sleep occurred 30 min or 4 h after training. These findings indicate that sleep does not enhance but rather stabilizes motor sequence performance without producing additional gains. PMID:25926448

  20. Dual enhancement of electroluminescence efficiency and operational stability by rapid upconversion of triplet excitons in OLEDs

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Taro; Nakanotani, Hajime; Inoue, Munetomo; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-01-01

    Recently, triplet harvesting via a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) process has been established as a realistic route for obtaining ultimate internal electroluminescence (EL) quantum efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). However, the possibility that the rather long transient lifetime of the triplet excited states would reduce operational stability due to an increased chance for unwarranted chemical reactions has been a concern. Herein, we demonstrate dual enhancement of EL efficiency and operational stability in OLEDs by employing a TADF molecule as an assistant dopant and a fluorescent molecule as an end emitter. The proper combination of assistant dopant and emitter molecules realized a “one-way” rapid Förster energy transfer of singlet excitons from TADF molecules to fluorescent emitters, reducing the number of cycles of intersystem crossing (ISC) and reverse ISC in the TADF molecules and resulting in a significant enhancement of operational stability compared to OLEDs with a TADF molecule as the end emitter. In addition, we found that the presence of this rapid energy transfer significantly suppresses singlet-triplet annihilation. Using this finely-tuned rapid triplet-exciton upconversion scheme, OLED performance and lifetime was greatly improved. PMID:25673259

  1. Intestine-Specific Delivery of Hydrophobic Bioactives from Oxidized Starch Microspheres with an Enhanced Stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanshan; Chen, Yuying; Liang, Hao; Chen, Yiming; Shi, Mengxuan; Wu, Jiande; Liu, Xianwu; Li, Zuseng; Liu, Bin; Yuan, Qipeng; Li, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    An intestine-specific delivery system for hydrophobic bioactives with improved stability was developed. It consists of oxidized potato starch polymers, where the carboxyl groups were physically cross-linked via ferric ions. The model hydrophobic ingredients (β-carotene) were incorporated inside the starch microspheres via a double-emulsion method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images showed that β-carotene were distributed homogeneously in the inner oil phase of the starch microspheres. The negative value of the ζ-potential of microspheres increased with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. In vitro release experiments showed that the microspheres were stable at acidic stomach conditions (pH < 2), whereas at neutral intestinal conditions (pH 7.0), they rupture to release the loaded β-carotene. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, 2,2-diphenyl-1-(2,4,6-trinitriphenyl), scavenging activity results suggested that microsphere-encapsulated β-carotene had an improved activity after thermal treatment at 80 °C. The storage stability of encapsulated β-carotene at room temperature was also enhanced. The starch microspheres showed potential as intestine-specific carriers with an enhanced stability. PMID:26414436

  2. Enhancing Protein Stability by Adsorption onto Raft-like Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Jeffrey; Padala, Chakradhar; Asuri, Prashanth; Vutukuru, Srinavya; Athmakuri, Krishna; Kumar, Sanat; Dordick, Jonathan; Kane, Ravi S.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the stability of adsorbed proteins can be enhanced by controlling the heterogeneity of the surface – by creating raft-like domains in a soft liposomal membrane. Recent work has shown that enzymes adsorbed onto highly curved nanoscale supports can be more stable than those adsorbed on flat surfaces with nominally the same chemical structure. This effect has been attributed to a decrease in lateral inter-enzyme interactions on a curved surface. Exploiting this idea, we asked if adsorbing enzymes onto “patchy” surfaces composed of adsorbing and non-adsorbing regions can be used to reduce lateral interactions even on relatively flat surfaces. We demonstrate that creating domains on which an enzyme can adsorb enhances the stability of that enzyme under denaturing conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the size of these domains has a considerable effect on the degree of stability imparted by adsorption. Such biomimetic raft-inspired systems may find use in applications ranging from biorecognition to the design of novel strategies for the separation of biomolecules, and controlling the interaction of multi-component membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:19385631

  3. Dual enhancement of electroluminescence efficiency and operational stability by rapid upconversion of triplet excitons in OLEDs.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Taro; Nakanotani, Hajime; Inoue, Munetomo; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-01-01

    Recently, triplet harvesting via a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) process has been established as a realistic route for obtaining ultimate internal electroluminescence (EL) quantum efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). However, the possibility that the rather long transient lifetime of the triplet excited states would reduce operational stability due to an increased chance for unwarranted chemical reactions has been a concern. Herein, we demonstrate dual enhancement of EL efficiency and operational stability in OLEDs by employing a TADF molecule as an assistant dopant and a fluorescent molecule as an end emitter. The proper combination of assistant dopant and emitter molecules realized a "one-way" rapid Förster energy transfer of singlet excitons from TADF molecules to fluorescent emitters, reducing the number of cycles of intersystem crossing (ISC) and reverse ISC in the TADF molecules and resulting in a significant enhancement of operational stability compared to OLEDs with a TADF molecule as the end emitter. In addition, we found that the presence of this rapid energy transfer significantly suppresses singlet-triplet annihilation. Using this finely-tuned rapid triplet-exciton upconversion scheme, OLED performance and lifetime was greatly improved. PMID:25673259

  4. Dual enhancement of electroluminescence efficiency and operational stability by rapid upconversion of triplet excitons in OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Taro; Nakanotani, Hajime; Inoue, Munetomo; Adachi, Chihaya

    2015-02-01

    Recently, triplet harvesting via a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) process has been established as a realistic route for obtaining ultimate internal electroluminescence (EL) quantum efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). However, the possibility that the rather long transient lifetime of the triplet excited states would reduce operational stability due to an increased chance for unwarranted chemical reactions has been a concern. Herein, we demonstrate dual enhancement of EL efficiency and operational stability in OLEDs by employing a TADF molecule as an assistant dopant and a fluorescent molecule as an end emitter. The proper combination of assistant dopant and emitter molecules realized a ``one-way'' rapid Förster energy transfer of singlet excitons from TADF molecules to fluorescent emitters, reducing the number of cycles of intersystem crossing (ISC) and reverse ISC in the TADF molecules and resulting in a significant enhancement of operational stability compared to OLEDs with a TADF molecule as the end emitter. In addition, we found that the presence of this rapid energy transfer significantly suppresses singlet-triplet annihilation. Using this finely-tuned rapid triplet-exciton upconversion scheme, OLED performance and lifetime was greatly improved.

  5. Enhanced Performance of Plasmid DNA Polyplexes Stabilized by a Combination of Core Hydrophobicity and Surface PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Elizabeth J.; Nelson, Christopher E.; Werfel, Thomas A.; Guo, Ruijing; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy has high potential for safely promoting tissue restoration and for treating various genetic diseases. One current limitation is that conventional transfection reagents such as polyethylenimine (PEI) form electrostatically stabilized plasmid DNA (pDNA) polyplexes with poor colloidal stability. In this study, a library of poly(ethylene glycol-b-(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate)) [poly(EG-b-(DMAEMA-co-BMA))] polymers were synthesized and screened for improved colloidal stability and nucleic acid transfection following lyophilization. When added to pDNA in the appropriate pH buffer, the DMAEMA moieties initiate formation of electrostatic polyplexes that are internally stabilized by hydrophobic interactions of the core BMA blocks and sterically stabilized against aggregation by a PEG corona. The BMA content was varied from 0% to 60% in the second polymer block in order to optimally tune the balance of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions in the polyplex core, and polymers with 40 and 50 mol% BMA achieved the highest transfection efficiency. Diblock copolymers were more stable than PEI in physiologic buffers. Consequently, diblock copolymer polyplexes aggregated more slowly and followed a reaction-limited colloidal aggregation model, while fast aggregation of PEI polyplexes was governed by a diffusion-limited model. Polymers with 40% BMA did not aggregate significantly after lyophilization and produced up to 20-fold higher transfection efficiency than PEI polyplexes both before and after lyophilization. Furthermore, poly(EG-b-(DMAEMA-co-BMA)) polyplexes exhibited pH-dependent membrane disruption in a red blood cell hemolysis assay and endosomal escape as observed by confocal microscopy.Lyophilized polyplexes made with the lead candidate diblock copolymer (40% BMA) also successfully transfected cells in vitro following incorporation into gas-foamed polymeric scaffolds. In summary, the enhanced colloidal stability

  6. Robustness, stability and efficiency of phage lambda genetic switch: dynamical structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X-M; Yin, L; Hood, L; Ao, P

