Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic stability enhancement

  1. Protein stabilizer, NDSB-195, enhances the dynamics of the β4 -α2 loop of ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haimei; Hosoda, Kazuo; Ishii, Takeshi; Arai, Ryo; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Terawaki, Shin-Ichi; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2016-03-01

    Non-detergent sulfobetaines (NDSBs) are a new group of small, synthetic protein stabilizers, which have advantages over classical compatible osmolytes, such as polyol, amines, and amino acids: they do not increase solution viscosity, unlike polyols, and they are zwitterionic at all pH ranges, unlike amines and amino acids. NDSBs also facilitate the crystallization and refolding of proteins. The mechanism whereby NDSBs exhibit such activities, however, remains elusive. To gain insight into this mechanism, we studied, using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), the effects of dimethylethylammonium propane sulfonate (NDSB-195) on the dynamics of ubiquitin, on which a wealth of information has been accumulated. By analyzing the line width of amide proton resonances and the transverse relaxation rates of nitrogen atoms, we found that NDSB-195 enhances the microsecond-millisecond dynamics of a β4 -α2 loop of ubiquitin. Although those compounds that enhance protein dynamics are generally considered to destabilize protein molecules, NDSB-195 enhanced the stability of ubiquitin against guanidium chloride denaturation. Thus, the simultaneous enhancement of stability and flexibility by a single compound can be attained. PMID:26856691

  2. Enhancement of amorphous celecoxib stability by mixing it with octaacetylmaltose: the molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Grzybowska, K; Paluch, M; Wlodarczyk, P; Grzybowski, A; Kaminski, K; Hawelek, L; Zakowiecki, D; Kasprzycka, A; Jankowska-Sumara, I

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel way of stabilization of amorphous celecoxib (CEL) against recrystallization by preparing binary amorphous celecoxib-octaacetylmaltose (CEL-acMAL) systems by quench-cooling of the molten phase. As far as we know this is the first application of carbohydrate derivatives with acetate groups to enhance the stability of an amorphous drug. We found that CEL in the amorphous mixture with acMAL is characterized by a much better solubility than pure CEL. We report very promising results of the long-term measurements of stability of the CEL-acMAL binary amorphous system with small amount of stabilizer during its storage at room temperature. Moreover, we examined the effect of adding acMAL on molecular dynamics of CEL in the wide temperature range in both the supercooled liquid and glassy states. We found that the molecular mobility of the mixture of CEL with 10 wt % acMAL in the glassy state is much more limited than that in the case of pure CEL, which correlates with the better stability of the amorphous binary system. By dielectric measurements and theoretical calculations within the framework of density functional theory (DFT), we studied the role of acMAL in enhancing the stability of amorphous CEL in mixtures and postulated which interactions between CEL and acMAL molecules can be responsible for preventing devitrification. PMID:22384922

  3. Delay and noise induced regime shift and enhanced stability in gene expression dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Chunhua; Zhou, Guoqiong; Han, Qinglin; Tian, Dong; Zhang, Huili

    2014-12-01

    A quantitative model of autoregulatory gene expression involving a single gene with time delays and cross-correlated noise sources is investigated. The probability density and mean first passage time (MFPT) of the protein concentration are obtained. The impacts of multiplicative (σM) and additive (σA) noise intensities, cross-correlation intensity λ between two noises, time delays τ in the degradation process and θ in the synthesis process and time delay β in both processes on the probability density and MFPT of the regime shifts between high and low protein concentration states are discussed, respectively. These results indicate that (i) the regime shifts from a high (or low) protein concentration state to a low (or high) one can be induced by σM, λ and θ (or σA and β) (ii) the MFPT as a function of the noise intensity σM or σA exhibits one maximum value in the case of λ > 0 or θ > 0, this maximum is a signature of the noise's enhanced stability phenomenon for high protein concentration state; and (iii) τ and β can weaken the stability of high protein concentration state but, in contrast, λ and θ can enhance it in the gene expression dynamics.

  4. Silver-mediated base pairings: towards dynamic DNA nanostructures with enhanced chemical and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal and chemical fragility of DNA nanomaterials assembled by Watson–Crick (WC) pairing constrain the settings in which these materials can be used and how they can be functionalized. Here we investigate use of the silver cation, Ag+, as an agent for more robust, metal-mediated self-assembly, focusing on the simplest duplex building blocks that would be required for more elaborate Ag+–DNA nanostructures. Our studies of Ag+-induced assembly of non-complementary DNA oligomers employ strands of 2–24 bases, with varied base compositions, and use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to determine product compositions. High yields of duplex products containing narrowly distributed numbers of Ag+ can be achieved by optimizing solution conditions. These Ag+-mediated duplexes are stable to at least 60 mM Mg2+, higher than is necessary for WC nanotechnology schemes such as tile assemblies and DNA origami, indicating that sequential stages of Ag+-mediated and WC-mediated assembly may be feasible. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests simple helical structures for Ag+-mediated duplexes with lengths to at least 20 base pairs, and further indicates that the structure of cytosine-rich duplexes is preserved at high urea concentrations. We therefore propose an approach towards dynamic DNA nanomaterials with enhanced thermal and chemical stability through designs that combine sturdy silver-mediated ‘frames’ with WC paired ‘pictures’.

  5. Noises- and delay-enhanced stability in a bistable dynamical system describing chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Chun; Han, Qinglin; Zeng, Chun-Hua; Wang, Hua; Tian, Dong; Long, Fei

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the Schlögl model with time-delayed feedback to study the switching behavior of a bistable chemical reaction system in the presence of cross-correlated multiplicative and additive noise sources. Our results show that (i) the multiplicative noise (or additive noise) can induce the switch from high (or low) concentration state to low (or high) concentration one; (ii) the mean first passage time (MFPT) of switch from high concentration state to the low concentration one as functions of the noise strengths exhibits a maximum, which is the signature of the noise enhanced stability (NES) phenomenon for the high concentration state; and (iii) as the value of cross-correlation strength λ, time delay τ, or strength K of the feedback loop increases, the maximum in the MFPT increases, i.e., λ, τ, or K can enhance stability of the high concentration state.

  6. End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Winiarski, D.W.; Donnelly, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.

  7. Dynamic stabilization of a bistable suspension system attached to a flexible host structure for operational safety enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Harne, R. L.; Wang, K. W.; Huang, Hai

    2014-12-01

    In engineering applications, a suspension system may be attached to a flexible host structure, e.g. spacecraft truss, to provide vibration isolation for sensitive instrumentation, where the suspension and host structure dynamics are strongly coupled. For linear suspensions, a resonance normally occurs adjacent to the roll-off frequency band, which significantly and detrimentally amplifies vibration transmission. To avoid the adverse resonance for operational safety enhancement, this research proposes a nonlinear bistable suspension and evaluates its performance when attached to a flexible host structure. Dynamic models of the bistable and comparable linear suspensions attached to the host structure are formulated, and steady-state responses are predicted using analytical and numerical methods. Results show that the bistable suspension can eliminate the harmful resonance via a dynamic stabilization phenomenon, and simultaneously retains the favorable isolation performance in the roll-off bandwidth as compared to the linear suspension. Series of experimental investigations support the analytical and numerical findings and help define design guidelines for operational safety improvement.

  8. Enhanced rotor modeling tailored for rub dynamic stability analysis and simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    New methods are presented that allow straightforward application of complex nonlinearities to finite element based rotor dynamic analyses. The key features are: (1) the methods can be implemented with existing finite element or dynamic simulation programs, (2) formulation is general for simple application to a wide range of problems, and (3) implementation is simplified because nonlinear aspects are separated from the linear part of the model. The new techniques are illustrated with examples of inertial nonlinearity and torquewhirl which can be important in rubbing turbomachinery. The sample analyses provide new understanding of these nonlinearities which are discussed.

  9. Dynamically stabilized magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Iacocca, E.; Awad, A. A.; Dumas, R. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Braun, H. B.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically non-trivial spin textures that manifest themselves as quasiparticles in ferromagnetic thin films or noncentrosymmetric bulk materials. So far attention has focused on skyrmions stabilized either by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) or by dipolar interaction, where in the latter case the excitations are known as bubble skyrmions. Here we demonstrate the existence of a dynamically stabilized skyrmion, which exists even when dipolar interactions and DMI are absent. We establish how such dynamic skyrmions can be nucleated, sustained and manipulated in an effectively lossless medium under a nanocontact. As quasiparticles, they can be transported between two nanocontacts in a nanowire, even in complete absence of DMI. Conversely, in the presence of DMI, we observe that the dynamical skyrmion experiences strong breathing. All of this points towards a wide range of skyrmion manipulation, which can be studied in a much wider class of materials than considered so far. PMID:26351104

  10. Enhancement of Transient Stability Limit and Voltage Regulation with Dynamic Loads Using Robust Excitation Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Jahangir; Mahmud, Apel; Roy, Naruttam K.; Pota, Hemanshu R.

    2013-10-01

    In stressed power systems with large induction machine component, there exist undamped electromechanical modes and unstable monotonic voltage modes. This article proposes a sequential design of an excitation controller and a power system stabiliser (PSS) to stabilise the system. The operating region, with induction machines in stressed power systems, is often not captured using a linearisation around an operating point, and to alleviate this situation a robust controller is designed which guarantees stable operation in a large region of operation. A minimax linear quadratic Gaussian design is used for the design of the supplementary control to automatic voltage regulators, and a classical PSS structure is used to damp electromechanical oscillations. The novelty of this work is in proposing a method to capture the unmodelled nonlinear dynamics as uncertainty in the design of the robust controller. Tight bounds on the uncertainty are obtained using this method which enables high-performance controllers. An IEEE benchmark test system has been used to demonstrate the performance of the designed controller.

  11. Dynamics simulation of soybean agglutinin (SBA) dimer reveals the impact of glycosylation on its enhanced structural stability.

    PubMed

    Halder, Swagata; Surolia, Avadhesha; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2016-06-16

    The legume lectins are widely used as a model system for studying protein-carbohydrate and protein-protein interactions. They exhibit a fascinating quaternary structure variation. Recently, it has become clear that lectins exist as oligomers. Soybean agglutinin is a tetrameric legume lectin, each of whose subunits are glycosylated. In the present study we explore the main origin for the stability of soybean agglutinin dimer. In order to understand the role of glycosylation on the dimeric interface, we have carried out normal (298K), high temperatures (380K, 500K) long explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and compared the structural and conformational changes between the glycosylated and non-glycosylated dimers. The study reveals that the high degree of stability at normal temperature is mostly contributed by interfacial ionic interactions (~200 kcal/mol) between polar residues like Lys, Arg, Asp, Thr, Ser, Asn and Gln (62%). It maintains its overall folded conformation due to high subunit interactions at the non-canonical interface. Mainly five important hydrogen bonds between CO of one β sheet of one subunit with the N-H of other β strand of the other subunit help to maintain the structural integrity. Ten inter subunit salt-bridge interactions between Arg 185-Asṕ192, Lys 163-Asṕ169, Asp 169-Lyś 163 and Asp 192-Arǵ 185 at non-canonical interface appear to be important to maintain the three dimensional structure of SBA dimer. Moreover, our simulation results revealed that increase in vibrational entropy could decrease the free energy and contribute to the glycan-induced stabilization by ~45 kcal/mol at normal temperature. PMID:27108103

  12. DYNAMIC NEUROMUSCULAR STABILIZATION & SPORTS REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    Kobesova, Alena; Kolar, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic neuromuscular (core) stability is necessary for optimal athletic performance and is not achieved purely by adequate strength of abdominals, spinal extensors, gluteals or any other musculature; rather, core stabilization is accomplished through precise coordination of these muscles and intra‐abdominal pressure regulation by the central nervous system. Understanding developmental kinesiology provides a framework to appreciate the regional interdependence and the inter‐linking of the skeleton, joints, musculature during movement and the importance of training both the dynamic and stabilizing function of muscles in the kinetic chain. The Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) approach provides functional tools to assess and activate the intrinsic spinal stabilizers in order to optimize the movement system for both pre‐habilitation and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and performance. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23439921

  13. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  14. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  15. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  16. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  17. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics. PMID:26907568

  18. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics.

  19. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study identifies basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  20. The condition for dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Hof, A L; Gazendam, M G J; Sinke, W E

    2005-01-01

    The well-known condition for standing stability in static situations is that the vertical projection of the centre of mass (CoM) should be within the base of support (BoS). On the basis of a simple inverted pendulum model, an extension of this rule is proposed for dynamical situations: the position of (the vertical projection of) the CoM plus its velocity times a factor (square root l/g) should be within the BoS, l being leg length and g the acceleration of gravity. It is proposed to name this vector quantity 'extrapolated centre of mass position' (XcoM). The definition suggests as a measure of stability the 'margin of stability' b, the minimum distance from XcoM to the boundaries of the BoS. An alternative measure is the temporal stability margin tau, the time in which the boundary of the BoS would be reached without intervention. Some experimental data of subjects standing on one or two feet, flatfoot and tiptoe, are presented to give an idea of the usual ranges of these margins of stability. Example data on walking are also presented. PMID:15519333

  1. Stabilization Strategies for Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Devjani J.; Morasso, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Background When humans are faced with an unstable task, two different stabilization mechanisms are possible: a high-stiffness strategy, based on the inherent elastic properties of muscles/tools/manipulated objects, or a low-stiffness strategy, based on an explicit positional feedback mechanism. Specific constraints related to the dynamics of the task and/or the neuromuscular system often force people to adopt one of these two strategies. Methodology/Findings This experiment was designed such that subjects could achieve stability using either strategy, with a marked difference in terms of effort and control requirements between the two strategies. The task was to balance a virtual mass in an unstable environment via two elastic linkages that connected the mass to each hand. The dynamics of the mass under the influence of the unstable force field and the forces applied through the linkages were simulated using a bimanual, planar robot. The two linkages were non-linear, with a stiffness that increased with the amount of stretch. The mass could be stabilized by stretching the linkages to achieve a stiffness that was greater than the instability coefficient of the unstable field (high-stiffness), or by balancing the mass with sequences of small force impulses (low-stiffness). The results showed that 62% of the subjects quickly adopted the high-stiffness strategy, with stiffness ellipses that were aligned along the direction of instability. The remaining subjects applied the low-stiffness strategy, with no clear preference for the orientation of the stiffness ellipse. Conclusions The choice of a strategy was based on the bimanual coordination of the hands: high-stiffness subjects achieved stability quickly by separating the hands to stretch the linkages, while the low-stiffness subjects kept the hands close together and took longer to achieve stability but with lower effort. We suggest that the existence of multiple solutions leads to different types of skilled behavior

  2. Stabilization strategies for unstable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; De Santis, Dalia; Nomura, Taishin; Rea, Francesco; Zenzeri, Jacopo

    2014-12-01

    The stabilization of the human standing posture was originally attributed to the stiffness of the ankle muscles but direct measurements of the ankle stiffness ruled out this hypothesis, leaving open the possibility for a feedback stabilization strategy driven by proprioceptive signals. This solution, however, could be implemented with two different kinds of control mechanisms, namely continuous or intermittent feedback. The debate is now settled and the latter solution seems to be the most plausible one. Moreover, stabilization of unstable dynamics is not limited to bipedal standing. Indeed many manipulation tasks can be described in the same framework and thus a very general protocol for addressing this kind of problems is the use of haptic virtual reality where instability is generated by some kind of divergent or saddle-like force field. Several studies demonstrated that human subjects can choose to adopt a stiffness or feedback strategy as a combination of biomechanical and task constraints and can learn to switch from one strategy to the other if it is feasible or to use one or the other is infeasible. Understanding such mechanisms is relevant, for example, for the design of novel ergonomic man-machine interfaces in difficult, unstable tasks. PMID:25453479

  3. Enhancement of calcium signalling dynamics and stability by delayed modulation of the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Diana M; Hoth, Markus; Lewis, Richard S

    2002-01-01

    In addition to its homeostatic role of maintaining low resting levels of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase (PMCA) may actively contribute to the generation of complex Ca2+ signals. We have investigated the role of the PMCA in shaping Ca2+ signals in Jurkat human leukaemic T cells using single-cell voltage-clamp and calcium-imaging techniques. Crosslinking the T-cell receptor with the monoclonal antibody OKT3 induces a biphasic elevation in [Ca2+]i consisting of a rapid overshoot to a level > 1 μM, followed by a slow decay to a plateau of ≈0.5 μM. A similar overshoot was triggered by a constant level of Ca2+ influx through calcium-release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in thapsigargin-treated cells, due to a delayed increase in the rate of Ca2+ clearance by the PMCA. Following a rise in [Ca2+]i, PMCA activity increased in two phases: a rapid increase followed by a further calcium-dependent increase of up to approximately fivefold over 10-60 s, termed modulation. After the return of [Ca2+]i to baseline levels, the PMCA recovered slowly from modulation (τ ≈4 min), effectively retaining a ‘memory’ of the previous [Ca2+]i elevation. Using a Michaelis-Menten model with appropriate corrections for cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering, we found that modulation extended the dynamic range of PMCA activity by increasing both the maximal pump rate and Ca2+ sensitivity (reduction of KM). A simple flux model shows how pump modulation and its reversal produce the initial overshoot of the biphasic [Ca2+]i response. The modulation of PMCA activity enhanced the stability of Ca2+ signalling by adjusting the efflux rate to match influx through CRAC channels, even at high [Ca2+]i levels that saturate the transport sites and would otherwise render the cell defenceless against additional Ca2+ influx. At the same time, the delay in modulation enables small Ca2+ fluxes to transiently elevate [Ca2+]i, thus enhancing Ca2+ signalling dynamics. PMID:12068047

  4. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  5. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  6. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  7. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  8. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 25.181 Section 25.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short...

  9. Stability in dynamical systems I

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Ruth, R.D.; Weng, W.T.

    1984-08-01

    We have reviewed some of the basic techniques which can be used to analyze stability in nonlinear dynamical systems, particularly in circular particle accelerators. We have concentrated on one-dimensional systems in the examples in order to simply illustrate the general techniques. We began with a review of Hamiltonian dynamics and canonical transformations. We then reviewed linear equations with periodic coefficients using the basic techniques from accelerator theory. To handle nonlinear terms we developed a canonical perturbation theory. From this we calculated invariants and the amplitude dependence of the frequency. This led us to resonances. We studied the cubic resonance in detail by using a rotating coordinate system in phase space. We then considered a general isolated nonlinear resonance. In this case we calculated the width of the resonance and estimated the spacing of resonances in order to use the Chirikov criterion to restrict the validity of the analysis. Finally the resonance equation was reduced to the pendulum equation, and we examined the motion on a separatrix. This brought us to the beginnings of stochastic behavior in the neighborhood of the separatrix. It is this complex behavior in the neighborhood of the separatrix which causes the perturbation theory used here to diverge in many cases. In spite of this the methods developed here have been and are used quite successfully to study nonlinear effects in nearly integrable systems. When used with caution and in conjunction with numerical work they give tremendous insight into the nature of the phase space structure and the stability of nonlinear differential equations. 14 references.

  10. On the dynamic stability of grasping

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, C.H.; Li, Y.F.; Ding, H.; Xiong, Y.L.

    1999-09-01

    Stability is one of the important properties that a robot hand grasp must possess to be able to perform tasks similar to those performed by human hands. This paper discusses the dynamic stability of a grasped object. To analyze the stability of grasps, the authors build the model of the dynamics of the grasped object in response to the small perturbances. Furthermore, they determine the conditions associated with the dynamic stability and discuss the effects of various factors on the grasp stability. A quantitative measure for evaluating grasps is then presented. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed theory is verified via examples.

  11. Hydrophilic Domains Enhance Nanobubble Stability.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Koji; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yutaka; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2016-05-18

    Highly stable nanoscale gas states at solid/liquid interfaces, referred to as nanobubbles, have been widely studied for over a decade. In this study, nanobubbles generated on a hydrophobic Teflon amorphous fluoroplastic thin film in the presence and absence of hydrophilic carbon domains are investigated by peak force quantitative nanomechanics. On the hydrophobic surface without hydrophilic domains, a small number of nanobubbles are generated and then rapidly decrease in size. On the hydrophobic surface with hydrophilic domains, the hydrophilic domains have a significant effect on the generation and stability of nanobubbles, with bubbles remaining on the surface for up to three days. PMID:26864857

  12. Langevin stabilization of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Jesús A.; Catarello, Daniel P.; Wozniak, Justin M.; Skeel, Robert D.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper we show the possibility of using very mild stochastic damping to stabilize long time step integrators for Newtonian molecular dynamics. More specifically, stable and accurate integrations are obtained for damping coefficients that are only a few percent of the natural decay rate of processes of interest, such as the velocity autocorrelation function. Two new multiple time stepping integrators, Langevin Molly (LM) and Brünger-Brooks-Karplus-Molly (BBK-M), are introduced in this paper. Both use the mollified impulse method for the Newtonian term. LM uses a discretization of the Langevin equation that is exact for the constant force, and BBK-M uses the popular Brünger-Brooks-Karplus integrator (BBK). These integrators, along with an extrapolative method called LN, are evaluated across a wide range of damping coefficient values. When large damping coefficients are used, as one would for the implicit modeling of solvent molecules, the method LN is superior, with LM closely following. However, with mild damping of 0.2 ps-1, LM produces the best results, allowing long time steps of 14 fs in simulations containing explicitly modeled flexible water. With BBK-M and the same damping coefficient, time steps of 12 fs are possible for the same system. Similar results are obtained for a solvated protein-DNA simulation of estrogen receptor ER with estrogen response element ERE. A parallel version of BBK-M runs nearly three times faster than the Verlet-I/r-RESPA (reversible reference system propagator algorithm) when using the largest stable time step on each one, and it also parallelizes well. The computation of diffusion coefficients for flexible water and ER/ERE shows that when mild damping of up to 0.2 ps-1 is used the dynamics are not significantly distorted.

  13. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181 Dynamic.... 31, 2012. For the convenience of the user, the revised text is set forth as follows: § 23.181...

  14. The dynamical stability of reverberatory neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Tegnér, Jesper; Compte, Albert; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2002-12-01

    The concept of reverberation proposed by Lorente de Nó and Hebb is key to understanding strongly recurrent cortical networks. In particular, synaptic reverberation is now viewed as a likely mechanism for the active maintenance of working memory in the prefrontal cortex. Theoretically, this has spurred a debate as to how such a potentially explosive mechanism can provide stable working-memory function given the synaptic and cellular mechanisms at play in the cerebral cortex. We present here new evidence for the participation of NMDA receptors in the stabilization of persistent delay activity in a biophysical network model of conductance-based neurons. We show that the stability of working-memory function, and the required NMDA/AMPA ratio at recurrent excitatory synapses, depend on physiological properties of neurons and synaptic interactions, such as the time constants of excitation and inhibition, mutual inhibition between interneurons, differential NMDA receptor participation at excitatory projections to pyramidal neurons and interneurons, or the presence of slow intrinsic ion currents in pyramidal neurons. We review other mechanisms proposed to enhance the dynamical stability of synaptically generated attractor states of a reverberatory circuit. This recent work represents a necessary and significant step towards testing attractor network models by cortical electrophysiology. PMID:12461636

  15. Rational Design of Biobetters with Enhanced Stability.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Fabienne; Schneider, Curtiss P; Agrawal, Neeraj J; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2015-08-01

    Biotherapeutics are the fastest growing class of pharmaceutical with a rapidly evolving market facing the rise of biosimilar and biobetter products. In contrast to a biosimilar, which is derived from the same gene sequence as the innovator product, a biobetter has enhanced properties, such as enhanced efficacy or reduced immunogenicity. Little work has been carried out so far to increase the intrinsic stability of biotherapeutics via sequence changes, even though, aggregation, the primary degradation pathway of proteins, leads to issues ranging from manufacturing failure to immunological response and to loss of therapeutic activity. Using our spatial aggregation propensity tool as a first step to a rational design approach to identify aggregation-prone regions, biobetters of rituximab have been produced with enhanced stability by introducing site-specific mutations. Significant stabilization against aggregation was achieved for rituximab with no decrease in its binding affinity to the antigen. PMID:26096711

  16. Hybrid Control of Electric Vehicle Lateral Dynamics Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabti, Khatir; Bourahla, Mohamend; Mostefai, Lotfi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for motion control applied to driver stability system of an electric vehicle with independently driven wheels. By formulating the vehicle dynamics using an approximating the tire-force characteristics into piecewise affine functions, the vehicle dynamics cen be described as a linear hybrid dynamical system to design a hybrid model predictive controller. This controller is expected to make the yaw rate follow the reference ensuring the safety of the car passengers. The vehicle speed is estimated using a multi-sensor data fusion method. Simulation results in Matlab/Simulink have shown that the proposed control scheme takes advantages of electric vehicle and enhances the vehicle stability.