    2004-12-01

    Based on the dynamical structure theory for complex networks recently developed by one of us and on the physical-chemical models for gene regulation, developed by Shea and Ackers in the 1980's, we formulate a direct and concise mathematical framework for the genetic switch controlling phage lambda life cycles, which naturally includes the stochastic effect. The dynamical structure theory states that the dynamics of a complex network is determined by its four elementary components: The dissipation (analogous to degradation), the stochastic force, the driving force determined by a potential, and the transverse force. The potential may be interpreted as a landscape for the phage development in terms of attractive basins, saddle points, peaks and valleys. The dissipation gives rise to the adaptivity of the phage in the landscape defined by the potential: The phage always has the tendency to approach the bottom of the nearby attractive basin. The transverse force tends to keep the network on the equal-potential contour of the landscape. The stochastic fluctuation gives the phage the ability to search around the potential landscape by passing through saddle points. With molecular parameters in our model fixed primarily by the experimental data on wild-type phage and supplemented by data on one mutant, our calculated results on mutants agree quantitatively with the available experimental observations on other mutants for protein number, lysogenization frequency, and a lysis frequency in lysogen culture. The calculation reproduces the observed robustness of the phage lambda genetic switch. This is the first mathematical description that successfully represents such a wide variety of major experimental phenomena. Specifically, we find: (1) The explanation for both the stability and the efficiency of phage lambda genetic switch is the exponential dependence of saddle point crossing rate on potential barrier height, a result of the stochastic motion in a landscape; and (2

  7. Stabilization of α-Chymotrypsin upon PEGylation Correlates with Reduced Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José A.; Solá, Ricardo J.; Castillo, Betzaida; Cintrón-Colón, Héctor R.; Rivera-Rivera, Izarys; Barletta, Gabriel; Griebenow, Kai

    2009-01-01

    Protein stability remains one of the main factors limiting the realization of the full potential of protein therapeutics. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugation to proteins has evolved into an important tool to overcome instability issues associated with proteins. The observed increase in thermodynamic stability of several proteins upon PEGylation has been hypothesized to arise from reduced protein structural dynamics, although experimental evidence for this hypothesis is currently missing. To test this hypothesis, the model protein α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) was covalently modified with PEGs with molecular weights (MW) of 700, 2000 and 5000 and the degree of modification was systematically varied. The procedure did not cause significant tertiary structure changes. Thermodynamic unfolding experiments revealed that PEGylation increased the thermal transition temperature (Tm) of α-CT by up to 6°C and the free energy of unfolding (ΔGU (25°C)) by up to 5 kcal/mol. The increase in stability was found to be independent of the PEG MW and it leveled off after an average of four PEG molecules were bound to α-CT. Fourier-transformed infrared (FTIR) H/D exchange experiments were conducted to characterize the conformational dynamics of the PEG-conjugates. It was found that the magnitude of thermodynamic stabilization correlates with a reduction in protein structural dynamics and was independent of the PEG MW. Thus, the initial hypothesis proved positive. Similar to the thermodynamic stabilization of proteins by covalent modification with glycans, poly(ethylene glycol) thermodynamically stabilizes α-CT by reducing protein structural dynamics. These results provide guidance for the future development of stable protein formulations. PMID:18781698

  8. Heterogeneous patterns enhancing static and dynamic texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa da Silva, Núbia; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-02-01

    Some mixtures, such as colloids like milk, blood, and gelatin, have homogeneous appearance when viewed with the naked eye, however, to observe them at the nanoscale is possible to understand the heterogeneity of its components. The same phenomenon can occur in pattern recognition in which it is possible to see heterogeneous patterns in texture images. However, current methods of texture analysis can not adequately describe such heterogeneous patterns. Common methods used by researchers analyse the image information in a global way, taking all its features in an integrated manner. Furthermore, multi-scale analysis verifies the patterns at different scales, but still preserving the homogeneous analysis. On the other hand various methods use textons to represent the texture, breaking texture down into its smallest unit. To tackle this problem, we propose a method to identify texture patterns not small as textons at distinct scales enhancing the separability among different types of texture. We find sub patterns of texture according to the scale and then group similar patterns for a more refined analysis. Tests were performed in four static texture databases and one dynamical one. Results show that our method provide better classification rate compared with conventional approaches both in static and in dynamic texture.

  9. Cross-linking oppositely charged oil-in-water emulsions to enhance heteroaggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Maier, Christiane; Oechsle, Anja M; Weiss, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    The formation and subsequent enzymatic and chemical cross-linking of heteroaggregates from oppositely charged oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions was investigated. For this purpose, 10% (w/w) oil-in-water emulsions (d43<1 μm) were prepared at pH 4 using a positively charged emulsifier (Nα-lauroyl-L-arginine ethyl ester (LAE), cold water fish gelatin, or whey protein isolate) or a negatively charged one (sugar beet pectin or Quillaja saponins). The oppositely charged emulsions were then combined at a volume ratio of 1:1 and treated with laccase or glutaraldehyde in order to further stabilize the electrostatically attached aggregates by covalently cross-linking the oppositely charged membranes. Emulsions and heteroaggregates were characterized by their rheological properties, their surface charge, particle size distribution, and microstructure using dynamic and static light scattering as well as confocal laser scanning microscopy. Prior to cross-linking, the emulsifiers' stabilization mechanism were found to greatly influence the formation of heteroaggregates. Laccase treatment (1.34 mU/mL) increased aggregate expansion by ca. 30% for the combined emulsions stabilized by Quillaja saponins/whey protein isolate, while combined Quillaja saponins/fish gelatin stabilized emulsions remained unaffected. When combined emulsions were treated with 50mM glutaraldehyde, aggregate size significantly increased 2- and 3-fold, respectively. Thus, our study provides novel insights into the enzymatic and chemical cross-linking of heteroaggregates composed of oppositely charged O/W emulsions. PMID:26298085

  10. The frequency response of dynamic friction: Enhanced rate-and-state models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabboi, A.; Putelat, T.; Woodhouse, J.

    2016-07-01

    The prediction and control of friction-induced vibration requires a sufficiently accurate constitutive law for dynamic friction at the sliding interface: for linearised stability analysis, this requirement takes the form of a frictional frequency response function. Systematic measurements of this frictional frequency response function are presented for small samples of nylon and polycarbonate sliding against a glass disc. Previous efforts to explain such measurements from a theoretical model have failed, but an enhanced rate-and-state model is presented which is shown to match the measurements remarkably well. The tested parameter space covers a range of normal forces (10-50 N), of sliding speeds (1-10 mm/s) and frequencies (100-2000 Hz). The key new ingredient in the model is the inclusion of contact stiffness to take into account elastic deformations near the interface. A systematic methodology is presented to discriminate among possible variants of the model, and then to identify the model parameter values.

  11. Dynamical investigation and parameter stability region analysis of a flywheel energy storage system in charging mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei-Ya; Li, Yong-Li; Chang, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Nan

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behavior analysis of the electromechanical coupling characteristics of a flywheel energy storage system (FESS) with a permanent magnet (PM) brushless direct-current (DC) motor (BLDCM) is studied. The Hopf bifurcation theory and nonlinear methods are used to investigate the generation process and mechanism of the coupled dynamic behavior for the average current controlled FESS in the charging mode. First, the universal nonlinear dynamic model of the FESS based on the BLDCM is derived. Then, for a 0.01 kWh/1.6 kW FESS platform in the Key Laboratory of the Smart Grid at Tianjin University, the phase trajectory of the FESS from a stable state towards chaos is presented using numerical and stroboscopic methods, and all dynamic behaviors of the system in this process are captured. The characteristics of the low-frequency oscillation and the mechanism of the Hopf bifurcation are investigated based on the Routh stability criterion and nonlinear dynamic theory. It is shown that the Hopf bifurcation is directly due to the loss of control over the inductor current, which is caused by the system control parameters exceeding certain ranges. This coupling nonlinear process of the FESS affects the stability of the motor running and the efficiency of energy transfer. In this paper, we investigate into the effects of control parameter change on the stability and the stability regions of these parameters based on the averaged-model approach. Furthermore, the effect of the quantization error in the digital control system is considered to modify the stability regions of the control parameters. Finally, these theoretical results are verified through platform experiments.

  12. Synthesis of multi-hierarchical structured yttria-stabilized zirconia powders and their enhanced thermophysical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Fengmei; Gao, Yanfeng; Chen, Hongfei; Liu, Xinling; Tang, Xiaoping; Luo, Hongjie

    2013-06-01

    Multi-hierarchical structured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders were successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal-calcination process. The morphology, crystallinity, and microstructure of the products were characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, and BET. A possible formation mechanism of the unique structure formed during hydrothermal processing was also investigated. The measured thermophysical results indicated that the prepared YSZ powders had a low thermal conductivity (0.63–1.27 W m⁻¹ K⁻¹), good short-term high-temperature stability up to 1300 °C. The influence of the morphology and microstructure on their thermophysical properties was briefly discussed. The unique multi-hierarchical structure makes the prepared YSZ powders candidates for use in enhanced applications involving thermal barrier coatings. - Graphical abstract: There are many tiny pores and grain boundaries in the multi-hierarchical structured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders,which greatly decrease the thermal conductivities of the YSZ powders. - Highlights: • Multi-hierarchical structured YSZ powders were successfully prepared. • The prepared YSZ powders had a low thermal conductivity (0.63–1.27 W m⁻¹ K⁻¹). • Improved high-temperature stability had been achieved for the prepared YSZ powders. • The influence of the morphology on their thermophysical properties was explored.

  13. Enhanced stability of low fouling zwitterionic polymer brushes in seawater with diblock architecture.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Robert; Gosa, Maria; Jańczewski, Dominik; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-08-27

    The successful implementation of zwitterionic polymeric brushes as antifouling materials for marine applications is conditioned by the stability of the polymer chain and the brush-anchoring segment in seawater. Here we demonstrate that robust, antifouling, hydrophilic polysulfobetaine-based brushes with diblock architecture can be fabricated by atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using initiator-modified surfaces. Sequential living-type polymerization of hydrophobic styrene or methyl methacrylate and commercially available hydrophilic sulfobetaine methacrylamide (SBMAm) monomer is employed. Stability enhancement is accomplished by protecting the siloxane anchoring bond of brushes on the substrate, grafted from silicon oxide surfaces. The degradation of unprotected PSBMAm brushes is clearly evident after a 3 month immersion challenge in sterilized artificial seawater. Ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements are used to follow changes in coating thickness and surface morphology. Comparative stability results indicate that surface-tethered poly(methyl methacrylate) and polystyrene hydrophobic blocks substantially improve the stability of zwitterionic brushes in an artificial marine environment. In addition, differences between the hydration of zwitterionic brushes in fresh and salt water are discussed to provide a better understanding of hydration and degradation processes with the benefit of improved design of polyzwitterionic coatings. PMID:23876125

  14. Enhanced stability of uncemented canine femoral components by bone ingrowth into the porous coatings.

    PubMed

    Jasty, M; Bragdon, C R; Zalenski, E; O'Connor, D; Page, A; Harris, W H

    1997-01-01

    The following questions were answered in this study: (1) What is the initial stability of proximally porous-coated canine femoral components? (2) Does bone ingrowth occur under these conditions? (3) Is the stability enhanced by tissue ingrowth in vivo? The stability of proximally porous-coated femoral components of canine total hip arthroplasties after 6 months to 2 years of in vivo service in dogs was measured in vitro using displacement transducers under loads simulating canine midstance. This was compared with the stability of identical components under the same loading conditions immediately after implantation in vitro in the contralateral femurs. The femurs were then sectioned and bone ingrowth into the porous coatings was quantified. The results showed that immediately after implantation the implants can move as much as 50 microns, but that the bone ingrowth into porous coatings of canine femoral components can occur even under such conditions. These data also suggested that the relative motion existing at the time of insertion can be reduced to very small amounts (< 10 microns) by bone ingrowth. PMID:9021510

  15. Thermal stability enhancement of modified carboxymethyl cellulose films using SnO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Baniasad, Arezou; Ghorbani, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    In this study, in-situ and ex-situ hydrothermal synthesis procedures were applied to synthesize novel CMC/porous SnO2 nanocomposites from rice husk extracted carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) biopolymer. In addition, the effects of SnO2 nanoparticles on thermal stability of the prepared nanocomposite were specifically studied. Products were investigated in terms of morphology, particle size, chemical structure, crystallinity and thermal stability by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. Presence of characteristic bands in the FTIR spectra of samples confirmed the successful formation of CMC and CMC/SnO2 nanocomposites. In addition, FESEM images revealed four different morphologies of porous SnO2 nanoparticles including nanospheres, microcubes, nanoflowers and olive-like nanoparticles with hollow cores which were formed on CMC. These nanoparticles possessed d-spacing values of 3.35Å. Thermal stability measurements revealed that introduction of SnO2 nanoparticles in the structure of CMC enhanced stability of CMC to 85%. PMID:26893046

  16. Enhancing stability of poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene)-based materials by bromination and dehydrobromination

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tianzi; Wang, Xiaojun; Malmgren, Thomas W; Mays, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve their thermal stability, poly(1,3-cyclohexadiene) (PCHD) homopolymer, diblock copolymer of PCHD with styrene (PCHD-b-PS), and crosslinked PCHD membranes were dehydrogenated by addition of bromine to the polymer in solution, followed by dehydrobromination using an isothermal treatment at elevated temperature. The brominated PCHD materials thus obtained were characterized via FT-IR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) before and after dehydrobromination. Dehydrobromination was performed inside a TGA instrument, allowing insight into thermal stability of the analytes to be obtained. The dehydrobrominated PCHD samples were characterized using elemental analysis, and it was found the dehydrogenation of PCHD to polyphenylene was not complete. Nevertheless, some aromatization did occur, and the thermal stability of the treated polymer was greatly enhanced as compared to its PCHD precursor. Such materials may thus be of interest as high carbon content, graphene-like films. Crosslinked PCHD membranes and PCHD-b-PS diblock copolymers were treated via the same bromination/pyrolysis process, which resulted in markedly improved thermal stabilities for these materials as well.

  17. Low temperature acclimation with electrical stimulation enhance the biocathode functioning stability for antibiotics detoxification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Kong, Deyong; Ma, Jincai; Wen, Chongqing; Yuan, Tong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Zhou, Jizhong; Wang, Aijie

    2016-09-01

    Improvement of the stability of functional microbial communities in wastewater treatment system is critical to accelerate pollutants detoxification in cold regions. Although biocathode communities could accelerate environmental pollutants degradation, how to acclimate the cold stress and to improve the catalytic stability of functional microbial communities are remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the structural and functional responses of antibiotic chloramphenicol (CAP) reducing biocathode communities to constant low temperature 10 °C (10-biocathode) and temperature elevation from 10 °C to 25 °C (S25-biocathode). Our results indicated that the low temperature acclimation with electrical stimulation obviously enhanced the CAP nitro group reduction efficiency when comparing the aromatic amine product AMCl2 formation efficiency with the 10-biocathode and S25-biocathode under the opened and closed circuit conditions. The 10-biocathode generated comparative AMCl maximum as the S25-biocathode but showed significant lower dehalogenation rate of AMCl2 to AMCl. The continuous low temperature and temperature elevation both enriched core functional community in the 10-biocathode and S25-biocathode, respectively. The 10-biocathode functioning stability maintained mainly through selectively enriching cold-adapted functional species, coexisting metabolically similar nitroaromatics reducers and maintaining the relative abundance of key electrons transfer genes. This study provides new insights into biocathode functioning stability for accelerating environmental pollutants degradation in cold wastewater system. PMID:27183211

  18. Power system stability enhancement employing controllers based on a versatile modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chi Yung

    Rapid advances in power electronics have made it both practicable and economic to design powerful thyristor-controlled devices, such as Flexible AC Transmission Systems (FACTS), for stability enhancements. The discrepancies of existing modeling approaches have limited the feasibility of handling these devices or designing its damping controller. In this thesis, a versatile and generalized approach to model standard power system components is proposed. The more systematic and realistic representation, accompanied by the development of powerful eigenvalue-analysis techniques, facilitates the study of small signal stability (monotonic and oscillatory) of the power systems. In monotonic stability study, the effect of exciter and governor is critically reviewed based on the exploitation of eigenvalues, modal and sensitivity analyses over a wide range of operating conditions. In oscillatory stability study, a common FACTS device, the static var compensator (SVC), is used to improve system damping. This study reveals the inadequacy of many conventional methodologies in SVC design since they have ignored (or cannot handle) some important factors such as SVC mode instability and robustness of the power system. Two approaches, combined sensitivities and Hinfinity algorithms, are introduced to solve these limitations. Finally, an extended Hinfinity algorithm, which is applied to PSS design and successfully solves certain limitations of the existing H infinity based PSS design, is also presented. Although these studies are developed on selected controller devices or typical systems for convenience of discussion, extension to more complex systems can be dealt with in a similar way because of the versatility of the proposed modeling methodology.