  17. A discussion of dynamic stability measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the measurement of the dynamic stability of linear systems are discussed. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the errors in the procedures, and to methods for calculating the system damping from the data. The techniques discussed include: transient decay, moving block analysis, spectral analysis, random decrement signatures, transfer function analysis, and parameter identification methods. The special problems of rotorcraft dynamic stability testing are discussed.

  18. Compressor Stability Enhancement Using Discrete Tip Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Hathaway, Michael D.; Thorp, Scott A.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Bright, Michelle B.

    2001-01-01

    Mass injection upstream of the tip of a high-speed axial compressor rotor is a stability enhancement approach known to be effective in suppressing small in tip-critical rotors. This process is examined in a transonic axial compressor rotor through experiments and time-averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations. Measurements and simulations for discrete injection are presented for a range of injection rates and distributions of injectors around the annulus. The simulations indicate that tip injection increases stability by unloading the rotor tip and that increasing injection velocity improves the effectiveness of tip injection. For the tested rotor, experimental results demonstrate that at 70 percent speed the stalling flow coefficient can be reduced by 30 percent using an injected mass- flow equivalent to 1 percent of the annulus flow. At design speed, the stalling flow coefficient was reduced by 6 percent using an injected mass-fiow equivalent to 2 percent of the annulus flow. The experiments show that stability enhancement is related to the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip. For a given injected mass-flow, the mass-averaged axial velocity at the tip is increased by injecting flow over discrete portions of the circumference as opposed to full-annular injection. The implications of these results on the design of recirculating casing treatments and other methods to enhance stability will be discussed.

  19. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  20. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  1. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  2. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  3. Stability of Dynamical Systems with Discontinuous Motions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Anthony N.; Hou, Ling

    In this paper we present a stability theory for discontinuous dynamical systems (DDS): continuous-time systems whose motions are not necessarily continuous with respect to time. We show that this theory is not only applicable in the analysis of DDS, but also in the analysis of continuous dynamical systems (continuous-time systems whose motions are continuous with respect to time), discrete-time dynamical systems (systems whose motions are defined at discrete points in time) and hybrid dynamical systems (HDS) (systems whose descriptions involve simultaneously continuous-time and discrete-time). We show that the stability results for DDS are in general less conservative than the corresponding well-known classical Lyapunov results for continuous dynamical systems and discrete-time dynamical systems. Although the DDS stability results are applicable to general dynamical systems defined on metric spaces (divorced from any kind of description by differential equations, or any other kinds of equations), we confine ourselves to finite-dimensional dynamical systems defined by ordinary differential equations and difference equations, to make this paper as widely accessible as possible. We present only sample results, namely, results for uniform asymptotic stability in the large.

  4. Enhanced stability of a naringenin/2,6-dimethyl β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: molecular dynamics and free energy calculations based on MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA.

    PubMed

    Sangpheak, Waratchada; Khuntawee, Wasinee; Wolschann, Peter; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada

    2014-05-01

    The structure, dynamic behavior and binding affinity of the inclusion complexes between naringenin and the two cyclodextrins (CDs), β-CD and its 2,6-dimethyl derivative (DM-β-CD), were theoretically studied by multiple molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Naringenin most likely prefers to bind with CDs through the phenyl ring. Although a lower hydrogen bond formation of naringenin with the 3-hydroxyl group of DM-β-CD (relative to β-CD) was observed, the higher cavity could encapsulate almost the whole naringenin molecule. In contrast for the naringenin/β-CD complex, the phenyl ring feasibly passed through the primary rim resulting in the chromone ring binding inside instead. MM-PBSA/GBSA and QM-PBSA/GBSA binding free energies strongly suggested a greater stability of the naringenin/DM-β-CD inclusion complex. Van der Waals force played an important role as the key guest-host interaction for the complexation between naringenin and each cyclodextrin. PMID:24681901

  5. Dynamic stability experiment of Maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Chen, S.S.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on Maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents magnetic-force data obtained from both measurements and calculations. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial Maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all Maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on Maglev systems and compares their numerical simulation with predictions calculated by a nonlinear dynamic computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic system (EDS)-type vehicle model were obtained from both experimental observations and computer simulations for a five-degree-of-freedom Maglev vehicle moving on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of Maglev systems.

  6. Enhancement of stability in systems with metastable states

    SciTech Connect

    Spagnolo, B.; Augello, G.; Pizzolato, N.; Valenti, D.; Fiasconaro, A.

    2007-12-06

    The investigation of noise-induced phenomena in far from equilibrium systems is one of the approach used to understand the behaviour of physical and biological complex systems. Metastability is a generic feature of many nonlinear systems, and the problem of the lifetime of metastable states involves fundamental aspects of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The enhancement of the life-time of metastable states through the noise enhanced stability effect and the role played by the resonant activation phenomenon will be discussed in models of interdisciplinary physics: (i) Ising model (ii) Josephson junction; (iii) stochastic FitzHugh-Nagumo model; (iv) a population dynamics model, and (v) a market model with stochastic volatility.

  7. Enhanced Product Stability in the Hammerhead Ribozyme†

    PubMed Central

    Shepotinovskaya, Irina; Uhlenbeck, Olke C.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of dissociation of P1, the 5′ product of hammerhead cleavage, is 100–300-fold slower in full-length hammerheads than in hammerheads that either lack or have disrupting mutations in the loop-loop tertiary interaction. The added stability requires the presence of residue 17 at the 3′ terminus of P1 but not the 2′, 3′ terminal phosphate. Since residue 17 is buried within the catalytic core of the hammerhead in the x-ray structure, we propose that the enhanced P1 stability is the result of the cooperative folding of the hammerhead around this residue. However, since the P1 is fully stabilized above 2.5 mM MgCl2 while hammerhead activity continues to increase with increasing MgCl2, it is clear that the hammerhead structure in the transition state must differ from that of the product complex. The product stabilization assay is used to test our earlier proposal that different tertiary interactions modulate the cleavage rate by differentially stabilizing the core. PMID:20423112

  8. U31: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Electronic Stability Control

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Delorenzis, Damon; LaClair, Tim J; Lim, Alvin; Pape, Doug

    2011-01-01

    A team led by NTRCI is working to improve the roll and yaw stability of heavy duty combination trucks through developing stability algorithms, assembling demonstration hardware, and investigating robust wireless communication. Modern electronic stability control (ESC) products automatically slow a vehicle rounding a corner too quickly or apply individual brakes when necessary to improve the steering characteristics of a vehicle. Air brake systems in North America provide no electronic communication between a tractor and semitrailer, limiting the degree to which control systems can be optimized. Prior research has demonstrated stability improvements where dynamic measurements and control commands are communicated between units of a vehicle. Three related activities were undertaken: (1) Develop an algorithm for the optimum yaw and roll control of a combination vehicle. Vehicle state parameters needed to control the vehicle and the proper brake response were determined. An integrated stability control for the tractor and semitrailer requires communication between the two units. Dynamic models were used to assess the algorithm. (2) Implement the ESC algorithm in the laboratory. Hardware components suitable for the harsh environment for measurement, sensor-to-controller communication, and semitrailer-to-tractor communication and brake actuation were specified and assembled as a working system. The goal was to collect the needed vehicle state information, transmit the information to the ESC system, and then actuate the brakes in response to controller commands. (3) Develop a wireless network with the data rate and reliability necessary to communicate dynamic signals for a vehicle stability control system. Adaptive connectivity-aware, multi-hop routing was selected because it can perform in the harsh environment where packet collisions and fading often will exist. The protocol is to give high priority to urgent messages.

  9. Convection, stability, and low dimensional dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, C.R.

    1997-05-01

    Recent developments concerning the connection between notions of hydrodynamic stability{emdash}usually associated with stationary laminar flows{emdash}and dynamics, most notably turbulent fluid flows, are reviewed. Based on a technical device originally introduced by Hopf in 1941, a rigorous mathematical relationship between criteria for nonlinear energy stability and bounds on global transport by steady, unsteady, or even turbulent flows, has been established. The optimal {open_quotes}marginal stability{close_quotes} criteria for the best bound leads to a novel variational problem, and the differential operator associated with the stability condition generates an adapted basis in which turbulent flow fields may naturally be decomposed. The application and implications of Galerkin truncations in these bases to produce low dimensional dynamical systems models is discussed in the context of thermal convection in a saturated porous layer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A. S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-06-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale.

  11. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A.S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-01-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale. PMID:26083864

  12. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications. PMID:24468046

  13. Dynamic stability of electrodynamic maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on mathematical models and experimental data. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis for motion-dependent magnetic-force-induced instability developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  14. Dynamic stability experiment of Maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Rote, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares with predictions calculated by a nonlinear dynamic computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic system (EDS)-type vehicle model were obtained from both experimental observations and computer simulations for a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  15. Dynamic stabilization of an optomechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, H.; Wright, E. M.; Meystre, P.

    2014-10-01

    Quantum optomechanics offers the potential to investigate quantum effects in macroscopic quantum systems in extremely well-controlled experiments. In this paper we discuss one such situation, the dynamic stabilization of a mechanical system such as an inverted pendulum. The specific example that we study is a "membrane-in-the-middle" mechanical oscillator coupled to a cavity field via a quadratic optomechanical interaction, with cavity damping the dominant source of dissipation. We show that the mechanical oscillator can be dynamically stabilized by a temporal modulation of the radiation pressure force. We investigate the system both in the classical and quantum regimes highlighting similarities and differences.

  16. Ceramic membranes with enhanced thermal stability

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin; Bischoff, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    A method of creating a ceramic membrane with enhanced thermal stability is disclosed. The method involves combining quantities of a first metal alkoxide with a second metal, the quantities selected to give a preselected metal ratio in the resultant membrane. A limited amount of water and acid is added to the combination and stirred until a colloidal suspension is formed. The colloid is dried to a gel, and the gel is fired at a temperature greater than approximately 400.degree. C. The porosity and surface area of ceramic membranes formed by this method are not adversely affected by this high temperature firing.

  17. On dynamic stability boundaries for binary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, M. I.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic stability boundaries are developed for linear two-degree-of-freedom systems with damping and elastic couplings. Special emphasis is placed on the influence of natural frequency proximity and those instabilities which stem from skew-symmetric stiffness properties. These arise in aeroelasticity and flight dynamics systems. Insight is provided into the destabilizing effects of the 'dreaded modal resonance' which results when the two natural frequencies in the modal natural frequency ratio match or nearly match.

  18. DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES, STABILITY AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The image of a ball rolling along a series of hills and valleys is an effective heuristic by which to communicate stability concepts in ecology. However, the dynamics of this landscape model have little to do with ecological systems. Other landscape representations, however, are ...

  19. Estimating Gait Stability: Asymmetrical Loading Effects Measured Using Margin of Stability and Local Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Worden, Timothy A; Beaudette, Shawn M; Brown, Stephen H M; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    Changes to intersegmental locomotor control patterns may affect body stability. Our study aimed to (a) characterize upper body dynamic stability in response to the unilateral addition of mass to the lower extremity and (b) evaluate the efficacy of 2 different stability measures commonly used in the literature to detect resulting symmetrical step pattern modifications across the weighted segments (spatial) and between epochs of the gait cycle (temporal). Young adults walked on a treadmill while unloaded or with weights applied unilaterally to their foot, shank, or thigh. Both margin of stability and local dynamic stability (LDS) estimates detected similar trends of distal segment weighting resulting in more unstable upper body movement compared to proximal weighting; however only LDS detected anteroposterior changes in upper body stability over time. PMID:27253774

  20. Dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic response of maglev systems is important in several respects: Safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. The dynamic response of vehicles is the key element in the determination of ride quality, and vehicle stability is one of the important elements relative to safety. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, the vehicle dynamics must be understood. The trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. This paper is a summary of our previous work on dynamics, stability and control of maglev systems. First of all, the importance of dynamics of vehicle/guideway of maglev systems is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the modeling vehicle/guideway interactions of maglev systems with a multicar, or multiload vehicle traversing on a single or double-span flexible guideway. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions in wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters for maglev systems are investigated. Secondly, the alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems are investigated in this study to achieve safe, stable operation and acceptable ride comfort requires some form of vehicle motion control. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. Finally, this paper discusses the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  1. Dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-06-01

    The dynamic response of maglev systems is important in several respects: Safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. The dynamic response of vehicles is the key element in the determination of ride quality, and vehicle stability is one of the important elements relative to safety. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, the vehicle dynamics must be understood. The trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. This paper is a summary of our previous work on dynamics, stability and control of maglev systems. First of all, the importance of dynamics of vehicle/guideway of maglev systems is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the modeling vehicle/guideway interactions of maglev systems with a multicar, or multiload vehicle traversing on a single or double-span flexible guideway. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions in wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters for maglev systems are investigated. Secondly, the alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems are investigated in this study to achieve safe, stable operation and acceptable ride comfort requires some form of vehicle motion control. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. Finally, this paper discusses the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  2. Photovoltaic panel having enhanced conversion efficiency stability

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, V. D.

    1985-10-01

    A photovoltaic panel for converting light into electrical energy has enhanced energy conversion efficiency stability. The panel includes a photovoltaic device having an active region formed from a semiconductor material which exhibits an energy conversion efficiency stability directly related to the operating temperature of the device. The panel also includes means for maintaining the operating temperature of the device upon exposure to light at an elevated temperature above the ambient temperature external to the device. The active region semiconductor material is preferably an amorphous semiconductor alloy such as, for example, an amorphous silicon alloy. The operating temperature elevating means can include a thermal insulating material such as glass wool, styrofoam, or cork applied to the back side of the device to minimize heat conduction from the device. The panel can also include an enclosure for enclosing the device having a transparent cover overlying the device to seal the enclosure and provide a still air space adjacent the device. The panel is thereby arranged to maintain the operating temperature of the device at a temperature which is from about twenty degrees Centigrade to about one hundred and fifty degrees Centigrade above the ambient temperature external to the device.

  3. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the 'thinnest site' of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most 'dangerous' direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  4. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the ‘thinnest site’ of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most ‘dangerous’ direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  5. Stability, complexity and robustness in population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Demongeot, J; Hazgui, H; Ben Amor, H; Waku, J

    2014-09-01

    The problem of stability in population dynamics concerns many domains of application in demography, biology, mechanics and mathematics. The problem is highly generic and independent of the population considered (human, animals, molecules,…). We give in this paper some examples of population dynamics concerning nucleic acids interacting through direct nucleic binding with small or cyclic RNAs acting on mRNAs or tRNAs as translation factors or through protein complexes expressed by genes and linked to DNA as transcription factors. The networks made of these interactions between nucleic acids (considered respectively as edges and nodes of their interaction graph) are complex, but exhibit simple emergent asymptotic behaviours, when time tends to infinity, called attractors. We show that the quantity called attractor entropy plays a crucial role in the study of the stability and robustness of such genetic networks. PMID:25107273

  6. Parachute Dynamic Stability Variations Due to Atmospheric Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, J. M.; Braun, R. D.; Clark, I. G.

    2014-06-01

    Apparent inertia effects on parachute dynamics are investigated. Both static and dynamic stability are examined as a function of apparent inertia parameters. Conclusions are drawn describing changes in stability based on atmospheric density.

  7. Dynamics and stability of pipes conveying fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.O. . Inst. of Applied Mechanics); Chen, K.C. )

    1994-02-01

    This paper deals with the dynamics and stability of simply supported pipes conveying fluid, where the fluid has a small harmonic component of flow velocity superposed on a constant mean value. The perturbation techniques and the method of averaging are used to convert the nonautonomous system into an autonomous one and determine the stability boundaries. Post-bifurcation analysis is performed for the parametric points in the resonant regions where the axial force, which is induced by the transverse motion of the pipe due to the fixed-span ends and contributes nonlinearities to the equations of motion, is included. For the undamped system, linear analysis is inconclusive about stability and there does not exist nontrivial solution in the resonant regions. For the damped system, it is found that the original stable system remains stable when the pulsating frequency increased cross the stability boundary and becomes unstable when the pulsating frequency decreases across the stability boundary. Practical applications of such a problem are vibrations of heat exchangers, liquid-fuel rocket piping, and nuclear reactor coolant channels.

  8. Dynamic flight stability of a model dronefly in vertical flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chong; Sun, Mao

    2014-12-01

    The dynamic flight stability of a model dronefly in hovering and upward flight is studied. The method of computational fluid dynamics is used to compute the stability derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector used to solve the equations of motion. The major finding is as following. Hovering flight of the model dronefly is unstable because of the existence of an unstable longitudinal and an unstable lateral natural mode of motion. Upward flight of the insect is also unstable, and the instability increases as the upward flight speed increases. Inertial force generated by the upward flight velocity coupled with the disturbance in pitching angular velocity is responsible for the enhancement of the instability.

  9. Dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuk Tung

    This thesis presents a study of the dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars resulting from the accretion induced collapse of rapidly rotating white dwarfs. Chapter 2 and part of Chapter 3 study the equilibrium models for these neutron stars. They are constructed by assuming that the neutron stars have the same masses, angular momenta, and specific angular momentum distributions as the pre-collapse white dwarfs. If the pre-collapse white dwarf is rapidly rotating, the collapsed object will contain a high density central core of size about 20 km, surrounded by a massive accretion torus extending to hundreds of kilometers from the rotation axis. The ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to gravitational binding energy, β, of these neutron stars is all found to be less than 0.27. Chapter 3 studies the dynamical stability of these neutron stars by numerically evolving the linearized hydrodynamical equations. A dynamical bar-mode instability is observed when the β of the star is greater than the critical value β d ≈ 0.25. It is expected that the unstable mode will persist until a substantial amount of angular momentum is carried away by gravitational radiation. The detectability of these sources is studied and it is estimated that LIGO II is unlikely to detect them unless the event rate is greater than 10-6/year/galaxy. All the calculations on the structure and stability of the neutron stars in Chapters 2 and 3 are carried out using Newtonian hydrodynamics and gravity. Chapter 4 studies the relativistic effects on the structure of these neutron stars. New techniques are developed and used to construct neutron star models to the first post- Newtonian (1PN) order. The structures of the ON models are qualitatively similar to the corresponding Newtonian models, but the values of β are somewhat smaller. The maximum β for these ON neutron stars is found to be 0.24, which is 8% smaller than the Newtonian result (0.26). However, relativistic effects will also change

  10. Stability studies of Solar Optical Telescope dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gullapalli, Sarma N.; Pal, Parimal K.; Ruthven, Gregory P.

    1987-01-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) is designed to operate as an attached payload mounted on the Instrument Pointing System (IPS) in the cargo bay of the Shuttle Orbiter. Pointing and control of SOT is accomplished by an active Articulated Primary Mirror (APM), an active Tertiary Mirror (TM), an elaborate set of optical sensors, electromechanical actuators and programmable controllers. The structural interactions of this complex control system are significant factors in the stability of the SOT. The preliminary stability study results of the SOT dynamical system are presented. Structural transfer functions obtained from the NASTRAN model of the structure were used. These studies apply to a single degree of freedom (elevation). Fully integrated model studies will be conducted in the future.

  11. Beam stability & nonlinear dynamics. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    his Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Beam Stability and Nonlinear Dynamics, December 3-5, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  12. Dynamical Stability of Slip-stacking Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-04

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  13. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  14. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J. N.; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  15. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J N; Fiebach, Christian J

    2015-06-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  16. Dynamic and galvanic stability of stretchable supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Gu, Taoli; Wei, Bingqing

    2012-12-12

    Stretchable electronics are emerging as a new technological advancement, since they can be reversibly stretched while maintaining functionality. To power stretchable electronics, rechargeable and stretchable energy storage devices become a necessity. Here, we demonstrate a facile and scalable fabrication of full stretchable supercapacitor, using buckled single-walled carbon nanotube macrofilms as the electrodes, an electrospun membrane of elastomeric polyurethane as the separator, and an organic electrolyte. We examine the electrochemical performance of the fully stretchable supercapacitors under dynamic stretching/releasing modes in different stretching strain rates, which reveal the true performance of the stretchable cells, compared to the conventional method of testing the cells under a statically stretched state. In addition, the self-discharge of the supercapacitor and the electrochemical behavior under bending mode are also examined. The stretchable supercapacitors show excellent cyclic stability under electrochemical charge/discharge during in situ dynamic stretching/releasing. PMID:23167804

  17. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  18. Calculation of the lateral-dynamic stability of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raikh, A

    1952-01-01

    Graphs and formulas are given with the aid of which all the aerodynamic coefficients required for computing the lateral dynamic stability can be determined. A number of numerical examples are given for obtaining the stability derivatives and solving the characteristic-stability equation. Approximate formulas are derived with the aid of which rapid preliminary computations may be made and the stability coefficients corrected for certain modifications of the airplane. A derivation of the lateral-dynamic-stability equations is included.

  19. High gain 1.3-μm GaInNAs SOA with fast gain dynamics and enhanced temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Iliadis, N.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Viheriälä, J.; Laakso, A.; Dris, S.; Spyropoulou, M.; Avramopoulos, H.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.; Guina, M.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are a well-established solution of optical access networks. They could prove an enabling technology for DataCom by offering extended range of active optical functionalities. However, in such costand energy-critical applications, high-integration densities increase the operational temperatures and require powerhungry external cooling. Taking a step further towards improving the cost and energy effectiveness of active optical components, we report on the development of a GaInNAs/GaAs (dilute nitride) SOA operating at 1.3μm that exhibits a gain value of 28 dB and combined with excellent temperature stability owing to the large conduction band offset between GaInNAs quantum well and GaAs barrier. Moreover, the characterization results reveal almost no gain variation around the 1320 nm region for a temperature range from 20° to 50° C. The gain recovery time attained values as short as 100 ps, allowing implementation of various signal processing functionalities at 10 Gb/s. The combined parameters are very attractive for application in photonic integrated circuits requiring uncooled operation and thus minimizing power consumption. Moreover, as a result of the insensitivity to heating issues, a higher number of active elements can be integrated on chip-scale circuitry, allowing for higher integration densities and more complex optical on-chip functions. Such component could prove essential for next generation DataCom networks.

  20. Stability precision dynamic testing system on artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Li, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic feature of Weapon equipments is one of important performance index for evaluating the performance of the whole weapon system. The construction of target range in our country in fire control dynamic testing is relatively backward; therefore, it has greatly influenced the evaluation on the fire control system. In order to solve this problem, it's urgent to develop a new testing instrument so as to adjust to the armament research process and promote weapon system working more efficiently and thereby meeting the needs of modernization in national defense. This paper proposes a new measure which is used to test the stability precision of the fire control system, and it is installed on the moving base. Using the method, we develop a testing system which can test the stability precision of the fire control system and achieve a high precision results after testing. The innovation of the system is we can receive the image not only by CCD, but our eyes. It also adopts digital image-forming and image processing technique for real-time measurement and storing of the target information; it simultaneously adopts the method adjusting the platform and the corresponding fixture mounted on a sample to measure the stable precision and the precision of corner of stabilizator. In this paper, we make a description on the construction of the system and the idea of the designing of the optical system. Finally, we introduce the actual application of the system and testing results.