  19. TCTP regulates spindle microtubule dynamics by stabilizing polar microtubules during mouse oocyte meiosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; You, Seung Yeop; Park, Yong Seok; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic changes in spindle structure and function are essential for maintaining genomic integrity during the cell cycle. Spindle dynamics are highly dependent on several microtubule-associated proteins that coordinate the dynamic behavior of microtubules, including microtubule assembly, stability and organization. Here, we show that translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a novel microtubule-associated protein that regulates spindle dynamics during meiotic maturation. TCTP was expressed and widely distributed in the cytoplasm with strong enrichment at the spindle microtubules during meiosis. TCTP was found to be phosphorylated during meiotic maturation, and was exclusively localized to the spindle poles. Knockdown of TCTP impaired spindle organization without affecting chromosome alignment. These spindle defects were mostly due to the destabilization of the polar microtubules. However, the stability of kinetochore microtubules attached to chromosomes was not affected by TCTP knockdown. Overexpression of a nonphosphorylable mutant of TCTP disturbed meiotic maturation, stabilizing the spindle microtubules. In addition, Plk1 was decreased by TCTP knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TCTP is a microtubule-associating protein required to regulate spindle microtubule dynamics during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. PMID:26802898

  20. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piriz, A. R.; Di Lucchio, L.; Rodriguez Prieto, G.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front is studied by considering a modulation in the acceleration that consists of sequences of Dirac deltas. This allows obtaining explicit analytical expressions for the instability growth rate as well as for the boundaries of the stability region. As a general rule, it is found that it is possible to stabilize all wave numbers above a certain minimum value km, but the requirements in the modulation amplitude and frequency become more exigent with smaller km. The essential role of compressibility is phenomenologically addressed in order to find the constraint it imposes on the stability region. The results for some different wave forms of the acceleration modulation are also presented.

  1. NudC regulates actin dynamics and ciliogenesis by stabilizing cofilin 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Wen; Lu, Yi; Yan, Xiaoyi; Yan, Xiumin; Zhu, Xueliang; Liu, Wei; Yang, Yuehong; Zhou, Tianhua

    2016-02-01

    Emerging data indicate that actin dynamics is associated with ciliogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we find that nuclear distribution gene C (NudC), an Hsp90 co-chaperone, is required for actin organization and dynamics. Depletion of NudC promotes cilia elongation and increases the percentage of ciliated cells. Further results show that NudC binds to and stabilizes cofilin 1, a key regulator of actin dynamics. Knockdown of cofilin 1 also facilitates ciliogenesis. Moreover, depletion of either NudC or cofilin 1 causes similar ciliary defects in zebrafish, including curved body, pericardial edema and defective left-right asymmetry. Ectopic expression of cofilin 1 significantly reverses the phenotypes induced by NudC depletion in both cultured cells and zebrafish. Thus, our data suggest that NudC regulates actin cytoskeleton and ciliogenesis by stabilizing cofilin 1. PMID:26704451

  2. Stability enhancement and fuel economy of the 4-wheel-drive hybrid electric vehicles by optimal tyre force distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Avesta; Mohammadi, Masoud

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, vehicle stability control and fuel economy for a 4-wheel-drive hybrid vehicle are investigated. The integrated controller is designed within three layers. The first layer determines the total yaw moment and total lateral force made by using an optimal controller method to follow the desired dynamic behaviour of a vehicle. The second layer determines optimum tyre force distribution in order to optimise tyre usage and find out how the tyres should share longitudinal and lateral forces to achieve a target vehicle response under the assumption that all four wheels can be independently steered, driven, and braked. In the third layer, the active steering, wheel slip, and electrical motor torque controllers are designed. In the front axle, internal combustion engine (ICE) is coupled to an electric motor (EM). The control strategy has to determine the power distribution between ICE and EM to minimise fuel consumption and allowing the vehicle to be charge sustaining. Finally, simulations performed in MATLAB/SIMULINK environment show that the proposed structure could enhance the vehicle stability and fuel economy in different manoeuvres.

  3. MoS2 Enhanced T-Phase Stabilization and Tunability Through Alloying.

    PubMed

    Raffone, Federico; Ataca, Can; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Cicero, Giancarlo

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional MoS2 is a promising material for nanoelectronics and catalysis, but its potential is not fully exploited since proper control of its multiple phases (H, T, ZT) and electronic properties is lacking. In this theoretical study, alloying is proposed as a method to stabilize the MoS2 T-phase. In particular, MoS2 is alloyed with another material that is known to exist in a monolayer MX2 T-structure, and we show that the formation energy difference among phases decreases even for low impurity concentrations in MoS2, and a relationship between impurity concentration and alloy band gap is established. This method can be potentially applied to many two-dimensional materials to tune/enhance their electronic properties and stabilities in order to suit the desired application. PMID:27225447

  4. Substrate and head group modifications for enhanced stability in molecular electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrato, Michael-Anthony

    Poor Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) stability is a barrier which impedes the incorporation of molecular layers as functional components in electronic device architectures. Here we investigate the molecular electronic characteristics of two well established approaches to enhancing SAM stability. In Chapter 2 we investigate the electrochemical modification of Au substrates by the underpotential deposition of silver monolayers (AgUPD). In Chapter 3 we study chelating dithiophosphinic acid (DTPA) head groups to anchor SAM molecules to substrates. Based on molecular electronic characterization using EGaIn Tip testbeds, we observed that AgUPD substrates maintained the inherent electronic character of n-alkanethiolate SAMs, but reduced charge transport by almost 1 order of magnitude as compared with the same SAMs on bulk Au substrates. Similar molecular electronic characterization of (diphenyl)dithiophosphinic acid SAMs on Au substrates revealed that the DTPA head group induced a ~3 order of magnitude drop in charge transport as compared with analogous thiophenol SAMs.

  5. Aeroelastic Tailoring for Stability Augmentation and Performance Enhancements of Tiltrotor Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, Mark W.; Piatak, David J.; Corso, Lawrence M.; Popelka, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The requirements for increased speed and productivity for tiltrotors has spawned several investigations associated with proprotor aeroelastic stability augmentation and aerodynamic performance enhancements. Included among these investigations is a focus on passive aeroelastic tailoring concepts which exploit the anisotropic capabilities of fiber composite materials. Researchers at Langley Research Center and Bell Helicopter have devoted considerable effort to assess the potential for using these materials to obtain aeroelastic responses which are beneficial to the important stability and performance considerations of tiltrotors. Both experimental and analytical studies have been completed to examine aeroelastic tailoring concepts for the tiltrotor, applied either to the wing or to the rotor blades. This paper reviews some of the results obtained in these aeroelastic tailoring investigations and discusses the relative merits associated with these approaches.

  6. The Next Generation of High-Speed Dynamic Stability Wind Tunnel Testing (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomek, Deborah M.; Sewall, William G.; Mason, Stan E.; Szchur, Bill W. A.

    2006-01-01

    Throughout industry, accurate measurement and modeling of dynamic derivative data at high-speed conditions has been an ongoing challenge. The expansion of flight envelopes and non-conventional vehicle design has greatly increased the demand for accurate prediction and modeling of vehicle dynamic behavior. With these issues in mind, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) embarked on the development and shakedown of a high-speed dynamic stability test technique that addresses the longstanding problem of accurately measuring dynamic derivatives outside the low-speed regime. The new test technique was built upon legacy technology, replacing an antiquated forced oscillation system, and greatly expanding the capabilities beyond classic forced oscillation testing at both low and high speeds. The modern system is capable of providing a snapshot of dynamic behavior over a periodic cycle for varying frequencies, not just a damping derivative term at a single frequency.

  7. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Look, Nicole; Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; McDermott, William J.; Kram, Rodger; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  8. Dynamic stability of running: The effects of speed and leg amputations on the maximal Lyapunov exponent

    SciTech Connect

    Look, Nicole; Arellano, Christopher J.; Grabowski, Alena M.; Kram, Rodger; McDermott, William J.; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2013-12-15

    In this paper, we study dynamic stability during running, focusing on the effects of speed, and the use of a leg prosthesis. We compute and compare the maximal Lyapunov exponents of kinematic time-series data from subjects with and without unilateral transtibial amputations running at a wide range of speeds. We find that the dynamics of the affected leg with the running-specific prosthesis are less stable than the dynamics of the unaffected leg and also less stable than the biological legs of the non-amputee runners. Surprisingly, we find that the center-of-mass dynamics of runners with two intact biological legs are slightly less stable than those of runners with amputations. Our results suggest that while leg asymmetries may be associated with instability, runners may compensate for this effect by increased control of their center-of-mass dynamics.

  9. Correction: Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface.

    PubMed

    Pandiri, Manjula; Shaham-Waldmann, Nurit; Hossain, Mohammad S; Foss, Frank W; Rajeshwar, Krishnan; Paz, Yaron

    2016-09-14

    Correction for 'Enhanced photocatalytic activity of a self-stabilized synthetic flavin anchored on a TiO2 surface' by Manjula Pandiri et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 18575-18583. PMID:27509005

  10. Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for Enzyme Immobilization with Enhanced Activity and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong J.; Lin, Chiann Tso; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-01

    Apoferritin is a nanostructured material with a uniform size and spherical structure, and it has excellent bio-compatibility. In this work, we report the use of apoferritin as a novel and biocompatible carrier for stabilizing enzymes and their activities. We used glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. GOx was immobilized on the surface of the apoferritin through a green synthetic approach taking advantage of bioaffinity binding between streptavidin and biotin. As a result, a glucose oxidase-biotin/streptavidin/biotin-apoferritin conjugate (Apo-GOx) was prepared using streptavidin as a bridge. The synthesized Apo-GOx was characterized with transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The activity and stability of GOx on the surface of the apoferritin were studied in different environments, such as temperature, chemicals, and pH, in comparison with the biotinylated GOx (B-GOx). The results showed that the activity of GOx on the apoferritin surface was significantly enhanced. The thermal and chemical stability of the GOx on the apoferritin was also greatly improved compared to free B-GOx in a solution. It was found that the activity of the GOx on the apoferritin only lost 30% in comparison to a 70% loss of free B-GOx after a 2 h incubation at 50oC. There was almost no decrease in activity for the GOx on the apoferritin as compared to an 80% activity decrease for free B-GOx after 30 min incubation in a 5 M urea solution. Glucose detection was used as a model application for the enzyme immobilization method developed in this work. The GOx immobilized apoferritin nanoparticles exhibited high sensitivity for glucose detection with a detection limit of 3 nM glucose. This work offers a novel approach for immobilizing enzymes with enhanced stability and activity, and this method may find a number of applications, such as in enzyme catalysis, DNA assays and immunoassays.

  11. Primary stability of two uncemented acetabular components of different geometry: hemispherical or peripherally enhanced?

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, G.; Smith, E. J.; Deakin, A. H.; Wearing, S. C.; Sarungi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study compared the primary stability of two commercially available acetabular components from the same manufacturer, which differ only in geometry; a hemispherical and a peripherally enhanced design (peripheral self-locking (PSL)). The objective was to determine whether altered geometry resulted in better primary stability. Methods Acetabular components were seated with 0.8 mm to 2 mm interference fits in reamed polyethylene bone substrate of two different densities (0.22 g/cm3 and 0.45 g/cm3). The primary stability of each component design was investigated by measuring the peak failure load during uniaxial pull-out and tangential lever-out tests. Results There was no statistically significant difference in seating force (p = 0.104) or primary stability (pull-out p = 0.171, lever-out p = 0.087) of the two components in the low-density substrate. Similarly, in the high-density substrate, there was no statistically significant difference in the peak pull-out force (p = 0.154) or lever-out moment (p = 0.574) between the designs. However, the PSL component required a significantly higher seating force than the hemispherical cup in the high-density bone analogue (p = 0.006). Conclusions Higher seating forces associated with the PSL design may result in inadequate seating and increased risk of component malpositioning or acetabular fracture in the intra-operative setting in high-density bone stock. Our results, if translated clinically, suggest that a purely hemispherical geometry may have an advantage over a peripherally enhanced geometry in high density bone stock. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:264–9. PMID:24326398

  12. Rapid Small-Signal Stability Assessment and Enhancement Following Changes in Topology

    SciTech Connect

    Saric, AT; Stankovic, AM

    2015-05-01

    The paper proposes a scalable and tractable algorithm for dynamic topology optimization of power systems involving changes in branch on/off status, while respecting small-signal stability (SSS) constraints. A procedure for fast updates of the system matrices (in descriptor form) and without additional full matrix inversions is proposed. To additionally reduce the computation time, only critical eigenvalues (right-most or those in a specified damping ratio and frequency range) are calculated. A quadratic optimization approach is proposed for optimized generation re-dispatch to satisfy SSS constraints. The approach is applied to two (medium- and large-scale) real-world test power systems.

  13. Flow of deep crust in orogens, associated surface dynamics, and the stabilization of continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, C. P.; Whitney, D. L.; Mulch, A.; Rey, P. F.

    2013-12-01

    Mountain building throws continental crust into an unstable state; subsequent stabilization of continental crust takes various forms, but flow of low-viscosity crust is the most common. Some of this low-viscosity crust remains at depth- it is the crust we see in the deep portions of Archean and Proterozoic cratons, typically granulite-migmatite terrains that have recorded ~10 kbar pressure, 600-800°C temperature, and intense deformation dominated by subhorizontal fabrics. In some places though, this deep crust reached the surface during the orogenic cycle. This is the case in the North American Cordillera where the deep crust leaked toward the surface and formed a series of metamorphic complexes that are cored by migmatite domes. Within the domes, complex structural overprints and decompression metamorphic paths indicate large-magnitude horizontal and vertical flow of partially molten crust relative to mantling rocks. No matter how the crust reached partial melting (thermal relaxation and/or heating) during continental under-thrusting, crustal thickening, lithosphere foundering, slab break-off, or slab window, the end result is one of an orogenic crust that contains a low viscosity layer at depth. This layer is mobile and opportunistic: it flows laterally and therefore helps keep a flat Moho; it may flow from a thick plateau and thicken the foreland region (mechanism of plateau growth); it fills gaps that open in the upper crust and therefore enhances orogenic collapse by transferring material from deep to shallow levels; ultimately, flow of this layer stabilizes the crust and may bring the end of orogeny. Thermal and mechanical numerical modeling can help evaluate quantitatively the relative importance of crust thickness, geothermal gradients, and tectonic boundary conditions in the evolution of orogenic systems. In the simple case of steady extension of a layered crust, results show that upper-crust extension is dynamically linked to lower crustal flow until

  14. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett Jr., John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2007-04-24

    An x-ray source assembly (2700) and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode (2125) having a source spot upon which electrons (2120) impinge and a control system (2715/2720) for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure (2710) notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  15. X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Radley, Ian; Bievenue, Thomas J.; Burdett, John H.; Gallagher, Brian W.; Shakshober, Stuart M.; Chen, Zewu; Moore, Michael D.

    2008-06-08

    An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

  16. A fuzzy logic excitation system for stability enhancement of power systems with multi-mode oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyama, Takashi; Miyazaki, Koushi; Satoh, Hironori

    1996-06-01

    A fuzzy logic excitation system has been proposed to enhance the overall stability of power systems. The proposed excitation system has two control loops. One is the voltage control loop which achieves the automatic voltage regulator (AVR) function, and the other is the damping control loop which gives the PSS function. Simple fuzzy logic control rules are applied to both loops. The input signal to the voltage control loop is the terminal voltage, and the input signal to the damping control loop is the real power output. Simulation studies show the advantages of the fuzzy logic excitation system.

  17. Fluorous Metal-Organic Frameworks with Enhanced Stability and High H2/CO2 Storage Capacities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da-Shuai; Chang, Ze; Li, Yi-Fan; Jiang, Zhong-Yi; Xuan, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Li, Jian-Rong; Chen, Qiang; Hu, Tong-Liang; Bu, Xian-He

    2013-01-01

    A new class of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been synthesized by ligand-functionalization strategy. Systematic studies of their adsorption properties were performed at low and high pressure. Importantly, when fluorine was introduced into the framework via the functionalization, both the framework stabilities and adsorption capacities towards H2/CO2 were enhanced significantly. This consequence can be well interpreted by theoretical studies of these MOFs structures. In addition, one of these MOFs TKL-107 was used to fabricate mixed matrix membranes, which exhibit great potential for the application of CO2 separation. PMID:24264725

  18. Glutamine deprivation enhances antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate through the stabilization of monocarboxylate transporter-1.