  1. Dynamic stability of an aerodynamically efficient motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amrit; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycles exhibit two potentially dangerous oscillatory modes known as 'wobble' and 'weave'. The former is reminiscent of supermarket castor shimmy, while the latter is a low frequency 'fish-tailing' motion that involves a combination of rolling, yawing, steering and side-slipping motions. These unwanted dynamic features, which can occur when two-wheeled vehicles are operated at speed, have been studied extensively. The aim of this paper is to use mathematical analysis to identify important stability trends in the on-going design of a novel aerodynamically efficient motorcycle known as the ECOSSE Spirit ES1. A mathematical model of the ES1 is developed using a multi-body dynamics software package called VehicleSim [Anon, VehicleSim Lisp Reference Manual Version 1.0, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, 2008. Available at http://www.carsim.com]. This high-fidelity motorcycle model includes realistic tyre-road contact geometry, a comprehensive tyre model, tyre relaxation and a flexible frame. A parameter set representative of a modern high-performance machine and rider is used. Local stability is investigated via the eigenvalues of the linearised models that are associated with equilibrium points of interest. A comprehensive study of the effects of frame flexibilities, acceleration, aerodynamics and tyre variations is presented, and an optimal passive steering compensator is derived. It is shown that the traditional steering damper cannot be used to stabilise the ES1 over its entire operating speed range. A simple passive compensator, involving an inerter is proposed. Flexibility can be introduced deliberately into various chassis components to change the stability characteristics of the vehicle; the implications of this idea are studied.

  2. Stability at systems of usual differential equations in virus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    In this paper we discuss different models of differential equations systems, that describe virus dynamics in different situations (HIV-virus and Hepatitis B-virus). We inquire the stability of differential equations. We use theorems of the stability theory.

  3. Flux-line-lattice stability and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glyde, H. R.; Moleko, L. K.; Findeisen, P.

    1992-02-01

    The mechanical stability of a flux-line lattice (FLL) having parameters appropriate for the high-Tc superconductors is determined using the self-consistent phonon theory of lattice dynamics. Nearly parallel flux lines (FL's) are assumed and FL pinning is neglected. The FLL becomes unstable when a phonon frequency goes to zero. At instability the rms vibrational amplitude diverges and the FL's can no longer be localized. In Bi2Sr2CaCuO2O8, the instability line as a function of temperature and magnetic field lies below but in reasonable agreement with the observed irreversibility line. In YBa2Cu3O7, it lies significantly below. The present instability line is a reliable upper bound to the FLL melting line. Identifying instability with melting, we find the Lindemann criterion of melting does not hold. However, the present instability lines and the melting lines obtained by Houghton et al. are found to have similar shape.

  4. Group formation stabilizes predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, John M; Mosser, Anna; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Packer, Craig

    2007-10-25

    Theoretical ecology is largely founded on the principle of mass action, in which uncoordinated populations of predators and prey move in a random and well-mixed fashion across a featureless landscape. The conceptual core of this body of theory is the functional response, predicting the rate of prey consumption by individual predators as a function of predator and/or prey densities. This assumption is seriously violated in many ecosystems in which predators and/or prey form social groups. Here we develop a new set of group-dependent functional responses to consider the ecological implications of sociality and apply the model to the Serengeti ecosystem. All of the prey species typically captured by Serengeti lions (Panthera leo) are gregarious, exhibiting nonlinear relationships between prey-group density and population density. The observed patterns of group formation profoundly reduce food intake rates below the levels expected under random mixing, having as strong an impact on intake rates as the seasonal migratory behaviour of the herbivores. A dynamical system model parameterized for the Serengeti ecosystem (using wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) as a well-studied example) shows that grouping strongly stabilizes interactions between lions and wildebeest. Our results suggest that social groups rather than individuals are the basic building blocks around which predator-prey interactions should be modelled and that group formation may provide the underlying stability of many ecosystems. PMID:17960242

  5. Enhancing probiotic stability in industrial processes

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja

    2012-01-01

    Background Manufacture of probiotic products involves industrial processes that reduce the viability of the strains. This lost of viability constitutes an economic burden for manufacturers, compromising the efficacy of the product and preventing the inclusion of probiotics in many product categories. Different strategies have been used to improve probiotic stability during industrial processes. These include technological approaches, such as the modification of production parameters or the reformulation of products, as well as microbiological approaches focused on the strain intrinsic resistance. Among the later, both selection of natural strains with the desired properties and stress-adaptation of strains have been widely used. Conclusion During recent years, the knowledge acquired on the molecular basis of stress-tolerance of probiotics has increased our understanding on their responses to industrial stresses. This knowledge on stress-response may nowadays be used for the selection of the best strains and industrial conditions in terms of probiotic stability in the final product. PMID:23990824

  6. Lift enhancement by bats' dynamically changing wingspan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the aerodynamic role of the dynamically changing wingspan in bat flight. Based on direct numerical simulations of the flow over a slow-flying bat, it is found that the dynamically changing wingspan can significantly enhance the lift. Further, an analysis of flow structures and lift decomposition reveal that the elevated vortex lift associated with the leading-edge vortices intensified by the dynamically changing wingspan considerably contributed to enhancement of the time-averaged lift. The nonlinear interaction between the dynamically changing wing and the vortical structures plays an important role in the lift enhancement of a flying bat in addition to the geometrical effect of changing the lifting-surface area in a flapping cycle. In addition, the dynamically changing wingspan leads to the higher efficiency in terms of generating lift for a given amount of the mechanical energy consumed in flight. PMID:26701882

  7. Dynamic flight stability of hovering insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mao; Wang, Jikang; Xiong, Yan

    2007-06-01

    The equations of motion of an insect with flapping wings are derived and then simplified to that of a flying body using the “rigid body” assumption. On the basis of the simplified equations of motion, the longitudinal dynamic flight stability of four insects (hoverfly, cranefly, dronefly and hawkmoth) in hovering flight is studied (the mass of the insects ranging from 11 to 1,648 mg and wingbeat frequency from 26 to 157 Hz). The method of computational fluid dynamics is used to compute the aerodynamic derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis are used to solve the equations of motion. The validity of the “rigid body” assumption is tested and how differences in size and wing kinematics influence the applicability of the “rigid body” assumption is investigated. The primary findings are: (1) For insects considered in the present study and those with relatively high wingbeat frequency (hoverfly, drone fly and bumblebee), the “rigid body” assumption is reasonable, and for those with relatively low wingbeat frequency (cranefly and howkmoth), the applicability of the “rigid body” assumption is questionable. (2) The same three natural modes of motion as those reported recently for a bumblebee are identified, i.e., one unstable oscillatory mode, one stable fast subsidence mode and one stable slow subsidence mode. (3) Approximate analytical expressions of the eigenvalues, which give physical insight into the genesis of the natural modes of motion, are derived. The expressions identify the speed derivative M u (pitching moment produced by unit horizontal speed) as the primary source of the unstable oscillatory mode and the stable fast subsidence mode and Z w (vertical force produced by unit vertical speed) as the primary source of the stable slow subsidence mode.

  8. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  9. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  10. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  11. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  12. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  13. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; Li, Jack; Reed, Sean A; Xiao, Han; Young, Travis S; Schultz, Peter G

    2016-05-24

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. Here we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a library of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ∼9 °C was identified. This result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes. PMID:27162342

  14. Dynamic Stabilization of a Quantum Many-Body Spin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, T. M.; Gerving, C. S.; Land, B. J.; Anquez, M.; Hamley, C. D.; Chapman, M. S.

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrate dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting quantum spin system realized in a spin-1 atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. The spinor Bose-Einstein condensate is initialized to an unstable fixed point of the spin-nematic phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to squeezing and quantum spin mixing. To stabilize the system, periodic microwave pulses are applied that rotate the spin-nematic many-body fluctuations and limit their growth. The stability diagram for the range of pulse periods and phase shifts that stabilize the dynamics is measured and compares well with a stability analysis.

  15. Dynamic stabilization of a quantum many-body spin system.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T M; Gerving, C S; Land, B J; Anquez, M; Hamley, C D; Chapman, M S

    2013-08-30

    We demonstrate dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting quantum spin system realized in a spin-1 atomic Bose-Einstein condensate. The spinor Bose-Einstein condensate is initialized to an unstable fixed point of the spin-nematic phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to squeezing and quantum spin mixing. To stabilize the system, periodic microwave pulses are applied that rotate the spin-nematic many-body fluctuations and limit their growth. The stability diagram for the range of pulse periods and phase shifts that stabilize the dynamics is measured and compares well with a stability analysis. PMID:24033006

  16. Temporal stability in forest productivity increases with tree diversity due to asynchrony in species dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morin, Xavier; Fahse, Lorenz; de Mazancourt, Claire; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Bugmann, Harald

    2014-12-01

    Theory predicts a positive relationship between biodiversity and stability in ecosystem properties, while diversity is expected to have a negative impact on stability at the species level. We used virtual experiments based on a dynamic simulation model to test for the diversity-stability relationship and its underlying mechanisms in Central European forests. First our results show that variability in productivity between stands differing in species composition decreases as species richness and functional diversity increase. Second we show temporal stability increases with increasing diversity due to compensatory dynamics across species, supporting the biodiversity insurance hypothesis. We demonstrate that this pattern is mainly driven by the asynchrony of species responses to small disturbances rather than to environmental fluctuations, and is only weakly affected by the net biodiversity effect on productivity. Furthermore, our results suggest that compensatory dynamics between species may enhance ecosystem stability through an optimisation of canopy occupancy by coexisting species. PMID:25212251

  17. Enhanced muscle activity during lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether pelvic stabilization affects multifidus (MF) and iliocostalis lumborum (IL) muscle activities during dynamic extension exercise. Nine males (age, 25.1±6.3 yr; height, 176.6±2.4 cm; body mass, 74.9±6.7 kg) performed an isometric lumbar extension strength test and dynamic exercise in an upright seated position with or without pelvic stabilization. The electromyography and muscle strength of the MF and IL muscles were measured when the subjects performed the isometric lumbar extension strength test at the trunk angle 110°, 146°, and 182°. In addition, the trunk extensor muscle activities were measured using 50% muscle strength of maximum isometric strength during a dynamic trunk extension exercise. The MF and IL muscle activities were significantly higher at 110°, 146°, and 182° with pelvic stabilization than that without pelvic stabilization during the isometric lumbar extension strength test (P<0.05) and the dynamic exercise (P<0.05). These results suggest that the lumbar extension exercise with pelvic stabilization may be more effective for MF and IL muscle activity compared to that without pelvic stabilization. PMID:26730390

  18. Double polymer sheathed carbon nanotube supercapacitors show enhanced cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenqi; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Ouyang, An; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Yibin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices.Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05978j

  19. Enhanced stabilization of vesicles by compressed CO2.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jianling; Cheng, Siqing; Han, Buxing; Zhang, Chaoxing; Feng, Xiaoying; Zhao, Yueju

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of compressed CO2 on the stability of vesicles formed in a dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mixed surfactant system by combination of phase behavior and turbidity study, and UV-vis and fluorescence techniques. It was discovered that compressed CO2 could enhance the stability of vesicles significantly. This new and effective method to stabilize vesicles has some unique advantages over conventional methods. For example, the size and stability of the vesicles can be easily controlled by CO2 pressure; the method is greener because CO2 is a green reagent and it can be released completely after depressurization, which simplifies postseparation processes in applications. The main reason for CO2 to stabilize the vesicles is that CO2 molecules can insert into the hydrophobic bilayer region to enhance the rigidity of the vesicle film and reduce the size of the vesicles, which is different from that of conventional cosolvents (e.g., alcohols) used to stabilize vesicles. On the basis of this discovery, we developed a method to prepare hollow silica spheres using tetraethoxysilane as the precursor and CO2-stabilized vesicles as the template, in which CO2 acts as both the stabilizer of the vesicular template and the catalyst for the hydrolysis reaction of the precursor, and other cosolvents and catalysts are not required. Besides, the size of the silica hollow spheres prepared can be controlled by the pressure of CO2. PMID:19049396

  20. Dynamic stabilization in the double-well duffing oscillator

    PubMed

    Kim; Kim

    2000-06-01

    Bifurcations associated with stability of the saddle fixed point of the Poincare map, arising from the unstable equilibrium point of the potential, are investigated in a forced Duffing oscillator with a double-well potential. One interesting behavior is the dynamic stabilization of the saddle fixed point. When the driving amplitude is increased through a threshold value, the saddle fixed point becomes stabilized via a pitchfork bifurcation. We note that this dynamic stabilization is similar to that of the inverted pendulum with a vertically oscillating suspension point. After the dynamic stabilization, the double-well Duffing oscillator behaves as the single-well Duffing oscillator, because the effect of the central potential barrier on the dynamics of the system becomes negligible. PMID:11088331

  1. Enhanced thermal stability of Ag nanorods through capping

    SciTech Connect

    Bachenheimer, Lou; Elliott, Paul; Stagon, Stephen; Huang, Hanchen

    2014-11-24

    Ag nanorods may serve as sensors in the detection of trace amounts of chemical agents, even single molecules, through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). However, thermal coarsening of Ag nanorods near room temperature limits their applications. This letter proposes the use of a thin oxide capping layer to enhance the thermal stability of Ag nanorods beyond 100 °C. Using electron microscopy characterization and SERS tests, the authors show that the proposed method is effective in stabilizing both morphology and sensitivity of Ag nanorods. The results of this work extend the applicability of Ag nanorods as chemical sensors to higher temperatures.

  2. A Quasi-Steady Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady CFD with Unsteady Aerodynamic Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin is caused by an undamping of the aerodynamics in one of the lower frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic lineloads derived from steady rigid computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic (CAE) analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping. This paper will present a method of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics. The enhanced formulation uses unsteady CFD to compute the response of selected lower frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle lineloads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic lineload response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping and mass matrices. The results of the enhanced quasi-static aeroelastic stability analysis are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady CAE analysis and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady CAE analysis.

  3. A paradigm shift from stationary stability to dynamically evolving stability required from experimental fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kondoh, Yoshiomi

    2009-05-15

    A paradigm shift from the traditional concept of stationary stability to the new one of dynamically evolving stability is proposed in order to correctly deal with dynamically evolving experimental plasmas. A new process to derive generalized simultaneous eigenvalue equations is presented by the use of a generalized theory of self-organization. The final simultaneous eigenvalue equations are shown to be a good candidate for the proposed paradigm shift because their mathematical forms exactly describe the self-similarly evolving and dynamically stable states available to various dynamic systems. Typical numerical configurations of mutually dependent, dynamically stable, and self-similarly evolving physical quantities are presented for the reversed-field pinch plasmas in cylindrical geometry by solving a set of simultaneous eigenvalue equations for the two-fluid model. A new algorithm is presented to find the dynamically stable, self-similarly evolving and self-organized configurations and to investigate quantitatively the robust dynamical stability of these configurations.

  4. Enhancing Biopolymer Dynamics through Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal filaments that organize intracellular space structurally and through active transport along their lengths. They need to be organized and remodeled quickly during development of differentiated cells or in mitosis. Much work has focused on remodeling from the ends because these long polymers can stochastically disassemble through dynamic instability or be actively disassembled. Microtubule-severing enzymes are a novel class of microtubule regulators that create new ends by cutting the filament. Thus, these proteins add a new dimension to microtubule regulation by their ability to create new microtubule ends. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We are interested in the inherent biophysical activities of these proteins and their ability to remodel cellular microtubule networks. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We use two-color single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence imaging to visualize purified severing enzymes and microtubules in vitro. We have examined two families of severing enzymes to find that their biophysical activities are distinct giving them different network-regulating abilities.

  5. Stability analysis of dynamic thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Crawford, Paulo

    2005-11-01

    We analyse the stability of generic spherically symmetric thin shells to linearized perturbations around static solutions. We include the momentum flux term in the conservation identity, deduced from the 'ADM' constraint and the Lanczos equations. Following the Ishak Lake analysis, we deduce a master equation which dictates the stable equilibrium configurations. Considering the transparency condition, we study the stability of thin shells around black holes, showing that our analysis is in agreement with previous results. Applying the analysis to traversable wormhole geometries, by considering specific choices for the form function, we deduce stability regions and find that the latter may be significantly increased by considering appropriate choices for the redshift function.

  6. On the dynamic stability of multilayer sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.; Chen, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the dynamic stability of plates which are constructed of several alternating soft and hard layers and are subjected to time-dependent periodic in-plane loads. A theory that accounts for all of these effects is presented for multilayer sandwich plates. The plate thickness consists of (k - 1) orthotropic soft core layers sandwiched between k hard isotropic membrane layers, each of which may have a different thickness and elastic properties. It is assumed that the core layers carry only the transverse shear stresses, while the hard membrane layers carry the in-plane normal and shear stresses. The complementary variational principle for dynamics is used to derive the governing differential equations and the necessary boundary conditions for the dynamic stability of the sandwich plate. The equations governing the vibration of the plate and those governing its static stability are deduced from the more general equations for dynamic stability.

  7. Marginal Stability Dynamics for Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Herbert

    2009-11-01

    Marginal stability in plasmas characteristically sets a stiff limit to the range of that can be achieved. Below this limit, the system is governed by classical. Near marginal stability, however, plasmas may be subject to rapid processes, resulting in a system that hovers near marginality. This scenario emerged from nonlinear studies of energetic particle relaxation and may be to more general plasma transport. We describe results from several such which include. [1] Avalanches---Near marginal stability, an important point is whether an instability driven by resonant particles where the distribution function has ``free energy'' will cause global radial diffusion. For that,modes need to overlap. This process can be continuous or bursty, the latter having been recently observed in NSTX and DIII-D. [2] Frequency chirping---Recent simulations by Vann showed that marginal stability can be sustained when there is only one unstable linear mode, due to the mechanism of spontaneous frequency sweeping. Although a single mode near stability should not cause dramatic relaxation, nevertheless in the Vann simulations, the achievement of marginal stability induced a continual chirping of that had removed energy from the bulk of the region where the external beam to deposit free energy. The distribution was then found to hover near stability. This mechanism may apply to the n=0 GAM where frequency sweeping might be a mechanism for extracting energy from alpha particles in a burning plasma, thereby reducing the stored alpha particle pressure. One way to implement this is to have the n=0 geodesic acoustic modes (GAM) be preferentially excited, since energy rather than momentum (leading to spatial diffusion) is then primarily extracted from alpha particles.

  8. Dynamical stability of extended teleparallel gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, Petr V.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss modified teleparallel gravity with function f(T,TG) in the action, where the function depends on two arguments: torsion scalar T and analogue of Gauss-Bonnet invariant TG. In contradistinction to usual teleparallel gravity f(T), this theory contains higher derivative terms, which may produce different instabilities. We discuss Minkowski stability problem in such kind of theories and explicitly demonstrate that for stability it must be fT(0, 0) < 0, fTGTG > 0. We apply these restrictions for the few types of functions discussed by the early authors.

  9. Dynamics and stability of wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.; Nolan, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous and induction generators are considered. A comparison is made between wind turbines, steam, and hydro units. The unusual phenomena associated with wind turbines are emphasized. The general control requirements are discussed, as well as various schemes for torsional damping such as speed sensitive stabilizer and blade pitch control. Integration between adjacent wind turbines in a wind farm is also considered.

  10. New Insight into Cataract Formation: Enhanced Stability through Mutual Attraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stradner, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Foffi, G.; Dorsaz, N.; Thurston, G.

    2007-11-09

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations combined with an application of concepts from soft matter physics to complex protein mixtures provide new insight into the stability of eye lens protein mixtures. Exploring this colloid-protein analogy we demonstrate that weak attractions between unlike proteins help to maintain lens transparency in an extremely sensitive and nonmonotonic manner. These results not only represent an important step towards a better understanding of protein condensation diseases such as cataract formation, but provide general guidelines for tuning the stability of colloid mixtures, a topic relevant for soft matter physics and industrial applications.

  11. Attraction-induced dynamical stability of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a nonlinear lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Raka; Venkatesh, B. Prasanna; Watanabe, Gentaro

    2016-06-01

    We study multiple-period Bloch states of a Bose-Einstein condensate with spatially periodic interatomic interaction. Solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the continuum model, and also using a simplified discrete version of it, we investigate the energy-band structures and the corresponding stability properties. We observe an "attraction-induced dynamical stability" mechanism caused by the localization of the density distribution in the attractive domains of the system and the isolation of these higher-density regions. This makes the superfluid stable near the zone boundary and also enhances the stability of higher-periodic states if the nonlinear interaction strength is sufficiently high.

  12. Dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Wang, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents both measured and calculated magnetic-force data. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares the results with predictions calculated by a nonlinear-dynamics computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic-suspension system type vehicle model were obtained by experimental observation and computer simulation of a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway that consists of a pair of L-shaped aluminum conductors attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  13. Constrained basin stability for studying transient phenomena in dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kan, Adrian; Jegminat, Jannes; Donges, Jonathan F.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Transient dynamics are of large interest in many areas of science. Here, a generalization of basin stability (BS) is presented: constrained basin stability (CBS) that is sensitive to various different types of transients arising from finite size perturbations. CBS is applied to the paradigmatic Lorenz system for uncovering nonlinear precursory phenomena of a boundary crisis bifurcation. Further, CBS is used in a model of the Earth's carbon cycle as a return time-dependent stability measure of the system's global attractor. Both case studies illustrate how CBS's sensitivity to transients complements BS in its function as an early warning signal and as a stability measure. CBS is broadly applicable in systems where transients matter, from physics and engineering to sustainability science. Thus CBS complements stability analysis with BS as well as classical linear stability analysis and will be a useful tool for many applications.

  14. Summary of methods for calculating dynamic lateral stability and response and for estimating aerodynamic stability derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1952-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Detailed estimation methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic and supersonic speed conditions.