    PubMed

    Cardaci, Simone; Rizza, Salvatore; Filomeni, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Roberta; Bertocchi, Fabio; Mattei, Maurizio; Paci, Maurizio; Rotilio, Giuseppe; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-09-01

    Anticancer drug efficacy might be leveraged by strategies to target certain biochemical adaptations of tumors. Here we show how depriving cancer cells of glutamine can enhance the anticancer properties of 3-bromopyruvate, a halogenated analog of pyruvic acid. Glutamine deprival potentiated 3-bromopyruvate chemotherapy by increasing the stability of the monocarboxylate transporter-1, an effect that sensitized cells to metabolic oxidative stress and autophagic cell death. We further elucidated mechanisms through which resistance to chemopotentiation by glutamine deprival could be circumvented. Overall, our findings offer a preclinical proof-of-concept for how to employ 3-bromopyruvate or other monocarboxylic-based drugs to sensitize tumors to chemotherapy. PMID:22773663

  19. Enhancement of thermal stability of porous bodies comprised of stainless steel or an alloy

    DOEpatents

    Bischoff, Brian L.; Sutton, Theodore G.; Judkins, Roddie R.; Armstrong, Timothy R.; Adcock, Kenneth D.

    2010-11-09

    A method for treating a porous item constructed of metal powder, such as a powder made of Series 400 stainless steel, involves a step of preheating the porous item to a temperature of between about 700 and 900.degree. C. degrees in an oxidizing atmosphere and then sintering the body in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature which is slightly below the melting temperature of the metal which comprises the porous item. The thermal stability of the resulting item is enhanced by this method so that the item retains its porosity and metallic characteristics, such as ductility, at higher (e.g. near-melting) temperatures.

  20. Stabilizing the CH2 Domain of an Antibody by Engineering in an Enhanced Aromatic Sequon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wentao; Kong, Leopold; Connelly, Stephen; Dendle, Julia M; Liu, Yu; Wilson, Ian A; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) exhibiting highly selective binding to a protein target constitute a large and growing proportion of the therapeutics market. Aggregation of mAbs results in the loss of their therapeutic efficacy and can result in deleterious immune responses. The CH2 domain comprising part of the Fc portion of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is typically the least stable domain in IgG-type antibodies and therefore influences their aggregation propensity. We stabilized the CH2 domain by engineering an enhanced aromatic sequon (EAS) into the N-glycosylated C'E loop and observed a 4.8 °C increase in the melting temperature of the purified IgG1 Fc fragment. This EAS-stabilized CH2 domain also conferred enhanced stability against thermal and low pH induced aggregation in the context of a full-length monoclonal IgG1 antibody. The crystal structure of the EAS-stabilized (Q295F/Y296A) IgG1 Fc fragment confirms the design principle, i.e., the importance of the GlcNAc1•F295 interaction, and surprisingly reveals that the core fucose attached to GlcNAc1 also engages in an interaction with F295. Inhibition of core fucosylation confirms the contribution of the fucose-Phe interaction to the stabilization. The Q295F/Y296A mutations also modulate the binding affinity of the full-length antibody to Fc receptors by decreasing the binding to low affinity Fc gamma receptors (FcγRIIa, FcγRIIIa, and FcγRIIIb), while maintaining wild-type binding affinity to FcRn and FcγRI. Our results demonstrate that engineering an EAS into the N-glycosylated reverse turn on the C'E loop leads to stabilizing N-glycan-protein interactions in antibodies and that this modification modulates antibody-Fc receptor binding. PMID:27128252

  1. The Effects of Experimentally Induced Low Back Pain on Spine Rotational Stiffness and Local Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Ross, Gwyneth B; Mavor, Matthew; Brown, Stephen H M; Graham, Ryan B

    2015-09-01

    Local dynamic stability, quantified using the maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponent (λ max), and the muscular contributions to spine rotational stiffness can provide pertinent information regarding the neuromuscular control of the spine during movement tasks. The primary goal of the present study was to assess if experimental capsaicin-induced low back pain (LBP) affects spine stability and the neuromuscular control of repetitive trunk movements in a group of healthy participants with no history of LBP. Fourteen healthy males were recruited for this investigation. Each participant was asked to complete three trials (baseline, in pain, and recovery) of 35 cycles of a repetitive trunk flexion/extension task at a rate of 0.25 Hz. Local dynamic stability and the muscular contributions to lumbar spine rotational stiffness were significantly impaired during the LBP trial compared to the baseline trial (p < 0.05); however, there was a trend for these measures to recover after a 1 h rest. This study provides evidence that capsaicin can effectively induce LBP, thereby altering spine rotational stiffness and local dynamic stability. Future research should directly compare the effects capsaicin-induced LBP and intramuscular/intraligamentous induced LBP on these same variables. PMID:25663629

  2. An upper-body can improve the stability and efficiency of passive dynamic walking.

    PubMed

    Chyou, T; Liddell, G F; Paulin, M G

    2011-09-21

    The compass-gait walker proposed by McGeer can walk down a shallow slope with a self-stabilizing gait that requires no actuation or control. However, as the slope goes to zero so does the walking speed, and dynamic gait stability is only possible over a very narrow range of slopes. Gomes and Ruina have results demonstrating that by adding a torso to the compass-gait walker, it can walk passively on level-ground with a non-infinitesimal constant average speed. However, the gait involves exaggerated joint movements, and for energetic reasons horizontal passive dynamic walking cannot be stable. We show in this research that in addition to collision-free walking, adding a torso improves stability and walking speed when walking downhill. Furthermore, adding arms to the torso results in a collision-free periodic gait with natural-looking torso and limb movements. Overall, in contrast to the suggestions that active control may be needed to balance an upper-body on legs, it turns out that the upper and lower bodies can be integrated to improve the stability, efficiency and speed of a passive dynamic walker. PMID:21740916

  3. Filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization in Drosophila visual circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Mehmet Neset; Langen, Marion; Hassan, Bassem A; Hiesinger, P Robin

    2015-01-01

    Filopodial dynamics are thought to control growth cone guidance, but the types and roles of growth cone dynamics underlying neural circuit assembly in a living brain are largely unknown. To address this issue, we have developed long-term, continuous, fast and high-resolution imaging of growth cone dynamics from axon growth to synapse formation in cultured Drosophila brains. Using R7 photoreceptor neurons as a model we show that >90% of the growth cone filopodia exhibit fast, stochastic dynamics that persist despite ongoing stepwise layer formation. Correspondingly, R7 growth cones stabilize early and change their final position by passive dislocation. N-Cadherin controls both fast filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization. Surprisingly, loss of N-Cadherin causes no primary targeting defects, but destabilizes R7 growth cones to jump between correct and incorrect layers. Hence, growth cone dynamics can influence wiring specificity without a direct role in target recognition and implement simple rules during circuit assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10721.001 PMID:26512889

  4. Local Dynamic Stability Assessment of Motion Impaired Elderly Using Electronic Textile Pants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Lockhart, Thurmon E; Jones, Mark; Martin, Tom

    2008-10-01

    A clear association has been demonstrated between gait stability and falls in the elderly. Integration of wearable computing and human dynamic stability measures into home automation systems may help differentiate fall-prone individuals in a residential environment. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the capability of a pair of electronic textile (e-textile) pants system to assess local dynamic stability and to differentiate motion-impaired elderly from their healthy counterparts. A pair of e-textile pants comprised of numerous e-TAGs at locations corresponding to lower extremity joints was developed to collect acceleration, angular velocity and piezoelectric data. Four motion-impaired elderly together with nine healthy individuals (both young and old) participated in treadmill walking with a motion capture system simultaneously collecting kinematic data. Local dynamic stability, characterized by maximum Lyapunov exponent, was computed based on vertical acceleration and angular velocity at lower extremity joints for the measurements from both e-textile and motion capture systems. Results indicated that the motion-impaired elderly had significantly higher maximum Lyapunov exponents (computed from vertical acceleration data) than healthy individuals at the right ankle and hip joints. In addition, maximum Lyapunov exponents assessed by the motion capture system were found to be significantly higher than those assessed by the e-textile system. Despite the difference between these measurement techniques, attaching accelerometers at the ankle and hip joints was shown to be an effective sensor configuration. It was concluded that the e-textile pants system, via dynamic stability assessment, has the potential to identify motion-impaired elderly. PMID:20953265

  5. Contributors to Enhanced CO2 Electroreduction Activity and Stability in a Nanostructured Au Electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haeri; Jeon, Hyo Sang; Jee, Michael Shincheon; Nursanto, Eduardus Budi; Singh, Jitendra Pal; Chae, Keunhwa; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Min, Byoung Koun

    2016-08-23

    The formation of a nanostructure is a popular strategy for catalyst applications because it can generate new surfaces that can significantly improve the catalytic activity and durability of the catalysts. However, the increase in the surface area resulting from nanostructuring does not fully explain the substantial improvement in the catalytic properties of the CO2 electroreduction reaction, and the underlying mechanisms have not yet been fully understood. Here, based on a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Kelvin probe force microscopy, we observed a contracted Au-Au bond length and low work function with the nanostructured Au surface that had enhanced catalytic activity for electrochemical CO2 reduction. The results may improve the understanding of the enhanced stability of the nanostructured Au electrode based on the resistance of cation adhesion during the CO2 reduction reaction. PMID:27466025

  6. Treatment of a patient with posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) with chiropractic manipulation and Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS): A case report

    PubMed Central

    Francio, Vinicius T.; Boesch, Ron; Tunning, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative syndrome which unusual symptoms include deficits of balance, bodily orientation, chronic pain syndrome and dysfunctional motor patterns. Current research provides minimal guidance on support, education and recommended evidence-based patient care. This case reports the utilization of chiropractic spinal manipulation, dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS), and other adjunctive procedures along with medical treatment of PCA. Clinical features: A 54-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with non-specific back pain associated with visual disturbances, slight memory loss, and inappropriate cognitive motor control. After physical examination, brain MRI and PET scan, the diagnosis of PCA was recognized. Intervention and Outcome: Chiropractic spinal manipulation and dynamic neuromuscular stabilization were utilized as adjunctive care to conservative pharmacological treatment of PCA. Outcome measurements showed a 60% improvement in the patient’s perception of health with restored functional neuromuscular pattern, improvements in locomotion, posture, pain control, mood, tolerance to activities of daily living (ADLs) and overall satisfactory progress in quality of life. Yet, no changes on memory loss progression, visual space orientation, and speech were observed. Conclusion: PCA is a progressive and debilitating condition. Because of poor awareness of PCA by physicians, patients usually receive incomplete care. Additional efforts must be centered on the musculoskeletal features of PCA, aiming enhancement in quality of life and functional improvements (FI). Adjunctive rehabilitative treatment is considered essential for individuals with cognitive and motor disturbances, and manual medicine procedures may be consider a viable option. PMID:25729084

  7. Design and Testing of a Pulsatile Conditioning System for Dynamic Endothelialization of Polyphenol-Stabilized Tissue Engineered Heart Valves

    PubMed Central

    Sierad, Leslie Neil; Simionescu, Agneta; Albers, Christopher; Chen, Joseph; Maivelett, Jordan; Tedder, Mary Elizabeth; Liao, Jun; Simionescu, Dan T.

    2011-01-01

    Heart valve tissue engineering requires biocompatible and hemocompatible scaffolds that undergo remodeling and repopulation, but that also withstand harsh mechanical forces immediately following implantation. We hypothesized that reversibly stabilized acellular porcine valves, seeded with endothelial cells and conditioned in pulsatile bioreactors would pave the way for next generations of tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs). A novel valve conditioning system was first designed, manufactured and tested to adequately assess TEHVs. The bioreactor created proper closing and opening of valves and allowed for multiple mounting methods in sterile conditions. Porcine aortic heart valve roots were decellularized by chemical extractions and treated with penta-galloyl glucose (PGG) for stabilization. Properties of the novel scaffolds were evaluated by testing resistance to collagenase and elastase, biaxial mechanical analysis, and thermal denaturation profiles. Porcine aortic endothelial cells were seeded onto the leaflets and whole aortic roots were mounted within the dynamic pulsatile heart valve bioreactor system under physiologic pulmonary valve pressures and analyzed after 17 days for cell viability, morphology, and metabolic activity. Our tissue preparation methods effectively removed cells, including the potent α-Gal antigen, while leaving a well preserved extra-cellular matrix scaffold with adequate mechanical properties. PGG enhanced stabilization of extracellular matrix components but also showed the ability to be reversible. Engineered valve scaffolds encouraged attachment and survival of endothelial cells for extended periods and showed signs of widespread cell coverage after conditioning. Our novel approach shows promise toward development of sturdy and durable TEHVs capable of remodeling and cellular repopulation. PMID:21340043

  8. Dynamic trunk stabilization: a conceptual back injury prevention program for volleyball athletes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chad E; Nyland, John; Caudill, Paul; Brosky, Joseph; Caborn, David N M

    2008-11-01

    The sport of volleyball creates considerable dynamic trunk stability demands. Back injury occurs all too frequently in volleyball, particularly among female athletes. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to review functional anatomy, muscle coactivation strategies, assessment of trunk muscle performance, and the characteristics of effective exercises for the trunk or core. From this information, a conceptual progressive 3-phase volleyball-specific training program is presented to improve dynamic trunk stability and to potentially reduce the incidence of back injury among volleyball athletes. Phase 1 addresses low-velocity motor control, kinesthetic awareness, and endurance, with the clinician providing cues to teach achievement of biomechanically neutral spine alignment. Phase 2 focuses on progressively higher velocity dynamic multiplanar endurance, coordination, and strength-power challenges integrating upper and lower extremity movements, while maintaining neutral spine alignment. Phase 3 integrates volleyball-specific skill simulations by breaking down composite movement patterns into their component parts, with differing dynamic trunk stability requirements, while maintaining neutral spine alignment. Prospective research is needed to validate the efficacy of this program. PMID:18978452

  9. Dynamic stability of a doubly quantized vortex in a three-dimensional condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundh, Emil; Nilsen, Halvor M.

    2006-12-01

    The Bogoliubov equations are solved for a three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate containing a doubly quantized vortex, trapped in a harmonic potential. Complex frequencies, signifying dynamical instability, are found for certain ranges of parameter values. The existence of alternating windows of stability and instability, respectively, is explained qualitatively and quantitatively using variational calculus and direct numerical solutions. It is seen that the windows of stability disappear in the limit of a cigar-shaped condensate, which is consistent with recent experimental results on the lifetime of a doubly quantized vortex in that regime.

  10. Dynamical behaviour of three-way throttle valve with pressure gradient stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašina, Martin; Hružík, Lumír; Bureček, Adam; Sikora, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Three-way throttle valves with pressure gradient stabilization are used in order to ensure constant flow independently of load changes of hydraulic motors in hydraulic systems. These valves are used to vibration damping in hydraulic systems too. For this reason, it is suitable to install the valves close to hydraulic motors. The valves also have a positive influence on an increasing of system eigenfrequency. The paper deals with investigation of dynamical behaviour and eigenfrequency of a three-way throttle valve with pressure gradient stabilization in consequence of transient changes.

  11. Classical linear-control analysis applied to business-cycle dynamics and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Linear control analysis is applied as an aid in understanding the fluctuations of business cycles in the past, and to examine monetary policies that might improve stabilization. The analysis shows how different policies change the frequency and damping of the economic system dynamics, and how they modify the amplitude of the fluctuations that are caused by random disturbances. Examples are used to show how policy feedbacks and policy lags can be incorporated, and how different monetary strategies for stabilization can be analytically compared. Representative numerical results are used to illustrate the main points.

  12. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, S; Mishra, S; Behera, R; Poornima; Dasgupta, K

    2015-06-01

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz(1/2) @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity. PMID:26133825

  13. An atomic magnetometer with autonomous frequency stabilization and large dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S. E-mail: pradhans75@gmail.com; Poornima,; Dasgupta, K.; Mishra, S.; Behera, R.

    2015-06-15

    The operation of a highly sensitive atomic magnetometer using elliptically polarized resonant light is demonstrated. It is based on measurement of zero magnetic field resonance in degenerate two level systems using polarimetric detection. The transmitted light through the polarimeter is used for laser frequency stabilization, whereas reflected light is used for magnetic field measurement. Thus, the experimental geometry allows autonomous frequency stabilization of the laser frequency leading to compact operation of the overall device and has a preliminary sensitivity of <10 pT/Hz{sup 1/2} @ 1 Hz. Additionally, the dynamic range of the device is improved by feedback controlling the bias magnetic field without compromising on its sensitivity.