  15. Effect of stabilizer on dynamic thermal transport property of ZnO nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of adding a stabilizer on the dynamic thermal properties of ZnO nanofluid (containing 5 to 10 nm diameter of ZnO nanocrystals) measured using a 3ω method. Addition of the stabilizer leads to the stabilization of the nanofluid and also substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport compared to that seen in the bare ZnO nanofluid. This also alters the frequency dependence of the thermal transport and the characteristic time scale associated with it. It is suggested that the addition of the stabilizer inhibits the thermodiffusion-assisted local aggregation thus leading to substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport properties of the bare nanofluid as proposed in some recent models, and this also alters the characteristic time scales by altering the scale of aggregation. PMID:23497347

  16. Dynamic regulation of Schwann cell enhancers after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hung, Holly A; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Svaren, John

    2015-03-13

    Myelination of the peripheral nervous system is required for axonal function and long term stability. After peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells transition from axon myelination to a demyelinated state that supports neuronal survival and ultimately remyelination of axons. Reprogramming of gene expression patterns during development and injury responses is shaped by the actions of distal regulatory elements that integrate the actions of multiple transcription factors. We used ChIP-seq to measure changes in histone H3K27 acetylation, a mark of active enhancers, to identify enhancers in myelinating rat peripheral nerve and their dynamics after demyelinating nerve injury. Analysis of injury-induced enhancers identified enriched motifs for c-Jun, a transcription factor required for Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. We identify a c-Jun-bound enhancer in the gene for Runx2, a transcription factor induced after nerve injury, and we show that Runx2 is required for activation of other induced genes. In contrast, enhancers that lose H3K27ac after nerve injury are enriched for binding sites of the Sox10 and early growth response 2 (Egr2/Krox20) transcription factors, which are critical determinants of Schwann cell differentiation. Egr2 expression is lost after nerve injury, and many Egr2-binding sites lose H3K27ac after nerve injury. However, the majority of Egr2-bound enhancers retain H3K27ac, indicating that other transcription factors maintain active enhancer status after nerve injury. The global epigenomic changes in H3K27ac deposition pinpoint dynamic changes in enhancers that mediate the effects of transcription factors that control Schwann cell myelination and peripheral nervous system responses to nerve injury. PMID:25614629

  17. Enhanced Enzyme Kinetic Stability by Increasing Rigidity within the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; An, Jiao; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Li; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important issue for protein engineers. Understanding how rigidity in the active site affects protein kinetic stability will provide new insight into enzyme stabilization. In this study, we demonstrated enhanced kinetic stability of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) by mutating the structurally flexible residues within the active site. Six residues within 10 Å of the catalytic Ser105 residue with a high B factor were selected for iterative saturation mutagenesis. After screening 2200 colonies, we obtained the D223G/L278M mutant, which exhibited a 13-fold increase in half-life at 48 °C and a 12 °C higher T5015, the temperature at which enzyme activity is reduced to 50% after a 15-min heat treatment. Further characterization showed that global unfolding resistance against both thermal and chemical denaturation also improved. Analysis of the crystal structures of wild-type CalB and the D223G/L278M mutant revealed that the latter formed an extra main chain hydrogen bond network with seven structurally coupled residues within the flexible α10 helix that are primarily involved in forming the active site. Further investigation of the relative B factor profile and molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the enhanced rigidity decreased fluctuation of the active site residues at high temperature. These results indicate that enhancing the rigidity of the flexible segment within the active site may provide an efficient method for improving enzyme kinetic stability. PMID:24448805

  18. Enhanced catalyst stability for cyclic co methanation operations

    DOEpatents

    Risch, Alan P.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is thereafter reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Enhanced catalyst stability for long term, cyclic operation is obtained by the incorporation of an alkali or alkaline earth dopant in a silica binding agent added to the catalyst-support additive composition.

  19. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  20. Stability of focal adhesion enhanced by its inner force fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhi-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Cells actively sense and respond to mechanical signals from the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. By representing a single focal adhesion as a cluster of slip bonds, it has been demonstrated that the cluster often became unstable under fluctuated forces. However, an unusual case was also reported, where the stability of the cluster might be substantially enhanced by a fluctuated force with a relatively low fluctuation frequency and high fluctuation amplitude. Such an observation cannot be explained by the conventional fracture theory of fatigue. Here, we intensively investigate this intriguing observation by carrying out systematic parametric studies. Our intensive simulation results indicate that stability enhancement of this kind is in fact quite robust, which can be affected by the stochastic features of a single bond and the profile of the fluctuated forces such as the average value of bond force. We then suggest that the fluctuation of traction force within a focal adhesion might enhance its stability in a certain way. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.*11372279).

  1. Dispersive Elements for Enhanced Laser Gyroscopy and Cavity Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Diels, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the modulation to determine the conditions for cavity self-stabilization and enhanced gyroscopic sensitivity. We find an enhancement in the sensitivity of a laser gyroscope to rotation for normal dispersion, while anomalous dispersion can be used to self-stabilize an optical cavity. Our results indicate that atomic media, even coherent superpositions in multilevel atoms, are of limited use for these applications, because the amplitude and phase filters work against one another, i.e., decreasing the modulation frequency increases its amplitude and vice-versa. On the other hand, for optical resonators the dispersion reversal associated with critical coupling enables the amplitude and phase filters to work together. We find that for over-coupled resonators, the absorption and normal dispersion on-resonance increase the contrast and frequency of the beat-note, respectively, resulting in a substantial enhancement of the gyroscopic response. Under-coupled resonators can be used to stabilize the frequency of a laser cavity, but result in a concomitant increase in amplitude fluctuations. As a more ideal solution we propose the use of a variety of coupled-resonator-induced transparency that is accompanied by anomalous dispersion.

  2. Dynamic Stabilization of Expressed Proteins in Engineered Diatom Biosilica Matrices.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yijia; Ford, Nicole R; Hecht, Karen A; Roesijadi, Guritno; Squier, Thomas C

    2016-05-18

    Self-assembly of recombinant proteins within the biosilica of living diatoms represents a means to construct functional materials in a reproducible and scalable manner that will enable applications that harness the inherent specificities of proteins to sense and respond to environmental cues. Here we describe the use of a silaffin-derived lysine-rich 39-amino-acid targeting sequence (Sil3T8) that directs a single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody or an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to assemble within the biosilica frustule, resulting in abundance of >200 000 proteins per frustule. Using either a fluorescent ligand bound to the scFv or the intrinsic fluorescence of EGFP, we monitored protein conformational dynamics, accessibility to external quenchers, binding affinity, and conformational stability. Like proteins in solution, proteins within isolated frustules undergo isotropic rotational motion, but with 2-fold increases in rotational correlation times that are indicative of weak macromolecular associations within the biosilica. Solvent accessibilities and high-affinity (pM) binding are comparable to those in solution. In contrast to solution conditions, scFv antibodies within the biosilica matrix retain their binding affinity in the presence of chaotropic agents (i.e., 8 M urea). Together, these results argue that dramatic increases in protein conformational stability within the biosilica matrices arise through molecular crowding, acting to retain native protein folds and associated functionality with the potential to allow the utility of engineered proteins under a range of harsh environmental conditions associated with environmental sensing and industrial catalytic transformations. PMID:27139003

  3. Effects of asymmetry on the dynamic stability of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantino, R. E.; Parsons, E. K.; Powell, J. D.; Shevell, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The oblique wing concept for transonic aircraft was proposed to reduce drag. The dynamic stability of the aircraft was investigated by analytically determining the stability derivatives at angles of skew ranging from 0 and 45 deg and using these stability derivatives in a linear analysis of the coupled aircraft behavior. The stability derivatives were obtained using a lifting line aerodynamic theory and found to give reasonable agreement with derivatives developed in a previous study for the same aircraft. In the dynamic analysis, no instability or large changes occurred in the root locations for skew angles varying from 0 to 45 deg with the exception of roll convergence. The damping in roll, however, decreased by an order of magnitude. Rolling was a prominent feature of all the oscillatory mode shapes at high skew angles.

  4. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results.

  5. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results. PMID:26764672

  6. Dynamical stability of global vortex strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tho, Nguyen Vien; Ha, To Ba

    2011-10-01

    The time-dependent field equations of the nonlinear field systems, whose static soliton solutions are (global) vortex strings, are studied by a numerical approach. They concern (i) the theory of a single complex scalar field with a spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry, and (ii) the system of a complex scalar field doublet with an approximate U(2) symmetry. The obtained numerical solutions allow to clarify the dynamical behaviors of the systems under fluctuations. The systems are shown to have order-chaos phase transitions, but, despite phase transitions and deformations in field profiles by fluctuations, the shapes of the total field energy density distributions are rather stable.

  7. Enhanced bioavailability of atorvastatin calcium from stabilized gastric resident formulation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Furquan Nazimuddin; Dehghan, Mohamed Hassan G

    2011-12-01

    Oral bioavailability of atorvastatin calcium (ATC) is very low (only 14%) due to instability and incomplete intestinal absorption and/or extensive gut wall extraction. When ATC is packed in the form of tablets, powders, etc., it gets destabilized as it is exposed to the oxidative environment, which is usually present during the production process, the storage of the substance, and the pharmaceutical formulation. Therefore, stabilized gastro-retentive floating tablets of ATC were prepared to enhance bioavailability. Water sorption and viscosity measurement studies are performed to get the best polymer matrix for gastro-retention. A 3(2) factorial design used to prepare optimized formulation of ATC. The selected excipients such as docusate sodium enhanced the stability and solubility of ATC in gastric media and tablet dosage form. The best formulation (F4) consisting of hypromellose, sodium bicarbonate, polyethylene oxide, docusate sodium, mannitol, crosscarmellose sodium, and magnesium stearate, gave floating lag time of 56 ± 4.16 s and good matrix integrity with in vitro dissolution of 98.2% in 12 h. After stability studies, no significant change was observed in stability, solubility, floating lag time, total floating duration, matrix integrity, and sustained drug release rates, as confirmed by DSC and powder X-ray diffraction studies. In vivo pharmacokinetic study performed in rabbits revealed enhanced bioavailability of F4 floating tablets, about 1.6 times compared with that of the conventional tablet (Storvas® 80 mg tablet). These results suggest that the gastric resident formulation is a promising approach for the oral delivery of ATC for improving bioavailability. PMID:21879394

  8. Enhanced structural stability of nanoporous zirconia under irradiation of He

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tengfei; Huang, Xuejun; Wang, Chenxu; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    This work reports a greatly enhanced tolerance for He irradiation-induced swelling in nanocrystalline zirconia film with interconnected nanoporous structure (hereinafter referred as to NC-C). Compared to bulk yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and another nanocrystalline zirconia film only with discrete nano voids (hereinafter referred as to NC-V), the NC-C film reveals good tolerance for irradiation of high-fluence He. No appreciable surface blistering can be found even at the highest fluence of 6 1017 cm2 in NCC film. From TEM analysis of as-irradiated samples, the enhanced tolerance for volume swelling in NCC film is attributed to the enhanced diffusion mechanism of deposited He via widely distributed nano channels. Furthermore, the growth of grain size is quite small for both nanocrystalline zirconia films after irradiation, which is ascribed to the decreasing of area of grain boundary due to loose structure and low energy of primary knock-on atoms for He ions.

  9. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  10. Stability limits and dynamics of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Resnik, Andy; Kaukler, William F.

    1993-01-01

    This program of theoretical and experimental ground-based and low gravity research is focussed on the understanding of the dynamics and stability limits of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges. There are three basic objectives to the proposed work: (1) to determine the stability limits of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges held between non-coaxially aligned disks; (2) to examine the dynamics of nonaxisymmetric bridges and nonaxisymmetric oscillations of initially axisymmetric bridges (some of these experiments require a low gravity environment and the ground-based research will culminate in a definitive flight experiment); and (3) to experimentally investigate the vibration sensitivity of liquid bridges under terrestrial and low gravity conditions.

  11. Control augmented structural synthesis with dynamic stability constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. L.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Dynamic stability constraints are included in a computer program that simultaneously synthesizes a structure and its control system. Two measures of stability, the real part of the system complex eigenvalues and the damping ratio, are examined. The procedure for calculating the sensitivities of the two measures of stability to changes in the structure and its control system is explained. The sensitivities are used to formulate an approximate problem that is solved at each design iteration. The effects of structural damping and noncollated controllers on the synthesis process are discussed.

  12. Structural Dynamics, Stability, and Control of Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Hale, A. L.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamic synthesis of gyroscopic structures consisting of point-connected substructures is investigated. The objective is to develop a mathematical model capable of an adequate simulation of the modal characteristics of a helicopter using a minimum number of degrees of freedom. The basic approach is to regard the helicopter structure as an assemblage of flexible substructures. The variational equations for the perturbed motion about certain equilibrium solutions are derived. The discretized variational equations can be conveniently exhibited in matrix form, and a great deal of information about the system modal characteristics can be extracted from the coefficient matrices. The derivation of the variational equations requires a monumental amount of algebraic operations. To automate this task a symbolic manipulation program on a digital computer is developed.

  13. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2003-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  14. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2004-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  15. Enhancing protein stability by adsorption onto raftlike lipid domains.

    PubMed

    Litt, Jeffrey; Padala, Chakradhar; Asuri, Prashanth; Vutukuru, Srinavya; Athmakuri, Krishna; Kumar, Sanat; Dordick, Jonathan; Kane, Ravi S

    2009-05-27

    We demonstrate that the stability of adsorbed proteins can be enhanced by controlling the heterogeneity of the surfaceby creating raftlike domains in a soft liposomal membrane. Recent work has shown that enzymes adsorbed onto highly curved nanoscale supports can be more stable than those adsorbed on flat surfaces with nominally the same chemical structure. This effect has been attributed to a decrease in lateral interenzyme interactions on a curved surface. Exploiting this idea, we asked if adsorbing enzymes onto "patchy" surfaces composed of adsorbing and nonadsorbing regions can be used to reduce lateral interactions even on relatively flat surfaces. We demonstrate that creating domains on which an enzyme can adsorb enhances the stability of that enzyme under denaturing conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the size of these domains has a considerable effect on the degree of stability imparted by adsorption. Such biomimetic raft-inspired systems may find use in applications ranging from biorecognition to the design of novel strategies for the separation of biomolecules and controlling the interaction of multicomponent membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:19385631

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  17. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-14

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  18. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min). PMID:23827593

  19. Constraints on dynamic stability during forward, backward and lateral locomotion in skilled football players.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of speed and plane of motion on stability during locomotion in skilled football players. Ten male national-level football players participated in this study to run forward, backward and in lateral directions on a treadmill at 80%, 100% and 120% of their preferred running speeds. The coordinate data of passive reflective markers attached to body segments were recorded using motion capture systems. Time series data obtained from the ankle marker were used for further analyses. The largest finite-time Lyapunov exponent and maximum Floquet multiplier were adopted to quantify local and orbital dynamic stabilities, respectively. Results showed that speed did not significantly change local and orbital dynamic stabilities in any of running patterns. However, both local and orbital dynamic stability were significantly higher in the secondary plane of progression. Data revealed that in running, unlike walking, stability in the direction perpendicular to the direction of running is significantly higher, implying that less active control is required in the secondary plane of progression. The results of this study could be useful in sports training and rehabilitation programmes where development of fundamental exercise programmes that challenge both speed and the ability to maintain stability might produce a tangible enhancement of athletic skill level. PMID:25553807

  20. Morphological stability and fluid dynamics of vapor crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research on morphological stability and fluid dynamics of crystal growth is discussed. Interfacial heat and mass transfer research is discussed. The finding of surface roughening is a precursor to a solid-solid phase transition was further quantified. Progress was obtained with the mass spectroscopic characterization of GeSe-Ge I sub 4.

  1. Vesicle Stability and Dynamics: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Bianco, Cristina; Torino, Domenica; Mansy, Sheref S.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory exercise is described that helps students learn about lipid self-assembly by making vesicles under different solution conditions. Concepts covering the chemical properties of different lipids, the dynamics of lipids, and vesicle stability are explored. Further, the described protocol is easy and cheap to implement. One to two…

  2. Enhancement of charge ordering by dynamic electron-phonon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Andrej; Fullerton, Eric; Shpyrko, Oleg

    Symmetry breaking and emergence of order is one of the most fascinating phenomena in condensed matter physics and leads to a plethora of intriguing ground states such as in antiferromagnets, Mott insulators, superconductors, and density-wave systems. Exploiting non-equilibrium dynamics of matter following ultrafast external excitation can provide even more striking routes to symmetry-lowered, ordered states, for instance, by accessing hidden equilibrium states in the free-energy landscape or dynamic stabilization of non-equilibrium states. This is remarkable because ultrafast excitation typically creates disorder, reduces the order parameter, and raises the symmetry. Here, we demonstrate for the case of antiferromagnetic chromium that moderate photo-excitation can transiently enhance the charge-density-wave (CDW) order by up to 30% above its equilibrium value, while strong excitation leads to an oscillating, large-amplitude CDW state that persists above the equilibrium transition temperature. Both effects result from dynamic electron-phonon interaction, which provides an efficient mechanism to selectively transform a broad excitation of the electronic order into a well defined, long-lived coherent lattice vibration. This mechanism may be exploited to transiently enhance the order parameter in other systems with coupled electronic and lattice orders. The data was collected at the x-ray free electron laser LCLS at SLAC.

  3. Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System (DSIS). Volume 3; User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Boyden, Richmond P.; Dress, David A.; Jordan, Thomas L.

    1996-01-01

    The paper is an operating manual for the Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System in specific NASA Langley wind tunnels. The instrumentation system performs either a synchronous demodulation or a Fast Fourier Transform on dynamic balance strain gage signals, and ultimately computes aerodynamic coefficients. The dynamic balance converts sting motor rotation into pitch or yaw plane or roll axis oscillation, with timing information provided by a shaft encoder. Additional instruments control model attitude and balance temperature and monitor sting vibrations. Other instruments perform self-calibration and diagnostics. Procedures for conducting calibrations and wind-off and wind-on tests are listed.

  4. Enhancing collagen stability through nanostructures containing chromium(III) oxide.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, Selvam; Ramamoorthy, Usha; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan; Nair, Balachandran Unni

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of collagen for various applications employs chemicals such as aldehydes, metal ions, polyphenols, etc. Stability against enzymatic, thermal and mechanical degradation is required for a range of biomedical applications. The premise of this research is to explore the use of nanoparticles with suitable functionalization/encapsulation to crosslink with collagen, such that the three dimensional architecture had the desired stability. Collagen solution prepared as per standard protocols is treated with chromium(III) oxide nanoparticules encapsulated within a polymeric matrix (polystyrene-block-polyacrylic acid copolymer). Selectivity towards encapsulation was ensured by the reaction in dimethyl sulfoxide, where the PS groups popped out and encapsulated the Cr(2)O(3). Subsequently when immersed in aqueous solution, PAA units popped up to react with functional groups of collagen. The interaction with collagen was monitored through techniques such as CD, FTIR, viscosity measurements, stress analysis. CD studies and FTIR showed no degradation of collagen. Thermal stability was enhanced upon interaction of nanostructures with collagen. Self-assembly of collagen was delayed but not inhibited, indicating a compete binding of the metal oxide encapsulated polymer to collagen. Metal oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within a polymeric matrix could provide thermal and mechanical stability to collagen. The formed fibrils of collagen could serve as ideal material for various smart applications such as slow/sustained drug release. The study is also relevant to the leather industry in that the nanostructures can diffuse through the highly networked collagen fibre bundles in skin matrix easily, thus overcoming the rate limiting step of diffusion. PMID:22766281

  5. Does a crouched leg posture enhance running stability and robustness?

    PubMed

    Blum, Yvonne; Birn-Jeffery, Aleksandra; Daley, Monica A; Seyfarth, Andre

    2011-07-21

    Humans and birds both walk and run bipedally on compliant legs. However, differences in leg architecture may result in species-specific leg control strategies as indicated by the observed gait patterns. In this work, control strategies for stable running are derived based on a conceptual model and compared with experimental data on running humans and pheasants (Phasianus colchicus). From a model perspective, running with compliant legs can be represented by the planar spring mass model and stabilized by applying swing leg control. Here, linear adaptations of the three leg parameters, leg angle, leg length and leg stiffness during late swing phase are assumed. Experimentally observed kinematic control parameters (leg rotation and leg length change) of human and avian running are compared, and interpreted within the context of this model, with specific focus on stability and robustness characteristics. The results suggest differences in stability characteristics and applied control strategies of human and avian running, which may relate to differences in leg posture (straight leg posture in humans, and crouched leg posture in birds). It has been suggested that crouched leg postures may improve stability. However, as the system of control strategies is overdetermined, our model findings suggest that a crouched leg posture does not necessarily enhance running stability. The model also predicts different leg stiffness adaptation rates for human and avian running, and suggests that a crouched avian leg posture, which is capable of both leg shortening and lengthening, allows for stable running without adjusting leg stiffness. In contrast, in straight-legged human running, the preparation of the ground contact seems to be more critical, requiring leg stiffness adjustment to remain stable. Finally, analysis of a simple robustness measure, the normalized maximum drop, suggests that the crouched leg posture may provide greater robustness to changes in terrain height. PMID

  6. Posterior dynamic stabilization: The interspinous spacer from treatment to prevention

    PubMed Central

    Nachanakian, Antoine; El Helou, Antonios; Alaywan, Moussa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Managements of lumbar stenosis evoluted over the time from decompression to dynamic stabilization preserving the motion segment passing by the rigid fixation. After long years of rigid fusion, adjacent segment disease became more and more frequent and the concept of dynamic stabilization emerged. Materials and Methods: We report our experience with posterior dynamic stabilization using an interspinous distracter (ISD). One hundred and eight patients were operated between September 2008 and January 2012 with different lumbar spine pathologies. The ages of our patients were between 45 years and 70 years, with a mean age of 55 years. With our growing experience, indication of ISD became narrowed and the interspinous spacer became an absolute tool for adjacent segment disease as a treatment as well as prophylactic with rigid stabilization. Results and Discussion: Overall clinical improvement was noted in ISD-treated patients, with considerable satisfaction in 77% of patients on average. The patient at first reported an improvement of their radicular pain with a mean reduction of 3.6/10 on visual analog scale. Post-operative walking distance progressively increased during the next 3 months. Whereas, a radiological evaluation at 3 months showed a mean of 42% improvement of the disc height. On the other hand, all patients operated with posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) at the time of rigid stabilization showed no adjacent segment disease compared to those operated with posterior arthrodesis (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Interspinous spacer after surgical decompression for spinal stenosis by excision of Ligamentum flavum demonstrates excellent short-term and long-term results for improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, and patient satisfaction. It provides restoration of disc height, reduction of vertebral slip and it's a necessary tool in the management and the prevention of adjacent segment disease. PMID:27057211

  7. Dynamic Stability of Uncertain Laminated Beams Under Subtangential Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vijay K.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Adelman, Howard (Technical Monitor); Horta, Lucas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the inherent complexity of fiber-reinforced laminated composites, it can be challenging to manufacture composite structures according to their exact design specifications, resulting in unwanted material and geometric uncertainties. In this research, we focus on the deterministic and probabilistic stability analysis of laminated structures subject to subtangential loading, a combination of conservative and nonconservative tangential loads, using the dynamic criterion. Thus a shear-deformable laminated beam element, including warping effects, is derived to study the deterministic and probabilistic response of laminated beams. This twenty-one degrees of freedom element can be used for solving both static and dynamic problems. In the first-order shear deformable model used here we have employed a more accurate method to obtain the transverse shear correction factor. The dynamic version of the principle of virtual work for laminated composites is expressed in its nondimensional form and the element tangent stiffness and mass matrices are obtained using analytical integration The stability is studied by giving the structure a small disturbance about an equilibrium configuration, and observing if the resulting response remains small. In order to study the dynamic behavior by including uncertainties into the problem, three models were developed: Exact Monte Carlo Simulation, Sensitivity Based Monte Carlo Simulation, and Probabilistic FEA. These methods were integrated into the developed finite element analysis. Also, perturbation and sensitivity analysis have been used to study nonconservative problems, as well as to study the stability analysis, using the dynamic criterion.

  8. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability.

    PubMed

    Levatić, I; Popčević, P; Šurija, V; Kruchkov, A; Berger, H; Magrez, A; White, J S; Rønnow, H M; Živković, I

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  9. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    PubMed Central

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  10. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket.

  11. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  12. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of mathbb {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius mathcal {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  13. Summary of Methods for Calculating Dynamic Lateral Stability and Response and for Estimating Lateral Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1951-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Reference is also made to reports presenting experimental data that should be useful in making estimates of the derivatives. Detailed estimating methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic- and supersonic-speed conditions.

  14. On the dynamics of turbulent transport near marginal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H. |; Hahm, T.S.

    1995-03-01

    A general methodology for describing the dynamics of transport near marginal stability is formulated. Marginal stability is a special case of the more general phenomenon of self-organized criticality. Simple, one field models of the dynamics of tokamak plasma self-organized criticality have been constructed, and include relevant features such as sheared mean flow and transport bifurcations. In such models, slow mode (i.e. large scale, low frequency transport events) correlation times determine the behavior of transport dynamics near marginal stability. To illustrate this, impulse response scaling exponents (z) and turbulent diffusivities (D) have been calculated for the minimal (Burgers) and sheared flow models. For the minimal model, z = 1 (indicating ballastic propagation) and D {approximately}(S{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}, where S{sub 0}{sup 2} is the noise strength. With an identically structured noise spectrum and flow with shearing rate exceeding the ambient decorrelation rate for the largest scale transport events, diffusion is recovered with z = 2 and D {approximately} (S{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 3/5}. This indicates a qualitative change in the dynamics, as well as a reduction in losses. These results are consistent with recent findings from {rho} scaling scans. Several tokamak transport experiments are suggested.