  14. Dynamic stability of a doubly quantized vortex in a three-dimensional condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, Emil; Nilsen, Halvor M.

    2006-12-15

    The Bogoliubov equations are solved for a three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate containing a doubly quantized vortex, trapped in a harmonic potential. Complex frequencies, signifying dynamical instability, are found for certain ranges of parameter values. The existence of alternating windows of stability and instability, respectively, is explained qualitatively and quantitatively using variational calculus and direct numerical solutions. It is seen that the windows of stability disappear in the limit of a cigar-shaped condensate, which is consistent with recent experimental results on the lifetime of a doubly quantized vortex in that regime.

  15. Analysis of a stability valve system for extending the dynamic range of a supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. A., Jr.; Dustin, M. O.

    1975-01-01

    A stability valve system designed for a full-scale, flight, supersonic, mixed-compression inlet was modeled dynamically by using analog computer techniques. The system uses poppet valves mounted in the inlet cowl to bypass airflow and augments the inlet shock position control system by preventing unstarts caused by high-frequency perturbations. The model was used as a design aid to investigate the effects of varying both the physical configurations of the valve and the flight and wind tunnel conditions. Results of the analysis indicate that the stability valve will provide a bandpass operation of 1 hertz to 17 hertz.

  16. Enhanced Stability and Knockdown Efficiency of Poly(ethylene glycol)- polyphosphoramidate/siRNA Micellar Nanoparticles by Co-condensation with Sodium Triphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yong; Shyam, Rishab; Wong, Philip; Mao, Hai Quan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles are a promis ing vehicle for siRNA delivery but suffer from low stability under physiological conditions. An effective stabilization meth od is essential for the success of polycationic nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery. In this study, sodium triphosphate (TPP), an ionic crosslinking agent, is used to stabilize siRNA containing nanoparticles by co condensation. Methods siRNA and TPP were co encapsulated into a block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol) b polyphosphoramidate (PEG b PPA), to form ternary nanoparticles. Physicochemical characterization was performed by dynamic light scattering and gel electrophoresis. Gene silencing efficiency in cell lines was assessed by dual luciferase assay system. Results The PEG b PPA/siRNA/TPP ternary nanoparticles exhibited high uniformity with smaller size (80 100 nm) compared with PEG b PPA/siRNA nanoparticles and showed increased stability in physiological ionic strength and serum containing medium, due to the stabilization effect from ionic crosslinks between negatively charged TPP and cationic PPA segment. Transfection and gene silencing efficiency of the TPP crosslinked nanoparticles were markedly improved over PEG b PPA/siRNA complexes in serum containing medium. No significant difference in cell viability was observed between nanoparticles prepared with and without TPP co condensation. Conclusions These results demonstrated the effectiveness of TPP co condensation in compacting polycation/siRNA nano particles, improving nanoparticle stability and enhancing the transfection and knockdown efficiency in serum containing medium. PMID:21387148

  17. ON THE INTERNAL DYNAMICS OF STARLESS CORES: STABILITY OF STARLESS CORES WITH INTERNAL MOTIONS AND COLLAPSE DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Young Min; Shirley, Yancy L.; Hong, Seung Soo

    2013-05-20

    In order to understand the collapse dynamics of observed low-mass starless cores, we revise the conventional stability condition of hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert spheres to take internal motions into account. Because observed starless cores resemble Bonnor-Ebert density structures, the stability and dynamics of the starless cores are frequently analyzed by comparing to the conventional stability condition of a hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert sphere. However, starless cores are not hydrostatic but have observed internal motions. In this study, we take gaseous spheres with a homologous internal velocity field and derive stability conditions of the spheres utilizing a virial analysis. We propose two limiting models of spontaneous gravitational collapse: the collapse of critical Bonnor-Ebert spheres and uniform density spheres. The collapse of these two limiting models is intended to provide the lower and the upper limits, respectively, of the infall speeds for a given density structure. The results of our study suggest that the stability condition sensitively depends on internal motions. A homologous inward motion with a transonic speed can reduce the critical size compared to the static Bonnor-Ebert sphere by more than a factor of two. As an application of the two limiting models of spontaneous gravitational collapse, we compare the density structures and infall speeds of the observed starless cores L63, L1544, L1689B, and L694-2 to the two limiting models. L1689B and L694-2 seem to have been perturbed to result in faster infall motions than for spontaneous gravitational collapse.

  18. Enhancing stability of octahedral PtNi nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction by halide treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juhyuk; Lee, Youhan; Kim, Jihan; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-03-01

    Because a reduction in the amount of Pt catalysts is essential for the commercialization of fuel cells, various approaches have been tested to maximize the mass activity of Pt-based catalysts. Among these, the most successful results so far were obtained using shaped PtNi alloy nanoparticles, preferably with PtNi(111) facets. However, these nanoparticles typically suffer from much lower activity after the durability tests due to the leaching out of the surface Ni during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which leads to the disappearance of the activity-enhancing effect caused by electronic structure modification. Here, we showed that halide treatment of the octahedral PtNi nanoparticles could significantly enhance their durability. Halides are adsorbed on surface Ni more strongly than on surface Pt, and the surface halides are found to preserve the surface Ni that induces the ORR activity enhancement. Especially, Br can preserve the surface Ni effectively. Durability testing by repeating cyclic voltammetry 10,000 times in the 0.6-1.1 V range showed that the mass activity decreased by 52.6% for the as-prepared PtNi octahedral nanoparticles, whereas the mass activity decreased by only 15.0% for the Br-treated PtNi nanoparticles. The simple treatment significantly enhanced the long-term stability of the highly active PtNi alloy nano-octahedra.

  19. Geometrical Effects in Plasma Stability and Dynamics of Coherent Structures in the Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D D; Cohen, R H

    2007-05-16

    Plasma dynamics in the divertor region is strongly affected by a variety of phenomena associated with the magnetic field geometry and the shape of the divertor plates. One of the most universal effects is the squeezing of a normal cross-section of a thin magnetic flux-tube on its way from the divertor plate to the main SOL. It leads to decoupling of the most unstable perturbations in the divertor legs from those in the main SOL. For perturbations on either side of the X-point, this effect can be cast as a boundary condition at some 'control surface' situated near the X-point. We discuss several boundary conditions proposed thus far and assess the influence of the magnetic field geometry on them. Another set of geometrical effects is related to the transformation of a flux-tube that occurs when it is displaced in such a way that its central magnetic field line coincides with some other field line, and the magnetic field is not perturbed. These flute-like displacements are of a particular interest for the low-beta edge plasmas. It turns out that this transformation may also lead to a considerable deformation of a flux-tube cross-section; in addition, the distance between plasma particles occupying the flux-tube may change significantly even if there is no parallel plasma motion. We present expressions describing aforementioned transformations for the general tokamak geometry and simplify them for the divertor region (using the proximity of the X-point). We also discuss the effects associated with the shape of the plasma-limiting surfaces, both those designed to intercept the plasma (like divertor plates and limiters) and those that can be hit in some 'abnormal' events, e.g., in the course of a radial motion of an isolated plasma filament. The orientation of the limiting surface with respect to the magnetic field affects the plasma dynamics via the sheath boundary conditions. One can enhance or suppress plasma instabilities in the divertor legs by tilting the divertor

  20. Self aligning electron beam gun having enhanced thermal and mechanical stability

    DOEpatents

    Scarpetti, R.D. Jr.; Parkison, C.D.; Switzer, V.A.; Lee, Y.J.; Sawyer, W.C.

    1995-05-16

    A compact, high power electron gun is disclosed having enhanced thermal and mechanical stability which incorporates a mechanically coupled, self aligning structure for the anode and cathode. The enhanced stability, and reduced need for realignment of the cathode to the anode and downstream optics during operation are achieved by use of a common support structure for the cathode and anode which requires no adjustment screws or spacers. The electron gun of the present invention also incorporates a modular design for the cathode, in which the electron emitter, its support structure, and the hardware required to attach the emitter assembly to the rest of the gun are a single element. This modular design makes replacement of the emitter simpler and requires no realignment after a new emitter has been installed. Compactness and a reduction in the possibility of high voltage breakdown are achieved by shielding the ``triple point`` where the electrode, insulator, and vacuum meet. The use of electric discharge machining (EDM) for fabricating the emitter allows for the accurate machining of the emitter into intricate shapes without encountering the normal stresses developed by standard emitter fabrication techniques. 12 Figs.