  15. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigation of the stability of nonaxisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric bridges contained between equal and unequal radii disks as a function of Bond and Weber number with emphasis on the transition from unstable axisymmetric to stable nonaxisymmetric shapes. Numerical analysis of the stability of nonaxisymmetric bridges for various orientations of the gravity vector for equal and unequal disks. Experimental and theoretical investigation of large (nonaxisymmetric) oscillations and breaking of liquid bridges. This project involves both experimental and theoretical work. Static and dynamic experiments are conducted in a Plateau tank which makes a range of static Bond numbers accessible.

  16. Dynamics and stability of parametrically excited gyroscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Narayana L.

    We study the reduction, dynamics and stability of two-degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. We are particularly interested in understanding energy transfer between modes in such systems. The first part of this research is concerned with the stochastic stability of a two-degree-of-freedom linear system: (a) with one asymptotically stable and one critical mode, (b) with both modes critical and one of the modes corresponding to a nilpotent structure. We obtain asymptotic expansions for the moment and maximal Lyapunov exponents which characterize the exponential growth rate of the amplitude. The results from (a) indicate that the presence of noise may have a stabilizing effect and are applied to explain experimental observations on fluid flow over tube bundles. The results from (b) are applied to show that the effects of noise on a pipe conveying fluid close to divergence are always destabilising in nature. The second part of this research involves the reduction of two-degree-of-freedom randomly perturbed nonlinear gyroscopic systems close to a double zero resonance. It is shown that the long term behaviour of the original four-dimensional system can be approximated by a one dimensional Markov process which take values on a line or a graph. These results are applied to study the dynamics and stability of a rotating shaft subjected to fluctuating axial load. In the final part of this research, we study the dynamics and stability of nonlinear delay gyroscopic systems with periodically varying delay. The center manifold and normal form methods are used to obtain an approximate and simpler two dimensional system. Analysis of this simpler system shows that periodic variations in the delay may lead to larger stability boundaries. These results are applied to demonstrate that greater depths of cut may be achieved in a boring process when the speed of the spindle is modulated sinusoidally instead of being kept constant. A detailed knowledge of the machine-tool structure

  17. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  18. Dynamic stability experiments in sodium-heated steam generators. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Roy, R.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.

    1984-01-01

    Seventy-two dynamic stability tests were performed in the sodium-heated boiling-water test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. A full-scale LMFBR steam generator tube was employed as the test section operating over the water parameter ranges of 6.9 to 15.9 MPa pressure and 170 to 800 kg/m/sup 2/.s mass flux. The stability thresholds from the test compared well to the predictions of a modified version of a correlation equation recently published by other investigators. Typical experimental data and the modified correlation equation are presented.

  19. Dynamic stabilization of classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Piriz, S. A.; Tahir, N. A.

    2011-09-15

    Dynamic stabilization of classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied by modeling the interface vibration with the simplest possible wave form, namely, a sequence of Dirac deltas. As expected, stabilization results to be impossible. However, in contradiction to previously reported results obtained with a sinusoidal driving, it is found that in general the perturbation amplitude is larger than in the classical case. Therefore, no beneficial effect can be obtained from the vertical vibration of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between two ideal fluids.

  20. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  1. Lipid Cross-Linking of Nanolipoprotein Particles Substantially Enhances Serum Stability and Cellular Uptake.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Sean F; Blanchette, Craig D; Scharadin, Tiffany M; Hura, Greg L; Rasley, Amy; Corzett, Michele; Pan, Chong-Xian; Fischer, Nicholas O; Henderson, Paul T

    2016-08-17

    Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) consist of a discoidal phospholipid lipid bilayer confined by an apolipoprotein belt. NLPs are a promising platform for a variety of biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, size, definable composition, and amphipathic characteristics. However, poor serum stability hampers the use of NLPs for in vivo applications such as drug formulation. In this study, NLP stability was enhanced upon the incorporation and subsequent UV-mediated intermolecular cross-linking of photoactive DiynePC phospholipids in the lipid bilayer, forming cross-linked nanoparticles (X-NLPs). Both the concentration of DiynePC in the bilayer and UV exposure time significantly affected the resulting X-NLP stability in 100% serum, as assessed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of fluorescently labeled particles. Cross-linking did not significantly impact the size of X-NLPs as determined by dynamic light scattering and SEC. X-NLPs had essentially no degradation over 48 h in 100% serum, which is a drastic improvement compared to non-cross-linked NLPs (50% degradation by ∼10 min). X-NLPs had greater uptake into the human ATCC 5637 bladder cancer cell line compared to non-cross-linked particles, indicating their potential utility for targeted drug delivery. X-NLPs also exhibited enhanced stability following intravenous administration in mice. These results collectively support the potential utility of X-NLPs for a variety of in vivo applications. PMID:27411034

  2. Distributed Multi-Agent-Based Protection Scheme for Transient Stability Enhancement in Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. S.; Mahmud, M. A.; Pota, H. R.; Hossain, M. J.; Orchi, T. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new distributed agent-based scheme to enhance the transient stability of power systems by maintaining phase angle cohesiveness of interconnected generators through proper relay coordination with critical clearing time (CCT) information. In this distributed multi-agent infrastructure, intelligent agents represent various physical device models to provide dynamic information and energy flow among different physical processes of power systems. The agents can communicate with each other in a distributed manner with a final aim to control circuit breakers (CBs) with CCT information as this is the key issue for maintaining and enhancing the transient stability of power systems. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated on a standard IEEE 39-bus New England benchmark system under different large disturbances such as three-phase short-circuit faults and changes in loads within the systems. From the simulation results, it is found that the proposed scheme significantly enhances the transient stability of power systems as compared to a conventional scheme of static CB operation.

  3. Numerical stability in multifluid gas dynamics with implicit drag forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, J. D.; Chang, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    The numerical stability of a conventional explicit numerical scheme for solving the inviscid multifluid dynamical equations describing a multicomponent gas mixture is investigated both analytically and computationally. Although these equations do not explicitly contain diffusion terms, it is well known that they reduce to a single-fluid diffusional description when the drag coefficients in the species momentum equations are large. The question then arises as to whether their numerical solution is subject to a diffusional stability restriction on the time step in addition to the usual Courant sound-speed stability condition. An analytical stability analysis is performed for the special case of a quiescent binary gas mixture with equal sound speeds and temperatures. It is found that the Courant condition is always sufficient to ensure stability, so that no additional diffusional stability restriction arises for any value of the drag coefficient, however large. This result is confirmed by one-dimensional computational results for binary and ternary mixtures with unequal sound speeds, which remain stable even when the time step exceeds the usual diffusional limit by factors of order 100.

  4. Stability Enhancement of Polymeric Sensing Films Using Fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Brian; Shevade, Abhijit; Ryan, Margaret Amy; Kisor, Adam; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Manatt, Kenneth; Homer, Margie; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown the stability enhancement of polymeric sensing films on mixing the polymer with colloidal filler particles (submicron-sized) of carbon black, silver, titanium dioxide, and fumed silicon dioxide. The polymer films are candidates for potential use as sensing media in micro/nano chemical sensor devices. The need for stability enhancement of polymer sensing films arises because such films have been found to exhibit unpredictable changes in sensing activity over time, which could result in a possible failure of the sensor device. The changes in the physical properties of a polymer sensing film caused by the sorption of a target molecule can be measured by any of several established transduction techniques: electrochemical, optical, calorimetric, or piezoelectric, for example. The transduction technique used in the current polymer stability experiments is based on piezoelectric principles using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The surface of the QCM is coated with the polymer, and the mass uptake by the polymer film causes a change in the oscillating frequency of the quartz crystal. The polymer used for the current study is ethyl cellulose. The polymer/ polymer composite solutions were prepared in 1,3 dioxolane solvent. The filler concentration was fixed at 10 weight percent for the composites. The polymer or polymer composite solutions were cast on the quartz crystal having a fundamental frequency of about 6 MHz. The coated crystal was subjected to a multistage drying process to remove all measurable traces of the solvent. In each experiment, the frequency of oscillation was measured while the QCM was exposed to clean, dry, flowing air for about 30 minutes, then to air containing a known concentration of isopropanol for about 30 minutes, then again to clean dry air for about 30 minutes, and so forth. This cycle of measurements for varying isopropanol concentrations was repeated at intervals for several months. The figure depicts some of the

  5. Dynamical systems techniques for enhancing microfluidic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    Achieving rapid mixing is often desirable in microfluidic devices, for example in improving reation rates in biotechnological assays. Enhancing mixing within a particular context is often achieved by introducing problem-specific strategies such as grooved or twisted channels, ac electromagnetic fields or oscillatory microsyringe flows. Evaluating the efficiency of these methods is challenging since either experimental fabrication and sensing, or computationally expensive direct numerical simulations with complicated boundary conditions, are required. A review of how mixing can be quantified when velocity fields have been obtained from such situations is presented. A less-known alternative to these methods is offered by dynamical systems, which characterizes the motion of collective fluid parcel trajectories by studying crucial interior flow barriers which move unsteadily, but nevertheless strongly govern mixing possibilities. The methodology behind defining these barriers and quantifying the fluid transport influenced by them is explained. Their application towards several microfluidic situations (e.g. best cross-flow positioning in cross-channel micromixers, usage of channel curvature to enhance mixing within microdroplets traveling in a channel, optimum frequencies of velocity agitations to use) is discussed.

  6. Stability of interconnected dynamical systems described on Banach spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, R. D.; Michel, A. N.

    1976-01-01

    New stability results for a large class of interconnected dynamical systems (also called composite systems or large scale systems) described on Banach spaces are established. In the present approach, the objective is always the same: to analyze large scale systems in terms of their lower order and simpler subsystems and in terms of their interconnecting structure. The present results provide a systematic procedure of analyzing hybrid dynamical systems (i.e., systems that are described by a mixture of different types of equations). To demonstrate the method of analysis advanced, two specific examples are considered.

  7. Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System (DSIS). Volume 1: Hardware description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. L.; Daniels, T. S.; Hare, D. A.; Boyden, R. P.; Dress, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a hardware description manual for the Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System that is used in specific NASA Langley wind tunnels. The instrumentation system performs either a synchronous demodulation or a fast Fourier transform on dynamic balance strain gage signals, and ultimately computes aerodynamic coefficients. The DSIS consists of a double rack of instruments, a remote motor-generator set, two special stings each with motor driven shafts, and specially designed balances. The major components in the instrumentation rack include a personal computer, digital signal processor microcomputers, computer-controlled signal conditioners, function generator, digital multimeter, and an optional fast Fourier transform analyzer.

  8. Dynamic stability testing of aircraft - Needs versus capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlik-Rueckemann, K. J.

    1973-01-01

    Highlights of a recent survey of the future needs for dynamic stability information for such aerospace vehicles as the Space Shuttle and advanced high-performance military aircraft, indicating the importance of obtaining this information for high-angle-of-attack high-Reynolds-number conditions. A review of the wind-tunnel capabilities in North America for measuring dynamic stability derivatives reveals an almost total lack of such capabilities for Mach numbers above 0.1 at angles of attack higher than 25 deg. In addition, capabilities to obtain certain new cross-coupling derivatives and information on effects of the coning motion are almost completely lacking. Recommendations are made regarding equipment that should be constructed to remedy this situation.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulation on Stability of Insulin on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Li-jun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Shen, Jia-wei; Kang, Yu

    2009-12-01

    The adsorption dynamics of a model protein (the human insulin) onto graphene surfaces with different sizes was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. During the adsorption, it has different effect on the stability of the model protein in the fixed and non-fixed graphene systems. The tertiary structure of the protein was destroyed or partially destroyed, and graphene surfaces shows the selective protection for some α-helices in non-fixed systems but not in fixed systems by reason of the flexibility of graphene. As indicated by the interaction energy curve and trajectory animation, the conformation and orientation selection of the protein were induced by the properties and the texture of graphene surfaces. The knowledge of protein adsorption on graphene surfaces would be helpful to better understand stability of protein on graphene surfaces and facilitate potential applications of graphene in biotechnology.

  10. Development of a transfer function method for dynamic stability measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    Flutter testing method based on transfer function measurements is developed. The error statistics of several dynamic stability measurement methods are reviewed. It is shown that the transfer function measurement controls the error level by averaging the data and correlating the input and output. The method also gives a direct estimate of the error in the response measurement. An algorithm is developed for obtaining the natural frequency and damping ratio of low damped modes of the system, using integrals of the transfer function in the vicinity of a resonant peak. Guidelines are given for selecting the parameters in the transfer function measurement. Finally, the dynamic stability measurement technique is applied to data from a wind tunnel test of a proprotor and wing model.

  11. Conditional random matrix ensembles and the stability of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Paul; Rolando, Delphine M. Y.; MacLean, Adam L.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-08-01

    Random matrix theory (RMT) has found applications throughout physics and applied mathematics, in subject areas as diverse as communications networks, population dynamics, neuroscience, and models of the banking system. Many of these analyses exploit elegant analytical results, particularly the circular law and its extensions. In order to apply these results, assumptions must be made about the distribution of matrix elements. Here we demonstrate that the choice of matrix distribution is crucial. In particular, adopting an unrealistic matrix distribution for the sake of analytical tractability is liable to lead to misleading conclusions. We focus on the application of RMT to the long-standing, and at times fractious, ‘diversity-stability debate’, which is concerned with establishing whether large complex systems are likely to be stable. Early work (and subsequent elaborations) brought RMT to bear on the debate by modelling the entries of a system’s Jacobian matrix as independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. These analyses were successful in yielding general results that were not tied to any specific system, but relied upon a restrictive i.i.d. assumption. Other studies took an opposing approach, seeking to elucidate general principles of stability through the analysis of specific systems. Here we develop a statistical framework that reconciles these two contrasting approaches. We use a range of illustrative dynamical systems examples to demonstrate that: (i) stability probability cannot be summarily deduced from any single property of the system (e.g. its diversity); and (ii) our assessment of stability depends on adequately capturing the details of the systems analysed. Failing to condition on the structure of dynamical systems will skew our analysis and can, even for very small systems, result in an unnecessarily pessimistic diagnosis of their stability.

  12. Issues on stability of ADP feedback controllers for dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S N; Ding, Jie; Lewis, Frank L

    2008-08-01

    This paper traces the development of neural-network (NN)-based feedback controllers that are derived from the principle of adaptive/approximate dynamic programming (ADP) and discusses their closed-loop stability. Different versions of NN structures in the literature, which embed mathematical mappings related to solutions of the ADP-formulated problems called "adaptive critics" or "action-critic" networks, are discussed. Distinction between the two classes of ADP applications is pointed out. Furthermore, papers in "model-free" development and model-based neurocontrollers are reviewed in terms of their contributions to stability issues. Recent literature suggests that work in ADP-based feedback controllers with assured stability is growing in diverse forms. PMID:18632377

  13. Facet joint changes after application of lumbar nonfusion dynamic stabilization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The long-term effects on adjacent-segment pathology after nonfusion dynamic stabilization is unclear, and, in particular, changes at the adjacent facet joints have not been reported in a clinical study. This study aims to compare changes in the adjacent facet joints after lumbar spinal surgery. METHODS Patients who underwent monosegmental surgery at L4-5 with nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system (Dynesys group) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation (fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Facet joint degeneration was evaluated at each segment using the CT grading system. RESULTS The Dynesys group included 15 patients, while the fusion group included 22 patients. The preoperative facet joint degeneration CT grades were not different between the 2 groups. Compared with the preoperative CT grades, 1 side of the facet joints at L3-4 and L4-5 had significantly more degeneration in the Dynesys group. In the fusion group, significant facet joint degeneration developed on both sides at L2-3, L3-4, and L5-S1. The subjective back and leg pain scores were not different between the 2 groups during follow-up, but functional outcome based on the Oswestry Disability Index improved less in the fusion group than in the Dynesys group. CONCLUSIONS Nonfusion dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system had a greater preventative effect on facet joint degeneration in comparison with that obtained using fusion surgery. The Dynesys system, however, resulted in facet joint degeneration at the instrumented segments and above. An improved physiological nonfusion dynamic stabilization system for lumbar spinal surgery should be developed. PMID:26721580

  14. Dynamic remedial action scheme using online transient stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Arun

    Economic pressure and environmental factors have forced the modern power systems to operate closer to their stability limits. However, maintaining transient stability is a fundamental requirement for the operation of interconnected power systems. In North America, power systems are planned and operated to withstand the loss of any single or multiple elements without violating North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) system performance criteria. For a contingency resulting in the loss of multiple elements (Category C), emergency transient stability controls may be necessary to stabilize the power system. Emergency control is designed to sense abnormal conditions and subsequently take pre-determined remedial actions to prevent instability. Commonly known as either Remedial Action Schemes (RAS) or as Special/System Protection Schemes (SPS), these emergency control approaches have been extensively adopted by utilities. RAS are designed to address specific problems, e.g. to increase power transfer, to provide reactive support, to address generator instability, to limit thermal overloads, etc. Possible remedial actions include generator tripping, load shedding, capacitor and reactor switching, static VAR control, etc. Among various RAS types, generation shedding is the most effective and widely used emergency control means for maintaining system stability. In this dissertation, an optimal power flow (OPF)-based generation-shedding RAS is proposed. This scheme uses online transient stability calculation and generator cost function to determine appropriate remedial actions. For transient stability calculation, SIngle Machine Equivalent (SIME) technique is used, which reduces the multimachine power system model to a One-Machine Infinite Bus (OMIB) equivalent and identifies critical machines. Unlike conventional RAS, which are designed using offline simulations, online stability calculations make the proposed RAS dynamic and adapting to any power system

  15. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed.

  16. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed. PMID:19566263

  17. Enhanced structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures by graphene encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Vasić, Borislav; Pešić, Jelena; Prinz, Julia; Bald, Ilko; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Gajić, Radoš

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that a single-layer graphene replicates the shape of DNA origami nanostructures very well. It can be employed as a protective layer for the enhancement of structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures. Using the AFM based manipulation, we show that the normal force required to damage graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures is over an order of magnitude greater than for the unprotected ones. In addition, we show that graphene encapsulation offers protection to the DNA origami nanostructures against prolonged exposure to deionized water, and multiple immersions. Through these results we demonstrate that graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures are strong enough to sustain various solution phase processing, lithography and transfer steps, thus extending the limits of DNA-mediated bottom-up fabrication.

  18. Low dose tunicamycin enhances atherosclerotic plaque stability by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Meijuan; Song, Liqiang; Yan, Hao; Liu, Min; Zhang, Le; Ma, Ying; Yuan, Jian; Hu, Jianhua; Ji, Zhaole; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Congye; Wang, Haichang; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Yingmei; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    After decades of indolent progression, atherosclerosis may cause unheralded events, such as myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and stroke due to sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaques, and pharmacologically modulating plaque stability would reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is responsible for the vulnerability of plaques. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this work, ApoE(-/-) mice underwent perivascular carotid collar placement surgeries or sham operations were given higher (3.0mg/kg) and lower (0.3mg/kg) doses of tunicamycin (TM), and plaque stability was evaluated. It was shown that lower TM-treated animals exhibited reduced plaque areas and necrotic cores as well as fibrous cap thickness accompanied by a lower percentage of infiltrates and foam cells than the sham-operated and higher TM treated animals. Lower TM had a profound inhibitory effect on plasma inflammatory response and lipid profile in atherosclerotic ApoE(-/-) mice. In addition, we found that the ApoE(-/-) mice presented higher autophagy activity in response to lower TM administration while apoptosis was reduced. An in vitro study in murine macrophages revealed that lower TM could markedly reduce lipid uptake and accumulation and cell apoptosis while significantly upregulated the expression of Atg7. However, higher TM had adverse effects. Finally, mild induction of ERS by lower TM inhibits AKT-TSC-mTOR cascades to increase cellular autophagy. However, high TM failed to enhance autophagy and equilibrate elevated CHOP-mediated cell death in spite of the inhibition of AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling. In conclusion, lower TM stabilized plaques by activating autophagy through AKT-TSC-mTOR signaling. PMID:26616221

  19. Dynamics, stability, and statistics on lattices and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Roberto

    2014-07-15

    These lectures aim at surveying some dynamical models that have been widely explored in the recent scientific literature as case studies of complex dynamical evolution, emerging from the spatio-temporal organization of several coupled dynamical variables. The first message is that a suitable mathematical description of such models needs tools and concepts borrowed from the general theory of dynamical systems and from out-of-equilibrium statistical mechanics. The second message is that the overall scenario is definitely reacher than the standard problems in these fields. For instance, systems exhibiting complex unpredictable evolution do not necessarily exhibit deterministic chaotic behavior (i.e., Lyapunov chaos) as it happens for dynamical models made of a few degrees of freedom. In fact, a very large number of spatially organized dynamical variables may yield unpredictable evolution even in the absence of Lyapunov instability. Such a mechanism may emerge from the combination of spatial extension and nonlinearity. Moreover, spatial extension allows one to introduce naturally disorder, or heterogeneity of the interactions as important ingredients for complex evolution. It is worth to point out that the models discussed in these lectures share such features, despite they have been inspired by quite different physical and biological problems. Along these lectures we describe also some of the technical tools employed for the study of such models, e.g., Lyapunov stability analysis, unpredictability indicators for “stable chaos,” hydrodynamic description of transport in low spatial dimension, spectral decomposition of stochastic dynamics on directed networks, etc.

  20. Metaconcrete: Engineered aggregates for enhanced dynamic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Stephanie J.

    This work presents the development and investigation of a new type of concrete for the attenuation of waves induced by dynamic excitation. Recent progress in the field of metamaterials science has led to a range of novel composites which display unusual properties when interacting with electromagnetic, acoustic, and elastic waves. A new structural metamaterial with enhanced properties for dynamic loading applications is presented, which is named metaconcrete. In this new composite material the standard stone and gravel aggregates of regular concrete are replaced with spherical engineered inclusions. Each metaconcrete aggregate has a layered structure, consisting of a heavy core and a thin compliant outer coating. This structure allows for resonance at or near the eigenfrequencies of the inclusions, and the aggregates can be tuned so that resonant oscillations will be activated by particular frequencies of an applied dynamic loading. The activation of resonance within the aggregates causes the overall system to exhibit negative effective mass, which leads to attenuation of the applied wave motion. To investigate the behavior of metaconcrete slabs under a variety of different loading conditions a finite element slab model containing a periodic array of aggregates is utilized. The frequency dependent nature of metaconcrete is investigated by considering the transmission of wave energy through a slab, which indicates the presence of large attenuation bands near the resonant frequencies of the aggregates. Applying a blast wave loading to both an elastic slab and a slab model that incorporates the fracture characteristics of the mortar matrix reveals that a significant portion of the supplied energy can be absorbed by aggregates which are activated by the chosen blast wave profile. The transfer of energy from the mortar matrix to the metaconcrete aggregates leads to a significant reduction in the maximum longitudinal stress, greatly improving the ability of the material

  1. Lower Protein Stability Does Not Necessarily Increase Local Dynamics.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Levi J; Bowler, Bruce E

    2016-05-17

    Overall protein stability is thought to have an important impact on the millisecond time scale dynamics modulating enzyme function. In order to better understand the effects of overall stability on the substructure dynamics of mitochondrial cytochrome c, we test the effect of a destabilizing L85A mutation on the kinetics and equilibrium thermodynamics of the alkaline conformational transition. The alkaline conformational transition replaces the Met80 ligand of the heme with a lysine residue from Ω-loop D, the heme crevice loop, consisting of residues 70-85. Residues 67-87 are the most conserved portion of the sequence of mitochondrial cytochrome c, suggesting that this region is of prime importance for function. Mutations to Ω-loop D affect the stability of the heme crevice directly, modulating the pKapp of the alkaline transition. Two variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c, WT*/L85A and WT*/K73H/L85A, were prepared for these studies. Guanidine-HCl unfolding monitored by circular dichroism and pH titrations at 695 nm, respectively, were used to study the thermodynamics of global and local unfolding of these variants. The kinetics of the alkaline transition were measured by pH-jump stopped-flow methods. Gated electron transfer techniques using bis(2,2',2″-terpyridine)cobalt(II) as a reducing reagent were implemented to measure the heme crevice dynamics for the WT*/K73H/L85A variant. Contrary to the expectation that dynamics around the heme crevice would be faster for the less stable WT*/K73H/L85A variant, based on the behavior of psychrophilic versus mesophilic enzymes, they were similar to those for a variant without the L85A mutation. In fact, below pH 7, the dynamics of the WT*/K73H/L85A variant were slower. PMID:27104373

  2. Dynamic Stability Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroenenberger, Mark; Yates, Leslie; Hathaway, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Results from a 26 shot ballistic range test of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule are presented. The supersonic pitch damping properties of the MSL capsule were characterized between Mach 1.35 and Mach 3.5 and total angles-of-attack from 0 to 30 degrees. In flight, the MSL entry capsule will utilize a radial center-of-gravity offset to produce a non-zero trim angle-of-attack. This offset trim angle will produce lift, enabling the capsule to fly a guided entry and reducing the landing footprint dimensions to within 10 km of the desired landing site. A lifting configuration could not be tested at the ballistic range used for this test as the models would swerve into the range walls, possibly damaging cameras, the coordinate reference system or other facility assets. Ballistic (non-lifting) data was extracted and will be implemented in a conservative fashion to ensure that the dynamic stability characteristics of the flight vehicle are bounded. A comparison between the MSL pitch damping results and the dynamic model of the Mars Exploration Rover capsule shows generally close agreement with no significant differences in damping characteristics due to the change in backshell geometry. Dynamic moments are also compared to the MSL reaction control system (RCS) control authority to show the controller has sufficient margin to easily damp any dynamic stability effects.

  3. Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.

  4. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  5. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  6. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  7. Enhanced stability and activity of an antimicrobial peptide in conjugation with silver nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Pal, Indrani; Brahmkhatri, Varsha P; Bera, Swapna; Bhattacharyya, Dipita; Quirishi, Yasrib; Bhunia, Anirban; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2016-12-01

    The conjugation of nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides (AMP) is emerging as a promising route to achieve superior antimicrobial activity. However, the nature of peptide-nanoparticle interactions in these systems remains unclear. This study describes a system consisting of a cysteine containing antimicrobial peptide conjugated with silver nanoparticles, in which the two components exhibit a dynamic interaction resulting in a significantly enhanced stability and biological activity compared to that of the individual components. This was investigated using NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other biophysical techniques. Using fluorescence assisted cell sorting and membrane mimics we carried out a quantitative comparison of the activity of the AMP-nanoparticle system and the free peptide. Taken together, the study provides new insights into nanoparticle-AMP interactions at a molecular level and brings out the factors that will be useful for consideration while designing new conjugates with enhanced functionality. PMID:27585423

  8. Symmetry-enhanced performance of dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasini, S.; Uhrig, G. S.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a system with general decoherence and a quadratic dynamical decoupling sequence (QDD) for the coherence control of a qubit coupled to a bath of spins. We investigate the influence of the geometry and of the initial conditions of the bath on the performance of the sequence. The overall performance is quantified by a distance norm d. It is expected that d scales with {tau}, the total duration of the sequence, as {tau}{sup min{l_brace}N{sub x},N{sub z}{r_brace}+1}, where N{sub x} and N{sub z} are the number of pulses of the outer and of the inner sequence, respectively. We show both numerically and analytically that the state of the bath can boost the performance of QDD under certain conditions: The scaling of QDD for a given number of pulses can be enhanced by a factor of 2 if the bath is prepared in a highly symmetric state and if the system Hamiltonian is SU(2) invariant.

  9. Reexamination of dynamical stabilization of matter-wave solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Itin, Alexander; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2006-09-15

    We consider dynamical stabilization of Bose-Einstein condensates by time-dependent modulation of the scattering length. The problem has been studied before by several methods: Gaussian variational approximation, the method of moments, the method of modulated Townes soliton, and the direct averaging of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We summarize these methods and find that the numerically obtained stabilized solution has a different configuration than that assumed by the theoretical methods (in particular a phase of the wave function is not quadratic with r). We show that there is presently no clear evidence for stabilization in a strict sense, because in the numerical experiments only metastable (slowly decaying) solutions have been obtained. In other words, neither numerical nor mathematical evidence for a new kind of soliton solutions has been revealed so far. The existence of the metastable solutions is nevertheless an interesting and complicated phenomenon on its own. We try some non-Gaussian variational trial functions to obtain better predictions for the critical nonlinearity g{sub cr} for metastabilization but other dynamical properties of the solutions remain difficult to predict.

  10. Strategy Switching in the Stabilization of Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zenzeri, Jacopo; De Santis, Dalia; Morasso, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms of strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics, this work investigates how human subjects learn to become skilled users of an underactuated bimanual tool in an unstable environment. The tool, which consists of a mass and two hand-held non-linear springs, is affected by a saddle-like force-field. The non-linearity of the springs allows the users to determine size and orientation of the tool stiffness ellipse, by using different patterns of bimanual coordination: minimal stiffness occurs when the two spring terminals are aligned and stiffness size grows by stretching them apart. Tool parameters were set such that minimal stiffness is insufficient to provide stable equilibrium whereas asymptotic stability can be achieved with sufficient stretching, although at the expense of greater effort. As a consequence, tool users have two possible strategies for stabilizing the mass in different regions of the workspace: 1) high stiffness feedforward strategy, aiming at asymptotic stability and 2) low stiffness positional feedback strategy aiming at bounded stability. The tool was simulated by a bimanual haptic robot with direct torque control of the motors. In a previous study we analyzed the behavior of naïve users and we found that they spontaneously clustered into two groups of approximately equal size. In this study we trained subjects to become expert users of both strategies in a discrete reaching task. Then we tested generalization capabilities and mechanism of strategy-switching by means of stabilization tasks which consist of tracking moving targets in the workspace. The uniqueness of the experimental setup is that it addresses the general problem of strategy-switching in an unstable environment, suggesting that complex behaviors cannot be explained in terms of a global optimization criterion but rather require the ability to switch between different sub-optimal mechanisms. PMID:24921254

  11. Strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zenzeri, Jacopo; De Santis, Dalia; Morasso, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms of strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics, this work investigates how human subjects learn to become skilled users of an underactuated bimanual tool in an unstable environment. The tool, which consists of a mass and two hand-held non-linear springs, is affected by a saddle-like force-field. The non-linearity of the springs allows the users to determine size and orientation of the tool stiffness ellipse, by using different patterns of bimanual coordination: minimal stiffness occurs when the two spring terminals are aligned and stiffness size grows by stretching them apart. Tool parameters were set such that minimal stiffness is insufficient to provide stable equilibrium whereas asymptotic stability can be achieved with sufficient stretching, although at the expense of greater effort. As a consequence, tool users have two possible strategies for stabilizing the mass in different regions of the workspace: 1) high stiffness feedforward strategy, aiming at asymptotic stability and 2) low stiffness positional feedback strategy aiming at bounded stability. The tool was simulated by a bimanual haptic robot with direct torque control of the motors. In a previous study we analyzed the behavior of naïve users and we found that they spontaneously clustered into two groups of approximately equal size. In this study we trained subjects to become expert users of both strategies in a discrete reaching task. Then we tested generalization capabilities and mechanism of strategy-switching by means of stabilization tasks which consist of tracking moving targets in the workspace. The uniqueness of the experimental setup is that it addresses the general problem of strategy-switching in an unstable environment, suggesting that complex behaviors cannot be explained in terms of a global optimization criterion but rather require the ability to switch between different sub-optimal mechanisms. PMID:24921254

  12. A study of helicopter stability and control including blade dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xin; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A linearized model of rotorcraft dynamics has been developed through the use of symbolic automatic equation generating techniques. The dynamic model has been formulated in a unique way such that it can be used to analyze a variety of rotor/body coupling problems including a rotor mounted on a flexible shaft with a number of modes as well as free-flight stability and control characteristics. Direct comparison of the time response to longitudinal, lateral and directional control inputs at various trim conditions shows that the linear model yields good to very good correlation with flight test. In particular it is shown that a dynamic inflow model is essential to obtain good time response correlation, especially for the hover trim condition. It also is shown that the main rotor wake interaction with the tail rotor and fixed tail surfaces is a significant contributor to the response at translational flight trim conditions. A relatively simple model for the downwash and sidewash at the tail surfaces based on flat vortex wake theory is shown to produce good agreement. Then, the influence of rotor flap and lag dynamics on automatic control systems feedback gain limitations is investigated with the model. It is shown that the blade dynamics, especially lagging dynamics, can severly limit the useable values of the feedback gain for simple feedback control and that multivariable optimal control theory is a powerful tool to design high gain augmentation control system. The frequency-shaped optimal control design can offer much better flight dynamic characteristics and a stable margin for the feedback system without need to model the lagging dynamics.

  13. Non-linear dynamics of human locomotion: effects of rhythmic auditory cueing on local dynamic stability

    PubMed Central

    Terrier, Philippe; Dériaz, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    It has been observed that times series of gait parameters [stride length (SL), stride time (ST), and stride speed (SS)], exhibit long-term persistence and fractal-like properties. Synchronizing steps with rhythmic auditory stimuli modifies the persistent fluctuation pattern to anti-persistence. Another non-linear method estimates the degree of resilience of gait control to small perturbations, i.e., the local dynamic stability (LDS). The method makes use of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, which estimates how fast a non-linear system embedded in a reconstructed state space (attractor) diverges after an infinitesimal perturbation. We propose to use an instrumented treadmill to simultaneously measure basic gait parameters (time series of SL, ST, and SS from which the statistical persistence among consecutive strides can be assessed), and the trajectory of the center of pressure (from which the LDS can be estimated). In 20 healthy participants, the response to rhythmic auditory cueing (RAC) of LDS and of statistical persistence [assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)] was compared. By analyzing the divergence curves, we observed that long-term LDS (computed as the reverse of the average logarithmic rate of divergence between the 4th and the 10th strides downstream from nearest neighbors in the reconstructed attractor) was strongly enhanced (relative change +73%). That is likely the indication of a more dampened dynamics. The change in short-term LDS (divergence over one step) was smaller (+3%). DFA results (scaling exponents) confirmed an anti-persistent pattern in ST, SL, and SS. Long-term LDS (but not short-term LDS) and scaling exponents exhibited a significant correlation between them (r = 0.7). Both phenomena probably result from the more conscious/voluntary gait control that is required by RAC. We suggest that LDS and statistical persistence should be used to evaluate the efficiency of cueing therapy in patients with neurological gait disorders. PMID

  14. Calmodulin enhances the stability of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Joyal, J L; Sacks, D B

    2001-05-18

    The estrogen receptor mediates breast cell proliferation and is the principal target for chemotherapy of breast carcinoma. Previous studies have demonstrated that the estrogen receptor binds to calmodulin-Sepharose in vitro. However, the association of endogenous calmodulin with endogenous estrogen receptors in intact cells has not been reported, and the function of the interaction is obscure. Here we demonstrate by co-immunoprecipitation from MCF-7 human breast epithelial cells that endogenous estrogen receptors bind to endogenous calmodulin. Estradiol treatment of the cells had no significant effect on the interaction. However, incubation of the cells with tamoxifen enhanced by 5-10-fold the association of calmodulin with the estrogen receptor and increased the total cellular content of estrogen receptors by 1.5-2-fold. In contrast, the structurally distinct calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine and CGS9343B attenuated the interaction between calmodulin and the estrogen receptor and dramatically reduced the number of estrogen receptors in the cell. Neither of these agents altered the amount of estrogen receptor mRNA, suggesting that calmodulin stabilizes the protein. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that, in the presence of Ca2+, calmodulin protected estrogen receptors from in vitro proteolysis by trypsin. Furthermore, overexpression of wild type calmodulin, but not a mutant calmodulin incapable of binding Ca2+, increased the concentration of estrogen receptors in MCF-7 cells, whereas transient expression of a calmodulin inhibitor peptide reduced the estrogen receptor concentration. These data demonstrate that calmodulin binds to the estrogen receptor in intact cells in a Ca2+-dependent, but estradiol-independent, manner, thereby modulating the stability and the steady state level of estrogen receptors. PMID:11278648

  15. Enhancement of stability of aqueous suspension of alumina nanoparticles by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngsang; Ha, Jeonghong; Kim, Dongsik; Choi, Tae-Youl; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Lee, Seung Yong

    2015-09-21

    In this work, we report substantially enhanced colloidal stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser (wavelength: 800 nm; pulse duration: 50 fs at full width at half maximum) was used to modify the electrochemical properties of nanoparticle suspensions at laser fluences below the particle ablation threshold. The colloidal stability of the suspension was evaluated by zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The DLS results along with the images from transmission electron microscopy revealed that the laser irradiation caused no distinct morphological change to the individual alumina particles, but a substantial portion of the clustered particles was fragmented by the laser pulses, decreasing the apparent size of the suspended particles. Also, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicates that the laser irradiation modified the surface chemistry of the alumina particles. The stabilizing capability of the proposed technique was turned out to be better than that of conventional ultrasonic treatments. The stability of the laser-treated sample with no added surfactant was maintained for up to 30 days, without requiring an additional homogenizing process such as magnetic stirring.

  16. Enhancement of stability of aqueous suspension of alumina nanoparticles by femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngsang; Choi, Tae-Youl; Ha, Jeonghong; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Lee, Seung Yong; Kim, Dongsik

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we report substantially enhanced colloidal stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser (wavelength: 800 nm; pulse duration: 50 fs at full width at half maximum) was used to modify the electrochemical properties of nanoparticle suspensions at laser fluences below the particle ablation threshold. The colloidal stability of the suspension was evaluated by zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The DLS results along with the images from transmission electron microscopy revealed that the laser irradiation caused no distinct morphological change to the individual alumina particles, but a substantial portion of the clustered particles was fragmented by the laser pulses, decreasing the apparent size of the suspended particles. Also, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicates that the laser irradiation modified the surface chemistry of the alumina particles. The stabilizing capability of the proposed technique was turned out to be better than that of conventional ultrasonic treatments. The stability of the laser-treated sample with no added surfactant was maintained for up to 30 days, without requiring an additional homogenizing process such as magnetic stirring.

  17. Kinematic variability, fractal dynamics and local dynamic stability of treadmill walking

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Motorized treadmills are widely used in research or in clinical therapy. Small kinematics, kinetics and energetics changes induced by Treadmill Walking (TW) as compared to Overground Walking (OW) have been reported in literature. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the differences between OW and TW in terms of stride-to-stride variability. Classical (Standard Deviation, SD) and non-linear (fractal dynamics, local dynamic stability) methods were used. In addition, the correlations between the different variability indexes were analyzed. Methods Twenty healthy subjects performed 10 min TW and OW in a random sequence. A triaxial accelerometer recorded trunk accelerations. Kinematic variability was computed as the average SD (MeanSD) of acceleration patterns among standardized strides. Fractal dynamics (scaling exponent α) was assessed by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) of stride intervals. Short-term and long-term dynamic stability were estimated by computing the maximal Lyapunov exponents of acceleration signals. Results TW did not modify kinematic gait variability as compared to OW (multivariate T2, p = 0.87). Conversely, TW significantly modified fractal dynamics (t-test, p = 0.01), and both short and long term local dynamic stability (T2 p = 0.0002). No relationship was observed between variability indexes with the exception of significant negative correlation between MeanSD and dynamic stability in TW (3 × 6 canonical correlation, r = 0.94). Conclusions Treadmill induced a less correlated pattern in the stride intervals and increased gait stability, but did not modify kinematic variability in healthy subjects. This could be due to changes in perceptual information induced by treadmill walking that would affect locomotor control of the gait and hence specifically alter non-linear dependencies among consecutive strides. Consequently, the type of walking (i.e. treadmill or overground) is important to consider in each protocol

  18. Dynamic and thermodynamic stability of relativistic, perfect fluid stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Schiffrin, Joshua S.; Wald, Robert M.

    2014-02-01

    We consider perfect fluid bodies (‘stars’) in general relativity, with the local state of the fluid specified by its 4-velocity, ua, its ‘particle number density’, n, and its ‘entropy per particle’, s. A star is said to be in dynamic equilibrium if it is a stationary, axisymmetric solution to the Einstein-fluid equations with circular flow. A star is said to be in thermodynamic equilibrium if it is in dynamic equilibrium and its total entropy, S, is an extremum for all variations of initial data that satisfy the Einstein constraint equations and have fixed total mass, M, particle number, N, and angular momentum, J. We prove that for a star in dynamic equilibrium, the necessary and sufficient condition for thermodynamic equilibrium is constancy of angular velocity, Ω, redshifted temperature, \\widetilde{T}, and redshifted chemical potential, \\widetilde{\\mu }. A star in dynamic equilibrium is said to be linearly dynamically stable if all physical, gauge invariant quantities associated with linear perturbations of the star remain bounded in time; it is said to be mode stable if there are no exponentially growing solutions that are not pure gauge. A star in thermodynamic equilibrium is said to be linearly thermodynamically stable if δ2S < 0 for all variations at fixed M, N, and J; equivalently, a star in thermodynamic equilibrium is linearly thermodynamically stable if \\delta ^2 M - \\widetilde{T} \\delta ^2 S -\\widetilde{\\mu } \\delta ^2 N - \\Omega \\delta ^2 J > 0 for all variations that, to first order, satisfy δM = δN = δJ = 0 (and, hence, δS = 0). Friedman previously identified positivity of canonical energy, {E}, as a criterion for dynamic stability and argued that all rotating stars are dynamically unstable to sufficiently non-axisymmetric perturbations (the CFS instability), so our main focus is on axisymmetric stability (although we develop our formalism and prove many results for non-axisymmetric perturbations as well). We show that

  19. Lagrangian, Eulerian, and Dynamically Accessible Stability of MHD flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Tommaso; Morrison, Philip; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-10-01

    Stability conditions of magnetized plasma flows are obtained by exploiting the Hamiltonian structure of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations and, in particular, by using three kinds of energy principles. First, the Lagrangian energy principle of Ref. [1] is introduced and sufficient stability conditions are presented. Next, plasma flows are described in terms of Eulerian variables and the noncanonical Hamiltonian formulation of MHD [2] is exploited. For symmetric equilibria, the energy-Casimir principle of Ref. [3] is expanded to second order and sufficient conditions for stability to symmetric perturbation are obtained. Then, dynamically accessible variations, i.e. variations that explicitly preserve the invariants of the system, are introduced and the respective energy principle is considered. As in Ref. [4], general criteria for stability are obtained. A comparison between the three different approaches is finally presented. [4pt] [1] E.A. Frieman and M. Rotenberg, Rev. Mod. Phys., 32 898 (1960).[0pt] [2] P.J. Morrison, J.M. Greene, Phys. Rev. Lett., 45 790 (1980).[0pt] [3] T. Andreussi, P.J. Morrison, F. Pegoraro, Phys. Plasmas, 19 052102 (2012).[0pt] [4] E. Hameiri, Phys. Plasmas, 10 2643 (2003).

  20. Algorithm for Stabilizing a POD-Based Dynamical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia L.

    2010-01-01

    This algorithm provides a new way to improve the accuracy and asymptotic behavior of a low-dimensional system based on the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). Given a data set representing the evolution of a system of partial differential equations (PDEs), such as the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow, one may obtain a low-dimensional model in the form of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that should model the dynamics of the flow. Temporal sampling of the direct numerical simulation of the PDEs produces a spatial time series. The POD extracts the temporal and spatial eigenfunctions of this data set. Truncated to retain only the most energetic modes followed by Galerkin projection of these modes onto the PDEs obtains a dynamical system of ordinary differential equations for the time-dependent behavior of the flow. In practice, the steps leading to this system of ODEs entail numerically computing first-order derivatives of the mean data field and the eigenfunctions, and the computation of many inner products. This is far from a perfect process, and often results in the lack of long-term stability of the system and incorrect asymptotic behavior of the model. This algorithm describes a new stabilization method that utilizes the temporal eigenfunctions to derive correction terms for the coefficients of the dynamical system to significantly reduce these errors.

  1. A Simple Model of Stability in Critical Mass Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centola, Damon

    2013-04-01

    Collective behaviors often spread via the self-reinforcing dynamics of critical mass. In collective behaviors with strongly self-reinforcing dynamics, incentives to participate increase with the number of participants, such that incentives are highest when the full population has adopted the behavior. By contrast, when collective behaviors have weakly self-reinforcing dynamics, incentives to participate "peak out" early, leaving a residual fraction of non-participants. In systems of collective action, this residual fraction constitutes free riders, who enjoy the collective good without contributing anything themselves. This "free rider problem" has given rise to a research tradition in collective action that shows how free riding can be eliminated by increasing the incentives for participation, and thereby making cooperation strongly self-reinforcing. However, we show that when the incentives to participate have weakly self-reinforcing dynamics, which allow free riders, collective behaviors will have significantly greater long term stability than when the incentives have strongly self-reinforcing dynamics leading to full participation.

  2. Dynamic stability of periodic shells with moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, M.; Baz, A.

    2006-10-01

    A moving load causes the radial displacements of an axi-symmetric shell to be several times higher than that produced by the static application of the same load. The travel velocity of the moving load affects the amplitude of the radial response and a critical velocity above which the shell response becomes unstable can be identified. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to analyze the dynamic response of axi-symmetric shells subjected to axially moving loads. The model accounts for the effect of periodically placing stiffening rings along the shell, on the dynamic response and stability characteristics of the shell. Shape functions obtained from the steady-state solution of the equation of motion for a uniform shell are utilized in the development of the FEM. The model is formulated in a reference frame moving with the load in order to enable study of the shell stability using wave propagation and attenuation criteria. Hence, the critical velocity can be identified as the minimum velocity allowing the propagation of applied perturbations. Such stability boundaries are conveniently identified through a transfer matrix formulation. The model is used to determine the critical velocities of the moving load for various arrangements and geometry of the stiffening rings. The obtained results indicate that stiffening the shell generally increases the critical velocity and generates a pattern of alternating stable and unstable regions. The presented analysis provides a viable means for designing a wide variety of stable dynamic systems operating with fast moving loads such as crane booms, robotic arms and gun barrels.

  3. Dynamic stability of periodic shells with moving loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzzene, Massimo; Baz, Amr M.

    2001-08-01

    A moving load causes the radial displacements of an axi- symmetric shell to be several times higher than that produced by the static application of the same load. The travel velocity of the moving load affects the amplitude of the radial response and a critical velocity above which the shell response becomes unstable can be identified. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to analyze the dynamic response of axi-symmetric shells subjected to axially moving loads. The model accounts for the effect of periodically placing stiffening rings along the shell, on the dynamic response and stability characteristics of the shell. Shape functions obtained from the steady-state solution of the equation of motion for a uniform shell are utilized in the development of the FEM. The model is formulated in a reference frame moving with the load in order to enable studying the shell stability using wave propagation and attenuation criteria. Hence, the critical velocity can be identified as the minimum velocity allowing the propagation of applied perturbations. Such stability boundaries are conveniently identified through a transfer mis formulation. The model is used to determine the critical velocities of the moving load for various arrangements and geometry of the stiffening rings. The obtained results indicate that stiffening the shell generally increases the critical velocity and generates a pattern of alternating stable and unstable regions. The presented analysis provides a viable means for designing a wide variety of stable dynamic systems operating with fast moving loads such as crane booms, robotic arms and gun barrels.

  4. On the dynamical stability of the space 'monorail'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, S.; Manni, D.

    The dynamical stability of 'monorail' tethered-satellite/elevator configurations being studied for the Space Station is investigated analytically, treating the end platforms and elevator as point masses, neglecting tether elasticity, and taking the Coriolis force and the complex gravitational field into account in analyzing the orbital-plane motion of the system. A mathematical model is constructed; the equations of motion are derived; and results obtained by numerical integration for platform masses 100,000 and 10,000 kg, elevator mass 5000 kg, and a 10-km-long 6-mm-diameter 4070-kg-mass tether are presented in graphs and briefly characterized.

  5. Nonequilibrium dynamics in lattice ecosystems: Chaotic stability and dissipative structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solé, Ricard V.; Bascompte, Jordi; Valls, Joaquim

    1992-07-01

    A generalized coupled map lattice (CML) model of ecosystem dynamics is presented. We consider the spatiotemporal behavior of a prey-predator map, a model of host-parasitoid interactions, and two-species competition. The latter model can show phase separation of domains (Turing-like structures) even when chaos is present. We also use this CML model to explore the time evolution and structural properties of ecological networks built with a set of N competing species. The May-Wigner criterion is applied as a measure of stability, and some regularities in the stable networks observed are discussed.

  6. Peptide lipidation stabilizes structure to enhance biological function★

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Brian P.; Ottaway, Nickki L.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Ma, Dejian; Gelfanov, Vasily M.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; DiMarchi, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Medicines that decrease body weight and restore nutrient tolerance could improve human diabetes and obesity treatment outcomes. We developed lipid–acylated glucagon analogs that are co-agonists for the glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors, and stimulate weight loss and plasma glucose lowering in pre-diabetic obese mice. Our studies identified lipid acylation (lipidation) can increase and balance in vitro potencies of select glucagon analogs for the two aforementioned receptors in a lipidation site-dependent manner. A general capacity for lipidation to enhance the secondary structure of glucagon analogs was recognized, and the energetics of this effect quantified. The molecular structure of a lipid–acylated glucagon analog in water was also characterized. These results support that lipidation can modify biological activity through thermodynamically-favorable intramolecular interactions which stabilize structure. This establishes use of lipidation to achieve specific pharmacology and implicates similar endogenous post-translational modifications as physiological tools capable of refining biological action in means previously underappreciated. PMID:24327962

  7. Observation of enhanced nuclear stability near the 162 neutron shell

    SciTech Connect

    Lougheed, R.W.; Moody, K.J.; Wild, J.F.; Hulet, E.K.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lazarev, Yu.A.; Lobanov, Yu.V.; Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Utyonkov, V.K.; Abdullin, F.Sh.; Buklanov, G.V.; Gikal, B.N.; Iliev, S.; Mezentsev, A.N.; Polyakov, A.N.; Sedykh, I.M.; Shirokovsky, I.V.; Subbotin, V.G.; Sukhov, A.M.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.; Zhuchko, V.E.

    1993-09-22

    In bombardments of {sup 248}Cm with {sup 22}Ne the authors discovered two new isotopes, {sup 265}106 and {sup 266}106, by establishing genetic links between {alpha} decays of the 106 nuclides and SF or {alpha} decays of the daughter (grand-daughter) nuclides. For {sup 266}106 they measured E{sub {alpha}}=8.62{+-}0.06 MeV followed by the SF decay of {sup 262}104 for which they measured a half-life value of 1.2{sup +1.0}{sub {minus}0.5} s. For {sup 265}106 they measured E{sub {alpha}}=8.82{+-}0.06 MeV. They estimated {alpha} half-lives of 10-30 s for {sup 266}106 and 2-30 s for {sup 265}106 with SF branches of {approximately}50% or less. The decay properties of {sup 266}106 indicate a large enhancement in the SF stability of this N=160 nuclide and confirm the existence of the predicted neutron-deformed shell N=162.

  8. Solar enhanced wastewater treatment in waste stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Agunwamba, J C; Utsev, J T; Okonkwo, W I

    2009-05-01

    One of the most popular off-site wastewater treatment plants used in the tropics is the waste stabilization pond (WSP). Although it has several advantages, its use in urban areas is limited because of its large land area requirement. Hence, this research is aimed at investigating if a solar-enhanced WSP (SEWSP) can increase treatment efficiency and consequently reduce the land area requirement. The SEWSPs of varying sizes, made of a metallic tank with inlet and outlet valves and a solar reflector, were constructed to increase the incident sunlight intensity. Wastewater samples collected from the inlet and outlet of the SEWSPs were examined for physio-chemical and biological characteristics for a period of 2 months. The parameters examined were total suspended solids, dissolved oxygen, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD), coliform, and Escherichia coli. The efficiencies of the SEWSPs, with respect to these parameters, fluctuated with temperature variation, with the shallowest SEWSP giving the highest treatment efficiency. The research revealed that the cost of treating wastewater using SEWSPs was approximately 2 times lower than the conventional WSP for the same treatment efficiencies. PMID:19472946

  9. Birefringence and Enhanced Stability in Stable Organic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyi; Exarhos, Annemarie; Cheng, Kevin; Jia, Tiezheng; Walsh, Patrick; Kikkawa, Jay; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Stable glasses can be prepared by physical vapor depositing organic molecules onto a cold substrate at slow rates. These glasses have many exceptional properties such as high thermal stability, high density, and birefringence. Regardless of the molecular shape or intermolecular interactions, birefringence has been observed in various stable glasses produced at low temperatures (below 80% of the molecule's glass transition temperature, Tg) . Here we prepare stable glasses of an organic molecule, 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene, that possesses a nearly isotropic shape and intrinsic fluorescence. Ellipsometry is used to show that all stable glasses prepared in the temperature range from 73% Tg to 97% Tgshow positive birefringence. Angle- and polarization- dependent photoluminescence measurements show isotropic molecular orientation in these optically birefringent glasses. Furthermore, the values of birefringence are strongly correlated with the enhanced density, implying a general origin of the observed anisotropy in stable glasses. This correlation can elucidate the role of packing in the formation of such high-density glasses. The authors would like to acknowledge Ethan Alguire and Joe Subotnik for simulation. Z.F. acknowledges funding from NSF CAREER (DMR-1350044). P.J.W. acknowledges funding from NSF (CHE-1152488). J.M.K acknowledges funding from NSF (DMR-1206270).

  10. Enhanced photoacoustic stability of gold nanorods by silica matrix confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Wei, Chen-Wei; Souris, Jeffrey S.; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Chen, Chin-Tu; Yang, Chung-Shi; Li, Pai-Chi; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has garnered much attention for its high contrast and excellent spatial resolution of perfused tissues. Gold nanorods (GNRs) have been employed to further enhance the imaging contrast of PAT. However, the photon fluences typically needed for PA wave induction often also result in GNR shape changes that significantly reduce the efficiency of acoustic wave generation. In this work, we propose, synthesize, and evaluate amorphous silica-coated gold nanorods (GNR-Si) in an effort to improve contrast agent stability and ameliorate efficiency loss during photoacoustic (PA) wave induction. TEM and optical absorption spectra measurements of GNR and GNR-Si show that encasing GNRs within amorphous silica provides substantial protection of nanorod conformation from thermal deformation. PA signals generated by GNR-Si demonstrate considerably greater resistance to degradation of signal intensity with repetitive pulsing than do uncoated GNRs, thereby enabling much longer, high-contrast imaging sessions than previously possible. The prolongation of high-contrast imaging, and biocompatibility and easy surface functionalization for targeting ligands afforded by amorphous silica, suggest GNR-Si to be potentially significant for the clinical translation of PAT.

  11. Dynamic pressure approach to analysis of reactor fuel plate stability

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Yahr, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic pressure model can conveniently be used to evaluate the critical stress regions as a function of flow velocity. For some of the preliminary advanced neutron source reactor plate designs this could be very significant since the flow velocity could be limited by peak stresses in the plates more than by deflection or stability. The dynamic pressure results predicts the differential pressure across a plate as a function of flow velocity. The pressure differential can then be used to find the deflection and/or stress of the plate using traditional plate analyses. Instability would occur when plates are touching at mid-channel such that rapid oscillations of pressure can occur. The technique is conservative and gives a design limit for the plate. This model is one of several methods being used in the design of the ANS fuel elements. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Nonlinear flight dynamics and stability of hovering model insects

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Sun, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Current analyses on insect dynamic flight stability are based on linear theory and limited to small disturbance motions. However, insects' aerial environment is filled with swirling eddies and wind gusts, and large disturbances are common. Here, we numerically solve the equations of motion coupled with the Navier–Stokes equations to simulate the large disturbance motions and analyse the nonlinear flight dynamics of hovering model insects. We consider two representative model insects, a model hawkmoth (large size, low wingbeat frequency) and a model dronefly (small size, high wingbeat frequency). For small and large initial disturbances, the disturbance motion grows with time, and the insects tumble and never return to the equilibrium state; the hovering flight is inherently (passively) unstable. The instability is caused by a pitch moment produced by forward/backward motion and/or a roll moment produced by side motion of the insect. PMID:23697714

  13. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part i: Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    1999-08-01

    The study presented is an investigation of the non-linear dynamics and stability of simply supported, circular cylindrical shells containing inviscid incompressible fluid flow. Non-linearities due to large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using the non-linear Donnell's shallow shell theory, with account taken of the effect of viscous structural damping. Linear potential flow theory is applied to describe the fluid-structure interaction. The system is discretiszd by Galerkin's method, and is investigated by using a model involving seven degrees of freedom, allowing for travelling wave response of the shell and shell axisymmetric contraction. Two different boundary conditions are applied to the fluid flow beyond the shell, corresponding to: (i) infinite baffles (rigid extensions of the shell), and (ii) connection with a flexible wall of infinite extent in the longitudinal direction, permitting solution by separation of variables; they give two different kinds of dynamical behaviour of the system, as a consequence of the fact that axisymmetric contraction, responsible for the softening non-linear dynamical behaviour of shells, is not allowed if the fluid flow beyond the shell is constrained by rigid baffles. Results show that the system loses stability by divergence.

  14. Dynamic Stability Testing of the Genesis Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Winchenbach, Gerald L.; Hathaway, Wayne; Chapman, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents a series of free flight tests of a scale model of the Genesis Sample Return Capsule. These tests were conducted in the Aeroballistic Research Facility (ARF), located at Eglin AFB, FL, during April 1999 and were sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center. Because these blunt atmospheric entry shapes tend to experience small angle of attack dynamic instabilities (frequently leading to limit cycle motions), the primary purpose of the present tests was to determine the dynamic stability characteristics of the Genesis configuration. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range of 1.0 to 4.5. The results for this configuration indicate that the models were dynamically unstable at low angles of attack for all Mach numbers tested. At Mach numbers below 2.5, the models were also unstable at the higher angles of attack (above 15 deg), and motion amplitudes of up to 40 deg were experienced. Above Mach 2.5, the models were dynamically stable at the higher angles of attack.

  15. Fast Dynamic Simulation-Based Small Signal Stability Assessment and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Naresh; Baone, Chaitanya; Veda, Santosh; Dai, Jing; Chaudhuri, Nilanjan; Leonardi, Bruno; Sanches-Gasca, Juan; Diao, Ruisheng; Wu, Di; Huang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yousu

    2014-12-31

    Power grid planning and operation decisions are made based on simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system. Enabling substantial energy savings while increasing the reliability of the aging North American power grid through improved utilization of existing transmission assets hinges on the adoption of wide-area measurement systems (WAMS) for power system stabilization. However, adoption of WAMS alone will not suffice if the power system is to reach its full entitlement in stability and reliability. It is necessary to enhance predictability with "faster than real-time" dynamic simulations that will enable the dynamic stability margins, proactive real-time control, and improve grid resiliency to fast time-scale phenomena such as cascading network failures. Present-day dynamic simulations are performed only during offline planning studies, considering only worst case conditions such as summer peak, winter peak days, etc. With widespread deployment of renewable generation, controllable loads, energy storage devices and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles expected in the near future and greater integration of cyber infrastructure (communications, computation and control), monitoring and controlling the dynamic performance of the grid in real-time would become increasingly important. The state-of-the-art dynamic simulation tools have limited computational speed and are not suitable for real-time applications, given the large set of contingency conditions to be evaluated. These tools are optimized for best performance of single-processor computers, but the simulation is still several times slower than real-time due to its computational complexity. With recent significant advances in numerical methods and computational hardware, the expectations have been rising towards more efficient and faster techniques to be implemented in power system simulators. This is a natural expectation, given that the core solution algorithms of most commercial simulators were developed

  16. Magnetic vortex state stability, reversal and dynamics in restricted geometries.

    PubMed

    Guslienko, K Yu

    2008-06-01

    Magnetic vortices are typically the ground states in geometrically confined ferromagnets with small magnetocrystalline anisotropy. In this article I review static and dynamic properties of the magnetic vortex state in small particles with nanoscale thickness and sub-micron and micron lateral sizes (magnetic dots). Magnetic dots made of soft magnetic material shaped as flat circular and elliptic cylinders are considered. Such mesoscopic dots undergo magnetization reversal through successive nucleation, displacement and annihilation of magnetic vortices. The reversal process depends on the stability of different possible zero-field magnetization configurations with respect to the dot geometrical parameters and application of an external magnetic field. The interdot magnetostatic interaction plays an important role in magnetization reversal for dot arrays with a small dot-to-dot distance, leading to decreases in the vortex nucleation and annihilation fields. Magnetic vortices reveal rich, non-trivial dynamical properties due to existance of the vortex core bearing topological charges. The vortex ground state magnetization distribution leads to a considerable modification of the nature of spin excitations in comparison to those in the uniformly magnetized state. A magnetic vortex confined in a magnetically soft ferromagnet with micron-sized lateral dimensions possesses a characteristic dynamic excitation known as a translational mode that corresponds to spiral-like precession of the vortex core around its equilibrium position. The translation motions of coupled vortices are considered. There are, above the vortex translation mode eigenfrequencies, several dynamic magnetization eigenmodes localized outside the vortex core whose frequencies are determined principally by dynamic demagnetizing fields appearing due to restricted dot geometry. The vortex excitation modes are classified as translation modes and radially or azimuthally symmetric spin waves over the vortex

  17. Enhancing enzyme stability by construction of polymer-enzyme conjugate micelles for decontamination of organophosphate agents.

    PubMed

    Suthiwangcharoen, Nisaraporn; Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2014-04-14

    Enhancing the stability of enzymes under different working environments is essential if the potential of enzyme-based applications is to be realized for nanomedicine, sensing and molecular diagnostics, and chemical and biological decontamination. In this study, we focus on the enzyme, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH), which has shown great promise for the nontoxic and noncorrosive decontamination of organophosphate agents (OPs) as well as for therapeutics as a catalytic bioscavanger against nerve gas poisoning. We describe a facile approach to stabilize OPH using covalent conjugation with the amphiphilic block copolymer, Pluronic F127, leading to the formation of F127-OPH conjugate micelles, with the OPH on the micelle corona. SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF confirmed the successful conjugation, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed ∼100 nm size micelles. The conjugates showed significantly enhanced stability and higher activity compared to the unconjugated OPH when tested (i) in aqueous solutions at room temperature, (ii) in aqueous solutions at higher temperatures, (iii) after multiple freeze/thaw treatments, (iv) after lyophilization, and (v) in the presence of organic solvents. The F127-OPH conjugates also decontaminated paraoxon (introduced as a chemical agent simulant) on a polystyrene film surface and on a CARC (Chemical Agent Resistant Coating) test panel more rapidly and to a larger extent compared to free OPH. We speculate that, in the F127-OPH conjugates (both in the micellar form as well as in the unaggregated conjugate), the polypropylene oxide block of the copolymer interacts with the surface of the OPH and this confinement of the OPH reduces the potential for enzyme denaturation and provides robustness to OPH at different working environments. The use of such polymer-enzyme conjugate micelles with improved enzyme stability opens up new opportunities for numerous civilian and Warfighter applications. PMID

  18. Global asymptotic stability of dynamic dissipative compensators for multibody flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Joshi, Suresh M.; Alberts, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    The stability characteristics of dynamic dissipative compensators are investigated for multibody flexible space structures having nonlinear dynamics. The problem addressed is that of proving asymptotic stability of dynamic dissipative compensators. The stability proof uses the Liapunov approach and exploits the inherent passivity of such systems. For such systems these compensators are shown to be robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics. The results are applicable to a large class of structures such as flexible space structures with articulated flexible appendages.

  19. Dynamic blade row compression component model for stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tesch, W. A.; Steenken, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes a generalized dynamic model which has been developed for use in compression component aerodynamic stability studies. The model is a one-dimensional, pitch-line, blade row, lumped volume system. Arbitrary placement of blade free volumes upstream, within, and downstream of the compression component as well as the removal of bleed flow from the exit of any rotor or stator are model options. The model has been applied to a two-stage fan and an eight-stage compressor. The clean inlet pressure ratio/flow maps and the surge line have been reproduced, thereby validating the capability of the dynamic model to reproduce the steady-flow characteristics of the compression component. A method for determining the onset of an aerodynamic instability which is associated with surge is described. Sinusoidally time-varying inlet and exit boundary conditions have been applied to the eight stage compressor as examples of the manner in which this model may be used for stability studies.

  20. Transient dynamics and nonlinear stability of spatially extended systems.

    PubMed

    Handel, Andreas; Grigoriev, Roman O

    2006-09-01

    As studies of various systems have shown, the sole focus on the eigenvalues in a linear stability analysis can be misleading, especially when the dynamics of disturbances is characterized by strong transient growth. The aim of this paper is to extend the generalized stability analysis, in the context of spatially extended systems, by examining the role of the nonlinear terms in the destabilization process. The critical noise level leading to destabilization is often found to scale as a power of the magnitude of transient amplification. In what follows we show that the power law exponent sensitively depends on the type of nonlinear terms and their potential for generating self-sustaining noise amplification cycles (bootstrapping). We find, however, that the exponents are not universal and also depend on the more subtle details of the transient dynamics. We also show that the basin of attraction of a spatially uniform state is bounded by the stable manifold(s) of nearby saddle(s) which play a major role in the transition. PMID:17025738

  1. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Slobozhanin, Lev A.; Resnick, Andrew H.; Ramus, Jean-Francois; Delafontaine, Sylvie

    1999-01-01

    Liquid bridges have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental investigations since the early work by Plateau more than a century ago. More recently, motivated by interest in their physical behavior and their occurrence in a variety of technological situations, there has been a resurgence of interest in the static and dynamic behavior of liquid bridges. Furthermore, opportunities to carry out experiments in the near weightless environment of a low-Earth-orbit spacecraft have also led to a number of low-gravity experiments involving large liquid bridges. In this paper, we present selected results from our work concerning the stability of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges, the bifurcation of weightless bridges in the neighborhood of the maximum volume stability limit, isorotating axisymmetric bridges contained between equidimensional disks, and bridges contained between unequal disks. For the latter, we discuss both theoretical and experimental results. Finally, we present results concerning the stability of axisymmetric equilibrium configurations for a capillary liquid partly contained in a closed circular cylinder.

  2. Chemical lake restoration products: sediment stability and phosphorus dynamics.

    PubMed

    Egemose, Sara; Reitzel, Kasper; Andersen, Frede Ø; Flindt, Mogens R

    2010-02-01

    Laboratory experiments with sediments from three shallow Danish lakes were conducted to evaluate the effects of chemical lake restoration products during resuspension. Phosphorus (P) removal, sediment stability, sediment consolidation and color reduction were studied over time. The investigated products were aluminum (Al), Phoslock (a commercial bentonite product coated with lanthanum) and a combination of Al covered with bentonite (Al/Ben). All treatments effectively reduced the P concentration in the water. However, the treatments containing Al reduced the P concentration immediately after resuspension, whereas Phoslock required several days after resuspension to reduce the P concentration. Especially Phoslock, but also Al/Ben, increased the sediment stability threshold by 265% and 101%, respectively, whereas Al had no stabilizing effect. The fresh Al floc was resuspended 5x easier than untreated sediment. The largest consolidation of the sediment occurred with addition of Phoslock, followed by Al/Ben, while Al alone had no effect. Enhanced consolidation may be of importance for macrophyte colonisation of organic sediment. Phoslock improved the light climate moderately by removing color, whereas Al was very effective in removing color. Ben/Al showed intermediate effects on color reduction. These findings are important when decisions are made on restoration method for a specific lake, which may be more or less wind exposed. PMID:20055487

  3. Enhanced stability and antibacterial efficacy of a traditional Chinese medicine-mediated silver nanoparticle delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjie; Qu, Ding; Ma, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Congyan; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used as antibacterial products in various fields. Recent studies have suggested that AgNPs need an appropriate stabilizer to improve their stability. Some antibacterial traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) contain various reductive components, which can not only stabilize AgNPs but also enhance their antimicrobial activity. In this study, we developed a series of novel AgNPs using a TCM extract as a stabilizer, reducing agent, and antimicrobial agent (TCM-AgNPs). A storage stability investigation of the TCM-AgNPs suggested a significant improvement when compared with bare AgNPs. Further, conjugation of TCMs onto the AgNP surface resulted in stronger antimicrobial potency on antibacterial evaluation using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration 50% (MIC50) ratios (and minimum bactericidal concentration 90% [MBC90] ratios) of AgNPs to respective TCM-AgNPs as assessment indices. Among these, P. cuspidatum Sieb. et-conjugated AgNPs (P.C.-AgNPs) had the advantage of a combination of TCMs and AgNPs and was studied in detail with regard to its synthesis and characterization. The extraction time, reaction temperature, and concentrations of AgNO3 and Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et extract were critical factors in the preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. Further, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated successful preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. In representative studies, P.C.-AgNPs showed a well-defined spherical shape, a homogeneous small particle size (36.78 nm), a narrow polydispersity index (0.105), and a highly negative zeta potential (−23.6 mV) on transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. These results indicate that TCM-AgNPs have a potential role as antibacterial agents in the clinic setting. PMID:25473286

  4. Enhanced stability and antibacterial efficacy of a traditional Chinese medicine-mediated silver nanoparticle delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Qu, Ding; Ma, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Congyan; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used as antibacterial products in various fields. Recent studies have suggested that AgNPs need an appropriate stabilizer to improve their stability. Some antibacterial traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) contain various reductive components, which can not only stabilize AgNPs but also enhance their antimicrobial activity. In this study, we developed a series of novel AgNPs using a TCM extract as a stabilizer, reducing agent, and antimicrobial agent (TCM-AgNPs). A storage stability investigation of the TCM-AgNPs suggested a significant improvement when compared with bare AgNPs. Further, conjugation of TCMs onto the AgNP surface resulted in stronger antimicrobial potency on antibacterial evaluation using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration 50% (MIC50) ratios (and minimum bactericidal concentration 90% [MBC90] ratios) of AgNPs to respective TCM-AgNPs as assessment indices. Among these, P. cuspidatum Sieb. et-conjugated AgNPs (P.C.-AgNPs) had the advantage of a combination of TCMs and AgNPs and was studied in detail with regard to its synthesis and characterization. The extraction time, reaction temperature, and concentrations of AgNO3 and Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et extract were critical factors in the preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. Further, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated successful preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. In representative studies, P.C.-AgNPs showed a well-defined spherical shape, a homogeneous small particle size (36.78 nm), a narrow polydispersity index (0.105), and a highly negative zeta potential (-23.6 mV) on transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. These results indicate that TCM-AgNPs have a potential role as antibacterial agents in the clinic setting. PMID:25473286

  5. Stabilization and dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Joanna A.

    The dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels is studied, first within the context of a reactive diffusive (or constant density) model and then in a variable density model which allows for the consideration of thermal expansion effects. Fuel and oxidizer, separated upstream by a thin plate of finite length, flow into a channel with a prescribed upstream velocity. At the end of the plate, the fuel and oxidizer mix and, when ignited, an edge flame is sustained at some distance from the tip of the plate. Typically, the flame, which is stabilized by heat conduction back to the cold plate, has a tribrachial structure. It consists of a leading edge, made up of lean and rich premixed segments, and an attached diffusion flame trailing behind. The flame can also have a hook-like shape, when one of the premixed branches is missing. This often happens for conditions away from stoichiometry and when the mass diffusivities of the fuel and oxidizer are unequal. Earlier work has determined the behavior of an edge flame in a mixing layer that develops downstream of a splitter plate with no boundaries in the lateral direction. This is relevant to the stabilization and liftoff of jet diffusion flames. The confined case has other possible applications, such as flames in mini-combustor systems, that have been recently tested experimentally. The objective in this work is to determine the effect that confinement has on the edge standoff distance, on the flame shape and on the flame stability. In particular, we examine the influence of channel width, wall temperature, and the effects of differential diffusion. We determine conditions under which the edge flame is stabilized near the tip of the splitter plate, is held near the tip but oscillates back and forth, or is blown-off. We consider a wide range of channel widths and boundary conditions at the walls.

  6. Stability and Load Sharing Characteristics of a Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Device

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Yeager, Matthew S.; Thampi, Shankar S.; Whiting, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion is a common treatment for a variety of spinal pathologies. It has been hypothesized that insufficient mechanical loading of the interbody graft can prevent proper fusion of the joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical stability and anterior column loading sharing characteristics of a posterior dynamic system compared to titanium rods in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model. Methods Range of motion, interpedicular kinematics and interbody graft loading were measured in human cadaveric lumbar segments tested under a pure moment flexibility testing protocol. Results Both systems provided significant fixation compared to the intact condition and to an interbody spacer alone in flexion extension and lateral bending. No significant differences in fixation were detected between the devices. A significant decrease in graft loading was detected in flexion for the titanium rod treatment compared to spacer alone. No significant differences in graft loading were detected between the spacer alone and posterior dynamic system or between the posterior dynamic system and the titanium rod. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the posterior dynamic system provides similar fixation compared to that of a titanium rod, however, studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of fixation in a cadaver model may not be sufficiently powered to establish differences in load sharing using the techniques described here. PMID:26131403

  7. Dynamics and stability of divacancy defects in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngkuk; Ihm, Jisoon; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do

    2011-08-01

    A divacancy (DV) is one of the most abundant and most important defects in irradiated graphene, which modifies electronic and chemical properties of graphene. In this paper, we present ab initio calculations to study the dynamics and stability of DVs in graphene. Divacancies in graphene have various reconstructed structures, such as triple pentagon-triple heptagon (555-777) and pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) patterns. A direct observation of the structural transformations between these reconstructions was recorded in transmission electron microscope images reported by Girit in ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1166999 323, 1705 (2009). We clarify the atomic structures of DVs observed in the experiment and investigate the atomic processes and energetics for the observed dynamical motions in great detail. It is found that a series of Stone-Wales-type transformations are responsible for the migration and structural transformations of DVs and that a pentagon-heptagon-heptagon-pentagon (5-7-7-5) defect appearing as an intermediate structure during the dynamical process plays an important role in the transformations of DVs.

  8. Portal Stability Controls Dynamics of DNA Ejection from Phage.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Krista G; Behrens, Manja A; Streletzky, Kiril A; Olsson, Ulf; Evilevitch, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Through a unique combination of time-resolved single-molecule (cryo-TEM) and bulk measurements (light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering), we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of stochastic DNA ejection events from phage λ. We reveal that both binding with the specific phage receptor, LamB, and thermo-mechanical destabilization of the portal vertex on the capsid are required for initiation of ejection of the pressurized λ-DNA from the phage. Specifically, we found that a measurable activation energy barrier for initiation of DNA ejection with LamB present, Ea = (1.2 ± 0.1) × 10(-19) J/phage (corresponding to ∼28 kTbody/phage at Tbody = 37 °C), results in 15 times increased rate of ejection event dynamics when the temperature is raised from 15 to 45 °C (7.5 min versus 30 s average lag time for initiation of ejection). This suggests that phages have a double fail-safe mechanism for ejection-in addition to receptor binding, phage must also overcome (through thermal energy and internal DNA pressure) an energy barrier for DNA ejection. This energy barrier ensures that viral genome ejection into cells occurs with high efficiency only when the temperature conditions are favorable for genome replication. At lower suboptimal temperatures, the infectious phage titer is preserved over much longer times, since DNA ejection dynamics is strongly inhibited even in the presence of solubilized receptor or susceptible cells. This work also establishes a light scattering based approach to investigate the influence of external solution conditions, mimicking those of the bacterial cytoplasm, on the stability of the viral capsid portal, which is directly linked to dynamics of virion deactivation. PMID:27176921

  9. Carotenoid incorporation into microsomes: yields, stability and membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Jessel, Robert; Diehl, Horst A.

    2000-12-01

    The carotenoids β-carotene (BC), lycopene (LYC), lutein (LUT), zeaxanthin (ZEA), canthaxanthin (CTX) and astaxanthin (ASTA) have been incorporated into pig liver microsomes. Effective incorporation concentrations in the range of about 1-6 nmol/mg microsomal protein were obtained. A stability test at room temperature revealed that after 3 h BC and LYC had decayed totally whereas, gradually, CTX (46%), LUT (21%), ASTA (17%) and ZEA (5%) decayed. Biophysical parameters of the microsomal membrane were changed hardly by the incorporation of carotenoids. A small rigidification may occur. Membrane anisotropy seems to offer only a small tolerance for incorporation of carotenoids and seems to limit the achievable incorporation concentrations of the carotenoids into microsomes. Microsomes instead of liposomes should be preferred as a membrane model to study mutual effects of carotenoids and membrane dynamics.

  10. Dynamical stability of a many-body Kapitza pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Citro, Roberta; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.; D’Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Babadi, Mehrtash; Oka, Takashi; Demler, Eugene

    2015-09-15

    We consider a many-body generalization of the Kapitza pendulum: the periodically-driven sine–Gordon model. We show that this interacting system is dynamically stable to periodic drives with finite frequency and amplitude. This finding is in contrast to the common belief that periodically-driven unbounded interacting systems should always tend to an absorbing infinite-temperature state. The transition to an unstable absorbing state is described by a change in the sign of the kinetic term in the Floquet Hamiltonian and controlled by the short-wavelength degrees of freedom. We investigate the stability phase diagram through an analytic high-frequency expansion, a self-consistent variational approach, and a numeric semiclassical calculation. Classical and quantum experiments are proposed to verify the validity of our results.

  11. Chemical stabilization of porous silicon for enhanced biofunctionalization with immunoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveas, Nelson; Torres Costa, Vicente; Gallach, Dario; Hernandez-Montelongo, Jacobo; Martín Palma, Raul Jose; Predenstinacion Garcia-Ruiz, Josefa; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2012-08-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) is widely used in biological experiments, owing to its biocompatibility and well-established fabrication methods that allow tailoring its surface. Nevertheless, there are some unresolved issues such as deciding whether the stabilization of PSi is necessary for its biological applications and evaluating the effects of PSi stabilization on the surface biofunctionalization with proteins. In this work we demonstrate that non-stabilized PSi is prone to detachment owing to the stress induced upon biomolecular adsorption. Biofunctionalized non-stabilized PSi loses the interference properties characteristic of a thin film, and groove-like structures resulting from a final layer collapse were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Likewise, direct PSi derivatization with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTS) does not stabilize PSi against immunoglobulin biofunctionalization. To overcome this problem, we developed a simple chemical process of stabilizing PSi (CoxPSi) for biological applications, which has several advantages over thermal stabilization (ToxPSi). The process consists of chemical oxidation in H2O2, surface derivatization with APTS and a curing step at 120 °C. This process offers integral homogeneous PSi morphology, hydrophilic surface termination (contact angle θ = 26°) and highly efficient derivatized and biofunctionalized PSi surfaces (six times more efficient than ToxPSi). All these features are highly desirable for biological applications, such as biosensing, where our results can be used for the design and optimization of the biomolecular immobilization cascade on PSi surfaces.

  12. The dynamics of CRM attitude change: Attitude stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorich, Steven E.

    1993-01-01

    Special training seminars in cockpit resource management (CRM) are designed to enhance crew effectiveness in multicrew air-transport cockpits. In terms of CRM, crew effectiveness is defined by teamwork rather than technical proficiency. These seminars are designed to promote factual learning, alter aviator attitudes, and motivate aviators to make use of what they have learned. However, measures of attitude change resulting from CRM seminars have been the most common seminar evaluation technique. The current investigation explores a broader range of attitude change parameters with specific emphasis on the stability of change between recurrent visits to the training center. This allows for a comparison of training program strengths in terms of seminar ability to effect lasting change.

  13. Subsonic and Transonic Dynamic Stability Characteristics of the X-33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomek, D.; Boyden, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic stability testing was conducted on a 2.5% scale model of the X-33 technology demonstrator sub-orbital flight-test vehicle. This testing was conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) l6-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel with the LaRC High-speed Dynamic Stability system. Forced oscillation data were acquired for various configurations over a Mach number range of 0.3 to 1.15 measuring pitch, roll and yaw damping, as well as the normal force due to pitch rate and the cross derivatives. The test angle of attack range was from -2 to 24 degrees, except for those cases where load constraints limited the higher angles of attack at the higher Mach numbers. A variety of model configurations with and without control surfaces were employed, including a body alone configuration. Stable pitch damping is exhibited for the baseline configuration throughout the angle of attack range for Mach numbers 0.3, 0.8, and 1.15. Stable pitch damping is present for Mach numbers 0.9 and 0.6 with the exception of angles 2 and 16 degrees, respectively. Constant and stable roll damping were present for the baseline configuration over the range of Mach numbers up to an angle of attack of 16 degrees. The yaw damping for the baseline is somewhat stable and constant for the angle of attack range from -2 to 8 degrees, with the exception of Mach numbers 0.6 and 0.8. Yaw damping becomes highly unstable for all Mach numbers at angles of attack greater than 8 degrees.

  14. Mechanism study on stability enhancement of adefovir dipivoxil by cocrystallization: Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rui-Zhen; Sun, Peng-Jie; Tao, Qian; Yao, Jia; Chen, Jia-Mei; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2016-03-31

    The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which cocrystallization can enhance the stability of adefovir dipivoxil (AD), a diester prodrug of adefovir with known chemical stability problem. Three multi-component crystals of AD with biologically safe coformers, including gallic acid cocrystal hydrate (1:1:1), salicylate salt (1:1), and maleate salt (1:1) were prepared and characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. DVS measurements and stability tests were applied to evaluate the stability. The new crystalline phases exhibit improved stability compared to pure drug in the order AD gallic acid cocrystal>AD maleate>AD salicylate>AD form I. Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation studies demonstrate that the stability enhancement mechanism by cocrystallization involves (1) inhibition of hydrolysis of AD by replacement of drug-drug homosynthons by stronger drug-coformer heterosynthons at adenine fragments; (2) suppression of dimerization of AD by separation of adenine fragments by inserting coformers in crystal lattices; (3) further reducing rates of hydrolysis by forming hydrogen bonds with hydrate water at phosphoryl fragments. This study has important implications for use of cocrystallization approach to some easily degradable drugs in pharmaceutical. PMID:26462447

  15. Statistical precision and sensitivity of measures of dynamic gait stability.

    PubMed

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H; Meijer, Onno G; Beek, Peter J

    2009-04-15

    Recently, two methods for quantifying a system's dynamic stability have been applied to human locomotion: local stability (quantified by finite time maximum Lyapunov exponents, lambda(S-stride) and lambda(L-stride)) and orbital stability (quantified as maximum Floquet multipliers, MaxFm). Thus far, however, it has remained unclear how many data points are required to obtain precise estimates of these measures during walking, and to what extent these estimates are sensitive to changes in walking behaviour. To resolve these issues, we collected long data series of healthy subjects (n=9) walking on a treadmill in three conditions (normal walking at 0.83 m/s (3 km/h) and 1.38 m/s (5 km/h), and walking at 1.38 m/s (5 km/h) while performing a Stroop dual task). Data series from 0.83 and 1.38 m/s trials were submitted to a bootstrap procedure and paired t-tests for samples of different data series lengths were performed between 0.83 and 1.38 m/s and between 1.38 m/s with and without Stroop task. Longer data series led to more precise estimates for lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm. All variables showed an effect of data series length. Thus, when estimating and comparing these variables across conditions, data series covering an equal number of strides should be analysed. lambda(S-stride), lambda(L-stride), and MaxFm were sensitive to the change in walking speed while only lambda(S-stride) and MaxFm were sensitive enough to capture the modulations of walking induced by the Stroop task. Still, these modulations could only be detected when using a substantial number of strides (>150). PMID:19135478

  16. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  17. Enrichment Ratio and Aggregate Stability Dynamics in Intensely Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Filley, T. R.; Hou, T.; Abban, B. K.; Wilson, C. G.; Boys, J.

    2015-12-01

    Challenges in understanding the soil carbon dynamics within intensely managed landscapes (IMLs), found throughout much the US Midwest, is highly complex due to the presence of heterogeneous landscape features and properties, as well as a mosaic of physical and biogeochemical processes occurring at different time scales. In addition, rainfall events exacerbate the effects of tillage by the impact of raindrops, which break down aggregates that encase carbon and dislodge and entrain soil particles and aggregates along the downslope. The redistribution of soil and carbon can have huge implications on biogeochemical cycling and overall carbon budgeting. In this study, we provide some rare field data on the mechanisms impacting aggregate stability, enrichment ratio values to estimate fluxes of carbon, as well as lignin chemistry to see influences on oxidation/mineralization rates. Rainfall simulation experiments were conducted within agricultural fields. Experiments were performed on the midslope (eroding) and toeslope (depositional) sections of representative hillslopes, under a variety of land managements, including row crop (conventional and conservation) and restored grasslands. Sensors were utilized to capture the evolution of soil moisture, temperature, microbial respiration pulses, and discharge rates to identify pseudo-steady state conditions. Samples collected at the weir outlet were tested for sediment concentrations and size fractions, as well as carbon and lignin fluxes. Preliminary findings show that conservation management practices have higher aggregate stability and decreased mass fluxes of carbon in the downslope than conventional tillage techniques.

  18. Dynamic enhancement in adhesion forces of microparticles on substrates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan; Li, Mingtao; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2013-11-12

    We report a dynamically induced enhancement in interfacial adhesion between microsized particles and substrates under dry and humid conditions. The adhesion force of soft (polystyrene) and hard (SiO2 and Al2O3) microparticles on soft (polystyrene) and hard (fused silica and sapphire) substrates was measured by using an atomic force microscope with retraction (z-piezo) speed ranging over 4 orders of magnitude. The adhesion is strongly enhanced by the dynamic effect. When the retraction speed varies from 0.02 to 156 μm/s, the adhesion force increases by 10% to 50% in dry nitrogen while it increases by 15% to 70% in humid air. Among the material systems tested, the soft-soft contact systems exhibit the smallest dynamic effect while the hard-hard contacts show the largest enhancement. A dynamic model was developed to predict this dynamic effect, which agrees well with the experimental results. The influence of dynamic factors related to the adhesion enhancement, such as particle inertia, viscoelastic deformations, and crack propagation, was discussed to understand the dynamic enhancement mechanisms. PMID:24117392

  19. Structural dynamic modeling and stability of a rotating blade under gravitational force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Seungmin; Chung, Jintai; Hee Yoo, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Turbine blade lengths have been increasing in recent wind energy system designs in order to enhance power generation capacity. A longer blade length makes the structural system more flexible and often results in an undesirable, large dynamic response, which should be avoided in the design of the system. In the present study, the equations of motion of a rotating wind turbine blade undergoing gravitational force are derived, while considering tilt and pitch angles. Since the gravitational force acting on the rotating blade creates an oscillating axial force, this results in oscillating stiffness terms in the governing equations. The validity of the derived rotating blade model is evaluated by comparing its transient responses to those obtained by using a commercial finite element code. Effects of rotating speed, tilt angle, and pitch angle of the wind turbine blade on its dynamic stability characteristics are investigated.

  20. Enhancing the stability of the synchronization of multivariable coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Gutiérrez, R.; Huerta-Cuellar, G.; Boccaletti, S.; Gómez-Gardeñes, J.; Arenas, A.; Buldú, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Synchronization processes in populations of identical networked oscillators are the focus of intense studies in physical, biological, technological, and social systems. Here we analyze the stability of the synchronization of a network of oscillators coupled through different variables. Under the assumption of an equal topology of connections for all variables, the master stability function formalism allows assessing and quantifying the stability properties of the synchronization manifold when the coupling is transferred from one variable to another. We report on the existence of an optimal coupling transference that maximizes the stability of the synchronous state in a network of Rössler-like oscillators. Finally, we design an experimental implementation (using nonlinear electronic circuits) which grounds the robustness of the theoretical predictions against parameter mismatches, as well as against intrinsic noise of the system.

  1. Ethanol enhances collective dynamics of lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, Martin D.; Schmalzl, Karin; Conti Nibali, Valeria; Tarek, Mounir; Rheinstaedter, Maikel C.

    2011-05-15

    From inelastic neutron-scattering experiments and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we present evidence for a low-energy dynamical mode in the fluid phase of a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phoshatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer immersed in a 5% water/ethanol solution. In addition to the well-known phonon that shows a liquidlike dispersion with energies up to 4.5 meV, we observe an additional mode at smaller energies of 0.8 meV, which shows little or no dispersion. Both modes show transverse properties and might be related to molecular motion perpendicular to the bilayer.

  2. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems. PMID:27225708

  3. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems.

  4. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems. PMID:27225708

  5. Applications of Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.

    2004-01-01

    Initial steps in the application o f a low-order panel method computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code to the calculation of aircraft dynamic stability and control (S&C) derivatives are documented. Several capabilities, unique to CFD but not unique to this particular demonstration, are identified and demonstrated in this paper. These unique capabilities complement conventional S&C techniques and they include the ability to: 1) perform maneuvers without the flow-kinematic restrictions and support interference commonly associated with experimental S&C facilities, 2) easily simulate advanced S&C testing techniques, 3) compute exact S&C derivatives with uncertainty propagation bounds, and 4) alter the flow physics associated with a particular testing technique from those observed in a wind or water tunnel test in order to isolate effects. Also presented are discussions about some computational issues associated with the simulation of S&C tests and selected results from numerous surface grid resolution studies performed during the course of the study.

  6. Dynamics of microresonator frequency comb generation: models and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Microresonator frequency combs hold promise for enabling a new class of light sources that are simultaneously both broadband and coherent, and that could allow for a profusion of potential applications. In this article, we review various theoretical models for describing the temporal dynamics and formation of optical frequency combs. These models form the basis for performing numerical simulations that can be used in order to better understand the comb generation process, for example helping to identify the universal combcharacteristics and their different associated physical phenomena. Moreover, models allow for the study, design and optimization of comb properties prior to the fabrication of actual devices. We consider and derive theoretical formalisms based on the Ikeda map, the modal expansion approach, and the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We further discuss the generation of frequency combs in silicon resonators featuring multiphoton absorption and free-carrier effects. Additionally, we review comb stability properties and consider the role of modulational instability as well as of parametric instabilities due to the boundary conditions of the cavity. These instability mechanisms are the basis for comprehending the process of frequency comb formation, for identifying the different dynamical regimes and the associated dependence on the comb parameters. Finally, we also discuss the phenomena of continuous wave bi- and multistability and its relation to the observation of mode-locked cavity solitons.

  7. Dynamic Growth and Shrinkage Govern the pH Dependence of RecA Filament Stability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Park, Jeehae; Joo, Chirlmin; Kim, Doseok; Ha, Taekjip

    2015-01-01

    RecA proteins form a long stable filament on a single-stranded DNA and catalyze strand exchange reaction. The stability of RecA filament changes dramatically with pH, yet its detailed mechanism is not known. Here, using a single molecule assay, we determined the binding and dissociation rates of RecA monomers at the filament ends at various pH. The pH-induced rate changes were moderate but occurred in opposite directions for binding and dissociation, resulting in a substantial increase in filament stability in lower pH. The highly charged residues in C-terminal domain do not contribute to the pH dependent stability. The stability enhancement of RecA filament in low pH may help the cell to cope with acidic stress by fine-tuning of the binding and dissociation rates without losing the highly dynamic nature of the filament required for strand exchange. PMID:25608006

  8. Understanding ethylammonium nitrate stabilized cytochrome c - Molecular dynamics and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaganathan, Maheshkumar; Ramakrishnan, C.; Velmurugan, D.; Dhathathreyan, Aruna

    2015-02-01

    For a conceptual understanding of how an ionic liquid stabilizes a solvated protein, in this study, using new force field parameters, a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) of the loop and helical regions of hydrated Cytochrome c (cyt c) and its interaction with the ionic liquid ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) have been studied. For a simulation trajectory of 100 ns, the changes in network of water around the protein due to EAN and subsequent reorganization of the protein have been analyzed. The radii of gyration of solvated cyt c (13.7 Å) and cyt c + EAN (13.4 Å) at the end of the trajectory are higher than the protein in its crystalline state (12.64 Å) suggesting enhanced stability of the protein due to tightly organized assembly of EAN near the solvated cyt c. This increase in stability of the protein has been verified experimentally using fluorescence, circular dichroic spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing EAN in cyt c + EAN, protein conformation shows unusually high β strand population. To check whether the beta strand is an intermediate or a local minimum state, denaturation of cyt c with urea in the presence of EAN has been undertaken. Results show that EAN helps in renaturation of the protein by forming a tightly organized assembly around the protein with the beta strand state appearing as a local minimum energy state. Thus the feasibility of using ionic liquids to form networks around the protein and their possible applications in stabilization of the proteins has been demonstrated.

  9. Alterations of Nonconserved Residues Affect Protein Stability and Folding Dynamics through Charge-Charge Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Garcìa, Angel E; Makhatadze, George I

    2015-10-15

    Charge-charge interactions play an important role in thermal stability of proteins. We employed an all-atom, native-topology-based model with non-native electrostatics to explore the interplay between folding dynamics and stability of TNfn3 (the third fibronectin type III domain from tenascin-C). Our study elucidates the role of charge-charge interactions in modulating the folding energy landscape. In particular, we found that incorporation of explicit charge-charge interactions in the WT TNfn3 induces energetic frustration due to the presence of residual structure in the unfolded state. Moreover, optimization of the surface charge-charge interactions by altering the evolutionarily nonconserved residues not only increases the thermal stability (in agreement with previous experimental study) but also reduces the formation of residual structure and hence minimizes the energetic frustration along the folding route. We concluded that charge-charge interaction in the rationally designed TNfn3 plays an important role not only in enhancing the stability but also in assisting folding. PMID:26413861

  10. Robust transmission stabilization and dynamic switching in broadband hybrid waveguide systems with nonlinear gain and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quan M.; Peleg, Avner; Tran, Thinh P.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a method for transmission stabilization and robust dynamic switching for colliding optical soliton sequences in broadband waveguide systems with nonlinear gain and loss. The method is based on employing hybrid waveguides, consisting of spans with linear gain and cubic loss, and spans with linear loss, cubic gain, and quintic loss. We show that the amplitude dynamics is described by a hybrid Lotka-Volterra (LV) model, and use the model to determine the physical parameter values required for enhanced transmission stabilization and switching. Numerical simulations with coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations confirm the predictions of the LV model, and show complete suppression of radiative instability and pulse distortion. This enables stable transmission over distances larger by an order of magnitude compared with uniform waveguides with linear gain and cubic loss. Moreover, multiple on-off and off-on dynamic switching events are demonstrated over a wide range of soliton amplitudes, showing the superiority of hybrid waveguides compared with static switching in uniform waveguides.